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ARAB HORSE COUTURE

VOL.7,7,NO. VOL. NO.12--2021 2021


Let us help you make a Statement on your property with an Exquisite Bronze Sculpture exuding the energy o f Life.

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ARAB HORSE COUTURE Table of Contents Jean Paul Guerlain In the past, in addition to his role as Master Perfumer for the House of Guerlain, Jean Paul also accumulated World Championships in Dressage and Carriage Driving. Jean Paul will share his extensive knowledge and talent for training and his love of horses with the readers of Arab Horse Couture. Guerlain is a French perfume house, amongst the oldest in the world. The House of Guerlain was founded in 1828 when PierreFrancois Pascal Guerlain opened his perfume store in Paris. Jean Paul Guerlain is fourth generation Guerlain and the last family Master Perfumer. Jean Paul currently works as a consultant and continues to travel the globe to develop new fragrances.

World Champion Dressage Rider & Carriage Driver Riding in the Classical Way on Your Beautiful Arabian Horse by Jean Paul Guerlain

An Introduction to Advanced Training One of the most dangerous phases of horse training is the beginning of advanced work. The goal is a balanced, harmonious and happy horse, working in partnership with the rider, along with mutual trust. As the training progresses, more engagement, power and suppleness are developed. The horse carries itself in a round, fluid, energetic fashion. A difficult notion for the horse to understand is the inexperienced rider confusing the end with the means. Too often we see riders pulling the horse’s front end around, and then having to resort to whips and spurs to kick the horse to what the rider thinks of as “forward”. By this means, the inexperienced rider plans to “make” a dressage horse; however, this usually results in the horse stopping, rearing or worse. Advanced work is the consistent gradual development of engagement, relaxation, impulsion, suppleness, straightness and collection. Through this work, a round, forward and happy horse emerges, as well as a happy rider. There is nothing nicer than a rider to be in harmony with one’s horse! The rider must choose their demands carefully and progressively so that the development of the horse is like grass growing… we never see anything happening; however, over time, riding becomes fluid and beautiful.

I am often asked how long it will take to master this or that movement. My answer is always the same, usually found to be unsatisfying to the student: “It depends on the horse, their prior handling and training, in addition to the skill and temperament of the rider. Rushing the training according to a time limit always leads to a fiasco!” An extremely important fact: the rider must always pay close attention to the needs of their horse as well as its ability to handle any new work. If the rider finds the horse objects to the work due to pushing a step too quickly, then they must immediately stop for awhile. Pushing on in the face of resistance will typically develop the resistance, not the horse. Similarly, critical training steps must not be neglected. Shortcuts imply that something is being cut away, and this can never be taken back; meaning that which is not done correctly at the start cannot be done again! Riding with a Plan I recommend that every training session follow a plan. It is often terrible to watch riders “schooling” their horses when they have not made a plan. Without a systematic approach, the rider never reaches a goal.

10

- World Champion Dressage Rider & Carriage Driver Riding in the Classical Way on Your Beautiful Arabian Horse Written by Jean Paul Guerlain An Introduction to Advanced Training

If the rider takes time to actually study their horse, a program designed to suit this horse’s particular needs may then be implemented. Riders must allow space for small differences in technique required for the horse’s individual characteristics. What is good for one horse can be wrong for another. The rider must never be rushed to reach a goal. Hastening a routine in 30 minutes that typically takes an hour should never be attempted. Work should focus on just the first part of the rider’s daily routine. Rhythm and relaxation… this work is never wasted! Collection & Self-Carriage Collection is the highest level of dressage. The horse carries increased weight on the well-flexed and active hind legs. This in turn promotes the elevation of the forehand and the lightest possible rein contact.

Self-carriage is an imperative goal and the result of proper training. If the self-carriage is implemented, the horse will successfully stretch his frame in the walk, trot and canter extensions, and shorten his frame in returning to the collected tempo. The movement of the horse becomes more expressive when the rider’s aids are able to tap the source of energy in the hindquarters. The

carrying power of the hindquarters is developed more and more for the purpose of lightening the horse’s forehand. This is accomplished as the hip and stifle joints of the hind legs become more flexed; thus, lowering the hindquarters and elevating the forehand.

The elevation of the forehand, resulting from the increased flexion of the joints of the haunches, gives the impression of riding uphill. That is why, if you want to ride dressage on your horse, you must choose an Arabian horse with an excellent croup and length of hip. This is where the MOTOR of the horse is located! Always exercise patience and care with your horse while training. As well, have a wonderful time with your beautiful Arabian horse friend! Questions or comments may be forwarded to: vitalcell.km@gmail.com

JPG

14 - Myostatin Gene and Endurance ...

The future may hold surprises for Arabian horse breeders!

Myostatin Gene and Endurance ... The future may hold surprises for Arabian horse breeders!

Endurance Humans invested in endurance to improve labor capability and athletic performance of horses. Today, endurance is one of the most popular types of equestrian athletic performances, and a trait of great economic value. According to Bergero et al. (2005), the endurance performance of horses is identified as a low-intensity long-term trial. Horses vary in their ability to perform endurance, due to variability of genetic background, psychological and morphological differences, health conditions, and training programs (Metayer et al. 2004). These factors are related to each other, where morphological traits including, for example, the general body size (muscular mass), can be highly affected by the genetic factors. However, through training, muscle cells are stimulated to store more energy, so that the muscle mass increases, which can affect, positively, the endurance performance. Arabian and Arabian-cross horses are the best competitors for long distance riding, and the most used in the endurance sport, considering their muscle composition and their metabolism pattern (Hinchcliff et al. 2013; Metzger et al. 2015; Almarzook et al. 2019).

Written by Dr. Saria Almarzook Equine Researcher - Berlin, Germany

Written by Dr. Saria Almarzook - Equine Researcher - Berlin, Germany

Candidate Genes for Endurance Performance In classical animal breeding, endurance horse breeders would base their mating decision on pedigree information and genetic predictors, attempting to have the progeny of the best performing ancestors.

Introduction 2020 was not the year of Covid-19 only, but also a year of scientific achievements. Not just about health issues, but also in the field of genetic modifications applied in horses. Recently, Moro et al. (2020) surprised everyone in the equine research community by generating the first myostatin (MSTN) edited horse embryos in Argentina, using CRISPR technology and somatic cell nuclear transfer. The first knockedout horse embryos may win the gold equestrian medals at the endurance competitions! BUT, why myostatin? Will the modified horses have better endurance performance? Is it important for Arabian horses?

Unique Liability Risks Involving Minors Written by Julie I. Fershtman, Attorney at Law equinelaw.net

19 - Unique Liability Risks Involving Minors Written by Julie I. Fershtman, Attorney at Law

Al Jabal Arabians Straight Egyptian Arabian Horse Preservation Breeder - History in the Making

T

his year, I was invited to speak at the American Youth Horse Council’s Virtual Symposium on the topic of “Unique Equine Liability Risks Involving Minors - What They Are and How to Protect Yourself”. This article summarizes my remarks.

25 -

Al Jabal Arabians

Straight Egyptian Arabian Horse Preservation Breeder - History in the Making Cover Feature: Al Jabal Arabians HAR BAAREZ (NK Ibn Leyl x HAR Basara) Straight Egyptian Arabian Stallion

6 Arab Horse Couture

Owned by Maya Jones, a Preservation Breeder of Straight Egyptian Abayyan Arabian horses, Al Jabal Arabians is located high up in the mountains of Eastern Switzerland. A successful breeder, Maya has been breeding and caring for her beautiful horses for 30 years. The serene mountain backdrop of Al Jabal Arabians is secondary to the magnificent Straight Egyptian Arabian horses located at the stud. In the following interview, Maya shares her journey with the Straight Egyptian Arabian as a Preservation Breeder, as well as how this magnificent breed of horse continues to impact her life.

Homebred black stallion Sharif Ibn Shaikh al Jabal and Maya the stallion is now living in Cairo/Egypt Photo: Christine Jakopcevic

VOL. 7, NO. 2 - 2021

Candidate genes are genes that likely contribute to a trait due to the known or predicted function of the gene product. Endurance, genetically, is a complex quantitative trait, which is regulated by multiple genes. Candidate genes counted for athletic and physical performance in human are approximately 230 genes, 93 of them are thought to be endurance-related genetic markers (Bray et al. 2009; Schröder et al. 2011; Ahmetov et al. 2016; Maciejewska-Skrendo et al. 2019). Horse breeds that differ in their endurance performing also differ in many physiological and metabolic parameters (Bergero et al.

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VOL. 7, NO. 2 - 2021

Rules of Engagement

Are They Working For or Against You? Written by Nancy Dye

37

- Rules of Engagement Are They Working For or Against You?

Written by Nancy Dye

R

ules, which can keep us stuck, are usually hidden. The well-practiced automatic reactions (like standing down, shutting down, avoidance or running away) are not.

For example, years ago, my rule of engagement when it came to fire was to not touch it! (Either I had effective parenting or I figured this out the painful way!)

05; Castejon et al. 2006; Joyner & Coyle 08), morphology and gaiting (Metayer et 2004; Cottin et al. 2010), skeletal muscle er types (fast/low twitch fibers) and muscle mposition (Rivero et al. 1993; Rivero & Barrey 01). Pathways contributing to endurance formance provide a list of candidate genes t can be tested for association with this trait.

ARABIAN HORSE FINE ARTISTRY

ure 1. Structure of the myostatin gene STN) including the promoter, exons, introns d the untranslated regions (5’ and 3’ UTRs).

horses, although the development of equine netics, only a small set of genes related to ysical performance were genotyped in some se breeds (Hill et al. 2010a; Silva et al. 2015). wever, Arabian horses provide a valuable del to investigate genes that have an effect the endurance trait. One of the most quently investigated genes for its potential ect on the performance of endurance horses he Myostatin.

45 - Arabian Horse Fine Artistry

yostatin

e Myostatin (MSTN) gene is located on the se chromosome 18. Myostatin encodes the owth differentiation factor 8 (GDF-8), which ongs to the TGF-β protein family affecting owth, differentiation and regulation of muscle oliferation, as well as controlling the muscle er’s growth (Carnac et al. 2006). Additionally, ostatin is involved in performance relevant ctions such as regeneration of skeletal scles, bone formation, glucose metabolisms d adipocyte proliferation. In different ecies, like in Bully Whippet dogs and Belgian e Cattle, mutations which result in an ibition of myostatin cause increased muscle ss (Mosher et al. 2007).

Emad Taay

horses, MSTN referred to as a speed gene, been identified and associated with race formance in different breeds, particularly eed short racing breeds.

sequencing the MSTN gene, studies ggested a significant association between ltiple variants of this gene - mainly an

I have a lazy streak inside of me and I don't like to do things over and over again, in other words, twice. That may seem like a tall order for the average horse owner who gets a horse from the local auction, similar to my characters Mathew and his mother Marcia, with no experience with horses at all from my book "The Horse Listener". This article is aimed at that beginner. I desire to educate the owner, a youth with supporting parents or a first-time older person or even the existing horse owner who does not have this hard-earned knowledge.

52 - Educating Foals from the Time of Conception Can We Do This? In My Opinion, YES! Part One

Written by Mark Hanna

Educating Foals from the Time of Conception Can We Do This? In My Opinion, YES! Part One: Written by Mark Hanna The education of a horse begins from the time of conception and starts way before that with the education of the dam and choosing of the sire. Why do I come up with such crazy things as this? Well, after years of doing it the wrong way, I have finally accomplished doing what I think is the right way resulting in a well rounded and sensible horse that has the ability to easily live in our world, the world of the human being, a "PREDATOR".

VOL. 7, NO. 2 - 2021

I have been brought up by Arabian horse breeders who have held the philosophy of choosing temperament and trainability above all other traits that are desirable in their breeding choices. Beginning with the sire… the time-honored tradition of the European model in countries like Germany, Spain, Poland and other areas where temperament and trainability are scored highest in the testing of their sires included in their stud books. We can choose our stallions with these desirable traits first without sacrificing the athleticism and conformation we are looking for; however, sometimes the temperament is not chosen first. Winnability takes precedence as their first choice. This has slowly weakened our precious bloodstock from within due to that defining characteristic, "winnability", that changes all the time. Our first priority should be in maintaining the highest quality to preserve the heritage of strong traits, this so-called improvement sire, where conformation, temperament and trainability are foremost. Likewise, we should choose our dams the same way. The mare is the most influential partner in our breeding barn. In the Bedouin cultures of the Middle East, the mare is highly prized in the pedigrees of Arabian horses. In fact, their pedigrees place the mare on top, not the stallions. Why is this? The environmental contributions the mare makes has a stronger influence upon the foal. The mare was chosen for her strength of character as a priority as her dam had been before her and so on. They revere them highly. The mares were chosen for their bravery and loyalty to their masters in times of war. They would not call out their presence as a stallion may do specifically due to their nature. Mares also played a role in nurturing

7 Arab Horse Couture

the tribe's children as they were often allowed to live with them in their tents. The nutritious mare's milk would supplement their diets along with dates and other precious scarcities for their subsistence in the desert. Ideally then, observe the history of the tail female lines of both sire and dam. Knowing how the mare influences the foal in so many ways, a desirable temperament should be a highly sought-after trait that will ultimately be passed on to the foal. I once was a mare barn manager. When I arrived at the stud, the mare barn was populated with 35 plus pregnant mares whose foals were exposed to a deadly bacterial disease in the soil that devastated their foal crop in previous years. To alleviate this disease from their new foal crop, the stud farm undertook an aggressive campaign to stop the losses. Soon after birth, foals were given a serum transfusion from high titer foals to the disease. The stud farms also had to take the temperatures of the foals every day to watch for elevated numbers. I noticed that this would take them at least two and a half days to test the small numbers of foals that were already born. There were 40 more mares to foal on the horizon requiring temperature checks. This was unacceptable as there were foals who would be unnoticed in time to treat for the devastating disease. I knew that with my experience in educating the many foals I had raised, the process of taking temperatures could be vastly improved.


ARAB HORSE COUTURE

Business Page VOL. 7, NO. 2 - 2021 LJB PUBLICATIONS LLC HEADQUARTERS:

NORTHVILLE, MICHIGAN 48167 USA 248.866.8756

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Owner, Founder & Publisher ARAB HORSE COUTURE MAGAZINE

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yassergomaa77@gmail.com DIANA CANTEY

Advertising Manager

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info@arabhorsecouture.com ADVERTISING; E-NEWSLETTERS; MARKETING; PROMOTION; PRESS RELEASES: 248.866.8756 info@arabhorsecouture.com EDITORIAL INQUIRIES: 248.866.8756 info@arabhorsecouture.com SUBSCRIPTION HOTLINE: 248.866.8756 info@arabhorsecouture.com SUBSCRIBE TODAY! PRINT & DIGITAL

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Dear Readers of Arab Horse Couture, It is my pleasure to provide you with compelling editorial content in this current issue of the magazine; articles of useful and edifying information. Our gratitude to the writers of these fantastic articles for their editorial submissions as well as to you, our readers, for taking the time to read this latest issue of Arab Horse Couture. It is the magazine’s aspiration to provide a professional and quality magazine in which to display these well written articles and advertising. Many beautiful Arabian horses grace the pages of this issue of the magazine. The magazine welcomes questions comments. Please write to: lauraj@arabhorsecouture.com.

or

With kind regards, Laura J. Brodzik Editor in Chief Owner & Publisher Arab Horse Couture

CONTRIBUTORS: Jean Paul Guerlain – France Dr. Saria Almarzook – Germany Julie I. Fershtman - USA Nancy Dye – USA Mark M. Hanna - USA

VOL. 7, NO. 2 - 2021 On the Cover: HAR Baarez (NK Ibn Leyl x HAR Basara) Straight Egyptian Arabian Stallion - Homozygous Black Owned by Al Jabal Arabians info@aljabalarabians.com facebook@AbayyanArabians Photo: Joanna Jonientz

ARAB HORSE COUTURE

VOL.7,7,NO. VOL. NO.12--2021 2021

VOL. 7, NO. 2 - 2021


‫ﻳﻨﺎﻳﺮ ‪ -‬ﻓﺮﻴﻟﺮﻴ ‪2021‬‬

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‫‪www.albadiamagazine.com‬‬ ‫‪January - February 2021‬‬ ‫‪Hares Fayad - Publisher & Editor-in-Chief‬‬ ‫‪hares@albadiamagazine.com‬‬ ‫‪albadiamagazine.com‬‬


Jean Paul Guerlain In the past, in addition to his role as Master Perfumer for the House of Guerlain, Jean Paul also accumulated World Championships in Dressage and Carriage Driving. Jean Paul will share his extensive knowledge and talent for training and his love of horses with the readers of Arab Horse Couture. Guerlain is a French perfume house, amongst the oldest in the world. The House of Guerlain was founded in 1828 when PierreFrancois Pascal Guerlain opened his perfume store in Paris. Jean Paul Guerlain is fourth generation Guerlain and the last family Master Perfumer. Jean Paul currently works as a consultant and continues to travel the globe to develop new fragrances.

World Champion Dressage Rider & Carriage Driver Riding in the Classical Way on Your Beautiful Arabian Horse by Jean Paul Guerlain

An Introduction to Advanced Training One of the most dangerous phases of horse training is the beginning of advanced work. The goal is a balanced, harmonious and happy horse, working in partnership with the rider, along with mutual trust. As the training progresses, more engagement, power and suppleness are developed. The horse carries itself in a round, fluid, energetic fashion. A difficult notion for the horse to understand is the inexperienced rider confusing the end with the means. Too often we see riders pulling the horse’s front end around, and then having to resort to whips and spurs to kick the horse to what the rider thinks of as “forward”. By this means, the inexperienced rider plans to “make” a dressage horse; however, this usually results in the horse stopping, rearing or worse. Advanced work is the consistent gradual development of engagement, relaxation, impulsion, suppleness, straightness and collection. Through this work, a round, forward and happy horse emerges, as well as a happy rider. There is nothing nicer than a rider to be in harmony with one’s horse! The rider must choose their demands carefully and progressively so that the development of the horse is like grass growing… we never see anything happening; however, over time, riding becomes fluid and beautiful. 10 Arab Horse Couture

I am often asked how long it will take to master this or that movement. My answer is always the same, usually found to be unsatisfying to the student: “It depends on the horse, their prior handling and training, in addition to the skill and temperament of the rider. Rushing the training according to a time limit always leads to a fiasco!” An extremely important fact: the rider must always pay close attention to the needs of their horse as well as its ability to handle any new work. If the rider finds the horse objects to the work due to pushing a step too quickly, then they must immediately stop for awhile. Pushing on in the face of resistance will typically develop the resistance, not the horse. Similarly, critical training steps must not be neglected. Shortcuts imply that something is being cut away, and this can never be taken back; meaning that which is not done correctly at the start cannot be done again! Riding with a Plan I recommend that every training session follow a plan. It is often terrible to watch riders “schooling” their horses when they have not made a plan. Without a systematic approach, the rider never reaches a goal. VOL. 7, NO. 2 - 2021


If the rider takes time to actually study their horse, a program designed to suit this horse’s particular needs may then be implemented. Riders must allow space for small differences in technique required for the horse’s individual characteristics. What is good for one horse can be wrong for another. The rider must never be rushed to reach a goal. Hastening a routine in 30 minutes that typically takes an hour should never be attempted. Work should focus on just the first part of the rider’s daily routine. Rhythm and relaxation… this work is never wasted! Collection & Self-Carriage Collection is the highest level of dressage. The horse carries increased weight on the well-flexed and active hind legs. This in turn promotes the elevation of the forehand and the lightest possible rein contact. Self-carriage is an imperative goal and the result of proper training. If the self-carriage is implemented, the horse will successfully stretch his frame in the walk, trot and canter extensions, and shorten his frame in returning to the collected tempo. The movement of the horse becomes more expressive when the rider’s aids are able to tap the source of energy in the hindquarters. The VOL. 7, NO. 2 - 2021

carrying power of the hindquarters is developed more and more for the purpose of lightening the horse’s forehand. This is accomplished as the hip and stifle joints of the hind legs become more flexed; thus, lowering the hindquarters and elevating the forehand. The elevation of the forehand, resulting from the increased flexion of the joints of the haunches, gives the impression of riding uphill. That is why, if you want to ride dressage on your horse, you must choose an Arabian horse with an excellent croup and length of hip. This is where the MOTOR of the horse is located! Always exercise patience and care with your horse while training. As well, have a wonderful time with your beautiful Arabian horse friend! Questions or comments may be forwarded to: vitalcell.km@gmail.com

JPG 11 Arab Horse Couture


Myostatin Gene and Endurance ... The future may hold surprises for Arabian horse breeders! Written by Dr. Saria Almarzook Equine Researcher - Berlin, Germany

Introduction 2020 was not the year of Covid-19 only, but also a year of scientific achievements. Not just about health issues, but also in the field of genetic modifications applied in horses. Recently, Moro et al. (2020) surprised everyone in the equine research community by generating the first myostatin (MSTN) edited horse embryos in Argentina, using CRISPR technology and somatic cell nuclear transfer. The first knockedout horse embryos may win the gold equestrian medals at the endurance competitions! BUT, why myostatin? Will the modified horses have better endurance performance? Is it important for Arabian horses? 14 Arab Horse Couture

VOL. 7, NO. 2 - 2021


Endurance Humans invested in endurance to improve labor capability and athletic performance of horses. Today, endurance is one of the most popular types of equestrian athletic performances, and a trait of great economic value. According to Bergero et al. (2005), the endurance performance of horses is identified as a low-intensity long-term trial. Horses vary in their ability to perform endurance, due to variability of genetic background, psychological and morphological differences, health conditions, and training programs (Metayer et al. 2004). These factors are related to each other, where morphological traits including, for example, the general body size (muscular mass), can be highly affected by the genetic factors. However, through training, muscle cells are stimulated to store more energy, so that the muscle mass increases, which can affect, positively, the endurance performance. Arabian and Arabian-cross horses are the best competitors for long distance riding, and the most used in the endurance sport, considering their muscle composition and their metabolism pattern (Hinchcliff et al. 2013; Metzger et al. 2015; Almarzook et al. 2019).

Candidate Genes for Endurance Performance In classical animal breeding, endurance horse breeders would base their mating decision on pedigree information and genetic predictors, attempting to have the progeny of the best performing ancestors. Candidate genes are genes that likely contribute to a trait due to the known or predicted function of the gene product. Endurance, genetically, is a complex quantitative trait, which is regulated by multiple genes. Candidate genes counted for athletic and physical performance in human are approximately 230 genes, 93 of them are thought to be endurance-related genetic markers (Bray et al. 2009; Schröder et al. 2011; Ahmetov et al. 2016; Maciejewska-Skrendo et al. 2019). Horse breeds that differ in their endurance performing also differ in many physiological and metabolic parameters (Bergero et al. VOL. 7, NO. 2 - 2021

2005; Castejon et al. 2006; Joyner & Coyle 2008), morphology and gaiting (Metayer et al. 2004; Cottin et al. 2010), skeletal muscle fiber types (fast/low twitch fibers) and muscle composition (Rivero et al. 1993; Rivero & Barrey 2001). Pathways contributing to endurance performance provide a list of candidate genes that can be tested for association with this trait.

Figure 1. Structure of the myostatin gene (MSTN) including the promoter, exons, introns and the untranslated regions (5’ and 3’ UTRs).

In horses, although the development of equine genetics, only a small set of genes related to physical performance were genotyped in some horse breeds (Hill et al. 2010a; Silva et al. 2015). However, Arabian horses provide a valuable model to investigate genes that have an effect on the endurance trait. One of the most frequently investigated genes for its potential effect on the performance of endurance horses is the Myostatin.

Myostatin The Myostatin (MSTN) gene is located on the horse chromosome 18. Myostatin encodes the growth differentiation factor 8 (GDF-8), which belongs to the TGF-β protein family affecting growth, differentiation and regulation of muscle proliferation, as well as controlling the muscle fiber’s growth (Carnac et al. 2006). Additionally, Myostatin is involved in performance relevant functions such as regeneration of skeletal muscles, bone formation, glucose metabolisms and adipocyte proliferation. In different species, like in Bully Whippet dogs and Belgian Blue Cattle, mutations which result in an inhibition of myostatin cause increased muscle mass (Mosher et al. 2007). In horses, MSTN referred to as a speed gene, has been identified and associated with race performance in different breeds, particularly speed short racing breeds. By sequencing the MSTN gene, studies suggested a significant association between multiple variants of this gene - mainly an 15 Arab Horse Couture


intronic variant and a promoter insertion of 227 base pairs of nucleobases - and the racing performance phenotypes, speed over short distances, body composition and muscle fiber proportions in different racehorses, e.g. Thoroughbred and Quarter Horse breeds (Binns et al. 2010; Dall’Olio et al. 2010; Hill et al. 2010a; Hill et al. 2010b; Tozaki et al. 2011; Hill et al. 2012; Tozaki et al. 2012; Dall’Olio et al. 2014). Further studies showed that the detected promoter insertion was in high linkage disequilibrium with the intronic variant, which refer that the correlation between the mutated positions can be functional and highly related to racing performance in different horse breeds. While studies in Arabian horses showed that the MSTN intronic regions were conserved and the above mentioned variants were homozygous for the reference genotype (Stefaniuk et al. 2016; Almarzook et al. 2019).

et al. 2019). Although only a few studies were conducted and opinions are more divergent, but generally speaking, these findings implied that MSTN observed genetic differences can be potential predictors of racing performance and morphological traits of different horse breeds performing different racings forms (Hill et al. 2010b; Tozaki et al. 2011; François et al. 2016).

In Arabian horses, one variant was detected within the promoter region of the MSTN gene, however, this variant has not been tested for its association with the endurance performance due to limited sample size. A group of alleles (haplotype) in the second MSTN exon was identified by Baron et al. (2012) in a cohort of Arabian horses. Generally, recent studies in Arabian horses demonstrated obviously that MSTN exons were conserved and identical to the reference (Stefaniuk et al. 2016; Almarzook

Recently, researchers at the Argentinian companies, Kheiron S.A (www.kheiron-biotech. com) and ViaGen (www.viagen.com), could modify the horse DNA by knocking out the Myostatin gene (which results in a gene loss) in order to increase the horse`s muscle mass, using CRISPR technique (Moro et al. 2020). CRISPR differs very considerably from Cloning, where CRISPR generates horses that have been deliberately altered, not by copying an original living form.

16 Arab Horse Couture

Genetic Modification in Horses Genetic modification has been applied in the equine world for almost two decades. The first cloned horse, Prometea, which was the progeny derived from fibroblast cell (from skin biopsies) of an Arabian-Thoroughbred male and one Haflinger female (Galli et al. 2003). In 2016, in the Argentine Open Polo Tournament, six horses, all cloned from the same mare, won the competition.

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In horses, the increased muscle mass is considered to be the most important factor determining the maintenance of energy homeostasis during endurance exercising and racing, which is attributable to thousands of years of genetic selection for stamina. High muscle mass compared to the total body weight can significantly enhance the endurance horse`s athleticism. Therefore, the inhibition of MSTN in horses using the CRISPR technique can be the first step to win the Gold in the endurance competitions soon! References Ahmetov I.I., Egorova E.S., Gabdrakhmanova L.J. & Fedotovskaya O.N. (2016) Genes and athletic performance: an update. Genetics and Sports 61, 41-54. Almarzook S., Said Ahmed A., Reissmann M. & Brockmann G. (2019) The Genetic variation of ACTN3 and MSTN genes in a cohort of endurance Arabian horses. Global Journal of Animal Scientific Research Vol 7 Baron E., Lopes M., Mendonça D. & da Câmara Machado A. (2012) SNP identification and polymorphism analysis in exon 2 of the horse myostatin gene. Animal genetics 43, 229-32. Bergero D., Assenza A. & Caola G. (2005) Contribution to our knowledge of the physiology and metabolism of endurance horses. Livestock Production Science 92, 167-76. Binns M., Boehler D. & Lambert D. (2010) Identification of the myostatin locus (MSTN) as having a major effect on optimum racing distance in the Thoroughbred horse in the USA. Animal genetics 41, 154-8. Bray M., Hagberg J., Perusse L., Rankinen T., Roth S., Wolfarth B. & Bouchard C. (2009) The human gene map for performance and health-related fitness phenotypes: the 2006-2007 update. Medicine+ Science in Sports+ Exercise 41, 35. Carnac G., Ricaud S., Vernus B. & Bonnieu A. (2006) Myostatin: biology and clinical relevance. Mini reviews in medicinal chemistry 6, 765-70.

Metayer N., Biau S., Cochet J. & Barrey E. (2004) Stduy of locomotion and morphological factors in the performance of the horse specialized in endurance tests. In: 30ème journée de la recherche équine, 3 mars 2004., pp. 67-76. Les Haras Nationaux Direction du Développement. Metzger J., Karwath M., Tonda R., Beltran S., Águeda L., Gut M., Gut I.G. & Distl O. (2015) Runs of homozygosity reveal signatures of positive selection for reproduction traits in breed and non-breed horses. BMC genomics 16, 764. Moro L.N., Viale D.L., Bastón J.I., Arnold V., Suvá M., Wiedenmann E., Olguín M., Miriuka S. & Vichera G. (2020) Generation of myostatin edited horse embryos using cRiSpR/Cas9 technology and somatic cell nuclear transfer. Scientific reports 10, 1-10. Mosher D.S., Quignon P., Bustamante C.D., Sutter N.B., Mellersh C.S., Parker H.G. & Ostrander E.A. (2007) A mutation in the myostatin gene increases muscle mass and enhances racing performance in heterozygote dogs. PLoS genetics 3, e79. Rivero J.-L.L. & Barrey E. (2001) Heritabilities and genetic and phenotypic parameters for gluteus medius muscle fibre type composition, fibre size and capillaries in purebred Spanish horses. Livestock Production Science 72, 233-41. Rivero J., Serrano A.L., Henckel P. & Aguera E. (1993) Muscle fiber type composition and fiber size in successfully and unsuccessfully endurance-raced horses. Journal of Applied Physiology 75, 1758-66. Schröder W., Klostermann A. & Distl O. (2011) Candidate genes for physical performance in the horse. The Veterinary Journal 190, 39-48. Silva M.S., Bolani W., Alves C.R., Biagi D.G., Lemos Jr J.R., da Silva J.L., de Oliveira P.A., Alves G.B., de Oliveira E.M. & Negrão C.E. (2015) Elimination of Influences of the ACTN3 R577X Variant on Oxygen Uptake by Endurance Training in Healthy Individuals. IJSPP 10. Stefaniuk M., Ropka-Molik K., Piórkowska K., Kulisa M. & Podstawski Z. (2016) Analysis of polymorphisms in the equine MSTN gene in Polish populations of horse breeds. Livestock Science 187, 151-7. Tozaki T., Hill E., Hirota K., Kakoi H., Gawahara H., Miyake T., Sugita S., Hasegawa T., Ishida N. & Nakano Y. (2012) A cohort study of racing performance in Japanese Thoroughbred racehorses using genome information on ECA18. Animal genetics 43, 42-52. Tozaki T., Sato F., Hill E.W., Miyake T., Endo Y., Kakoi H., Gawahara H., Hirota K.i., Nakano Y. & Nambo Y. (2011) Sequence variants at the myostatin gene locus influence the body composition of Thoroughbred horses. Journal of Veterinary Medical Science 73, 1617-24.

Castejon F., Trigo P., Muñoz A. & Riber C. (2006) Uric acid responses to endurance racing and relationships with performance, plasma biochemistry and metabolic alterations. Equine Veterinary Journal 38, 70-3. Cottin F., Metayer N., Goachet A., Julliand V., Slawinski J., Billat V. & Barrey E. (2010) Oxygen consumption and gait variables of Arabian endurance horses measured during a field exercise test. Equine Veterinary Journal 42, 1-5. Dall’Olio S., Fontanesi L., Nanni Costa L., Tassinari M., Minieri L. & Falaschini A. (2010) Analysis of horse myostatin gene and identification of single nucleotide polymorphisms in breeds of different morphological types. BioMed Research International 2010. Dall’Olio S., Scotti E., Fontanesi L. & Tassinari M. (2014) Analysis of the 227 bp short interspersed nuclear element (SINE) insertion of the promoter of the myostatin (MSTN) gene in different horse breeds. Veterinaria italiana 50, 193-7. Galli C., Lagutina I., Crotti G., Colleoni S., Turini P., Ponderato N., Duchi R. & Lazzari G. (2003) A cloned horse born to its dam twin. Nature 424, 635-. Hill E., Gu J., McGivney B. & MacHugh D. (2010a) Targets of selection in the Thoroughbred genome contain exercise-relevant gene SNPs associated with elite racecourse performance. Animal genetics 41, 56-63. Hill E.W., Fonseca R.G., McGivney B.A., Gu J., MacHugh D.E. & Katz L.M. (2012) MSTN genotype (g. 66493737C/T) association with speed indices in Thoroughbred racehorses. Journal of Applied Physiology 112, 86-90. Hill E.W., McGivney B.A., Gu J., Whiston R. & MacHugh D.E. (2010b) A genomewide SNP-association study confirms a sequence variant (g. 66493737C> T) in the equine myostatin (MSTN) gene as the most powerful predictor of optimum racing distance for Thoroughbred racehorses. BMC genomics 11, 1. Hinchcliff K.W., Kaneps A.J. & Geor R.J. (2013) Equine Sports Medicine and Surgery E-Book. Elsevier Health Sciences. Joyner M.J. & Coyle E.F. (2008) Endurance exercise performance: the physiology of champions. The Journal of physiology 586, 35-44. Maciejewska-Skrendo A., Cięszczyk P., Chycki J., Sawczuk M. & Smółka W. (2019) Genetic markers associated with power athlete status. Journal of human kinetics 68, 17-36.

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Dr. Saria Almarzook photo by: Zoran Mircetic 17 Arab Horse Couture


Unique Liability Risks Involving Minors Written by Julie I. Fershtman, Attorney at Law equinelaw.net

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his year, I was invited to speak at the American Youth Horse Council’s Virtual Symposium on the topic of “Unique Equine Liability Risks Involving Minors - What They Are and How to Protect Yourself”. This article summarizes my remarks.

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Children and horses have a strong bond. Many Ohio) have allowed waivers/releases signed by a of us developed our passion for horses when we were young children. Those who provide horserelated activities for children, such as riding instructors and camps, face unique risks because the law looks at children differently than adults.

Liability Waivers/Releases and Minors: Take Caution

Courts in most states have shown a willingness to enforce liability waivers/releases – as long as the documents were properly worded and signed. Still, courts in several states (including, but not limited to, Alabama, Illinois, Maine, Michigan, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Tennessee, and Washington) have held that parents cannot legally release the claims of their minor children. By comparison, a few other states (including, but not limited to, Alaska, California, Colorado, and 20 Arab Horse Couture

parent to bar claims of their injured children.

If you are an equine industry professional, these variations could mean that your well-worded liability waiver/release document may be powerless to stop a claim brought by an injured child, depending on the applicable law. Worse, as explained below, you might receive a child’s lawsuit several years in the future.

Statute of Limitations: It’s Different for Minors

Statutes of limitations are laws essentially setting forth deadlines for filing lawsuits. State laws vary considerably as to the time limit to file a lawsuit against a person or entity arising from a personal injury. One state allows up to six years for an injured person to file suit, while a few others allow only one year, with the rest of the states falling in VOL. 7, NO. 2 - 2021


between. Limited exceptions apply. When the injured person is a minor, these statutory time limits typically don’t apply. Most states allow minors to file suit within a certain period of time after they have reached the age of majority (age 18 in most states). This means that your student who fell off and broke their leg at age eight could file suit against you at least ten years after the accident. By then, you may have forgotten about what happened.

This article does not constitute legal advice. When

Equine Activity Liability Acts

questions arise based on specific situations, direct them to a knowledgeable attorney.

a “legal guardian”). Just as with incident reports, store your signed waiver/release documents securely. When children reach the age of majority, you can now ask them to sign your documents.

Equine activity liability acts (now found in all states but California and Maryland) sometimes offer powerful defenses against personal injury claims. Laws in Oregon and Pennsylvania, by their terms, only apply to claims of injured adults. By comparison, the majority of these laws could potentially apply to claims of injured children. Whether an equine activity liability act is powerful enough to defeat an injured minor’s claim will depend on the facts and the applicable law.

Risk Management As you consider ways to control liability risks involving children, here are a few ideas:

Use incident reports.

Develop a form that provides information on the injured person, what happened, where it happened, who saw it, what they saw, the horse involved (if any), and more. Plan to secure these documents for several years. Do not destroy them until you are certain they are no longer needed, preferably after you have discussed this with a knowledgeable lawyer.

About the Author Julie Fershtman, one of the nation’s most experienced Equine Law practitioners, is a Shareholder with Foster Swift Collins & Smith, PC, in Michigan. She has successfully litigated equine cases in 18 jurisdictions nationwide and has tried cases in four states. She is listed in The Best Lawyers in America and received the American Bar Association (ABA) “Excellence in the Advancement of Animal Law Award”. Her speaking engagements span 29 states. Her latest book is the multiple award-winning 372-page book published in 2019 by the ABA called “Equine Law & Horse Sense”. Find it on Amazon. Look for the horse on the cover. For more information, please visit: www.equinelaw.net

Liability insurance. Make sure that you are properly insured for all of your horse-related activities. Discuss coverages with a knowledgeable insurance agent.

Liability waivers/releases.

Where allowed by law, make liability waivers/releases part of your routine paperwork, but make sure they are properly worded and signed by at least one parent or legally appointed guardian of the child (the babysitter almost certainly doesn’t qualify as

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TO ACHIEVE QUALITY AND STYLE THAT RESULTS IN AMAZING MASTERPIECES!

KIM NORDQUIST


Kim Nordquist

Equine Artist & Jewelry Designer After graduating with a four year postgraduate medical degree in Acupuncture, Kim is now following in her mother’s footsteps. She is designing exquisite equine jewelry and creating amazing bronze sculptures. Kim’s fine jewelry and sculptures can be found in prized collections around the globe. Judy and Kim have travelled extensively in Egypt, Africa, Italy and the Middle East researching the history of the Arabian horse. Their collections reflect the classic style of the 19th century French school of sculpture, Les Animaliers. Judy and Kim live in Arizona where they are surrounded by the natural beauty of the desert and can enjoy the many horse farms in the area.

Judy and Kim have completed over twenty life-size bronzes together and numerous tabletop bronze sculptures and trophies. Kim has been designing elegant equine jewelry, for discriminating collectors, since 1990. Their unique techniques complement each other. Working closely together allows them to achieve quality and style that results in amazing masterpieces!

JK NORDQUIST Bronze & Beyound Kim Nordquist kimnordquist@msn.com WhatsApp: +1 303.249.6168


Al Jabal Arabians Straight Egyptian Arabian Horse Preservation Breeder - History in the Making

Owned by Maya Jones, a Preservation Breeder of Straight Egyptian Abayyan Arabian horses, Al Jabal Arabians is located high up in the mountains of Eastern Switzerland. A successful breeder, Maya has been breeding and caring for her beautiful horses for 30 years. The serene mountain backdrop of Al Jabal Arabians is secondary to the magnificent Straight Egyptian Arabian horses located at the stud. In the following interview, Maya shares her journey with the Straight Egyptian Arabian as a Preservation Breeder, as well as how this magnificent breed of horse continues to impact her life.

Homebred black stallion Sharif Ibn Shaikh al Jabal and Maya the stallion is now living in Cairo/Egypt Photo: Christine Jakopcevic VOL. 7, NO. 2 - 2021

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Four year old mares of Al Jabal Arabians: Masida Halima, Jumanah Al Jabal, Rayyanah Al Jabal Photo by: Joanna Jonientz

Al Jabal Arabians Please describe your first introduction to the Arabian horse. Maya: As a young girl I was amazed when I looked at the wonderful photos of Arabian horses. In one book I found a photograph of a Straight Egyptian Arabian bay mare, her name was Hania (Tuhotmos | Hodhoda) an Abayyah Sherrakiah (I did not know this at the time). This mare became my dream horse from that day forward. I began to learn and read everything I could find about these beautiful horses. The Arabian horse is a majestic, beautiful and extremely refined breed of horse. What characteristics of the Arabian horse captivated you most upon your initial introduction to the breed? Maya: In three words: power, pride and stamina! My first Arabian stallion Sher-Gall (Sherifa by Mahomed out of Marahout) had It all. He was affectionate towards humans, especially children. Sher-Gall had a kind soul 26 Arab Horse Couture

and no matter what adventure I was planning for us, trekking for a week, crossing rivers on a ferry, climbing mountains, endurance rides or races, he was ready for anything and everything! What are the contributing factors resulting in your decision to breed specifically Straight Egyptian Arabian horses? Maya: The deeper I focused on heritage studies of the Desert Horse, I became more and more fascinated. I learned everything about the different strains and much more. I believe my first Arabian stallion cemented the wish and desire in me to dedicate my life to these amazing creatures. Please describe the Straight Egyptian Arabian horse, including their exceedingly significant importance to the Arabian horse breed as a whole. Maya: In my opinion, it is crucial to preserve old traditions and heritages such as the Bedouin tribes did long ago. Once it is gone, it will be VOL. 7, NO. 2 - 2021


Maya with her beloved stallion NK Abbas El Dine by NK Jamal El Dine Photo by: Joanna Jonientz

gone forever, like so many species on the planet today. The Straight Egyptian Arabian horse has and continues to influence many horse breeds in a positive manner by contributing their intelligence, strength, stamina and beauty.

Maya: I am breeding Straight Egyptian Arabian horses of the Abayyan Um Juray strain or El Obeya Om Grees (Desert Bred) which has become exceedingly rare in recent years.

Maya: A breeder is a breeder basically; however, every breeder should have a personal vision or goal of what to achieve. There are horse breeders who do not care much about pedigrees. A Straight Egyptian Arabian horse Preservation Breeder attempts to combine pedigrees, heritage and traits of the ancient warhorse into modern-day life. My personal vision is to breed a beautiful, showy horse that is able to carry a rider and a family member.

I believe most people interested in Straight Egyptian Arabian horses remember: El Araby (Morafic | Hafiza), Ibn Hafiza (Sameh | Hafiza), Magidaa (Alaa El Din | Maysa) and her famous daughter Bint Magidaa (by *Khofo) who gave birth to the legendary Ruminaja Ali (Shaikh Al Badi | Bint Magidaa), Alidaar (Shaikh Al Badi | Bint Magidaa), Nabiel (Sakr | Magidaa), Hanan (Alaa El Din | Mona), Jamill (Madkour I | Hanan), Asfour (Malik | Hanan), Marahout (Galal | Maysa), Salaa El Dine (Ansata Halim Shah | Hanan) and many more who are included amongst the chapters of the history books of the breed, all of them Abayyans.

Please describe the bloodlines of your Straight Egyptian Arabian horse breeding program and its rich heritage.

You own Straight Egyptian Arabian horse stallions. Please provide their names and the significance of their pedigrees as a Preservation Breeder.

What is the definition of a Straight Egyptian Arabian Preservation Breeder?

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Maya: Before I introduce my stallions, I would like to explain that I not only use Abayyan stallions, whose genetic pool is narrowing, it is also a proven fact that the Saklawi and the Abayyan strains match as breeding stallions as well. Therefore, I searched for stallions with interesting pedigrees who match well as an outcross with my Abayyah mares. HAR Baarez (NK Ibn Leyl | HAR Basara) This homozygous black beauty is a proven sire and traces back to the former World Champion Stallion Imperial Mashhar (Imperial Madheen | Imperial Janaabah). His sire was bred by Dr. Hans Nagel’s Katharinenhof Stud of Germany. NK Abbas El Dine (NK Jamal El Dine | NK Asila)

The Queen of Al Jabal Arabians: the homebred Rheemah al Jabal (Salaa Maysan X Latifa) a Salaa El Dine granddaughter

Bred by Dr. Hans Nagel, this exotic NK Jamal El Dine (NK Hafid Jamil | Ansata Ken Ranya) son represents the Abayyan Um Jurays Hanan line.

King of the Mountains: homozygous black stallion HAR Baarez and Maya Jones Photo by: Joanna Jonientz 28 Arab Horse Couture

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NK Abbas El Dine (NK Jamal El Dine X NK Asila) bred by Dr. Nagel, Katharinenhof chief sire of Al Jabal Arabians Photo by: Joanna Jonientz

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Nile Pasha Halim (Ansata Nile Pharao | Nagda Halima)

Nile Pasha Halim Photo by: Maya Jones

This stallion is one of the very few Ansata Nile Pharaoh (Ansata Iemhotep | Ansata Misty Nile) offspring here In Europe. DF Nafis (DF Siraj | DF Nadeemah) This stallion is another homozygous black beauty. He is a star on the rise, not only because of his fantastic pedigree and black color, but for his beauty and intelligence. Nabiel Halim (Sabeh al Salhia | Nile Halima) This stallion’s grandsires, Ansata Nile Echo (Ansata Hejazi | Ansata White Nile) and PVA Karim (Imperial Imdal | BKA Raklisah), influenced this pretty young stallion with their genes. Do you allow outside and purebred mares to breed to your Straight Egyptian Arabian stallions? Maya: Yes, every breeder needs a personal vision to breed the horse of their dreams and I am proud if one of my stallions will be part of a future foal which makes the mare owner happy.

DF Nafis Photo by: Maya Jones

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Nabiel Halim Photo by: Maya Jones

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NK Abbas El Dine (NK Jamal El Dine X NK Asila) Photo by: Joanna Jonientz

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Mare: Rheemah al Jabal (Salaa Maysan X Latifa) Left filly: Jumanah al Jabal (NK Abbas El Dine X Rheemah al Jabal) Right filly: Rayyanah al Jabal (Sharif Ibn Shaikh al Jabal X Layla Bint Ghazira) Photo by : Gabriele Bietry

What is the range of territory you cover for shipping fresh cooled and/or frozen semen? Maya: At the moment, it is not possible to ship fresh cooled semen other than to Europe. However, Al Jabal Arabians does offer frozen semen from the black stallion HAR Baarez available for shipment in Europe and to the USA. You are a dedicated and successful Straight Egyptian Arabian horse breeder. Do you retain your foals for future generation breeding or are select foals available for purchase? Maya: My aim as a breeder is to support young and new breeders to start their own programs. Therefore, sometimes it is necessary to sell my best horses to promote the breed and to allow these breeders the best possible future. On occasion, there are particular progeny available at Al Jabal Arabians.

Do you show or ride your Straight Egyptian Arabian horses? Maya: Absolutely, however, I only attend shows every now and then. Most recently, I prefer shows such as the Noble Festival in the Netherlands where you may present your 32 Arab Horse Couture

breeding program to the audience without being judged, in a relaxed atmosphere with a tremendous amount of joy. Winning a trophy is not the only aspect of horse showing that is gratifying. Nowadays, I often feel that a beautiful head of a horse is worth much more than great character and temperament. To explain, I would like to mention that many people primarily look at the head to define a horse. My thought is, the character and temperament (especially when choosing a stallion for your mare) are often secondary or forgotten. No one has inquired lately about the character of my stallions, which all possess excellent temperaments. Their size and beauty seem to be the most important aspect for stallion selection. Early on in your breeding career, did you have a mentor or a certain person who fueled your passion for the Straight Egyptian Arabian horse?

Maya: Yes, the husband of my cousin had a passion for the Straight Egyptian Arabian horse long before I did. When he would talk about these amazing horses, I became so inspired that I wanted to learn everything about them. We would sit together for hours to write VOL. 7, NO. 2 - 2021


JAMAL EL DINE (NK HAFID JAMIL X ANSATA KEN RANYA) Photo by: Martin Kubat

pedigrees by hand (at that time), all the while reading and talking about interesting articles. It is no surprise I began dreaming of owning an Arabian horse myself. Al Jabal Arabians is located in the Eastern Mountains of Switzerland. What are some of the challenges you face with your horses due to the elevation and secluded location? Maya: Winters can be quite difficult up here; 20 inches of snow is not uncommon. If you have to clear the barn doors a few times a day before you can reach the horses, it sometimes feels exhausting. Recently, one of my mares had an accident which resulted in a fetlock joint dislocation. Due to deep snow, a road transport to the clinic was impossible. A rescue crew had to organize a helicopter to fly my mare down to the valley, and from there straight to the veterinary hospital. May people visit Al Jabal Arabians in Switzerland? Maya: Visitors and arabian horse enthusiasts are always welcome In closing, please complete the following in your own words: VOL. 7, NO. 2 - 2021

Ibn Bint Inas daughter AR Faranak and her newborn baby boy Photo by: Maya Jones

“My hopes and aspirations for the Straight Egyptian Arabian horse of present day and into the future are…. “that people will be able to admire these exceptional horses for the next five or ten centuries and beyond.“

Al Jabal Arabians Flums, Switzerland + 41 78 330 04 66 info@aljabalarabians.com aljabalarabians.com 33 Arab Horse Couture


Rules of Engagement

Are They Working For or Against You? Written by Nancy Dye

R

ules, which can keep us stuck, are usually hidden. The well-practiced automatic reactions (like standing down, shutting down, avoidance or running away) are not.

For example, years ago, my rule of engagement when it came to fire was to not touch it! (Either I had effective parenting or I figured this out the painful way!) VOL. 7, NO. 2 - 2021

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But if I wired into my brain that keeping "a safe" distance from fire felt better than touching fire, then that became my personal rule of engagement. (Engagement rule: fires are to watch or cook with, but don't touch or jump into burning logs!) (A rule of engagement I liked even better and tried to deploy was... get someone else to make the fire or do the cooking! LOL) Where am I going with this? There came a time in my life when I realized not being able to get myself to engage in walking through situations that caused me fear was holding me back in life. It was even causing me to make the wrong decisions in my life. (This forced me to become an EXPERT at CREATIVE excuses and "stories".) And it wasn't always things I feared. Sometimes it was just things I didn't WANT to do. You know, not starting a project because my rule of engagement was I had to first feel motivated or inspired. (THAT rule of engagement has long since been replaced with "deploy discipline".) And by the way, don't we have rules of engagement for riding our horses like, "I don't use spurs or crops to engage a horse to move forward?" (Fear of going too fast.) And don't our horses have rules of engagement for us to ride them? ("I will ONLY engage in stopping at the obstacle if you jump up on my neck before take-off to the jump!") This last one speaks to the importance of the TIMING of our rules of engagement. (The culprit for procrastination!) Back to fears: So the obvious answer to getting myself to face my fears was... wait for it... desensitize myself to anything that caused me fear. In fact, I changed my personal rule of engagement to purposely seeking out difficult and scary people and events to JUMP into! I actually learned how to embrace them instead of allowing those people or situations to control me with my fear. (Becoming a victim of fear.) In other words, my new identity was that of being a first responder; someone who ran INTO the fire! Thus, I ended up fire walking at the Tony Robbins event. 38 Arab Horse Couture

This was a breakthrough for me... learning how to embrace and condition my brain to DO IT ANYWAY! To automatically say YES, loudly, no matter what was put in front of me. (As different from being negative about or demonizing people, places, and things.) I can't tell you how POWERFUL I felt being able to master MYSELF! Note, that to walk across fire required (not necessarily in this order): 1. Change my excuses for not doing it. 2. Change my beliefs about not being able to do that. 3. Change my personal rules of engagement! Which included... NOT allowing others to do for me what I should be doing for myself! My new rule of engagement was not just about walking on fire. The new rule of engagement was a new GLOBAL rule for my life which became: "Whatever you fear or don't like, walk TOWARDS it to embrace it, and enjoy the empowered feeling of overcoming your fear or patterns!" VOL. 7, NO. 2 - 2021


As humans, we have filed away in our brains, lots of "rules" that keep us safe. Or organized. Or moving forward. Problem is, some of our rules are keeping us lazy, stuck, or worse, causing us to make decisions that are not in our best interest. The decision based upon the wrong rules of engagement itself is flawed and reeks of fear or weakness! And lack of discipline. Or the tools to rein in our control issues! My favorite quote: "We are either pitiful or powerful, but we can't be both!" Dr. Joyce Meyers. Examples of Rules of Engagement: Fear of public speaking may have wired into our brains a rule that we don't speak in public. (But how many opportunities have we turned down to keep "safe" from that encounter?) When I have a client with this issue, their RX is to join Toastmasters or to take GROUP acting lessons. Or for riders, we may have a fear of trying new horses, jumping a new height or going to a new show resulting in a rule for a lack of engagement. Or saying no. Or having "that difficult" conversation with our trainers. (You know, the one where you express what you don't like about their barn or their training.) Or maybe that you intend to pull your horses out and leave. For some riders, this conversation could take WAY too many months (of you being unhappy there) or years. Or the conversation may never happen AT ALL! When I work with Junior riders, building the "talking to my trainer" engagement muscle is a key component of the program! Why? Most of them fear their trainers and/or they see it as a scary confrontation. Or they just don't want to FEEL the defeat of not being able to "win" the debate or get their objectives met. In other words, they hate for someone to disagree with them or to hear the word, "No." OOOOHHHHH! So, they WILL engage in a conversation, BUT ONLY IF it goes the way they want it to go! So, the "trip wire" of some rules of engagement... controlling how OTHERS engage back with us! VOL. 7, NO. 2 - 2021

And if it doesn't go EXACTLY according to our script? The rule of engagement, if we are triggered, is to rear up, buck or run away! COACHING STORY: I have a trainer I work with who had a thriving business with her spouse. She had already untangled the legal marital status, but she wanted to leave the barn she was leasing from him. She was afraid to make the move, but even as she overcame that and found a new barn and business partner, she stalled out in a rabbit hole, afraid to "have the conversation" with him. And that is the stuck place where she landed. She justified this, of course, with excuses like, "Well, I had agreed to lease there when we got divorced, and we share several kids. It is probably the right thing to do to keep my agreement and just stay on his property so our kids don't have far to go to see both of us every day." (Mind you, she was fearless when she came to training horses to jump the 1.50 meter jumping class!) Why was she afraid to do that next move with her ex-spouse? "I don't like confrontations." How did this fear affect her business? Was she able to be an effective leader for her 30 clients? Could she have those necessary "confrontations" with those clients or staff that needed it? This was why she was still there at the barn YEARS after she wanted to leave! Her rule for engagement was that it was OK to procrastinate or just stand down and “quit" altogether from situations she didn't like! This was why she was stressed out with clients who were not a good fit for her program and yet, they were still there at the barn! She had a long list of rules of engagement, and one of those rules was: Avoid confrontation. (Global rule) Her belief was that confrontations were stressful, she was not "good" at confrontation, and it would somehow hurt her. (She also held the belief that problems would just magically resolve themselves.) So that was how she created her rule of engagement for NOT engaging in what was simply an uncertain or uncomfortable conversation. 39 Arab Horse Couture


(Uncomfortable also meaning "things not going the way she wants them to.") How do we get around this POWERFUL rule that keeps us stuck in life where we are unhappy? (That's the problem with rules of engagement. Some rules will help us to win the war and some rules, like wait until the enemy shoots first, will keep us from engaging with the problem in a proactive way where we CAN win the war!) The Solution: 1. Change the word. It was just a conversation. This deflates the emotional impact of the word confrontation which had the previous meaning of: A hostile or argumentative meeting or situation between opposing parties. The other meanings she gave to it was a conflict, a fight or a battle. She was more focused on the negative feelings she MIGHT have rather than the empowered feeling she WOULD generate from accomplishing her mission and overcoming her fears! What about just calling it an encounter or a contest (whose argument is going to win... make it fun?) 40 Arab Horse Couture

Or just a "brush" with someone that disagrees with you? If we elevate the words up even more, we COULD choose to label the conversation as an OPPORTUNITY to achieve our goal or mission. With a person that sees things through a different pair of glasses. Engage anyway! If nothing else, to feel good about standing up for ourselves and to be heard! To break a pattern of avoidance and throwing up walls. Get on the YES bridle path! This is what my trainer ended up doing; rewiring her brain for "conversations" and new, risky events to become exciting possibilities for opportunities. Now she jumps in with a "solve the problem" mindset, and opens up all kinds of doors! Even ones she never dreamed of are opening up for her. "Nancy, I'm going all over Europe this summer to do FEI shows! Showing my client's horses in Europe was never even ON my bucket list! I never even dreamed this could actually happen!" This happened why? Because her GLOBAL rule of engagement had flipped 180 degrees! She made herself open to opportunities by GETTING EXCITED ABOUT THE POSSIBILITIES of what could happen if she stayed focused on, and committed to, the YES gear! And then she worked on staying on that mindset bridle path and fought like a warrior when the old negative thoughts and concerns tried to creep back in to sabotage her. WHAT ABOUT YOU? What you are, your global rules, and what are your rules for specific people and events? If you adopted those less emotionally impactful words and meanings, then your rules of engagement might automatically change as well! After all, having a conversation, or "quick chat", is just that! It is up to us to not be negative about them. To not demonize them OR THE PERSON! (As Tony Robbins would say, "See it as it is, not worse than it is.") Now, if you FEAR the conversation will "get ugly" (trigger you), then go in with certainty by putting on your armor and change your rules of engagement! VOL. 7, NO. 2 - 2021


2). Lead with your identity! If you are from a military background, you might actually lead with that identity of being a warrior and being good at combat! In fact, you could get your needs met for fulling significance, growth, and power by stepping up and jumping into the fight! After all, that is who you are. That is who you have been trained to be! Stay focused on the outcome that you want. (Note that if the military is not your background, you can still adopt and utilize that powerful identity! Most of my clients have had to LEARN how to find and embrace their inner warrior! Especially those who want to go into the ring and win!) All athletes have to deploy a fight mentality to win! 3). Change your rules of engagement! Regardless of the words you use to transform the experience, sometimes (like my fire walking) you just have to change your rules and then say, "Halt!” every time you want to shut down or run away! Then change your lead and focus on something else. And if you do temporarily go into your bad patterns of shut down or retreat, it is just like becoming unseated from your horse. The answer is ALWAYS to quickly get back on and just stay calm and keep riding through it! Practice, practice, practice. Desensitize and build your courage and "pattern breaking" muscle! 4). Learn better communication skills. How about adding to your NEW rockstar identity that you are a champion debater? What if you purposefully practiced lesser impactful "confrontations" with family/friends/ acquaintances, or sign up for learning how to debate so that you could desensitize your emotional nervous system and then actually become an expert at "having those conversations?" My Juniors that are learning how to "have EFFECTIVE conversations" with their trainers (and parents) start with creating a script! It is all about being prepared and acting as if until we become! My business entrepreneurs are learning how to have effective negotiating rules. Then we role play! My rider's parents are learning how to say NO to their children, setting boundaries, and VOL. 7, NO. 2 - 2021

crafting effective consequences that are changing dysfunctional behaviors. And my trainers are learning how to effectively deal with their drama queens in their barn before that toxic virus spreads. The point is: what is the mission and then what is your intention? It is not just to show up in your camo uniform and LOOK LIKE a soldier going to battle, but the intention is to actually accomplish a goal and to win... to always be able to quickly adjust and make the moves forward no matter what obstacles are put on your path in front of you. Then, change your beliefs about your ability to take that action, change your excuses to justify being triggered, wimping out, backing down, and quitting, and change your rules of engagement so you CAN take that action. DO It ANYWAY. Say yes and make it a great year! Choose to step up and stay strong!

To learn more about Nancy Dye, schedule a session, or download her book, please visit: elitelifestyletransformations.com

Nancy Dye Equestrian Mindset Coach Strategic Interventionist EliteLifestyleTransformations.com NancyDyeSIcoach@gmail.com 561.866.0402 41 Arab Horse Couture


Hares Fayad, Publisher & Editor-in-Chief hares@firstavenuemagazine.com firstavenuemagazine.com


ARABIAN HORSE FINE ARTISTRY

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is a fine artist who works and lives in London. A gifted artist, Emad holds a Bachelor of Fine Arts from the Academy of Fine Arts in Baghdad, Iraq. As well, Mr. Taay is currently in the process of obtaining his Master of Fine Arts in London. Emad Taay’s career also includes an Art Instructor’s role in varying locations, including: Institute of Fine Arts in Baghdad and work as a private art teacher in London, Jordan and Lebanon. Many of Emad Taay’s fine Arabian horse artworks are held in private collections across the globe. Emad Taay Fine Artist London W2 4LW t_emd@yahoo.co.uk +447584577778 46 Arab Horse Couture

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Awards 2013 First Award Winner of the British Artist Lucian Freud Competition 2011 Award Winner of Equestrian Artists Regional Exhibition & Sally Mitchell Gallery Prize (Best in Show) 2005 Award Winner of Landscape Painting Competition for Young Artist 2002 Award Winner of Mural Painting, Iraq Solo Exhibitions 2011 Humanitarian Dialogue Foundation Gallery, London 2011 Art Space Gallery, London 2009 AL-Anda Art Gallery, Jordan 2009 Zaman Modern Art Gallery, Lebanon Exclusive Exhibit Participation 2019 Horse in Art, London 2018 Arabian Horse International Exhibition, Qatar 2017 London Art Fair, London 2016 London Art Fair, London 2015 London Art Fair, London 2015 Al-Asmakh International Symposium of Art, Qatar 2015 Equestrian Art Exhibition, Qatar 2014 Equestrian Art Exhibition, Qatar 2014 Arab Youth Saloon Art Exhibition 2013 Arabian Horse Art, London 2013 Cork Street Annual Exhibition, London 2012 Shakespeare City, Stratford Upon Avon Annual Exhibition 2011 Equestrian Artists Open Exhibition – The Mall Galleries London, ROYAL SOCIETY OF FINE ART 2011 New Equestrian Art - Sally Mitchell Gallery 2011 ROYAL SOCIETY OF MARINE ARTISTS ANNUAL EXHIBITION, The Mall Galleries, London 2007 International Equestrian Art Exhibition - Las Vegas, USA 2005 - 2010 Art Exhibitions in Jordan, Lebanon, Sweden, Syria, Canada & USA 1992 - 2005 Art Exhibitions Globally: Morocco, Qatar, Bahrain, Lebanon, Jordan, Egypt, USA, South Africa, London & Paris

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Congratulations Mark M. Hanna

author of The Horse Listener an international best-seller in six categories in seven countries.

Best seller PuBlishing A Premiere Hybrid-Publishing Company Over 1000 books launched internationally U.S.A., Canada, Mexico, England, Denmark, Sweden, Australia, New Zealand, Israel, Dubai, and Japan, among others Find out more

contact Bob Harpole at Bob@BestSellerPublishing.org or (626)765-5163


Educating Foals from the Time of Conception Can We Do This? In My Opinion, YES! Part One: Written by Mark Hanna The education of a horse begins from the time of conception and starts way before that with the education of the dam and choosing of the sire. Why do I come up with such crazy things as this? Well, after years of doing it the wrong way, I have finally accomplished doing what I think is the right way resulting in a well rounded and sensible horse that has the ability to easily live in our world, the world of the human being, a "PREDATOR". 52 Arab Horse Couture

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I have a lazy streak inside of me and I don't like to do things over and over again, in other words, twice. That may seem like a tall order for the average horse owner who gets a horse from the local auction, similar to my characters Mathew and his mother Marcia, with no experience with horses at all from my book "The Horse Listener". This article is aimed at that beginner. I desire to educate the owner, a youth with supporting parents or a first-time older person or even the existing horse owner who does not have this hard-earned knowledge. I have been brought up by Arabian horse breeders who have held the philosophy of choosing temperament and trainability above all other traits that are desirable in their breeding choices. Beginning with the sire… the time-honored tradition of the European model in countries like Germany, Spain, Poland and other areas where temperament and trainability are scored highest in the testing of their sires included in their stud books. We can choose our stallions with these desirable traits first without sacrificing the athleticism and conformation we are looking for; however, sometimes the temperament is not chosen first. Winnability takes precedence as their first choice. This has slowly weakened our precious bloodstock from within due to that defining characteristic, "winnability", that changes all the time. Our first priority should be in maintaining the highest quality to preserve the heritage of strong traits, this so-called improvement sire, where conformation, temperament and trainability are foremost. Likewise, we should choose our dams the same way. The mare is the most influential partner in our breeding barn. In the Bedouin cultures of the Middle East, the mare is highly prized in the pedigrees of Arabian horses. In fact, their pedigrees place the mare on top, not the stallions. Why is this? The environmental contributions the mare makes has a stronger influence upon the foal. The mare was chosen for her strength of character as a priority as her dam had been before her and so on. They revere them highly. The mares were chosen for their bravery and loyalty to their masters in times of war. They would not call out their presence as a stallion may do specifically due to their nature. Mares also played a role in nurturing VOL. 7, NO. 2 - 2021

the tribe's children as they were often allowed to live with them in their tents. The nutritious mare's milk would supplement their diets along with dates and other precious scarcities for their subsistence in the desert. Ideally then, observe the history of the tail female lines of both sire and dam. Knowing how the mare influences the foal in so many ways, a desirable temperament should be a highly sought-after trait that will ultimately be passed on to the foal. I once was a mare barn manager. When I arrived at the stud, the mare barn was populated with 35 plus pregnant mares whose foals were exposed to a deadly bacterial disease in the soil that devastated their foal crop in previous years. To alleviate this disease from their new foal crop, the stud farm undertook an aggressive campaign to stop the losses. Soon after birth, foals were given a serum transfusion from high titer foals to the disease. The stud farms also had to take the temperatures of the foals every day to watch for elevated numbers. I noticed that this would take them at least two and a half days to test the small numbers of foals that were already born. There were 40 more mares to foal on the horizon requiring temperature checks. This was unacceptable as there were foals who would be unnoticed in time to treat for the devastating disease. I knew that with my experience in educating the many foals I had raised, the process of taking temperatures could be vastly improved. 53 Arab Horse Couture


I have developed through the years, a process of educating young foals early to give them the foundation they need to be easily worked with and will introduce them into our world. This interaction would help them to see me as their trusted safe haven and not someone, like a predator, to be feared. Their first priority, the nature of the newborn foal is to survive. The foal has been given the gift of that instinct to survive from their dam through the nerve pathways at birth. They can get up early after birth and naturally run and escape from a predator. The lessons that both the mare and I contribute early develop trust. Our knowing the nature of horses and how it relates to our interaction with them will help us teach the foal how to survive in our dangerous world. This is the bargain we make with them after taking them out of their world. I am aware of imprinting and the methods some people use on the newborn foal. I have seen some people be rather forceful in their process of imprinting. They may think that getting used to hard handling will be useful in their task of imprinting. My opinion is the opposite of that which I will explain in this article. It helps to have a mare that is trustful of you to handle her newborn. I would proceed to start with a series 54 Arab Horse Couture

of lessons taking into consideration the foal’s strength and coordination at usually about one week of age. Also, in order to not stress the foal, I spread out the three lessons, about an hour and a half total. When I enter the stall, I sit in the corner and ask the mare for permission to enter their world. With that granted, I let the foal notice me. Some foals are evasive and some are curious and will come over to me and check me out. It is helpful if the mare communicates to her foal that I am not a threat. If the mare is distrusting of me, it is transmitted to the foal and it makes your efforts that much harder. There is one event in the new foal’s interaction with us that will be a shock to them, my first capture and control. A foal’s instinctual response to danger is passed on in their nerve endings through the mare as mentioned above. It is their nature to be wary of you. Consider their first natural reaction--to survive at all times. You can cradle them softly around their butt and chest when gaining control without fighting them. I try to do it with the least amount of stress and I eventually get down on one knee VOL. 7, NO. 2 - 2021


after I guide them into a corner, so as to give the foal a confinement of sorts, with two extra walls to aid me. At first, they will try to jump over you, their only route of escape, but done properly you can confine them quietly. You will notice when the foal’s heart rate decreases and they get used to the first big shock of your presence so close you can proceed with your first lesson. You will then observe the foal gnawing at you in submission with their mouths. I love it when the mare is there with me touching the foal to let them know all is okay with me being there. It is important to have a mare who will work with you freely and not haltered or tied. Get this accomplished first to avoid the communication of danger to the foal. I will, with the mare’s help, caress softly many parts of the foal’s body and back off if there is an adverse reaction. Approach and retreat if this adverse reaction occurs. Gradually, the foal will not try to escape these touches and will allow you to continue all over their body. All the while, keep the foal in your control quietly, they will try to find that surprise time to escape though. Stay down on the foal’s size on your knee, it is less intimidating to them. After this first introduction, I will look for the right time to end our interaction on a good note, when you can get up without the foal escaping your grasp. Try to wait until you can get up and walk away without the flight reflex kicking in. If this is done successfully, you will have a foal that will let you get close to them next time without them trying to escape. When and if they fight, back off and go with them softly while maintaining this subtle control. The foal will learn the first and most important lesson you will impart to them, you are not a danger to them. They will unlearn the instinct to escape from you, but will trust your touch and go with you. The nature of a horse is to seek safety from a predator. We are that predator. They are the prey that is usually pursued and eaten by that predator. We as predators chase down and catch them, then hold them down while they try to escape our grasp or fight us until they ultimately submit to us. We are not to act like that predator and should unlearn our instincts VOL. 7, NO. 2 - 2021

to grasp and control and hold on to them tightly when they try to escape. You can accomplish this by softening your grasp when they fight or try to escape but still have subtle control. For example, if you pick up a foot of your own horse, they tend to pull away from your grasp. We as a predator will hold onto the foot as they fight to pull it away, and it becomes a battle. It will set up a bad memory where the foal or the horse will anticipate your grasp and fight because of a learned manmade problem. If you will relax your grasp, the fight reflex will be decreased because they realize there is no inherent danger as you did not act like a predator and hold on until submission. After all, you do not want a horse to learn submission from your wrong handling practices. Submission is contrary to a future partner that is trusting and wanting to learn from you. When you use submission as a tool in training, the only reaction will be opposition to you. They will learn to oppose you to avoid the pain and discomfort. Their only reaction will be opposition, not learning. The lesson here is simple. You cannot win a battle with a horse by fighting with them because they will fight back in order to survive. You should never use force or become angry. Understand and anticipate when they are reacting like a prey animal. If a horse has learned from a human that they cannot trust you, then you have to understand they are reacting to learned events. Our job is to know when horses are anticipating a dangerous action from us. We should never fulfill this anticipated event and understand why a horse may react adversely to such an event. It is a learning process for us, but with experience and understanding, along with their natural instincts to survive, we can communicate to them that we understand why they are reacting in a particular manner. They learn to trust us if we do not fulfill their expectations of past pain and discomfort of manmade problems. In this next lesson, I shall enter the stall similarly to the first lesson. If you have done a good job to elicit less flight, you will be able to handle the foal and cradle them again in the corner so it is much easier for you to maintain subtle control. I will softly touch the foal all over as I did before, 55 Arab Horse Couture


however, not in a strong manner. I do not believe in holding down a foal to imprint. Some imprinting methods are teaching submission during this process. This process diminishes the foal’s future learning process, teaching them to submit rather than learn, and then more learning.

I usually receive a response from the foal when they begin to groom me. This is very desirable and allows for the foal to relax. You will notice a cocked foot during this wonderful moment. Perhaps a little chewing, in addition to soft eyes and ears that will give you a friendly flicker. I can back off and the foal will willingly stand without trying to escape and is beginning to enjoy my presence. A soft touch like a mare will ask for the foal’s compliance, it is preferable to the foal now. They will not understand a harsh disciplinary movement from you at this stage due to their instinct to protect themselves. They initially perceive you as a potential predator. It is all they know right now. So, remember to be judicious in your handling and understand the fact that they are learning to trust you. 56 Arab Horse Couture

Our next lesson will begin by teaching the foal to react to our directives in a safe manner. We as predators have to unlearn our instincts that I described above when teaching this phase. And, we need to learn this lesson permanently when dealing with horses, period, if we would like to have a harmonious relationship and partnership with them. We both have to learn from each other when we enter one another’s domain. We assume most of the responsibility to teach the foal as we are supposedly more intelligent and use reason where the horse is instinctual. A foal's nature is first to survive. If they react like prey animals, the result is very dangerous for the foal who only knows how to flee from you and fight you. A foal’s natural reaction to danger is to pull back, push against, or run over an immobile object. Or, they escape from a snake that is attached to the halter (lead rope) which eventually results in the foal running through a fence or gate. If a foal pulls back and breaks a board due to your tying them to it (your mistake), and then runs from this monster chasing them, it results in the same outcome as the snake. Pull back and then jump forward when tied, either VOL. 7, NO. 2 - 2021


into you or a solid wall or the manger of your trailer. Now is the time to teach the foal to give way. Teaching the foal to give way is the key to their existence in our world which is fraught with dangers. In the wild, these dangers exist, but our goal is to keep them alive by teaching them to give way. It is a good time to point out many of the injuries horses and their owners receive, may be prevented by directing this kind of education to young foals as well as our older horses. However, unfortunately, manmade disasters occur due to the lack of knowledge of horse owners. So, I am writing this to help the owners develop skills that will result in a safe environment for horse and man.

Now after all of this give way rhetoric, what is the meaning of this reference? Whenever you sense the foal is fighting against you, back off. You are too strong and your predatory nature is rearing its ugly head. The goal is for you to teach the foal to unlearn their instinctive reactions to your restraint by giving way to pressure. VOL. 7, NO. 2 - 2021

How do you accomplish this? Now that you have an amicable foal in your control by softly cradling them on your knee down on the foal’s level, groom them as before and then back off slightly. The foal will be drawn to you on its own. When they make this first step, to me, this is the most emotional experience I have when teaching these foals. It often brings tears to my eyes. They are now wanting to be in your presence. You will see their tails wag softly; the feet and legs will be a little cocked and relaxed. Their desire to escape is no longer there if you have done your job. You may now begin asking the foal to move with your touch. While cradling them with your soft touch on their behind, gradually increase the pressure until they make the slightest movement. The movement from the foal should be followed by your instant release of pressure as a reward. You may ask more in the beginning to help them understand; however, it is an ask and then a response from them that will be a learned response, rather than an action due to you forcing them to move. Never use force. Ask first, and then let them follow upon learning. 57 Arab Horse Couture


I hope you do not believe this is arrogance on my part as this is not my intent. The mistakes I made with my horses early on were filled with extreme anguish and pain for my horses as well as for me in the process of my learning. I have a lot, and I mean a lot, of apologizing to do to my horses when I meet them again up yonder. I could explain my philosophy this way: I would rather guide a first-time horse owner by attempting to assist with the avoidance of the same maladies and foibles as described above. Stay tuned for Part Two. In my next episode I will discuss a method of teaching a foal to deal with the ever-present restraint that will be present in their lives. This will result in a horse that is tractable and easy to work with, free from the dangers present in our world as we teach them to give way to pressure rather than acting instinctively. I will answer the questions you may have relating to my comment that you can start to train your foals in-utero beginning at conception. If you would like to share your own experiences, please send comments and/or questions to: shahwanamar@yahoo.com 58 Arab Horse Couture

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About Mark M. Hanna I was not unlike many other young boys or girls who were infatuated by and dreamed about the horse. My suburban home in Inglewood, California adjacent to Hollywood Park Race Track beckoned me. From the proximity of my bedroom windows, I could hear the starting bells, the cheering crowds and pounding hooves that at the time was only accessed by my imagination and the book “The Black Stallion”. My youthful exuberance towards horses finally convinced my big sister who relented, taking me to the morning workouts at the track. The strangely familiar smells and ambiance with the horses emerging out of the morning fog on the track convinced me that horses were about to dominate my life.

I was an angry young man after losing my father at the age of six. My name rhymed with banana and I had very kinky curly hair. I was relentlessly teased. The only way I could cope with these conditions was to overcompensate with every aspect of my life. My athletics became my way out of this dilemma. I was a very clumsy youth and soon with my brother’s help, I developed into a strong dominating competitor. Even with this compensation, I still experienced the teasing. I became a very controlling person. An innate voice continued to occupy my head. I had been taught by my mother to be a caring, kind and courageous person who was not afraid to be true to myself. Even with this instilled motivation, my anger and controlling nature would affect my dealings with the love of my life, the Arabian horse. My dreams came true with the building of my own Arabian horse ranch that was populated with the precious horses I dreamed about so often in the books by Walter Farley. I realized, after many years of following the Arabian horse across the country, that my anger was my downfall. I followed a dominating form of training that included intimidation and fear to elicit the beautiful movement and attractive traits that the Arabian horse was known for. After my beloved young stallion, during a training session reached out and bit me savagely, I realized what I was doing wrong to the horses that I loved so much. I experienced an epiphany after that experience that launched me onto a path 180 degrees from the submission I sought from my horses. I immediately understood VOL. 7, NO. 2 - 2021

the innate small voice I heard from my youth to be kind, have the courage and be true to myself. I was fighting against and ignoring this counsel to my disadvantage. There was another way to achieve a horse’s cooperation without force or submission. I embarked on a search for the answer. My belief in the Divine Creator God and the mentorship of influential horsemen throughout the world has led me to an understanding that there is another path to follow when becoming a partner with your horse.

There is a message of redemption for souls who have lost their way: Get up when you fall and never give up. Never fail to follow your dreams. Failure is just a step on the path. The “realist” sees his path, the “dreamer” has already been there on that path. I want to attribute to my soulmate, the Arabian stallion *Shahwan GASB, also my good friend Darik Anderson who helped change my life. The strong and gentle character they exhibited that beckoned me on a journey toward becoming a “Horse Listener”. For a horse whispers to us and we become the listener. And to my mentors Frederic Pignon and Magali Delgado, the cofounders of Cavalia who are, in my opinion, the finest and most sensitive horse people in the world. My motivation for embarking on this path in life is based upon my desire to help change the culture of force and submission that exists to the detriment of our horses. My desire is to guide the youth and new horsemen/horsewomen in the world to embark on a path different from mine when beginning a life with the horse of their dreams, especially the majestic Arabian horse. 59 Arab Horse Couture


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ARAB HORSE COUTURE VOL. 7, NO. 2 - 2021  

The Original Arabian Horse Lifestyle, Art & Culture Magazine

ARAB HORSE COUTURE VOL. 7, NO. 2 - 2021  

The Original Arabian Horse Lifestyle, Art & Culture Magazine

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