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ARAB HORSE

COUTURE MAGAZINE

Contents Issue spring 2020

6 - RIDING IN THE CLASSICAL WAY ON

RIDING IN THE CLASSICAL WAY ON YOUR BEAUTIFUL ARABIAN HORSE Written by Jean Paul Guerlain

In the past, in addition to his role as Master Perfumer for the House of Guerlain, Jean Paul Guerlain also accumulated World Championships in Dressage and Carriage Driving. Guerlain is a French perfume house, amongst the oldest in the world. The House of Guerlain was founded in 1828, when Pierre-Francois Pascal Guerlain opened his perfume store in Paris. Jean Paul Guerlain is fourth generation Guerlain and the last family Master Perfumer. Jean Paul continues to travel the globe to develop new fragrances.

Your Beautiful Arabian Horse

LONGEING

Starting the Young Sport Horse Arabian in a Soft Kind Way, With Lots & Lots of Patience

good fit so nothing is rubbing. The cavesson is used so as not to hurt the horse’s nose and the half-halts are felt more on the horse’s nose and not in the mouth (the most sensitive part).

The longe, ideally seven meters in length, is attached to the middle ring of the cavesson. The snaffle reins will be twisted around each Dear Arabian Horse Lovers, other and the throatlatch of the bridle opened The exciting time has come to put your young and refastened to secure the reins. The saddle horse in kindergarten class (longeing). The is securely on the horse. Make certain it is light foundation is being built and as always, we and comfortable with a soft protective saddle want to keep a willing happy horse. So make no blanket/lambskin and the girth is protected with lambskin as well. After two weeks, let the mistakes that can scare or damage the horse. stirrups down loose when you longe. The young horse is more likely to hurt itself during training, such as the back hoof touching The longeing circle should ideally be the front leg, etc. Be sure to always place leg approximately fourteen meters in diameter. It protection on the young horse. The older horse is not good for the articulation of the horse’s has better balance and coordination; however, joints to turn on small circles! Initially, walk with the horse on the circle to show him the please continue the use of leg protection. way and praise all the time. If the horse wants Longeing a horse correctly is a great art. On the to move inwards from the circle, flip the longe longe, the trainer can see if the horse is moving line slightly to make waves to show him to stay with the right rhythm. When the horse is moving out on the circle. Use your voice with the same to the left, the longe line should be kept in the words each time. A soft voice for coming down left hand at the height of the horse’s mouth and from a trot to the walk (example: ugh, ugh) and the whip in the right hand; vice versa moving a sharper voice from a walk to the trot and a in the opposite direction. The longe cavesson trot to the gallop. is placed over the snaffle bridle (make sure the bridle is soft and of middle thickness) with a Use your voice in accordance with the

By Jean Paul Guerlain

12 - TO RIDE OR NOT TO RIDE

temperament of the horse. Do not pull on the line, use your voice. Do not crack the whip, simply lift it up to signal the horse to move forward and lower the whip to slow down. Stay behind the head of the horse. The longe line should be kept taut and not twisted. Do not allow your horse’s legs or your own legs to intertwine with the longe line. Work on the longe is the first step in obedience/ confidence training. The horse should recognize our superiority in rank to him and respect us, but never fear us. This trust/confidence is built for riding the horse further on in the training process. The work on the longe line should be no more than twenty minutes in total (ten minutes to each side), every second day. When the horse stops on the longe (changing direction), you should walk toward the horse. The horse should not walk toward you. Always be calm. After a few weeks you can place a pole on the ground and walk the first few times with the horse over the pole. The horse may then walk and trot over the pole himself, building confidence and performing new tasks. The next week a cavaletti may be introduced, you will see when the horse is ready. For the show horse, as they begin training slightly younger, running on a straight line is better for the joints rather than circles; however, again, do not overdo it. After longing the horse, make sure the hoofs are cleaned again and that the skin is okay underneath the girth, etc. Perhaps he is hot under the saddle and requires a small shower and a wet sponge on his face. Please check his mouth that the bridle has not rubbed. Now, carrot time! Important Information: As this is the first time your horse has had a bridle in the mouth, please ensure the dentist has checked the mouth and teeth as well as the overall health of the horse before you begin longeing. Enjoy your Arabian horse….is he enjoying you?

JPG

For questions or comments, please write to: vitalcell.km@gmail.com

TO RIDE OR NOT TO RIDE That is the Question Written by Irina Stigler Stigler Stud, Italy

Good afternoon, dear friends! Today I will try to dispel the enduring myth that it is undesirable to ride Arabian horses intended for a beauty show. The training of the finest Arabian horses is necessary. The important aspect is to know the basic rules of training and follow them.

That is the Question

Saddle Training Saddle training of Arabian horses usually begins at the age of two and a half years. In Europe, the best time for training is Autumn until raining season. By the time it is saddle training, the Arabian horse should be well accustomed to cleaning, grooming, putting on a bridle, walking "in hand"; not being afraid of people (pre-saddle training for the young horse). Familiarize the horse with a saddle, and then introduction of the rider occurs gradually. Treat your horse calmly and gently, encourage.

The best physical development of the horse occurs during training. The horse becomes accustomed to discipline. Systematic training does not overload the horse. If a horse feels uncomfortable while training, it begins to protect itself. It can be bad habits or removal of a rider, a bad mood of a horse. You should feel the mood of your horse. Over time, horses begin to enjoy training and they wait for classes with the rider. The horse’s heart, respiratory system and muscles begin to work more efficiently. The muscles of the neck and body become more flexible.

Training should be regular, moderate (1-1.5 hours per day). In training, the horse walks mainly in steps and trots.

Entering the ring, a trained horse shows itself at a favorable angle. First, the horse is satisfied and demonstrates itself. The trained horse is elegant; moving from a step to a trot with no sharp angles. The movements are beautiful due to the group of muscles involved in horseback riding. The horse is accustomed to work flexibly.

By the age of three years, the trained Arabian horse’s tendons will be very developed; its legs, back and neck will already have tone. However, we still stop at the same weight of 60 kilograms (a saddle with a rider), in order to not heavily load the unformed horse. And, I must repeat, there must be constant training, steps and trots, at least one hour per day. Continuous training.

Written by Irina Stigler / Stigler Stud, Italy

For a four-year-old trained Arabian horse, the weight of the saddle with the rider may reach 80 kilograms and even up to 100 kilograms. This must all be done gradually. And, of course, on a trained horse. If the horse has not trained for a year, you cannot immediately begin with a weight of 80-100 kilograms.

It is advisable the first time the young horse is saddled it should be done by a person who cares for it, the horse will experience less stress. Also, the horse gradually becomes accustomed to the reins; to ride freely under the saddle while maintaining balance. The maximum weight of a saddle with a rider for Arabian horses up to two and a half years must not exceed 60 kilograms.

The muscle mass of a trained horse is different from a non-trained horse. In addition, trained horses exhibit a playful, charismatic mood in the show ring; however, they remain well-managed.

How to Make the Most of a Day in Cairo & a Week with the World’s Finest Straight Egyptian Arabian Horses

21 - ENCHANTING EGYPT

Diana Cantey, Photojournalist On behalf of Arab Horse Couture & the E.A.O.

At flamboyant Kasem Sakr who appeared to wow the crowd

the invitation of the Egyptian Agricultural Organization (E.A.O.), fellow Arabian horse breeder, Maya Jones, photographer Paula Volpe, and I headed “home” to Egypt to attend the Egyptian National Championships and International ECAHO-B Show at El Zahraa Stud. I refer to it as “home” because to Arabian breeders, El Zahraa Stud is also known as the Egyptian Agricultural Organization, “The Place”, where Straight Egyptian Arabian horses originated.

Champion mare Aliaa Leila, a bay beauty (Kenz Noor x Aisha by Royal). Tall and statuesque, she was a standout with lovely dark pigment, a smooth body and topline.

Diana Cantey - Photojournalist

The famous dancing horse competition, with lively authentic Egyptian Mizmar Baladi Music, drew large crowds in the evening of the first day. The winner was the dark liver chestnut stallion Pebars adorned beautifully in contrasting green and gold tack. There were several beautiful horses in the competition and the crowd participated with clapping and cheering for their favorites.

GOLD, Silver & Bronze Champion Mares Shahreeya Al Baidaa, Dalaa Rabab & Aliaa Leila

Colts & Stallions – Egyptian National Championship

Trophy presentation Sheikh Khaled Bin Laden Best Owner & Breeder - Egyptian National Show

The Yearling Colt Champion was the eye-catching Zopir Al Azab, a unanimous winner owned and bred by Torath Al Azab Stud. He won his class with impressive scores in type and movement. The Silver Champion was Negm Rawdet El Rahman owned and bred by Rawdet El Rahman Stud and Anbar El Ekhlass owned and bred by El Ekhlass Stud took the Bronze. All three of these colts were of exceptional quality. The Junior Colt Championship was also a unanimous decision awarding GOLD to the beautiful Magd Ezzaman bred by Maha Ibrihim of Ezzaman Stud and owned by Al Abhar Stud. Magd Ezzaman possessed beautiful trot and presence on the lead, with impressive scores. He edged out the younger Magd Oony in the body and topline scores; however, both were very lovely and with another year of maturity probably making the difference in the final judging decision. Magd Oony was the two-year-old class winner owned and bred by Oony Stud. The Bronze Championship went to Sadek Al Safenat owned and bred by Al Safenat Stud.

Al Tarzy Stud – Best Stallion Award

Rabab Stud

30 - EGYPTIAN STUD FARMS

Sheikh Khaled Bin Laden’s success at the Egyptian National Show was so impressive that I could not wait to visit his farm. He earned three of the four top awards including Best Breeder, Best Owner and Best Mare, with a powerful show string of the prettiest, and most wellconformed horses at the show. I think for me when I started looking at the horses and their pedigrees, I was most impressed he utilized a variety of Straight Egyptian bloodlines and his show horses are the quality that can win anywhere in the world. He has imported horses from Europe and the U.S.A., and also to Egypt for Rabab Stud’s breeding program, including: Imperial Safama by (Ibn Safinez x Imperial) IM Wassama and Romeo Al Amaar, son of Amaar (Al Rayaan x Imperial Maysama).

The Senior Stallion Championship was a showdown between the elegant Laheeb El Ekhlass and the

Class winner Aliaa Leila, who was awarded Best Mare at the show, was stunning and is sired by Kenz Noor and out of Aisha by Royal sired by Royal Colours. A maternal half-sister to Aliaa Leila, class winner Ghalia Leila by Amori Rabab (Al Lahab x Mahala) and out of Aisha by Royal (Royal Colours) is also another example of the breeding success at Rabab. This amazing mare is powerful with all the qualities any breeder would admire.

Egyptian food in the lodge over the stables which was built for guests to enjoy a view of the horses.

El Badrawi Stud

A good friend of mine told me that I would enjoy the visit to Mohamed Badrawi’s farm and that he knows bloodlines and pedigrees better than anyone. With that in mind, I was excited to see the farm on our tour list. Mohamed is in his fifth generation of breeding and his roots run deep. I was amazed to learn that at the end of the 19th century, his maternal Grandfather Mahmoud Pasha El Ettrebi, founded the stud. He was considered one of the best breeders in all of Egypt and gifted two of his stallions to El Zahraa Stud. He and his paternal Grandfather, El Sayed Pasha, were the founders of the Royal Agricultural Society which is now the E.A.O.

two full sisters, Moheba II and Malika by Ghazal (Nazeer x Bukra) and out of Malacha (El Sareei x Moheba). The influence of these great mares has impacted the horses bred by Al Amin Stud. With some outcrossing to other pedigrees with Ruminaja Ali, Sakr bloodlines, Ansata Hejazi and Halim Shah plus E.A.O. stallions, the stud is seeing some outstanding quality being produced. Al Amin also has black breeding lines through the Simon Sadik son DF Samid who is out of the Classic Shadwan daughter Sanaa Bint Shahlia and a Hadban strain. I was

Abdullah Al Mousa started riding horses at the pyramids area in 1983 getting to know breeders and visiting their farms to buy horses to ride. He fell in love with a sixmonth-old filly owned by Hosny Abdu named, “Nawarat Al-Waha” (Atared x Safwa), and purchased her. In 1991 he bought another mare, an E.A.O. bred mare named “Memphis” (Wasel x Abha). It was after this he met the highly respected and admired breeder Mrs. Wegdan Hanem El Barbary from whom he bought a filly called “Set El-Helween” (Adl x Nirvana). Abdullah’s herd-building continued and he bought a stallion named “E.A.O. Aggour” (E.A.O. Rashdan x E.A.O. Owayedat). He became the main stallion for Al-Mousa farm and sired many beautiful foals. He was presented to us during our visit and was very elegant and old-world style, a Saqlawi with a lovely head, tippy ears and nice eyes, a balanced body with excellent bone and substance.

Kasem Sakr (El Thay Kamil x Kismat Saqr) Senior Stallion GOLD Champion Neama Badrawi (Baydoun E.A.O. x Kamar Badrawi)

Ghalia Leila (Amori Rabab x Aisha) Class Winner Egyptian Nationals 4-6 YO Mares & Top Five (4th) in Senior Mares Championship

The Badrawi family is dedicated to the preservation of quality Straight Egyptian Arabians and this was evident in the horses he showed in the presentation. I was excited to meet Fatma Hamza, also a well-known and respected breeder and great family friend to the Badrawi family. A large group gathered together to enjoy beverages and a very impressive group of stallions, mares and youngsters from the program. I noted that his focus was on specific families such as those descending from Moniet El Nefous (Saqlawi), Farida (Dahman) and Maysa (Abayyan). Afterwards, we snacked on sandwiches and pastries, talked more about breeding and bloodlines while one of the guests’ children enjoyed a pony ride.

very impressed with the colts and stallions, some of the best we had seen during the trip. It was no coincidence that it was the same female line from each that caught my attention, Molesta I. Ahlam Al Amin, his son Ashhab Al Amin by Amal El Khaled (by Ansata Safeera), his full brother Adam Al Amin, Borhan Al Amin, by Shaah El Khorafy (by Ezz Ezzain) were all from the Molesta I line, through the mare Omneya El Hayah by Sheikh El Araby. Dinner was served after the presentation which consisted of authentic Egyptian cuisine and nice conversation. A visit to Al Amin Stud is always educational and interesting with wonderful hospitality.

Al-Mousa Arabians

Bint Bint Mahboubah (Abbas Pasha I x Bint Maboubah)

Photo: Paula Volpe

Al Amin Stud: Dr. Noora Faawzy, Diana Cantey, Mr. Mohamed Amin & Maya Jones

SPECIAL AWARDS

Diana Cantey - Photojournalist

39 - NK NAKEEBYA

Maged Al Tarzy of Al Tarzy Stud received the award for BEST STALLION with Kasem Sakr who was a stunning sight; big and bold, full of attitude and presence, he was captivating. Bred by Omar Sakr, Sakr Arabians, he is sired by El Thay Kamil and out of Kismat Sakr. It was great to see the Al Tarzy family out together celebrating their victory.

Magd Ezzama (Malik El Nil Al Sharbatly x Majara Al Qusar) Junior Colt GOLD Champion

Aisha by Royal was a successful show filly in Italy and he saw great potential in her. The farm itself is a beautiful haven amidst date palm groves and attractive landscaping. Having learned that Sheikh Khaled Bin Laden is an architect, his vision in designing an attractive yet functional facility with form-to-function serves multiple purposes. He not only has an extensive breeding facility, but also a full equestrian center for show jumping and dressage competitions. He is also involved in the training of dancing horses and has won numerous competitions with them. We walked around the facilities, stopping along the way for discussions about horses and breeding. Bright colored domes could be seen atop the buildings which allowed for airflow. The barns and grazing areas were designed for the horses to thrive in a more natural, open environment. We enjoyed a buffet lunch of authentic

Al Tarzy Stud

Al Amin Stud

Rabab Stud – Best Owner, Best Breeder & Best Mare One of the highlights of our trip was a visit with Mr. Mohamed Amin of Al Amin Stud. After a trip of a lifetime to visit him in 2017, it felt like coming home to family. He and his lovely Farm Manager and Veterinarian, Dr. Noora Faawzy, greeted the road-tired guests and immediately provided refreshments as the horses were getting prepared for the presentation. I truly admire this breeding program and the type of horses bred here. Mr. Amin uses many different bloodlines from Egypt and Europe, with a focus on the Dahman and Saqlawi family strains. He imported horses from the stud of Peter Gross of Germany, including

E.A.O. Aggour (E.A.O. Rashdan x E.A.O. Owayedat)

As future breeding decisions were made, he bred Set El Helween to the stallion “E.A.O. Beltagi” (E.A.O. Adeeb & E.A.O. Barakesh), owned by Mrs. El-Barbary, and the result was an amazing colt named “Al-Moushahar”. He was retained as the second stallion for the program. Mrs. Wedgan was a great friend and mentor to Abdullah and assisted him with many facets of breeding. Later he added

Sheikh Khaled Bin Laden of Rabab Stud took home the Gold in the Yearling Champion Filly Class and all three Championships in the Senior Mare Championship Class as well. In addition, Rabab Stud had class winners with Rokya Rabab (Yearling Fillies-1A), Ghalia Leila (Mares 4-6 YO Mares-4A), Dalaa Rabab (4-6 YO Mares-4B,), Aliaa Leila (7-9 YO Mares) and Shahreyya Al Baidaa (Mares Age 10+). He was the breeder of the Silver Champion Senior Mare Dalaa Rabab and received BEST OWNER, BEST BREEDER and BEST MARE awards.

Zopir Al Azab (Mareg Al Masry x Moniet El Nefous El Sheruk) Yearling Gold Champion

DF Samid (Simeon Sadik x Sanaa Bint Shahlia)

Queen Of Al Ward Arabians By Judith Wich-Wenning

Queen of Al Ward Arabians by Judith Wich-Wenning

NK Nakeebya is a true dream mare: A flea-bitten beauty with large, remarkably expressive eyes, huge nostrils, a beautiful dish, and splendid, floating movements. With her excellent type, she overall exemplifies the dry look of the desert. NK Nakeebya is the queen of Al Ward Stud. She developed into the most important foundation mare of this prestigious stud farm, situated in Kuwait.

46 - EL ZAHRAA STUD

El Zahraa Stud

the Animal Reproduction Research Institute. I spent three years there, then took the responsibility of Chairman of Animal Wealth Sector at the Ministry of Agriculture. Finally, I am here as Chairman of the E.A.O.; however, this is a very brief explanation. We are honored you are here.

Historical State Stud of Egypt & E.A.O.'s Treasure

Diana Cantey: We just experienced one of the best Arabian horse shows here at El Zahraa. I can say as a breeder of 20 years, the quality of horses here was absolutely amazing. The presentation of the E.A.O. stallions and mares was outstanding. Their pride, quality and beauty ensure they are some of the best in the world.

An Interview with: Dr. Khaled Osman Chairman of the Egyptian Agricultural Organization

Historical State Stud of Egypt & E.A.O.'s Treasure

Written by Diana Cantey of Zajaddi Egyptian Arabians - USA In collaboration with Maya Jones of Al Jabal Arabians - Switzerland

Maya Jones: It is an honor and pleasure to be at this place, to see the horses and the heritage where it all began. We experienced the event and we are seeing some amazing horses. Dr. Osman, what are the plans for the next show? Dr. Osman: We are carrying on an ambitious “multi-faceted” program by preparing for this show every year held in November. We hope the show will return to what I refer to as the "Days of Glory of the E.A.O." Each year it is better and more developed than the previous year. We exert a lot of effort to enhance and keep the Arabian horse, that is the main task of El Zahraa Station. We are proud that you can find Arabian horses all over the world that list their roots as started from El Zahraa Stud. Diana Cantey: Do you have future plans for any collaborations with small breeders or other international shows? Photo by: Paula Volpe

W

Pictured: Dr. Khaled Osman, Diana Cantey & Maya Jones

hile at the El Zahraa Show, we had the opportunity to interview Dr. Khaled Osman, Chairman of the Egyptian Agricultural Organization (E.A.O.). After our warm welcome and introductions, we were escorted to the historic office where many dignitaries and noteworthy breeders once visited. An interview was arranged and filmed by Elena Vignato, a representative of Arabian Essence, who, along with her father Marco, provided show promotion through video production on the Arabian Essence website.

Written by Diana Cantey of Zajaddi Egyptian Arabians - USA In collaboration with Maya Jones of Al Jabal Arabians - Switzerland

Dr. Osman: I am the Chairman of the E.A.O., which El Zahraa Stud belongs to, and I am glad to be meeting during our annual event, the Egyptian National Championship and the 21st International Championship; our horse beauty show. Glad to have you join us for this event at this ancient place. Diana Cantey: Dr. Osman, can you tell us how you came to be the Chairman of the E.A.O.?

54 - FINE ARABIAN HORSE ARTISTRY

Dr. Osman: I am a Scientist at the Agricultural Research Center and my career is in Animal Science, in particular animal reproduction/artificial insemination and embryo transfer. I conducted a scientific Egyptian Buffalo Breeding Research Study at the University of Florida at Gainesville and I enjoyed my time there. I was supervised by two scientific pioneers who had travelled the world. I came back to Egypt and was nominated to direct

Dr. Osman: We already collaborate with organizations and breeders as this is very typical for us. We consider breeders as the cornerstone of this big investment, not just a hobby, so we cooperate with all the organizations. Our recent collaboration was to be the host for the ECAHO DC course during our show as well as opening the door to El Zahraa Stud youth veterinarians for skills improvement, directed by two ECAHO senior coaches: Mrs. Jacqueline Vandyke and Dr. Laura Mascagne. I am currently working on establishing cooperation with Germany. It has already begun via a meeting with the Minister for Rural Affairs of Baden Wurttemberg, Mr. Peter Hauk and Dr. Astrid Velsen Marbach, Farm Director. Diana Cantey: The stands were full today with the colts and stallions showing. The crowds were very excited, cheering and supporting these future breeding horses. The quality was amazing, the beauty, charisma, movement and presence, you

Photo by: Mohab Elshiat

HASEM

(Rawwah x Mobtasema)

‫حا سم‬

) ‫ مبتسمة‬X ‫(رواح‬

FINE ARABIAN HORSE ARTISTRY OF KATJA SAUER GAZAL AL SHAQAB (Anaza El Farid x Kajora)

K

atja Sauer is a German freelance artist who lives and works near the lovely spa-town of Baden-Baden in the middle of the Black Forest. ANSATA HEJAZI (Ansata Halim Shah x Ansata Sudarra)

As a child, Katja discovered a passion for drawing animals, especially horses. Animals have always played an important role in Katja‘s life and to draw them gives her great pleasure. Katja is a self-taught artist and learned through experience by experimenting with different drawing techniques and also with a lot of passion for what she loves doing. Katja works mainly with soft pastels, charcoal and graphite. One of Katja‘s favorite motives is the Arabian Horse. She says, “I adore its beauty and temperament and also its placidity. These characteristics give each horse a unique expression which I enjoy capturing in my paintings.” Katja‘s love and expertise for drawing, especially

57 - HORSE-ASSISTED COACHING

ESTOPA (Tabal x Uyaima)

NDA SHARIHA BINT SHANAH (GR Amaretto x Shanah Halima - Dalia Halim)

PADRONS PSYCHE (*Padron x Kilika)

of Katja Sauer

EL THAY MASHOUR (Madkour I x El Thay Bint Kamla)

As a child, Katja only drew horses; however, more and more, other animals have earned her fascination. Since 2011, Katja has created individual commissioned works for beloved family members of animals for customers from all over the world. Ever since Katja began her commissioned work, she has been moved by the stories behind the photographs she is sent to draw. ‘‘This shows me how important pets are to our modern lives and how they can make us more ‘human’. This is also one of the reasons I enjoy my work so thoroughly,” says Katja.

NK HAFID JAMIL (Ibn Nejdy x Helala)

Photo Credits: Julia Moll Martin Kubat Stuart Vesty Gregor Aymar Gigi Grasso

Arabian horses, originates in the fact that her Mother is lucky enough to own an Arabian horse. Therefore, Katja was able to study its anatomy and movements intensely.

For information regarding Katja Sauer’s fine artistry and for commissioned artworks, please contact: Tierzeichnungen und Tierportraits Katja Sauer info@katja-sauer.de + 01 76 3443 6906 katja-sauer.de

El LAHAB (Laheeb x The Vision HG)

Horse-Assisted Coaching Reality or Myth? Written by Eva Reifler - visionpure

Reality or Myth?

Written by Eva Reifler - visionpure

62 - RIGHT OF FIRST REFUSAL CLAUSES:

Are They Worth the Paper They’re Written On?

T

he horse has always been a valuable companion for us, particularly the Arabian breed: Hippocrates found that riding has a healing effect on us. Xenophon also recognized the therapeutic virtues of the horse: The horse is a good master, not only for the body, but also for the mind and heart. And Winston Churchill (at least the

quote is credited to him)Clauses: pointed out that the outside of the horse has a positive influence Right of First Refusal on the inside of man. Are They Worth the Paper They’re Written On? By Julie I. Fershtman, Attorney at Law

What is a Right of First Refusal? Equine-related contracts sometimes include a “right of first refusal” clause that restricts how a horse can be re-sold. Through these clauses, a horse buyer agrees to give the seller an opportunity to buy back the horse later under certain specified conditions. For example, these clauses sometimes provide that if the buyer (after becoming the horse owner) later receives a legitimate offer to buy the horse and is inclined to sell, the former owner must first receive the opportunity to match that purchase offer and pay within a certain time frame. Risks and Options for Action Right of first refusal clauses sometimes generate disputes in the horse industry. This can happen when horse buyers file away their contracts and, years later, forget the promises they made. Sometimes, these clauses are so unclear or unenforceable as written that the parties don’t understand their rights and obligations. Generally speaking, what rights do people have if they believe someone violated a right of first refusal? • Depending on the contract’s language and applicable state law, if the former owner who holds a right of first refusal is denied his or her contractual right to repurchase a horse and learns that a sale is in progress, that party – before the sale – could potentially bring a lawsuit seeking an injunction to stop the sale so that a

court can enforce the right of first refusal clause. These types of lawsuits also ask the court to order specific performance to allow the former owner to buy back the horse as the contract terms permit. • If the right of first refusal was part of a verbal equine sale agreement, with nothing in writing, chances are good that the claimed “right” will not be enforceable based on the state’s statute of frauds. • If the horse has already been sold, in violation of a right of first refusal, the would-be buyer’s lawsuit might potentially seek monetary damages. Proving what those damages are can be especially complex, however, raising numerous questions such as: Did the former owner (who was denied a re-purchase right) lose profits? Are the claimed lost profits too speculative and therefore not recoverable by law? Did (or could) the would-be buyer take reasonable efforts to mitigate his or her claimed losses? When you include “right of first refusal” clauses in your equine sale contracts, draft the language with great care and consider seeking legal counsel to help in the process. Equine sellers who rely on these clauses might want to remind the buyers about them as time goes on, before the buyer places the horse on the market; this may also help the buyer notify others that all sales will be subject to a right of first refusal.

Conclusion Disputes involving rights of first refusal can be complicated, especially when the parties draft unclear clauses or fail to honor them. When drafting these clauses and when evaluating your rights under them, consider seeking timely advice of knowledgeable counsel. This article does not constitute legal advice. When questions arise based on specific situations, direct them to a knowledgeable insurance agent or attorney. About the Author Julie Fershtman, a lawyer for 30 years, is one of the nation’s most experienced Equine Law practitioners and handles legal matters involving all equine breeds and disciplines. She is a Shareholder with Foster Swift Collins & Smith, PC, based in Michigan, and has handled equine cases nationwide. One of very few lawyers in the country to be named a Fellow of the American College of Equine Attorneys, she is also listed in The Best Lawyers in America. Her speaking engagements on Equine Law span 29 states. For more information, visit: www.equinelaw.net

By Julie I. Fershtman, Attorney at Law

64 - EASILY DISTRACTED & TOUGH TO CATCH? The Wild Pony Syndrome By Nancy Dye

Farm Visits & Egyptian Hospitality

24 - EGYPTIAN NATIONAL CHAMPIONSHIP

(France). Approximately 100 horses were entered, and although some of the classes had a modest number of entries, the quality of the horses was exceptional. Judge Joanne Lowe commented the Straight Egyptian horses in the class held their own and the quality of “legs” was very good in this group of horses. “There was a bay foal colt who showed great potential for the future and the middle mare class had outstanding quality, all scoring 90 points or higher,” she stated.

with his attitude and presence. Kasem Sakr earned one 20 point score for type and two 20 point scores for movement in his class earning an impressive total score of 92.7 points. Bred by Omar Sakr, Sakr Arabians, and owned by Al Tarzy Stud, he was the top stallion at the show. Earning a bronze was a son of Kasem Sakr, Sultan Kheir, owned by El Gamil Stud, bred by Kheir Stud, class winner for the Stallions 4-6-Year Old’s, with a score of 91.3 points.

Easily Distracted & Tough to Catch? The Wild Pony Syndrome

This is frequently a problem for high-energy people who are always on the move. Outgoing and adventurous, they usually have lots of friends or they enjoy adventures and meeting new people in “their herd”. Fun to be around, it’s hard to get them to sit down and focus for long periods of time… and that’s AFTER they always arrive late. In fact, it is hard for them to focus on the task at hand, period. They are too easily distracted. The Wild Ponies complain about being ADD (Attention Deficit Disorder) and they hate being so disorganized. They would fix the organization issue, but they have difficulty disciplining themselves enough to stay focused on completing a boring project such as cleaning their house. Instead, they are “not very successfully” multi-tasking their way through a hectic, stressful, and borderline out-of-control life. By Nancy Dye Elite Lifestyle Transformations, LLC Equestrian Mindset Coach

A

re you an easily distracted athlete or professional that suffers from running around all over the place? Do you find it difficult to schedule and discipline yourself? Do you find it tough to stay focused on a task for any length of time? Are you disorganized and always late? Do you feel like you are not performing at your absolute best? I coined the term, “Wild Pony Syndrome”, to describe a debilitating issue that some of my successful clients feel trapped in. Getting the edge on beating your competition and receiving the blue ribbon, instead of always coming in second or third (or not at all), is sometimes just about learning how to rewire your brain to tweak a few bad habits that you recognize are sabotaging your best performance in all areas of your life. So, what is Wild Pony Syndrome?

What would happen if they were organized and focused every day on applying my “game changing” equestrian success rituals and my emotional strength techniques and strategies that I customized just for them; showing up relaxed, empowered, and totally prepared and confident for both their training and their competition? The real problem with Wild Pony Syndrome sufferers is that by the time they come to me for a complete transformation in their riding and their lifestyle, they have already defined themselves with these challenges deep down in their fundamental core. This has become their identity and their “story”. And they keep building up the story; stacking issues on top of issues.

For example, displaying varying degrees of being “a hoarder”, they have a hard time letting go of “stuff ”. And by that I mean not only all the stored items in their home, garages, basements and attics (tack trunks, trucks and horse trailers), but also letting go of their past, their “issues”, and their identity. To add insult to injury, these ponies constantly beat themselves up with a whip, calling themselves bad names such as a “mess” and a “wreck”. And as they continue to identify with the symptoms of Wild Ponies, they unconsciously act it out even more, because remember, we will always remain consistent with who we truly believe ourselves to be. Why is that? Because it is our core belief about ourselves and because, heck, at least we know how to be that person! At least we can do THAT perfectly! There IS comfort and certainty in that, right? Eventually, the disorganized patterns have convinced everyone else that it’s “always something” with the Wild Pony; forgetting things, losing stuff (the other riding glove hiding somewhere), always late, not keeping their word with calls and appointments, etc. Friends and co-workers, after trying to help them get over this chronic disability, finally throw up their hands and end up actually making it worse by accepting their “quirkiness”, covering for them, or picking up the slack. This is called enabling and out of desperation for help in this area, Wild Ponies unconsciously surround themselves with people that will help them stay on track.

Days 3 & 4 International ECAHO - B Show The 21st International ECAHO-B Show for Arabian horses (those registered in any recognized WAHO studbook) took place on the final two days at El Zahraa Stud. The judges for the international competition were: Mr. Holger Ismer, (Germany); Mr. Lucas Gozdzialski (Poland); Mrs. Joanne Lowe (Great Britain); and Mr. Richard Pihlstrom

The Egyptian National Championship

Diana Cantey - Photojournalist


Hares Fayad - Publisher & Editor-in-Chief hares@albadiamagazine.com albadiamagazine.com


RIDING IN THE CLASSICAL WAY ON YOUR BEAUTIFUL ARABIAN HORSE Written by Jean Paul Guerlain

In the past, in addition to his role as Master Perfumer for the House of Guerlain, Jean Paul Guerlain also accumulated World Championships in Dressage and Carriage Driving. Guerlain is a French perfume house, amongst the oldest in the world. The House of Guerlain was founded in 1828, when Pierre-Francois Pascal Guerlain opened his perfume store in Paris. Jean Paul Guerlain is fourth generation Guerlain and the last family Master Perfumer. Jean Paul continues to travel the globe to develop new fragrances.

LONGEING

Starting the Young Sport Horse Arabian in a Soft Kind Way, With Lots & Lots of Patience Dear Arabian Horse Lovers, The exciting time has come to put your young horse in kindergarten class (longeing). The foundation is being built and as always, we want to keep a willing happy horse. So make no mistakes that can scare or damage the horse. The young horse is more likely to hurt itself during training, such as the back hoof touching the front leg, etc. Be sure to always place leg protection on the young horse. The older horse has better balance and coordination; however, please continue the use of leg protection.

good fit so nothing is rubbing. The cavesson is used so as not to hurt the horse’s nose and the half-halts are felt more on the horse’s nose and not in the mouth (the most sensitive part). The longe, ideally seven meters in length, is attached to the middle ring of the cavesson. The snaffle reins will be twisted around each other and the throatlatch of the bridle opened and refastened to secure the reins. The saddle is securely on the horse. Make certain it is light and comfortable with a soft protective saddle blanket/lambskin and the girth is protected with lambskin as well. After two weeks, let the stirrups down loose when you longe. The longeing circle should ideally be approximately fourteen meters in diameter. It is not good for the articulation of the horse’s joints to turn on small circles! Initially, walk with the horse on the circle to show him the way and praise all the time. If the horse wants to move inwards from the circle, flip the longe line slightly to make waves to show him to stay out on the circle. Use your voice with the same words each time. A soft voice for coming down from a trot to the walk (example: ugh, ugh) and a sharper voice from a walk to the trot and a trot to the gallop.

Longeing a horse correctly is a great art. On the longe, the trainer can see if the horse is moving with the right rhythm. When the horse is moving to the left, the longe line should be kept in the left hand at the height of the horse’s mouth and the whip in the right hand; vice versa moving in the opposite direction. The longe cavesson is placed over the snaffle bridle (make sure the bridle is soft and of middle thickness) with a Use your voice in accordance with the 6 Arab Horse Couture

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temperament of the horse. Do not pull on the line, use your voice. Do not crack the whip, simply lift it up to signal the horse to move forward and lower the whip to slow down. Stay behind the head of the horse. The longe line should be kept taut and not twisted. Do not allow your horse’s legs or your own legs to intertwine with the longe line. Work on the longe is the first step in obedience/ confidence training. The horse should recognize our superiority in rank to him and respect us, but never fear us. This trust/confidence is built for riding the horse further on in the training process. The work on the longe line should be no more than twenty minutes in total (ten minutes to each side), every second day. When the horse stops on the longe (changing direction), you should walk toward the horse. The horse should not walk toward you. Always be calm. After a few weeks you can place a pole on the ground and walk the first few times with the horse over the pole. The horse may then walk and trot over the pole himself, building confidence and performing new tasks. The next week a cavaletti may be introduced, you will see when the horse is ready. For the show horse, as they begin training slightly younger, running on a straight line is better for the joints rather than circles; however, again, do not overdo it. After longing the horse, make sure the hoofs are cleaned again and that the skin is okay underneath the girth, etc. Perhaps he is hot under the saddle and requires a small shower and a wet sponge on his face. Please check his mouth that the bridle has not rubbed. Now, carrot time! Important Information: As this is the first time your horse has had a bridle in the mouth, please ensure the dentist has checked the mouth and teeth as well as the overall health of the horse before you begin longeing. Enjoy your Arabian horse‌.is he enjoying you?

JPG

For questions or comments, please write to: vitalcell.km@gmail.com 7 SPRING 2020

Arab Horse Couture


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ARAB HORSE

COUTURE MAGAZINE SPRING 2020 LJB PUBLICATIONS LLC HEADQUARTERS:

NORTHVILLE, MICHIGAN 48167 USA 248.866.8756

LAURA J. BRODZIK

Owner, Founder & Publisher ARAB HORSE COUTURE MAGAZINE

lauraj@arabhorsecouture.com RANDALL E. BRODZIK CFO

info@arabhorsecouture.com YASSER GOMAA GOUDA Lead Designer - Egypt

info@arabhorsecouture.com MOHAB ELSHAYAT Photography - Dubai

info@arabhorsecouture.com CONTRIBUTORS: Jean Paul Guerlain - PARIS, FRANCE Hares Fayad M.D. - Dubai UAE Diana Cantey - USA Maya Jones - SWITZERLAND Irina Stigler - ITALY/RUSSIA Julie I. Fershtman - USA Judith Wich-Wenning - GERMANY visionpure, Eva Reifler, - FRANCE Nancy Dye - USA

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SPRING 2020 - On the Cover: Raad E.A.O. (Rawah X Tayees) 2010 Grey Straight Egyptian Stallion Bred by the E.A.O. EL Zahraa Stud – Egypt Raad has been a tremendous asset at El Zahraa Stud, siring beautiful Straight Egyptian foals, the first to arrive were in 2014. He consistently passes his athleticism and long upright necks. This is no surprise as his pedigree is quality throughout. His sire is linebred to Rashdan, with Rameya on the very bottom. Her sire, Mohawed, is by Alaa El Din, out of the great Rafica x Nazeer. He is a Saqlawi tail-female and his dam Tayees traces back to one of the top-producing mares of all time. Photo by Mohamed Abdo

Corrections to Arab Horse Couture Oct/Nov 2019 Issue Beautiful Arabian Horse Tack on the Cover by: Arabian Fancy Tack Gina Roland Dupree 601.670.5707 arabianfancy@live.com @facebook.com/ArabianFancyTack On the Cover of the Oct/Nov 2019 Issue: ZAYYAN (FA Ali Bey x Akila Mareekh) 2018 Black Homozygous Colt SCID, CA & LFS Clear 2019 Egyptian Event Reserve Champion Egyptian Breeders Challenge Colt ATH Straight Egyptian Yearling Futurity Colt Class – Third on Judge’s Cards Owned by: Donnie & Yvonne Jones of Hackberry Arabians, LLC Manvel, Texas hackberryarabians.com zayyan.us Cover photo: Moffatt Photography & Design - Trace & Lisa Moffatt

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magazine Celebrating the Beauty & Charisma of the Arabian Horse Increase Your Market Reach with New Advertising Opportunities!

Spring 2020

Available in Digital & Print Formats Advertising & Subscriptions, please contact:

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Love

makes the wildest spirit tame and the tamest spirit wild

www.zajaddiegyptianarabians.com

dianacanteyphotography.com


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TO RIDE OR NOT TO RIDE That is the Question Written by Irina Stigler Stigler Stud, Italy

Good afternoon, dear friends! Today I will try to dispel the enduring myth that it is undesirable to ride Arabian horses intended for a beauty show. The training of the finest Arabian horses is necessary. The important aspect is to know the basic rules of training and follow them.

Saddle Training Saddle training of Arabian horses usually begins at the age of two and a half years. In Europe, the best time for training is Autumn until raining season. By the time it is saddle training, the Arabian horse should be well accustomed to cleaning, grooming, putting on a bridle, walking "in hand"; not being afraid of people (pre-saddle training for the young horse). Familiarize the horse with a saddle, and then introduction of the rider occurs gradually. Treat your horse calmly and gently, encourage.

For a four-year-old trained Arabian horse, the weight of the saddle with the rider may reach 80 kilograms and even up to 100 kilograms. This must all be done gradually. And, of course, on a trained horse. If the horse has not trained for a year, you cannot immediately begin with a weight of 80-100 kilograms. The best physical development of the horse occurs during training. The horse becomes accustomed to discipline. Systematic training does not overload the horse.

It is advisable the first time the young horse is saddled it should be done by a person who cares for it, the horse will experience less stress.

If a horse feels uncomfortable while training, it begins to protect itself. It can be bad habits or removal of a rider, a bad mood of a horse. You should feel the mood of your horse.

Also, the horse gradually becomes accustomed to the reins; to ride freely under the saddle while maintaining balance. The maximum weight of a saddle with a rider for Arabian horses up to two and a half years must not exceed 60 kilograms.

Over time, horses begin to enjoy training and they wait for classes with the rider. The horse’s heart, respiratory system and muscles begin to work more efficiently. The muscles of the neck and body become more flexible.

Training should be regular, moderate (1-1.5 hours per day). In training, the horse walks mainly in steps and trots.

Entering the ring, a trained horse shows itself at a favorable angle. First, the horse is satisfied and demonstrates itself. The trained horse is elegant; moving from a step to a trot with no sharp angles. The movements are beautiful due to the group of muscles involved in horseback riding. The horse is accustomed to work flexibly.

By the age of three years, the trained Arabian horse’s tendons will be very developed; its legs, back and neck will already have tone. However, we still stop at the same weight of 60 kilograms (a saddle with a rider), in order to not heavily load the unformed horse. And, I must repeat, there must be constant training, steps and trots, at least one hour per day. Continuous training.

The muscle mass of a trained horse is different from a non-trained horse. In addition, trained horses exhibit a playful, charismatic mood in the show ring; however, they remain well-managed. 13

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Horses with a soft back There is such an erroneous opinion that the soft back of a horse under the weight of a rider will deepen even more. It is not true. When we ride a horse, all its muscles are strengthened. A soft back is acquired genetically, but by training we can strengthen or improve it. As a result of horseback riding, the soft back is leveled and the back muscles are strengthened, legs work and the neck becomes flexible. We all notice the horse is becoming more beautiful and their class is improving. About the Author: Irina Stigler has been an Arabian horse National Judge subsequent to 2005 and an International ECAHO A List Judge from 2012. She has been invited to judge many National and International Championships in addition to A and Title shows in the following countries: USA, Australia, Egypt, Jordan, Syria, Lebanon, Palestine, Saudi Arabia, Israel, Belgium, Holland, Spain, France,

Poland, Italy, Finland, Sweden, England, Qatar and Russia. She is also an official Russian Delegate for the European Arab Horse Association ECAHO – Show, Sport and Registry Commissions. She is the organizer of two shows per year in Russia: St. Petersburg International Cup and the Russian Nationals. For the first time in USA history, Irina had the honour to be the first European judge nominated as “Favourite Judge of the Year” for two consecutive years in 2014 and 2015 by public vote in Scottsdale, Arizona, USA. Irina Stigler began breeding Arabian horses in 1998. She acquired some excellent broodmares, mostly Russian and Polish related. Irina owns her own farm in Northern Italy surrounded by the beautiful landscape of a National Park. The farm is located between Milan (Italy) and Lugano (Switzerland) near the famous Lake Como. All of her horses have National and/ or International titles. Irina’s motto is: "The good horses of yesterday will produce the good horses of tomorrow". She uses outcrosses to different breeding lines. Irina is an excellent rider and has participated in endurance competitions very successfully. Stigler Stud is proud to announce it is a home of International Champions who are winning in shows all over the globe. Our home-bred horses are competing on the highest level in the Middle Eastern countries, Europe and Russia. Stigler Stud has an exclusive collection of mares: daughters of legendary Padrons Psyche as well as granddaughters of Monogramm, Ekstern and Laheeb. A wonderful background, an amazing present and a brilliant future. Come and visit Stigler Stud, enjoy and experience! www.stiglerstud.com info@stiglerstud.com Instagram.com/StiglerStud Facebook.com/StiglerStud

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Stallions

Sharif Ibn Shaikh al Jabal Latifa x Shaikh El Sheriff by Teymur B Bred by Maya Jones Al Jabal Arabians, Switzerland

Photo/Ad design - Diana Cantey


Fathi Nur

by Farhoud Al Shaqab out of Pasha Kadeesha by Al Kidar

Salaa Maysan

by Salaa El Dine out of Mansoura I by Maysoun

E.A.O. Diab

by Tagweed out of Darweesha by Ibn Akhtal

Three of the Sebha Stud stallions carry significant bloodlines from Europe and one stallion, Diab, is from the Egyptian Agricultural Organization (E.A.O.). Diab is a son of the legendary Tagweed who passed away a few years ago. Sebha Stud treasures the bloodlines of El Zahraa Stud in Egypt. The goal at Sebha Stud is to use these varied bloodlines to produce authentic Arabian horse type, beautiful sculpted faces with large expressive eyes and nostrils, all of this combined with strong and well-balanced bodies, high tail carriage and powerful movement. At Sebha Stud we show our horses from time to time at select Arabian horse shows. We are planning to show S some of our beauties at the upcoming Egyptian Event in Cairo. Please contact us to schedule a visit with Sebha Stud:

Contact: Waleed Abdeen Sebha Stud Giza, Egypt Phone +20 111111 2205 Email: Waleed@sebhastud.com Facebook/Instagram: Sebha Stud


2019 FOALS

Qamar Sebha 2019 Filly by Fathi Nur out of Amirah Bint Bint Latifa

Fajr 2019 Colt by Fathi Nur out of Louloua Shaarawi

Wadah Sebha 2019 Colt by Salaa Maysan out of Shagaret El Dour

Kenz Sebha 2019 Colt by Sharif Ibn Shaikh out of Magic Majesta

We welcome your visit to see these and other outstanding foals at Sebha Stud Contact: Waleed Abdeen Phone +20 111111 2205 Giza, Egypt


Safir Tiba

Straight Egyptian Arabian Stallion Sired by Shah El Khorafi Out of Zina Tiba Owned & bred by Tiba Stud, Egypt

w w w . m o h a m e d a b d o . c o m


Hares Fayad - Publisher & Editor-in-Chief hares@firstavenuemagazine.com firstavenuemagazine.com


How to Make the Most of a Day in Cairo & a Week with the World’s Finest Straight Egyptian Arabian Horses Diana Cantey, Photojournalist On behalf of Arab Horse Couture & the E.A.O.

At

the invitation of the Egyptian Agricultural Organization (E.A.O.), fellow Arabian horse breeder, Maya Jones, photographer Paula Volpe, and I headed “home” to Egypt to attend the Egyptian National Championships and International ECAHO-B Show at El Zahraa Stud. I refer to it as “home” because to Arabian breeders, El Zahraa Stud is also known as the Egyptian Agricultural Organization, “The Place”, where Straight Egyptian Arabian horses originated. 21 SPRING 2020

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This historic farm is where the foundation horses in our pedigrees once resided along with those that influenced breeding programs around the world. I think back to our own horses that are important to our 20 year breeding program; the horses who were imported by Gleannloch Farms in the 1960s and 1970s, such as *Morafic who was imported in 1965, the Ansata and Babson imports. So many of the horses anyone reads about when referencing pedigrees, once resided at El Zahraa Stud. Maya and I had each independently visited El Zahraa Stud in years past, but for Paula it was a first-time trip to Egypt. This opportunity was in itself a very special one in that we were able to become more intimately involved with the show as media representatives. The show and horses are such an important part of Egypt’s treasures and we interacted with owners, breeders, horses and international guests each day. We enjoyed the farm visits, the food, comradery amongst breeders and the history and culture of Cairo. Before the show, we had one full day to immerse ourselves in the rich Egyptian culture by touring some of the popular sights. Our host arranged a siteseeing day for us just eight hours after landing. So we drank coffee, had a delicious breakfast at the hotel and met up with our driver and guide. If that wasn’t enough, we also added a visit to the pyramids light and sound show to finish off the evening. Egyptologist Nevin Morris acted as our tour guide. She took the five of us to the Egyptian Museum near Tahrir Square in downtown Cairo. The museum, which is also known as the Museum of Ancient Egyptian Civilizations, houses one of the world’s most significant collections of ancient artifacts dating back over 4,000 years. Nevin’s narration was not only great storytelling, her enthusiasm and passion for her country’s history and culture was captivating. It personalized the tour, making it both educational and fun. Nevin shared many stories, pointing out small details in the displays enabling us to have a better understanding of the people, rulers and way of life. From chariots to organ jars, there are over 120,000 items on display including the great mask of Tutankhamun, known as one of the most famous works of art in the world. The special room housing the collection of the 19-year-old boy king, “King Tut”, included two sarcophagi, one made of gold, the other gold-gilded wood, several cases displaying jewelry and items found in the same discovery. In our short time we looked at mummies, statues of pharaohs and hundreds of ancient artifacts that were found buried along with the deceased. Some tombs had multiple chambers, housing food, weapons, oils, and ointments, along with boats and chariots. Many items were stored for their journey to the afterlife. One exhibit caught my attention, a complete skeleton of a horse, a mare. She was located on the slope below the tomb and buried in a wooden coffin with a blanket and expensive bit.

Pet Mare Discovered in Senenmut Tomb

Cairo Museum

Egyptian Chariot

The mare was thought to belong to a member of the Senenmut family, or perhaps Senenmut himself, who may have wanted his horse in the afterlife. Senenmut was an 18th Dynasty ancient Egyptian architect and nobleman in Egypt, a close advisor to Queen Hatshepsut. In just a few short hours we experienced a fascinating look at art and history. With more adventures planned for the day, we headed to catch a boat to take a cruise on the Nile River. While on the tour, we snacked on delicious falafel sandwiches and enjoyed the beautiful scenery. Some of the architecture is very unique and includes the Revolutionary Command Council building that was converted to a Sofitel Hotel, and the Cairo Tower that used to be the tallest building in North Africa for more than 50 years.

Cairo Museum Building

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Our final event of the day was the popular pyramids evening sound and light show near the Giza pyramids and Sphinx. The hour long evening show was narrated by the Sphinx who told the history of the ancient Egyptians including famous figures such as Nefertiti and Tutankhamen. The three pyramids, Khufu, Khafra and Menkaure, were lit up in vivid colors capturing the imagination. Because we booked on such short notice, our show was narrated in Spanish! We were provided headsets to listen in English but it was a linguistic and technical challenge, actually a bit humorous. The headphones did not work properly, but thankfully I had seen the show during my previous trip and I just enjoyed the scenery. Revolutionary Command Council Building

Next was a quick walk through the famous Khan El Khalili Bazaar and Souq. It is located in the center of Cairo, teeming with craftsmen, souvenir shops, coffee houses and restaurants, a lively place that attracts many visitors. The architecture all around us was stunning and the mosques nearby gave us many interesting photo opportunities. We paid a visit to the Church of St. Sergius and Bacchus Church which is also known as Abu Serga in Coptic Cairo. It is one of the oldest Coptic Christian churches in Egypt dating back to the 4th Century and named after the Roman soldiers Sergius and Bacchus. They were martyred in Syria for their Christian faith in A.D. 296. The church was built over a cave where the Holy Family hid while fleeing the persecution of King Herod after the birth of Jesus. There is a well in the center of the floor from where they drank water.

By the time the show was over, we worked up an appetite so our guide Latif escorted us to a local Egyptian restaurant for some traditional food and good conversation. We were all tired but very stimulated after a full day of sightseeing. All of us were ready to head back to the hotel for a good night’s rest before heading to El Zahraa Stud in the morning to attend the first day of the Egyptian National Championship Horse Show.

We could have stayed there studying the impressive history, but time was of the essence. As there was still much to see, we pushed on to a shop selling perfumed oils where we enjoyed some conversation with the vendor and a cup of Turkish coffee. Here we learned about the different types of oils, their uses and that Pharaohs were often buried with jars of essential oils. In the tomb of King Tut, evidence of lotus flower essence was discovered. Found along the Nile River, the lotus flower became the symbol for upper Egypt. The physical and spiritual benefits of essential oils have roots deep in Egyptian history. It was a fascinating presentation and although tempting, I did not purchase any oils myself. However, Paula and Maya both took advantage of bringing some small bottles back home.

Khan El Khalili

Abu Serga

Pyramids Light & Sound Show 23

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Days 1 & 2 The Egyptian National Championships One of the most prestigious horse shows in Egypt, the Egyptian National Championships, takes place each November for horses registered at the E.A.O., at the state stud farm El Zahraa. El Zahraa Stud is a special place for Arabian breeders and enthusiasts from around the globe. Many visitors, including dignitaries, were in attendance traveling from Europe, Australia, the U.S.A., as well as several Middle Eastern countries including Kuwait, Saudi Arabia and the U.A.E. From new breeders to those with many years of experience, the show is an important venue for education, breed promotion, camaraderie and celebrating the Straight Egyptian Arabian horse. It affords an opportunity to not only meet with representatives of local breeding farms but also to evaluate the breeding stock from El Zahraa Stud. Although I had visited Egypt a few years prior, I was very excited to attend this show which was a great way to see some of the best horses from many different breeding programs in Egypt.

E.A.O. Stallion SHAFEA (Tagweed x Shafaat)

A special presentation of some of the fillies and mares took place on the first day of the show, colts and stallions on the second day. The presentations drew praise and applause as the quality of horses from the E.A.O. was outstanding. Noteworthy was the beautiful and very typey stallion “Shafea” with his huge black eyes. This striking son of the legendary “Tagweed” has a big role to play as a replacement for his sire. Tagweed, sired by Gad Allah (Adeeb x Omnia) and out of the beloved Tee (Adl x Bint Ibtisam), sadly passed away in 2018. He was considered one of the greats, truly a horse admired and loved by all. His pedigree was impressive and his female line traced back to the Queen of Egypt, Moniet El Nefous. He was a very important breeding stallion to the E.A.O., and to the world, siring outstanding quality foals. A Saqlawi in strain, he was ethereal and set a standard by which breeders strived for in their programs.

In addition, Tagweed’s pedigree is filled with stallions that were vitally important to the E.A.O. With stallions who produced great daughters, who in turn produced great sons: Morafic, Tuhotmos, (also Moniet El Nefous tail female) and Antar plus the beautiful El Sareei. When I saw Tagweed in 2017, I remember thinking how breeders in the U.S.A. needed a stallion of his quality and how breathtaking he was, with a smooth balanced body, large prominent eyes, dished head, beautifully sculpted ears and a lovely expression. I heard he sadly passed away the next year and knew it was a tremendous loss to the E.A.O. Shafea possesses many of the qualities of his sire and there is great optimism for him to make an impact in the future as a sire of significance. Many of the E.A.O. mares and stallions had nice pigment, large dark eyes, good bone, substance and excellent tail carriage. The crowd supported the presentations with cheers and applause. Another eye-catching stallion was “Wassaf” (Rawwah x Wagfa, Abayyan strain) and his bay son “Wefaq” (out of Di El Amar by Defaf). This handsome pair, presented together, exuded elegance and refinement. In the mare group, the dark black bay Defaf daughter “Dai El Kamar” (out of Maya) was a standout with her very sculpted head, huge nostrils and charisma. Heavy in foal, the snowy white “Kanrya” (El Ragel x Keshta) was light on the lead, prancing effortlessly around the arena. The young two-year-old “Gofoun” (Nour El Fagr x Galalh), a very attractive dark grey, had an amazing head. Several young fillies were presented, all of which were very promising. The quality of these and other horses at the E.A.O. are no surprise as they have extremely high breeding standards. Careful decisions are made regarding breeding and the offspring that do not meet the criteria are culled from the program. Only horses within the E.A.O. program are used and the program is closed to outside horses, keeping the gene pool tight to assure better breeding outcomes. Some offspring are sold in the E.A.O. El Zahraa Stud auctions giving the opportunity for breeders to incorporate blood into their programs; however, the “best of the best” are retained to guarantee quality at the E.A.O. With new technology and the advancements of freezing semen and oocytes, preservation is assured for the future.

E.A.O. Mare Dai El Kamar (Defaf x Maya)

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The atmosphere was lively, and in addition to the show, there were vendors selling food, horse halters, books, jewelry and equine feed representatives. Inside the arena there were brightly colored potted flowers arranged in two rows in center ring. This arrangement was to provide a designated area for the horses to be presented to the judges, banners promoting sponsors and ample seating for VIP and local guests. The judges for the first two days of competition at El Zahraa Stud for the National Championships were: Mrs. Irina Stigler, (Italy/Russia); Mr. Christian Moschini (Italy); Mrs. Berengere Fayt (Belgium); and Mrs. Reinhild Moritz (Germany). The media was abuzz interviewing VIP’s and preparing for the horses to enter the ring. In attendance were special guests and dignitaries from several countries including: Dr. Mona Mehrez, Deputy Minister of Agriculture for Animals, Fisheries and Poultry Affairs; State Minister for Rural Affairs, Minister Peter Hauk Baden-Wurttemberg; Dr. Astrid von Velsen-Zerweck, Manager of Marbach Stud, Germany; H.H. Sheikha Sarah Fahad Al Sabah of Kuwait; Mr. Peter Pond, President of WAHO and his wife Jenny; Mrs. Marion Richmond of Simeon Stud, Australia and her Farm Manager Tracey Garrison and past WAHO President and prominent breeder, Dr. Hans Nagel from Germany. Also in attendance were VIP guests from the United States, Austria, Greece and Switzerland, all excited about visiting the historic El Zahraa Stud, watching the show, enjoying the hospitality provided by the E.A.O., touring farms and the treasures of Egypt – the pyramids, Khan El Khalili and Sphinx. Fillies & Mares – Egyptian National Championship The first class of the two sections of yearling fillies came in, then exited, then were presented individually in two groups. This traditional presentation format went on throughout the rest of the two days, horses shown in order of birth year, youngest to oldest. The Egyptian police band performed after the first class was presented with their beautiful trophies.

The final Championship trophies were presented in the evening of the second day beginning with the Gold Champion Yearling Filly Rokya Rabab, a very feminine, leggy, good moving filly by Murtajab Al Nakeeb x the beautiful Dalia Rabab (GR Maarif x Mahala). She earned three 19.5 scores for head and neck and three 19 scores for movement as class winner. She was the clear favorite followed by Silver Champion yearling filly Kamilia Al Naseem and Bronze Ayat Rawdet El Rahman.

Rokya Rabab (Murtajab Al Nakeeb x Dilia Rabab) Breeder Marion Richmond from Australia, Dr. Osman, Chairman of the E.A.O. with Khaled Bin Laden and his wife

The Junior Fillies competition was very deep with several top contenders over three exciting classes. The three finalists in this really beautiful group were separated by just a few point differences in their scores. The Gold and Silver Champion Fillies, Nouf AAL Al Sabbah and Shakira Abou Gameaa (.5 points apart), are owned by Al Tarzy Stud (bred by AAL Al Sabbah Stud and Abou Gameaa Stud), and the Bronze Champion, winning by type, was Kammar Oony. A class winner and owned and bred by Mr. Kamal Mondi of Oony Stud, placing just .2 points from second.

Nouf AAL Al Sabbah (Gasir Al Rayyan x Hadeel Shawkat), GOLD Champion Filly & Shakira Abou Gameaa (Nashwan Saqr x Shahinaz Saqr) Silver Champion Filly with Al Tarzy Stud group

National Show Judges & Disciplinary Committee

The Senior Mare competition was a sweep for Rabab Stud, taking all three as owner/breeder. The Gold Champion Mare, Shahreyya Al Baidaa bred by Al Baidaa Stud and owned by Rabab Stud, was stunning. Her stablemates Dalaa Al Rabab (Silver Champion) and Aliaa Leila (Bronze Champion) were equally as lovely, all possessing great bodies, beautiful expressive faces, type and excellent overall quality. The highest scoring mare with a total of 91.3 points was the Bronze 25

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The Egyptian National Championship

Egyptian National Championship - Show Results


Champion mare Aliaa Leila, a bay beauty (Kenz Noor x Aisha by Royal). Tall and statuesque, she was a standout with lovely dark pigment, a smooth body and topline.

flamboyant Kasem Sakr who appeared to wow the crowd with his attitude and presence. Kasem Sakr earned one 20 point score for type and two 20 point scores for movement in his class earning an impressive total score of 92.7 points. Bred by Omar Sakr, Sakr Arabians, and owned by Al Tarzy Stud, he was the top stallion at the show. Earning a bronze was a son of Kasem Sakr, Sultan Kheir, owned by El Gamil Stud, bred by Kheir Stud, class winner for the Stallions 4-6-Year Old’s, with a score of 91.3 points.

GOLD, Silver & Bronze Champion Mares Shahreeya Al Baidaa, Dalaa Rabab & Aliaa Leila

Colts & Stallions – Egyptian National Championship The Yearling Colt Champion was the eye-catching Zopir Al Azab, a unanimous winner owned and bred by Torath Al Azab Stud. He won his class with impressive scores in type and movement. The Silver Champion was Negm Rawdet El Rahman owned and bred by Rawdet El Rahman Stud and Anbar El Ekhlass owned and bred by El Ekhlass Stud took the Bronze. All three of these colts were of exceptional quality. The Junior Colt Championship was also a unanimous decision awarding GOLD to the beautiful Magd Ezzaman bred by Maha Ibrihim of Ezzaman Stud and owned by Al Abhar Stud. Magd Ezzaman possessed beautiful trot and presence on the lead, with impressive scores. He edged out the younger Magd Oony in the body and topline scores; however, both were very lovely and with another year of maturity probably making the difference in the final judging decision. Magd Oony was the two-year-old class winner owned and bred by Oony Stud. The Bronze Championship went to Sadek Al Safenat owned and bred by Al Safenat Stud.

Magd Ezzama (Malik El Nil Al Sharbatly x Majara Al Qusar) Junior Colt GOLD Champion

The Senior Stallion Championship was a showdown between the elegant Laheeb El Ekhlass and the

Kasem Sakr (El Thay Kamil x Kismat Saqr) Senior Stallion GOLD Champion

SPECIAL AWARDS Rabab Stud – Best Owner, Best Breeder & Best Mare

Zopir Al Azab (Mareg Al Masry x Moniet El Nefous El Sheruk) Yearling Gold Champion

Sheikh Khaled Bin Laden of Rabab Stud took home the Gold in the Yearling Champion Filly Class and all three Championships in the Senior Mare Championship Class as well. In addition, Rabab Stud had class winners with Rokya Rabab (Yearling Fillies-1A), Ghalia Leila (Mares 4-6 YO Mares-4A), Dalaa Rabab (4-6 YO Mares-4B,), Aliaa Leila (7-9 YO Mares) and Shahreyya Al Baidaa (Mares Age 10+). He was the breeder of the Silver Champion Senior Mare Dalaa Rabab and received BEST OWNER, BEST BREEDER and BEST MARE awards.

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The famous dancing horse competition, with lively authentic Egyptian Mizmar Baladi Music, drew large crowds in the evening of the first day. The winner was the dark liver chestnut stallion Pebars adorned beautifully in contrasting green and gold tack. There were several beautiful horses in the competition and the crowd participated with clapping and cheering for their favorites. Trophy presentation Sheikh Khaled Bin Laden Best Owner & Breeder - Egyptian National Show

Al Tarzy Stud – Best Stallion Award Maged Al Tarzy of Al Tarzy Stud received the award for BEST STALLION with Kasem Sakr who was a stunning sight; big and bold, full of attitude and presence, he was captivating. Bred by Omar Sakr, Sakr Arabians, he is sired by El Thay Kamil and out of Kismat Sakr. It was great to see the Al Tarzy family out together celebrating their victory.

Al Tarzy Stud

Days 3 & 4 International ECAHO - B Show The 21st International ECAHO-B Show for Arabian horses (those registered in any recognized WAHO studbook) took place on the final two days at El Zahraa Stud. The judges for the international competition were: Mr. Holger Ismer, (Germany); Mr. Lucas Gozdzialski (Poland); Mrs. Joanne Lowe (Great Britain); and Mr. Richard Pihlstrom 27 SPRING 2020

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The Egyptian National Championship

(France). Approximately 100 horses were entered, and although some of the classes had a modest number of entries, the quality of the horses was exceptional. Judge Joanne Lowe commented the Straight Egyptian horses in the class held their own and the quality of “legs” was very good in this group of horses. “There was a bay foal colt who showed great potential for the future and the middle mare class had outstanding quality, all scoring 90 points or higher,” she stated.


The Gold Champion Filly Foal was Rayah Al Abhar (Ghazal Adel x Rabha Tahani) owned and bred by Al Abhar Stud. Samraa Al Mohandes (Daheem Al Mohandes x Muranas Nayla) was awarded the Silver Champion title owned and bred by Al Mohandes Stud and Khadeja Basiony (Mashhour El Gabry x Al Anoud Al Rasheed) the Bronze owned and bred by Basiony Stud.. Layla Desert Wind was awarded Fourth and Rawaa Oony Fifth place. This was a really beautiful group of youngsters who showed much promise as future show contenders and breeding stock. H.R.H. Prince Saud Bin Sultan Bin Saud Al Saud, owner of Mamlaka Stud, had a superb show string and his horses either won their classes or took second or third. He supported the show with over 20 horses and swept the Junior Filly and Colt Championship Classes taking all six trophies. He also won the Gold in the Senior Mare Championship Class and Bronze in the Senior Stallion Class.

Mamlaka Stud was the owner of the Silver Champion Senior Stallion GM Aiyad bred by Anton Marzell Stockle, (Germany), sired by WH Justice and out of Anissa. GM Aiyad is the sire of the Bronze Junior Champion colt Aiyad Al Mamlaka. The Senior Mare Championship was very competitive with the feminine and elegant younger mare Asia Al Mamlaka winning the Gold. Marwa Al Ameen, a good bodied mare with outstanding movement, earned one 20 point score for type and was awarded Silver. The exotic Ansata Sinan daughter, Nour Bint Eternity-D, received three 19.5 point scores for type and good leg scores finishing with the Bronze trophy. The unanimous Gold Champion Senior Stallion was the stunning Fakher Al Badeeah sired by Murtajab Al Nakeeb x Wahet Al Khair, bred by Mr. Said Khair of Jordan and owned by Hawazn Stud, Egypt. Silver was awarded to GM Aiyad and Bronze to Fakhr Al Mamlaka.

Noteworthy is the sire of several of the International ECAHO-B Show winners from Mamlaka Stud, PCF Vision, a statuesque and look-alike son of the multichampion stallion Marwan Al Shaqab out of Veronica GA by Versace and tracing on the tail female to Samia (E.A.O.). PCF Vision won U.S. National Champion Futurity Colt, Canadian National Reserve Champion Futurity Colt and Arabian Breeders World Cup Reserve Champion 3-Year-Old Colt and sired several U.S. winners including: PCF Crystal Vision, Region 17 Champion Yearling Filly and Scottsdale Champion 4-Year-old Mares ATH, Reserve Champion. Gold Champion Junior Filly Leen Al Mamlaka and Bronze Champion Manay Al Mamlaka were both sired by PCF Vision, as well as Gold Junior Colt Champion Fakher Al Mamlaka, Silver Champion Junior Colt Ghazy Al Mamlaka, the beautiful Gold Champion Senior Mare Asia Al Mamlaka and Bronze Champion Senior Stallion Fakhr Al Mamlaka.

International GOLD Senior Stallion Champion Fakher Al Badeeah (Murtajab Al Nakeeb x Wahet Al Khair)

Most Classic Head Female winners (All bred by Al Qasr Al Malaky Stud, Egypt): 265-Seham Al Qasr Al Malaky (Simeh El Sheruk x Thawra Hedayah) owned by Alqima Stud. 266-Raheba Al Qasr Al Malaky (Rayyan Albadeia x Alyaa Tahani) owned by Propaganda Stud. 267-Batoul Al Qasr Al Malaky (Imperial Baarez x Ayah Al Farida) owned by Propaganda Stud. Most Classic Head Male class winners: 269-Mansour El Sheruk (Moez Al Kaherah x Yosreia El Sheruk) bred by El Sheruk Stud and owned by Propaganda Stud, Egypt. 270-Karim Saqr (Ansata Marengo x Ansata Desert Queen) bred by Saqr Stud and owned by Propaganda Stud.

GOLD Champion Senior Mare - “Asia Al Mamlaka� International B Show

271-Negm Tahani (King Tahani x TB Qadifa) bred by Tahani Stud and owned by Alqima Stud.

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International ECAHO-B Show

H.R.H. Prince Saud Bin Sultan Bin Saud Al Saud, owner of Mamlaka Stud, received the honor of Best Owner and Breeder at the show. Several awards of appreciation were presented to sponsors: Show Manager, Dr. Naglaa Radwan, Manager of El Zahraa Stud; Dr. Dana Mehrez for her support; the judges and DC’s; and to show announcer, Yasmin Atieh.

H.R.H. Prince Saud Bin Sultan Bin Saud al Saud Best Owner & Best Breeder - International B Show

Junior Female Champion GOLD - LEEN AL MAMLAKA (PCF Vision x Baleena EB) Owned by AL MAMLAKA STUD

Presentation to El Zahraa Manager & Show Manager Dr. Naglaa Radwan - Award of Appreciation Senior Female Champion GOLD - ASIA AL MAMLAKA (PCF Vision x Amira Al Mamlaka) Owned by AL MAMLAKA STUD

Junior Male Champion GOLD - FAKHER AL MAMLAKA (PCF Vision x Ghaliyat Azbah) Owned by AL MAMLAKA STUD

Dr. Naglaa Radwan presents an Appreciation Award to Yasmin Atieh, Show Announcer

Photo: Ahmed Taha

Senior Male Champion GOLD - FAKHER AL BADEEAH (Murtajab Al Nakeeb x Wahet Al Khair) Owned by Hawazn Stud

Maya Jones & Diana Cantey receive an International Photojournalist Appreciation Award 29

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Days 5 - 7 Farm Visits & Egyptian Hospitality During the days that followed, we had the honor of visiting several breeding farms around Cairo. This is always a fun time where breeders and Arabian horse enthusiasts can gather, enjoy a meal and see some really lovely horses. Each farm has its own unique vision and breeding philosophy; however, all with the same goal of producing quality Straight Egyptians and some, purebred Arabians. Discussions ensued regarding bloodlines and family strains and all facets of horse shows plus ownership. The commonality of the love and passion for the horse was evident. There is a deep respect and admiration for breeders and it was great to see the camaraderie, not only at the show but also at the farms.

Ezzaman Stud

I met Maha Ibrihim at the Noble Festival in Lochem, The Netherlands in 2019, and looked forward to my next trip to Egypt to visit her farm and horses. We were able to spend time with her after the National Championship Show where two of her homebred horses achieved great success. Magd Ezzaman won the Gold Junior Champion Colt title and the lovely Shahd Ezzaman earned a Top Five in a very deep class of amazing 3-Year-Old Fillies. These wins were big victories for both Maha as the breeder and their owners, Al Abhar Stud.

Ezzaman Stud not only realized success in the show ring, but also as an international breeder. Maha became one of the first breeders to send Ezzaman-bred horses to Al Wakeel, the first official Arabian Stud in Iraq. This is a huge accomplishment for the small breeder with big goals and dreams. Two days of horse farm tours included Albadeia Stud, El Safinat Stud, Shaarawi Arabians, Al Tarek Arabians, Rabab Stud, El Badrawi Stud and Al Amin Stud. Our last day in Egypt was spent with a few additional breeders: Al Mousa Stud, Marmar Stud, Sebha Stud and an evening visit with Omar Sakr, Sakr Arabians. One can never see enough horses or spend enough time with friends. Each one of our visits was special in more ways than can be described.

Albadeia Stud

We weaved our way in and around the busy Cairo traffic each day which made for interesting conversation in the spacious vans that transported us to each farm. Upon the arrival at Albadeia Stud, I overheard the “ooh’s and ah’s” of some of the guests who had never been there before. It was easy to see why as the surroundings are enchanting. The large palm tree canopies, beautifully landscaped gardens, sunset colored stables adorned with colorful tiles and the ethereal snowy white horses peeking out of their windows, created the feeling of being in a dream.

Maha purchased her first breeding stock in 2006 and with patience, research and learning from established breeders, her farm is now in its third generation. She is breeding top quality show winning horses with amazing type, attitude, and presence. Although her facility is small, it is well laid out and comfortable for her herd of eight mares and her stallion. Her bloodlines originated from Al Sharbatly Stud, Birkhof Stud and Al Qasar Stud horses. Maha leased an outcross stallion from prominent breeder Talal Al-Mehri, owner of Al Jazira Stud, Kuwait, in partnership with two other breeders. Maha credits her success to having great mentors including Omar Sakr and the late Dr. Nasr Marei, both very successful and prominent breeders of Straight Egyptian horses that have global influence.

Halim Albadeia (Rayyan Albadeia x Haneen Albadeia, by Laheeb) Albadeia Stud

Maha with Champion Mare Sana Ezzaman (Malik El Nil Al Sharbatly x Sara Al Sharbatly)

The Marei family, the Farm Manager and Dr. Mohamed Hammad greeted the group and provided refreshments as the stallions were presented. We moved to the arena for the presentation of the mares, each one prancing, snorting and showing off for the guests who enjoyed sandwiches

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Al Safinat Stud

Owner Neshaat Hegazy’s stud is comprised of both purebred Arabian horses and Straight Egyptians. His breeding program has been in existence since the 1990’s. He purchased his first horse, an Arabian mare from El Zahraa Stud - E.A.O., and has since expanded, incorporating modern bloodlines into his herd. He is active in showing and his goal is to breed horses that can be used in all levels of competition. His presentation included several horses from his program including the striking chestnut son of Ajman Moniscione, Gajman PS, and a look-alike son of Marwan Al Shaqab, WH Kaneko. His young stock was very impressive, and noteworthy was the filly Ama Allah Al Safenat (Seef Al Safenat x Asia Al Safenat). She was led around the arena by her handler showing off her beautiful dished face, huge expressive eyes, and large nostrils. This filly was a great example of the quality at Al Safinat. There are a variety of bloodlines used from studs all over the world including Rothenburg Stud (GR), Imperial Egyptian Stud (USA), Al Shaqab Stud (Qatar) and Al Nakeeb Stud (UK). Lunch was served in a spacious room where some of his many trophies were on display from the successes of the stud.

Filly: Ama Allah al Safinat (Seef Al Safenat x Asia Al Safenat)

Shaarawi Arabians & Al Tarek Arabians

The highlight of the night was a presentation at the oasis known as Shaarawi Arabians. Having visited in 2017, I was very excited to return to see the jewels of this lovely farm, many of which I fell in love with during my previous visit. Although we arrived later than expected, a feast of large prawns and other delicious foods were prepared for the guests to enjoy after the presentation of the horses. The senior mares were paraded out first, followed by representatives of five distinct family strains including the beautiful chestnut mare Baraka Shaarawi, a Kuhaylan Krush. She was an eye-catcher, sired by Jabbar El Halimaar MH and out of the imported mare Maarjoraa MH from the Rancho Bulakenyo breeding program in the U.S.A. I seem to recall how much I admired her the last time I visited the farm. I was very excited to see Tarek Hamza’s new stallion, Fadeel El Tarek, a half-brother to the impressive Rebat Al Tarek who sadly passed away shortly after our visit. Fadeel El Tarek did not disappoint as he was the last horse presented. The guests were quite impressed with this lovely young stallion, a three-year-old who has tremendous presence, attitude and confidence. He was very mature for his age with a robust body and short back, excellent tail carriage, a well-set neck and a beautiful head. After admiring the offspring sired by his halfbrother, it will be exciting to see how he develops as a sire for the future. I was excited for Tarek as he was very impressive and I was thinking about how he would compliment my mares. It is always an enjoyable visit with the Shahwaari’s and Tarek Hamza who are all wellknown and highly respected breeders, true horse lovers and some of the most hospitable and generous friends.

Shahwaari Arabians: Baraka Shaarawi (Jabbar El Halimaar MH x Maarjoraa MH) Mares Parade 31

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and pastries. One horse after another glided across the arena, exuding quality, good bone and substance, beautiful expression and presence that are all part of the “type” we expect to see from a program that has been in existence for decades over three generations. Dr. Nasr Marei sadly passed away shortly after my visit in 2017, but I will never forget our discussions regarding bloodlines and his incorporating horses from other programs when he felt he needed outcrosses. Horses from Simeon Stud, Imperial Egyptian Stud, Ariela, Sakr Arabians and most recently Al Shaqab Stud, were used strategically; however, the classic type of the horses remained the same: large dark eyes and prominent jowls, tapered muzzles with large nostrils in addition to elegance and refinement. Dr. Nasr Marei was a friend to many and his program has a far reaching impact on breeders throughout the world.


Rabab Stud

Sheikh Khaled Bin Laden’s success at the Egyptian National Show was so impressive that I could not wait to visit his farm. He earned three of the four top awards including Best Breeder, Best Owner and Best Mare, with a powerful show string of the prettiest, and most wellconformed horses at the show. I think for me when I started looking at the horses and their pedigrees, I was most impressed he utilized a variety of Straight Egyptian bloodlines and his show horses are the quality that can win anywhere in the world. He has imported horses from Europe and the U.S.A., and also to Egypt for Rabab Stud’s breeding program, including: Imperial Safama by (Ibn Safinez x Imperial) IM Wassama and Romeo Al Amaar, son of Amaar (Al Rayaan x Imperial Maysama). Class winner Aliaa Leila, who was awarded Best Mare at the show, was stunning and is sired by Kenz Noor and out of Aisha by Royal sired by Royal Colours. A maternal half-sister to Aliaa Leila, class winner Ghalia Leila by Amori Rabab (Al Lahab x Mahala) and out of Aisha by Royal (Royal Colours) is also another example of the breeding success at Rabab. This amazing mare is powerful with all the qualities any breeder would admire.

Egyptian food in the lodge over the stables which was built for guests to enjoy a view of the horses.

El Badrawi Stud

A good friend of mine told me that I would enjoy the visit to Mohamed Badrawi’s farm and that he knows bloodlines and pedigrees better than anyone. With that in mind, I was excited to see the farm on our tour list. Mohamed is in his fifth generation of breeding and his roots run deep. I was amazed to learn that at the end of the 19th century, his maternal Grandfather Mahmoud Pasha El Ettrebi, founded the stud. He was considered one of the best breeders in all of Egypt and gifted two of his stallions to El Zahraa Stud. He and his paternal Grandfather, El Sayed Pasha, were the founders of the Royal Agricultural Society which is now the E.A.O.

Neama Badrawi (Baydoun E.A.O. x Kamar Badrawi)

Ghalia Leila (Amori Rabab x Aisha) Class Winner Egyptian Nationals 4-6 YO Mares & Top Five (4th) in Senior Mares Championship

Aisha by Royal was a successful show filly in Italy and he saw great potential in her. The farm itself is a beautiful haven amidst date palm groves and attractive landscaping. Having learned that Sheikh Khaled Bin Laden is an architect, his vision in designing an attractive yet functional facility with form-to-function serves multiple purposes. He not only has an extensive breeding facility, but also a full equestrian center for show jumping and dressage competitions. He is also involved in the training of dancing horses and has won numerous competitions with them. We walked around the facilities, stopping along the way for discussions about horses and breeding. Bright colored domes could be seen atop the buildings which allowed for airflow. The barns and grazing areas were designed for the horses to thrive in a more natural, open environment. We enjoyed a buffet lunch of authentic

The Badrawi family is dedicated to the preservation of quality Straight Egyptian Arabians and this was evident in the horses he showed in the presentation. I was excited to meet Fatma Hamza, also a well-known and respected breeder and great family friend to the Badrawi family. A large group gathered together to enjoy beverages and a very impressive group of stallions, mares and youngsters from the program. I noted that his focus was on specific families such as those descending from Moniet El Nefous (Saqlawi), Farida (Dahman) and Maysa (Abayyan). Afterwards, we snacked on sandwiches and pastries, talked more about breeding and bloodlines while one of the guests’ children enjoyed a pony ride.

Al Amin Stud

One of the highlights of our trip was a visit with Mr. Mohamed Amin of Al Amin Stud. After a trip of a lifetime to visit him in 2017, it felt like coming home to family. He and his lovely Farm Manager and Veterinarian, Dr. Noora Faawzy, greeted the road-tired guests and immediately provided refreshments as the horses were getting prepared for the presentation. I truly admire this breeding program and the type of horses bred here. Mr. Amin uses many different bloodlines from Egypt and Europe, with a focus on the Dahman and Saqlawi family strains. He imported horses from the stud of Peter Gross of Germany, including

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Al Amin also has black breeding lines through the Simon Sadik son DF Samid who is out of the Classic Shadwan daughter Sanaa Bint Shahlia and a Hadban strain. I was

very impressed with the colts and stallions, some of the best we had seen during the trip. It was no coincidence that it was the same female line from each that caught my attention, Molesta I. Ahlam Al Amin, his son Ashhab Al Amin by Amal El Khaled (by Ansata Safeera), his full brother Adam Al Amin, Borhan Al Amin, by Shaah El Khorafy (by Ezz Ezzain) were all from the Molesta I line, through the mare Omneya El Hayah by Sheikh El Araby. Dinner was served after the presentation which consisted of authentic Egyptian cuisine and nice conversation. A visit to Al Amin Stud is always educational and interesting with wonderful hospitality.

Al-Mousa Arabians

Abdullah Al Mousa started riding horses at the pyramids area in 1983 getting to know breeders and visiting their farms to buy horses to ride. He fell in love with a sixmonth-old filly owned by Hosny Abdu named, “Nawarat Al-Waha” (Atared x Safwa), and purchased her. In 1991 he bought another mare, an E.A.O. bred mare named “Memphis” (Wasel x Abha). It was after this he met the highly respected and admired breeder Mrs. Wegdan Hanem El Barbary from whom he bought a filly called “Set El-Helween” (Adl x Nirvana).

Bint Bint Mahboubah (Abbas Pasha I x Bint Maboubah)

Abdullah’s herd-building continued and he bought a stallion named “E.A.O. Aggour” (E.A.O. Rashdan x E.A.O. Owayedat). He became the main stallion for Al-Mousa farm and sired many beautiful foals. He was presented to us during our visit and was very elegant and old-world style, a Saqlawi with a lovely head, tippy ears and nice eyes, a balanced body with excellent bone and substance.

Photo: Paula Volpe

Al Amin Stud: Dr. Noora Faawzy, Diana Cantey, Mr. Mohamed Amin & Maya Jones

E.A.O. Aggour (E.A.O. Rashdan x E.A.O. Owayedat)

DF Samid (Simeon Sadik x Sanaa Bint Shahlia)

As future breeding decisions were made, he bred Set El Helween to the stallion “E.A.O. Beltagi” (E.A.O. Adeeb & E.A.O. Barakesh), owned by Mrs. El-Barbary, and the result was an amazing colt named “Al-Moushahar”. He was retained as the second stallion for the program. Mrs. Wedgan was a great friend and mentor to Abdullah and assisted him with many facets of breeding. Later he added 33

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two full sisters, Moheba II and Malika by Ghazal (Nazeer x Bukra) and out of Malacha (El Sareei x Moheba). The influence of these great mares has impacted the horses bred by Al Amin Stud. With some outcrossing to other pedigrees with Ruminaja Ali, Sakr bloodlines, Ansata Hejazi and Halim Shah plus E.A.O. stallions, the stud is seeing some outstanding quality being produced.


“Shahrazad” (Maddah & Alf Leila Wa Leila) from Rabab Stud. Sheikh Khalid Bin Ladin and Mrs. El-Barbary shared her dam “Sharbat”, the daughter of Wasfia. Dr. Mansour Al Naggar oversaw the farm veterinary duties and helped choose the best E.O.A. stallions for the AlMousa mares. He has been blessed with great colleagues and friends on the farm and lovely people outside the farm for whom he is grateful. Sadly, both Mrs. Wegdan El Barbary and Dr. Al Naggar have passed away, but with their previous help and support, Al-Mousa Stud is thriving today as a top breeder of quality Straight Egyptian Arabian horses in Egypt.

Al Mousa” (Al-Moushahar Al-Mousa x Marzoukah AlMousa). He has an amazing face with large, expressive eyes, beautiful dish and small shapely ears, beautiful neck set, excellent tail carriage and a balanced body. He was harmonious and enchanting with the environment around us. We enjoyed all of the horses and our time at the beautiful paradise known as Al-Mousa Stud.

Marmar Stud

We had the good fortune to meet Iman El-Essawy, a lovely Egyptian woman and friend to Abdulla Al-Mousa, who accompanied us to his farm. While there, she offered us the opportunity to visit her farm as well. We were very excited to see her horses and learn about her breeding program which is also founded on E.A.O. bloodlines. She rents a 15-stall barn with a studio that overlooks the Sakkara Pyramid and Abusir Pyramids. This picturesque facility is ideal for her small program which is now in its fourth generation of breeding. Her philosophy is simple, “quality over quantity”, to maintain a small group of wellbred mares with emphasis on preserving the identity and heritage of authentic Straight Egyptian horses.

Al Mousa (Al-Moushahar Al-Mousa x Marzoukah Al-Mousa).

Beautiful background & landscape

Abdullah’s farm is a beautiful paradise with a bit of southwestern flair. We walked through the tall palms into a beautiful lawn where flamingos walked in front of giant ferns. Large cactus, ceramic pots and beautiful yellow flowers adorned the landscape. One of the fillies presented was the beautiful dark grey, “Ghada Al-Mousa” (AL-Moushahar Al-Mousa x Nayfa Al-Mousa) who we saw compete in the first Egyptian National Championship Yearling Filly Class making the Top Five, placing fourth in her group. She is very tall and elegant with a beautiful head and neck. A stallion who really had the “wow factor” and was one of my favorites on the farm visits was the ethereal “Al-Moughtar

Iman El-Essawy “Sharbaat Rabab” (ZT Malhaah x Kahramanah Rabab)

Iman El-Essawy focuses on four family strains and bloodlines: Saqlawi (Moniet El Nefous), Hadban (Kamla and Yousria), Dahman (Bint Boukra) and Obayyan (Wasfia). The horses bring her great joy and have allowed her to meet some great breeders such as Mrs. Wegdan ElBarbary who would become her mentor and dear friend. She purchased her first filly Marmar SEA (Set El-Hosen II E.A.O. by Karawah x Bahraweya x Al Masry E.A.O. by Adl x Bint Misr), from Mrs. El-Barbary of Shams El-Asil

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Farm Visits & Egyptian Hospitality

Stud, and later named her farm “Marmar” in her honor. As we walked through the stables, we were introduced to her lovely horses and had the opportunity to take some photos of her with her beautiful bay Abayyan mare, “Sharbaat Rabab” (ZT Malhaah x Kahramanah Rabab), who carries the blood of Imperial Madheen and Shaikh Al Badi on the sire’s side and goes back to Wasfia on the tail female line. We enjoyed sipping our tea and taking in the views of the pyramids around this lovely farm.

Rabab Abdeen of Sebha Stud & Maya Jones “Fay Soraya” (Shaikh El Sherif x Fay Sabeena)

Pictured left to right: Paula Volpe, Diana Cantey, Iman El-Essawy & Maya Jones

Sebha Stud

We made a special trip to visit a few horses bred by Maya, who now reside at Sebha Stud. Owned by Waleed Abdeen and his lovely wife Rabab, they specialize in breeding quality Straight Egyptian Arabian horses. Unfortunately, Waleed was away, but we were still welcomed to come for what turned out to be a birthday surprise party for Maya. This beautiful facility is now home to her two stallions and two mares who left Switzerland and now call Egypt home: the beautiful black stallion “Sharif Ibn Shaikh al Jabal” by Shaikh El Sherif (Shaikh Al Badi) and out of Latifa by Teymur B; an own son of Salaa El Dine “Salaa Maysan” out of Mansoura I by Maysoun; and the Abayyan mare “Fay Soraya” (Shaikh El Sherif x Fay Sabeena) and “Amirah Bint Bint Latifa” (Nedschd Amir Ibn Montasar x Rheemah Al Jabal). Another stallion of significance was presented, “Diab”, an only son of the

Stallion: “Diab” (Tagweed x Darweesha by Ibn Akhtal)

legendary Tagweed and out of Darweesha by Ibn Akhtal, out of Dahsha who traces in tail female back to Ghazeih, a Saqlawi Jindraniyah of Ibn Sudan. Tagweed sadly passed away and his loss was felt by many as he was a very important stallion at the E.A.O., one of the best sires of his time. We enjoyed mango cake and beverages while watching foals romp and play as they were turned out for the presentation. Sebha Stud’s facility is stunning with lovely architecture, spacious paddocks and picturesque palm trees. Our visit was short as we had one last stop on our way back to the hotel to pack for our journey home. 35

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Sakr Arabians

One simply does not go to Egypt and not stop and see some of the best Straight Egyptian horses on the planet. Although it was late, we were welcomed by Omar Sakr for a coffee and glance at some of the superstars at Sakr Arabians. Omar Sakr has been deeply influential in the world of Straight Egyptian Arabians. He has been a dedicated breeder for almost three decades and is involved with the Pyramid Society U.S.A., in addition to co-Founder and Chairman of the Pyramid Foundation in Egypt. He is directly responsible for the Egyptian Event Cairo Show for Straight Egyptian horses, a highly successful show that is now in its third year.

Story and photos (unless otherwise noted) by Diana Cantey, freelance photojournalist, professional photographer and videographer. Diana’s photos appear in several Arabian horse breed journals covering shows and events in the United States and abroad. She and her husband Duane have raised Straight Egyptian Arabian horses in central Arkansas for over twenty years. Contact: diana.cantey@yahoo.com zajaddiegyptianarabians.com

Horses bred by Sakr Arabians are global ambassadors having earned World Champion titles, most recently with Adham Saqr, Bronze Champion Senior Stallion at the Salon du Cheval, Paris in 2019, owned by El Farida Stud. The ethereal Kasem Sakr won the title of Gold Champion Stallion at the Egyptian National Show, and for his owners Al Tarzy Stud, BEST STALLION award.

Kasem Sakr (El Thay Kamil x Kismat Saqr)

Omar’s farm and horses are amazing. Every one of them are what breeders dream about; huge black expressive eyes, dark pigment under snowy white coats, heads sculpted and dished, strong bodies and good feet, tails set high like fountains. His vision as a breeder, knowledge and understanding of form to function, pedigrees and genetics is evident in his program. The Sakr influence can be found at farms all over Egypt and throughout the world. As we loaded into our van and headed back to the hotel to pack, we reminisced about our day, the scenery, amazing horses, all the lovely breeders and how we were looking forward to returning soon. We appreciated the hospitality afforded to us on the trip from friends new and old, from the breeders who hosted us at their farms: Dr. Khaled Osman, Chairman of the E.A.O., Dr. Naglaa Radwan, Manager of El Zahraa Stud, and to Noha Saber, Executive Secretary, E.A.O., in addition to Marco and Elena Vignato of Arabian Essence and to our outstanding guides, Nevin Morris and her husband Latif. Egypt will always be a special place and I look forward to returning “home” again soon. 36 Arab Horse Couture

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info@carbookmagazine.com carbookmagazine.com


Queen of Al Ward Arabians by Judith Wich-Wenning NK Nakeebya is a true dream mare: A flea-bitten beauty with large, remarkably expressive eyes, huge nostrils, a beautiful dish, and splendid, floating movements. With her excellent type, she overall exemplifies the dry look of the desert. NK Nakeebya is the queen of Al Ward Stud. She developed into the most important foundation mare of this prestigious stud farm, situated in Kuwait.

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NK Nakeebya (NK Hafid Jamil x Nabilah)

NK Nakeebya and her genetic background NK Nakeebya was born at Dr. Hans-Joachim Nagel’s Katharinenhof in Northern Germany in 2000. NK Nakeebya was an immediate eye-catcher through her beautiful face and extreme head. When she was 1.5 years old, Usamah Al-Kazemi of Ezzain Arabians, Kuwait was fascinated by the exotic filly and bought her for his stud farm. NK Nakeebya developed into an elegant broodmare and produced several excellent babies for Ezzain Arabians. In 2010, Mr. Saleh Al-Terkait from Al Ward Arabians purchased NK Nakeebya. A new, exciting chapter started for his stud farm. NK Nakeebya’s father NK Hafid Jamil (Ibn Nejdy x Helala) is a stallion like no other. Being of unique and extreme type, he looks like he just stepped out of an orientalist painting. NK Hafid Jamil is a living piece of art with his refined face, tippy ears, and exuberant pride. He seems to be fully aware of the enormous fascination he has on spectators. NK Hafid Jamil has the true aura of a desert animal. “At all times, he showed himself with a presence and pride of a king, fiercely taking in his surroundings and alert. Those who were skeptical and doubted him at the beginning, came to love him and wanted one of his foals, particularly when they had seen the extraordinary quality of the foals of both sexes that he sired. A handful of enlightened breeders recognized him immediately as a new creation, an Arabian who would have a very special and exciting future and a stallion likely to change the breed for the better. He was the best gift ever to Katharinenhof from the Dahman family, and he has already proven himself as an extraordinary sire by producing some of the most beautiful colts and fillies imaginable, both for Katharinenhof and for other breeders," his famous breeder Dr. Hans-Joachim Nagel relates.

NK Hafid Jamil’s pedigree is impeccably bred. He is a Dahman Shawan, descending from the Bukra-line (Sabah family). He is linebred to Salaa El Dine and has several lines to Hanan and Bukra in his pedigree. No wonder that he is an excellent sire stamping his progeny. Among his world-famous sons and daughters are for example: Jamal El Dine, NK Kamar El Dine, NK Nadeer, NK Qaswarah, NK Nadirah, etc. NK Nakeebya’s pedigree combines unique matriarchs, for example: Helala, Ghazala, Ameera, Lutfeia and boasts several lines to immortal Hanan. NK Nakeebya’s dam was NK Nabeelah (Nahaman x Nashua). NK Nabeelah turned out to be one of the most productive mares at Dr. Nagel’s Katharinenhof. She was a snow-white beauty who enchanted everybody who saw her. NK Nabeelah went back to the Hadban Enzahi family. The Hadban Enzahi strain has contributed important broodmares and excellent sires to Arabian horse breeding. This was also the dam line of the “Millennium Stallion” Nazeer and of prominent Aswan. NK Nabeelah descended from the Kamla line, an important family through, for example, the famous stallion Hadban Enzahi. He was the main sire at the German State Stud of Marbach and stamped the breeding program there. Researching further back in NK Nakeebya’s pedigree, her dam line goes back to Bint Hadba El Saghira. She was a chestnut mare born in 1912 at the Kubba Stables of the Khedive Abbas Pasha Hilmi II. Bint Hadba El Saghira was purchased by the R.A.S. (Royal Agricultural Society) of Egypt. She became the foundation mare of a very prolific and important family. NK Nabeelah was out of the important Lotfeia family. This dynasty is famous for their wonderful character, short and broad heads with concave profiles, large round eyes, big nostrils and short

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Haddar Ezzain (NK Qaswarah x NK Yasmin) Photo: Gigi Grasso

mouths. Typical is also an excellent, high tail carriage. NK Nabeelah had very dark pigmentation, no markings and extreme type. When Dr. Nagel selected the foundation stock for his stud farm, Lotfeia (Alaa El Din x Bint Kamla) was recommended to him by Dr. Ameen Zaher. He was the official breeding advisor at El Zahraa Stud in Egypt at that time. Lotfeia (also spelled “Lutfia”) was an exquisite, very refined mare. In her pedigree the blood of Shaloul was doubled – a key to success. Lotfeia founded a most remarkable family at the Hungarian State Stud of Bàbolna before being imported to Germany by Dr. Nagel. Here again she turned out to be a most valuable broodmare. When asked about NK Nakeebya, her breeder Dr. HansJoachim Nagel explains: “In order to tell the story about

The �ueen - NK Nakeebya

NK Nakeebya, one has to start a bit earlier with Nashua, her grandmother. Amongst all Katharinenhof mares, the chestnut mare Nashua was the most beautiful which was ever born in this stud, and to find a similarly exquisite mare seems to be impossible. She became one of the four foundation mares of Katharinenhof; normally Lotfeia, a Hadban-mare is mentioned, but in fact Nashua, her only daughter, continued this Hadban-line in the stud. She was a daughter of Salaa el Dine, well known everywhere. Nashua was bred three times to Nahaman, a Salaa el Dine son out of Ameera (Obayan-mare) and she was bred three times to Adnan, a Salaa el Dine son out of Gazalla, another Obayan mare. From these two combinations, each time three foals were born which means three Nahaman daughters and three Adnan daughters. All these six daughters were, according to her breeding, half-sisters. Then regrettably Nashua died at an age of only 11 years. Her daughters, however, were very fortunate; they were all fertile and created the largest branch of a Hadban family in all Egyptian breeding. Nabeela was Nashua’s second daughter, her sire Nahaman was a strong, well-built horse of good size and of dark grey color. She was the nicest and most elegant of the three Nahaman-foals. From her Father she inherited the size of her body, her height and topline. From her Mother, the refinement, elegant and exquisite head, a perfect combination. And not only that, she was by far the best producer amongst her three full-sisters. She exactly fit the definition of a first-class broodmare, which means to give good foals from different stallions. She was bred to NK Hafid Jamil, to NK Nadeer, Jamal el Dine and Adnan. All her foals from this breeding were of excellent quality. 41

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Muhanned Alward (NK Qaswarah x NK Nakeebya) Photo: Jennifer Ogden

The first daughter of this outstanding NK Nabeela was NK Nakeebya. She was as well the first daughter of NK Hafid Jamil. It happened that this time the size and height came from the Mother's side and both sire and dam gave Nakeebya her beautiful face. Mr. Usamah Al Kazemi purchased Nakeebya at an early age. He was insisting on having this nice filly in his wonderful stables in Kuwait. There she started her own career. Al Ward Stud Al Ward Stud is a beautiful, picturesque stud farm located in Wafra, an oasis in the South of Kuwait. The farm is owned by Mr. Saleh Al-Terkait. He founded Al Ward Stud in 2009 by importing Straight Egyptian horses from Egypt. Afterwards he started to become fascinated by the Arabians from Dr. Nagel’s Katharinenhof and changed the direction of his breeding program. Mr. AlTerkait is intrigued by the elegance, refinement, and enormous type of Dr. Nagel’s horses. They come closest to his personal ideal. At the moment, Mr. Saleh Al-Terkait owns around 40 Straight Egyptians. They descend from carefully selected bloodlines with a clear emphasis on Dr. Nagel’s horses. Huge fountains adorn the well-tended premises of Al Ward Stud. Seeing the silver herd of broodmares prancing in their paddock is a breathtaking sight. NK Nakeebya’s influence NK Nakeebya has created a dynasty of her own. She is a very productive mare. So far, she has given birth to thirteen foals. Four of them were born at Ezzain Arabians, nine of them at Al Ward Stud. Bred to Ansata Al Murtajiz she foaled famous Nabaweyah Ezzain. This striking bay mare was bred by Usamah Al Kazemi (Ezzain Arabians). She became Gold Champion Senior Mare at the 2010 H.H. Sheikh Faisal Bin Hamad Al Khalifa National Arabian Horse Show in Bahrain. Nabaweyah Ezzain is today owned by Al Rashediah Stud, Bahrain. Her son Naseem Al Rashediah (by Al Adeed Al Shaqab) is a very successful

show horse as well. He was crowned unanimous Gold Champion Colt at the Egyptian Event Europe in 2016. In the same year, he was unanimous Champion Colt at the Straight Egyptian World Championships in Milano. In 2017 he was named Silver Medal Champion Junior Males at the prestigious show in Menton. At Al Ward Arabians, NK Nakeebya produced nine foals so far. All of them were kept by Al Ward. Especially breathtaking is Muhannad Alward (by NK Qaswarah), a rich bay stallion of a special quality. With his refined chiseled head and his extreme type, he is a beauty to behold. Bred to Noorreddine Ezzain, Ansata Almurtajiz and Dahes Al Rayyan, NK Nakeebya produced fantastic offspring as well. The mares Janna Alward, Nakeebya Alward, Safeyya Ezzain, Rawwa Alward, Noor Alward, and Noora Alward are precious pearls in the broodmare band of Al Ward Stud. Also, the second generation, NK Nakeebya’s grandchildren, are very refined and noble. Her granddaughter Elzzainn Alward (Dahes Al Rayyan x Safeyya Ezzain) for example is a very typey and elegant young mare. Standing in the sunlight at the beautiful premises of Al Ward, she looks like a sculpture coming to life. NK Nakeebya has already founded a legacy of her own. She is a mare who would have inspired poets in ancient times. For her and her progeny, the following old saying seems fitting: “The wind of heaven is that which blows between a horse’s ears.” About the Author: Straight Egyptian Arabian Owner and Breeder, Judith Wich-Wenning, is a freelance photographer and journalist and works for numerous Arabian horse magazines around the world. Moreover, she is the author of the highly acclaimed book “Jewels of the Desert - The Magic of Egyptian Arabians”, published by Orienta Publications. Judith Wich-Wenning, Orienta Arabians, Germany: judithwich@t-online.de

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Muhanned Alward (NK Qaswarah x NK Nakeebya) Photo: Jennifer Ogden

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El Zahraa Stud Historical State Stud of Egypt & E.A.O.'s Treasure

An Interview with: Dr. Khaled Osman Chairman of the Egyptian Agricultural Organization Written by Diana Cantey of Zajaddi Egyptian Arabians - USA In collaboration with Maya Jones of Al Jabal Arabians - Switzerland

Photo by: Paula Volpe

W

Pictured: Dr. Khaled Osman, Diana Cantey & Maya Jones

hile at the El Zahraa Show, we had the opportunity to interview Dr. Khaled Osman, Chairman of the Egyptian Agricultural Organization (E.A.O.). After our warm welcome and introductions, we were escorted to the historic office where many dignitaries and noteworthy breeders once visited. An interview was arranged and filmed by Elena Vignato, a representative of Arabian Essence, who, along with her father Marco, provided show promotion through video production on the Arabian Essence website.

Dr. Osman: I am the Chairman of the E.A.O., which El Zahraa Stud belongs to, and I am glad to be meeting during our annual event, the Egyptian National Championship and the 21st International Championship; our horse beauty show. Glad to have you join us for this event at this ancient place. Diana Cantey: Dr. Osman, can you tell us how you came to be the Chairman of the E.A.O.?

Dr. Osman: I am a Scientist at the Agricultural Research Center and my career is in Animal Science, in particular animal reproduction/artificial insemination and embryo transfer. I conducted a scientific Egyptian Buffalo Breeding Research Study at the University of Florida at Gainesville and I enjoyed my time there. I was supervised by two scientific pioneers who had travelled the world. I came back to Egypt and was nominated to direct

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the Animal Reproduction Research Institute. I spent three years there, then took the responsibility of Chairman of Animal Wealth Sector at the Ministry of Agriculture. Finally, I am here as Chairman of the E.A.O.; however, this is a very brief explanation. We are honored you are here. Diana Cantey: We just experienced one of the best Arabian horse shows here at El Zahraa. I can say as a breeder of 20 years, the quality of horses here was absolutely amazing. The presentation of the E.A.O. stallions and mares was outstanding. Their pride, quality and beauty ensure they are some of the best in the world. Maya Jones: It is an honor and pleasure to be at this place, to see the horses and the heritage where it all began. We experienced the event and we are seeing some amazing horses. Dr. Osman, what are the plans for the next show? Dr. Osman: We are carrying on an ambitious “multi-faceted” program by preparing for this show every year held in November. We hope the show will return to what I refer to as the "Days of Glory of the E.A.O." Each year it is better and more developed than the previous year. We exert a lot of effort to enhance and keep the Arabian horse, that is the main task of El Zahraa Station. We are proud that you can find Arabian horses all over the world that list their roots as started from El Zahraa Stud. Diana Cantey: Do you have future plans for any collaborations with small breeders or other international shows? Dr. Osman: We already collaborate with organizations and breeders as this is very typical for us. We consider breeders as the cornerstone of this big investment, not just a hobby, so we cooperate with all the organizations. Our recent collaboration was to be the host for the ECAHO DC course during our show as well as opening the door to El Zahraa Stud youth veterinarians for skills improvement, directed by two ECAHO senior coaches: Mrs. Jacqueline Vandyke and Dr. Laura Mascagne. I am currently working on establishing cooperation with Germany. It has already begun via a meeting with the Minister for Rural Affairs of Baden Wurttemberg, Mr. Peter Hauk and Dr. Astrid Velsen Marbach, Farm Director. Diana Cantey: The stands were full today with the colts and stallions showing. The crowds were very excited, cheering and supporting these future breeding horses. The quality was amazing, the beauty, charisma, movement and presence, you

Photo by: Mohab Elshiat

HASEM

(Rawwah x Mobtasema)

‫حا سم‬

) ‫ مبتسمة‬X ‫(رواح‬ 47

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could feel the electricity. Dr. Osman: I am happy to hear this from you. What you see in this presentation is a clear example of “practice makes perfect”, a saying which throughout the ages has had a great impact on humanity. Looking across El Zahraa Stud's history, you will notice many great people, remarkable institutions and noble endeavors. All this contributes to EL Zahraa Stud’s shine, with its remarkable history and track-line of supreme Arabian horses. Diana Cantey: The show was a crowd pleaser and the handlers this year were also very good. Dr. Osman: I am glad to hear this as the Show Organizing Committee planned for this success. The show came after long arrangements and considerations to resolve any errors or problems concerning the handlers’ performance during the show. Also, we are preparing to do training for handlers here in the near future. Maya Jones: Could you elaborate please regarding educational programs at El Zahraa Stud? Dr. Osman: One of our activities in this place is to teach breeders how to breed, in addition to how to raise and deal with diseases. Also, one of the areas of concern is the veterinary care at El Zahraa Stud. With the increasing number of horses, the availability

Photo by: Diana Cantey

WEFAK

(Wasaf X Dai El Amar)

‫وفاق‬

‫ض‬ ) ‫� القمر‬ ‫ ي‬X ‫(وصاف‬

of knowledgeable and experienced veterinarians is lagging behind. My plans in regard to making information and training available is one of the most important areas to be addressed, the veterinary care both here at El Zahraa Stud and at private farms. We need to have proper and effective medicines and proper training for the veterinarians. Protocols will be established with other countries in Europe so that we may take advantage of any advances being made. We will be able to have an exchange of veterinarians, farriers, trainers and even grooms. It is essential that people learn to do their jobs with the latest knowledge and techniques. Maya Jones: Has your breeding philosophy changed or is it the same as 20-30-40 years ago? Dr. Osman: This is a key area that is on the minds of all Egyptian Arabian breeders. It is widely acknowledged that the E.A.O. has most definitely had a tremendous amount of prestige and command of the breeding worldwide. We develop breeding plans each year; our final target is to keep the families and the lines. This is the main task of El Zahraa Stud. On the other hand, we follow, as any horse farm, a culling and selection process which is one of the most important activities that should be done perfectly, scientifically and technically. I do my best in that way as we have a strict breeding plan to keep lines and special families in the E.A.O.

Photo by: Diana Cantey

WASSAF

(Rawwah x Wagfa)

‫وصاف‬

) ‫ وجفة‬x ‫(رواح‬

El Zahraa Stud had a great number of excellent mares such as: "Tee" who was the daughter of two of our most well-known horses, Adl and Bint Ibtisam. She was regarded by many as the "Queen

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of El Zahraa Stud". We also have some strong old bloodlines carrying through in Dahshana (Dahsha x Ibn Akhtal), Tayees (Tee x El Ragel), Zahwah (Aleyat x Serag El Din) and Semeramis (Sergana x Adl). Diana Cantey: It is my understanding the E.A.O. grants availability of select horses to the outside from El Zahraa Stud. How are local and outside breeders able to purchase E.A.O. horses to continue the heritage outside of Egypt? Dr. Osman: Quality is the most important matter for the breeder looking for E.A.O. horses. The last auction sales of El Zahraa Stud for purebred Arabian horses exceeded 15 Million Egyptian Pounds. E.A.O. auctions, which are held three times annually at El Zahraa Stud, were successful in creating the last auction as a new achievement in organization and turnout of purebred Arabian horse lovers. The people are keen on attending such auctions for the selection of high-quality horses descending from legend horses. The sales exceeded 3.5 Million Egyptian Pounds, including the most expensive horse that was auctioned at a value of 850,000 Thousand Egyptian Pounds. The most salient objectives of El Zahraa Stud are its keen skills regarding purebred Arabian horses. As well, offering all bloodlines at

the Egyptian market price. This distinguishes the El Zahraa Stud auction from all other horse auctions. Diana Cantey: How many foals does El Zahraa Stud have annually and does the E.A.O. participate in frozen semen/frozen oocytes? Dr. Osman: El Zahraa Stud has approximately 150 foals annually and the stud cooperates with the Reproduction Science Institute. We are aiming to have a semen bank and to develop a Fertilization Center at El Zahraa Stud. The E.A.O., through the El Zahraa Stud farm, provides its utmost concern for keeping and preserving the purity and authenticity of the Arabian and Straight Egyptian Arabian horses. On this trail, strict breeding programs are implemented on the farm. In addition, the E.A.O. has recently signed a cooperative protocol with the Animal Reproduction Research Institute to set up a germ-plasm bank for preserving genetically elite equine oocytes and spermatozoa. Expectedly, this could effectively contribute to maintaining the foundation required to sustain the genetic resources of Arabian and Straight Egyptian Arabian horses.

Photo by: Diana Cantey

SHAFEA

(Tagweed x Shafaat)

‫شافع‬

) ‫ شفاعات‬x ‫(تجويد‬

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Diana Cantey: Sadly, the number of Straight Egyptian Arabian horses is decreasing around the world. Yet it is very important there is preservation for the future. The USA has experienced a steady decline in the Straight Egyptian Arabian horse market. Last year, less than approximately 200 Straight Egyptian Arabian horses were registered; however, most likely some breeders are still waiting to finish their registrations. Even if the number is around ten percent still unregistered, we are worried about the declining numbers. Can the E.A.O. make recommendations or suggestions to USA breeders regarding preserving our Straight Egyptian Arabian horse market? Dr. Osman: I agree with you completely. In Egypt and the USA, no one who makes their living in the thoroughbred industry needs to be reminded when the world’s economy collapsed and the European Union placed a ban on imported horses from Egypt and some Gulf countries in 2008, the thoroughbred industry’s fortunes fell even harder. The foal crop has fallen 27.3 percent, tumbling from 34.29 percent in 2017 to 24.9 percent in the last year. The Straight Egyptian Arabian industry is facing some challenging times right now, but I think both countries can look to re-seeing this industry again as a breath of fresh air! As all know, Henry Babson imported the first horses to the USA in 1932. Sara Loken and Doug Marshall imported the famous Morafic to the USA and Judith Forbis found her stock Arabians such as Bint Bukra,

Photo by: Mohab Elshiat

TEE

(Adl x Bint Ibtisam)

‫تي‬

)‫ بنت ابتسام‬x ‫(عدل‬

Ibn Halima and other important horses hugely famous today, from here at El Zahraa Stud. Egypt has provided Straight Egyptian Arabian horse and breeding expertise support to the USA subsequent to the late 1950’s. I find that breeders from the USA are more enthusiastic about buying and breeding to the El Zahraa Stud bloodlines. What prevents us from building a bridge of cooperation between the E.A.O. and the USA Department of Agriculture, organizations and bodies interested in Straight Egyptian Arabian horses? It would be great to think about that kind of cooperation. We welcome this cooperation and the E.A.O. wishes to send thoughts to the USA governmental bodies to take advantage of the capabilities of the E.A.O. Diana Cantey: We are working hard for breed promotion and wonder how we can reach younger people? Dr. Osman: That is a good question. The E.A.O. is a unique resource as it has been closed to outside blood and so the genetic pool of Straight Egyptian Arabians is small. El Zahraa Stud can provide the world with horses to regenerate the horse of today and will always be the place to go when youth breeders realize they need to use crossbreeding in their modern programs. Horse breeders typically expect assistance from El Zahraa Stud, considered the “Mother Farm”. Egyptian youth breeders need to maintain the integrity of the Straight Egyptian Arabian by preserving and improving from within. They need to go back to a solid program, the "El Zahraa Program", what we already have with no expectations of fast results. If we all succeed, it will help the Arabian horse breeders worldwide, not just in Egypt.

Photo by: Mohab Elshiat

MALAAK

(Serag El Din x Malayka)

‫مال ك‬

)‫ ماليكة‬x ‫(رساج الدين‬

Diana Cantey: What are the additional responsibilities of the E.A.O. other than overseeing and management of El Zahraa Stud?

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Photo by: Diana Cantey

Dr. Osman: The E.A.O. was founded in 1898 and was known at that time as the Royal Agricultural Society (R.A.S.) and subsequently the Agricultural Society Khidiwi (*Associate the name of the Khedive Ismail). In 1952, after the Revolution, it was given the name of the “Egyptian Agricultural Organization” (E.A.O.) and supervised by the Ministry of Agriculture. The foundational purpose of the organization is to assist farmers in marketing their products and providing the requirements of agricultural production, apart from representing Egypt, in international exhibitions. E.A.O.’s other activities are: provide all the requirements of agricultural seedlings of fruit, vegetables and ornamental plants; the provision of selected seeds of vegetable crops; field crops at the highest level of quality through local production or importations from abroad; fertilizers and pesticides of all kinds; and provide all types of fungicides, insecticides, pesticides and nematodes Lazarus, as well as biocides agricultural equipment with suitable prices.

E.A.O. - mares & foals at the feeder

funds for the purchase. The last auction list included a variety of colts, fillies, stallions and broodmares. For example, contrary to normal procedure, a filly by the name of “Dolamah” was added to this year’s auction. “Dolamah” belongs to the rare OBEYAN family strain which is divided into two families. She is a descendent of Wassaf and Dalila, which are two of the five rarest family strains in the Egyptian Arabian horse.

Diana Cantey: We discussed the culling of horses at El Zahraa Stud and sustaining the best horses moving forward each year to maintain the families. What happens to the horses that the E.A.O. decides not to breed on with the stud? Dr. Osman: We hold these auctions in order to sell the horses for whom we have duplications or for whom we have chosen replacements. The E.A.O. Arabian horse auction is held once in Winter, once in Spring and once in Autumn. The list of horses to be shown is published and disseminated to the breeders prior to the auction. This enables the breeders to better study the horses and prepare the necessary

Photo by: Mohab Elshiat

RAWY

(Gabal x Rayat)

‫راوي‬

)‫ رايات‬x ‫(جبل‬

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Diana Cantey: (From the 2019 WAHO Report) As mentioned, the E.A.O. recently signed with the Animal Reproduction Research Institute to set up a germ-plasm bank for preserving genetically elite equine oocytes and spermatozoa. Will frozen semen be available for breeding programs outside of Egypt? Dr. Osman: After completing a project with the Animal Reproduction Research Institute, it will be available for sale to the public. Not only for Egyptians, any breeders, regardless of the nationality of the breeder. The E.A.O. can trade by exporting as well. Diana Cantey: Are there any particular bloodlines you especially admire at El Zahraa Stud and why? Dr. Osman: I’m very devoted to the Straight Egyptian bloodlines. I believe the Egyptian breeders carry a great burden on their shoulders to preserve and improve the breed of such magnificent horses, not only for the sake of the future of the Straight Egyptian horses, but also for other bloodlines. If you look at all of today's World Champions, you will find Straight Egyptian Arabian horses in their bloodlines. Maya Jones: What is your vision for El Zahraa? Dr. Osman: My main target is to achieve development here for El Zahraa Stud. Frankly speaking, we have many efforts to complete for infrastructure. Veterinary care is also important and breeding plans as well. I can say one of the most

Photo by: Diana Cantey

AL BADR

(Adl x Daab)

‫ا لبد ر‬

)‫ دعب‬x ‫(عدل‬

important aspects is nutrition. We need to develop a system of nutrition. My primary concern is I want to do everything I can to run the E.A.O. in the best interest of Egypt. I am seriously attempting to remedy many of the mistakes which were made in previous years. Diana Cantey: During some of the visits at various farms, there was discussion about El Zahraa Stud moving to a new location, the New Administrative Capital. Is this a possibility, and if so, what would happen to El Zahraa Stud as we know it today? The history is deep here and so many of the great horses in our pedigrees have graced these pastures. Dr. Osman: Searching for a new location for El Zahraa Stud has become an imperative requirement. For a number of years, there was talk about moving El Zahraa to another location. At the same time, we are able to maintain the history and nostalgia that is so strong amongst many of the visitors throughout the years. The decision has been made to move; however, it will take a long time to plan the move the way we need to. The current setting has become overrun due to crowding from outside the facility. The project is now under the auspices of the Ministry of Agriculture. It will be an enormous project of everything that is equine.

Photo by: Diana Cantey

DURRY

(Baydoun x Nakeyah)

ُ ‫د ري‬

) ‫ نقية‬x ‫(بيضون‬

Diana Cantey: I read there is a riding school at El Zahraa Stud subsequent to the 1990’s. Is the program still active?

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Photo by: Diana Cantey

GABBOUR

(El Ragel x Gobrana)

Dr. Osman: Yes, this is still active and improved upon yearly. El Zahraa Riding School is our great way to expose younger generations as a living example of the values of past blending with the passion of the present. The El Zahraa Riding School is the only institution in Egypt that has practiced for more than 30 years. The horse and rider are trained and continually exercised at this location. Moreover, in the El Zahraa Riding School, participants are given the opportunity to improve their horsemanship skills through various courses.

‫جبو ر‬

)‫ج�انة‬ ‫ ب‬x ‫(الراجل‬

Diana Cantey: Thank you for your time today in answering our questions Dr. Osman. As well, for your outstanding hospitality at the show for us and the many guests visiting from all over the world.

Special Note About the Interviewers: Maya Jones is a Straight Egyptian Arabian horse breeder residing in Flumserberg, Switzerland. Her 35 year breeding program focuses on the rare Abayyan strain. Her horses can be found throughout Europe and Egypt.

Photo by: Diana Cantey

DEFAF

(Ouf x Sarhana)

‫ضفا ف‬

)‫ رسحانة‬x ‫(عوف‬

Story and photos (unless otherwise noted) by Diana Cantey, freelance photojournalist, professional photographer and videographer. Diana’s photos appear in several Arabian horse breed journals covering shows and events in the United States and abroad. She and her husband Duane have raised Straight Egyptian Arabian horses in central Arkansas for over twenty years. Contact: diana.cantey@yahoo.com zajaddiegyptianarabians.com 53

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FINE ARABIAN HORSE ARTISTRY OF KATJA SAUER

PADRONS PSYCHE (*Padron x Kilika)

K

atja Sauer is a German freelance artist who lives and works near the lovely spa-town of Baden-Baden in the middle of the Black Forest. ANSATA HEJAZI (Ansata Halim Shah x Ansata Sudarra)

As a child, Katja discovered a passion for drawing animals, especially horses. Animals have always played an important role in Katja‘s life and to draw them gives her great pleasure.

Arabian horses, originates in the fact that her Mother is lucky enough to own an Arabian horse. Therefore, Katja was able to study its anatomy and movements intensely.

Katja is a self-taught artist and learned through experience by experimenting with different drawing techniques and also with a lot of passion for what she loves doing. Katja works mainly with soft pastels, charcoal and graphite.

As a child, Katja only drew horses; however, more and more, other animals have earned her fascination.

One of Katja‘s favorite motives is the Arabian Horse. She says, “I adore its beauty and temperament and also its placidity. These characteristics give each horse a unique expression which I enjoy capturing in my paintings.” Katja‘s love and expertise for drawing, especially

Since 2011, Katja has created individual commissioned works for beloved family members of animals for customers from all over the world. Ever since Katja began her commissioned work, she has been moved by the stories behind the photographs she is sent to draw. ‘‘This shows me how important pets are to our modern lives and how they can make us more ‘human’. This is also one of the reasons I enjoy my work so thoroughly,” says Katja.

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GAZAL AL SHAQAB (Anaza El Farid x Kajora)

ESTOPA (Tabal x Uyaima)

NDA SHARIHA BINT SHANAH (GR Amaretto x Shanah Halima - Dalia Halim)

NK HAFID JAMIL (Ibn Nejdy x Helala)

Photo Credits: Julia Moll Martin Kubat Stuart Vesty Gregor Aymar Gigi Grasso

EL THAY MASHOUR (Madkour I x El Thay Bint Kamla)

For information regarding Katja Sauer’s fine artistry and for commissioned artworks, please contact: Tierzeichnungen und Tierportraits Katja Sauer info@katja-sauer.de + 01 76 3443 6906 katja-sauer.de

El LAHAB (Laheeb x The Vision HG) 55

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Horse-Assisted Coaching Reality or Myth? Written by Eva Reifler - visionpure

T

he horse has always been a valuable companion for us, particularly the Arabian breed: Hippocrates found that riding has a healing effect on us. Xenophon also recognized the therapeutic virtues of the horse: The horse is a good master, not only for the body, but also for the mind and heart. And Winston Churchill (at least the quote is credited to him) pointed out that the outside of the horse has a positive influence on the inside of man. 57

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Originally, the horse was used as a work animal, later as a sports and leisure device and currently it is very widely used as a “therapeutic agent� to support mentally and physically disabled people. Today horses gallop not only into the managerial suites, but also into the personal sphere and prove to be exceptional allies in our pursuit of physical, mental, emotional and spiritual wellbeing.

obstacle - does it follow you well, or does it stop, does it pull you onto the green grass, or does it even want to go back to its buddies? 2. Their incredible sensitivity

As they are prey, horses have developed unprecedented attention to the smallest changes in their environment. A horse senses fluctuations in a heart rhythm from up to 20 meters away (we do, too, by the way!). "By far the most important training in my She reacts accordingly. As a rule, it tries professional life.� (D.H. training manager, to distance itself from the source of danger. This is an extremely valuable skill when you 60 years) must distinguish between a lion who has But why are horses so effective? just devoured its food and a lion prowling 1. Their physical size for a delicious meal. Running in vain could consume the precious calories needed to Horses are big and impressive. Getting them to do something for us without dominating survive the long winter. On the other hand, them encourages and enables us to access standing still could cost life immediately. our internal resources. These have often The horse therefore continuously perceives been suppressed and silenced by our the energetic reactions (movements, childhood education. The resulting adaptive micro-movements, breathing, temperature, behaviours and limiting beliefs fell into our tension) in its environment. It responds to subconscious, from where they are strongly our own thoughts much faster than we do. involved in shaping our relationships of When we are (un)consciously in an all kinds. Horses act without judgment. emotional conflict, this manifests itself Through simple interactions with them, physically. Like a lie detector, the horse the discrepancy between our conscious recognizes the slightest internal tensions request and unconscious behaviour is and acts accordingly. Thanks to our partner, made visible immediately, unfiltered and the horse, we can therefore visualize without judgement. We can therefore work on the effectiveness of our behaviour in real and change subtle and unconscious time and immediately dissolve unconscious mechanisms that sabotage our relationships patterns. Lack of self-confidence, inability and well-being. to assert oneself, lack of limits, anxiety, etc., Try it yourself: Think for 30 seconds each are promptly reflected by our four-legged on the words strength, fear and love and trainer and can be changed immediately. notice how your body changes. What do Try it for yourself: Simply guide your horse you notice? You can do this in the presence from one place to another - or over a small of your horse and watch how she reacts. 58 Arab Horse Couture

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3. Their social life The social herd life of a horse is very similar to that of our nomad ancestors. To ensure their survival, horses maintain very close social relationships just like we do. Newcomers are checked extensively and must be carefully integrated. The experience of older horses ensures the survival of the entire herd and the strength of the younger ones the survival of the species. In addition, we humans and horses have an unbelievable common past. Hardly anyone remains untouched by a horse, which makes her an excellent surface for our psychological projections. The behaviour that we observe in him or her reflects our deeply rooted unconscious attitudes without judgement. Once made visible, we can change them to our advantage - among other things. This neutralizes limiting beliefs, frees relationships and reduces frustration with others and us.

access with conventional therapy. Similar to a hypnosis treatment, the horse enables us, in a non-verbal exchange, to gently repeat and modify the experience. Nerve pathways are reprogrammed and the new corrective experience remains anchored in us. Try it yourself: Stand next to a horse and "empty" your head (it is best to have a trained person accompany you in this silent exchange so that you can stay safe). Become fully aware of your body sensation, from head to toe. What is the horse doing? Do you have a heart's desire? What do you feel? Just let it happen. Why do horses participate at all? Life is quite simple for horses: something is either dangerous or harmless. It therefore always chooses the presence of an

Try it for yourself: What do you think about the horse that is facing you? (For example - it is interested, it is stubborn‌). Now change the sentence so that it fits you. (I am interested, I am stubborn). Where and when is that true in your life? How was or is that helpful to you? Do you still need this? 4. Their magic - or the indescribable Being without words and without intention in the presence of a horse has the potential to repair emotional wounds. Wounds which were inflicted on us before we could speak and which are therefore often difficult to 59 SPRING 2020

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emotionally congruent person who offers security without wasting energy. Isolation, unclear instructions, incongruity or uncertainty are considered unpleasant and should be avoided under all circumstances. Securing survival for two is a more promising alternative - provided we are honest - with him/her and us. Requirements for a respectful interaction As described above, horses touch us on an emotional, physical, intellectual, spiritual and psychological level, all at the same time. Customers, horses and coaches are not indifferent to this interaction. The welltrained coach, working with the assistance of horses, is well aware of this responsibility and enables the customer to have a judgement-free, safe and interpretationfree experience. It takes a lot of humility to create and enable this wonderful space of self-awareness.

A judgement-free interaction is also only possible if the horses solicited are kept appropriately and respectfully. (In the herd, without conventional horseshoes, fed with grass or hay and with adequate breaks for regeneration). Horses communicate continuously. Let's listen to them! Too many of them have become silent, resigned to the fact that they are not understood anyway. Conditioned riding horses, enclosed in a small individual horse box, take up to 12 months to communicate spontaneously again, provided that they are incorporated into a herd. Privacy, tranquillity, secured "workplaces" and comfort for the physical well-being of the customers (heated/cooled, dry meeting room, toilet, paved, clean paths) during the treatment, places additional demands on the necessary infrastructure (stable). Training requirements The field of horse-assisted personal development and management seminars is booming. Would you like to participate and become a coach? There are different providers (some of them even online). But before you decide where to train, we recommend reflecting on the following questions: 1. With regard to the future target group and your own requirements: • Which audience do you want to address? Do you have an understanding of their problems and the possible causes? • Would you like to work individually or with groups? • Where and how will you work? • Do you already have enough horse experience?

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• Do you have a good knowledge of

Author Information

corporate management (if that is the field

Eva Reifler:

you would like to work in)? Do you need

Lifecoach

help?

(horse assisted coach), business analyst;

• Can you accompany someone emotionally and psychologically or do you need additional training? 2. About providers of training:

and

Equicoach

visionpure

visionpure is a leading training institute for horse-based personality development and Equicoaching. Her dedicated herd of horses and the Training Centre are located 30 kilometres from Paris. She is specialized

• What are their specific areas of expertise?

in the training of “Equicoaches”, and also

• How long have they been working as an

offers

thematic

workshops,

individual

instructor?

interactions and seminars for companies.

• What information can you find about

For more information: www.visionpure.

them (references, publications, workshops,

fr (site in French); phone +33 (0) 6 99 19

offerings)? • How does their professional expertise

02 95; by email info@visionpure.fr (also in German or English).

(beyond their training program can offer) match or correspond to that of the students? • Where does the training take place? Is the space adequate? • How is the quality level guaranteed? Is there continuous training available? • What prerequisites should you bring? • What is the content of the training, does it meet your needs and is it clearly defined? • What format is offered and which teaching methods are used? • Do the trainers involve specialists in order to supplement their own knowledge? • How many trainers are there for which group size? • What does the training cost and what is included? • What title do you get after your training? 61 SPRING 2020

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Right of First Refusal Clauses: Are They Worth the Paper They’re Written On? By Julie I. Fershtman, Attorney at Law

What is a Right of First Refusal? Equine-related contracts sometimes include a “right of first refusal” clause that restricts how a horse can be re-sold. Through these clauses, a horse buyer agrees to give the seller an opportunity to buy back the horse later under certain specified conditions. For example, these clauses sometimes provide that if the buyer (after becoming the horse owner) later receives a legitimate offer to buy the horse and is inclined to sell, the former owner must first receive the opportunity to match that purchase offer and pay within a certain time frame. Risks and Options for Action Right of first refusal clauses sometimes generate disputes in the horse industry. This can happen when horse buyers file away their contracts and, years later, forget the promises they made. Sometimes, these clauses are so unclear or unenforceable as written that the parties don’t understand their rights and obligations. Generally speaking, what rights do people have if they believe someone violated a right of first refusal? • Depending on the contract’s language and applicable state law, if the former owner who holds a right of first refusal is denied his or her contractual right to repurchase a horse and learns that a sale is in progress, that party – before the sale – could potentially bring a lawsuit seeking an injunction to stop the sale so that a

court can enforce the right of first refusal clause. These types of lawsuits also ask the court to order specific performance to allow the former owner to buy back the horse as the contract terms permit. • If the right of first refusal was part of a verbal equine sale agreement, with nothing in writing, chances are good that the claimed “right” will not be enforceable based on the state’s statute of frauds. • If the horse has already been sold, in violation of a right of first refusal, the would-be buyer’s lawsuit might potentially seek monetary damages. Proving what those damages are can be especially complex, however, raising numerous questions such as: Did the former owner (who was denied a re-purchase right) lose profits? Are the claimed lost profits too speculative and therefore not recoverable by law? Did (or could) the would-be buyer take reasonable efforts to mitigate his or her claimed losses? When you include “right of first refusal” clauses in your equine sale contracts, draft the language with great care and consider seeking legal counsel to help in the process. Equine sellers who rely on these clauses might want to remind the buyers about them as time goes on, before the buyer places the horse on the market; this may also help the buyer notify others that all sales will be subject to a right of first refusal.

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Conclusion Disputes involving rights of first refusal can be complicated, especially when the parties draft unclear clauses or fail to honor them. When drafting these clauses and when evaluating your rights under them, consider seeking timely advice of knowledgeable counsel. This article does not constitute legal advice. When questions arise based on specific situations, direct them to a knowledgeable insurance agent or attorney. About the Author Julie Fershtman, a lawyer for 30 years, is one of the nation’s most experienced Equine Law practitioners and handles legal matters involving all equine breeds and disciplines. She is a Shareholder with Foster Swift Collins & Smith, PC, based in Michigan, and has handled equine cases nationwide. One of very few lawyers in the country to be named a Fellow of the American College of Equine Attorneys, she is also listed in The Best Lawyers in America. Her speaking engagements on Equine Law span 29 states. For more information, visit: www.equinelaw.net

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Available for Your Consideration

2018 Bay Gelding (EKS Alihandro x Bella Rosa LA out of Black Magnum Psyche Daughter)

Owned & Bred by Lauran Arabians Northville, Michigan 248.866.8756 lauranarabians@comcast.net

2019 TOP TEN SCOTTSDALE INTERNATIONAL YEARLING COLT CLASS

AHA Sweepstakes Nominated Scottsdale Signature Program US & Canadian National Futurity Programs


By Nancy Dye Elite Lifestyle Transformations, LLC Equestrian Mindset Coach

A

re you an easily distracted athlete or professional that suffers from running around all over the place? Do you find it difficult to schedule and discipline yourself? Do you find it tough to stay focused on a task for any length of time? Are you disorganized and always late? Do you feel like you are not performing at your absolute best? I coined the term, “Wild Pony Syndrome�, to describe a debilitating issue that some of my successful clients feel trapped in. Getting the edge on beating your competition and receiving the blue ribbon, instead of always coming in second or third (or not at all), is sometimes just about learning how to rewire your brain to tweak a few bad habits that you recognize are sabotaging your best performance in all areas of your life. So, what is Wild Pony Syndrome? 66

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Easily Distracted & Tough to Catch? The Wild Pony Syndrome

This is frequently a problem for high-energy people who are always on the move. Outgoing and adventurous, they usually have lots of friends or they enjoy adventures and meeting new people in “their herd”. Fun to be around, it’s hard to get them to sit down and focus for long periods of time… and that’s AFTER they always arrive late. In fact, it is hard for them to focus on the task at hand, period. They are too easily distracted. The Wild Ponies complain about being ADD (Attention Deficit Disorder) and they hate being so disorganized. They would fix the organization issue, but they have difficulty disciplining themselves enough to stay focused on completing a boring project such as cleaning their house. Instead, they are “not very successfully” multi-tasking their way through a hectic, stressful, and borderline out-of-control life. What would happen if they were organized and focused every day on applying my “game changing” equestrian success rituals and my emotional strength techniques and strategies that I customized just for them; showing up relaxed, empowered, and totally prepared and confident for both their training and their competition? The real problem with Wild Pony Syndrome sufferers is that by the time they come to me for a complete transformation in their riding and their lifestyle, they have already defined themselves with these challenges deep down in their fundamental core. This has become their identity and their “story”. And they keep building up the story; stacking issues on top of issues.

For example, displaying varying degrees of being “a hoarder”, they have a hard time letting go of “stuff ”. And by that I mean not only all the stored items in their home, garages, basements and attics (tack trunks, trucks and horse trailers), but also letting go of their past, their “issues”, and their identity. To add insult to injury, these ponies constantly beat themselves up with a whip, calling themselves bad names such as a “mess” and a “wreck”. And as they continue to identify with the symptoms of Wild Ponies, they unconsciously act it out even more, because remember, we will always remain consistent with who we truly believe ourselves to be. Why is that? Because it is our core belief about ourselves and because, heck, at least we know how to be that person! At least we can do THAT perfectly! There IS comfort and certainty in that, right? Eventually, the disorganized patterns have convinced everyone else that it’s “always something” with the Wild Pony; forgetting things, losing stuff (the other riding glove hiding somewhere), always late, not keeping their word with calls and appointments, etc. Friends and co-workers, after trying to help them get over this chronic disability, finally throw up their hands and end up actually making it worse by accepting their “quirkiness”, covering for them, or picking up the slack. This is called enabling and out of desperation for help in this area, Wild Ponies unconsciously surround themselves with people that will help them stay on track. 67

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They will fall in love with inappropriate spouses that eventually, with enough practice, becomes a that may not be a perfect fit, because of this all- work of art; and possibly one with an Olympic Gold consuming need for help! Medal around its neck. As the Wild Pony is enabled and freed up from the time needed and their responsibility to “get their act together”, they overcommit and run around from one thing to another even more; always terrified that they are about to drop one of the balls they are juggling. If these people are not working, they will have a hard time finding a job. If they are working, they will not perform at their best, and it’s a competitive world out there! The most “together” and professional person wins. (Your innate talent, charming personality, and sense of humor will only take you so far.)

Discipline is freedom!

Think about the Olympic gymnast. Think about the ballet dancer. And if you’re an equestrian, think about the dressage horse or Olympic show jumper. Channeled energy. Focused and disciplined. If you perceive it in a different way, being “reined in” is actually just “collecting” the horse; bringing together the magic of the muscles, energy, and talent to produce absolute grace, beauty, and perfection. It is combining all of your “ingredients” and then planning and completing the goals for the direction Yes, it’s true. People in your circle will eventually get in which you want the horse to move. exasperated. Not only is it stressful for the Wild Pony Compare it to the process of baking a magnificent to think and behave like this, it is also disruptive for cake. What good are all the ingredients like the sugar, everyone around them. Not to mention disrespectful flour, salt, flavoring, butter etc., individually on their and rude. How many times can you break your own; some stored in the cabinet, some on the spice promises for calling, showing up or keeping your rack, and some in the refrigerator? The ingredients commitments? are all over the place, right? But what is created It has the subtle ripple effect of a giant Tsunami when you combine them, set the oven at a specific after an earthquake out at sea. It doesn’t just temperature and then remove the cake at the right disturb everyone’s peace, focus, and rhythm – it time? The magnificent cake that you visualized and completely destroys trust. set a goal to create, right? What is the answer to this syndrome? Well, suggest to a Wild Pony that they may have to deploy some discipline and to schedule themselves and then just sit back and watch what happens! Talk about being spooked! “Oh no, you mean you’re going to rein me in?” They ask this question with a total panic in their voice; you can see it in their eyes. You can just feel them dying to gallop away!

But you have to change the phrase “reined in” in order to transform the meaning, and therefore, the feelings and emotions tied to that meaning. A dressage horse is just energy collected and focused; dancing in perfect timing with the music. Is there anything more beautiful? The jumper has a set course, the perfect place to turn in order to get over all those obstacles with just the right impulsion and the most effective These are clients who do not want to stop “having number and length of strides. All of this is perfectly fun”. They see being harnessed or “reined in” as a planned and practiced. negative. They feel it as a fear of being locked up in It takes repetition to program the brain. It doesn’t a tiny prison cell. They even have trouble keeping to just happen on a whim. their commitment for coaching calls! You have to The Wild Pony seems free, powerful, and able to deploy a pack of hounds, track them down and corral overcome obstacles, but just ask my clients suffering them back in; and all the while they are bucking and from that issue and they will tell you a painful story of rearing up, desperately trying to run away from you! being trapped, spinning around in an unproductive In actuality, they are running away from themselves. state of self-hate and self-sabotage. Every obstacle, (They are paying to play all these games, mind you!) even small ones, seem like a huge wall to jump over, But is being “reined in” really so bad? What happens and the entire course feels overwhelming; not to when we harness all that energy with discipline and mention their forgetfulness or aversion to the boring focus? While the Wild Pony perceives that as being task of practicing or “staying on course”. trapped, bored and suffocated, the reality is actually In addition, they hate the identity and image of a something more positive and on a much higher level. “screw up going nowhere” or “potential talent” that will Think about it. Does “reining it in” prevent them never really make it to the top. Imagine an unbridled, from moving or does it produce a more directed and Wild Pony trying to perform in the jumper ring or purposeful action? Every athlete that harnesses their the dressage competition. Not a pretty picture, right? energy and focus creates a magnificent masterpiece But this is who my Wild Pony clients want to be. 68 Arab Horse Couture

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They are frequently perfectionists with high standards. This is the dream for their life. They come to me with talent, skills, the best trainers and amazing horses. They KNOW they are better than their current performance in life. They are frustrated with not being able to be the best they can be. Equestrians of all ages come to me to change their stories and therefore their destinies. They come to me to peel away the trappings of their ineffective, disempowering identities and the resulting patterns of those thoughts and behaviors. They come to me to transform their lives and to feel proud about themselves. Why choose to make excuses for always showing up as an unproductive Wild Pony when you can display the royalty, mastery and the beautiful, elegant art form of a dressage horse? Why not be the best that you can be and show off the dance and enjoy the ride around the course? Do you think running around without a goal or purpose; disheveled, spooked, directionless and “wild and free” is fun? Wait until you feel the exhilaration of mastering your talents and orchestrating them to all work together; flying over the jumps in the Olympic Grand Prix like Nick Skelton or dancing to music in New York’s Central Park like Charlotte Dujardin on Valegro! Wait till you hear all that applause and feel the significance and empowerment of all your happiness and pride inside! And all you have to do is change your identity, shift your mindset, collect that energy, and learn the strategies for finding your leverage and staying focused. Caution: I may also insist that you start every day by getting up a little earlier, practicing your equestrian success rituals, and deleting all the foods (chemicals) that contribute to producing the Wild Pony syndrome! (Such as cake.) Not that I’m trying you rein you in; but it works if you work it! ABOUT THE AUTHOR: Nancy Dye is an equestrian breakthrough mindset coach and resilience trainer helping people to transform the quality of their lifestyles. Nancy is a strategic interventionist trained by the official coach training school of Tony Robbins and has

over 30 years as a change agent; shifting people into peak performance. Nancy specializes in solving the puzzle of why people are not performing at their best and customizing the right strategy for “jumping over” adversity. After transforming the rider’s mental state for peak performance in the ring, she shows the rider how to use the same techniques to transform all areas of their lifestyle to include relationships, career, physical fitness and transitioning through life stages. With a past career in corporate sales and as a luxury lifestyle realtor, Nancy has been coached by some of the top sales trainers in the corporate world, as well as by some of the most elite coaches in the world of sports. Nancy redesigns the inner lives of athletes, executives, celebrities, entrepreneurs and elite military and veterans. Nancy has written a new book entitled “Equestrian Rockstars: Solving Your Puzzle for Riding With Confidence and Joy” https://www.elitelifestyletransformations.com/ equestrian-rockstars--solving-your-puzzle-forriding-with-confidence-and-joy-copy.html Nancy is married to Jack Miles, a former gymnast who is inducted into four athletic Hall of Fames. For oneon-one coaching or information on her workshops or riding clinics, click the link below to go to the calendar and book a free call. https://elitelifestyletransformations.coachesconsole. com/v3/calendar/complimentary60 Nancy can also be reached at: nancydyesicoach@gmail.com 69

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CORPORATE HEADQUARTERS 46247 Five Mile Road, Plymouth, MI 48170 USA Ph: 734.454.0500 Fx: 734.454.0563 info@redviking.com


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ARAB HORSE COUTURE - Spring 2020