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M U S I C • DA N C E • T H E AT R E • V I S UA L A R T S • F I L M

AN APPALACHIAN SUMMER FESTIVAL

Photo: Peter Zay

JUNE 27-AUGUST 5, 2017

ON AND AROUND THE CAMPUS OF APPALACHIAN STATE UNIVERSITY, BOONE, NC


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SUNDAY

MONDAY

JUNE 26

TUESDAY

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YOUNG PEOPLE’S GLOBAL FILM SERIES:

My Lucky Elephant Page 23

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3

WEDNESDAY

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THURSDAY

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The Innocents Page 25

BOB RAY & BARBARA HARDY

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COMMUNITY ARTS EVENT:

Summer Exhibition Celebration

WORKSHOP BEGINS:

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Trash to Treasure

WEICHOLZ GLOBAL FILM SERIES:

Eastern Festival Orchestra with Midori Page 41

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WORKSHOP BEGINS:

Empowered Journaling

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YOUNG PEOPLE’S GLOBAL FILM SERIES:

Virginia’s Run Page 23

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Appalachian Energy Appalachian Energy Summit Keynote Summit Keynote Address with Address with Majora Carter Gina McCarthy

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at the Turchin Center

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Broyhill Chamber Ensemble

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JACKIE ALEXANDER Page 21

WEICHOLZ GLOBAL FILM SERIES:

Rams

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Duma Page 23

An Evening with Sutton Foster Page 39

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THE NATIONAL BLACK THEATRE FESTIVAL PRESENTS:

THE NATIONAL BLACK THEATRE FESTIVAL PRESENTS:

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SCHAEFER POPULAR SERIES EVENT

Jennifer Nettles

Maid's Door Maid's Door

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19 20 LUNCH & LEARN

YOUNG PEOPLE’S GLOBAL FILM SERIES:

SCHAEFER POPULAR SERIES EVENT

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LUNCH & LEARN

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17

12

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First Friday Art Crawl

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JULY 1

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Worlds Apart 9

SATURDAY

Broyhill Chamber Ensemble

WEICHOLZ GLOBAL FILM SERIES:

5 6 LUNCH & LEARN INDEPENDENCE DAY

FRIDAY

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MARY ANNE REDDING

MOMIX Masterclass

31st Rosen Sculpture Walk

WEICHOLZ GLOBAL FILM SERIES:

MOMIX:

SCHAEFER POPULAR SERIES EVENT

WORKSHOP BEGINS:

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I, Daniel Blake

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“Opus Cactus”

Chris Botti

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Page 71

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Broyhill Chamber Ensemble

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YOUNG PEOPLE’S GLOBAL FILM SERIES:

TCVA WORKSHOP BEGINS:

Famous Artists Page 21

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Secrets of War Page 23

Broyhill Chamber Ensemble Page 75

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Rosen-Schaffel Competition for Young & Emerging Artists Page 94

AUGUST 1 YOUNG PEOPLE’S GLOBAL FILM SERIES:

Theeb Page 23

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LUNCH & LEARN MARYROSE CARROLL Page 21

WEICHOLZ GLOBAL FILM SERIES:

Glory

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SCHAEFER POPULAR SERIES EVENT

Bruce Hornsby & the Noisemakers

2 3 LUNCH & LEARN Page 21

WEICHOLZ GLOBAL FILM SERIES:

Tanna Page 99

COMMUNITY ARTS EVENT:

Charlotte Ballet

Symphony by the Lake at Chetola

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Page 85

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SUZI MILLS

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Theatre Bus Trip:

Legally Blonde Lees McRae College

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COMMUNITY ARTS EVENT:

First Friday Art Crawl

SCHAEFER POPULAR SERIES EVENT

YES

with special guests Todd Rundgren & Carl Palmer's ELP Legacy Page 101


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AN APPALACHIAN SUMMER FESTIVAL 2017 CORPORATE AND MEDIA SPONSORS: CORPORATE SPONSORS:

WESTGLOW RESORT & SPA

MCDONALD’S OF BOONE

MAST GENERAL STORE

GOODNIGHT BROTHERS

BOONE AREA VISITORS BUREAU

SKYBEST COMMUNICATIONS, INC.

THE UNIVERSITY. BOOKSTORE

CHETOLA RESORT AT BLOWING ROCK

HOLIDAY INN EXPRESS

COURTYARD MARRIOTT

COUNTRY INN & SUITES QUALITY INN & SUITES

PEABODY’S WINE & BEER MERCHANTS

(a wholly-owned subsidiary of SkyLine Membership Corporation)

PANORAMIC HOSPITALITY

NORTH CAROLINA ARTS COUNCIL This year the North Carolina Arts Council celebrates its 50th anniversary, and over the next year they are partnering with artists and arts organizations across the state to celebrate. The anniversary season will conclude on May 31, 2018 at the North Carolina Heritage Awards.

MEDIA SPONSORS: WBTV (Charlotte, NC) WCYB (Bristol, VA/TN) CHARTER SPECTRUM WINSTON-SALEM JOURNAL GREENSBORO NEWS & RECORD WNC MAGAZINE (Asheville, NC)

OLDIES 100.7FM/HIGHWAY 106.1 FM (Boone, NC) greensboro.com

WHKY 1290 AM (Hickory, NC) WDAV 89.9 FM (Davidson, NC) WFDD 88.5 FM (Winston-Salem, NC) WASU 90.5 FM (Boone, NC) HIGH COUNTRY 365 (Boone, NC)


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THE SCHAEFER CENTER PRESENTS... 2017-18 SEASON

Friday, October 6, 2017

“TajMo”: Taj Mahal & Keb’ Mo’

Friday, March 16, 2018

Golden Dragon Acrobats

8PM, SCHAEFER CENTER FOR THE PERFORMING ARTS

7PM, SCHAEFER CENTER FOR THE PERFORMING ARTS

Thursday, October 26, 2017

April 13-15, 2018

Ailey II Dance Theatre

7PM, SCHAEFER CENTER FOR THE PERFORMING ARTS

Friday, November 17, 2017

Us The Duo

7PM, SCHAEFER CENTER FOR THE PERFORMING ARTS

Friday, February 9, 2018

Les Ballets Trockadero de Monte Carlo

Sweeney Todd: The Demon Barber of Fleet Street A production of Appalachian’s Department of Theatre & Dance and the Hayes School of Music 7PM, SCHAEFER CENTER FOR THE PERFORMING ARTS

Friday, April 20, 2018

Black Violin

7PM, SCHAEFER CENTER FOR THE PERFORMING ARTS

Tuesday, February 27, 2018

"Visions of Cape Breton”: Natalie MacMaster & Donnell Leahy 7PM, SCHAEFER CENTER FOR THE PERFORMING ARTS

TICKETS ON SALE JULY 10 theschaefercenter.org • 828.262.4046

Photo: Eduardo Patino

7PM, SCHAEFER CENTER FOR THE PERFORMING ARTS


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WELCOME Dear Friends, On behalf of the entire Appalachian Community, welcome to another season of An Appalachian Summer Festival! It is with a sense of great excitement that we launch the 33rd season of the summer festival that has enriched the High Country, enlivened our summers, and enhanced the cultural landscape of our region. The festival’s 2017 season truly encompasses the “best of the best” in music, dance, theatre, visual arts and film: world-class programming we have come to expect from this nationally recognized arts celebration that has further defined the High Country as an “arts destination.” Showcasing Grammy and Tony Award-winning performers, the festival’s diverse programming enables us to enjoy entertainment from the world’s greatest celebrities, as well the nation’s finest emerging artists – the “brightest stars” of tomorrow – and some of the most distinguished visual artists from across our region, nation, and the world. With a broad menu of visual and performing arts programming offered at no cost, combined with ticketed events offered at a fraction of the prices found in other locations, the festival truly offers something for everyone! Your continued support of An Appalachian Summer Festival sustains the festival while allowing arts programming in our community to grow and flourish. I thank you for your patronage and support, and look forward to sharing with you a magnificent summer season filled with the arts! With Appalachian Pride,

Sheri N. Everts, Chancellor

ABOUT AN APPALACHIAN SUMMER FESTIVAL Presented by Appalachian State University’s Office of Arts & Cultural Programs, this annual celebration of the performing and visual arts is held every July in venues across the university campus, and features an eclectic, diverse mix of music, dance, theatre, visual arts and film programming. An Appalachian Summer Festival began in 1984 as a chamber music series, and retains strong roots in classical music, combined with a variety of other programming geared to almost every artistic taste and preference. Celebrating its 33rd season in 2017, the festival has risen in stature to become one of the nation’s most highly respected summer festivals, acclaimed for the breadth and quality of its artistic programming. In recent years, the festival has been selected as one of the “Top 20 Events in the Southeast” by the Southeast Tourism Society. For many years, The New York Times has included An Appalachian Summer Festival in its “Summer Stages” issue, which profiles the nation’s most prominent and interesting summer arts festivals.

Festival Mission An Appalachian Summer Festival is an annual arts festival presenting and producing programs in music, theatre, dance, film and visual arts. The festival forges a unique national identity through artistic excellence, innovative programming, commissioning new works, educational opportunities, and by bringing the most accomplished and respected creative and performing artists from around the world to the Appalachian State University community. Founded on the principle of promoting young American artists, the festival supports the overall university mission, enhances the cultural life of the Appalachian community through affordable access to its programs, serves as an important gateway onto the campus, and promotes the economic development of our region.

Festival Vision: Artistic Excellence, Innovation and Engagement In keeping with its status as a university-based arts program, the festival continually seeks to enlighten and educate – a focus reflected in such initiatives as the festival’s discounts for children’s tickets, school coupons and ticket prices that are typically 30-40% lower than prices for comparable events in other venues. A rich variety of educational opportunities is part of the festival schedule each summer, including exhibitions, lectures, tours, workshops, student internships and employment opportunities for young people seeking experience in arts presenting. These experiences offer opportunities for lifelong learning and meaningful engagement with the arts. The festival holds central the belief that access to a strong and dynamic program of artistic excellence in the performing and visual arts is an important component of a vital and healthy community.


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FOUNDERS SOCIETY On July 22, 2000, the university created a Founders Society to recognize the supporters whose vision, generosity and hard work helped build An Appalachian Summer Festival. The festival owes its success in large part to these extraordinary individuals.

CHARTER MEMBERS BERGE H. and MELINÉ A. MARKARIAN BUDD and NANETTE MAYER ARNOLD P. and MURIEL S. ROSEN MARTIN L. and DORIS B. ROSEN ROBERT and MINNIE SNEAD J. BERNARD and SHIRLEY S. SPECTOR ROBERT L. and LILLIAN A. TURCHIN

THE BROYHILL FAMILY FOUNDATION:

J. EDGAR and SATIE H. BROYHILL JAMES T. and LOUISE R. BROYHILL PAUL H. and FAYE A. BROYHILL WILLARD A. and BETTIE B. GORTNER ROBERT E. and ALLENE B. HEILMAN ROBERT G. and MARIAM CANNON HAYES ARMFIELD and RACHEL RIVERS COFFEY

2002 MEMBERS JOHN E. and FAYE B. COOPER BUDDY and CHARLOTTE HALPERT FLORENCE R. HECHT

D. GRADY MORETZ JR. and REBA SMITH MORETZ PETER and JONI WEBB PETSCHAUER

2013 MEMBERS CONNIE ADAMS BONNIE and JAMIE SCHAEFER

2015 MEMBERS FRANK and KAY BORKOWSKI DOUG and TERESA JOHNSON RALPH and VENDA LERCH

RALPH GLASER JR. and JOHN A. PFEIFER NEIL and NANCY SCHAFFEL MARK and NANCY TAFEEN

AN APPALACHIAN SUMMER FESTIVAL ADVISORY BOARD The Festival Advisory Board provides critical leadership for An Appalachian Summer Festival by offering overall guidance, fundraising assistance, programming ideas and long-term direction for the festival. Advisory Board members are representative of the festival audience, and in many ways they serve as the festival’s “eyes and ears” in the community-providing valuable feedback to the staff regarding festival operations, and serving as advocates and community ambassadors for the university and the festival. We wish to thank our board members for the leadership, skills, expertise and commitment they bring to this important role. NICK FRIEDMAN Chair LYNN EISENBERG Vice Chair JUDY ADLER KAY BORKOWSKI HOWARD BRAFMAN WENDY BRENNER NATALIE BROYHILL SUE CHASE LISA COOPER BEN HENDERSON SUSAN LUTZ JOE MILLER JENNY MILLER ALLEN MOSELEY

MARK MOSKOWITZ PETER PETSCHAUER KAREN POWELL CHRIS ROBBINS NEIL SCHAFFEL TINA SILVERSTEIN SANDI FINCI SOLOMON KEITH STONEMAN MARK TAFEEN KENT TARBUTTON WRIGHT TILLEY HELENE WEICHOLZ

EX-OFFICIO MEMBERS: Vice Chancellor for University Advancement

RANDY EDWARDS Acting Chief of Staff and Senior Associate Vice Chancellor for Arts Engagement and Special Assistant to the Chancellor for Strategic Initiatives

HANK FOREMAN Director of Development, Hayes School of Music, Arts and Cultural Programs, and the Turchin Center for the Visual Arts

MELINDA FUDGE Dean, Hayes School of Music

JAMES DOUTHIT Interim Director of Arts Engagement and Cultural Resources

DENISE RINGLER


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An Appalachian Summer Festival is presented by the Office of the Chancellor

FRIENDS OF AN APPALACHIAN SUMMER FESTIVAL Volunteer Coordinator:

CYN D. WEAVER

Acting Chief of Staff, Senior Associate Vice Chancellor for Arts Engagement and Special Assistant to the Chancellor for Strategic Initiatives

HANK T. FOREMAN Interim Director of Arts Engagement and Cultural Resources

DENISE RINGLER SALES, MARKETING, MEMBERSHIP & DEVELOPMENT Director of Development, Hayes School of Music, Arts and Cultural Programs, Turchin Center for the Visual Arts

Supervisors:

MELINDA FUDGE

BILL BARBOUR, MARGOT BROWN-HAMPTON, CHRISTINE DAVE, JENNIFER DOTSON, JANA DUKE, DIANA LATENDRESSE, CARMEN PATELLA, MIRIAM PITTMAN, PAM WALKER

Director of Marketing and Public Relations, Arts and Cultural Programs

BETTY ARMISTEAD FRANCINE BARR CAROL BROWN BILLIE JO BROWN ELIZABETH BUCHANAN BETH CARRIN SUSAN CAUDILL PAUL CAUDILL KATHY COPLEY ELAINE CROWELL JIM CROWELL RUTH DAGGETT BARBARA DAYE SANDY DAVIS SONDRA EDWARDS BERNIE EDWARDS SANDRA FOLTS DODIE GLOWA DAN GLOWA SUSAN GRAHAM KAREN GROSS SUSAN HAZLEWOOD BEN HENDERSON BARBARA HUNSUCKER ROBIN HUNT JERRY HUTCHINS REBECCA HUTCHINS LYNDA LASSETER MARIA LICHTMANN FAYE MATTHEWS JACKIE MCINTURFF

AMBER MELLON RAY MORETZ SUSIE MORGAN CAMILLE NAPIER SANDRA PERRY HELEN PHILLIPS PHOEBE POLLITT JOANNE PULIATTI TERI REDDICK ANN RHYNE MIKE RHYNE MARTY RICE BARBARA ROBINSON JOHN ROGERS TISH ROKOSKE KITTY ROMIGER JAN ROWE TRACI ROYSTER MARY RUPP JOANIE SHIRLEY ROBERT SHIRLEY LYNNE SLASOR INEKA THOMAS CAROL THOMPSON NANCI TOLBERT NANCE JERRY TRAUDT MARY UNDERWOOD DUSTY WASHBURN RUTH WILLIAMS BARBARA WOODROW

ANNA GAUGERT Director of Visitor and Donor Services, Turchin Center for the Visual Arts

JACKIE GARNER Director of Sales and Patron Relations, Arts and Cultural Programs

SARAH HEUSTESS Director of Marketing, Turchin Center for the Visual Arts

LYNN REES-JONES Director of Donor and External Relations, Turchin Center for the Visual Arts

LINDSAY MILLER ARTIST RELATIONS Director of Artist Relations, Arts and Cultural Programs

SALI GILL-JOHNSON VISUAL ARTS PROGRAMMING Installation Manager and Lead Preparator, Turchin Center for the Visual Arts

CRAIG DILLENBECK Assistant Director and Curator, Turchin Center for the Visual Arts

MARY ANNE REDDING TECHNICAL MANAGEMENT Director of Technical and Production Services, Arts and Cultural Programs

SCOTT HAYNES Lead Technician, Arts and Cultural Programs

CONOR MCKENZIE ARTS EDUCATION & OUTREACH Director of Arts Education and Outreach, Office of Cultural Affairs

CHRISTY CHENAUSKY Assistant Director of Art Education and Outreach, Office of Cultural Affairs

MOLLY ECKERT Community Outreach Coordinator, Turchin Center for the Visual Arts

PEGGE LAINE ADMINISTRATION Director of Administration, Turchin Center for the Visual Arts

SANDRA BLACK Business Manager, Arts and Cultural Programs

LAURA KAUFMAN


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STUDENT & TEMPORARY STAFF Artist Relations Assistants, Arts and Cultural Programs

JENNIFER DALTON (Faculty, Dept. of Communication Sciences and Disorders)

HAYLEY HORTON (Elementary Education ‘17) KELSEY LYNCH (Music Performance ‘17) Sales/Marketing Assistants, An Appalachian Summer Festival

AN APPALACHIAN SUMMER FESTIVAL Dear Friends of Appalachian Summer Festival, All of us who have attended the summer festival have been privileged to be part of one of our nation’s most interesting and unique arts festivals. No other festival, much less one produced by a state university, offers such a broad spectrum of programming across a diversity of arts disciplines. The primary goal of the festival is to educate, entertain, and to promote new and emerging artists. None of this could happen without the support of our chancellor, our director, a dedicated and talented staff, the students, and dozens of volunteers, donors and very generous sponsors. We are indeed proud to serve on the Advisory Board which helps to spread the word about this treasured cultural resource that enriches our lives and makes the High Country such a special place! Frequently heralded by publications such as The New York Times for the breadth and quality of its programming, and proclaimed one of the “top 20 events in the southeast” by the Southeast Tourism Society, none of the festival’s many offerings would be possible without you, our friends and patrons who attend our events. By attending festival events, we have all seen and heard some of the most talented and famous (even legendary) artists in the world. Our facilities, including the Schaefer Center for the Performing Arts, are second to none. Whether this is your permanent home or a treasured summer home in the mountains, we hope you will return to the festival often. If you have been entertained – or moved – by your experience with the festival, please remember that your ticket purchase only covers about one third of the cost of presenting the series. The university, along with festival donors and sponsors, makes up the all-important difference. Many of you who read this have given donations in the past and have already pledged support for this year. We greatly appreciate your support! Our hope is to reach out to the appreciative audience members who live or vacation in close proximity who have enjoyed performances over the years or are new to experiencing the Appalachian Summer Festival. If you have not yet become a festival supporter, we ask that you consider doing so, and helping to ensure the success and continuation of this unique cultural series that enhances quality of life for all of us. (For details on how you can help, please refer to page ?. All gifts, large and small, are necessary and deeply appreciated! Sincerely yours,

Nick Friedman Chair, Festival Advisory Board

Lynn Eisenberg Vice-Chair, Festival Advisory Board

BRIAN ARMSTRONG (Biology Education) ASHLEY CHILDERS (Masters of Nutrition) ABBY COCKERHAM (Masters of Business Administration)

NANCYE EDWARDS (Public Relations) DARIUS T. GREGORY (Theatre Performance, Dance Studies ‘17)

ABBY HUMPHRIES (Public Relations) SMIT PATEL (Political Science) CARLIE PIERCE (Exercise Science ‘17) JENNA TONSOR (Theatre Performance ‘17) Production Staff, An Appalachian Summer Festival

JON MICHAEL ASKEW (Music Industry Studies, Recording and Production)

ALEX GOLDEN (Applied Physics, Astrophysics ‘17) NATHAN HANNER (Music Industry Studies) JOHN HARGETT (Music Industry Studies, Marketing and Promotion)

DANNY KNIGHT (Music Industry Studies) CORBIN LENARD (Music Industry Studies, Recording and Production)

ALEX LISOWSKI (Music Industry Studies, Recording and Production)

SHEA MCKISSACK (Music Industry Studies, Recording and Production)

JOHN OVERBY (Music Industry Studies, Marketing and Promotion)

JULIE RICHARDSON (Theater Professional) LINDSAY RUDISILL (Music Industry Studies, Management and Marketing) Visual Arts Gallery & Exhibition Staff, Turchin Center for the Visual Arts EXHIBITIONS TEAM:

ERIN DURHAM (Commercial Photography) JARROD MAYES (Graphic Design) KELSEY WAGNER (Appalachian Studies) JASON WRIGHT (Graphic Design) BRANDON JACKOMIN (Criminal Justice, Art History) FRONT OF HOUSE/GALLERY AMBASSADORS:

BETH DE LEON (Art Education) PHILLIP MCRORIE (Recreation Management, Dance Studies)

BELLA ALLEN (Art History/Film Studies) JULIET IRVING (Graphic Design) ELIANA RODRIGUEZ (Studio Art) JOSIE BENFIELD (Accounting) RAVEN MOFFETT (Studio Art) FELICIA SUTTON (Art and Visual Culture) DAVID VERTREES (Studio Art) The Arts and Cultural Affairs staff wish to thank our colleagues in University Communications for the exceptional photography, design, web and video production work they provide to An Appalachian Summer Festival.


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BECOME A SUPPORTER! Artistic excellence, accessibility, and audience engagement are elements that make An Appalachian Summer Festival unique among arts festivals. But quality arts programming is expensive, and because the festival is committed to maintaining affordable ticket prices, revenues from ticket sales cover only 43% of the festival’s costs. Private support must fill the gap, thereby ensuring a continued commitment to both quality programming and affordable ticket pricing. We are extraordinarily fortunate that our community embraces the arts so passionately, and that festival donors have chosen to support An Appalachian Summer Festival so generously. This loyal annual support is the critical element in sustaining the artistic quality of the festival, enabling it to thrive for three decades. If you are not a current festival donor, we hope you will consider making a tax-deductible gift or pledge. Visit our website at appsummer.org/supporters, call 828.262.6084, ext. 105 or inquire at the ticket counter.

FESTIVAL REVENUE

57 percent of festival expenses must be covered by critical private support Your support will make it possible to build the audiences of tomorrow, showcase rising artists, raise national visibility and public awareness of the festival and continue to present the “best of the best!�

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LIFETIME CUMULATIVE FESTIVAL SUPPORT: Since the festival’s inception in 1984, many individuals, corporations and foundations have made significant contributions to the creation and growth of An Appalachian Summer Festival. This list recognizes their cumulative commitments. $1,000,000 AND ABOVE Blue Ridge Electric Membership Corporation The Broyhill Family Foundation Arnold & Muriel Rosen/Rosen-Schaffel Endowment for Classical Music Programming Mr. & Mrs. Neil Schaffel Rowland’s & Westglow Resort & Spa/The Bonnie Schaefer Family Foundation

$500,000 - $999,999 Mr. Paul H. Broyhill The Cannon Foundation, Inc.

Mariam Cannon Hayes Nanette & Budd Mayer

Martin & Doris Rosen SkyBest Communications, Inc.

(a wholly-owned subsidiary of SkyLine Membership Corporation)

$250,000 - $499,999 Mr. & Mrs. John Cooper/ Mast General Store Ford Motor Company

McDonald’s of Boone/ Venda Lerch Northern Trust Company Robert and Lillian Turchin

The Max & Victoria Dreyfus Foundation, Inc. Mr. & Mrs. Willard A. Gortner Anthony & Deborah di Santi Mrs. Florence Hecht, Neal & Isabelle Amdur, & the Flagler & Naples-Fort Myers Greyhound Tracks

Joan & Bernie Keele/Storie Street Grille Mr. & Mrs. Roger Michelson National Endowment for the Arts North Carolina Arts Council Joni & Peter Petschauer R.Y. & Eileen L. Sharpe Foundation

Mrs. Nan Van Every Mr. and Mrs. Ken Wilcox

$100,000 - $249,999 J. Bernard & Shirley Spector Mrs. Allene Broyhill Stevens Keith & Letty Stoneman Mark & Nancy Tafeen Helene & Stephen Weicholz

$50,000 - $99,999 Michael & Judy Adler Allen Wealth Management, LLC Appalachian Hospitality Management Barbara & George Ball Hanes & Lida Boren/ Footsloggers Outdoor & Travel Outfitters Boone Area Visitors Bureau/Town of Boone Boone Ford-Lincoln Sen. & Mrs. James T. Broyhill Mr. & Mrs. Keith Cloyed

Armfield & Rachel Coffey A.J. Fletcher Foundation Lawrence & Barbara Freiman J.C. Goodnight William S. Goodnight Goodnight Brothers Produce, Inc. Dr. & Mrs. Brent Hall Mr. & Mrs. Sol Halpert Dieter & Karyn Herterich Dr. & Mrs. Marc Kadyk Harold Libby & Wanda Rayle-Libby

Dr. & Mrs. Berge Markarian Peabody’s Wine & Beer Merchants The Martin & Doris Rosen Giving Fund/ Debbie Rosen Davidson and David Rosen/ Charles & Nancy Rosenblatt Foundation Tina & Gary Silverstein Bob & Minnie Snead Kent & Shelly Tarbutton/Chetola Resort Mr. J. Wallace Wrightson Mr. & Mrs. Arthur Yergey

$25,000 - $49,999 Appalachian Ski Mountain/ The Moretz Family Drs. William & Sally Atkins Frank & Kay Borkowski Wendy & Mike Brenner Kathleen Price Bryan Family Fund Mr. & Mrs. Arthur Courshon Byrdie & Ed Denison Dewoolfson Down Products Susan & Harvey Durham Ted & Adrienne Finkel The Friedman Family: Ingrid, Mary & Nick Mr. Jim Furman – Wendy’s of Boone Dr. & Mrs. Lowell Furman

Mr. & Mrs. Robert F. Gilley Sonya Rabin Greenfield Susie Greene Holiday Inn Express Billy & Ray Howell Mr. & Mrs. Harry F. Jacobs Ethel & George Kennedy Family Foundation Laurelmor – A Ginn Company Resort Edgar & Nan Lawton Lexington Furniture Industries Linville Ridge Country Club Mr. & Mrs. James T. Lynagh Hospitality Mints, Inc. Karen P. Minges Daniel & Harlene Mitchum Rosanne & Ken Peacock

Edith S. Peiser Betty & Jesse Pike Perfection Equipment Company Drs. Raymond & Judith Pulley John & Joy Safer Mr. & Mrs. Lawrence Singer Sandi Finci Solomon T.G. Solomon Marshall Stein & Denise Grohs David & Ginny Stevens Ms. Helen Taulman Park Terrell/Nationwide Insurance Agency Mr. & Mrs. Dolph von Arx Cindy Wallace & Allen Moseley Mr. & Mrs. Samuel Whalen

$10,000 - $24,999 Homer & Margie Barrett William & Linda Blanton Blue Ridge Mountain Club Charter Communications, Inc. Sue & Steve Chase Cheap Joe’s Art Stuff, Inc. Creekside Electronics Helen Clabough Foundation Alan & Sally Cone Crestwood Resort & Spa Dr. Pamelia S. Cromer Deer Valley Racquet Club Dianne Davant Interiors Foundation of Jewish Philanthropies Ralph Glaser, Jr. & John A. Pfeifer Mr. & Mrs. Julian Good

Mr. & Mrs. Harold Granoff The Bruce J. Heim Foundation Mr. & Mrs. Ronald G. Hester Kenneth Hubbard Anne C. & Myron B. Liptzin Michael & Sara Mayhew Larry & Nanci Tolbert Nance Nationwide Insurance/The Charles Eyler Agency The Nesor Foundation Old World Galleries Edmund F. Perls Anonymous Ron Redmon & Tom Normand Fred & Priscilla Robinette Mr. & Mrs. Frank Ross, Jr. Gerard & Judith Rothschild

Sazingg Jewelers The Sesame Foundation The Shane Family Foundation Gus & Frances Stavros Tarheel Capital Charles Gordon Travis Tweetsie Railroad Mary Underwood & Ben Henderson/ Bare Essentials Natural Market United Technologies Corp. US Airways Mr. & Mrs. Alberto Vadia Mr. Edward Vincz Jeffrey & Cher Zavik Betty E. Yount


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2017 FESTIVAL SUPPORTERS An Appalachian Summer Festival deeply appreciates the support of its contributors. This list reflects contributions and pledges made solely to An Appalachian Summer Festival’s Annual Campaign from October 1, 2016 through June 8, 2017. Please note this list does not include gifts to other areas within Appalachian State University. PREMIER SPONSORS $100,000 and Above Dr. Bonnie Schaefer / Westglow Resort and Spa & Rowland’s Restaurant The Rosen-Schaffel Endowment for Classical Music Programming

LEAD SPONSORS $50,000 - $99,999 Larry & Barbara Freiman Broyhill Family Foundation, Inc.

FESTIVAL SPONSORS $25,000 - $49,999 Martin & Doris Rosen Giving Fund/Debbie Rosen Davidson & David Rosen/ Charles & Nancy Rosenblatt Foundation The Muriel & Arnold Rosen Endowment for the Arts Helene & Stephen Weicholz

CHANCELLOR’S CIRCLE $10,000 - $24,999 McDonald's of Boone/Venda & Ralph Lerch Neil & Nancy Schaffel Tina & Gary Silverstein SkyBest Communications, Inc. Circle S Foundation/Letty & Keith Stoneman

Boone Area Visitors Bureau Wendy & Mike Brenner Goodnight Brothers Produce Company Brent & Tricia Hall Mast General Store/John & Faye Cooper Max & Victoria Dreyfus Foundation

ARTIST’S CIRCLE $6,000 - $9,999 Harold Libby & Wanda Rayle-Libby Chetola Resort/Kent & Shelley Tarbutton Nanette Mayer (in memory of Budd Mayer) Peter & Joni Petschauer Mark & Nancy Tafeen

BRAVO! CIRCLE $3,000 - $5,999 Michael & Judy Adler The Alfred B. & Josette L. Glover Family Foundation Joan & Albert Benbasat (in memory of Esta Perlow) Natalie & Penn Broyhill Sue & Steve Chase Country Inn & Suites Courtyard by Marriott Creekside Electronics, Inc. Lynn & Barry Eisenberg Louis & Merle Feinberg Adrienne Finkel

Nick & Mary Friedman Ralph S. Grier Holiday Inn Express Sandy & Marc Kadyk Anne C. & Myron B. Liptzin Roger & Helen Michelson Drs. Daniel & Harlene Mitchum Panoramic Hospitality Peabody’s Wine & Beer Merchants Scholars Bookshop at the University Bookstore Sandi Finci Solomon Winston-Salem Foundation

BENEFACTOR’S CIRCLE $1,200 - $2,999 Appalachian Home Care/Ellen Harrell Frank & Kay Borkowski Bruce J. Heim Foundation Susan & Harvey Durham (in honor of Nanette Mayer, Lillian Turchin & Nancy and Neil Schaffel) Judie Feinberg & Sonny Harris Susie Greene

Jerry & Rebecca Hutchins Edith S. Peiser Steven Price & Christopher Frye (in memory of Emma Carter Price) R. Y. & Eileen L. Sharpe Foundation Edmund & Louise Reiss Minnie & Bob Snead Kenneth & Gerry Wilcox


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PATRONS Ira & Brenda Abrams Charlie & Ann Baker (in memory of Ellen Reamer) Dick & Margaret Beckman Teri & Wayne Bonomo Hanes & Lida Boren Howard & Kathryne Brafman Lisa Cooper Ralph Glaser, Jr. & John Pfeifer

$600 - $1,199 Molle Grad Megan Hayes & Michael Kitchell (in honor of Kaaren & Lowell Hayes) Sarah & Troy Heustess Linda & Ed Kelly Judith M. Liersch & Allen L. Jennings Morris & Kathleen Lioz Jenny & Wayne Miller Barbara & Mark Moskowitz

Larry & Nanci Tolbert Nance Bill Pelto & Linda Larson Carol Quintero & Laurie Weiner Russell & Sally Robinson Sam Tallman & Mike Zuravel Julie & Tom Trueman Tweetsie Railroad/Chris and Cathy Robbins Mary Underwood & Ben Henderson

CONTRIBUTORS Anonymous Mr. & Mrs. Dean Auten Blowing Rock Yacht Club Dottie & Barry Cook Stuart & Arline Darrow Byrdie Rae Denison (in memory of Edward L. Denison) Tracey & Paul Ford Hank Foreman & John Baynor

$300 - $599 Gaugert Financial, Inc. (in honor of Anna Gaugert) Sali Gill-Johnson (in memory of Jack Branch) Ernest & Shelby Lane Reneé & David Lieberman Cheryl & James Long Jane & Grady Lonon Dr. & Mrs. Berge Markarian

Gus & Jean Perry Denise & William Ringler Traci Royster (in honor of Sarah Heustess) Drs. Bernard & Michaela Segall Dr. Morry & Margie Segall Cyn D. & John Weaver Janet H. Wilson

FRIENDS Ellis & Barbara Aycock Bill Barbour Kate R. Barrett John & Bettie Bond James & Margaret Bragg Rose & Craig Bridgeman Nakita Brooks Dennis & Anne Carlton-Jones Christy & Brad Chenausky Stephanie Poet Cohen (in memory of Jim & Dolly Poet) Anonymous Dee Dundon Mrs. Billy Elliott (in memory of Michael S. Elliott) Nelson & Rhonda Faro Anna Gaugert (in memory of Jack Branch)

$125 - $299 Dan & Dodie Glowa (in memory of Ben Bradley) Gwen & Bernie Golan Gerald & Sydney Gura Scott & Kathleen Haynes Laura & Kenny Kaufman Gregg & Bonnie Marland Conor McKenzie Ray Moretz Susan B. Morgan Susan & Doug Morton Mike & Sandra Perry Susan & Bruce Pettyjohn (in memory of Jack Branch) Bob & Karen Powell (in memory of Jack Branch) Priscilla Rich

John Rogers Tish & Tom Rokoske Mary Rupp (in memory of Richard “Dick” Rupp) Patrick K. Setzer Paula & Richard Shapiro Bernice Snow Barbara Sugerman (in memory of Barry Sugerman) Claudia Van Essen Fred & Barbara Webb Mary & Dale Whisenant Ruth G. Williams (in memory of Robert L. Williams) Carolyn G. Witt

MEMBERS Gerald & Julia Adams Ronald and Radie Armstrong Francine Barr Michael & Joan Bell Frank & Kay Borkowski (in memory of Jack Branch) Larry & Carol Brown Elaine & Jim Crowell Anonymous Ethan Dodson Sondra & Bernie Edwards Sandra W. Folts Susan Graham (in memory of Dot Barber)

up to $124 Karen Gross Jeff Handler Clark & Karen Havighurst (in honor of Michael & Annie Liptzin) Murrell & Kathy Johnson Bonnie Marmor & Steven Goldstein Margaret McCoy (in memory of Helen Weissberg) Anonymous Beth Mueller Barbara Lazar (in memory of Budd Mayer) Drs. Rao Aluri & Mary Reichel Marty Rice

Marilyn Seward Jim & Sandy Sheatsley Joanie & Robert Shirley Helen Sirett & Ken Hendrix Ineke Thomas Carol & Hank Thompson Daisy Goodnight Waldrep Wes & Lynne Waugh Chuck & Lynne Weiss (in honor of Dr. John Pfeifer) Bob & Maggie Wilson


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WELCOME TO THE HIGH COUNTRY! Come and explore the Boone area for a true mountain experience like no other. From the majestic peaks of the Blue Ridge Mountains to the scenic overlooks on the Blue Ridge Parkway, the Boone area provides many opportunities to relax and enjoy nature’s beauty.

NEED A PLACE TO STAY? An Appalachian Summer Festival and its hotel sponsors come together to make a trip to the High Country stress-free and convenient! Whether you prefer a luxury resort or the comfort of a chain hotel, packages for selected performances are offered at various accommodations in the High Country! For more information, visit appsummer.org/visit

WESTGLOW RESORT & SPA 800-562-0807 westglow.com

CHETOLA RESORT & THE BOB TIMBERLAKE INN

HOLIDAY INN EXPRESS

800-243-8652 chetola.com/app-summer-package

828-264-2451 expressboone.com Rate Code: IXNM9

COURTYARD BY MARRIOTT

LA QUINTA INN & SUITES

COUNTRY INN & SUITES

828-265-7676 marriott.com/hkybn

828-262-1234 visitboone.com

828-264-4234 countryinns.com/appsummerfest

FINE ARTS & GREAT FOOD Make it a memorable evening with dinner and a show! Discounts are offered at the following restaurants for festival ticket holders.

IN BOONE: Makoto’s Japanese Steakhouse & Sushi Bar Red Onion Pepper’s Restaurant The Local Lost Province Brewing Co.

IN BLOWING ROCK: Rowland’s Restaurant at Westglow Resort & Spa Timberlake’s Restaurant at Chetola Resort


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THE ARTS AT APPALACHIAN

HAYES SCHOOL OF MUSIC music.appstate.edu

DEPARTMENT OF THEATRE AND DANCE theatreanddance.appstate.edu

THE SCHAEFER CENTER PRESENTS... Presented during the academic year, this series supports the teaching mission of the university by presenting a diverse array of music, dance and theatre events designed to enrich the cultural, educational and economic landscape of the campus and surrounding region. By creating memorable performance experiences, the series promotes the power and excitement of the live performance experience; provides a “window on the world” through the artistry of nationally and internationally renowned artists and showcases some of the finest artists of our region. 2017-18 SEASON: TajMo: The Taj Mahal & Keb’ Mo’ Band October 6 Ailey II Dance Company October 26 Us the Duo November 17 Les Ballets Trockadero de Monte Carlo February 9 “Visions of Cape Breton” Natalie MacMaster & Donnell Leahy February 27 Golden Dragon Acrobats March 16 Appalachian’s Department of Theatre & Dance and the Hayes School of Music: Sweeney Todd April 13-15 Black Violin April 20 theschaefercenter.org

APPLAUSE! K-12 PERFORMING ARTS SERIES Appalachian State University’s arts education and outreach program strives to broaden and deepen arts experiences for audiences of all ages, while ensuring access to the arts for young audiences, building future audiences for the arts, and inspiring a love of learning through the arts. 2017-18 SERIES: TheatreworksUSA’s “Click, Clack, Moo” October 5 Ailey II Dance Company October 26 Appalachian’s Department of Theatre & Dance: Fall Appalachian Dance Ensemble November 16 Natalie MacMaster & Donnell Leahy February 27 Golden Dragon Acrobats March 16 Banff Mountain Film Festival World Tour: Student Edition March 21 Black Violin April 20 theschaefercenter.org/applause

DEPARTMENT OF ART art.appstate.edu

THE HUGHLENE BOSTIAN FRANK VISITING WRITERS SERIES visitingwriters.appstate.edu

BELK LIBRARY & INFORMATION COMMONS: GLOBAL FILM SERIES guides.library.appstate.edu/globalfilmseries

CANNON MUSIC CAMP 2017 PERFORMANCE SCHEDULE Thursday, June 29 7 pm

Faculty Recital I

Sunday, July 2 2 pm

“Kaleidoscope Concert”

Friday, July 7 7 pm

Faculty Recital II

Sunday, July 9 2 pm 7 pm

Honors Recital I Selected camper solo performances Piano Student’s Recital

Tuesday, July 11 7 pm

Honors Recital II Chamber Groups

Thursday, July 13 7 pm

FINALE CONCERT I Percussion Ensemble String Orchestra

Friday, July 14 7 pm

FINALE CONCERT II Treble Choir Chamber Singers Concert Choir Wind Ensemble

Saturday, July 15 10 am

FINALE CONCERT III All Things Jazz Jazz Ensemble Jazz Vocal Ensemble

12 pm

FINALE CONCERT IV Symphonic Band

1 pm

FINALE CONCERT V Symphony Orchestra

TURCHIN CENTER FOR THE VISUAL ARTS Located on King Street in the heart of downtown Boone, at the crossroads between campus and community, the center’s exhibitions focus on a blend of new and historically important artwork and feature works of nationally and internationally renowned artists, as well as many of the finest artists in the region. With its multi-faceted education and outreach programs, the center is a dynamic, living, breathing presence in the Appalachian community, creating opportunities for people of all ages and backgrounds to experience the power and excitement of the visual arts! tcva.org

Cannon Music Camp 813 Rivers Street, Rosen Concert Hall Appalachian State University, Boone, NC Concerts are free and open to the public. cannon.appstate.edu


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THE TURCHIN CENTER FOR THE VISUAL ARTS TCVA.ORG LUNCH & LEARN WEDNESDAYS NOON, TURCHIN CENTER FOR THE VISUAL ARTS LECTURE HALL FREE EVENT

Interactive and informative lectures provide an insider’s look at the festival programming from experts in the field. Bring a bagged lunch to enjoy during the lecture! July 5- Barbara Hardy & Bob Ray, Circles of Influence Exhibition Artists Circles of Influence highlights Barbara Hardy and Bob Ray, artists who have been living and working together for over twenty-five years, sharing a deeply rewarding intimate, creative and artistic bond. Their two-person exhibition in the Turchin Center’s Main Gallery (which opens on July 7) brings together their artwork for only the second time in a public venue. July 12- Jackie Alexander, NC Black Repertory Company The North Carolina Black Repertory Company (NCBRC), North Carolina’s only professional black theatre company, exposes diverse audiences to classics and new works of African-American drama. In this presentation, NCBRC Artistic Director Jackie Alexander will lead a discussion about the festival and its production of Maid’s Door (to be presented at Valborg Theatre on July 13 and 14). July 19- Mary Anne Redding: A Walk with the Curator Turchin Center Curator and Assistant Director Mary Anne Redding will provide an overview and curator’s perspective on the center’s featured summer exhibitions. Mary Anne will lead participants on a walking tour of the exhibitions with a Q&A in each of the gallery spaces throughout the Turchin Center. July 26- Maryrose Carroll: Reflections on the Rosen Sculpture Competition For nearly 30 years, Maryrose Carroll has been a central figure in the world of contemporary sculpture. In this lecture-demonstration, Maryrose will examine the Rosen Sculpture Competition & Exhibition and its influence on sculpture in North Carolina. This project is made possible by funding from the North Carolina Humanities Council, a statewide nonprofit and affiliate of the National Endowment for the Humanities

August 2- Suzi Mills: Connecting Students, Community & Visiting Artists through Cultural Music Pedagogy Susan W. Mills is Professor and Director of Music Education in the Hayes School of Music. Her teaching focuses on development

of accessible music education that is relevant, balanced, and inclusive of both classical and folk music traditions. Her most recent publication is “An Ethnography of a Southern Roots Music Community: Field, Swamp and Internet” in the book Contemporary Research in Music Learning Across the Lifespan.

VISUAL ARTS WORKSHOPS Explore your inner artist with a workshop! Artists of all skill levels welcome. Enrollment is limited and pre-registration is required. For detailed information visit tcva.org/workshops or to register, call 828-262-3017. FOR KIDS & TEENS:

EMPOWERED JOURNALING July 10-14 Ages 12-16

DRAWING FROM LIFE July 11, 13, 18, 20, 25 & 27 Ages 10-15

FAMOUS ARTISTS July 24-28 Ages 6-12

TRASH ART August 7-11 Ages 10-15 FOR ADULTS:

TRASH TO TREASURE July 6 & 7 Ages 16 and up

MOMIX MASTERCLASS Friday, July 21 10-11:30am Appalachian State University Dance Studio, Varisty Gym Free Event Advance registration preferred: gilljohnsons@appstate.edu or 828-262-6084, ext. 101 Traditional ballet barre and floor warm-up, followed by MOMIX-inspired work, finishing with a Q&A and photo session.


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Young People’s Global Film Series TUESDAYS

1PM, SCHAEFER CENTER FOR THE PERFORMING ARTS GENERAL ADMISSION: $5 includes movie ticket, snack and drink

After a very successful inaugural year, The Young People’s Global Film Series is back as part of An Appalachian Summer Festival’s 2017 season, featuring five motion pictures from Thailand, Canada, Kenya, The Netherlands and Jordan. Dr. John Pfeifer will present a brief introduction prior to each film.

TUESDAY, JULY 18

Duma Recommended for All Ages

In this tale of growing up and letting go, an orphaned cheetah becomes the best friend of a young boy and his family living in rural South Africa. When forced to leave the farm and move to the city, the boy runs away to the mountains with his pet cheetah. SOUTH AFRICA; RATED PG FOR MILD ADVENTURE PERIL; DIRECTED BY CARROLL BALLARD (2005); 100 MINUTES

TUESDAY, JUNE 27

TUESDAY, JULY 25

My Lucky Elephant

Secrets of War

Recommended for All Ages

Recommended for Ages 10+ (Film features subtitles)

A young orphaned boy and a baby elephant end up together in an adventure that takes them from a jungle to a bustling city. They’ll discover that through the laughter, the fun, the challenges and the surprises, life is better when you share it with a friend. THAILAND; RATED PG FOR BRIEF MILD LANGUAGE; DIRECTED BY ERIC SCHWAB (2013); 91 MINUTES.

TUESDAY, JULY 11

Virginia’s Run Recommended for All Ages

Secrets of War puts both the danger and the humanity of wartime friendships squarely on the shoulders of three children who must face unusual circumstances with a maturity far beyond their years. NETHERLANDS; UNRATED; DIRECTED BY DENIS BOTS (2014); 95 MINUTES.

TUESDAY, AUGUST 1

Theeb Recommended for Ages 12+ (Some violence, film features subtitles)

In the tradition of such timeless stories as My Friend Flicka, Black Beauty and The Black Stallion comes a touching tale of friendship between a young girl devastated by the loss of her mother, and the young colt who gives her hope when all seems lost.

Nominated for the 2016 Academy Award for Best Foreign Language Film, mischievous Theeb finds himself trapped amidst threatening terrain riddled with Ottoman mercenaries, Arab revolutionaries, and outcast Bedouin raiders.

CANADA; RATED PG FOR RECKLESS BEHAVIOR AND LANGUAGE; DIRECTED BY PETER MARKLE (2002); 103 MINUTES.

JORDAN; UNRATED; DIRECTED BY NAJI ABU NOWAR (2016); 100 MINUTES.


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THE HELENE AND STEPHEN WEICHOLZ GLOBAL FILM SERIES

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 28 7 PM, SCHAEFER CENTER FOR THE PERFORMING ARTS

In Warsaw, December 1945, the second World War is finally over and French Red Cross doctor Mathilde is treating the last of the French survivors of the German camps. When a panicked Benedictine nun appears at the clinic begging Mathilde to follow her back to the convent, what she finds there is shocking: a holy sister about to give birth and several more in advanced stages of pregnancy. A non-believer, Mathilde enters the sisters’ fiercely private world, dictated by the rituals of their order and the strict Reverend Mother. Fearing the shame of exposure, the hostility of the occupying Soviet troops and local Polish communists and while facing an unprecedented crisis of faith, the nuns increasingly turn to Mathilde as their beliefs and traditions clash with harsh realities. POLAND/FRANCE; PG-13; DIRECTED BY ANNE FONTAINE (2016); 115 MINUTES

Pre-film talk with Dr. John Pfeifer begins at 7pm, with the film beginning at approximately 7:30pm. Concessions, including popcorn, beer, wine and cold beverages are available for purchase. With special thanks to our generous sponsors for this series, Helene and Stephen Weicholz.

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BROYHILL CHAMBER ENSEMBLE TUESDAY, JUNE 30 8 PM, ROSEN CONCERT HALL

Sponsored by McDonald’s of Boone

Gil Morgenstern, violin; Grace Park, violin Kathryn Lockwood, viola; Caroline Stinson, cello Reiko Uchida, piano

Piano Trio in G Major (“Gypsy Rondo”), Hob XV:25

Joseph Haydn

String Trio in D Major, Op. 21. C

Sergei Ivanovich Taneyev

Quintet for Piano and Strings, Op. 44

Robert Schumann

The Broyhill Chamber Ensemble Concert Series is generously supported by the Broyhill Family Foundation (in memory of Faye Broyhill), and by Ralph and Venda Lerch/McDonald’s of Boone. Additional performance underwriting has been provided by Nanette Mayer and her family (in memory of Budd Mayer), Joni and Peter Petschauer, the Muriel and Arnold Rosen Endowment for the Arts and the Rosen-Schaffel Endowment for Classical Music Programming. The 2017 concert series by the Broyhill Chamber Ensemble is dedicated to the memory of Mr. Jack Branch. With special thanks to Appalachia Cookie Company, for a generous donation of refreshments during this evening’s performance. Biographical information for this evening’s performers beings on page 78

Acclaimed for his artistry and technical brilliance, violinist Gil Morgenstern is devoted to expanding the traditional classical music concert experience. His vision is THE BUDD AND NANETTE MAYER CHAIR to unlock the mystery surrounding classical music by presenting the audience with a more complete concert experience, meticulously curated from start to finish, placing music in an historical and artistic context, and organically integrating it with other artistic disciplines in innovative and unexpected ways. The New York Times describes him as a “brilliant and musically curious artist.” Morgenstern founded Reflections Series International with the goal of creating original programs combining music, visual art, cinema, dance, poetry and prose. Morgenstern invites audiences to reflect on the relationships between artistic disciplines and to reflect anew on universal themes. Since its inaugural performance in 2007, Reflections Series International enjoys a presence throughout the United States and Europe. Morgenstern is also the co-founder of Nine Circles Chamber Theatre, a creative organization dedicated to exploring the collaborative nature of inter-disciplinary performance, and of the Broyhill Chamber Ensemble which specializes in Baroque, Classical, Romantic and contemporary chamber music. A violinist with a long history of performing in the world’s great concert halls, Morgenstern’s career has taken him to international venues including Wigmore Hall, London; Cultural Center Concert Hall, Hong Kong; the American Academy, Rome; Palazzio Vecchio, Florence; El Teatro Sucre, Quito; and Arts Centre and State Theatre, Melbourne, Australia. He has also toured the U.S. extensively, performing in recitals and as guest soloist with many leading orchestras including the symphonies of St. Louis, Baltimore, Louisville, Indianapolis, Denver, Milwaukee, New Jersey and North Carolina. The New York Times has hailed his playing as, “a perfect demonstration of supreme ability.” The South China Morning Post describes him


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as “a rare poet of the violin” and according to The Washington Post “Morgenstern played a program that tested every part of a violinist’s equipment and he did it all beautifully.” Gil Morgenstern has also shared the stage with such eminent musicians as Lynn Harrell, Philippe Entremont, André-Michel Schub, Jeffrey Kahane, Sharon Isbin, and Heinz Holliger, and has collaborated with United States Poet Laureate Robert Pinsky, Pulitzer Prizewinning poet Yusef Komunyakaa, the actress Claire Bloome, and performance artist Laurie Anderson. Morgenstern’s discography includes works by Beethoven, Fauré, Copland, Ravel, Kodaly, Sessions and the awardwinning American composer George Tsontakis. His latest recording, 20th Century Duos for Violin and Cello, was the No. 1 classical CD for over a month on eMusic, the largest online store for independent music in the world, and was one of the top ten best-selling classical music albums on Amazon. The New York Times raved, “the music is terrific and the performances compelling

on this surprisingly exciting and excellently engineered recording.” Morgenstern records for the Koch International Classics, MMC and Engine Company labels, and can regularly be heard on National Public Radio and classical music radio stations across the country. Morgenstern is also deeply committed to education, specializing in the synthesis between academic subjects and the arts. In 2014, Morgenstern was named Artist-in-Residence for Interdisciplinary Studies at Avenues: The World School in New York City. Gil Morgenstern’s many honors include a command performance at the White House when he was just 21 years old, a performance at the inaugural festivities for President Clinton, and a citation from the floor of the House of Representatives entered in the Congressional Record for outstanding service in the arts. Highlights of Gil Morgenstern’s recent and upcoming seasons include interdisciplinary performances at Lincoln Center, New York City’s 92nd Street Y, and Harvard

University, as well as performances in Rome, Florence, Venice, Capri, Toronto, London, and Alaska. Gil Morgenstern lives in New York City.

PROGRAM NOTES: Joseph Haydn Piano Trio in G Major, H. X: 25 (“Gypsy Rondo”) (Born March 31, 1732, in Rohrau, Austria; died May 31, 1809, in Vienna) In the 1790’s, Haydn wrote nineteen piano trios, twelve of which were published in four sets of three, each set dedicated to a woman whose talents he probably reflected in the music of the piano parts. Even this late in the eighteenth century, the music did not appear with equality among the parts, although parity had been coming for some time. The important defining characteristic took its character from a functional, perhaps social, not musical aspect: almost all chamber music was composed for private performance and for the pleasure of the performers. Composers tailored this private music to the tastes and skills of specific players; consequently, Haydn’s


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late trios contain some of his most difficult, daring and original music, and they were intended for a group of very proficient, largely female performers. These performers had a significant influence on the art of composition of that time; the elaborate dedications to them that often accompanied the music did not constitute empty gestures. In fact, the amateur musician population in the last quarter of the eighteenth century had grown so rapidly that Haydn and other composers wrote much music to satisfy the demand brought on by the rush of piano sales and the increased publication of music for home performers. During his second long stay in London in 1794 and 1795, Haydn composed a series of three piano sonatas for Theresa Jansen, a piano student of the composer Clementi, and around the same time, he also wrote three piano trios for her. Haydn knew Jansen, both a performer and a piano teacher, well enough to stand as witness at her marriage to the accomplished artist/engraver Gaetano Bartolozzi in 1795. The first edition of the Trios called the works Sonatas for the Piano-Forte, with an Accompaniment for the Violin and Violincello, and although the string parts have a relatively high degree of individual freedom and identity in the ensemble, these are really pianists’ pieces. The Trios clearly reveal Haydn’s high opinion of Jansen. The piano writing is as brilliant, as colorful and as difficult as that found in Mozart and Beethoven’s concertos. H.C. Landon wrote, “It is almost as if Haydn wished to show the world what possibilities in tonal relationships, harmonic subtleties, instrumental combinations and sheer brilliance of form the genre of the trio could display.” This trio was first published in 1790, for John Bland’s series Le Tout Ensemble. Haydn dedicated this “Gypsy Rondo” Trio and the trios that preceded and followed it, H. 24 and H. 26, to Rebecca Schroeter, the widow of a composer. Haydn and she developed an intimate relationship; some touching letters from her to Haydn survive. Once she wrote: “No language can express half the Love and affection I feel for you, you are Dearer to me every Day of my life.” Haydn treasured the relationship and cherished her letters; he even admitted

to one of his biographers that “she was a beautiful and lovable woman, whom I would very readily have married if I had been free then.” This trio is one of the two trios Haydn wrote for piano, flute and cello. At the time of its composing, Haydn had begun to liberate the strings from their conventional function of “accompanying” the keyboard instrument. Instead of featuring the violin, Haydn wrote for the flute as the discant instrument, yet he felt the substitution of a violin was always possible, and as he was a good businessman, he was most willing for the violin to be used anytime as an alternate. (Nevertheless, since Haydn had adjusted himself to writing for the flute, the flute certainly would capture the character of the music.) The cello, in a role that it inherited from the trio sonata of the Baroque era, basically concentrates on a harmonic bass line. It plays along with the piano left hand, a gesture perhaps necessary because of the relatively weak bass register of the pianos of the time. The work was scored originally for fortepiano, a forerunner of the piano, although when Haydn composed it, the part was generally played on a harpsichord. The trio was later republished in pianotrio form. There are three movements. The gentle opening movement, Andante, begins with a straightforward theme introduced by the violin; it continues in a cross between a rondo and a set of variations with much ornamentation for the solo piano. Most of the variations include repeated sections. Here, as elsewhere in the trio, there is a clear shifting of relationship between strings and piano. The second movement is slow, Poco Adagio, in three-part form, with the piano at first carrying the theme with strings accompanying; then the violin takes the lead with a particularly lovely subject. Throughout, the cello remains as support. When the first theme returns, the piano again articulates the melody. The final movement, which gives the trio its nickname, is a lively Rondo all’ ongarese. Since Haydn had spent the majority of his adult working life employed at Eszterháza, in Hungary, he regularly was exposed to both gypsy

and Hungarian folk music and was one of the first composers to incorporate popular folk music into his own work, as he did in this trio. The spirited dance melody on which the movement is based, typical of a Maygar gypsy folk theme, resembles the kind of theme Haydn often used. Haydn also includes verbunkos, recruiting dances, originating when army officials hired gypsies to perform dance music with the specific purpose of attracting peasants to the recruiting posts. This final movement is unusual because it is the only Rondo finale Haydn wrote in any piano trio of this period. Although the trio concludes in the major tonality, the rondo has many minor episodes. Sergei Ivanovich Taneyev String Trio in D Major (Born November 25, 1856 in Vladimir, Russia; died June 19, 1915 in Moscow) Taneyev was a uniquely important figure in Russian musical history. From a cultured and literary family of Russian nobility, Taneyev entered the Moscow Conservatory at the age of nine. There he studied composition with Tchaikovsky and piano with Nicolai Rubinstein. He became the first student in the Conservatory’s history to win the gold medal for both composition and for performing (piano) and was also the first person ever to be awarded the Conservatory's Great Gold Medal. Taneyev attended Moscow University for a brief period; Turgenev was among his acquaintances there. During his trip to Europe in 1876 and 1877, Taneyev met Zola, Flaubert, Franck, and Saint-Saëns; two decades later, he spent the summer of 1895 with Tolstoy at his summer home. Tolstoy’s wife Sofia became enamored of him, embarrassing her children and making Tolstoy jealous, but Taneyev reportedly was not aware of her feelings. Taneyev was the soloist in the Russian premieres of the Tchaikovsky Piano Concertos No. 1 and 2, and became one of Tchaikovsky’s closest friends as well as one of his most frank personal critics. Taneyev became known for his interpretations of Bach, Mozart, and Beethoven, and taught piano, composition and harmony at the Conservatory,


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where his students included Glière, Rachmaninoff and Scriabin. After the Russian Revolution, he resigned from his post at the Conservatory, where he was Director of Music from 1885 to 1889, and resumed his career as a concert pianist and composer. Rimsky-Korsakov described Taneyev's compositional process: “Before setting out for the real expounding of a composition, Taneyev used to precede it with a multitude of sketches and studies: he used to write fugues, canons, and various contrapuntal interlacings on the individual themes, phrases, and motives of the coming composition; and only after gaining thorough experience in its component parts did he take up the general plan of the composition and the carrying out of this plan, knowing by that time, as he did, and perfectly, the nature of the material he had at his disposal and the possibilities of building with that material.” Taneyev believed in the ideal of national music, writing: “The task of every Russian composer consists in furthering the creation of national music. The history of western music gives us the answer as to what should be done to attain this: apply to the Russian song the workings of the mind that were applied to the song of western nations and we will have our own national music. Begin with elementary contrapuntal forms, pass to more complex ones, elaborate the form of the Russian fugue, and from there it is only a step to complex instrumental types. The Europeans took centuries to get there, we need far less. We know the way, the goal, we can profit by their experience.” His works, nevertheless, reflect the European, and especially the German, orientation of the Moscow Conservatory, rather than the Russian nationalist school. Tchaikovsky commented on his work: “He is the greatest master of counterpoint in Russia; I am not even sure there is his equal in the West." A master of polyphonic composition, Taneyev also gave special attention to thematic development, seeking to realize a balance between the emotional and the rational in music. His works for string trio demonstrate his contrapuntal abilities, perhaps the first that a Russian composer had displayed. His string trios

are brilliant examples of this skill in counterpoint and also his generous use of Romantic harmonies. His first foray into the trio genre came in 1879 with this Trio in D Major. In a major key, this trio is highly spirited, clearly following the structures and style of high Classicism. The first movement of this fourmovement work is a gay, spirited Allegro giocoso; the second movement, usually the slow movement in most trios, is a Menuetto with trio and coda, while the third movement is the slow movement, Andante, and the final movement, Vivace, brings the work to a close with a quick and joyful romp. Robert Schumann Quintet for Piano and Strings in E-Flat Major, Op. 44 (Born June 8, 1810, in Zwickau; died July 29, 1856, in Endenich) Throughout his career, Schumann composed a series of works in related forms and styles. In 1840, when he married Clara Wieck, he composed almost only songs, more than 130, in a great outpouring of love and gratitude. His attention was diverted to the orchestra in 1841, when he wrote four symphonic compositions and the first movement of his Piano Concerto. In 1842, he put other work aside to concentrate on chamber music, and in a furious burst of creative energy, composed three string quartets, a piano quartet and this piano quintet, in three months. This quintet has an important position in Schumann’s oeuvre: it is credited with building his reputation as well as creating the standard instrumentation for piano quintets to come. Schumann revolutionized the musical character of the piano quintet with his instrumentation, a standard string quartet (two violins, viola, and cello) plus a piano. When, before him, Schubert scored his Trout Quintet, leaving out the second violin, always present in quartets, and instead included double bass, he established the quintet instrumentation that would be used until Schumann established a new model, which has been used since Schumann’s time by Brahms, Dvořák,

Franck, Fauré, Elgar, Bloch, Shostakovich and many others. Schumann's choice to deviate from Schubert’s model and pair the piano with a standard string quartet reflected the changing technical capabilities and cultural importance of all these instruments. Schumann dedicated the quintet to his wife, Clara, who played the piano part at its premiere. At the second performance, Mendelssohn played piano because Clara had suddenly become ill. The more established Mendelssohn praised the work but suggested that Schumann replace the second trio of the Scherzo with something more spirited; Schumann, receptive to his suggestion, reworked it in time for its debut, on January 8, 1843, in Leipzig. The first movement, Allegro brillante, starts with a powerful, expansive main subject and bold opening chords in all the instruments. Schumann skillfully utilizes this declarative main subject for elements of all the secondary subjects. The second and very poetic subject begins in the piano with a kind of abbreviated statement of the theme; then the cello and viola, responding antiphonally, embellish the second theme. The development utilizes two measures of the opening theme in a very quick tempo; a very regular recapitulation closes the melodic movement. The slow second movement, Un poco largamente, In modo d’una Marcia (“In the Style of a March”) showcases two contrasting episodes. This march has more of a somber character than a parade-like feel. The violin introduces brief phrases with an almost uncanny and compulsive emphasis on middle C; they grow to a broad theme that the violin and cello play. The middle section comforts the listener with lyricism, and then the quietly intense initially clipped march theme returns, almost as a refrain, finally yielding to an Agitato section where the piano leads. The critic Arthur Cohn noted that original music was rarely composed to accompany silent films; instead filmmakers searched diligently for already composed music in certain thematic moods to aid in the pantomimic drama. As a theme of menace for certain types of silent films, this movement has served frequently. In


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the second episode, a stormy Agitato section, the piano provides a backdrop of triplets behind ominous brooding in the strings. The Scherzo third movement, Molto vivace, consists of virtually nothing but ascending and descending scales, creating a sense of exhilaration with its rhythmic and harmonic variety. Two completely contrasting trios depend on rhythmic patterns for their effects. Although the first feels pleasant and relaxed, the second has a restless character in a rustic dance reminiscent of Hungarian gypsy music. The latter section is the one Schumann rewrote following Mendelssohn’s suggestion. The vigorous finale, Allegro ma non troppo, combines elements of sonata and rondo forms. Fugue dominates the last movement that begins with a kind of Slavic theme that soon occupies all five instruments. When Schumann introduces the second theme, a disguised version of the first theme accompanies it. In the coda, Schumann uses the first movement theme in combination with the last movement theme in a double fugue style, creating a most impressive, memorable conclusion and giving the work a sense of unity. Program Notes: Susan Halpern, Š 2017

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THE HELENE AND STEPHEN WEICHOLZ GLOBAL FILM SERIES

WEDNESDAY, JULY 5 7 PM, SCHAEFER CENTER FOR THE PERFORMING ARTS

Set in modern day Greece, Worlds Apart is comprised of three separate narratives, each following a love story between a foreigner and a Greek. Each story represents a different generation falling in love during a time of socioeconomic turmoil that dominates Southern Europe as a whole, only to connect as a single story in the end. Almost like a triptych work of art where each painting stands alone, its true impact lies when viewed as a whole. Worlds Apart follows the characters’ difficult path to love and the complications in the world around them. Nevertheless, Greece, despite its harsh realities, is still a place where truth, beauty and humanity exist. A place where love can thrive, even in the darkest hour. GREECE; UNRATED; DIRECTED BY CHRISTOPHER PAPAKALIATIS (2015); 113 MINUTES

Pre-film talk with Dr. John Pfeifer begins at 7pm, with the film beginning at approximately 7:30pm. Concessions, including popcorn, beer, wine and cold beverages are available for purchase. With special thanks to our generous sponsors for this series, Helene and Stephen Weicholz.

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CELEBRATE THE FINE ART OF

EXHIBITION DATES:

JULY 7 - AUGUST 2 SMITH GALLERY, SCHAEFER CENTER FOR THE PERFORMING ARTS

Throughout the course of An Appalachian Summer Festival, visitors to the Schaefer Center are invited to enjoy work by several talented artists from the local community. Artwork is displayed on both the main and mezzanine levels of the lobby, and many of the works are offered for sale! An Appalachian Summer Festival and the Turchin Center for the Visual Arts wish to thank Dr. Alice Roess for the inspiration she provided for this exhibition program.

PAM AYOUB (quilting) VICKIE BEAVER (painting) ALEX HALLMARK (sculpture/bronzes) JANE MEYERS (original jewelry) CAMILLE REED (painting) ALICE ROESS (ink drawing)

Jane Meyers

Alex Hallmark

Alice Roess

Vickie Beaver

Pam Ayoub

Camille Reed


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THE TURCHIN CENTER FOR THE VISUAL ARTS TCVA.ORG SUMMER EXHIBITION CELEBRATION July 7 | Friday, 6-10pm FREE EVENT

Celebrate summer at the Turchin Center and “engage, discover and connect through the arts!” The Summer Exhibition Celebration is an opportunity for art lovers to meet the artists, enjoy refreshments, and spend time with fellow arts patrons, while viewing collections in seven galleries filled with a diverse mix of contemporary art from local, regional, and international artists. TCVA summer programming is sponsored in part by:

FEATURED EXHIBITIONS Circles of Influence: Barbara Hardy & Bob Ray July 7-December 2 Main Gallery

Barbara Hardy, Visible Ghosts, Mixed media, found objects

Circles of Influence highlights Barbara Hardy and Bob Ray, artists who have been living and working together for over twenty-five years. The artist’s shared love of rich texture, layered Bob Ray, Birthday Party, Oil and patterns, and the mixed media on canvas detritus of life will be immediately apparent, although each artist’s practice and techniques are uniquely their own. Both artists work in a variety of similar media using found objects as well as more traditional art-making materials.

This project is supported by the N.C. Arts Council, a division of the Department of Natural & Cultural Resources.

Images of Social Justice from the Segura Arts Studio July 7-October 7 Mezzanine Gallery Images of Social Justice, on loan from the Segura Arts Studio at the Notre Dame Center for Arts and Culture, illustrates the history of Segura Art Studio by describing its mission of working with underrepresented artists through their published artwork. Founded by master printer Enrique Chagoya, You are Here #4, 2003, Lithograph Joseph Segura, the studio Courtesy Segura Arts Studio has played an important role in contemporary printmaking with an initial focus on collaboration with artist-printmakers and on the technical aspects and aesthetics of various print processes. The initial focus was expanded to include artists whose creative work had a strong political message. The studio continues to emphasize the importance of collaborative practice as well as education and activism.

In One: Siping Zhang July 7-October 7 Community Gallery Siping Zhang served as a visiting artist/ scholar in the Department of Art at Appalachian State University during the 2016-17 academic year. Siping Zhang, Untitled, ceramic, 2016/17 The Turchin Center for the Visual Arts is partnering with the art department to present this important international artist, with an emphasis on the conceptual understanding, perspective and language of clay.


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ICONIPOP: Michael Turchin June 2-September 9 Gallery A

Michael Turchin, Loves Me Not, Oil on canvas

Since his arrival on the international art scene in 2012, Michael Turchin has quickly become one of today's rising stars in the Pop Art genre. Inspired by Hollywood’s effervescent pop culture, Turchin's unique use of vibrant color, dynamic patterns, and unmistakable humor has established his modern signature take on retro celebrity-driven pop art.

Behind the Door: Vanity’s Demand: Milisa TaylorHicks June 2-September 9 Gallery B

Milisa Taylor-Hicks, Arbre de treize, Alternative photographic process

Deeply influenced by the journals and writings of Anaïs Nin, Milisa Taylor-Hicks creates images of fragile beauty; she embraces the idea of metaphor to weave personal narratives through visual poetry. Although her images are not self-portraits in the traditional sense, she collaborates with trusted models who stand in not only for the photographer but also for all woman who struggle to forge their own rules in cultures that tend to mediate emotional excess.

Wayne Trapp, A Life in the Arts April 7-November 4 Bridge Gallery Nationally acclaimed sculptor and painter, Wayne Trapp, is being honored with an exhibition featuring his intimate sculptural forms in bronze and steel, drawings in pencil and ink on paper and oil paintings that deliver to the eye a feast of color and stroke saturated with childlike Wayne Trapp, Always Turn Left, curiosity and adult confidence. Oil on canvas Trapp made his first sculpture at the age of nine and didn’t stop creating until his death last November.

CONTINUING EXHIBITIONS Collective Vigilance: Speaking for the New River February 3-July 29 Mayer Gallery

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AN EVENING WITH

A SCHAEFER POPULAR SERIES EVENT

SATURDAY, JULY 8 8 PM, SCHAEFER CENTER FOR THE PERFORMING ARTS

Sutton Foster can currently be seen starring as the lead of Darren Star’s hit TV Land series, “Younger.” Broadway: Violet, Anything Goes (Tony Award), Shrek, Young Frankenstein, The Drowsy Chaperone, Little Women, Thoroughly Modern Millie (Tony Award), Les Misérables, Annie, The Scarlet Pimpernel, Grease. Off-Broadway: Sweet Charity (The Pershing Square Signature Center) The Wild Party (City Center Encores!), Trust (Second Stage), Anyone Can Whistle (City Center Encores!). Albums: Wish and An Evening with Sutton Foster: Live at the Café Carlyle. Television: “Gilmore Girls: A Year in the Life,” “Bunheads,” “Elementary,” “Psych,” “Royal Pains,” “Law & Order: SVU,” “Flight of the Conchords” and “Sesame Street.” She holds an honorary doctorate from Ball State University, where she also teaches.

SERIES SPONSORSHIP PROVIDED BY WESTGLOW RESORT & SPA AND ROWLAND’S RESTAURANT, MADE POSSIBLE THROUGH THE GENEROSITY OF BONNIE SCHAEFER.

PERFORMANCE SPONSORSHIP PROVIDED BY: BOONE AREA VISITORS BUREAU, MAST GENERAL STORE, GOODNIGHT BROTHERS, SKYBEST COMMUNICATIONS, INC.

This evening’s performance has been supported by generous gifts from Letty and Keith Stoneman and Tricia and Brent Hall.

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EASTERN FESTIVAL ORCHESTRA Gerard Schwarz, conductor Midori, Violin Hunter Bockes, Saxophone

SUNDAY, JULY 9 4 PM, SCHAEFER CENTER FOR THE PERFORMING ARTS

Suite from The Snow Maiden (Snegurochka) Introduction - Le beau printemps (tableau) La danse des oiseaux (Dance of the Birds) Le cortège du roi (fabuleaux) Bérendei Le danse des bouffons (Dance of the Buffoons)

Rimsky-Korsakov

Violin Concerto, in D Major, Op.35 Allegro moderato – Moderato assai Canzonetta. Andante Finale. Allegro vivacissimo Midori, violin

Tchaikovsky

INTERMISSION Saxophone Concerto, in E-flat Major, Op. 109 Glazunov Hunter Bockes, saxophone 2016 Rosen-Schaffel Competition Winner Pictures at an Exhibition Promenade Gnomus Promenade The Old Castle Promenade Tuileries Bydlo Promenade Ballet of the Chicks in Their Shells Samuel Goldenberg and Schmuyle Limoges Catacombs Cum mortuis in lingua mortua The Hut on Fowl's Legs The Great Gate of Kiev

Mussorgsky/Ravel

This performance has been supported in part by the Rosen-Schaffel Endowment for Classical Music Programming at An Appalachian Summer Festival, and is dedicated to the memory of Muriel and Arnold Rosen, whose vision and generosity led to the founding of An Appalachian Summer Festival. Additional support for this performance has been generously provided by Barbara and Larry Freiman.

Gerard Schwarz enters his 13th year with the Eastern Music Festival in 2017. He joined the Festival as music advisor in 2005, became principal conductor in 2006 and music director in 2008. He also serves as music director of the All-Star Orchestra, an ensemble of top musicians from America’s leading orchestras which includes eight members of the EMF faculty. All-Star Orchestra is featured in a new television series that has aired throughout the United States on PBS reaching 3.5 million viewers. It is the basis for their Khan Academy education platform. As in baseball, Schwarz created an “all-star” team of top musical athletes who have thus far recorded 12 episodes to encourage a greater understanding and enjoyment of classical music. All 12 programs have been released by Naxos and have been awarded four Emmy Awards and the Deems Taylor Television Broadcast Award from the American Society of Composers, Authors and Publishers. Schwarz is conductor laureate of the Seattle Symphony and is a renowned interpreter of 19th century German, Austrian and Russian repertoire, in addition to his noted work with contemporary American composers. With more than 300 world premieres to his credit, Schwarz has always felt strongly about commissioning and performing new music. As EMF music director he initiated the Bonnie McElveen-Hunter Commissioning Project that has thus far commissioned John Coriglian, Richard Danielpour and Lowell Lieberman. For the 2016 Festival, renowned Academy and Grammy Award winning conductor, composer and pianist Andre Prévin, has created a new work. In all, McElveen-Hunter has committed to 10 new works from American composers. During Schwarz’ tenure with the Festival, he has expanded audiences to the largest in its history, incorporated a composer in residence program, developed three new concert series and added new educational initiatives. The Festival Orchestra has also recorded a critically praised recording of


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the music of Alan Hovhaness for Naxos. A prolific recording artist, Schwarz’s total discography numbers over 350. His pioneering cycles of American symphonists such as William Schuman, David Diamond and Howard Hanson have received high critical praise, as have his acclaimed series of Stravinsky ballets, symphony cycles of Robert Schumann, Gustav Mahler and Dmitri Shostakovich as well as orchestral works of Richard Wagner, Richard Strauss and Rimsky-Korsakov. More than 50 discs featuring Gerard Schwarz and the Seattle Symphony – with works by 54 composers ranging from the Baroque to contemporary periods – were released in the last two years on Naxos, Delos, Artek and Brilliance Audio. Representing the breadth and depth of the conductor’s vast repertoire, the recordings vary in genre, including major 20th century ballets by Stravinsky, Strauss, Bartók, Ravel and Prokofiev, as well as multi-disc cycles of works by Schumann, Strauss, Wagner and Stravinsky. Schwarz’ dedication to the promotion of American music is also represented with recordings featuring the works of 26 American composers. The Hanson cycle, first released on Delos, was a mainstay on Billboard’s classical music best-selling list for 41 weeks, including six weeks at number three; earned Grammy nominations and was named 1989 Record of the Year by Stereo Review. The new Russian series on Naxos has been acclaimed as “a high point in the extensive Schwarz/Seattle discography” (Classics Today), “very fine” (The Guardian) and “a powerhouse in Russian Romantic repertoire” (Music Web International). In addition to his numerous recordings with the Seattle Symphony, he has also recorded with the Berlin Radio Symphony, Czech Philharmonic, English Chamber Orchestra, Juilliard Orchestra, London Symphony, Los Angeles Chamber Symphony, New York Chamber Symphony, Orchestre National de France, Philadelphia Orchestra, Royal Liverpool Philharmonic, Tokyo Philharmonic and, of course, Eastern Music Festival. His most recent release is of Rimsky-Korsakov’s 1st and

3rd Symphonies with the Berlin Radio Symphony Orchestra. The Maestro’s long-standing commitment to education continues through his partnership with the AllStar Orchestra and Kahn Academy, the ground breaking organization that provides a free world-class education to anyone anywhere. Thus far their educational platform has reached 5 million students. A gifted composer and arranger, Schwarz has expanded his compositional activities in recent years. His Trio for Violin, Horn and Piano was called a work of “sophistication and intelligence” by critic R.M. Campbell. Earlier works include In Memoriam and Rudolf and Jeanette (dedicated to the memory of his grandparents who perished in the Holocaust), both recorded by Naxos; Human Spirit, a composition for children’s choir and orchestra and his duos for violin and cello were called “redolent of the gentle humanism central to much of the music Schwarz loves to conduct” by The Seattle Times. His arrangements of suites from Strauss’ Der Rosenkavalier, Debussy’s Pelléas et Mélisande and Humperdinck’s Hansel and Gretel as well as many orchestral works are programmed in concerts worldwide. A Journey, a large scale orchestral tone poem, was commissioned by Dave Gannet and received its world premiere at the Eastern Music Festival in July 2012. Schwarz’s work for concert band Above and Beyond was premiered by the United States Marine Band in 2013 and is now available on Naxos. His newest work for that ensemble, a transcription of Rudolf and Jeannette, was premiered in February 2016. His orchestral work A Poem was recently given its first performance by the Hartford Symphony. A sought-after guest conductor, Schwarz has led the most renowned orchestras throughout the world. He is also known for his operatic performances in addition to his concert work, having appeared with the Juilliard Opera, Kirov Opera, Mostly Mozart Festival, San Francisco Opera, Seattle Opera (where he has led 21 productions) and Washington National Opera conducting the operas of Wagner, Janáček, Strauss, Mozart,

Bizet, Weber, Debussy, Bartók, Stravinsky, Beethoven and Gluck. Born in America to Viennese parents, Schwarz began studying music at the age of 5 and soon focused on the trumpet. A graduate of both New York City's High School of Performing Arts and The Juilliard School, he joined the New York Philharmonic in 1972 as co-principal trumpet, a position he held until 1977. Schwarz’s numerous previous positions include music director of New York’s Mostly Mozart Festival, where he presided over soldout houses, developed the orchestra’s international touring, maintained a nine-year residency in Japan, considerably expanded its Mozart repertoire and through its televised Live from Lincoln Center appearances earned several Emmy nominations. His tenure as music directorof the Royal Liverpool Philharmonic Orchestra (RLPO) initiated the long-standing partnership between the orchestra and Classic FM, expanded recordings on the RLPO Live label, initiated a new partnership with Avie records, created the enormously popular Sunday matinee Musically Speaking concert series, led highly acclaimed tours to Spain and Prague and brought the orchestra to National Television in BBC Proms broadcasts. As music director of the Los Angeles Chamber Orchestra and New York Chamber Symphony he expanded concert series and audiences, made award-winning recordings and championed new works. In addition he served as artistic advisor to the Tokyo Philharmonic. Gerard Schwarz completed his final season as music director of the Seattle Symphony in 2011 after an acclaimed 26 years. During his leadership, Schwarz was instrumental in the building of Benaroya Hall, spearheading efforts that resulted in the acoustically superb new home for the Seattle Symphony. The many legacies of his extraordinary leadership include a critically acclaimed discography of more than 140 recordings; numerous television programs and concert broadcasts resulting in two Emmy Awards; major strides in music education programs including new


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series and the successful Soundbridge Seattle Symphony Music Discovery Center; regular programming of innovative themed festival weeks; in addition to dramatically increased audience attendance and classical subscription weeks. Schwarz’ final season in Seattle was emblematic of the conductor’s passionate dedication and support for contemporary music, with a total of 22 world premieres, 18 of these premieres being a part of the Gund/Simonyi Farewell Commissions, an unprecedented commissioning initiative celebrating his farewell season as music director. In his nearly five decades as a respected classical musician and conductor, Schwarz has received hundreds of honors and accolades. Over the years, he has received four Emmy Awards, 14 Grammy nominations, eight ASCAP Awards and numerous Stereo Review and Ovation Awards. He holds the Ditson Conductor’s Award from Columbia University, was the first American named conductor of the year by Musical America and has received numerous honorary doctorates, including from his alma mater, The Juilliard School. In 2002 the American Society of Composers, Authors and Publishers honored Schwarz with its Concert Music Award and in 2003 the National Academy of Recording Arts & Sciences gave Schwarz its first IMPACT lifetime achievement award. Active in music advocacy on a national and state level, he served on the National Council of the Arts and is honorary chairman of the Board of Young Musicians Excelling, an organization in Washington State which supports music education in the Pacific Northwest. Most recently, the City of Seattle recognized his outstanding achievements by naming the street alongside the Benaroya Hall “Gerard Schwarz Place” and the State of Washington gave him the honorary title of “General” for his extraordinary contributions as an artist and citizen.

Midori is one of the most admired violinists of her generation. In addition to performing at the highest levels internationally, giving master classes and participating in prominent artistic residencies, she has made a sustained commitment to the violin repertoire of the future, commissioning new concerto and recital works over a period of many years. Beyond her performing and recording career, Midori has been recognized as a dedicated and gifted educator and an innovative community engagement activist throughout the US, Europe, Asia and the developing world. Among many honors she has received in recent years, she was named a Messenger of Peace by U.N. Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon and received the prestigious Crystal Award by the World Economic Forum in Davos. In recent seasons, Midori has added several new recordings to her extensive discography – Bach’s complete Solo Sonatas and Partitas, a recital of sonatas by Bloch, Janáček and Shostakovich with pianist Özgür Aydin, and Paul Hindemith’s violin concerto with the NDR Symphony Orchestra and conductor Christoph Eschenbach in a recording that won a Grammy for Best Classical Compendium. In February 2016, Sony Classical released The Art of Midori, a 10-CD set containing some of her most important recordings for the label. DoReMi, the violin concerto written for her by Peter Eötvös and performed with the Orchestre Philharmonique de Radio France under the baton of the composer, was released in May 2016. In 1992 Midori founded Midori & Friends, a non-profit organization in New York City that brings music education programs to underserved schoolchildren. Two other organizations, Music Sharing, based in Japan, and Partners in Performance, based in the U.S., also bring music closer to the lives of people who may not otherwise have involvement with the arts. Midori’s commitment to community

collaboration and outreach is further realized in her Orchestra Residencies Program, which involves week-long residencies with American youth orchestras. Midori was born in Osaka, Japan, in 1971 and began studying the violin with her mother, Setsu Goto, at an early age. In 1982, Zubin Mehta invited the11-year-old Midori to make her debut at the New York Philharmonic’s traditional New Year’s Eve concert, on which occasion she received a standing ovation and the impetus to begin a major career. Today, in addition to her performing and outreach activities, Midori serves as Distinguished Professor of Violin and holds the Jascha Heifetz Chair at the University of Southern California’s Thornton School of Music. She is also a Guest Professor at Japan’s Soai University and at Shanghai Conservatory and an Honorary Professor at the Beijing’s Central Conservatory of Music. Midori plays the 1734 Guarnerius del Gesù ‘ex-Huberman’. She uses four bows – two by Dominique Peccatte, one by François Peccatte and one by Paul Siefried. Saxophonist Christopher “Hunter” Bockes is currently in his first year of graduate studies at Northwestern University in pursuit of his masters of music in saxophone performance. He has been a member of their Symphonic Wind Ensemble, Symphony Orchestra, and Contemporary Music Ensemble and is a graduate assistant in their chamber music program. Hunter earned his bachelor of music in saxophone performance from the University of North Carolina School of the Arts (UNCSA) in Winston-Salem, NC. During his studies he has collaborated with dancers, actors, and other musicians in various ensembles and venues. Among those collaborations was a performance with Olympian Jeremy Abbott at the U.S. Figure Skating Championships with the group “uncsaX.”


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Hunter has been a member of awardwinning saxophone quartets including ~Nois, Atchara Saxophone Quartet, Half and Half Saxophone Quartet, and Minerva Saxophone Quartet. Among his awards as a chamber musician are First Prize at the Chicago Chamber Music Competition, 2nd Prize at the Music Teachers National Association (MTNA) Southeastern Regional Conference, and multiple First Prize awards at the North Carolina State MTNA conference. Among his awards as a soloist he most recently received First Place at the 2016 Rosen-Schaffel Competition in Boone, NC. He has also been a finalist in the 2015 and 2016 UNCSA concerto competitions. Outside of his current and past school music groups he has performed with the Fayetteville Symphony Orchestra, the North Carolina Saxophone Ensemble, and Twin City Stage Theater in Winston-Salem, NC. He has performed in masterclasses held by world-renowned saxophonists Jean-Michel Goury and Kenneth Tse. He has also worked with saxophonists Timothy McAllister, Otis Murphy, Carrie Koffman, John Sampen, Griffin Campbell, Zachary Shemon, Susan Fancher, Robert Young, and Jonathan Yanik, among others.

PROGRAM NOTES: NIKOLAI RIMSKY-KORSAKOV Suite from The Snow Maiden (Born in Tikhvin, Russia, on March 18, 1844, and died in Lyubensk on June 21, 1908) In his youth, Nikolai Rimsky-Korsakov was studious and reserved, finding great joy in both Russian literature and in learning to play the piano. He began formal piano lessons at 5 but did not discover his true passion for music until 17 when his piano teacher, Fyodor Kanille, began instructing him in music theory and composition. Shortly thereafter, Rimsky-Korsakov began studying with composer Mily Balakirev, who fatefully introduced him to Vladimir Stasov, a critic whose influence shaped the course of Russian art through the end of the 19th century. Rimsky-Korsakov met fellow composers

Modest Mussorgsky, César Cui and Alexander Borodin, and along with Balakirev, this group became known as the moguchaya kuchka, “The Mighty Handful” or “The Five,” united by their common interests in Russian mythology, folklore and traditional music from the villages. Some of Rimsky-Korsakov’s most well-known works in the West are his orchestral pieces, Scheherazade, Capricccio Espagnol and Russian Easter Overture, but during his lifetime he was known as a prolific composer of operas that are still performed frequently in Russia. One of these operas is Snegurochka (“The Snow Maiden”) composed in 1880-81 and premiered at the Mariinsky Theatre on January 29, 1882. Among the principal cast was bass Fyodor Stravinsky, father of Igor Stravinsky, playing the role of Grandfather Frost. The Snow Maiden is a “springtime fairy-tale” written by Alexander Orlovsky as a play in verse form, originally performed with incidental music by Tchaikovsky. The play features both human and fairy-tale characters, a common trait amongst Russian folk tales, and tells the love story of the Snow Maiden who resides in both the human and fairy tale worlds. This suite extracts music from the opera beginning with the “Introduction: The Beautiful Spring” which defines the setting of Tsar Berendey’s palace and the surrounding woodlands that are suffering under an eternal winter brought on by the birth of the Snow Maiden. The “Dance of the Birds” represents the attempts of Bonny Spring’s birds to warm themselves from the chill by dancing about. “The Procession of Tsar Berendey” from Act 2 of the opera, begins with a stately march as the villagers gather to hear the Tsar make a decree offering a reward to any man who can win the Snow Maiden’s love and thus make her melt, ending the ongoing winter. The final movement from this suite, “The Dance of the Buffoons,” comes from a lively celebration during Act 3 with the Tsar and villagers, a celebration that also features another of Rimsky-Korsakov’s well-known pieces, “The Dance of the Jesters.”

PYOTR ILYICH TCHAIKOVSKY Violin Concerto in D major, op.35 (Born in Kamsko-Votkinsk, Russia, on May 7, 1840, and died in St. Petersburg on November 6, 1893) The year 1877 was a dramatic one for both Tchaikovsky’s personal life and his professional career, and its implications reached into his compositions, or more accurately, lack thereof. By 1877 Tchaikovsky’s financial situation was rather tenuous and was a contributing factor to his decision making regarding work and marriage. He had been teaching at the Moscow Conservatory, but was unhappy that he had to continue spending great time and energy there merely to maintain a source of income. Perhaps for financial reasons, or to keep his private affairs secret from the public (he had lived as a bachelor his entire adult life), Tchaikovsky suddenly married Antonina Milyukova, a former student who professed her love to him through a letter, in June 1877. Their marriage would last only three months, during which Tchaikovsky felt emotionally tortured and suffered severe illness. In an effort to rescue Tchaikovsky from himself, his brother Anatoly took the despondent composer on an extended journey to Europe. Getting away from Russia cleared the fog for Tchaikovsky but he did not immediately begin composing new ideas. Instead he finished two works that had been put aside early in the year, his Fourth Symphony and the great opera Eugene Onegin. In February 1878, Tchaikovsky complained to Anatoly of his struggle with finding new musical ideas and the great effort composing now required, but the following month he rediscovered his voice, quickly and easily writing the Violin Concerto in D major. Tchaikovsky was staying in Clarens, Switzerland, and a visit from his student and friend, violinist Yosif Kotek, inspired the concerto that was completed on April 11. Tchaikovsky’s Violin Concerto in D major is now considered one of the masterpieces of the genre, but it was initially rejected by violinist Leopold Auer, to whom the work was dedicated, and the eventual premiere in December


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1881 by Adolf Brodsky and the Vienna Philharmonic was given disastrous reviews. This work remains a testament to Tchaikovsky’s exceptional sense of lyricism, and the technical demands placed upon the soloist are truly captivating. Tchaikovsky set in motion a new compositional phase in his career with the Violin Concerto, according to Roland John Wiley, one in which “remembrance, belief and fatalism are henceforth more prominent in his music than before.” ALEXANDER GLAZUNOV Saxophone Concerto in E-flat major, op.109 (Born in St. Petersburg on August 10, 1865, and died in Paris on March 21, 1936) Alexander Glazunov perfectly fit the bill of a child prodigy, and his musical talents were recognized and encouraged early by his parents. He had a remarkable memory and ear for music, and when he began studying composition with Rimsky-Korsakov at 14, his natural gifts and passion for learning launched him into the company of Russian music’s elite composers. Rimsky-Korsakov famously stated that Glazunov progressed, “not from day to day but from hour to hour.” Glazunov composed his First Symphony at 16 and it was premiered by Mily Balakirev on March 29, 1882, followed a few months later by the premiere of his First String Quartet. These premieres captured the attention of wealthy arts patron Mitrofan Belyayev, who immediately pledged to support Glazunov’s career, bringing him into the group of artists that became known as the “Balyayev Circle.” Where “The Five” left off with their nationalist agenda, having successfully rooted Russian traditionalism into its classical music, the “Balyayev Circle” picked up, seeking to combine Russian nationalism with Europeanism to create a more global, cosmopolitan music. Glazunov composed the majority of his works early in his career, reaching the height of his compositional maturity with his Violin Concerto of 1904 and Eight Symphony of 1906. The second half of his career was dedicated to

education following his appointment as director of the St. Petersburg Conservatory in 1905, where he helped lead the school through the turmoil of World War I and the October Revolution, taking special interest in revitalizing their curriculum and personally advocating for his students, including the young Dmitri Shostakovich. The last major works Glazunov wrote were a pair of commissions for the young German saxophone virtuoso Sigurd Raschèr, the Saxophone Quartet in 1932 and Saxophone Concerto in 1934. Raschèr performed the premiere in Nykoping, Sweden, on November 25, 1934. Despite the drastic changes in classical music that occurred during the first decades of the 20th century, Glazunov remained rooted in his 19th century compositional style. The Saxophone Concerto is not organized into the traditional three movement structure, but is played through continuously, opening with a unison melody in the strings followed by a beautiful, lyric melody in the saxophone. After an increasingly complex development, the saxophone plays an extended solo cadenza before launching into the concluding fugue in the style of a tarantella. MODEST MUSSORGSKY Pictures at an Exhibition (Born in Karevo, Russia, on March 21, 1839, and died in St. Petersburg on March 28, 1881) During the second half of the 19th century, Russian critic Vladimir Stasov held significant influence over many artists, pushing his nationalist agenda in an effort to demonstrate the individuality and merit of Russian art. While he frequently directed artists by telling them what they should create and practically how they should do it, he also brought them together and helped establish a sense of community. Mussorgsky, a member of the group of composers mentored by Stasov and known as “The Five,” became close friends with painter and architect Victor Hartmann who was another of Stasov’s circle. On August 4, 1873, Hartmann died suddenly at 39, leaving

Mussorgsky, Stasov and the Russian art world grieving this unexpected tragedy. In response, Stasov organized a memorial exhibit featuring over 400 of Hartmann’s artworks, including paintings, architectural designs, costumes and sketches, and from this show Mussorgsky found the inspiration and strength to produce his own memorial to his late friend. Mussorgsky decided to compose a set of piano pieces representing the composer’s experience walking through the exhibition of Hartmann’s works, contemplating the stories behind the images he sees and remembering his beloved friend. He began composing on June 2, 1874, and after 20 days of feverish work he completed Pictures at an Exhibition, a set of 10 miniature pieces musically representing specific artworks and connected by a recurrent theme, the promenade, carrying us from one exhibit room to another. Mussorgsky never published Pictures at an Exhibition and only performed it privately for friends. Upon his death, Rimsky-Korsakov was given the responsibility of handling Mussorgsky’s music and he edited the manuscript for the first publication of Pictures in 1886. Working from this edition by RimskyKorsakov, Maurice Ravel orchestrated the original keyboard part into a work for full orchestra, a process he was intimately familiar with as many of his own great orchestra works began as compositions for piano. Ravel remained faithful to Mussorgsky’s original, adding only a few notes of his own to “The Great Gate of Kiev,” demonstrating his exceptional ability to use the variety of instruments in an orchestra to produce vivid tone colors, painting exquisite pictures with sound. Program Notes by Catherine Keen Hock


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EASTERN MUSIC FESTIVAL ARTIST FACULTY ORCHESTRA LIBRARIAN

CONDUCTORS

CELLO

HORN

Gerard Schwarz, Music Director Grant Cooper, Resident Conductor José-Luis Novo, Resident Conductor

Neal Cary, Principal Julian Schwarz, Assoc. Principal Amy Frost Baumgarten, Asst. Princ. Sean Hawthorne** Marta Simidtchieva Beth Vanderborgh Rebecca Zimmerman

Kevin Reid, Principal Joy Branagan Kelly Hofman Andrew McAfee

Marc Facci

TRUMPET

Stephanie Barrett Hannah Barrow Catherine Cole Isabel Dimoff Peter Dutilly Brandon Gianetto Trace Johnson Annaliese Kowert Alex Krawczyk Alexandra Matloff Tania Moldovan Justin Ouellet David Parks Jessica Ryou

VIOLIN I Jeffrey Multer, John R. Kernodle, Jr. Concertmaster Chair

Nigel Armstrong, Assoc. Concertmaster John Fadial, 1st Asst. Concertmaster Shawn Weil, 2nd Asst. Concertmaster Ariadna Bazarnik-Ilika Corine Brouwer Joan Griffing Diana Lupo Courtney LeBauer Fabián López Elizabeth Phelps Jennifer Rickard Uli Speth David Yarbrough

VIOLIN II Randall Weiss, Timothy W. Lane Principal Second Violin Chair

Jenny Grégoire, Asst. Principal Cathy Cary Ioana Galu Susan McCallum Avi Nagin** Daniel Skidmore

VIOLA Ben Geller, Principal Chauncey Patterson, Assoc. Principal Derek Mosloff, Asst. Principal Sarah Cote Jerome Gordon** Jamie Hofman Jennifer Puckett Diane Phoenix-Neal

BASS Leonid Finkelshteyn, Principal Joel Braun, Asst. Principal Luciano Carnéiro Marc Facci Meredith Johnson Rick Ostrovsky

Chris Gekker, Principal Jeffrey Kaye Judith Saxton, 3rd/Assoc. Principal

TROMBONE Gregory Cox, Principal Michael Kris, Bass Trombone Rusty McKinney, Bass Trombone

TUBA

FLUTE

Derek Fenstermacher, Principal**

Les Roettges, Principal Jake Fridkis Ann Choomack, Flute/Piccolo

TIMPANI PERCUSSION

OBOE Randall Ellis, Principal Susan Eischeid Karen Birch Blundell, English Horn/Assoc. Principal Oboe

John Shaw, Principal Matthew Decker

Meredith Johnson

2017 ORCHESTRAL FELLOWS

ON LEAVE Anne Donaldson Danielle Guideri Tom McCaslin Daniel Reinker Katie Young Steele

HARP Anna Kate Mackle, Principal

CLARINET

PIANO

Shannon Scott, Principal Anthony Taylor Kelly Burke

Awadagin Pratt William Wolfram Eunhye Grace Choi, Collaborative Piano Marika Bournaki, Collaborative Piano

BASSOON George Sakakeeny, Principal Karla Ekholm

CONTRABASSOON Anthony Anurca, Adjunct

Eric Schweikert, Principal

PERSONNEL MANAGER

GUITAR Jason Vieaux Julian Gray Kami Rowan *Section strings are listed alphabetically and seated in rotation **One Year Position

Eggers, Eggers, Eggers, & Eggers, PLLC AT T O R N E Y S AT L AW Proud Supporters and Alumni of Appalachian State University 7 3 7 W E S T K I N G S T R E E T • B O O N E , N C 2 8 6 0 7 • ( 8 2 8 ) 2 6 4 - 3 6 0 1 • W W W. E G G E R S - L AW. C O M


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KEYNOTE SPEAKERS

GINA MCCARTHY MONDAY, JULY 10 7:30 PM, SCHAEFER CENTER FOR THE PERFORMING ARTS

Gina McCarthy

MAJORA CARTER

Majora Carter

TUESDAY, JULY 11 6:30 PM, SCHAEFER CENTER FOR THE PERFORMING ARTS

Former EPA head Gina McCarthy and Peabody Award-winning radio broadcaster Majora Carter will serve as the keynote speakers for the 2017 Appalachian Energy Summit, an annual gathering of progressive energy thought-leaders and innovators from academia and industry. About the Appalachian Energy Summit: The 2017 Appalachian Energy Summit is the sixth-annual meeting of some of the world’s most brilliant minds in energy policies and practices. This unique three-day event convenes academia, industry, and students in a transformational effort that delivers meaningful ecological, financial and social benefit. The 2017 theme, “Perspectives: Policy & Practice” broadens the conference’s scope, increasing it to include issues of social and climate justice related to energy production, distribution, and consumption.


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~ SINCE 1989 ~

RESORT •RESTAURANT • MEDICAL OFFICE • COMMERCIAL • RESIDENTIAL • CONDOMINIUMS

Animal Emergency & Pet Care Clinic, Boone Boone Point, Boone Five Guys Burgers & Fries, Boone Casey & Casey Law Offices, Boone Grandfather Mountain Top Shop, Linville Jackson-Sumner Insurance Offices, Boone Linville Ridge Clubhouse Renovations, Linville LifeStore Bank, Boone GE Aviation Plant Renovations, Ashe County United Community Bank, Blowing Rock Many fine residences in the High Country 703 West King Street • Suite #201 • Boone, NC 28607 • (828) 265-2405


A N A P PA L A C H I A N S U M M E R F E S T I VA L 2 0 1 7

THE HELENE AND STEPHEN WEICHOLZ GLOBAL FILM SERIES

WEDNESDAY, JULY 12 7 PM, SCHAEFER CENTER FOR THE PERFORMING ARTS

In a secluded valley in Iceland, Gummi and Kiddi live side by side, tending to their sheep. Although they share the land and a way of life, they have not spoken to each other in four decades. When a lethal disease suddenly infects Kiddi’s sheep, the entire valley comes under threat. This is a near death sentence for the farmers, whose sheep are their main source of income, and many abandon their land. But Gummi and Kiddi don’t give up so easily – and each brother tries to stave off the disaster in his own fashion: Kiddi by using his rifle and Gummi by using his wits. As the authorities close in, the brothers will need to come together to save the special breed passed down for generations, and themselves, from extinction. ICELAND; R; DIRECTED BY GRIMUR HAKONARSON (2015); 93 MINUTES

Pre-film talk with Dr. John Pfeifer begins at 7pm, with the film beginning at approximately 7:30pm. Concessions, including popcorn, beer, wine and cold beverages are available for purchase. With special thanks to our generous sponsors for this series, Helene and Stephen Weicholz.

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THE CAST THE NORTH CAROLINA BLACK REPERTORY COMPANY, PRODUCERS OF THE NATIONAL BLACK THEATRE FESTIVAL PRESENTS:

MAID’S DOOR THURSDAY, JULY 13 AND

FRIDAY, JULY 14 8 PM, VALBORG THEATRE

Written by Cheryl L. Davis Directed by Jackie Alexander Cast Nikyla Boxley (Sarah/Young Betty) Rachel Buckland (Angela/Adela/Mrs. Lewis) Jacobi Howard (Case) Melissa Joyner (Betty) Kathrine Mobley (Dr. Patel/Orderly) Sandra Mills Scott (Ida) Setting: Time: 2005-2006 Place: NYC Upper West Side Apartment, Doctor’s Office, Nursing Home, & Church Parking Lot Act I Scene 1: Late Morning in March Scene 2: Later That Day Scene 3: Morning A Few Weeks Later Scene 4: Later That Day Scene 5: That Evening Scene 6: Early Afternoon in July Scene 7: Afternoon Weeks Later Scene 8: Minutes Later That Same Day Scene 9: Later That Night Act II Scene 1: Early Morning in September Scene 2: Morning in November Scene 3: Later That Day Scene 4: A Few Weeks Later Scene 5: Early Morning in January Scene 6: Early Morning in March Scene 7: Early Afternoon Weeks Later Production Note: Events in the play take place over the course of one year. There will be one ten-minute intermission. Performances by the National Black Theatre Festival have been supported by a generous gift from Nancy and Mark Tafeen.

Nikyla Boxley (Young Betty/Sarah) is a native of Detroit, Michigan. She went to Cass Technical High School and trained under Marilyn McCormick (Tony Award Winner). Nikyla is a rising junior at the University of North Carolina School of the Arts. Some of her roles at UNCSA include Zonia Loomis in Joe Turner’s Come and Gone and Nerissa in The Merchant of Venice. Nikyla is very grateful to be a part of this production. She would like to thank her faculty at School of the Arts and her family for always being supportive of her dreams. Rachel Buckland (Mrs. Lewis/Adela/Angela) is honored to be a part of her first North Carolina Black Repertory Company production. She is a recent graduate of the University of North Carolina at Greensboro with a Bachelor of Arts in drama and minors in anthropology and ASL/deaf studies. Previous credits include Antigone and Machinal (UNCG Theatre), Hamlet (Shared Radiance Theatre), and Little Women: the Musical (Little Theatre of Winston Salem). Jacobi Howard (Case) is a graduate of the drama program at the University of North Carolina School of the Arts, training and working under such names as Gerald Freedman, Charles Randolph Wright, and Molly Smith. North Carolina born and bred, Jacobi Howard is honored and excited to be working with the North Carolina Black Repertory Company again. Last year, he directed the members of the company’s youth outreach program, Teen Theatre Ensemble, in their self-written show, Bullying. Some of his theatre credits include Mother Courage and Her Children alongside Academy Award-winning actress Kathleen Turner; Where We Belong, directed by Grammy Award-winner Bebe Winans and written by Charles Randolph Wright; Broke-ology (Anacostia Playhouse, DC); and The Sunset Limited (Blumenthal


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Performing Arts Center, Charlotte, NC). His screen credits include War Room (Dir. Sam Kendrick), Mainline (Dir. Grant Conversano) and Decipher (Dir. Jacquie Barnbrook). Additionally, he is a playwright: his plays Pants on Fire and Souls Amid the Iron Partition received staged readings at the Essential Theatre and the National Black Theatre Festival, respectively. Jacobi teaches acting as well. Recently, he played the role of Graham in Informed Consent at American Stage in Tampa, Florida. Follow Jacobi’s journey on Instagram @heisthejoat! Melissa Joyner (Betty) is excited to reprise her role in the North Carolina Black Repertory Company’s production of Maid’s Door. Previously, she performed the role at the Billie Holiday Theatre in New York, winning an Audelco Award for Best Supporting Actress. A Master of Fine Arts graduate of The New School for Drama she has studied under some of the most inspiring and accomplished artists in the industry, including Robert LuPone, Ron Leibman, Robert Walden, Arthur Storch, Paul Rudd, Austin Pendleton, Nova Thomas, Christopher Shinn, Pippin Parker, Michael Weller, Laura Maria Censabella, Elinor Renfield, Rick Sordelet and Patricia Fletcher. Her New York credits include Mary Talbert in At Buffalo: The Musical (NY Musical Theatre Festival), Melissa in He Said, She Said, I Said, Yes (The Public Theatre), Jermaine in Generation Graffiti (Playwrights Horizons), Angela Metcalf in Fell (NY Fringe Festival), Anna in Old Times (59 East 59th), Sparkle in Body Shots (The Atlantic Theatre), Val in Jack Perry is Alive and Dating (New York Musical Festival). Her regional credits include Kanika Weaver in Permanent Collection (Human Race Theatre). Her screen credits include the supporting roles of Carla Hughes in Redrum on Discovery ID and Amanda in the film Three Blind Mice.

Kathryn Mobley (Dr. Patel) is excited to join the very talented Maid’s Door cast. She’s also appeared in North Carolina Black Repertory Company’s productions of; The Colored Museum, Home, Brass Birds Don’t Sing, A Goddess’s Tail, The Annual Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Birthday Celebration, Four Queens, No Trump and in The Glory of Gospel. Ms. Mobley performed in the world premiere production of Shades of Valor (Little Theatre of Winston-Salem) as well as in several musicals including; Ragtime and Rock of Ages (Theatre Alliance). Her talents have also contributed to the Triad Shakes unique production of The Crucible and she’s appeared on the Stained Glass Playhouse’s stage in Piano Lesson and in North Star. When not performing, Ms. Mobley works as a multi-media producer for the City of Winston-Salem. Sandra Mills Scott (Ida) is thrilled to reprise her role as Ida in the Audelco Awardwinning play Maid’s Door and is excited to make her debut with the legendary North Carolina Black Repertory Company. Sandra has appeared on stages in New York, regionally, and internationally. She is a proud member of Brooklyn’s Brave New World Repertory Company, where she portrayed varied roles such as Mrs. Jones in the critically acclaimed site specific production of Elmer Rice’s Street Scene, Lynn Nottage’s Fabulation, Arthur Miller’s American Clock, and The Crucible. She has performed in a number of play festivals in New York at such notable venues as the Public Theatre, Signature Theatre and the Kraine Theatre. Summer Stock credits include Tintypes, Oklahoma, Big River, Ragtimes: The Scott Joplin Story, and Born Yesterday - all in rotating rep at Arrow Rock Lyceum Theatre in Missouri. TV & Film credits include Law & Order and Law & Order: Criminal Intent (NBC), All My Children (ABC), As the World Turns (CBS), The Conan O’Brien Show (NBC), The Chris Rock Show (HBO). Ms Scott also has to her credit numerous

commercials, industrials, and voiceovers. She received her MFA from New York University’s Tisch Graduate Acting Program. Cheryl L. Davis (Playwright) received the Kleban Award as a librettist for her musical Barnstormer, (written with Douglas J. Cohen) about Bessie Coleman, the first Black woman flyer. The show received a Jonathan Larson Award through the Lark Play Development Center. In its world premiere production, Maid’s Door won seven Audelco Awards. Her play The Color of Justice (commissioned by Theatreworks/USA), received excellent reviews in the New York Times and Daily News, and tours regularly. Her musical Bridges, which was commissioned by the Berkeley Playhouse, received its world premiere in February 2016 to great reviews and three award nominations from the San Francisco Bay Theater Critics’ Circle. She received a Daytime Emmy Award nomination and a Writers’ Guild Award for her work on As the World Turns. Her work has been read and performed internationally, including at the Cleveland Play House, the Actors Theatre of Louisville, and the Kennedy Center. She is a partner at the law firm of Menaker & Herrmann LLP. Jackie Alexander (Director) is an awardwinning actor, writer, producer, and director, former Artistic Director of The Billie Holiday Theatre in New York, and current Artistic Director of The North Carolina Black Repertory Company, producers of The National Black Theatre Festival. His debut novel Our Daily Bread was published by Turner Publishing in September 2012. His debut feature film Joy was awarded Best Feature Film by the Black Filmmakers Hall of Fame, and also earned Best Actor and Best Screenplay honors for Jackie on the festival circuit. Stage directing credits include the World Premieres of his critically acclaimed plays Brothers from the Bottom, The High Priestess of Dark Alley, The Legend of Buster Neal, The Desire, The Right Reverend Dupree in Exile, and Birthright. A short list of additional directing credits include Jelly’s Last Jam, The Waiting Room by Tony nominee Samm-Art Williams, Lemon Meringue Façade, written by and starring Ted Lange, and the world premieres of The Sting of White Roses,


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Plenty of Time, Fati’s Last Dance, Finding Home, Matisse’s Self-Portrait by two-time Obie award winner Charles L. Mee, and Maid’s Door by Cheryl L. Davis (winner of 7 AUDELCO awards). For more information, please visit: jackiealexanderproductions.com. Taylor M. Murrell (Stage Manager) is a native of Winston Salem, North Carolina. She is a graduate of North Carolina Central University where she obtained her Bachelor of Arts in theatre with a concentration in performance. When she attended the university she performed in many black box productions and main stage shows such as: Up, Down; Strange Charmed Beauty and Truth; The Misanthrope; Frog Loves Christy; Homegirls; and Too Many Secrets. Throughout her academic career, Taylor developed a passion for the technical theatre as well. Due to her love for both sides of the stage, she has often worked as an actor and part of the production crew for the same show. Her commitment to the performing arts lead to further opportunities as she worked the National Black Theatre Festival in 2013 and 2015 and joined Alpha Psi Omega, the National Theatre Honors Society. Recently, she served as the Stage Manager for the world premiere of The Sting of White Roses (for which she also served as Props Master); Black Nativity; Faith Journey: Untold Stories of Courage, Strength and Power; and The Right Reverend Dupree in Exile. Whatever side of the stage she’s on, her hard work and dedication shine. Arthur Reese (Set Design/Technical Director) has set the mood for the past 29 years as Technical Director for the North Carolina Black Repertory Company. He has designed sets and lighting for, among others, the late Dr. Maya Angelou, John Amos, Samuel L. Jackson, and the Negro Ensemble Company. Reese has done technical work for many stars including Sidney Poitier, Debbie Allen, Oprah, Queen Latifah, Malcolm-Jamal Warner, and Denzel Washington. Reese won the 2006, 2007, 2008, and 2009 AfricanAmerican Image Makers Award for Best Lighting Design for his work at ETA Theatre. He is the co-author and director of By a Black Hand. Arthur Reese received his Master of Fine Arts degree from the University of Virginia. Additionally, he is

the Technical Director of North Carolina Central University’s Department of Theatre and Dance. Frenchie La’Vern (Costume Designer) is a native of Winston-Salem and graduate of University of North Carolina School of the Arts with a degree in design and production. Frenchie has designed shows for the North Carolina Black Repertory Theatre since their production of Smokey’s Joe’s Café in 1999. She has designed and draped for Duke University, North Carolina Central University, the North Carolina Shakespeare Festival, the

American Dance Festival, Community Theatre of Greensboro, the Barn Dinner Theatre, Montage Showcase Ensemble and the Assegai Film Group. Her atelier, Frenchie La’Vern Costume Studio, provides complete rental packages and builds for film, theatre and the general public since 2000. Auri Wilds (Light Board Operator) hails from Welcome, NC. He graduated from North Carolina Central University with a degree in technical theatre. He is a member of the International Alliance of Theatrical Stage Employees Local 417.


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A SCHAEFER POPULAR SERIES EVENT

SATURDAY, JULY 15 8 PM, SCHAEFER CENTER FOR THE PERFORMING ARTS

Superstar entertainer Jennifer Nettles is one of the most admired and animated performers. ASCAP has honored her songwriting prowess with five awards, including the emotionally charged, #1 PLATINUM hit “Stay” that also earned Jennifer GRAMMY®, ACM and CMA Awards. As the first female artist to be the solo songwriter on an ACM Song of the Year winner since 1972, Jennifer was acknowledged with the Crystal Milestone Award. Leading with her powerhouse vocals and vivacious energy, Jennifer hit high notes throughout 2016, releasing two Big Machine Records’ albums – Playing with Fire and To Celebrate Christmas – in addition to back-to-back headline tours as well as holiday-themed dates. She recently released the music video for her catchy latest single, “Hey Heartbreak” which is an anchor on her critically acclaimed sophomore solo album, Playing with Fire. In 2015, Jennifer made her Broadway debut as Roxy Hart in the Tony Award-winning, record-breaking musical Chicago. In December, she reprised her role as Dolly Parton’s mom Avie Lee Parton in the holidaythemed sequel to the ratings success Coat of Many Colors, Christmas of Many Colors: Circle of Love. Jennifer also played a vital role on the inaugural season of American Supergroup, serving as a celebrity judge alongside Elle King, Aloe Blacc and Jason Scheff. She was also added to the lineup for the annual C2C Festival in London, Glasgow and Dublin March 10-12 and headlined the 2017 Women’s Final Four concert in Dallas, TX on Saturday, April 1. SERIES SPONSORSHIP PROVIDED BY WESTGLOW RESORT & SPA AND ROWLAND’S RESTAURANT, MADE POSSIBLE THROUGH THE GENEROSITY OF BONNIE SCHAEFER.

PERFORMANCE SPONSORSHIP PROVIDED BY: MAST GENERAL STORE, GOODNIGHT BROTHERS, SKYBEST COMMUNICATIONS, INC., BOONE AREA VISITORS BUREAU

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PROGRAM NOTES:

BROYHILL CHAMBER ENSEMBLE SUNDAY, JULY 16 4 PM, ROSEN CONCERT HALL

Sponsored by McDonald’s of Boone

Gil Morgenstern and Grace Park, violin; Kathryn Lockwood, viola Alexis Pia Gerlach, cello; Rieko Aizawa, piano Terzetto, Op.74

Antonín Dvořák

Piano Trio in D Major (“Ghost”), Op. 70, #1

Ludwig van Beethoven

Piano Quartet in E-flat Major, Op. 87

Antonín Dvořák

The Broyhill Chamber Ensemble Concert Series is generously supported by the Broyhill Family Foundation (in memory of Faye Broyhill), and by Ralph and Venda Lerch/McDonald’s of Boone. Additional performance underwriting has been provided by Nanette Mayer and her family (in memory of Budd Mayer), Joni and Peter Petschauer, the Muriel and Arnold Rosen Endowment for the Arts and the Rosen-Schaffel Endowment for Classical Music Programming. The 2017 concert series by the Broyhill Chamber Ensemble is dedicated to the memory of Mr. Jack Branch. With special thanks to Appalachia Cookie Company, for a generous donation of refreshments during this evening’s performance. Biographical information for this evening’s performers beings on page 78

LUDWIG VAN BEETHOVEN Piano Trio No. 4, in E-Flat, Op. 70, No. 1, Geistertrio (“Ghost Trio”) (Born December 16, 1770, in Bonn, Germany; died March 26, 1827, in Vienna, Austria) In Beethoven’s time, the trio for piano, violin and cello was a very popular medium, and it occupied an important place in Beethoven’s oeuvre. His Opus 1 was made up of three trios that he played in 1793 for Joseph Haydn, who thought the third of them so advanced that he suggested that it be withheld from publication at the time. That one was Beethoven’s favorite; he finally returned to it again only twenty-four years after first completing it when he arranged it as a string quintet that was published as his Op. 104. In his middle years, when he brought the forms he had inherited from Mozart and Haydn to their greatest fulfillment, Beethoven wrote three more trios, the two of Op. 70 and Op. 97. He completed Op. 70 in 1808, at the time he was composing the Symphonies Nos. 5 and 6; during this same period, he worked on the music for Goethe’s Egmont, as well as learning to accommodate the stresses of his increasing deafness. When he offered these works to the publisher Breitkopf and Härtel, he wrote that he had decided to write two piano trios “since such trios are rather scarce.” He dedicated both to the Countess Anna Maria Erdödy, in whose house he occupied an apartment at the time. Erdödy, a frail woman, related by marriage to Haydn’s patrons, the Esterházys, was a student of Beethoven’s, and she performed his music well. Although they became close friends, there was never any evidence of any amorous relationship between them. Beethoven originally had planned that Op. 70 was to be dedicated to the Emperor’s son, Archduke Rudolph, his most generous, most faithful and most elevated student. However, he made a sudden switch, and Rudolph received instead the dedication of Op. 97, now always called the Archduke Trio. At that time, trios were more frequently played as hausmusik (concerts in homes) than in concert halls. The composer Louis Spohr, a contemporary of Beethoven’s, mentioned hearing the composer playing the trios of Op. 70 and wrote in his Autobiography, “As at the time I made


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Beethoven’s acquaintance, he had already discontinued playing both in public and at private parties; I had therefore but one opportunity to hear him, when I casually came to the rehearsal of a new Trio at Beethoven’s house. It was by no means an enjoyment; for in the first place the pianoforte was woefully out of tune, which however little troubled Beethoven, since he could hear nothing of it, and secondly, of the former so admired excellence of the virtuoso, scarcely any thing was left, in consequence of his total deafness... I felt moved with the deepest sorrow at so hard a destiny. It is a sad misfortune for anyone to be deaf; how then should a musician endure it without despair? Beethoven’s almost continual melancholy was no longer a riddle to me.” Nevertheless, during this middle period, Beethoven composed fast and furiously. The Trio, Op. 70, No. 1 is very dramatic. Throughout, the music moves quickly from loud and violent to soft and lyrical and uses deceptively simple materials, creating masterful effects. Its first movement, Allegro vivace con brio, begins with all three instruments playing a unison rhythmic motif, violent and fiery, which blends into a more melodic motif that the cello first introduces. These two, displaying Beethoven’s fondness for working with small motifs rather than with expansive themes, dominate the movement. The movement ends suddenly, with a final repeat of the original motif. The extraordinarily slow second movement, Largo assai ed espressivo, has the programmatic quality that gives this work its name. In Beethoven’s sketchbook, music for this movement appeared in the same location as an idea for the opera Macbeth, which he never completed. Some commentators indicate that the name “Ghost” may have been derived from these entries in the sketchbook, making the name “Ghost” reflect some connection in Beethoven’s mind between the spectral music he writes in its slow movement and the ghostliness of the witches’ scene in Shakespeare’s Macbeth. On the other hand, other commentators indicate Beethoven had just completed reading Hamlet and may have been recalling the terror of the ghosts that tormented the protagonist. Lewis Lockwood in his book, Beethoven: The Music and the Life notes that Czerny

wrote in 1842 that the second movement “reminded him of the first appearance of the Ghost in Hamlet, thus coining the colloquial title ‘Ghost’ for the whole work.” Regardless of how the trio became associated with ghostliness, the music throughout shows that Beethoven, now in his middle period, was reaching toward Romanticism. This tension filled, suspenseful slow movement includes serious, dark, mysterious rumblings and other dramatic and eerie effects, and like the first movement, this powerful movement grows out of a motif that Beethoven states at the very beginning. The exciting finale, Presto, has a completely cheerful, bright aspect and was composed in clearly-defined sonata form with several contrasting themes. Basil Smallman describes this movement as “an admirable compound of high spirits, wit and occasional rustic good humor.” ANTONIN DVORÁK Quartet for Piano and Strings, No. 2, in E-Flat, Op. 87 (Born September 8, 1841, in Nelahozeves, Czech Republic; died May 1, 1904, in Prague) The father of Antonin Dvořák was a village innkeeper and butcher who hoped to pass his trade on to his son, but the young man turned instead to music, took up the violin and organ, and at sixteen left home to study in Prague. Five years later he joined the orchestra of the National Theater, playing the viola (which in those days was the instrument of failed violinists), and soon began to test his creative powers with extended compositions in the classical forms. Until he was more than thirty years old, he was unknown as a composer outside of the little circle of musicians in Prague who were his friends. Then in 1875, his talent came to the attention of Brahms, who finally helped launch him on his career. Chamber music had an important place in Dvořák’s life as a young musician. To develop his craft, he composed quartets and quintets that he modeled after those of Beethoven and Schubert, and then tried out with his colleagues and friends. Dvořák wrote the first of the two Piano Quartets in 1875, dedicating the first one to Brahms with gratitude. It is not a work often heard today since it almost too strongly reflects Brahms’ workings out

of this difficult ensemble medium. The combination of strings and piano requires an extremely deft play of weight and texture. Dvořák’s mastery of this medium, however, can be better felt in this Piano Quartet No. 2. The form is a very difficult one for composers and Brahms himself, in the year he met Dvořák, had just completed a piano quartet, which occupied him for almost twenty years before it was completed to his satisfaction. By the time Dvořák wrote this Piano Quartet in the summer of 1889, he had a growing reputation as well as a growing oeuvre. He had recently composed a masterful piano quintet and was about to begin what would later become one of his finest works, Symphony No. 8 in G Major. The first movement, Allegro con fuoco, opens with a forceful melodic line in the strings, underscored by the rhythms in the piano part. The two halves are intertwined and extended until the contrasting, lyrical second subject is heard. In the development, Dvořák becomes very involved in a free elaboration of the first theme, and to balance this concentration, when the time comes to recapitulate the basic subject matter, he gives great emphasis to the second. At the end, the music slows for a moment, for the quiet, buzzing start of the coda, and then breaks out vigorously, as Dvořák finishes the movement with passion and power. The Lento second movement is freely built of a succession of five distinctively written passages covering a wide range of expression, which are then simply repeated with variation. The third movement, Allegro moderato, grazioso, resembles a scherzo, but the music moves with the gentle rhythm of a waltz, except in the contrasting central section. The energetic Finale: Allegro ma non troppo, balances the weight and shape of the first movement, but its ideas are allowed to spread themselves out much more freely. At the end, there is a huge, stirring, almost orchestral coda. Program Notes: Susan Halpern, © 2017


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THE HELENE AND STEPHEN WEICHOLZ GLOBAL FILM SERIES

WEDNESDAY, JULY 19 7 PM, SCHAEFER CENTER FOR THE PERFORMING ARTS

Winner of the Palme d’Or at the 2016 Cannes Film Festival, the latest from legendary director Ken Loach is a gripping, human tale about the impact one man can make. Gruff but goodhearted, Daniel Blake is a man out of time: a widowed woodworker who’s never owned a computer, he lives according to his own common sense moral code. But after a heart attack leaves him unable to work and the state welfare system fails him, the stubbornly self-reliant Daniel must stand up and fight for his dignity, leading a one-man crusade for compassion that will transform the lives of a struggling single mother and her two children. Graced with humor and heart, I, Daniel Blake is a moving, much-needed reminder of the power of empathy. UK; R; DIRECTED BY KEN LOACH (2016); 100 MINUTES

Pre-film talk with Dr. John Pfeifer begins at 7pm, with the film beginning at approximately 7:30pm. Concessions, including popcorn, beer, wine and cold beverages are available for purchase. With special thanks to our generous sponsors for this series, Helene and Stephen Weicholz.

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ABOUT THE COMPANY

OPUS CACTUS PRESENTED BY

FRIDAY, JULY 21 8 PM, SCHAEFER CENTER FOR THE PERFORMING ARTS Artistic Director MOSES PENDLETON with ANTHONY BOCCONI, BEAU CAMPBELL, SAMANTHA CHIESA, GREGORY DEARMOND, STEVEN EZRA, LAUREN JAEGER, SARAH NACHBAUER, MATTHEW ORTNER, REBECCA RASMUSSEN and JASON WILLIAMS Associate Director CYNTHIA QUINN Lighting Design JOSHUA STARBUCK MOSES PENDLETON Production Manager WOODROW F. DICK III Technical Director JAMESON WILLEY Production Stage Manager JEFFREY MAIN Production Electrician CHRISTOPHER LUBIK Company Manager PAULA BURNS MOMIX PO Box 1035 Washington, Connecticut 06793 Tel: 860•868•7454 Fax: 860•868•2317 info@momix.com www.momix.com Margaret Selby - Selby Artists Management 262 West 38th Street, Suite 1701, New York, NY 10025 Phone: +1 (212) 382-3260 selbyartistsmgmt.com

Conceived & Directed by: MOSES PENDLETON Assisted by: Cynthia Quinn, Kori Darling, Brian Sanders, Craig Berman, Amphaymany Keohavong, Nicole Loizides, Jane’l Caropolo, Kara Oculato, Brian Simerson, Michael Holdsworth and the Ballet Arizona. Lighting Design: Joshua Starbuck and Moses Pendleton Puppet Design: Michael Curry Sculpture Design: Alan Boeding Costume Design: Phoebe Katzin Associate Lighting Design: John Finen III *Fire Walker choreographed by Brian Sanders* This evening’s performance has been supported by a generous gift from Harold Libby and Wanda Rayle-Libby.

MOMIX: 37 Years of Innovation Known internationally for presenting work of exceptional inventiveness and physical beauty, MOMIX is a company of dancer-illusionists under the direction of Moses Pendleton. In addition to stage performances world-wide, MOMIX has worked in film and television, recently appearing in a national commercial for Hanes underwear and a Target ad that premiered during the airing of the 67th Annual Golden Globe Awards. With performances on PBS’s “Dance in America” series, France’s Antenne II, and Italian RAI television, the company’s repertory has been broadcast to 55 countries. Joining the Montreal Symphony in the Rhombus Media film of Mussorgsky’s Pictures at an Exhibition, winner of an International Emmy for Best Performing Arts Special, the company’s performance was distributed on laserdisc by Decca Records. MOMIX was also featured in IMAGINE, one of the first 3-D IMAX films to be released in IMAX theaters worldwide. MOMIX dancers Cynthia Quinn and Karl Baumann, under Moses Pendleton’s direction, played the role of “Bluey” in the feature film FX2; and White Widow, co-choreographed by Moses Pendleton and Cynthia Quinn, was featured in Robert Altman’s movie, The Company. Participating in the Homage a Picasso in Paris, MOMIX was also selected to represent the US at the European Cultural Center at Delphi. With the support of the Scottsdale Cultural Council Scottsdale Center for the Arts in Scottsdale, Arizona, Mr. Pendleton created Bat Habits to celebrate the opening of the San Francisco Giants’ new spring training park in Scottsdale. MOMIX has been commissioned by corporations such as Fiat and Mercedes Benz, performing at Fiat’s month long 100th Anniversary Celebration in Torino, Italy and Mercedes Benz’s International Auto Show in Frankfurt, Germany. With nothing more than light, shadow, props, and the human body, MOMIX has astonished audiences on five continents for more than 35 years.


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PART I 1. Desert Storm 2. Cactus Wren / Morning Star 3. Pole Dance 4. Desert Blooms 5. Ostrich of the Imagination 6. Prickly Pair 7. Black Mesa 8. Sidewinder 9. Gila Dance 10. Tracking the Earth 11. Caravan

PART II 12.Dream Catcher 13. Menitation 14. Sundance 15. Big Pole Dance 16. Totem 17. Fire Walker 18. First Contact

OPUS CACTUS is performed with one 20 minute intermission. OPUS CACTUS SOUNDTRACK: 1. Desert Storm: Adam Plack, Johnny (White Ant) Soames, “Willi Willi” from Winds of Warning* 2. Cactus Wren / Morning Star: Peter Buffet, “The Dream” from Spirit Dance, Distribution: Hollywood Records 3. Pole Dance: Produced & Mixed by Adam Plack, “The Hunt” from the album Winds of Warning by Adam Plack & Johnny Sames. (P) & (C) 1993 Australian Music International / Rasa Music, Yalumba Music (ASCAP). Kind permission from Rasa Music www.rasamusic.com tel: 212 253 1567 4. Desert Blooms: Brian Eno, “But If” from The Drop, Published by Opal Music 5. Ostrich of the Imagination: TUU, “Migration” from Mesh, Fathom/Hearts of Space 6. Prickly Pair: TUU, “Mesh” from Mesh, Fathom/Hearts of Space 7. Black Mesa: Gabrielle Roth and the Mirrors, “Black Mesa” from Ritual, Distribution: Raven Recording 8. Sidewinder: Transglobal Underground, “Ali Mullah” from Rejoice/Rejoice, Distribution: MCA 9. Gila Dance: Brent Lewis & Peter Wood, “Outback Attack” from Thunder Down Under: Tribal Drumming and Didgeridoo 10. Tracking the Earth: Le Duc, “Touareg” from Buddah Bar, Published by PST! 11. Caravan: Jose Nieto, Hemza Al-Din, “The Lost City” from Passion in the Desert: Music from the Motion Picture Soundtrack 12. Dream Catcher: NOMAD, “Mountain Walk East” from Nomad* 13. Menitation: Mickey Hart, “Pigs in Space” from At The Edge. Distribution by Rykodisc 14. Sundance: Joanne Shenandoah & Tom Wasinger, “Prophecy Song” from Orenda – courtesy of Silver Wave Records silverwave.com 1-800-SIL-WAVE 15. Big Pole Dance: Adam Plack, Johnny (White Ant) Soames, “Initiation” from Winds of Warning* 16. Totem: Gabrielle Roth and the Mirrors, “Stillness” from Tribe, Distribution: Raven Recording 17. Fire Walker: Dead Can Dance, “Mother Tongue” from The Serpent’s Egg, Distribution by Warner Bros. 18. First Contact: Douglass Spotted Eagle, “First Contact” from Pray, Market & Manuf. by Higher Octave Music *Courtesy of Australian Music International

WHO’S WHO IN THE COMPANY MOSES PENDLETON (Artistic Director) has been one of America’s most innovative and widely performed choreographers and directors for over 40 years. A co-founder of the ground-breaking Pilobolus Dance Theater in 1971, he formed his own company, MOMIX, in 1980. Mr. Pendleton has also worked extensively in film, TV, and opera and as a choreographer for ballet companies and special events. Mr. Pendleton was born and raised on a dairy farm in Northern Vermont. His earliest experiences as a showman came from exhibiting his family’s dairy cows at the Caledonian County Fair. He received his BA in English Literature from Dartmouth College in 1971. Pilobolus began touring immediately and the group shot to fame in the1970’s, performing on Broadway under the sponsorship of Pierre Cardin, touring internationally, and appearing in PBS’s Dance in America and Great Performances series. By the end of the decade, Mr. Pendleton had begun to work outside of Pilobolus, performing in and serving as principal choreographer for the Paris Opera’s Integrale Erik Satie in 1979 and choreographing the Closing Ceremonies of the Winter Olympics at Lake Placid in 1980. In 1980 he created MOMIX, which rapidly established an international reputation for highly inventive and often illusionistic choreography. The troupe has been touring steadily and is currently performing several programs internationally. The company has made numerous special programs for Italian and French television and received the Gold Medal of the Verona Festival in 1994. Mr. Pendleton has also been active as a performer and choreographer for other companies. He has staged Picabia’s Dadaist ballet Relache for the Joffrey Ballet and Tutuguri, based on the writings of Artaud, for the Deutsch Opera Berlin. He created the role of the Fool for Yuri Lyubimov’s production of Mussorgsky’s Khovanschina at La Scala and choreographed Rameau’s Platee for the U.S. Spoleto Festival in 1987. He contributed choreography to Lina Wertmuller’s


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production of Carmen at the Munich State Opera in 1993. More recently, he has choreographed new works for the Arizona Ballet and the Aspen Santa Fe Ballet. He teamed up with Danny Ezralow and David Parsons to choreograph AEROS with the Romanian National Gymnastics Team. His film and television work includes the feature film FX2 with Cynthia Quinn, Moses Pendleton Presents Moses Pendleton for ABC ARTS cable (winner of more than 10 international awards including a Cine Golden Eagle award and the US Film and Video Competition – now known as Sundance – Special Jury Award), and Pictures at an Exhibition with Charles Dutoit and the Montreal Symphony, which received an International Emmy for Best Performing Arts Special in 1991. Mr. Pendleton has made music videos with Prince, Julian Lennon, and Cathy Dennis, among others. Mr. Pendleton is an avid photographer with works presented in Rome, Milan, Florence, and Aspen. Images of his sunflower plantings at his home in northwestern Connecticut have been featured in numerous books and articles on gardening. He is the subject of the book Salto di Gravita by Lisavetta Scarbi, published in Italy in 1999. Mr. Pendleton was a recipient of the Connecticut Commission on the Arts Governor’s Award in 1998. He received the Positano Choreographic Award in 1999 and was a Guggenheim Fellow in 1977. He is a recipient of a 2002 American Choreography Award for his contributions to choreography for film and television. In May 2010, Mr. Pendleton received an Honorary Doctorate of Fine Arts (HDFA) and delivered the keynote address to the University of the Arts in Philadelphia. Most recently, Mr. Pendleton choreographed the Doves of Peace, featuring Diana Vishneva, for the Opening Ceremony of the 2014 Sochi Winter Olympics. His photographs accompany the sixteen cantos of Phil Holland’s The Dance Must Follow (2015), which takes Mr. Pendleton’s own creative process as its subject.

CYNTHIA QUINN (Associate Director) grew up in Southern California. She graduated Phi Beta Kappa from the University of California at Riverside and continued there as an Associate in Dance for five years. In 1988 she received the University’s Alumni Association’s “Outstanding Young Graduate Award.” As a member of Pilobolus, she performed on Broadway and throughout the United States, Europe, Canada, Israel and Japan. She collaborated on the choreography of Day Two, Elegy for the Moment, Mirage, What Grows in Huygens Window and Stabat Mater. Ms. Quinn began performing with MOMIX in 1983 and has since toured throughout the United States, Canada, Europe, Australia, South America and Japan. She has appeared in numerous television programs and music videos; and has assisted Moses Pendleton in the choreography of Pulcinella for the Ballet Nancy in France, Tutuguri for the Berlin Opera Ballet, Platee for the Spoleto Festival USA, Les Maries de la Tour Eiffel in New York, AccorDION for the ZurichVolksbuhne Theatre and Carmen for the Munich State Opera, as well as Opus Cactus for Arizona Ballet and Noir Blanc for Aspen Sante Fe Ballet. She has also appeared as a guest artist with the Ballet Theatre Francaise de Nancy, the Berlin Opera Ballet and the Munich State Opera, as well as international galas in Italy, France and Japan. Ms. Quinn made her film debut as “Bluey” (a role she shared with Karl Baumann) in FX II. She was a featured performer in the Emmy Award winning “Pictures at an Exhibition” with the Montreal Symphony and has also appeared in a 3D IMAX film. Ms. Quinn is a board member of the Nutmeg Conservatory in Torrington, Connecticut and is on the advisory board of the Susan B. Anthony Project, also in Torrington, CT. Ms. Quinn was featured with Ru Paul and k.d. Lang for M.A.C. Cosmetics’ “Fashion Cares” benefits in Toronto and Vancouver. Ms. Quinn is co-choreographer of “White Widow,” which is featured prominently in the Robert Altman film, The Company. Ms. Quinn was also featured in the film, “First Born,” with Elisabeth Shue. Most

recently, Ms. Quinn co-choreographed the Doves of Peace, featuring Diana Vishneva, for the Opening Ceremony of the 2014 Sochi Winter Olympics. However, her most rewarding and challenging role is as a mother to her daughter, Quinn Elisabeth. ANTHONY BOCCONI (Dancer) was born in Brooklyn, New York and began his dance training at the age of 13. The following year, Anthony attended Fiorello H. LaGuardia High School of Music, Art, and the Performing Arts. It was there he found his niche in modern dance while studying Graham and Horton techniques. Upon graduation, Anthony continued his dance training in the Ailey/Fordham BFA program under the direction of Melanie Person. Anthony spent each summer at Jacob’s Pillow Dance Festival, Hubbard Street Dance Chicago, Nederlands Dans Theatre, and Springboard Dance Montreal. Anthony graduated in 2013 and has since performed with Lydia Johnson Dance, The Metropolitan Opera, The Santa Fe Opera, and Lar Lubovitch Dance Company. Bocconi joined MOMIX in 2015. BEAU CAMPBELL (Dancer) is a professional dancer, yoga and barre instructor and photographer from Southern California. Beau trained in classical ballet in Malibu, California with Joanna Jarvis and at the School of American Ballet at Lincoln Center. Beau also received extensive training from Zippora Karz, Amanda McKerrow, and John Gardner. She performed with the Malibu Civic Ballet for 6 years, dancing several principal roles. In 2005, Beau was awarded the coveted Solo Seal by London’s Royal Academy of Dance and later that year, joined Ballet Pacifica under the direction of Ethan Stiefel. Beau joined Ballet Arizona in 2006 under the direction of Ib Anderson, where she spent 8 seasons. She has performed soloist and principal roles in several classical, neoclassical, and


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contemporary works by choreographers including Ib Anderson, Petipa, Bournonville, Fokine, Balanchine, and Christopher Wheeldon. Beau has performed principal roles with Nova Ballet, including Emery Lecrone’s Pulling to Break, Adam Hougland’s Beyond, and Yanis Pikieris and David Palmer’s Adiemus. Most recently, Beau has performed as a guest artist with Post: Ballet in Triads under the director of Robert Dekkers in San Francisco, and for Les Grands Ballet Canadiens in their production of the Nutcracker in Montreal. For the past two years, Beau has performed with Quixotic Fusion, sharing a variety of dance styles and projection interaction pieces. Beau is a certified yoga and barre instructor (200 hour RYT). She has taught at several different studios and festivals across North America, including Wanderlust Studio Montreal, Sutra Midtown, Woodside Health and Tennis Club, Wanderlust Festival, and the Arise Festival. Beau joined MOMIX in 2016. SAMANTHA CHIESA (Dancer) Graduated summa cum laude from Southern Methodist University with a BFA in Dance Performance and a BS in Applied Physiology and Sport Management. While at SMU’s Meadows School of the Arts, she was honored to perform in Kathy Young’s Zero Cool, Jawole Willa Jo Zollar’s Chalabati, Martha Graham’s Appalachian Spring, and as a soloist in Jose Limon’s There Is A Time. Samantha trained with Hubbard Street Dance Chicago and San Francisco Conservatory of Dance. Most recently, Samantha has performed as a backup dancer for British pop star Viktoria Modesta and for Hannibal Buress on his Funny or Die tour. Samantha joined MOMIX in 2016. STEVEN EZRA (Dancer/Dance Captain) Born and raised in Long Island, Steven Ezra began training classical ballet at the ripe age of thirteen. His first steps toward a professional career started at the Seiskaya Ballet School in Long Island. He then went off to the Nutmeg Conservatory for

the Arts in Connecticut and finished his training at the School of American Ballet in New York City. At eighteen years old his career path took a turn away from classical ballet when he joined MOMIX. Enamored with MOMIX since a young age, Steven Ezra proudly performed much of its grand repertoire all around the world, in over twenty countries, for more than ten years and counting. He assisted in creating the full length evening performances of Lunar Sea, Botanica, and Alchemia, respectively, and has collaborated with MOMIX for many industrial shows as well as a commercial for Target. Most recently, he appeared as a finalist on America's Got Talent with the shadow performance troupe Catapult, with which he collaborated since 2011. He continues working for both MOMIX and Catapult, as well as freelancing around NYC. In his spare time he enjoys practicing guitar and studying Italian. Gedetevi lo spettacolo! Steven joined MOMIX in 2003. GREG DeARMOND (Dancer) grew up in Southern California having trained at Saddleback Dance Center, Golden State Ballet and Ballet Pacifica. He graduated cum laude from the University of California, Irvine with a Bachelor of Arts in Dance and a Bachelor of Science in Civil Engineering with an emphasis in structures. He was honored as a William J. Gillespie Scholar and as a Gregory Osborne Memorial Scholar. After graduating, Gregory joined the North Carolina Dance Theatre in 2010 and later participated in the National Choreographers Initiative, performing works by Jiri Kylian, William Forsythe, Twyla Tharp, Jiri Bubenicek, Jodie Gates, Dwight Rhoden, Peter Quanz, and George Balanchine. Gregory would like to thank everyone who has helped to make his career in dance possible. Gregory joined MOMIX in 2014. LAUREN JAEGER (Dancer) graduated magna cum laude from Marymount Manhattan College with a BFA in Dance. Lauren has toured

both nationally and internationally as a member of MOMIX, Buglisi Dance Theatre, Michael Mao Dance, and Catapult. Lauren is an Assistant Rehearsal Director for Buglisi’s Table of Silence Project, which is performed each year on September 11th at Lincoln Center. She has also performed with Peridance Contemporary Dance Company, ACB Dance, Ballet Ambassadors, and as a guest artist with Eva Dean Dance. Most recently, Lauren was a guest artist and master teacher for the Fini Dance Festival in Southern Italy. In addition to her performance work, Lauren teaches for several schools including The Joffrey Ballet School, Peridance Capezio Center, and the Greenwich Dance Studio. Lauren joined MOMIX in 2015. SARAH NACHBAUER (Dancer) began dancing in Pittsfield, MA with the Albany Berkshire Ballet, Terpsichore Dance Theatre and appeared annually at Jacob’s Pillow. She moved to Boston where she studied with the Emerson Dance Ensemble and Prometheus Dance Company. She attended The Boston Conservatory, under the direction of Yasuko Tokunaga, where she graduated Cum Laude. Sarah has performed premiere works choreographed by Jacqulyn Buglisi, Seàn Curran, Daniel Pelzig, Katherine Helen Fisher and assisted Donald Byrd. She has also performed timeless pieces by Paul Taylor, Anna Sokolow, José Limòn and Murray Louis. She has been honored with a Best of Boston award and was a recipient of the Ruth Sandholm Ambrose Award. Sarah appeared on season 8 of America's Got Talent with Top 12 finalists Catapult Entertainment and is a print model for acclaimed photographer Robert Whitman. Ms. Nachbauer has taught at The Nutmeg Conservatory for the Arts, at a residency with the Moscow Ballet, and is the co-creator of an artist in residency program in Berkshire County. Sarah is also a personal trainer for the Tracy Anderson Method and a Kripalu trained body worker. Sarah joined MOMIX in 2001.


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MATT ORTNER (Dancer) attended the Boston Conservatory, graduating in 2012 with a BFA in Dance. Matthew had the opportunity to perform master works by Jose Limon, Alwin Nikolias, Paul Taylor, Anna Sokolow, Ohad Narahin and Danielle Agamie. Other credits include Springboard Dance Montreal where he worked with Victor Quijada and Alanna Kraaijeveld, as well as Movement Invention Project with Sidra Bell, Andrea Miller, and Jill Johnson. Matthew currently resides in NYC, working as a freelance performing artist, teacher and choreographer. This is Matthew’s third tour with MOMIX. He joined MOMIX in 2013. REBECCA RASMUSSEN (Dancer/Dance Captain) was born and raised in Moorpark, CA where she received her dance training at Pam Rossi’s Dance Ten and Moorpark College. Rebecca went on to receive a BFA in Dance from The Boston Conservatory where she had the honor of performing works by Paul Taylor, Jose Limon, Michael Folkine and Murray Louis. Other professional dance companies include: Catapult Entertainment, Evolution Dance Theater, Media City Ballet, La Danserie, DeDa Dance Theater, and Moorpark Civic Ballet. Industrial works include: National Target Commercial, International Builders’ show (Kohler Co.), and the Mercedes Benz Car show. She wants to thank her family and friends for their endless love and support. Rebecca joined MOMIX in 2006. JASON WILLIAMS (Dancer) began his dance career and training at Boca Ballet Theater at the age of 16 under the direction of Dan Guin and Jane Tyree, and furthered his studies at New World School of the Arts in Miami, Florida where he became proficient in Graham, Limon, Horton, as well as Classical and Contemporary

Ballet techniques. While there he deepened his studies by being exposed to Anatomy, Kinesiology, Labon Movement Analysis, and Ballet Pedagogy. Jason Williams is a 2011 summa cum laude B.F.A. Graduate of New World School of the Arts. While there, he worked with noted choreographers such as Robert Battle, Daniel Lewis, Michael Uthoff, Peter London, Darshan Bhueller, and Gerard Ebitz, to name a few. During his summers he has performed in the New Prague Dance Festival (Prague, Czech Republic), and Semana de Internacional de Baile (San Juan, Puerto Rico). Since completing his degree he has danced with DanceNow! Miami, Momix, Joseé Garant Dance Company, Miami Contemporary Dance Company, and RudduR Dance. He has also participated in The Lincoln Center Festival in New York, performing alongside the Paris Opera Ballet. Jason joined MOMIX in 2011. PHOEBE KATZIN (Costume Designer) has been designing and constructing dresses and costumes for over twenty years. After graduating from Endicott College’s fashion design program, she worked for Kitty Daly, building dance costumes and dressmaking. For several years she lived in New York making costumes for Kitty Leach, Greg Barnes, and Allison Conner, among others. For the past several years, she has been working for MOMIX and Pilobolus. Ms. Katzin lives in Connecticut with her three children and her husband, James. WOODROW F. DICK III (Production Stage Manager & Lighting Supervisor) No, this name is not someone’s idea of something funny to slip into the program. Woodrow, or “Woody” as he is affectionately called, gave up being taken seriously long ago. You won’t believe anything that is written here so why should he even bother to tell you about himself? He has worked on various productions, some big, most of them small. This would have probably been the bio that gave you that smug satisfaction of recognizing an obscure production that no one else you came with has seen. But really, what’s the point in listing all of that stuff and wasting space in this program when you still don’t believe there's a guy out there named Woody Dick?

JEFFREY MAIN (Production Stage Manager) is a graduate of the NC School of the Arts and began working with Momix in 2001. He is also a freelance photographer and video editor who enjoys seeing the world through a variety of lenses. JAMESON WILLEY (Technical Director) grew up in a theatre family in Connecticut and began working backstage at the ripe old age of seven. Jameson’s early passion led to a career in technical theatre, affording him the opportunity to work on productions across the state of Connecticut, including many at Torrington’s historic Warner Theatre. Jameson joined MOMIX in 2012. CHRISTOPHER LUBIK (Production Electrician) is a graduate of the University of Connecticut Construction Campus with a BFA in Technical Theatre. His past lighting design credits include Cloud 9 (CRT), Albert Herring (UConn Music Dept.), and Be a Good Little Widow (UConn Department Series). He also worked as a master electrician for His Girl Friday (CRT), Hound of the Baskervilles, The Fantasticks, and Last of the Red Hot Lovers (New Harmony Theatre). In his spare time he is known for dwelling in trees and aspires to be the next Nikola Tesla. Christopher joined MOMIX in 2015. Victoria Mazzarelli (Ballet Mistress)


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31ST ROSEN SCULPTURE WALK Sculpture Walk with juror Gregory Elliott and Turchin Center founding director Hank Foreman

SATURDAY, JULY 22 10 AM, SMITH GALLERY, SCHAEFER CENTER FOR THE PERFORMING ARTS FREE EVENT

The Rosen Sculpture Competition and Exhibition is a national, juried competition presented annually by the Turchin Center for the Visual Arts on the campus of Appalachian State University. To celebrate the 31st anniversary of this important program, join competition juror Gregory Elliott and Turchin Center director Hank Foreman on an educational outdoor tour of the ten selected pieces from this year’s competition. The tour concludes at the Schaefer Center with an awards reception. Paris Alexander Portal VIII

Charlie Brouwer Ordinary Guy

Jacob Burmood Depth of Form

Mark Connelley Defiance

James Futral Tetness, the Polar Bear

Noah Kirby Force of Action of Force - Killbox

Susan Moffatt Succulent I

Charles Pilkey Brave New World

Wayne Vaughan Conversation

Mike Wsol Lost Horizon

Alison Ouellette-Kirby Instead

Stephanie Sailor Nature's Quintet

Made possible by the continued generosity of the Rosen Family: The Martin & Doris Rosen Giving Fund/Debbie Rosen Davidson and David Rosen/Charles & Nancy Rosenblatt Foundation. THE ROSEN SCULPTURE INVITATIONAL SCULPTORS: Paris Alexander, Portal VIII (Raleigh, NC) Charlie Brouwer, Ordinary Guy (Willis, VA) Jacob Burmood, Depth of Form (Springfield, MO) Mark Connelley, Defiance (Brevard, NC) James Futral, Tetness, the Polar Bear (Frostproof, AL) Noah Kirby, Force of Action of Force – Killbox (Alton, IL) Susan Moffatt, Succulent I (Chapel Hill, NC) Charles Pilkey, Brave New World (Mint Hill, NC) Wayne Vaughan, Conversation (Graham, NC) Mike Wsol, Lost Horizon (Lilburn, GA) At Blowing Rock Art and History Museum: Alison Ouellette-Kirby, Instead (Alton, IL) At Chancellor's Residence: Stephanie Sailor, Nature’s Quintet (Swisher, IA) ABOUT JURROR GREGORY ELLIOTT: Gregory Elliott is currently the chair of the Department of Art & Art History at the University of Texas, San Antonio. He has been making and exhibiting sculpture for the past 35+ years. Elliott earned a Bachelor of Fine Arts from Stephen F. Austin State University with concentrations in commercial art, printmaking, and ceramics; a Master of Arts from Stephen F. Austin Studio Art in ceramic sculpture and a Master of Fine Arts from Southern Methodist University with a focus on sculpture. Elliot has exhibited widely across the U.S. and received numerous awards and grants for his work. He has lectured extensively on forging, welding, iron casting, conservation, preservation and sustainability, and issues of outdoor sculpture and managing sculpture parks.

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A N A P PA L A C H I A N S U M M E R F E S T I VA L 2 0 1 7

A SCHAEFER POPULAR SERIES EVENT

SATURDAY, JULY 22 8 PM, SCHAEFER CENTER FOR THE PERFORMING ARTS

Since the release of his 2004 critically acclaimed CD When I Fall In Love, Chris Botti has become the largest-selling American instrumental artist. His success has crossed over to audiences usually reserved for pop muisc and his ongoing association with PBS has led to four #1 jazz albums, as well as multiple Gold, Platinum and Grammy Awards. Most recently, his latest album Impressions won the Grammy for Best Pop Instrumental Album at the 2013 55th Grammy Awards. Performing worldwide and selling more than four million albums, he has found a form of creative expression that begins in jazz and expands beyond the limits of any single genre. Over the past three decades, Botti has recorded and performed with the best in music, including Sting, Barbra Streisand, Tony Bennett, Lady Gaga, Josh Groban, Yo-Yo Ma, Michael Bublé, Paul Simon, Joni Mitchell, John Mayer, Andrea Bocelli, Joshua Bell, Aerosmith's Steven Tyler and even Frank Sinatra. Hitting the road for as many as 300 days per year, the trumpeter has also performed with many of the finest symphonies and at some of the world's most prestigious venues from Carnegie Hall and the Hollywood Bowl to the Sydney Opera House and the Real Teatro di San Carlo in Italy. Impressions, Botti's 2012 Columbia Records and Grammy winning release, is the latest in a stellar parade of albums – including When I Fall In Love (2004), To Love Again: The Duets (2005), Italia (2007), and the CD/DVD Chris Botti in Boston (2009) – that has firmly established him as a clarion voice in the American contemporary music scene. Playing with his uniquely expressive sound and soaring musical imagination, Botti is joined on the disc by featured artists Andrea Bocelli, Vince Gill, Herbie Hancock, Mark Knopfler, and David Foster in a warm, intimate celebration of melodic balladry. With Impressions and the albums that preceded it, Chris Botti has thoroughly established himself as one of the important, innovative figures of the contemporary music world.

SERIES SPONSORSHIP PROVIDED BY WESTGLOW RESORT & SPA AND ROWLAND’S RESTAURANT, MADE POSSIBLE THROUGH THE GENEROSITY OF BONNIE SCHAEFER.

PERFORMANCE SPONSORSHIP PROVIDED BY: GOODNIGHT BROTHERS, SKYBEST COMMUNICATIONS, INC., BOONE AREA VISITORS BUREAU, MAST GENERAL STORE

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Enjoy the show. 896 Blowing Rock Road • Boone

McDonald’s is proud to serve as a sponsor for An Appalachian Summer Festival


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PROGRAM NOTES:

BROYHILL CHAMBER ENSEMBLE SUNDAY, JULY 23 4 PM, ROSEN CONCERT HALL

Sponsored by McDonald’s of Boone

Gil Morgenstern and Chloé Kiffer, violin; Kathryn Lockwood, viola Ole Akahoshi, cello; J.Y. Song, piano Terzetto, Op.74 Piano Trio in D Major (“Ghost”), Op. 70, #1 Piano Quartet in E-flat Major, Op. 87

Antonín Dvořák Ludwig van Beethoven Antonín Dvořák

The Broyhill Chamber Ensemble Concert Series is generously supported by the Broyhill Family Foundation (in memory of Faye Broyhill), and by Ralph and Venda Lerch/McDonald’s of Boone. Additional performance underwriting has been provided by Nanette Mayer and her family (in memory of Budd Mayer), Joni and Peter Petschauer, the Muriel and Arnold Rosen Endowment for the Arts and the Rosen-Schaffel Endowment for Classical Music Programming. The 2017 concert series by the Broyhill Chamber Ensemble is dedicated to the memory of Mr. Jack Branch. With special thanks to Appalachia Cookie Company, for a generous donation of refreshments during this evening’s performance. Biographical information for this evening’s performers beings on page 78

LUDWIG VAN BEETHOVEN Piano Trio No. 4, in E-Flat, Op. 70, No. 1, Geistertrio (“Ghost Trio”) (Born December 16, 1770, in Bonn, Germany; died March 26, 1827, in Vienna, Austria) In Beethoven’s time, the trio for piano, violin and cello was a very popular medium, and it occupied an important place in Beethoven’s oeuvre. His Opus 1 was made up of three trios that he played in 1793 for Joseph Haydn, who thought the third of them so advanced that he suggested that it be withheld from publication at the time. That one was Beethoven’s favorite; he finally returned to it again only twenty-four years after first completing it when he arranged it as a string quintet that was published as his Op. 104. In his middle years, when he brought the forms he had inherited from Mozart and Haydn to their greatest fulfillment, Beethoven wrote three more trios, the two of Op. 70 and Op. 97. He completed Op. 70 in 1808, at the time he was composing the Symphonies Nos. 5 and 6; during this same period, he worked on the music for Goethe’s Egmont, as well as learning to accommodate the stresses of his increasing deafness. When he offered these works to the publisher Breitkopf and Härtel, he wrote that he had decided to write two piano trios “since such trios are rather scarce.” He dedicated both to the Countess Anna Maria Erdödy, in whose house he occupied an apartment at the time. Erdödy, a frail woman, related by marriage to Haydn’s patrons, the Esterházys, was a student of Beethoven’s, and she performed his music well. Although they became close friends, there was never any evidence of any amorous relationship between them. Beethoven originally had planned that Op. 70 was to be dedicated to the Emperor’s son, Archduke Rudolph, his most generous, most faithful and most elevated student. However, he made a sudden switch, and Rudolph received instead the dedication of Op. 97, now always called the Archduke Trio. At that time, trios were more frequently played as hausmusik (concerts in homes) than in concert halls. The composer Louis Spohr, a contemporary of Beethoven’s, mentioned hearing the composer playing


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the trios of Op. 70 and wrote in his Autobiography, “As at the time I made Beethoven’s acquaintance, he had already discontinued playing both in public and at private parties; I had therefore but one opportunity to hear him, when I casually came to the rehearsal of a new Trio at Beethoven’s house. It was by no means an enjoyment; for in the first place the pianoforte was woefully out of tune, which however little troubled Beethoven, since he could hear nothing of it, and secondly, of the former so admired excellence of the virtuoso, scarcely any thing was left, in consequence of his total deafness... I felt moved with the deepest sorrow at so hard a destiny. It is a sad misfortune for anyone to be deaf; how then should a musician endure it without despair? Beethoven’s almost continual melancholy was no longer a riddle to me.” Nevertheless, during this middle period, Beethoven composed fast and furiously. The Trio, Op. 70, No. 1 is very dramatic. Throughout, the music moves quickly from loud and violent to soft and lyrical and uses deceptively simple materials, creating masterful effects. Its first movement, Allegro vivace con brio, begins with all three instruments playing a unison rhythmic motif, violent and fiery, which blends into a more melodic motif that the cello first introduces. These two, displaying Beethoven’s fondness for working with small motifs rather than with expansive themes, dominate the movement. The movement ends suddenly, with a final repeat of the original motif. The extraordinarily slow second movement, Largo assai ed espressivo, has the programmatic quality that gives this work its name. In Beethoven’s sketchbook, music for this movement appeared in the same location as an idea for the opera Macbeth, which he never completed. Some commentators indicate that the name “Ghost” may have been derived from these entries in the sketchbook, making the name “Ghost” reflect some connection in Beethoven’s mind between the spectral music he writes in its slow movement and the ghostliness of the witches’ scene in Shakespeare’s Macbeth. On the other hand, other commentators indicate Beethoven had just completed reading Hamlet and may have been recalling the

terror of the ghosts that tormented the protagonist. Lewis Lockwood in his book, Beethoven: The Music and the Life notes that Czerny wrote in 1842 that the second movement “reminded him of the first appearance of the Ghost in Hamlet, thus coining the colloquial title ‘Ghost’ for the whole work.” Regardless of how the trio became associated with ghostliness, the music throughout shows that Beethoven, now in his middle period, was reaching toward Romanticism. This tension filled, suspenseful slow movement includes serious, dark, mysterious rumblings and other dramatic and eerie effects, and like the first movement, this powerful movement grows out of a motif that Beethoven states at the very beginning. The exciting finale, Presto, has a completely cheerful, bright aspect and was composed in clearly-defined sonata form with several contrasting themes. Basil Smallman describes this movement as “an admirable compound of high spirits, wit and occasional rustic good humor.” ANTONIN DVORÁK Quartet for Piano and Strings, No. 2, in E-Flat, Op. 87 (Born September 8, 1841, in Nelahozeves, Czech Republic; died May 1, 1904, in Prague) The father of Antonin Dvořák was a village innkeeper and butcher who hoped to pass his trade on to his son, but the young man turned instead to music, took up the violin and organ, and at sixteen left home to study in Prague. Five years later he joined the orchestra of the National Theater, playing the viola (which in those days was the instrument of failed violinists), and soon began to test his creative powers with extended compositions in the classical forms. Until he was more than thirty years old, he was unknown as a composer outside of the little circle of musicians in Prague who were his friends. Then in 1875, his talent came to the attention of Brahms, who finally helped launch him on his career. Chamber music had an important place in Dvořák’s life as a young musician. To develop his craft, he composed quartets and quintets that he modeled after those of Beethoven and Schubert, and then tried out with his colleagues and friends.

Dvořák wrote the first of the two Piano Quartets in 1875, dedicating the first one to Brahms with gratitude. It is not a work often heard today since it almost too strongly reflects Brahms’ workings out of this difficult ensemble medium. The combination of strings and piano requires an extremely deft play of weight and texture. Dvořák’s mastery of this medium, however, can be better felt in this Piano Quartet No. 2. The form is a very difficult one for composers and Brahms himself, in the year he met Dvořák, had just completed a piano quartet, which occupied him for almost twenty years before it was completed to his satisfaction. By the time Dvořák wrote this Piano Quartet in the summer of 1889, he had a growing reputation as well as a growing oeuvre. He had recently composed a masterful piano quintet and was about to begin what would later become one of his finest works, Symphony No. 8 in G Major. The first movement, Allegro con fuoco, opens with a forceful melodic line in the strings, underscored by the rhythms in the piano part. The two halves are intertwined and extended until the contrasting, lyrical second subject is heard. In the development, Dvořák becomes very involved in a free elaboration of the first theme, and to balance this concentration, when the time comes to recapitulate the basic subject matter, he gives great emphasis to the second. At the end, the music slows for a moment, for the quiet, buzzing start of the coda, and then breaks out vigorously, as Dvořák finishes the movement with passion and power. The Lento second movement is freely built of a succession of five distinctively written passages covering a wide range of expression, which are then simply repeated with variation. The third movement, Allegro moderato, grazioso, resembles a scherzo, but the music moves with the gentle rhythm of a waltz, except in the contrasting central section. The energetic Finale: Allegro ma non troppo, balances the weight and shape of the first movement, but its ideas are allowed to spread themselves out much more freely. At the end, there is a huge, stirring, almost orchestral coda. Program Notes: Susan Halpern, © 2017


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PROGRAM NOTES:

BROYHILL CHAMBER ENSEMBLE TUESDAY, JULY 25 8 PM, ROSEN CONCERT HALL

Sponsored by McDonald’s of Boone

Gil Morgenstern and Chloé Kiffer, violin; Kathryn Lockwood, viola Ole Akahoshi, cello; J.Y. Song, piano Sonata #8 in G Major, Op. 30 #3 3 Madrigals for Violin and Viola, H.313 Piano Quintet in f minor, Op. 34

Ludwig van Beethoven Bohuslav Martinu Johannes Brahms

The Broyhill Chamber Ensemble Concert Series is generously supported by the Broyhill Family Foundation (in memory of Faye Broyhill), and by Ralph and Venda Lerch/McDonald’s of Boone. Additional performance underwriting has been provided by Nanette Mayer and her family (in memory of Budd Mayer), Joni and Peter Petschauer, the Muriel and Arnold Rosen Endowment for the Arts and the Rosen-Schaffel Endowment for Classical Music Programming. The 2017 concert series by the Broyhill Chamber Ensemble is dedicated to the memory of Mr. Jack Branch. With special thanks to Appalachia Cookie Company, for a generous donation of refreshments during this evening’s performance. Biographical information for this evening’s performers beings on page 78

LUDWIG VAN BEETHOVEN Sonata for Violin and Piano No. 8, in G Major, Op. 30, No. 3 (Born December 16, 1770, in Bonn, Germany; died March 26, 1827, in Vienna, Austria) In early 1802, Beethoven wrote a set of three violin sonatas and then, heeding the advice of his physician, left the urban environment of Vienna to go to the pastoral village of Heiligenstadt for the summer months. Musically at this time, Beethoven was just coming into his incomparably fertile middle years, yet it was a time of turmoil and tragedy personally. On October 6th, shortly before he returned to Vienna, he wrote a will, which took the form of a letter to his two brothers; it is a poignant and stirring document in which he confessed the terror and dread of the affliction he had not divulged to anyone, that he was losing his hearing. “How could I possibly admit an infirmity in the one sense which ought to be more perfect in me than in other people, a sense that I once possessed in the highest perfection, a perfection such as few in my profession enjoy or have ever enjoyed! I would have ended my life – but my art held me back. To leave the world until I have brought forth everything that I feel within me is impossible.” [Abridged] A few days later he added a postscript of utter despair, but by November, he had returned to Vienna with his new compositions from his year’s arduous work. Having to continue with the ordinary course of life despite his hearing loss and his feelings about it, he resumed his busy public career. The violin sonatas were published in the spring of the following year, 1803, with the outmoded designation “Three Piano Sonatas with the Accompaniment of a Violin.” Beethoven dedicated them to “His Majesty Alexander I, Emperor of all the Russias,” who had ascended the throne in 1801. Protocol required that permission for such a dedication must be granted in advance, and Beethoven had no doubt secured it with the help of one of the many music-loving Russian noblemen he knew in Vienna. Supposedly, Beethoven also expected the Czar to give him a diamond ring as a gift, but there is no record that he ever received that or any other acknowledgments.


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The Op. 30 sonatas are rich, mature, skillful works similar in type to those found in Beethoven’s string quartets. The emotions are powerful, the forms original. The instrumental writing is highly original and perfectly idiomatic for the piano and the violin. Sonata No. 3 of Op. 30 was first understood as a pastoral idyll, which pictured rustic dances and other bucolic pleasures. Now it is more often interpreted as a forcefully passionate composition containing contrasting passages of high spirits, qualities demonstrated in the two principal themes of the opening movement, Allegro assai. The rhythmic dynamism of the first continues into the second, which is both tender and rugged. The second movement, Tempo di menuetto ma molto moderato e grazioso, is in the tempo of a minuet and feels very moderate and gracious. The music is in the shape of a protracted song, melodious and gently paced, in the rhythm of a popular contemporary dance form that frequently found its way into serious musical works. Near the end of the movement, Beethoven has written an especially charming passage in which the main theme is fragmented into tiny elements played first by one instrument and then the other. The last movement is a vigorous, witty rondo, Allegro vivace, whose almost perpetual motion provides a vibrant contrast with the music that preceded it. BOHUSLAV MARTINU 3 Madrigals for Violin and Viola, H.313 (Born December 8, 1890 in Policka, Bohemia, now the Czech Republic; died August 28, 1959, in Liestal, Switzerland) Bohuslav Martinu was born and lived his early years in the church bell-tower of a tiny Bohemian town where his father was a watchman and cobbler. At the age of eight, Martinu made his debut performing, and at ten, he began to compose. When he was sixteen, he entered the Prague Conservatory, but was not successful as a student because academic discipline interfered with his personal artistic interests and his private

creative needs. As an adult, for ten years Martinu performed as a violinist, a member of the Czech Philharmonic Orchestra, whose conductor Václav Talich encouraged him as a composer. He spent time in Paris in the 1920s and left Prague in 1940. In 1941, he came to the United States. In 1946, while he was working on his Quartet No. 6, the Prague Conservatory offered him a teaching position. Eager to return to home, he sent his wife to Czechoslovakia to prepare their move. Martinu stayed in New York to finish his composition, but most unfortunately, he had a freak accident and fell off the balcony of his apartment and was very seriously injured. He recovered but suffered from nervous shock, partial hearing and memory loss. Since he was then only fifty-six years old, he was gradually able to resume work, although the accident took a permanent toll on his physical and creative energy. In 1953, he returned to Europe to spend his last years in France and Switzerland. Although Martinu took a part of Josef Suk’s composition course at the Prague Conservatory and was a disciple of Albert Roussel in Paris, he was essentially self-taught as a composer. His hundreds of compositions cover an enormous range of media and of expressive character; his best works have a rhythmic and melodic vigor that make them directly appealing. Martinu was a kind, quiet and gentle man who lived a simple life, unburdened by possessions, and at times he barely could keep himself above the level of simple poverty. His fluent and colorful orchestral style made his music very popular with such important conductors of a generation or two ago as Serge Koussevitsky, George Szell and Charles Munch, and with their audiences. Martinu composed the Three Madrigals for Violin and Viola in 1947 after being inspired by a performance by his friends, the brother-sister duo of Lillian and Joseph Fuchs, of Mozart’s Violin and Viola Duos. When Martinu finished his three-movement work, he dedicated it to the Fuchs pair. In it, Martinu gives voice to his interest in the Renaissance and Baroque periods, as the name Madrigals suggests.

Composed soon after his fall, at a time when he felt that writing large-scale works was too arduous for him, the Madrigals can be seen as an example of Martinu’s determination to continue to compose despite obstacles. The Madrigals mark the beginning of what became known as his chamber music period, even though he had already composed many chamber pieces prior to his accident. Martinu was attracted to the madrigal as a form because of the free contrapuntal technique it allowed him to work with. The music of this virtuosic duet is mostly dissonant and slightly polytonal, although it has well defined French style lyrical themes, which are, nevertheless, full of vigor and nostalgia for Martinu’s homeland. The texture becomes dense at climactic moments in the driving first movement, Poco Allegro, making the work seem to have more voices than two. The second movement, Andante, which has a unique tone quality, begins with four voices, but the theme is articulated in concentrated two-voice lines. Martinu is able to enrich the texture and create a sense of there being four parts by using double stops creatively in both instruments simultaneously. Throughout the movement, he varies the number of voices from two, to three to four, giving the music a mysterious feel. In the third and final movement, Allegro, rhythm is the motor that drives the often contrapuntal Baroque-like structure. JOHANNES BRAHMS Quintet for Piano and Strings, in F minor, Op. 34 (Born May 7, l833, in Hamburg, Germany; died April 3, l897, in Vienna, Austria) The Quintet for Piano and Strings, Op. 34 is the climactic composition of the young Brahms; it is one of the very greatest of his works, yet one that arrived in its final form with great difficulty. In his early career, after Brahms completed a work, he usually became severely self-critical. Only after he finished a work did he decide whether to allow his creation to be performed or to reject it, often perhaps because he judged his composition needed greater


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self-discipline than he had given it. He was frequently reluctant to launch works that he knew would be compared to those of Beethoven and other great masters; therefore, much of the music he composed, he subsequently destroyed. The pieces that do survive were often those he created with instrumentation that others had not used extensively, and thus he avoided the possibility of direct comparison. For example, he wrote string sextets and piano quartets rather than string quartets, and he made sure that these were mostly note-perfect in their original manuscripts with but a few important exceptions. The history of the changes in the present work differs somewhat from those of other works, for on this occasion Brahms tried the composition out with varying instruments. The Quintet for Piano and Strings made its first appearance in 1861, as a string quintet in F minor with two cellos. (The most memorable work written for this combination is Schubert’s majestic Quintet in C Major, Op. 163, D. 956.) Brahms sent the first three movements of his work, on this occasion even before he had finished the quintet, to Clara Schumann, herself a pianist and Robert Schumann’s wife, to ask her to judge it. As soon as he completed it, he sent it to the violinist Joachim for the same purpose. Joachim arranged for the quintet to be played in May 1863, and subsequently told Brahms that the strings could not effectively convey the power and range of some of the music without some additional instrumental help. The content was simply too rich and too forceful for the strings to express, he felt, but the musical quality was fine. Seeking a more dynamic medium for his work, Brahms responded by converting it into a sonata for two pianos. Clara Schumann and Anton Rubinstein played it in this form at Baden-Baden, and at a later time, performed it with Brahms for Princess Anna of Hesse. The Princess so liked the sonata that Brahms decided to dedicate it to her when he had it published. Princess Anna carefully checked with Clara Schumann to make sure that both published versions would bear her name and that she would have

the first copies off the press. A letter of November 3, 1864, signed, “your old Clara” tells Brahms, “The Princess was so pleased that I seized the opportunity to suggest a beautiful gift for you, and the moment was so well chosen that she then and there commanded me to buy it. You will understand the joy with which I did so when you see it.” The gift was indeed precious; it was the original manuscript of Mozart’s Symphony in G minor. Unfortunately, the two-piano work still did not feel just right to Brahms, and when he and Carl Tausig played the sonata at a concert of Brahms’ works in Vienna in April 1864, it was the only work on the program that the audience did not seem to like. Echoing in kind Joachim’s earlier comment about the quality of the sound of the strings alone, Clara Schumann ultimately felt that the music demanded more variety in sound than the two pianos could provide and suggested that Brahms convert the work into an orchestral piece. By the end of the year, Brahms had instead combined piano and strings to create the Piano Quintet, Op. 34. His original version for strings no longer exists, but Brahms published the Sonata for Two Pianos in 1871 as Op. 34 bis. When Joachim saw the changes that Brahms had made, he was very impressed and declared that Brahms’s Piano Quintet was the greatest piece of chamber music written since Schubert’s death. The only other work that could have possibly approached it was Schumann’s Quintet, written in 1842. The opening movement of Brahms’s Quintet, Allegro non troppo, has both drama and an epic scale. It is based on several themes that have an unusually wide range of expression. They include the brooding, the dramatic, the exultant, and the lyrical. A solemn theme predominates, but also present are a plethora of subsidiary themes, each functioning importantly in the rich, dramatic structure. The simplest of the movements is the second, a serene and tender Andante, un poco adagio in a three-part song form, notable for its gentle, swaying piano melody with its restrained and rhythmic string accompaniment. The Scherzo, Allegro,

an exciting movement of substantial dimension and intense power, has an irresistible rhythmic drive based in part on material related to the first movement. The contrasting, calm central trio section derives its themes, in turn, from the first part of the strongly syncopated Scherzo. The syncopation and marchlike rhythms return to close the movement. The Finale begins with a slow and mysterious introduction, Poco sostenuto, full of germinal ideas that come into bloom in the lively main section, Allegro non troppo. The material of this vibrant movement is subjected to further development in the coda, Presto non troppo, which leads to the powerful climax. Program Notes: Susan Halpern, © 2017

Biographical information for Gil Morgenstern appears on page 27. Having performed at world-renowned locations including Lincoln Center’s Avery Fisher Hall, Boston’s Symphony Hall, Chicago’s Orchestra Hall and Vienna’s THE NEIL AND NANCY Konzerthaus, Japanese SCHAFFEL CHAIR pianist Rieko Aizawa is praised by The New York Times for her “impressive musicality, a crisp touch and expressive phrasing.” Studying at the Curtis Institute and the Julliard School, Aizawa was the youngest-ever participant at the Marlboro Music Festival and has become an active chamber musician. Aizawa is a founding member of the Horszowski Trio and of the prize-winning Duo Prism, and became the artistic director of the Alpenglow Chamber Music Festival in Colorado in 2010. Aizawa has established her own unique musical voice after opening concerts of Tokyo’s Casals hall and debut concerts at the Kennedy Center and Carnegie Hall under conductor Alexander Schneider’s New York String Orchestra. She currently lives in New York City with her husband, violinist Jesse Mills, and is on faculty at Longy School of Music of Bard College.


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Cellist Ole Akahoshi from Germany has performed in recitals and as a soloist with many of the world’s leading orchestras on four continents. He has won numerous THE NEIL AND NANCY competitions SCHAFFEL CHAIR including Concertino Praga and Jugend Musiziert. He is also recipient of the fellowship award from Charlotte White’s Salon de Virtuosi. Akahoshi has performed in many prestigious concert halls worldwide and his performances have been featured on CNN, NPR, SenderFreies-Berlin, RIAS-Berlin and Korean Broadcasting Station, among others. He has also made recordings for the Albany, New World Records and Composers Recording Inc., to name a few. He has collaborated with distinguished artists such as Sarah Chang, Ani Kavafian, Wolfgang Schultz, Naoko Yoshino and Hyuna Yu. At age 11, Ole Akahoshi was the youngest student to be accepted by Pierre Fournier. He has received his bachelor’s from Juilliard and master’s degree from Yale University. Akahoshi has served as teaching assistant for both Aldo Parisot and Janos Starker. He has been teaching at the Manhattan School of Music since 2004. He joined the faculty of the Yale School of Music in 1997 and is assistant professor of cello at Yale University. Cellist Alexis Pia Gerlach has been lauded by the press for the “gripping emotion” and “powerful artistry” of her interpretations; qualities which have THE RALPH AND VENDA led to a career striking LERCH CHAIR for its wide range of artistic collaborations. She has appeared extensively in recitals and as a soloist with orchestras across the United States, as well as in Europe, Asia, the Middle East and South America, with such conductors as Mstislav Rostropovich, James DePreist and Peter Oundjian. Ms. Gerlach is a founding member of the acclaimed Trio Solisti, with whom

she performs throughout the US on major concert series. The piano trio has recorded extensively, including a 2-CD set of the Tchaikovsky and Rachmaninoff Trios to be released on Bridge Records in July this year, and a critically acclaimed 2014 recording of trios by Ravel and Chausson, which was met by rave reviews from both The New York Times and Gramophone. Next season the ensemble gives the world premiere of a new trio written by composer Jennifer Higdon, commissioned for them by Arizona Friends of Chamber Music and the Harvard Musical Association. As a founding member of Concertante, a string sextet based in New York City, she has toured throughout North America, Asia and the Middle East. Ms. Gerlach has performed at major festivals including Marlboro, Aspen, Bridgehampton, La Musica di Asolo, Caramoor, and as a guest artist with the Chamber Music Society of Lincoln Center. She has played extensively with Musicians from Marlboro, performing on both national and international tours. A frequent collaborator with dancers, Ms. Gerlach has performed as solo cellist with the Paul Taylor Dance Company on tour in India and at New York’s City Center, and in a duo with New York City Ballet principal dancer, Damian Woetzel. She is active in commissioning and premiering new works from many preeminent composers, such as Kevin Puts, Lowell Liebermann, Shulamit Ran, Richard Danielpour, Tigran Mansurian and Paul Moravec, and has worked with many others including Philip Glass, Thomas Ades, Osvaldo Golijov and Bright Sheng. Ms. Gerlach was born in New York City, and studied with Aldo Parisot at The Juilliard School and The Yale School of Music. Praised by press for her spellbinding and electrifying performances, violinist Chloé Kiffer claimed top prizes at multiple national and international THE PETER AND JONI competitions including PETSCHAUER CHAIR “Jugend Musiziert” in Germany and “European Competition for Strings Soloists.”

An early success lead Chloé to solo and orchestra engagements throughout Europe, Canada, North and South America, the Middle East, and Asia playing in some of the world’s most prestigious concerts halls such as Théâtre des Champs-Élysées in Paris, Beethoven Hall in Bonn, Frankfurt Radio Symphony Hall. In October 2015 Chloé made her debut at Carnegie Hall’s Stern Auditorium with Tchaikovsky concerto under baton of David Gilbert. A native of Metz, France, Chloé graduated Conservatoire National Supérieur de Musique de Paris at the age of 17. She went on to earn an Artist Diploma in Germany and postgraduates degrees at Manhattan School of Music as a student of Pinchas Zukerman and Patinka Kopec. Enthusiastic chamber musician, Chloé has collaborated with artists such as Pavel Vernikov, Gustav Rivinius, Shmuel Ashkenasi, Joshua Epstein, Vladimir Mendelsohn, Timothy Eddy and the Emerson Strings Quartet. A frequent guest performer and faculty at various festivals Chloé has been closely associated with Heifetz Institute serving there as Artist in Residence since 2015. Currently Ms. Kiffer is a teaching artist at both Bard University (precollege division) and Stony Brook University, where she is subsequently completing her Doctor of Musical Arts Degree under tutelage of Hagai Shaham and Philip Setzer. Kathryn Lockwood has been hailed as a violist of exceptional talents in reviews around the country and abroad for her performances as a chamber musician and THE ARNOLD AND soloist. Formerly MURIEL ROSEN CHAIR a founding member of the Pacifica Quartet, she currently performs with the Lark Quartet, duoJalal with percussionist and husband Yousif Sheronick, and teaches at the University of Massachusetts, Amherst. Lockwood is frequently invited back to her homeland of Australia to perform with the Camerata of St. John’s and to teach at


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her alma mater school at the Queensland Conservatorium of Music. Lockwood plays on an unknown Italian viola from the 18th Century Brescian School and performs during the summer for the Broyhill Chamber Ensemble, at Elm City ChamberFest in Connecticut and at the Telluride ChamberFest in Colorado. Grace Park is a dynamic violinist, dedicated chamber musician, and passionate pedagogue. Her diverse career has carried her from the world’s foremost THE RALPH AND VENDA concert halls to LERCH CHAIR universities around the country as a soloist, collaborator, coach, and educator. As a soloist, Ms. Park has been the featured soloist at The Kennedy Center, Library of Congress, Walt Disney Hall, Jordan Hall, Carnegie Hall, The Grace Rainey Auditorium in the Metropolitan Museum, The Rudolfinum in Prague, and Glinka Hall in St. Petersburg- with orchestras including North Czech Philharmonia, Russian Chamber Philharmonic, Napoli Chamber Orchestra and most recent, an engagament with Maxim Vengerov at the Cartegena Music Festival. For the season 2016-2017, upcoming engagements include concerto debuts in Mexico and Poland. A devoted chamber musician, Ms. Park has performed with a variety of ensembles around the world and has led chamber orchestras from the principal chair. Ms. Park has performed and worked personally with renowned composers Steve Reich, Brett Dean, Georg Freidrich Hass and upcoming commissions include a concerto by Andy Akiho and a violin sonata by the composer in residence of Chicago Symphony Orchestra, Samuel Carl Adams. Recent collaborations include working with the St. Paul Chamber Orchestra, Mark Morris Dance Company, members of Silk Road Ensemble, principle dancers of La Scala Ballet Theater, the Royal Ballet, American Ballet Theater, New York City Ballet and has lead Orpheus Chamber Orchestra and Australian

Chamber Orchestra. Ms Park has also performed at many of the leading music festivals including Vail, Music@Menlo, IMS Prussia Cove, Yellowbarn and the Perlman Music Program’s Chamber Music Workshop. Beyond the concert stage, Ms. Park has demonstrated a strong commitment to teaching and community engagement. She has taught and coached ensembles at Washington and Lee University, North Dakota State University, Skidmore College, and at the Innsbrook Institute. Ms. Park currently coaches and teaches at the Mannes Prepartory Division as a guest faculty. On the piano faculty at Mannes College in New York City, J.Y. Song has been noted for her varied programming and idiosyncratic musical tastes. Critic Harris THE ARNOLD AND Goldsmith MURIEL ROSEN CHAIR commented on her “truly astounding technical and imaginative resources,” and has described her performances as “tigerishly intense” and “exquisite.” J.Y. Song’s recordings on the Pro Piano label have received rave reviews. Her recording of Debussy Etudes was distinguished with a Diapason d’Or and designated a “Desert Island Selection” by Gramophone’s International Piano Quarterly. Among Ms. Song’s numerous awards are the Petschek Award (Juilliard’s highest honor to a pianist), the first ever Christel Award from the American Pianists Association, the Gold Medal at the Palm Beach Invitational International Piano Competition, and the distinction of Pro Piano Artist of the Year. In addition to providing insightful reinterpretations of traditional repertoire, J.Y. Song has been an advocate of new music, recording works by Ezequiel Viñao and Jiang Wen Ye. This last recording inspired a film by the celebrated director Hou Hsiao-Hsien, Café Lumière, which was nominated for a Lion d’Or at the Venice Film Festival. Raised in Switzerland, J.Y. Song studied at the Conservatoire de Genève and the Conservatoire de Lausanne with Alexis Golovine, Eduardo Vercelli, and Jean-

François Antonioli. She graduated from Stanford University with distinction and honors, acquiring both a B.S. in Microbiology and Immunology and a B.A. in Music, and receiving the Sudler Prize for outstanding achievement in the creative arts. She earned a D.M.A. at The Juilliard School, where she studied with Jerome Lowenthal, and completed an M.B.A. at NYU Stern School of Business. Ms. Song has served for eight years as artistic director of the EAMA and Classics Abroad piano programs at the Ecole Normale de Musique de Paris. Her diverse interests have led her to explore entrepreneurial opportunities in music, most recently founding a tech startup, ToneRow, dedicated to bringing performing arts training to enthusiasts worldwide. She now teaches Leadership & Innovation at The Juilliard School. Canadian cellist Caroline Stinson performs widely as a soloist, recitalist and chamber musician and has appeared at Carnegie’s Zankel Hall, Boston’s Gardner THE BROYHILL FAMILY Museum and FOUNDATION CHAIR Washington D.C.’s Smithsonian; the Koelner Philharmonie, Lucerne Festival and Cité de la Musique in Europe, and the Centennial Centre in Canada. In recent seasons she appeared in recital in New York sponsored by the Finnish Consulate, in recital in Brussels, Belgium, with Accroche note in Strasbourg France, and as a soloist with the Stamford Symphony in Connecticut under Eckart Stier, where she also serves as Principal Cellist. Ms. Stinson has commissioned and premiered works from solo cello to concerti, as well as chamber music with the Lark Quartet and Open End Ensemble, and has had the privilege of working closely with Pierre Boulez, John Corigliano, Peter Eötvös, John Harbison, Aaron Kernis, Paul Moravec, Shulamit Ran, Steven Stucky, Joan Tower and Andrew Waggoner. In 2011 she performed Esa-Pekka Salonen’s “YTA III” for solo cello at Scandinavia House in New York at the composer’s recommendation, and in 2013 premiered John Harbison’s Invention of a Theme of Shakespeare for


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solo cello and string quartet at the composer’s festival in Token Creek, WI. As a member of Lark, she will celebrate the group’s 30 years from 2016-17 with commissions from Harbison, Waggoner, Bunch, Weesner and Hatke. As a recording artist, Caroline’s CD Lines was released on Albany and she has contributed to more than a dozen chamber music recordings with reviews and features on this continent and abroad. Born in Edmonton, Ms. Stinson studied with Alan Harris (Cleveland), Maria Kliegel (Germany), Joel Krosnick (Juilliard) and Tanya Prochazka, with grants from the Alberta Heritage Scholarship Fund and the Canada Council. She has given masterclasses in Canada, the U.S., Mexico and Europe, and teaches cello and chamber music at The Juilliard School. Together with her husband, Andrew Waggoner, Caroline is Co-Artistic Director of Weekend Chamber Music in the Delaware River Valley.

Pianist Reiko Uchida has performed solo and chamber music concerts throughout the world, including the United States, Japan, France, Italy, Germany, Russia, THE PETER AND JONI Finland, Bulgaria, and PETSCHAUER CHAIR the Czech Republic, in venues including Lincoln Center, the 92nd Street Y, the Metropolitan Museum of Art, the Kennedy Center, the White House, and Suntory Hall in Tokyo. First prize winner of the Joanna Hodges Piano Competition and Zinetti Competition, she has appeared as a soloist with the Los Angeles Philharmonic, Santa Fe Symphony, Greenwich Symphony, and the Princeton Symphony, among others. She made her New York solo debut in 2001 at Carnegie’s Weill Hall under the auspices of the Abby Whiteside Foundation. As a chamber musician she has performed at the Marlboro, Santa Fe, Tanglewood, and Spoleto Music Festivals; as a member of Camera

Lucida and guest artist with American Chamber Players, and the Borromeo, Talich, Daedalus, St. Lawrence, and Tokyo String Quartets; and in recital with Jennifer Koh, Thomas Meglioranza, Anne Akiko Meyers, David Shifrin, Sharon Robinson, and Jaime Laredo. Her recording with Jennifer Koh, “String Poetic” was nominated for a Grammy Award. She is also a past member of the Chamber Music Society of Lincoln Center Two. Ms. Uchida holds a Bachelor’s degree from the Curtis Institute of Music, a Master’s degree from the Mannes College of Music, and an Artist Diploma from the Juilliard School. She studied with Claude Frank, Leon Fleisher, Edward Aldwell, Sophia Rosoff, and Margo Garrett. She has taught at the Brevard Music Center, and is currently an associate faculty member at Columbia University.


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THE HELENE AND STEPHEN WEICHOLZ GLOBAL FILM SERIES

WEDNESDAY, JULY 26 7 PM, SCHAEFER CENTER FOR THE PERFORMING ARTS

Tsanko Petrov, a railroad worker, finds millions of leva on the train tracks. He decides to turn the money over to the police, for which the state rewards him with a new wristwatch that soon stops working. Meanwhile, Julia Staikova, head of the PR department of the Ministry of Transport, loses Petrov’s old watch, a family relic. Here starts his desperate struggle to recover both his old watch and his dignity. BULGARIA; UNRATED; DIRECTED BY KRISTINA GROZEVA AND PETAR VALCHANOV (2016); 101 MINUTES

Pre-film talk with Dr. John Pfeifer begins at 7pm, with the film beginning at approximately 7:30pm. Concessions, including popcorn, beer, wine and cold beverages are available for purchase. With special thanks to our generous sponsors for this series, Helene and Stephen Weicholz.

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A SCHAEFER POPULAR SERIES EVENT

THURSDAY, JULY 27 8 PM, SCHAEFER CENTER FOR THE PERFORMING ARTS

Bruce Hornsby has built one of the most diverse, collaborative and adventurous careers in contemporary music. Drawing from a vast wellspring of American musical traditions, the singer/pianist/ composer/bandleader has created a large and accomplished body of work and employed a vast array of stylistic approaches. Throughout this period, Hornsby has maintained the integrity, virtuosity and artistic curiosity that have been hallmarks of his work from the start. Bruce Hornsby’s work displays a creative iconoclasm that’s been a constant in the artist’s two-and-ahalf decade recording career. His commercial stock soared early on, when “The Way It Is”– the title track of his 1986 debut album – became one of the most popular songs on American radio. Despite his early mainstream successes, Hornsby has pursued a more personal, idiosyncratic musical path, focusing on projects that sparked his creative interest, including collaborations with the Grateful Dead, Spike Lee, Ricky Skaggs, Don Henley, Ornette Coleman, Bob Dylan, Bela Fleck, Bonnie Raitt, Pat Metheny, and Robbie Robertson. Performing with his longtime band, the Noisemakers, Hornsby will offer a glimpse of a restless spirit who continues to push forward into exciting new musical terrain.

PERFORMANCE SPONSORSHIP PROVIDED BY: SKYBEST COMMUNICATIONS, INC., GOODNIGHT BROTHERS, BOONE AREA VISITORS BUREAU, MAST GENERAL STORE Photo: Kat Fisher

SERIES SPONSORSHIP PROVIDED BY WESTGLOW RESORT & SPA AND ROWLAND’S RESTAURANT, MADE POSSIBLE THROUGH THE GENEROSITY OF BONNIE SCHAEFER.


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CHARLOTTE BALLET SATURDAY, JULY 29 8 PM, SCHAEFER CENTER FOR THE PERFORMING ARTS

Jean-Pierre Bonnefoux - President & Artistic Director Patricia McBride - Associate Artistic Director Sasha Janes - Associate Artistic Director & Resident Choreographer Robert Lindgren - Founder Dwight Rhoden - Resident Choreographer Douglas Singleton - Executive Director

Charlotte Ballet Juwan Alston • Raven Barkley • Jamie Dee Clifton • Chelsea Dumas Drew Grant • Josh Hall • Sarah Hayes Harkins • Ben Ingel Alessandra Ball James* • Lexi Johnston • James Kopecky • Sarah Lapointe Michael Matthews • Peter Mazurowski • Maurice Mouzon Jr. Tendo Pereira Dos Santos • Amelia Sturt-Dilley Ryo Suzuki • Elizabeth Truell • Shaina Wire *Princess Grace Dance Fellowship Award Winner

MAP Choreography by Alonzo King Music by Arvo Pärt‡, “Fratres” and “Ludus” from Tabula Rasa Costume design by Robert Rosenwasser Lighting design by Nate McGaha MAP was underwritten for Charlotte Ballet by Tina Bonner-Henry and Kevin Henry, Kobi and Ronald Brinson, Beckie and Brett Carter, Angela and Jesse Cureton, Tracey and A.D. Hembrick, Dr. Alfred and Toni Kendrick, Dana Lumsden and Kristan Adkins, Debra Plousha-Moore and Col. John E. Moore, Jr., and Richard “Stick” and Teresa Williams. I. First Direction: Look Up Sarah Lapointe, Elizabeth Truell & Juwan Alston II. Second Direction: Promise Peter Mazurowski III. Third Direction: Persist Alessandra Ball James & James Kopecky Chelsea Dumas & Josh Hall MAP was created for Charlotte Ballet in March 1998, as Artistic Director JeanPierre Bonnefoux’s first commission for the company. The work is a metaphor for the different paths individuals must choose in life. ‡Used by arrangement with European American Music Distributors Company, U.S. and Canadian agent for Universal Edition Vienna, publisher and copyright owner. This evening’s performance has been supported by a generous gift from Barbara and Larry Freiman.

CHARLOTTE BALLET LEADERSHIP Jean-Pierre Bonnefoux, President & Artistic Director Jean-Pierre Bonnefoux became artistic director of Charlotte Ballet and Charlotte Ballet Academy in 1996. He danced with the Bolshoi, Kirov and Paris Opera Ballets and in 1970 became a principal dancer with the New York City Ballet. From 1977-1984, Jean-Pierre taught at the School of American Ballet, the official school of the New York City Ballet. He has served as choreographer and ballet master for the Pittsburgh Ballet, as chairman and artistic director of the ballet department in the School of Music at Indiana University, and is currently the artistic director, choreographer and teacher for the ballet company and school at the Chautauqua Institution in NY. Jean-Pierre’s choreographic repertoire includes Carmina Burana, Cinderella, Nutcracker, Peter Pan and Romeo & Juliet. In 2008, he and wife Patricia McBride won The Arts & Science Council’s inaugural ASC Honors lifetime achievement award. In the fall of 2015, Jean-Pierre announced that the 2016/2017 Season would be his final as artistic director. Patricia McBride, Associate Artistic Director Patricia McBride has been celebrated as the outstanding American ballerina of our day and a star of international stature. In 1959, she joined the company of New York City Ballet and, in 1961, became its youngest principal dancer. Patricia danced for five American presidents performed with many of the great male dancers of our time and had numerous master works created for her by George Balanchine and Jerome Robbins. She joined Charlotte Ballet in 1996 as associate artistic director and is a master teacher with the Charlotte Ballet Academy. She also serves as associate artistic director and master teacher at the Chautauqua Institution in NY. Patricia is married to Jean-Pierre Bonnefoux and they have two children and three grandchildren. She was a 2014 Kennedy Center Honoree.


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Stars and Stripes Pas de Deux Choreography by George Balanchine Music by John Philip Sousa, orchestrated by Hershy Kay Costumes by Karinska Lighting by Mark Stanley Restaged by Patricia McBride Liberty Bell and El Capitan Sarah Hayes Harkins & James Kopecky The performance of a Balanchine® Ballet, is presented by arrangement with The George Balanchine Trust and has been produced in accordance with the Balanchine Style® and Balanchine Technique®

Sleeping Beauty Wedding Pas de Deux Choreography by Jean-Pierre Bonnefoux after Marius Petipa Repetiteur Patricia McBride Composed by Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky Scenic and Costume design by Peter Cazalet Lighting design by John P. Woodey Lighting adapted by Jennifer Propst Alessandra Ball James & Josh Hall INTERMISSION

Angels in the Architecture “The peculiar grace of a shaker chair is due to the fact that it was made by someone capable of believing that an angel might come and sit on it.” −Thomas Merton Choreography by Mark Godden Music by Aaron Copland, “Appalachian Spring Suite” Costumes and scenery by Paul Daigle Lighting design by Michael Korsch Sets and Costumes courtesy of Canada’s Royal Winnipeg Ballet Angels in the Architecture was underwritten for Charlotte Ballet by Dale F. Halton. Raven Barkley Alessandra Ball James Juwan Alston James Kopecky

Chelsea Dumas Sarah Lapointe Josh Hall Peter Mazurowski

Sarah Hayes Harkins Elizabeth Truell Ben Ingel Ryo Suzuki

Sasha Janes, Associate Artistic Director & Resident Choreographer Sasha Janes was born in Perth, Australia, and received his formal dance training from the Australian Ballet School. He has danced professionally with the West Australian Ballet, Australian Ballet, Hong Kong Ballet, Dayton Ballet and Charlotte Ballet. In 2006, Sasha was commissioned to choreograph his first ballet, Lascia la Spina, Cogli la Rosa, and since has choreographed many ballets for Charlotte Ballet, including Rhapsodic Dances, performed as part of the Kennedy Center’s Ballet Across America series in June 2013. The Washington Post called Sasha “a choreographer to watch.” He was invited to participate in the New York Choreographic Institute’s spring session, where he created Murmuration on the students of the School of American Ballet. In 2013, he created Dominant Curves for Richmond Ballet’s New Works Festival. Sasha was a dancer with Charlotte Ballet for eight seasons before being named associate artistic director in 2012 and resident choreographer in 2014. Douglas Singleton, Executive Director Doug Singleton’s passion for dance began at Spoleto Festival USA with a performance of the Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater. After graduating from the College of Charleston, he moved to New York City and spent over five years traveling with the Ailey company. While in New York, he was the producing manager for the premiere performances of Complexions Contemporary Ballet, led by Dwight Rhoden and Desmond Richardson, and worked with dance luminaries such as Judith Jamison, Masazumi Chaya, Jerome Robbins, Garth Fagan, Elisa Monte and Lar Lubovitch. Doug joined Charlotte Ballet in 1996. He received the Charlotte Business Journal’s 40 under 40 Award and was selected to the 2008-2010 Class of the William C. Friday Fellowship of Human Relations at the Wildacres Leadership Initiative. He is currently chair of Dance/USA and a member of the Knight Arts Advisory Committee. Doug was formerly on the NC


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Arts Council’s Grants Panel and the Arts and Humanities Council of Montgomery County, MD. He proudly served on the boards of the Choir School at St. Peters in Charlotte and ARTS North Carolina, advocating for public funding to support arts programming throughout the state. He and his wife Viki live in Charlotte with their three children. Hope Muir, Artistic Advisor (2016/2017) / Artistic Director (2017/2018) Born in Toronto, Hope Muir was a founding member of Peter Schaufuss’s London Festival Ballet School. Upon graduation she joined the company (now English National Ballet), and in 1994 Hope joined Rambert Dance Company with the appointment of Christopher Bruce CBE and danced a wide variety of repertoire from prolific choreographers, including Ek, Kylian, Naharin, Tharp, Tetley, De Frutos, Cunningham and over a dozen Bruce works. After ten years with the award winning RDC, she moved to Hubbard Street Dance Chicago and expanded her repertoire to include Forsythe, Duato and Lubovitch. After a twenty-year career, Hope retired from performing and now coaches both classical and contemporary technique. A sought after guest teacher and rehearsal director, Hope has worked with The National Ballet of Canada, English National Ballet, Rambert Dance Company and Matthew Bourne’s New Adventures Company. Hope assists Christopher Bruce CBE with the setting of his work internationally along with Javier De Frutos and Helen Pickett. Hope assisted Crystal Pite on her creation Emergence for the National Ballet of Canada in 2009 and was invited by Emily Molnar to be guest rehearsal director when she took the helm at Ballet BC. Most recently Hope worked as rehearsal assistant for Hofesh Shechter’s creation Untouchable at the Royal Ballet, Covent Garden. Hope joined Scottish Ballet in 2009 and was promoted to Assistant Artistic Director in 2015.

Mark Diamond, Charlotte Ballet II Director Mark Diamond has choreographed and taught in Europe, Japan and the U.S. since retiring from Hamburg Ballet in Germany in 1983. He has choreographed more than 30 ballets for Charlotte Ballet and is program director for Charlotte Ballet II. In the summer he serves as associate artistic director and resident choreographer for Jean-Pierre Bonnefoux at Chautauqua Institution in New York. Before joining Charlotte Ballet, Mark was resident choreographer for Cincinnati Opera, founded Ballet Artists Cincinnati and received grants from Ohio Arts Council, New England Foundation for the Arts and others. Before dancing in Europe, Mark was a principal dancer with Milwaukee Ballet Company, danced with Pittsburgh Ballet Theatre and Tamburitzans Slavic Folk ensemble. He trained with Edward Caton and studied music, history and dance at Duquesne University and Point Park College, where he earned a Bachelor of Arts degree. Traci Gilchrest-Kubie, Répétiteur Traci Gilchrest-Kubie was born in El Paso, TX, and danced professionally for Hartford Ballet, Ballet Arizona, Chautauqua Ballet and Charlotte Ballet. During her 20-year career, she danced many leading roles by George Balanchine, Paul Taylor, William Forsythe, Alonzo King, Mark Diamond and Jean-Pierre Bonnefoux. She retired from Charlotte Ballet in 2011 after a 16-year career to serve as Repetiteur for the Charlotte Ballet and CBII. She is an instructor with the Charlotte Ballet Academy and in addition stages ballets on Complexions Contemporary Ballet and Carolina Ballet Theatre among others. In 2009 she was celebrated by the Chautauqua Dance Circle for her “extraordinary artistry and contributions to Chautauqua Dance.”

ARTISTIC CONTRIBUTORS George Balanchine The Russian-born American choreographer is one of the foremost choreographers in the history of ballet, particularly in the neoclassical style. The son of a composer, Balanchine was born Melitonovich Balanchivadze in Saint Petersburg, Russia. He was trained at the Imperial Ballet Academy and studied composition at the Saint Petersburg Conservatory. His early works, for the 1922 series Evenings of Young Ballet, were criticized as too avantegarde. In 1925, while touring in Europe with his small company, he joined the Diaghilev Company in Paris as a choreographer. After the impresario Sergei Diaghilev died in 1929, Balanchine choreographed for several companies, and in 1933 he organized his own group, Les Ballets. At the invitation of American ballet patron Lincoln Kirstein, Balanchine moved to New York City and together they founded the School of American Ballet in 1933 and the American Ballet Company in 1935. After the American Ballet Company dissolved in 1938, Balanchine’s work for The Boys from Syracuse (1938) and the famous ballet sequence “Slaughter on Tenth Avenue” in On Your Toes (1936) established ballet as a permanent element of the musical. With Kirstein he cofounded Ballet Society in 1946, which in 1948 became the New York City Ballet. Mark Godden Mark Godden has created original works for Boston Ballet, American Ballet Theatre (studio company), Canada’s Royal Winnipeg Ballet, Les Grands Ballet Canadiens, Northern Ballet Theatre (UK), Ballet Florida, Compania Nacional de Danza (Mexico), Ballet Contemporania (Argentina), Ballet Memphis, Alberta Ballet, Milwaukee Ballet, Ballet British Columbia, Ballet Met, American Repertory Ballet, Charlotte Ballet and Ballet Gamonet. Mark is resident choreographer for the prestigious Harid Dance Conservatory and was resident choreographer for the


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Royal Winnipeg Ballet. He won top honors in both Varna, Bulgaria, and Helsinki, Finland international ballet competitions. Mark is a recipient of the notable Choo-San Goh award, and his full-length ballet, Dracula, was nominated for a Dora Mavor Moore award. Mark directed and choreographed the 2006 Olympic Games Flag Hand-over Ceremony in Torino, Italy. Alonzo King Heralded as “one of the few, true Ballet Masters of our time,” Alonzo King is a choreographer who has changed the way we look at ballet. Alonzo calls his works “thought structures” created by the manipulation of energy that governs the shapes and movement directions of everything that exists. He has works in the repertories of the Royal Swedish Ballet, Frankfurt Ballet, Ballet Bejart, Les Ballets de Monte-Carlo, Joffrey Ballet, Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater, Hong Kong Ballet, Charlotte Ballet, Hubbard Street Dance Chicago and many others. He has collaborated with distinguished visual artists, musicians and composers across the globe including Pharaoh Sanders, Hamza El Din, Charles Lloyd, Jason Moran and Zakir Hussain. Renowned for his skill as a teacher, Alonzo was honored with the Lifetime Achievement Award by the Corps de Ballet International Teacher Conference in 2012. An internationally acclaimed guest ballet master, his training philosophy undergirds the educational programming at the Alonzo King LINES Dancer Center of San Francisco, which includes the pre-professional Training Program, Summer Program and BFA Program at Dominican University of California. Alonzo’s work has been recognized for its impact on the cultural fabric of the company’s home in San Francisco, as well as nationally by the dance world’s most prestigious institutions. Named a Master of Choreography by the Kennedy Center in 2005, he is the recipient of the NEA Choreographer’s Fellowship, the Jacob’s Pillow Creativity Award, the Irvine Fellowship in Dance, the US Artist Award in Dance, NY Bessie Award and the National Dance Project’s Residency and Touring Awards. Alonzo was awarded

an honorary Doctorate by Dominican University of California, the Green Honors Chair Professorship from Texas Christian University as well as an honorary Doctorate from CalArts. In 2014, Alonzo was appointed to the advisory council of the newly established Center for Ballet and the Arts at New York University; in 2015 he received the prestigious Doris Duke Artist Award in celebration of his ongoing contributions to the advancement of contemporary dance. Joining historic icons in the field, Alonzo was named one of America’s “Irreplaceable Dance Treasures” by the Dance Heritage Coalition in 2015.

DANCERS Juwan Alston – Texas (2nd Season) Juwan began dancing at the age of 15 at Cedar Ridge High School in Round Rock, TX. He was awarded the Senior Hip-Hop Scholarship at The Texas Association Teachers of Dancing, Inc. convention in June 2012. Juwan began seriously studying ballet at Dancers Workshop in Austin, where he performed in Nutcracker and Paquita Grand Pas de Deux. In 2013, he attended American Ballet Theatre’s Summer Intensive on scholarship. That same year, he received a number of awards for his choreography featured in the National Parent Teacher Association’s Reflections program. Juwan attended the University of North Carolina School of the Arts in 2014, where he performed in Ethan Stiefel’s Nutcracker, Sir Frederick Ashton’s Birthday Offering, Susan Jaffe’s Metallurgy, and George Balanchine’s Allegro Brillante. Currently, he serves as a professional mentor for Texas Future Dance Educators. Raven Barkley – New York (2nd Season) Raven, from Bronx, NY, began dancing at age 10 at Ballet Tech, the New York City Public School for Dance. She furthered her training at the Fiorello H. LaGuardia Arts High School for Music and Art and Performing Arts, where she graduated with honors. While at LaGuardia, Raven also attended the Dance Theatre of

Harlem’s (DTH) Pre-Professional Program as a scholarship student and performed with DTH’s Dancing Through Barriers Ensemble. While at DTH, Raven was selected as a featured dancer for the Scholastic Children’s book, “Beautiful Ballerina” by Marilyn Nelson. During the summer of 2013 and 2014, Raven received the honor of performing choreography by Tony Award winner George Faison for the NYC SummerStage Performance Series. In 2015, Raven graduated Summa Cum Laude with a BFA in Dance with a concentration in ballet from SUNY Purchase. In the summer of 2015, Raven appeared on NBC’s annual “Macy’s 4th of July Fireworks Spectacular.” She has performed works by George Balanchine, Aszure Barton, DaVon Doane, George Faison, Eliot Feld, Robert Garland, Bill T. Jones, Jessica Lang, Arthur Mitchell, Matthew Neenan, Taryn Russell, Bettijane Sills and Deborah Wingert. Jamie Dee Clifton – California (8th Season) Jamie, a native of CA, received her training at Orange County Regional Ballet. After receiving the California Alliance for Arts Education’s 2000 Emerging Young Artist Award, she joined the American Repertory Ballet in New Jersey where she spent two seasons. Jamie accompanied Nai Ni Chen Dance Company on their 2002 China Tour and has been a guest artist with L.A. Chamber Dance. She danced for seven years with BalletMet Columbus where she received the 2008 Violetta Boft Award. Some of her favorite roles include Juliet in David Nixon’s Romeo and Juliet, Odette in Nixon’s Swan Lake and Daisy in Jimmy Orrante’s world premiere of The Great Gatsby. She has had the pleasure of dancing works by such choreographers as Ji í Kylián, George Balanchine, Dwight Rhoden, Twyla Tharp and Stanton Welch. Chelsea Dumas – Indiana (4th Season) Chelsea began her training in Fort Wayne, IN, at New American Youth Ballet and Conservatory under the direction of Beth


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McLeish. She then studied ballet at Indiana University’s Jacobs School of Music. Chelsea has spent summers at The Chautauqua Institution and The School of American Ballet. Some of her favorite ballets to perform have been Balanchine’s Serenade, Who Cares? and Concerto Barocco; and Mark Diamond’s Bolero. Chelsea was an apprentice with Charlotte Ballet prior to joining the Company. Drew Grant – New York (1st Season) Drew was born in Philadelphia, PA. He trained on full scholarship with the Dance Center in West Chester, PA, and The School of American Ballet in New York City. He attended summer courses with The School of American Ballet, Miami City Ballet and Chautauqua Institution on full scholarship. He has danced professionally with Los Angeles Ballet, Atlanta Ballet, BalletMet, Carolina Ballet and Stadt Theater Chemnitz in Germany. Josh Hall – North Carolina (5th Season) Josh started dancing at Lisa’s Dance Academy in Syracuse, NY. At age 8, he moved to North Carolina and started training at Dance Productions under Denise Britz-Clarke and Ed Phelan, and at Piedmont Dance Conservatory under Rebecca Massey Wiley and Daniel Wiley. He attended high school at the University of North Carolina School of the Arts where he studied under Warren Conover, Nina Danilova, Douglas Gawriljuk, Nigel Burley and Ethan Stiefel. Josh attended summer intensives under full scholarship with Miami City Ballet, Charlotte Ballet and Pittsburgh Ballet Theatre. Josh has performed as Siegfried in Swan Lake and as the Snow King and Cavalier in Nutcracker. Sarah Hayes Harkins – North Carolina (9th Season) Sarah’s early training was in Asheville, NC, at the Asheville Center of Performing Arts, after which she

attended North Carolina School of the Arts in the High School Program. She performed George Balanchine’s Serenade for the Tribute to Melissa Hayden, and at the Hollywood Bowl in Los Angeles. In 2005, she performed with Ballet Adriatico in Ascoli Piceno, Italy. Sarah attended summer intensives with Miami City Ballet and Charlotte Ballet. She has performed in seven world premieres by choreographer Dwight Rhoden, and has also performed in works by Jean-Pierre Bonnefoux, Jiri Bubenicek, Mark Diamond, David Ingram, Sasha Janes, Twyla Tharp, William Forsythe and Jiri Kylian. Some of her favorite roles include, Choleric in Balanchine’s Four Temperaments, Grand Pas Classique, Cinderella, Tinker Bell and the Grey Girl in Jiri Kylian’s Forgotten Land. Ben Ingel – North Carolina (3rd Season) Ben, from Charlotte, NC, has studied with the Houston Ballet’s Ben Stevenson Academy, Boston Ballet School and Charlotte Ballet Academy. He attended high school at the University of North Carolina School of the Arts. He has had the privilege of working with Jean-Pierre Bonnefoux, Patricia McBride, Johan Kobborg, Claudio Munoz, Dwight Rhoden, Ethan Steifel and Twyla Tharp. Ben has performed and learned various classical and contemporary ballet repertoire including George Balanchine’s Who Cares?, Mark Diamond’s Bolero, Alonzo King’s Chants and Dwight Rhoden’s world premiere of The Groove. In 2013, he performed in the world premiere of Twyla Tharp’s Treefrog in Stonehenge at the American Dance Festival. Ben was a member of Charlotte Ballet II for the 2013/2014 Season. Alessandra Ball James – Georgia (12th Season) Alessandra trained with Gwinnett Ballet Theatre under the direction of Lisa Sheppard. She also trained with Stanislav Issaev and went on to compete in the Premio Roma International Ballet Competition where she received third prize and the Grishko Prize for Charm

and Elegance. Alessandra danced with Colorado Ballet for one season before joining Charlotte Ballet II and later, the main company. In 2008, after six years with Charlotte Ballet, Alessandra moved to Madrid, Spain, where she danced with the Victor Ullate Ballet. Alessandra has performed in George Balanchine’s Agon, Apollo, Midsummer Night’s Dream and Who Cares?; Jerome Robbin’s Fancy Free; Twyla Tharp’s Nine Sinatra Songs and The Golden Section; and as Mina in Mark Godden’s Dracula. She received a Princess Grace Award in 2005. Lexi Johnston – Texas (1st Season) Lexi, from Kilgore, TX, started taking ballet classes at age 6 with Longview Ballet Theatre under the direction of Pat George Mitchell. After graduating from high school, Lexi continued her studies in classical ballet and contemporary dance at the University of North Carolina School of the Arts (UNCSA,) under Susan Jaffe. She graduated in May 2015 with a BFA in Dance with a concentration in Ballet. At UNCSA, Lexi performed in works including George Balanchine’s Allegro Brillante and Valse-Fantaisie; Susan Jaffe’s Metallurgy and Polovtsian Dances; Emery LeCrone’s 3 Parts in 4 Sections; a duet from William Forsythe’s New Sleep; and Ethan Stiefel’s The Nutcracker. She attended summer intensives at Jacob’s Pillow Ballet School, BalletX, Complexions Contemporary Ballet, Hubbard Street Dance Chicago, Miami City Ballet, San Francisco Ballet, The School of American Ballet, American Ballet Theatre and Boston Ballet. Lexi was a member of Charlotte Ballet II for the 2015/2016 Season. James Kopecky – Illinois (2nd Season) Born and raised in the suburbs of Chicago, James grew up dancing at Dancenter North. He trained in ballet, jazz, tap, modern and musical theater. After high school, James studied at Butler University under Marek Cholewa, Susan McGuire, Derek Reid, Cynthia Pratt, Tong Wang, Stephan


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Laurent and Michelle Jarvis. In 2010, he graduated with a BFA in Dance and was offered an apprenticeship at Ballet San Jose under the artistic leadership of Dennis Nahat. In his second season, James was promoted to Corps de Ballet. During his five years with Ballet San Jose, he was featured in a number of works including Paul Taylor’s Piazzolla Caldera, Twyla Tharp’s In The Upper Room and Jorma Elo’s Glow/Stop. Sarah Lapointe – Maryland (2nd Season) Sarah began her dance training in MD at the age of 2, attending Mid-Atlantic Center for the Performing Arts until age 14. She studied at Baltimore School for the Arts before attending a summer intensive at The Rock School for Dance Education in Philadelphia, where she received a full scholarship to train under the direction of Bo and Stephanie Spassoff. Sarah has attended summer intensives with the Bolshoi Ballet Academy, The Rock School and Chautauqua School of Dance, where, in 2014, she was awarded with the Artistic Director Award for Overall Excellence and Faculty Award for Technical Merit. In 2015, Sarah was named a National YoungArts Foundation Winner for ballet. She was nominated as a U.S. Presidential Scholar in the Arts semi-finalist and received second place at regionals for the World Ballet Competition and Youth America Grand Prix. In April 2015, Sarah was a guest artist with The Washington Ballet, performing in Swan Lake featuring Misty Copeland and Brooklyn Mack. Michael Matthews– Pennsylvania (1st Season) Michael was raised outside of Philadelphia, PA, and began his dance training at Ballet NJ Theater Company at age 5. He attended summer intensives with Central Pennsylvania Youth Ballet, as well as Miami City Ballet School and Pacific Northwest Ballet, all on full scholarship. In 2013, Michael began training at The School of Pennsylvania Ballet on scholarship before joining

Pennsylvania Ballet II under the direction of Francis Veyette. While with Pennsylvania Ballet II, Michael performed in numerous ballets as well as toured with the company dancing works by George Balanchine, Christopher Wheeldon, Angel Corella and Durante Verzola. Peter Mazurowski – New Hampshire (1st Season) Peter began dancing at age 6 at New Hampshire School of Ballet. At age 13, Peter landed the title role of Billy in Billy Elliot: the Musical on Broadway. Performing choreography by Tony Award winner Peter Darling, he also received ballet training from Francois Perron and Jeff Edwards. Peter played the role for a year and a half, staying until the show closed in 2012. He continued his training at New Hampshire School of Ballet, Eastern Ballet Institute, Southern New Hampshire Dance Theater and Urbanity Dance in Boston where he was a junior apprentice. He attended Ballet West and Boston Ballet’s summer programs on full scholarship. In 2014, Peter joined Boston Ballet School, where he trained for two years under Margaret Tracey, Peter Stark, Igor Burlak, Kathleen Mitchell and Pavel Gurevich. Maurice Mouzon Jr. – Maryland (1st Season) Maurice, a Baltimore native, says his first passions were football and baseball, but after being introduced to dance, he started formal dance training at the Baltimore School for the Arts at age 14. After graduating, Maurice continued his dance training at Purchase College at State University of New York. He attended summer intensives with Dance Theatre of Harlem, Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater and Miami City Ballet. Amelia Sturt-Dilley – Colorado (2nd Season) Amelia was raised in Colorado where she trained under Karen and David Samuelson. She graduated from

Walnut Hill School for the Arts under the direction of Michael Owen and Samuel Kurkjian. Amelia’s summer intensives include The Nutmeg Conservatory, Washington School of Ballet, Houston Ballet, Ballet Austin and Paris Opera Ballet. She received her BFA from the Juilliard School, and while there danced in works by Monica Bill Barnes, Emery LeCrone, Darrell Grand Moultrie, William Forsythe, Twyla Tharp, Larry Keigwin, Merce Cunningham and Jessica Lang. Ryo Suzuki – Japan (2nd Season) Ryo trained at Le Course de Ballet in Iwaki, Japan, and with Houston Ballet II in Houston, TX. He has performed in works by Houston Ballet Artistic Director Stanton Welch, in Kenneth MacMillan’s Manon, George Balanchine’s Jewels and John Cranko’s Taming of the Shrew. In 2011, he joined Singapore Dance Theatre where he performed in George Balanchine’s Divertimento No. 15, Serenade, and Themes and Variations; Edwaard Liang’s Age of Innocence; and Janek Schergen’s Giselle, Swan Lake and Nutcracker. Ryo returned to the United States in 2013 and joined the New Jersey Ballet, performing in Paul McRae’s Peter and the Wolf and as a soloist in Leonid Lavrovsky’s Faust. Ryo has won awards in dance competitions worldwide including the Youth America Grand Prix and the Kawasaki Ballet Competition. Elizabeth Truell – South Carolina (3rd Season) Elizabeth, a native of Columbia, SC, began her ballet training with Debra Bricker at the age of 4. She then studied for one year at the South Carolina Governor’s School for Arts and Humanities in Greenville, SC. After attending a summer course at the Pittsburgh Ballet Theatre School, Elizabeth decided to move there to continue her training with Marjorie Grundvig, Dennis Marshall, Janet Popeleski and Polyanna Ribiero. While in Pittsburgh, Elizabeth had the privilege of performing in the


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Pittsburgh Ballet Theatre’s productions of The Nutcracker and Coppelia, as well as PBT outreach performances. Elizabeth also spent summers at The Harid Conservatory, Charlotte Ballet Academy and the Chautauqua Institution. Elizabeth was a member of Charlotte Ballet II for the 2013/2014 Season. Shaina Wire – New Jersey (1st Season) Shaina, from Sussex County, NJ, started dancing at age 8 at Branchville Dance Centre. Shaina has attended summer intensives at The Nutmeg Ballet Conservatory, Charlotte Ballet, Chautauqua Institution, Houston Ballet, Boston Ballet, and The Joffrey Ballet School. At age 13, Shaina was invited by Ethan Stiefel to attend the University of North Carolina School of the Arts. When she returned to New York, she joined The Joffrey Ballet School as a trainee, and a year later was invited to join the Joffrey Ballet Concert Group under the direction of Davis Robertson. She has performed principal roles in various ballets, including Balanchine’s Serenade and Valse Fantaisie, and Gerald Arpino’s Birthday Variations, Light Rain, Kettentanz, Suite Saint-Saens and Viva Vivaldi. Shaina has had the opportunity to perform at the Florence Dance Festival in Florence Italy and Beijing Dance Academy’s 60th anniversary.

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ABOUT THE COMPETITION

ROSEN-SCHAFFEL COMPETITION FOR YOUNG AND EMERGING ARTISTS FINAL ROUND OF COMPETITION

SUNDAY, JULY 30 1 PM, SCHAEFER CENTER FOR THE PERFORMING ARTS

Piano Concerto in G Major Allegramente Adagio assai Presto

Maurice Ravel

The festival, in partnership with the Hayes School of Music, proudly presents the seventh season of the highly acclaimed Rosen-Schaffel Competition for Young & Emerging Artists. During the spring of 2017, contestants submitted recordings of their work and a panel of judges selected eight finalists to compete in a public performance. During the final round on July 30, jurors will designate three top prizewinners and the audience will select an audience choice award winner. In addition to a cash prize, the first-prize winner will receive the opportunity to perform with conductor Gerard Schwarz and the Eastern Festival Orchestra during the 2018 season of An Appalachian Summer Festival.

FINALIST BIOS

Owen Dodds, piano Dmitri Shteinberg, piano Cello Concerto in b minor, Op. 104 Antonín Dvořák Allegro Chelsea Bernstein, cello Justin Sturz, piano “In quelle trine morbide” from Manon Lescaut Giacomo Puccini “Du bist der Lenz” from Die Walküre Richard Wagner “Porgi amor” from Le Nozze di Figaro W.A. Mozart “Il est doux, Il est bon” from Herodiade Jules Massenet “To this we’ve come” from The Consul Gian Carlo Menotti Lyndsey Swann, soprano Jonathan Blake Borton, piano Concerto for Alto Saxophone and Orchestra Henri Tomasi Andante et Allegro Giration: Allegro Caleb Carpenter, saxophone Nancy Johnston, piano Intermission Keiko Abe

Prism Rhapsody Isaac Pyatt, marimba Robin McLaughlin, piano

Cellist Chelsea Bernstein received a Bachelors degree in cello performance from the Conservatory of Music at Purchase College, SUNY, where she studied with Julia Lichten. After graduating Summa Cum Laude from SUNY Purchase, Ms. Bernstein earned a Master of Music degree in Cello Performance from the University of South Florida, where she was awarded the position of Graduate Cello Assistant under the tutelage of Scott Kluksdahl and Helga Winold. An endlessly inspired chamber musician, Ms. Bernstein spends her summers as a Teaching Assistant at the Apple Hill Center for Chamber Music. There, she has participated in the prestigious Fellowship String Quartet, Winter Chamber Music Residency and Dirt Road Ensemble programs. Chelsea currently resides in eastern North Carolina, where she regularly performs with North Carolina Symphony. She has recently completed an Advanced Performance Certificate at East Carolina University, where she studied with Emanuel Gruber. Chelsea will begin a DMA program this fall at the University of Maryland’s School of Music studying with Eric Kutz.


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“Dies Bildnis ist bezaubernd schön” from Die Zauberflöte “Una Furtiva Lagrima” from L’elisir d’amore “La fleur que tu m’avais jetée” from Carmen “I’m gettin’ tired of travelin’ through” from The Tender Land Ethan Garner, tenor Nancy Johnston, piano

W. A. Mozart Gaetano Donizetti Georges Bizet Aaron Copland

Heitor Villa-Lobos

Ciranda das Sete Notas Rachel Davis, bassoon Fidel Leal, piano Violin Concerto in D Major, Op. 35

Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky Allegro Moderato

Eva Wetzel, violin Nancy Johnston, piano

The competition program is dedicated to the memory of Mrs. Muriel Rosen, who with her husband Arnold, served as a founding patron of An Appalachian Summer Festival. The festival extends its deepest appreciation to the Rosens’ daughter, Nancy Schaffel, and her husband, Neil Schaffel, whose vision and generosity have made possible this annual competition. The 2017 Rosen-Schaffel Competition for Young and Emerging Artists has also received generous support from the Bruce J. Heim Foundation, Nanette Mayer, and Mark and Nancy Tafeen. These gifts have enabled the program to increase the amount of its cash awards to the competition’s winners. The festival expresses its appreciation to Maestro Gerard Schwarz, Music Director of the Eastern Music Festival, and Dr. James Douthit, Dean, Hayes School of Music, for their assistance and support in developing and implementing this program. Please join us for a reception in the lobby of the Schaefer Center during intermission. Refreshments have been provided by Appalachia Cookie Company.

Competition Founders and Patrons, Nancy and Neil Schaffel

Caleb Carpenter is pursuing a Bachelor of Music degree in saxophone performance under Robert Young at the University of North Carolina School of the Arts. Since beginning at UNCSA, Caleb has performed with the UNCSA Wind Ensemble, the Jazz Ensemble as lead alto saxophone, the Atchara Saxophone Quartet as the baritone chair, and the uncsaX Saxophone Ensemble. Caleb has had success in many competitions across the country; most recently he was named the national winner of the MTNA Young Artist Woodwind competition in the spring of 2017 in Baltimore, Maryland. He was a semi-finalist in the 2016 North American Saxophone Alliance’s College Solo Competition at Texas Tech University in Lubbock, Texas. In 2014, 2015, and 2016 he was a finalist in the UNCSA Concerto Competition, and he was selected as a competitor in the 2014 International Saxophone Symposium and Competition in Columbus, GA. In 2013 he was a finalist in “The President’s Own” US Marine Band Concerto Competition in Washington, D.C. With the Atchara Saxophone Quartet, Caleb performed on UNCSA’s inaugural Collage Concert, “Next Now”. The group was the winner of the 2015-2016 North Carolina MTNA Chamber Winds Competition and was the alternate in the Southern Division competition of the same series. Caleb is originally from Harrisburg, North Carolina. Rachel Davis is a rising senior majoring in music therapy at Appalachian State University. She is originally from Satellite Beach, Florida and began studying bassoon at the age of 12. Rachel is currently a student of Dr. Jon Beebe. She is the recipient of the 2014-2015 Hayes Young Artist Scholarship. After graduation, Rachel plans to study music therapy at the graduate level and practice as a music therapist for hospice and palliative care.


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Owen Dodds, age 21, is a junior in college at the University of North Carolina School of the Arts, where he studies piano with Dmitri Shteinberg. Born in Rochester, New York, Mr. Dodds has lived in various locations in the United States and Europe. In 2009, Mr. Dodds began studying at the UNCSA as an eighth grader in the high school program, with Clifton Matthews and later Dmitri Shteinberg. Mr. Dodds has attended and performed at several music festivals, including the Tibor Varga Music Festival in Switzerland, the Green Mountain Chamber Music Festival in Vermont, the InterHarmony International Music Festival in Germany, the Rebecca Penneys Piano Festival in Florida and the Meadowmount School of Music in NY. Mr. Dodds has been a recipient of various grants, including the Semans Art Fund and UNCSA’s Career Development Grant, and has won prizes in competitions such as MTNA, the Harold Protsman Classical Piano Competition, and a first prize in the UNCSA Concerto Competition. In addition to his activity at the piano, Mr. Dodds is also an avid composer. Ethan Garner is a tenor from Robbins, North Carolina. While in middle school, he found a strong love for classical music where he began playing the violin and saxophone. Ethan continued his education at Appalachian State University in Boone, North Carolina, where he has studied numerous roles including King Kaspar in Amahl and The Night Visitors, Don Basilio in Le Nozze di Figaro, Vašek in The Bartered Bride, and Tamino in Die Zauberflöte. He has developed an incredible passion for music while studying at Appalachian. This Fall, Ethan will be pursuing his Master of Music in vocal performance at the Mannes School of Music in New York, New York.

Isaac Pyatt is an undergraduate percussion performance major at University of North Carolina at Greensboro, where he is a recipient of a School of Music Minerva Scholarship. In 2017 he was a winner in the UNCG Student Artist Competition. He won the North Carolina Percussive Arts Society University Soloist Competition in 2016 and 2017. In 2015 he performed with the UNCG percussion ensemble at the Percussive Arts Society International Convention. In high school, Isaac attended University of North Carolina School of the Arts, Brevard Music Center, and NC Governor’s School West. In addition to performing and promoting his own music, he has premiered and recorded works by John Mackey, Jason Treuting, Kendall Williams, Mark Engebretson, Adam Silverman, Binshan Zhao, and Wesley Levers. As an active composer, his music has been featured at several new music festivals, and has music published through Tapspace Publications. He has studied with percussionists Eric Willie and John Beck, and composers Alejandro Rutty and Mark Engebretson. Lyndsey Swann, a student of Professor Clara O’Brien, holds her Master of Music in vocal performance from the University of North Carolina at Greensboro and her Bachelor of Music in vocal performance from the University of Central Florida. Most recently, Lyndsey performed the role of Magda Sorel in The Consul (Menotti) with UNCG Opera Theater in the April of 2016. She has also performed the roles of the Mother in Amahl and the Night Visitors and Miss Pinkerton in The Old Maid and the Thief (also by Menotti) as well as Madame Lidoine in Poulenc’s Dialogues of the Carmelites. Ms. Swann has also been a member of the ensemble for Greensboro Opera’s production of Carmen by Bizet and the Orlando Philharmonic Orchestra’s productions of Tosca by Puccini and La Traviata by Verdi. She has also made appearances in scenes from operas such as Cosi fan

tutti, Le Cid, Die Entführung aus dem Serail, Der Freischütz, and Le Nozze di Figaro. Eva Wetzel, began studying piano at age three and violin at age four. She attended the pre-college program at the Robert-SchumannHochschule Düsseldorf, graduated from the University of North Carolina School of the Arts High School and is currently pursuing her Bachelors of Music at UNCSA with Professor Ida Bieler. She has won many national and international competitions, including “Jugend Musiziert,” the Omega Talent Hunt and the MANC String Competition. She had the opportunity to attend the Aspen Music Festival and School to study with Professor Cornelia Heard. Eva is playing a violin by Marc de Sterke from 2011.

COMPETITION JUDGES Biographical information for Gerard Schwarz appears on page 41.

Robert Moody begins his tenure as Principal Conductor of the Memphis Symphony with the 2016-17 season. He has been Music Director of the Winston-Salem Symphony (North Carolina) since 2005, Artistic Director of Arizona Musicfest since 2007, and Music Director of the Portland Symphony Orchestra (Maine) since 2008. Moody’s 2015-16 season included debuts with the Vienna Chamber Orchestra and Columbus Symphony, as well as return engagements with the Memphis and Pacific Symphonies, and the Oklahoma City Philharmonic. Recent guest conducting appearances include the Chicago Symphony at Ravinia, and the Los Angeles Philharmonic at the Hollywood Bowl, in addition to the symphonies of Toronto, Houston,


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symphonies of Toronto, Houston, Indianapolis, Detroit, Seattle, Ft. Worth, San Antonio, Buffalo, Louisville, and, in Europe, the Slovenian Philharmonic. Summer festival appearances include Santa Fe Opera, Spoleto Festival USA, Brevard Music Center, Sewanee Festival, Eastern Music Festival, PortOpera, and the Oregon Bach Festival. Equally at home in the opera pit, Moody began his career as apprentice conductor for the Landestheater Opera in Linz, Austria. He has gone on to conduct at the opera companies of Santa Fe, Rochester, Hilton Head Opera, and North Carolina Opera. He also assisted on a production of Verdi Otello at the Metropolitan Opera, conducted by Valery Gergiev, and at The English National Opera, where he was Assistant Conductor for Kurt Weill Street Scene. He made his Washington National Opera and North Carolina Opera debuts in 2014, and he conducts Bartok Bluebeard’s Castle, Leoncavallo I Pagliacci, and Poulenc Dialogues of the Carmelites during 2016-2017. Moody served as Associate, then Resident Conductor, of The Phoenix Symphony (AZ) from 1998 through 2006. There he conducted a wide variety of concerts, including Classics, Chamber, Pops, Family, Handel’s Messiah, and the New Year’s Eve gala. His ability to speak with ease from the podium helped new converts to classical music and enthusiasts alike to gain a greater appreciation for orchestral music. Audiences at his concerts grew considerably during his time in Phoenix. Moody also founded The Phoenix Symphony Chorus, and for seven years was Music Director of the Phoenix Symphony Youth Orchestra. Prior to Phoenix, Moody served as Associate Conductor for the Evansville (IN) Philharmonic Orchestra, and Music Director (and founder) of the Evansville Philharmonic Youth Orchestra. Moody conducted the first professional performance of a work by the brilliant young composer Mason Bates, now Composer-in-Residence with the Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts, and was instrumental in the commissioning and premiere performances of several of Bates’ important major works for orchestra. Moody’s work can be heard on several commercially released compact disc recordings. He collaborated with the Canadian Brass for their Bach and Legends CDs; he is also the conductor for the CD Fourth World, highlighting the music of Native American recording artist R. Carlos Nakai (available on the Canyon Record label); and in 2010, the Winston-Salem Symphony released their performance (live from 2009) of Beethoven’s Symphony No. 9. A DVD of Beethoven Symphony No. 9 with Arizona Musicfest was released in 2012. Recently, he was honored to conduct on the “Cancer Blows” concert with Ryan Anthony, members of the Dallas Symphony, and a host of trumpet luminaries, to aid the fight against Multiple Myloma.

Described by the Atlanta Constitution Journal as a “genuine talent” and Knoxville Mercury as having a “splendid sense of musicality”, Portuguese-American Jacomo Rafael Bairos has been sought after for his energetic leadership and dynamic artistry. Annually in demand by some of America’s finest orchestras, Bairos’ has earned a reputation for versatility, superb musicianship and creativity ingenuity. Bairos is the Amarillo Symphony’s 17th Music Director and Co-founder and Artistic Director for Miami’s based Nu Deco Ensemble; a virtuosic and eclectic chamber orchestra designed for the 21st century. Through his critically acclaimed performances and imaginative programing, as well as his dedication to young musicians and living composers, Bairos has fostered artistic growth, positivity community impact, as well as a collaborative spirit for the presentation of compelling art at the highest levels. 2016/17 highlights include debuts with the Detroit Symphony Orchestra, as well as returns to the National Symphony Orchestra to direct their critically acclaimed DeClassified Series, the Grand Rapids Symphony to curate a residency of orchestral and chamber performances during the 2016 International ArtPrize Festival, and the Atlanta Symphony Orchestra. In 2015/16 Bairos debuted with the National (Washington, DC), Houston, Grand Rapids, Knoxville, Sarasota and Oaxaca (Mexico) Symphony Orchestras, and made returns to the Florida Orchestra, St. Louis and San Diego Symphonies. Previous subscriptions include Atlanta, Singapore, Alabama, Liepzig, and Charleston Symphony Orchestras, as well as the Malaysian Philharmonic Orchestra, the Orquesta Sinfónica Provincial of Santa Fe Argentina and the Orquesta Sinfónica Universidad de Guanajuato of Mexico. Additionally, he has appeared with the Los Angeles Chamber Orchestra, Orquesta National do Porto Portugal, and the Louisiana Philharmonic as well as the Jacksonville, North Carolina, and Charlotte Symphony Orchestras. The wide range of Bairos’ artist collaborators include MacArthur “Genius” Fellowship recipient Jeremy Denk, famed American pianists’ Garrick Ohlsson and Anne-Marie McDermott, as well as guitarist Pablo Saint Villagas to name a few. Bairos closely collaborates with some of today’s most ground-breaking and eclectic, genre-bending composers and artists such as Academy Award Winning guitarist-composer Bryce Dessner, singer-songwriter-violinist Kishi Bashi, neo-funk soul-singer Bilal, and the classical cross-over group Project Trio. Bairos also regularly works with multi-platinum selling singer-song-writer, Ben Folds. With education and outreach as core tenants of work, Bairos passionately presents insightful and engaging music performances to schools and children across the Texas panhandle and South Florida region. Bairos has crafted interactive programs and concerts for orchestras, including Amarillos’s Class Act, SymphonyKids, Nu Deco Ensembles Imagine Series and Carnegie Hall’s Link-Up Program which enrich the lives of tens of thousands of kids annually. Bairos was Associate Conductor for the Charlotte Symphony from 2010-2013 and conducted and programmed a broad spectrum of performances on every series to include the innovative KnightSounds concerts.

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His musical mentors included esteemed teacher of conductors Gustav Meier, as well as Robert Spano and Kurt Masur. Jacomo is a graduate of the famed conducting programs of both the Peabody Institute and Aspen Music Festival, as well holds a Bachelors of Music degree from The Juilliard School. Hailed as a conductor who conducts with “vigor” and “commitment” by the Charlotte Observer and for bringing a “fresh view to classical music” by The Republic, Roger Kalia is currently the Assistant Conductor of Pacific Symphony and the Music Director of Pacific Symphony Youth Orchestra. Previously, he served for two seasons as Assistant Conductor of the Charlotte Symphony, where he conducted the orchestra in a variety of performances and invigorated the orchestra’s engagement with the community. Kalia also serves as Co-Founder and Music Director of the Lake George Music Festival in upstate New York, the premier musical arts festival in the region. Kalia has also held Music Director positions with both the Young Musicians Foundation (YMF) Debut Orchestra and Columbus (IN) Symphony Orchestra, the oldest orchestra in the state and only its fourth music director. Kalia recently led the Pacific Symphony Youth Orchestra on a highly successful tour of China, which marked the orchestra’s second international tour and its first to Asia. The orchestra performed sold-out concerts in Beijing’s Forbidden City Concert Hall and Shanghai’s Oriental Arts Centre as well as a cultural exchange concert with the Shanghai Nanyang Model School Orchestra, which was broadcasted worldwide on International Channel Shanghai (ICS). Kalia is a proud recipient of a 2013 Solti Foundation U.S. Career Assistance Award. In addition to his current positions, Kalia is in consistent demand as a guest conductor. Recent and upcoming engagements include the National Symphony at the Kennedy Center, Chicago Sinfonietta at Symphony Hall, Long Beach Symphony, Great Falls Symphony, Owensboro Symphony, Boise Philharmonic, Adrian Symphony, and Bakersfield Symphony, among others. He has collaborated with such artists as Glenn Dicterow, David Kim, Randy Newman, Dan Dunn, Fei-Fei Dong, and Misha Dichter, and has served as cover conductor for the Los Angeles Philharmonic, St. Louis Symphony and Indianapolis Symphony. Kalia has worked in

various capacities with the New York Philharmonic, Pittsburgh Symphony, Seattle Symphony, Utah Symphony, Fort Worth Symphony, Danish National Symphony, and Royal Scottish National Orchestra, among others. Kalia conducted the Memphis Symphony in 2011 after winning Second Prize in their International Conducting Competition, which led to his debut the following season and launched his professional career. As Co-Founder and Music Director of the Lake George Music Festival, Kalia conducts the Lake George Festival Orchestra and chamber ensembles every August. Through its unique and innovative artistic collaborations and outreach, the festival was recently voted the Best Annual Event by the City of Lake George and featured in Time Out New York Magazine and Saratoga Living. Kalia recently created a new and innovative concert series called Sounds of Our Time, which highlights the connections between the popular music of our time and orchestral music. For its debut concert the series focused on electronic music, specifically electronic dance music (EDM), by collaborating with the EDM duo MAKO in a performance of original compositions that combined electronica with symphonic music, one of the first collaborations of its kind. The collaboration gained national publicity by being featured in the League of American Orchestras The Hub, Broadway World, EDMjoy, the Albany Times Union, and Saratoga Living. The festival brings together young professionals and current students from many prestigious institutions including the Czech Philharmonic Orchestra, the Philadelphia Orchestra, the symphonies of Atlanta, Charlotte, Kansas City, New World, Dallas, Detroit, and the premier conservatories in the nation including the Curtis Institute of Music, the Juilliard School, and the Eastman School of Music. The Festival Orchestra has been featured on a variety of radio programs including American Public Media’s Performance Today with Fred Child and WQXR-NY. A strong advocate of music education and audience development, Kalia has helped to develop an annual Family Concert Series and Late Night Concert series that have resulted in numerous grants from a variety of organizations including the National Endowment of the Arts (NEA) and the New York State Council on the Arts.


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THE HELENE AND STEPHEN WEICHOLZ GLOBAL FILM SERIES

WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 2 7 PM, SCHAEFER CENTER FOR THE PERFORMING ARTS

Set in the South Pacific, Tanna is a tale of young lovers Wawa, a young girl from one of the last traditional tribes, and her chief’s grandson, Dain. When an intertribal war escalates, Wawa is unknowingly betrothed as part of a peace deal. The young lovers run away, but are pursued by enemy warriors intent on killing them. They must choose between their hearts and the future of the tribe, while the villagers must wrestle with preserving their traditional culture and adapting it to the increasing outside demands for individual freedom. VANUATU/AUSTRALIA; UNRATED; DIRECTED BY MARTIN BUTLER AND BENTLEY DEAN (2016); 100 MINUTES

Pre-film talk with Dr. John Pfeifer begins at 7pm, with the film beginning at approximately 7:30pm. Concessions, including popcorn, beer, wine and cold beverages are available for purchase. With special thanks to our generous sponsors for this series, Helene and Stephen Weicholz.

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A SCHAEFER POPULAR SERIES EVENT

SATURDAY, AUGUST 5 7PM, HOLMES CONVOCATION CENTER

Yestival will feature special guest Todd Rundgren and an opening set from Carl Palmer’s ELP Legacy honoring the magic of Keith Emerson and Greg Lake. Inducted into the Rock and Rock Hall of Fame in 2017, YES embarks on a national tour, treating fans to a set list of greatest hits from all of the band’s nine studio albums up to 1980, and showcasing the storied history of one of the world’s most influential, ground-breaking, and respected progressive rock bands. Performing their classic hits, the audience can expect iconic favorites such as such as “Roundabout,” “Starship Trooper,” “Yours is no Disgrace,” “Going for the One,” “And you and I” and countless others. Following the recent passing of the band’s leader and cornerstone, bassist Chris Squire, YES plans to continue forward with its impressive legacy. Joining YES on bass is former YES member, Billy Sherwood. Extremely well-versed with YES music and the inner working of YES as a unit, Sherwood is a master bassist and vocalist-- the perfect addition to a line-up of fellow virtuosos.

SERIES SPONSORSHIP PROVIDED BY WESTGLOW RESORT & SPA AND ROWLAND’S RESTAURANT, MADE POSSIBLE THROUGH THE GENEROSITY OF BONNIE SCHAEFER.

PERFORMANCE SPONSORSHIP PROVIDED BY: SKYBEST COMMUNICATIONS, INC., GOODNIGHT BROTHERS, BOONE AREA VISITORS BUREAU, MAST GENERAL STORE

About Todd Rundgren: A Wizard, A True Star. The title of Todd Rundgren’s 1973 solo album aptly sums up the contributions of this multi-faceted artist to state-of-the-art music. As a songwriter, video pioneer, producer, recording artist, computer software developer, conceptualist, and, most recently, interactive artist (re-designated TR-i), Rundgren has made a lasting impact on both the form and content of popular music. About Carl Palmer: Carl Palmer is a drummer’s drummer. A consummate professional, a brilliant technician and a dynamic showman, he has thrilled listeners and audiences alike for nearly four decades with some of music’s most memorable bands including Atomic Rooster, The Crazy World Of Arthur Brown, Asia and Emerson, and Lake & Palmer. Along the way his dazzling speed and mastery of the drums, combined with his infectious stage personality, have secured for him a respected place in history as one of Rock and Roll’s greatest drummers. With special thanks to Mr. John Carter from WBTV, our emcee for the evening.

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An Appalachian Summer Festival Playbill 2017  

Presented by Appalachian State University’s Office of Arts & Cultural Programs, this annual celebration of the performing and visual arts is...

An Appalachian Summer Festival Playbill 2017  

Presented by Appalachian State University’s Office of Arts & Cultural Programs, this annual celebration of the performing and visual arts is...