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Turchin Center for the Visual Arts North Carolina Arts Council Artist Fellowship Award Exhibition 2012

CraftFilm&Visual Arts Featuring NCAC Artist Fellowship Award Recipients 2010|11 Elizabeth Brim Phoebe Brush Kirk Fanelly Gail Fredell Maja Godlewska Christopher Holmes Mark Iwinski Young Kim Anne Lemanski Nava Lubelski Sean Pace Susan Harbage Page Vita Plume Shoko Teruyama Bob Trotman Linda Vista


Turchin Center for the Visual Arts Appalachian State University PO Box 32139 423 West King Street Boone, North Carolina 28608 828.262.3017 www.tcva.org turchincenter@appstate.edu

Publication copyright Š 2012 Appalachian State University Graphic design by Sarah McBryde, University Communications, Appalachian State University Installation photography by Amanda Getty and Troy Tuttle, University Communications, Appalachian State University Printed by Wallace Printing, Inc. 2,000 copies of this public document were printed at a cost of $5,520 or $2.76 per copy. This project was supported by the N.C. Arts Council, a division of the N.C. Department of Cultural Resources, with funding from the National Endowment for the Arts.

Appalachian State University is committed to providing equal opportunity in education and employment to all applicants, students, and employees. The university does not discriminate in access to its educational programs and activities, or with respect to hiring or the terms and conditions of employment, on the basis of race, color, national origin, religion, creed, sex, gender identity and expression, political affiliation, age, disability, veteran status, or sexual orientation. The university actively promotes diversity among students and employees.

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TABLE OF CONTENTS 6

FOREWARD Mary B. Regan

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Anne Lemanski Sculpting

INTRODUCTION Hank T. Foreman

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Nava Lubelski Fibers

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THE ARTISTS

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Sean Pace Sculpting

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Elizabeth Brim Metalsmithing

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Susan Harbage Page Photography

Phoebe Brush Filmmaking

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Vita Plume Fibers

Kirk Fanelly Painting

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Shoko Teruyama Ceramics

Gail Fredell Woodworking

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Bob Trotman Sculpting

Maja Godlewska Painting

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Linda Vista Mixed Media

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Christopher Holmes Filmmaking

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ARTIST BIOGRAPHIES

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Mark Iwinski Photography & Sculpting

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EXHIBITION CHECKLIST

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Young Kim Installation

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64-66 ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

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FOREWARD The Artist Fellowship program is part of a long tradition of artist support at the North Carolina Arts Council. From its earliest days in 1964 when Governor Terry Sanford established the North Carolina Arts Council by executive order, artists were a priority. When the council became a state agency with a budget and staff in 1967, artists-centered programs such as Poetry in the Schools, Musicians in Residence, and Dance Touring program were among the first to be launched. The artist program came of age in 1971 with the creation of the remarkable Visiting Artists Program, which would run successfully until 1995. It was a partnership with the Department of Community Colleges and, at its peak, had artists working full-time in all 58 community colleges. Later, during a period of alarmingly high unemployment in 1975, a federally-funded jobs program financed the Arts Council’s Third Century Artists Program which provided employment for hundreds of artists over the next few years. In those early years, we justified using taxpayer dollars to hire artists on the basis that the artists were working for the schools and communities – not for themselves. In the 1960s and ‘70s, government support for the arts was a new unproven idea and we were developing cautiously. It was not until 1979, having been prodded multiple times by board member and painter Maud Gatewood, that we felt secure and bold enough to create a program that recognized artists solely for the excellence of the work they created – not for how they were going to contribute that work to society. Implicit in that transition was the belief that artists contribute meaningfully to the quality of life in our state by their presence and that supporting creativity was an essential public good. In 1980-81, we awarded four $5,000 fellowships to visual artists; the next year four to writers. Now annually we award 18 fellowships at $10,000 each and, in addition to visual artists and writers, they go to choreographers, playwrights, screenwriters, composers and songwriters. North Carolina can be a good state in the arts if we have strong arts organizations based here. But, to be a really great state in the arts, we must have excellent artists living and working within our borders. Clearly $10,000, though helpful, doesn’t set up an artist to make a living; not many artists are able to make a living solely from their art in North Carolina, or in most other places across the country. However, we believe the Artist Fellowship program makes a strong statement that North Carolina values its artists for the work they create and that having outstanding artists live and work here is, in itself, a great value to the people of our state. Mary B. Regan Executive Director, 1976-2012 North Carolina Arts Council

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INTRODUCTION The Turchin Center for the Visual Arts at Appalachian State University is honored by our selection to present the work of the 16 recipients of the 2010-11 North Carolina Arts Council Artist Fellowship Awards. These fellowship awards are vitally important as they support and nurture great art and artists across the state. The exhibition portion of the fellowship program is an extremely vital part of the program because it provides an opportunity for communities across our state to experience great art made here at home and to engage in dialog about contemporary art and the world around us. Support for artists as they create new work is one facet of the fellowships that mirrors a core tenet of the Turchin Center. The vitality generated through the opportunity to create new work, while critical to the artist, extends beyond the individual to strengthen the entire cultural fabric of our state. As communities experience the work of these artists, they better understand that artists live and work with us, and that their lives, concerns, and celebrations are all born of a world we all experience every day. This project, supported by the North Carolina Arts Council and the N.C. Department of Cultural Resources, with funding from the National Endowment for the Arts, also supports the message that these artists, and their work, are valuable to the health of our communities. First, educationally and therapeutically, the arts play vital roles in the development of creative and critical potential of citizens and in experiencing, interpreting, understanding, recording and shaping culture. Second, the cultural resources of our state are a critical component of our economic development and well-being. The Turchin Center for the Visual Arts celebrates the work of these artists and thanks them for their contributions to our communities and state. Special thanks go to the North Carolina Arts Council and the N.C. Department of Cultural Resources. As someone who has been privileged to work within the arts environment of our state for more than two decades, I would like to take this opportunity to express my pride and sincere appreciation for these agencies and the real and positive differences they make in the lives of North Carolinians every day. Hank T. Foreman Associate Vice Chancellor for University Communications and Cultural Affairs Director and Chief Curator

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Elizabeth Brim Metalsmithing Mitchell County

Artist Statement I use ancient traditional and innovative blacksmithing techniques to produce sculptures that mimic the look of soft fabric. By carefully crafting the work I believe the content becomes more accessible and can be appreciated and respected by a larger audience. The themes of the work reference feminine attire and are suggested by my upbringing in Columbus, Ga. My sister and I grew up in a very female-dominated and domestic world. My mother and grandmother made frilly dresses for us and were very meticulous in their craftsmanship. They enjoyed and took pride in their accomplishments. My mother entertained us with fairy tales and stories she made up while we played with the scraps of fabric that fell to the floor as they worked. The sculptures I make honor that tradition but also poke fun at what is expected of a Southern woman of my generation. I really enjoy making it and believe that shows in the finished pieces.

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Phoebe Brush Filmmaking Durham County

Artist Statement I am a documentary filmmaker based in Durham. My work is primarily concerned with understanding how experiences of isolation (both psychic and institutional) and encounter (personal and collective) contribute to political imagination. The land and landscape figure prominently in my explorations.

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Kirk Fanelly

Painting Mecklenburg County Artist Statement My images are based on observations from my day-to-day. I hope you find interest in something I’ve made. If you have specific questions, feel free to contact me.

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Gail Fredell Woodworking Buncombe County

Artist Statement I design and execute projects ranging in scale and scope from residential, functional furniture to public installations, for both interior spaces and landscape settings. Although the character of my work has evolved over the years, my aesthetic remains driven by an interest in and affinity for articulated structure, quiet compositions and the Zen point of view of objects in reference to time and ritual. I employ a vocabulary of minimal, architectural forms, and use a wide range of materials: wood, steel, concrete, stone and cast glass. In all my work I strive to create objects that are timeless in character, work well within their context, are intentionally crafted and welcoming of use.

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Maja Godlewska Painting Mecklenburg County

Artist Statement I explore beauty, permanence and decay in my creative work. I look to phenomena that occur between the form and formlessness, order and chaos, things that seem permanent, yet are subject to change and evolution (such as clouds, stains, icebergs and weather patterns). Rococo and Baroque architecture and frescoes fascinate me for their formal solutions — ascending motion and swirling compositions that are similar to nebulae, cumulonimbus clouds or glacial moraines — and for their fleshy, ostentatious content. To me, they symbolize eternal beauty that transcends time. Physically, they are subject to decay and eventually, to deterioration. They are literally beauty threatened by time, as in Giambattista Tiepolo’s, a painter of my interest and admiration, depictions of Venus and Chronos. Frescoes, stuccos and azulejo tiles covered with water stains from leaking roofs and fungus growths provide me with source material. Their sublime form is slowly descending into chaos, into the formless.

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Christopher Holmes Filmmaking Guilford County

Artist Statement It was a deliberate artistic decision to choose North Carolina over the synthetic, vertical landscapes of New York or Los Angeles, as I’ve long held that authentic personalities and virgin soil provide far richer filmic material than exceedingly self-conscious metropoli where people are implicitly coerced into perpetual performance art, cameras ubiquitous and lurking around every corner. The project I’m developing with the North Carolina Arts Council Fellowship award is The Lost Colony, an elegiac comedy manifested from my years as conduit of the industrial north immersed within the spectra of confederacy and failed economies in the American South. I am most passionate about The Lost Colony because it gives voice to a marginalized class of citizens that spends hard-earned money on films that continually exploit them by propagating the rhetoric of increasing self-worth through acquisition of material goods. It is a socially relevant work that uses the legend of the Lost Colony at Roanoke and a mythical shark attack as parables in illustrating the cycle of debt, miseducation, powerlessness, and fear perpetuated by mainstream media. I regard the camera as a shovel, a tool for excavation as it were — whether excavation of a character’s emotional detritus, strip-mining history to reveal patterns imperceptible to the amnesiac lens of pop culture, or unearthing of physical artifacts in seeking to reconnect with the origins of artistic communication — indeed the age-old, nonverbal language of image and symbol. Objects such as arrowheads, metal detectors, fossils and animals invoke an awareness of lineage, both moral and genealogical, and transport viewers into a state of sensory immersion where viewership becomes an active, engaged process. And, though my writing style belies me here, a pervasive naturalism and a delirious sense of humor are critical components to creating the work I advocate.

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Mark Iwinski

Photography & Sculpting Durham County Artist Statement Mighty old-growth forests, lost architecture and missing artworks all leave traces that reveal themselves to us from out of the past, enabling comparisons of “what was now” to “what now is.” As stumps mark the intersection of the forest and history in the landscape, parking lots, old photographs and ruins provide traces in the urban environment. These enigmatic traces are clues enabling me to give presence to these terrains of absence. My current work embodies two main avenues of research. The first follows historic traces through the urban and cultural fabric of history in cities. The second addresses deforestation and the resultant changes in the landscape. In the first series, I use a rephotography process to explore the effects of urban renewal which occurred throughout 20th-century America and using lost historic architecture from places I have lived and visited as examples. Through superimposing transparencies of historic images of lost architecture and city life over current scenes, I create spectral presences resulting in a visually ambiguous “slippage” in time. These works possess a performative, conceptual conceit as my hand, holding a transparency of the lost work in front of the camera, locates me both at the site and within the image as I film. The images give presence to historical absence and loss, make the past visible, conjure ghosts and enable us to glimpse the mystery of time. This examination of cultural historic losses is paralleled by my explorations of the forest, the loss of old growth and seeking out its isolated remains. In the forest these traces are stumps which endure for many decades. I use multiple techniques to give presence to these losses including photography and artist books to document site-specific works and reimagining ghost forests from the stumps scattered among second growth and clearcuts. Paper castings, done directly from the stumps, provide a ghostly sense of physical scale, while monoprints are taken from the stumps’ end grains. The image is made by inking up the end grain surface, laying down large sheets of Kozo paper over the prepared surface, applying pressure from the back with rollers and then peeling up the paper. These prints are then presented tapestry-like on the wall, or stretched in a wood frame supported just above the floor to imply the original context of the stump. Most recently, I’ve collected the prints into large handmade artist books whose large scale gives them a sculptural presence. Finally, gold leafing of the old growth stumps in situ provides a metaphorical commercial value for the immeasurable loss of the trees. These works are all meant to show what has been removed from our memory in the cityscape and the landscape and to address larger questions of loss and change in dealing with our history, culture and environment. They embody a forward-looking nostalgia, using these lost places and environments to ask what kind of cities and landscapes we want to live in. 22


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Young Kim Installation Forsyth County

Artist Statement In making art objects that are inherently fragile and temporal, rather than permanent objects that would be archived, I hope to parallel the nature of our own existence. The work is meant to serve as meditation on time, memory and the state of the human condition. Salt and earth have been the primary materials used to create my work. I am continually interested in using materials that have intrinsic history and meaning. Salt and earth are ubiquitous elements found in the oceans and lands of the world. Although abundant, they are necessary elements to sustain human life.

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Anne Lemanski Sculpting Mitchell County

Artist Statement Through the use of materials such as vintage paper, vinyl, textiles, wood veneer, metal and artificial sinew, I create a menagerie of sculptural portraits. The politically-charged content and form of the sculpture happens through the combination of a copper rod armature and hand-stitched “skin.� My current focus is on the complex, symbiotic relationship between humans and animals, highlighting our admiration for animals as symbols, and our exploitation of them to suit our needs.

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Nava Lubelski Fibers Buncombe County

Artist Statement My work is about the contradictions and commonalities between the impulse to destroy and the compulsion to mend; juxtaposing acts of aggression, such as spilling, shredding and cutting, with restorative labor and reconstruction. I explore accident, error and gestures of impatience, developing detailed narratives from chance and impulse. My work combines painting and sculpture with aspects of traditional craft techniques, such as embroidery, lace and paper cutting: threads are embroidered over stains and rips on canvas; tablecloths and blankets are repaired by sewing around spills and smudges; shredded paper sculptures reconfigure a mass of stored paper. I play with scrambling notions of craft versus art as well as formal versus conceptual, allowing traditionally meticulous and decorative media to be used in roughly expressionistic and improvisational ways that suggest layered meanings, reinterpretations of information and embedded personal and transactional histories. My most recent works experiment with extending the canvas into a sculptural element and playing with questions about the value of the unique, and of craftsmanship, in a work of art.

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Sean Pace

Sculpting Buncombe County Artist Statement I work to make the impossible, the possible; the incredible, the tangible; the wild, the real, and the idea, the truth. I wantonly use humor, favoring the energy of the id over the leash of the ego. I draw lines of inclusion to guilty parties for acts of inhumanity and misunderstanding. I create work that challenges the normal, that erases the normal, that intrigues the imagination, and declares the value of the absurd. For me, art is the chance to stand for a situation that is free and demonstrate the stretch that imagination can take when not tied to absolutes. Sean Pace is what I am called but not what I am. I am a laughter making fun and my life’s work is to invite every one else to see a visual comedy manifest in the makings of my hands. My subject matter is all over the place just as people have opinions on many subjects. I create work involving many ideas but in each one is a vein of sardonic humor as well as the unmistakably evident pursuit of applied ingenuity. When I paint, I flex my freedom forcing myself to see that there is no such thing as a mistake. Every line is as valid as the next. Painting is like additive sculpture when I build my work; lines are the blocks that stack to make the forms. Forms are the bodies and the colors are the feeling. If it isn’t right it changes. If it’s too much then it’s erased. The two-dimensional is no different than the three. And it is paramount for the planning and layout of my process. My work evolves from nothing to something and I am the fuel for its gestation. The twodimensional world allows me some quick, instantaneous reflection where as in the threedimensional world I have to struggle much harder to build an idea. I would say that I am a sculptor before a painter because my sculptures are more highly developed drawings. But, I could not be one without the other and would prefer to say that the two are married as a means to an end.

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Susan Harbage Page Photography Orange County

Artist Statement Borders and thresholds. Crossroads and intersections. Transit. All lie at the heart of my work. I use photography, video, installation and sound to explore popular culture, behavior traces and marginalized communities. My current work, The Border Project, is an intervention — at once aesthetic, archaeological, and archival — into the spaces and objects associated with the great migration north across the Rio Grande and into the United States. Concurrently, my exploration of communities includes temporary public interventions and several municipal public art commissions that link place, history and community together including Crossing Over: A Floating Bridge, Brownsville, Texas and Matamoros, Mexico; The Blue Circle Project, Laredo, Texas, and Handmade, a municipal project for the Charlotte Area Transit System’s Light Rail Station.

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Vita Plume Fibers Wake County

Artist Statement I use Photoshop速 to simplify digital portraits and design the weave structures. I weave the cloth on a digital Jacquard handloom (TC-1). On the loom, the pieces are woven completely in white, however a supplementary shibori (Japanese resist/tiedye) weft thread is also woven in. After weaving, the cloth is pulled tightly using the shibori thread to create a resist. The piece is then immersed in a dye bath. After dyeing, the shibori thread is removed and the full portrait with colour is revealed. Both natural (cotton, linen) and synthetic threads (polyester, polyolefin), which behave differently under various dye and shrinkage conditions, are used.

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Shoko Teruyama Ceramics Madison County

Artist Statement Growing up in Japan, I remember tradition being part of daily life. Temples and shrines were everywhere, even inside our home. I was drawn to these sacred spaces and ceremonial objects because they were decorated with texture and pattern contrasted by areas of calm and stillness. These memories inspire my current work. I make boxes, intimate bowls and small plates for precious objects; vases for flower arranging, and a variety of serving pieces. Many of the forms allude to function and would serve food well, but are more comfortable being placed in sacred spaces of the home like the center of a formal dining room table, a hope chest, or a bedside stand. The making begins with bisque molds, slab construction and coil building to make thick, heavy forms. I carve, shave and sand excess clay away to slowly reveal the final shape. Puff handles and other elements are added for physical decoration. White slip is brushed over the red earthenware to create depth and motion. Then I carve back through the slip, exposing the red clay. Shiny translucent glazes are applied over the decorated areas and opaque matte glazes over the calm areas. Ornamentation is important to my ideas. I have created motifs called vine patterns to lead your eye around the work. Patterns run continuously to create narrow borders or to fill large amounts of space. They can flow into tight curves just as easily as they can bend around the belly of a form. The patterns create visual movement representing water, wind and clouds. I create characters based on human relations and things I have experienced. To me it is much easier to draw owls than humans. I don’t want to tell specific stories to people, I want people to create their own. Sometimes you feel like the weight of a turtle standing on top of you and sometimes you feel like an owl standing on top of the world. Some of my characters have a dark nature. I think that is life. Sometimes dark things happen. Overall, I want my work to have a sense of hope and a sense of humor because life goes on.

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Bob Trotman Sculpting Rutherford County

Artist Statement Working mostly in wood, I see my efforts in relation to the vernacular traditions of the carved religious figures, ships’ figureheads and the so-called “show figures” found in the 19th century outside shops and in circuses. But as a contemporary artist I am fascinated by a noire narrative of life at the office. My wooden people, often surprisingly posed, evoke both humor and anxiety and, taken together, offer an absurdist vision of an imaginary corporate purgatory.

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Linda Vista

Mixed Media Mecklenburg County Artist Statement As an assemblage artist, I use items that are already out in the world and assemble them in ways to create new meaning, curiosity or absurdity. I source my materials from flea markets, antique malls, junkyards, dollar stores, craft stores, hardware stores and sometimes the curb. I make small sculptures and objects ranging from crosses and chalices to keepsake boxes, gourd sculpture, torches and ticklers, nonsense plaques and tabletop monuments. Beginning in 2011, my work includes larger scale sculptures for the LindaLand art garden environment that I am creating. The goal of my work is always to hit the sweet spot. The sweet spot is the place where divergent elements come together and create a beautiful new dynamic wholeness. It is where the parts and the sum of the parts are in exquisite right relation to one another. This is achieved through a process of adding and subtracting, looking and honing, heeding divine intuition and trusting surprises.

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ARTIST BIOGRAPHIES Elizabeth Brim Elizabeth Brim has an Master of Fine Arts degree from the University of Georgia and has studied extensively in metals, sculpture and blacksmithing at the Penland School of Crafts in North Carolina She was an instructor in the Columbus State University Art Department in Columbus, Ga. before deciding to become a full-time studio artist and moving to Penland. Elizabeth was the iron studio coordinator at Penland for six years and also coordinated two national iron symposia that were held at the school. She created a body of sculptural work that interprets feminine imagery such as high-heeled shoes, aprons, tutus, and pillows using traditional and innovative blacksmithing techniques. Elizabeth has taught blacksmithing at Penland, Haystack, Peters Valley and has been a visiting artist at several universities and Cranbrook Academy of Art. She has demonstrated extensively in the United States, Germany and Canada.

Phoebe Brush Phoebe Brush is a documentary filmmaker based in Durham. Her work has been exhibited at the Center for Documentary Studies at Duke University and at festivals including the Strange Beauty Film Festival, the Carrboro Film Festival and the Indie Grits Film Festival.

Kirk Fanelly Kirk Fanelly was born in Charlotte where he spent the first 18 years of his life before moving to Providence, R.I. to attend college. His studies at Brown University began as an engineering student, and ended in 1999 with a degree in visual art. During Fanelly’s time in Providence, he also studied extensively at Rhode Island School of Design through a liberal cross-registration agreement between the schools. He began sharing his work online in 1999, and has amassed a small, but eclectic audience across the country and world. In 2000, Fanelly returned temporarily to Charlotte to be closer to family. He currently lives and makes work in Charlotte, exhibits regularly and travels when possible. 42


Gail Fredell For more than 30 years Gail Fredell has pursued a career of studio furniture work. She has maintained workshops in her native San Francisco Bay Area, the mountains of Colorado and, since 2008, in western North Carolina. She designs and executes projects ranging in scale and scope from residential, functional furniture to public installations, for both interior spaces and landscape settings. The aesthetic of her work is informed by her background in architecture, a life-long interest in Japanese design, and an upbringing grounded in the natural landscapes of the West. Fredell employs a vocabulary of minimal, architectural forms, and uses a wide range of materials: wood, steel, concrete, stone and cast glass. Although the character of her work has evolved over the years, her aesthetic has consistently been driven by an affinity for articulated structure; the nature of functional objects in reference to time and ritual, and her desire to create quiet, fully-resolved compositions of contrasting elements. Fredell’s furniture is in the permanent collections of San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, the Oakland Museum, The Fuller Craft Museum, Stanford University Memorial Chapel and the AIDS Memorial Grove in Golden Gate Park. Throughout her studio career Fredell has contributed significantly to her field through teaching and arts administration work. She has taught at the college level nationwide and in summer workshop programs at Penland School of Crafts, Haystack Mountain School and Anderson Ranch Arts Center. She has served as Director of the Furniture and Wood Turning Programs at Anderson Ranch from 1993 to 2001 and is currently a member of the board of directors of the Center for Craft, Creativity and Design.

Maja Godlewska Maja Godlewska, born in Poland; MFA in Painting and Graphic Arts, Academy of Fine Arts, Wroclaw, Poland; Post-Graduate Scholarship at the National College of Art and Design, Dublin, Ireland. Specializes in painting, drawing and installation art. Her work has been exhibited nationally and internationally in more than 90 solo and group shows. Recipient of numerous grants and fellowships, including recent North Carolina Arts Council Grant and Fulbright Fellowship, she participated in artist-in-residence programs in South and North America, Europe and Asia. Associate Professor of Art/Painting at UNC Charlotte. Represented in Southeast US by The New Gallery of Modern Art in Charlotte, N.C. 43


Christopher Holmes Christopher Holmes is currently the program coordinator for the RiverRun International Film Festival in Winston-Salem, and prior to that taught film courses as a visiting assistant professor of Broadcasting and Cinema at UNC-Greensboro. His work has won numerous awards and has been featured in a wide range of festivals throughout the world, including the Milano Film Festival, Slamdance, SF Indie, Cinequest and the Wisconsin Film Festival. His most recent film, Sapsucker, has screened at over 40 notable festivals worldwide, winning Best Short Narrative at the Denver Underground Film Festival. His short films have also been featured several times on PBS programs in both North and South Carolina, and the feature documentary projects he edited and co-produced with The Unheard Voices Project (Wild Caught: The Life and Struggles of an American Fishing Town and With These Hands: The Story of an American Furniture Factory) have been featured on over 50 PBS stations nationwide.

Mark Iwinski Mark Iwinski is an interdisciplinary artist working with photography, printmaking, sculpture, book arts and site-specific work to reveal layers of absence, history, and memory in our landscapes and cities. Originally from Milwaukee, Wis., he received his M.F.A in sculpture in 1991 from the University of Wisconsin. He taught art at The College of William and Mary, Dartmouth College, Colby College, and Cornell University before moving to Durham in 2008. He is a 2006 Constance Saltonstall Foundation Grant recipient for works on paper featuring his old growth stump prints. His artist’s book Crosscuts, documenting the loss and rediscovery of an old growth White Pine forest in the Adirondack State Park in New York, was featured in the international artist’s book tour Arcadia Id Est in 2007. Ghost Trees and Crosscuts: Intersections between the Forest and History, was a one-person exhibition of old growth stump prints and paper castings at the Wriston Art Center at Lawrence University in 2006 while Terrains of Absence, which included his rephotography work was shown at Wells College in Aurora, N.Y., in 2008. He is the recipient of a 2008 Fellowship from the New York Foundation for the Arts for his rephotography work, This was now, and subsequently published in the Cornell Alumni Magazine in 2011 and the online journal Inflexions in 2008. He has participated in Print Summit 2010, a national survey of prints shown at East Carolina University. Caudex, an exhibition of his old growth stump prints, large scale artist books, and rephotography projects, will open at Flanders Gallery in Raleigh in August 2012.

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Young Kim Born in Seoul, Korea, Kim migrated to the United States at the age of ten. He received his M.F.A. from the University of Kentucky and currently is an associate professor of Art at the Elon University. His experimental work quietly examines the nature of our own existence through the making of temporal art objects and installations. His work is represented by Causey Contemporary Gallery in Brooklyn, N.Y.

Anne Lemanski Anne Lemanski’s work is in many private collections, and in the permanent collection of the Asheville Art Museum in Asheville and in the U.S. Department of State Art in Embassies collection, Karachi, Pakistan. She was recently nominated for the Louis Comfort Tiffany Foundation grant. Lemanski’s work has been featured in American Craft Magazine, Surface Design Journal, FiberARTS, VERVE and WNC Magazine. She has exhibited at the Kohler Arts Center, Wis.; Mint Museum of Craft+Design; Portland Museum of Art, Maine; Asheville Art Museum, and the Chautauqua Institution, N.Y. Lemanski is a former resident artist for both Penland School of Crafts and Ox-Bow Summer School of Art in Saugatuck, Mich. She currently resides in Spruce Pine.

Nava Lubelski Nava Lubelski was born and raised in New York City and lives currently in Asheville. Lubelski’s work has been shown in galleries and museums worldwide and was most recently on view at The Shelburne Museum, VT, The Powerhouse Museum, Australia and in galleries in New York, Toronto and Los Angeles. Her work can be found in the permanent collections of the Museum of Arts and Design in Manhattan, The Queens Museum of Art in Queens, N.Y. and the Henry Buhl collection. Her work has been reviewed in the New York Times, Los Angeles Times, Toronto’s Globe and Mail, Artforum, Boston Globe, ARTnews, and the Huffington Post, among others. Prior to receiving the North Carolina Arts Council Fellowship, Lubelski received grants from the Pollock-Krasner Foundation, CUE Art Foundation, the New York Foundation for the Arts and the Marie Walsh Sharpe Art Foundation. Lubelski received a degree in Russian Literature and History from Wesleyan University and spent a year as a student in Moscow, Russia.

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Sean Pace

Sean Pace is alive and his art is more alive than most. His constant experimentation with material, form, content and humor are expeditions that take the audience to the pipeline of creativity. In his work, it is apparent that beating limitations and defining the impossible are not only the ends of his means but they are the foundation of his nature. He often uses irony or sarcasm in his work to draw attention to all of the useful things people throw away, creating a visual commentary by combining art and engineering. His work has been shown at the Metals Museum in Memphis, Tenn. Also at SECCA in Winston-Salem for the opening of the NCNC (North Carolina New Contemporary) show of October of 2011. He received his bachelor’s degree from the University of North Carolina at Asheville.

Susan Harbage Page Susan Harbage Page has exhibited nationally and internationally including exhibits in Bulgaria, France, Italy, Israel and China. Her work can be found in many public and private collections including the Baltimore Museum of Art, the High Museum of Art, the Houston Museum of Fine Arts and the Israel Museum. Concurrently, her exploration of communities includes temporary public interventions and several municipal public art commissions that link place, history and community together including Crossing Over: A Floating Bridge, Brownsville, Texas and Matamoros, Mexico and Handmade, a municipal project for the Charlotte Area Transit System’s Light Rail Station. Her education includes a M.F.A. with a concentration in photography from the San Francisco Art Institute, as well as a bachelor’s and master’s degree in music (saxophone performance) from Michigan State University. She teaches studio art and women’s studies at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

Vita Plume Vita Plume sees portraits and patterns as holders of specific cultural information. She weaves and dyes patterns that, when merged on a digital Jacquard loom with portraits she selects, create ghostly distortions of both the portrait and the patterns. She uses these contortions to explore and expand on the instability of visual and cultural identity. Plume is an associate professor at North Carolina State University’s College of Design in Raleigh. She received her bachelor’s and master’s degrees from Nova Scotia College of Art and Design in Halifax, Canada.

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Shoko Teruyama Shoko Teruyama grew up in Mishima, Japan. She earned a B.A. in education and taught elementary school two years before coming to the United States to study art at the University of Nebraska at Lincoln in 1997. Shoko received her M.F.A. in ceramics in the fall of 2005 from Wichita State University. She finished a three-year residency at the Penland School of Crafts in 2008 and is now a studio artist in Marshall. Shoko’s hand-built work is made of earthenware with white slip and sgraffito decoration. She has developed a cast of characters based in experience with human relations. As the characters interact, Shoko wants the viewer to find their own stories. The work is seemingly whimsical, but reveals itself to be something more devious and interesting.

Bob Trotman Bob Trotman was born in Winston-Salem in 1947. He received a B.A. in philosophy from Washington and Lee University and for 35 years has maintained a studio in the foothills of western North Carolina. Self-taught in art, he has received two National Endowment of the Arts (NEA) grants and four grants from the North Carolina Arts Council. His work is in the permanent collections of the Renwick Gallery, Smithsonian Institution, The Virginia Museum of Fine Arts, The North Carolina Museum of Art, The Weatherspoon Museum of Art, The Mint Museum of Art, The Museum of Art of the Rhode Island School of Design, and The Museum of Art and Design in New York, among others.

Linda Vista 1960 - 4th grade fervently praying to God every night: “Please let me draw as good as Kathy and Peggy.” 1972 - awarded B.F.A., School of the Art Institute of Chicago, painting/printmaking 1983 - began a successful career selling monoprints and collages to the corporate art market 1999 - moved to North Carolina totally burned out on corporate art market; began 3D assemblage work 2001 - stopped selling work; reclaimed art exclusively as a personal endeavor 2010 - awarded a NC Arts Council Artist Fellowship Grant; began larger scale outdoor pieces 2011 - broke ground on the LindaLand art garden environment 47


EXHIBITION CHECKLIST Elizabeth Brim Fragment

Forged, inflated and fabricated steel with nylon fiber 2012 8” H x 12” W x 15” D Photo credit: Mary Vogel

Lafayette

Forged and welded steel with bass wood 2012 42” H x 14” W x 9” D Photo credit: Mary Vogel

Miss Wilmott’s Ghost

Forged and fabricated steel and stainless steel mesh 2010 32” H x 24” W x 48” D Photo courtesy of the artist

Steel Heels

Forged and fabricated steel 2010 4” H x 3.5” W x 8” D each Photo credit: Mary Vogel

Tallons

Forged and fabricated steel 2010 120” H x 12” W x 10” D Photo credit: Mary Vogel

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Phoebe Brush SPITTY

13 Minute Video SPITTY, a home movie in eight tracks, is a short film about a father and his daughters making music, making family. Still photo credit: Phoebe Brush

TOGETHER

2 Minute Video TOGETHER is a (very) short video about teaming up. Still photo credit: Phoebe Brush

YUCCA MTN TALLY

25 minute DVD (rough cut presentation) 2011-2012 YUCCA MTN TALLY is a desert meditation on nuclear waste and the narrative boundaries of deep time. Part-documentary, part-disembodied essay on mortality, endeavor and magical thinking, the film is work-in-progress and is slated for completion in the fall of 2012. Still photo credit: Beatty, Nevada Historical Society *This work is not featured within the exhibition but is a part of a special presentation designed for in-progress discussion and audience feedback.

Kirk Fanelly A Little After Midnight

Oil on canvas 2011 On loan from the Collection of Cindy Anderson and Sir Purr 20” H x 28” W x 1” D Photo credit: Kirk Fanelly

Cubby

Paper collage on panel 2009 48” H x 31” W x 1” D Photo credit: Kirk Fanelly

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Man Carrying Fuel Container Paper collage and flashe vinyl on panel 2012 90” H x 40” W x 2” D Photo credit: Kirk Fanelly

Self Portrait as Dictator

Pastel on paper 2011 On loan from the Collection of Bob Peterson 30” H x 15” W x 1” D Photo credit: Kirk Fanelly

The Legend of the Appalachian Dogboy Oil on linen 2011 10” H x 14” W x 1” D Photo credit: Kirk Fanelly

Tough Times: No, No, No Tough Times Here, It’s Not What It Looks Like! Oil on canvas (Triptych-Tough Times Series) 2012 30” H x 22” W x 1” D Photo credit: Kirk Fanelly

Tough Times: Drunk (again)

Oil on canvas (Triptych-Tough Times Series) 2012 30” H x 22” W x 1” D Photo credit: Kirk Fanelly

Tough Times: The Evicted

Oil on canvas (Triptych-Tough Times Series) 2012 30” H x 22” W x 1” D Photo credit: Kirk Fanelly

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Gail Fredell Glacial Point

Cherry, soft maple and steel 2011 33” H x 64” W x 12” D Photo credit: Steve Mann Photography, Asheville Work courtesy of the Blue Spiral Gallery, Asheville

Spud Point

White oak - natural and pickled finish, painted ash with steel details 2012 33” H x 12” W x 55” D Photo credit: Steve Mann Photography, Asheville Work courtesy of the Blue Spiral Gallery, Asheville

Maja Godlewska Fasola, Un Bel Composto Series

Acrylics, inks, and gold leaf on linen 2011 This body of work was supported in part by: Arts and Science Council Grant/CharlotteMecklenburg, Faculty Research Grant (UNC Charlotte) and North Carolina Arts Council Fellowship 96” H x 72” W x 2” D Photo credit: Maja Godlewska

Forma, Un Bel Composto Series

Acrylics, heat transfer print on poly mesh, chalk paint, inks and gold leaf on canvas 2009 This body of work was supported in part by: Arts and Science Council Grant/CharlotteMecklenburg, Faculty Research Grant (UNC Charlotte) and North Carolina Arts Council Fellowship 96” H x 72” W x 2” D Photo credit: Maja Godlewska

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Green, Un Bel Composto Series

Heat transfer on poly mesh, inks, silver leaf and chalk paint on linen 2010 This body of work was supported in part by: Arts and Science Council Grant/CharlotteMecklenburg, Faculty Research Grant (UNC Charlotte) and North Carolina Arts Council Fellowship 72” H x 96” W x 2” D Photo credit: Maja Godlewska

Pink Tygrys, Un Bel Composto Series

Heat transfer on poly mesh, inks, gold leaf and chalk paint on linen 2011 This body of work was supported in part by: Arts and Science Council Grant/CharlotteMecklenburg, Faculty Research Grant (UNC Charlotte) and North Carolina Arts Council Fellowship 72” H x 96” W x 2” D Photo credit: Maja Godlewska

Pinsel Putti, Un Bel Composto Series

Acrylics, heat transfer print on poly mesh, chalk paint, inks and gold leaf on canvas 2010 This body of work was supported in part by: Arts and Science Council Grant/CharlotteMecklenburg, Faculty Research Grant (UNC Charlotte) and North Carolina Arts Council Fellowship 96” H x 72” W x 2” D Photo credit: Maja Godlewska

Christopher Holmes Fence Dogs

16mm/35mm Stills/DV- 10 minutes 2004 A man’s quest to find a lost dog exposes the squalid state of a Southern town in the wake of a decimating fire. In attempting to salvage his last surviving link to a deceased brother, our protagonist discovers that he has lost more than he ever imagined. Oreo was a good dog, but even he could sense the fences. Director/Producer/Editor/Writer/Cinematography: Christopher Holmes Music: Jeffrey Seelye Narrator: Frank Levering Still photo credit: Christopher Holmes

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Sapsucker

DV- 12 Minutes 2009 One man’s determination to track down a rare woodpecker wreaking havoc on his house puts him on the warpath. What he discovers in his pursuit is an ecology of sight and sound that defies every natural property he’s ever trusted and an environment far more surreal than he’d bargained for. Sapsucker interweaves bird footage from Cornell University’s Lab of Ornithology with live action to forge a delirious vision of ultimate justice, raising questions of the fundamental faith we place in our corporeal senses and the ephemeral laws of nature and property possession we cultivate to make them real. Christopher Holmes: Director/Producer/Cinematographer/Editor/Writer Phillip Ward as Emitt Still photo credit: Christopher Holmes

Mark Iwinski Academic Freedom: This Was Now Series

Photographic superimposition over existing architecture made on site using 8” x 10” transparency of historical photographic image from 1905 of President Teddy Roosevelt speaking from his train in front of the Trinity College, Durham. 2012 17” H x 22” W x .25” D Photo credit: Amanda Getty/Troy Tuttle

Caudex

Handmade book, stump prints and ink on Kozo paper with linen thread binding 2012 5” H x 39” W x 78” D (open book) Photo credit: Mark Iwinski

Fairview: Terrains of Absence Series

Photographic superimposition over existing architecture made on site using 8” x 10” transparency of historical photographic image of old Duke Mansion, razed 1920’s, Durham. 2012 40” H x 60” W x .25” D Photo credit: Mark Iwinski

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Five Forks: This Was Now Series

Photographic superimposition over existing architecture made on site using 8” x 10” transparency of historical photographic image of old Five Forks showing old Durham Library and trolleys, Durham. 2011-12 40” H x 60” W x .25” D Photo credit: Amanda Getty/Troy Tuttle

Old Pennsylvania Railroad Station from West 31st Street: Terrains of Absence

Photographic superimposition made over existing architecture on site using 8” x 10” transparency of historical photographic image of the old Pennsylvania Railroad Station, New York City. 2009 17” H x 22” W x .25” D Photo credit: Mark Iwinski

Old Pennsylvania Railroad Station from West 33rd Street: Terrains of Absence

Photographic superimposition over existing architecture made on site using 8” x 10” transparency of historical photographic image of the old Pennsylvania Railroad Station, New York City. 2009 17” H x 22” W x .25” D Photo credit: Mark Iwinski

Silenced, Academy of Music: Terrains of Absence Series

Photographic superimposition over existing architecture made on site using 8” x 10” transparency of historical photographic image of the old Academy of Music, razed 1920’s, Durham. 2011-12 40” H x 60” W x .25” D Photo credit: Amanda Getty/Troy Tuttle

Threshold: This Was Now Series

Photographic superimposition over existing architecture made on site using 8” x 10” transparency of historical photographic image of original entrance to Trinity College, Durham. 2012 60” H x 40” W x .25” D Photo credit: Amanda Getty/Troy Tuttle

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Tower Struck Down: Terrains of Absence Series

Photographic superimposition over existing architecture made on site using 8” x 10” transparency of historical photographic image of tower ruins of the old Washington Duke Hall of Trinity College, Durham. 2012 40” H x 60” W x .25” D Photo credit: Amanda Getty/Troy Tuttle

Young Kim Salt & Earth

Granular salt, red clay powder, porcelain bowls with honey, cotton and wine 2009 36” H x 36” W x 3” D (each) Photo credit: Amanda Getty/Troy Tuttle

Anne Lemanski 21st Century Super Species: Jack-Dor

Copper rod, birch veneer, Rowlux and artificial sinew 2010 8’” H x 10’” W x 4’” D Photo credit: Steve Mann Photography, Asheville

Furadan Feline (panthero leo leo - African lion)

Copper rod, archival inkjet paper, “shuka” fabric and artificial sinew 2009 24” H x 21” W x 21” D Photo credit: Steve Mann Photography, Asheville

SENKWEKWE (gorilla beringei beringei - mountain gorilla) Copper rod, archival inkjet paper, leather and artificial sinew 2009 26” H x 13” W x 17” D Photo credit: Steve Mann Photography, Asheville

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Nava Lubelski 003

Thread on stained canvas with double stretchers 2010 24” H x 24” W x 3” D Photo credit: Amanda Getty/Troy Tuttle Work courtesy of the Luis de Jesus Los Angeles, Calif.

All Better Never Done

Thread on stained blanket 2011 91” H x 45” W x 3” D Photo credit: Amanda Getty/Troy Tuttle Work courtesy of the Luis de Jesus Los Angeles, Calif.

Epic

Thread on stained canvas 2010 24” H x 24” W x 1.5” D Photo credit: Amanda Getty/Troy Tuttle

First Cavalry

Machine embroidered fabric and hand stitching 2011 First Cavalry is a piece created from a factory reject, where a series of machineembroidered patches, intended for army uniforms, were “ruined” by a malfunctioning piece of equipment. The piece is an exploration of rehabilitating these remnants as a work of Pop Art, highlighting and enjoying the imperfections in pattern and repetition and the magic of chance. 108” H x 95” W x .5” D Photo credit: Amanda Getty/Troy Tuttle Work courtesy of the LMAK Projects, New York, N.Y.

Gone

Stitching on antique chair 2011 35” H x 21” W x 21” D Photo credit: Amanda Getty/Troy Tuttle Work courtesy of the LMAK Projects, New York, N.Y.

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Remains of the Night

Thread on stained tablecloth 2011 Remains of the Night is a tablecloth marked by its use over many years, and specifically by a single evening’s meal among friends. The marks of spill and stain are embroidered and made permanent, transforming accident into intention, memorializing fragments of seemingly insignificant experience. 68” H x 70” W x .5” D Photo credit: Amanda Getty/Troy Tuttle Work courtesy of the Luis de Jesus Los Angeles, Calif.

Sean Pace Chicken Shooter

Found objects 2007 87” H x 76” W x 96” D Photo credit: Amanda Getty/Troy Tuttle

National Defense Authorization Act

Paper and wood 2012 12’ H x 16’ W Photo credit: Amanda Getty/Troy Tuttle

Perishable Goods

Wood and steel 2012 18’ H x 7’ W x 3’ D Photo credit: Amanda Getty/Troy Tuttle

Saloon Doors I and II

Glass and steel 2012 4’ H x 4’ W x 2” D Photo credit: Amanda Getty/Troy Tuttle

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Susan Harbage Page Inner Tube, Path and Bugs, Laredo, Texas from the U.S.- Mexico Border Project (2007-present) Archival Digital Photograph 2011 42” H x 61” W x .25” D Photo credit: Susan Harbage Page

Red Shirt in River, San Ignacio, Texas from the U.S.- Mexico Border Project (2007-present) Archival Digital Photograph 2011 42” H x 61” W x .25” D Photo credit: Susan Harbage Page

Vita Plume 56 of 158 Fallen Canadian Soldiers (Afghanistan April 18, 2002 – Oct. 29, 2011)

Cotton, polyolefin, handwoven on digital TC-1 loom, and woven, dyed shibori 2010-2012 Studio Assistants: Gabrielle Duggan & Katelyn Sexton. Woven with the support of the North Carolina Arts Council, Artists Fellowship (2010). Cotton donated by: Cotton Inc. 6.5” H x 10” W x .5” D (each) Photo credit: Amanda Getty/Troy Tuttle

Doris Ulmann Series (#4978): Miss Georgia Duffield, Weaver, Gatlinburg Tenn.

Cotton, polyolefin and woven shibori. Machine woven at Oriole Mill, Hendersonville. 2012 Funded by: The Oriole Mill and United Arts Council of Raleigh & Wake County. These two following works are based on the photographs of Doris Ulmann (1882-1934) taken during her visits to the southeast (N.C., S.C., Ky. & Tenn.) to document the diversity of people living in the area. The original photographs are in the Collection of Berea College, Ky. 71” H x 57” W x .5” D Photo credit: Amanda Getty/Troy Tuttle

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Doris Ulmann Series (#872): Mrs. Heyden Hensley & John, Brasstown, N.C.

Cotton, polyolefin, and woven shibori 2012 Studio Assistant: Gabrielle Duggan. These two following works are based on the photographs of Doris Ulmann (1882-1934) taken during her visits to the southeast (North Carolina, South Carolina, Kentucky, and Tennessee) to document the diversity of people living in the area. The original photographs are in the Collection of Berea College, Ky. 60” H x 37” W x .5” D Photo credit: Amanda Getty/Troy Tuttle

James Galanos II

Cotton, polyolefin and dyed, woven shibori 2011 26” H x 46” W x .5” D Photo credit: Amanda Getty/Troy Tuttle

Shoko Teruyama Crow Woman with Pig (commemorative plate) Handbuilt earthenware with sgraffito decoration 2011 12” H x 12” W x 3” D Photo credit: Amanda Getty/Troy Tuttle

Fish Woman with Sushi (commemorative plate) Handbuilt earthenware with sgraffito decoration 2011 12” H x 12” W x 3” D Photo credit: Matt Kelleher

Goat Woman (commemorative plate)

Handbuilt earthenware with sgraffito decoration 2011 12” H x 12” W x 3” D Photo credit: Amanda Getty/Troy Tuttle

Occupy (platter)

Handbuilt earthenware with sgraffito decoration 2011 18” H x 18” W x 4” D Photo credit: Amanda Getty/Troy Tuttle 59


Owl

Handbuilt earthenware with sgraffito decoration 18” H x 12” W x 9” D Photo credit: Amanda Getty/Troy Tuttle

Raven

Handbuilt earthenware with sgraffito decoration 20” H x 9” W x 15” D Photo credit: Amanda Getty/Troy Tuttle

Bob Trotman Double Portrait of John

Wood, tempera, wax and steel 2006 25” H x 25” W x 14” D Photo credit: Bob Trotman

Jane

Wood, tempera and wax 2008 50” H x 37” W x 19” D Photo credit: Bob Trotman

Large Bust of John

Wood, tempera, nails and wax 2007 33” H x 36” W x 16” D Photo credit: Bob Trotman

Linda Vista Alien BFF’s

Metal, mirrors and found objects 2011 53” H x 14” W x 11” D Photo credit: Amanda Getty/Troy Tuttle

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Amy Winehouse Memorial Birdhouse

Mirror, ceramic mosaic, zip ties, gutter guard and found objects 2011 67” H x 17” W x 14” D Photo credit: Amanda Getty/Troy Tuttle

Chickens in Eden

Mirror, ceramic mosaic and found objects 2011 31” H x 15” W x 7” D (figure); 17” H x 15” W x 6” D (chicken #1); 16” H x 12” W x 8” D (chicken #2) Photo credit: Amanda Getty/Troy Tuttle

Holy Cow

Found objects 2011 24” H x 24” W x 7” D Photo credit: Amanda Getty/Troy Tuttle

King Midas

Mirror, ceramic mosaic and found objects 2011 31” H x 18” W x 7” D Photo credit: Amanda Getty/Troy Tuttle

Lawn Chair

Artificial turf, and vintage metal lawn chair 2011 35” H x 21” W x 34” D Photo credit: Amanda Getty/Troy Tuttle

Plot Box

Metal, mirrors and found objects 2006 7” H x 7” W x 6.75” D Photo credit: Amanda Getty/Troy Tuttle

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Portrait of the Artist as a Young Girl

Mirror mosaic, window screening and found objects 2011 36” H x 19” W x 8” D Photo credit: Amanda Getty/Troy Tuttle

Post Pagan Churchlady Urn

Feathers and found objects 2011 13” H x 8” W x 8” D Photo credit: Amanda Getty/Troy Tuttle

St. Francis of 35th Street

Mirror, ceramic mosaic and found objects 2011 32” H x 28” W x 7” D Photo credit: Amanda Getty/Troy Tuttle

The Little Sparrow Bird

Mirror, ceramic mosaic, tin foil and found objects 2011 69” H x 22” W x 14” D Photo credit: Amanda Getty/Troy Tuttle

Thorny Issue

Gourd, metal and dye 2001 10” H x 8” W x 8” D Photo credit: Amanda Getty/Troy Tuttle

Wall Totem

Found objects and feathers 2009-2010 76” H x 22” W x 9” D Photo credit: Amanda Getty/Troy Tuttle

Woodland Nympho

Mirror, ceramic mosaic, zip tie, and gutter guard 2011 70” H x 17” W x 18” D Photo credit: Amanda Getty/Troy Tuttle 62


ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS This project was supported by the North Carolina Arts Council, a division of the N.C. Department of Cultural Resources, with funding from the National Endowment for the Arts. The North Carolina Arts Council Artist Fellowship Award Exhibition could not have been realized without the generous support of the following individuals and organizations: The North Carolina Arts Council (NCAC) All of the staff of the NCAC Mary B. Regan Jeff Pettus Rebecca Moore N.C. Department of Cultural Resources National Endowment for the Arts

2010-11 Grant Panelists: Craft Annie Carlano, director, Mint Museum of Craft & Design, Charlotte; Sonya Clark, chair, Department of Craft and Material Studies, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, and Mark Hewitt, ceramist, Pittsboro.

Film Linnea Beyer, director of film, The Light Factory, Charlotte; Portia Cobb, associate professor in film, University of Wisconsin-Madison, and Josh Gibson, associate director of the Duke University Program in the Arts of the Moving Image, Durham.

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Visual Arts Lia Newman, director of programs and exhibitions, Artspace, Raleigh; Ce Scott, director of residencies and exhibitions, McColl Center for Visual Art, Charlotte, and Mark Sloan, director and senior curator, Halsey Institute of Contemporary Art, College of Charleston.

At the Turchin Center for the Visual Arts: Hank T. Foreman, associate vice chancellor for university communications and cultural affairs director and chief curator Brook Bower, assistant curator Sandra Black, director of administration Cassie McDowell, visitor and donor services director Megan Stage, marketing and public relations manager Neil Coleman, exhibitions coordinator LaTanya Afolayan, director of development Pegge DeLaney Laine, education outreach Sytiva Perry, housekeeping Lona Woodring, housekeeping HannaH Crowell, Chris Everhart, Ben Jackson, Carolyn Rein - installation assistants

At Appalachian State University: University Communications Megan Hayes, director of marketing Sarah McBryde, graphic designer Troy Tuttle, university photographer Amanda Getty, photography assistant

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Lenders and Colleagues: Blue Spiral 1, Asheville, (Jordan Ahlers, gallery director) DocuSource, Raleigh, (Adam Kaderabek) LMAKprojects, New York, N.Y. (Bart Keijsers Koning) Luis De Jesus Los Angeles, Calif. (Luis de Jesus) Kate Cahow Bob Peterson Cindy Anderson and Sir Purr

The Artists: Elizabeth Brim Phoebe Brush Kirk Fanelly Gail Fredell Maja Godlewska Christopher Holmes Mark Iwinski Young Kim Anne Lemanski Nava Lubelski Sean Pace Susan Harbage Page Vita Plume Shoko Teruyama Bob Trotman Linda Vista 66


North Carolina Arts Council Artist Fellowship Award Exhibition 2012 Catalog  

Winner: GDUSA American Design Award 2013

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