An Appalachian Summer Festival 2016 Playbill

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AN APPALACHIAN SUMMER FESTIVAL ON AND AROUND THE CAMPUS OF APPALACHIAN STATE UNIVERSITY, BOONE, NC


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SUNDAY

MONDAY

JUNE 27

Theatre Bus Trip:

TCVA WORKSHOP BEGINS:

Time Travel Page 27

Davidson Community Players

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TUESDAY

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WEDNESDAY

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THURSDAY

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6 WEICHOLZ GLOBAL FILM SERIES:

Difret Page 29

Broyhill Chamber Ensemble Page 31

LUNCH & LEARN Marietta Patricia Leis & David Vogel

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REDUCED SHAKESPEARE COMPANY:

Gerard Schwarz, Music Director

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12 WEICHOLZ GLOBAL FILM SERIES:

TCVA WORKSHOP BEGINS:

Exploring the Modern World through Art Page 27

The Dinner

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LUNCH & LEARN

On the Way to School

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Page 24

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Rosen-Schaffel Appalachian Competition for Energy Summit Young and Keynote Address with Emerging Artists Bill McKibben Page 54

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WEICHOLZ GLOBAL FILM SERIES:

Baba Joon Page 61

Page 59

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SCHAEFER POPULAR SERIES EVENT

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Broyhill Chamber Ensemble

COMMUNITY ARTS EVENT:

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Sugar Grove Music Fest

3 Hearts

Symphony by the Lake at Chetola

LUNCH & LEARN

Around the World We Go & Moving Pieces

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IN/VISIBLE THEATRE PRESENTS:

Bettie Bond & Eric Plaag Page 27

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3 WEICHOLZ GLOBAL FILM SERIES:

Tangerines Page 89

Beth Davidson Page 27

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RIOULT Dance NY with the Broyhill Chamber Ensemble

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Mauzy

YOUNG PEOPLE’S FILM:

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Mauzy

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Belle and Sébastian Page 24

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LUNCH & LEARN

29 IN/VISIBLE THEATRE PRESENTS:

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AUGUST 1

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Building Sculpture, Building Community

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LUNCH & LEARN

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30th Rosen Sculpture Walk

COMMUNITY ARTS EVENT:

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WEICHOLZ GLOBAL FILM SERIES:

TCVA WORKSHOPS BEGIN:

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Pat Benatar & Neil Giraldo/ Melissa Etheridge

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Broyhill Chamber Ensemble

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Eliana Arenas

Pink Martini

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An Evening with Broadway Star Kelli O’Hara

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YOUNG PEOPLE’S FILM:

SCHAEFER POPULAR SERIES EVENT

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SCHAEFER POPULAR SERIES EVENT

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Karen Sabo & Derek Davidson

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William Shakespeare’s REDUCED Long Lost First Play SHAKESPEARE COMPANY: Page 37 William Shakespeare’s YOUNG PEOPLE’S FILM: Long Lost First Play Oddball & the Page 37 Penguins

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Eastern Festival Orchestra

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Summer Exhibition Celebration

Labyrinth of Lies 5

SATURDAY

TURCHIN CENTER FOR THE VISUAL ARTS

WEICHOLZ GLOBAL FILM SERIES:

INDEPENDENCE DAY

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JULY 1

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FRIDAY

Marie’s Story Page 24

Trombone Shorty & Orleans Avenue Page 81

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YOUNG PEOPLE’S FILM:

SCHAEFER POPULAR SERIES EVENT

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COMMUNITY ARTS EVENT:

First Friday Art Crawl

SCHAEFER POPULAR SERIES EVENT

Jerry Douglas Band with special guest Mipso Page 91


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AN APPALACHIAN SUMMER FESTIVAL 2016 CORPORATE AND MEDIA SPONSORS: CORPORATE SPONSORS:

WESTGLOW RESORT & SPA

MCDONALD’S OF BOONE

GOODNIGHT BROTHERS

PEABODY’S WINE & BEER MERCHANTS

COURTYARD MARRIOTT

BLUE RIDGE ELECTRIC MEMBERSHIP CORPORATION

NORTHERN TRUST COMPANY

MAST GENERAL STORE

SKYBEST COMMUNICATIONS, INC. COUNTRY INN & SUITES QUALITY INN & SUITES

(a wholly-owned subsidiary of SkyLine Membership Corporation)

CHETOLA RESORT AT BLOWING ROCK

PANORAMIC HOSPITALITY

BOONE FORD-LINCOLN

THE UNIVERSITY BOOKSTORE

NATIONAL ENDOWMENT FOR THE ARTS

BOONE AREA VISITORS BUREAU

HOLIDAY INN EXPRESS

CREEKSIDE ELECTRONICS, INC.

NORTH CAROLINA ARTS COUNCIL

MEDIA SPONSORS: WBTV (Charlotte, NC) WCYB (Bristol, VA/TN) CHARTER SPECTRUM WINSTON-SALEM JOURNAL GREENSBORO NEWS & RECORD WNC MAGAZINE

OLDIES 100.7FM/HIGHWAY 106.1 FM WHKY 1290 AM (Hickory, NC) WDAV 89.9 FM (Davidson, NC) WFDD 88.5 FM (Winston-Salem, NC) WASU 90.5 FM (Boone, NC) HIGH COUNTRY 365 (Boone, NC)


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ABOUT AN APPALACHIAN SUMMER FESTIVAL Presented by Appalachian State University’s Office of Arts & Cultural Programs, this annual celebration of the performing and visual arts is held every July in venues across the university campus, and features an eclectic mix of music, dance, theatre, visual arts and film programming. An Appalachian Summer Festival began in 1984 as a chamber music series, and retains strong roots in classical music, combined with a variety of other programming geared to almost every artistic taste and preference. Celebrating its 32nd season in 2016, the festival has risen in stature to become one of the nation’s most highly respected summer festivals, acclaimed for the breadth and quality of its artistic programming. With an audience of 27,000, the festival has been named one of the “Top Twenty Events in the Southeast” by the Southeast Tourism Society.

Festival Mission An Appalachian Summer Festival is an annual arts festival presenting and producing programs in music, theatre, dance, film and visual arts. The festival forges a unique national identity through artistic excellence, innovative programming, commissioning new works, educational opportunities, and by bringing the most accomplished and respected creative and performing artists from around the world to the Appalachian State University community. Founded on the principle of promoting young American artists, the festival supports the overall university mission, enhances the cultural life of the Appalachian community through affordable access to its programs, serves as an important gateway onto the campus, and promotes the economic development of our region.

Festival Vision: Artistic Excellence, Innovation and Engagement In keeping with its status as a university-based arts program, the festival continually seeks to enlighten and educate– a focus reflected in such initiatives as the festival's discounts for children's tickets, school coupons and ticket prices that are typically 30-40% lower than prices for comparable events in other venues. A rich variety of educational opportunities is part of the festival schedule each summer, including exhibitions, lectures, tours, workshops, student internships and employment opportunities for young people seeking experience in arts presenting. These experiences offer opportunities for lifelong learning and meaningful engagement with the arts. The festival holds central the belief that access to a strong and dynamic programming in the performing and visual arts is an important component of a vital and healthy community.


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FOUNDERS SOCIETY On July 22, 2000, the university created a Founders Society to recognize the supporters whose vision, generosity and hard work helped build An Appalachian Summer Festival. The festival owes its success in large part to these extraordinary individuals.

CHARTER MEMBERS BERGE H. and MELINÉ A. MARKARIAN BUDD and NANETTE MAYER ARNOLD P. and MURIEL S. ROSEN MARTIN L. and DORIS B. ROSEN ROBERT and MINNIE SNEAD J. BERNARD and SHIRLEY S. SPECTOR ROBERT L. and LILLIAN A. TURCHIN

THE BROYHILL FAMILY FOUNDATION:

J. EDGAR and SATIE H. BROYHILL JAMES T. and LOUISE R. BROYHILL PAUL H. and FAYE A. BROYHILL WILLARD A. and BETTIE B. GORTNER ROBERT E. and ALLENE B. HEILMAN ROBERT G. and MARIAM CANNON HAYES ARMFIELD and RACHEL RIVERS COFFEY

2002 MEMBERS JOHN E. and FAYE B. COOPER BUDDY and CHARLOTTE HALPERT FLORENCE R. HECHT

D. GRADY MORETZ JR. and REBA SMITH MORETZ PETER and JONI WEBB PETSCHAUER

2013 MEMBERS CONNIE ADAMS BONNIE AND JAMIE SCHAEFER

2015 MEMBERS FRANK AND KAY BORKOWSKI DOUG AND TERESA JOHNSON RALPH AND VENDA LERCH

RALPH GLASER JR. AND JOHN A. PFEIFER NEIL AND NANCY SCHAFFEL MARK AND NANCY TAFEEN

AN APPALACHIAN SUMMER FESTIVAL ADVISORY BOARD The Festival Advisory Board provides critical leadership for An Appalachian Summer Festival by offering overall guidance, fundraising assistance, programming ideas and long-term direction for the festival. Advisory Board members are representative of the festival audience, and in many ways they serve as the festival’s “eyes and ears” in the community-providing valuable feedback to the staff regarding festival operations, and serving as advocates and community ambassadors for the university and the festival. We wish to thank our board members for the leadership, skills, expertise and commitment they bring to this important role. NICK FRIEDMAN Chair LYNN EISENBERG Vice Chair HOWARD BRAFMAN WENDY BRENNER NATALIE BROYHILL WHITNEY BURNS SUE CHASE LISA COOPER BEN HENDERSON JOAN KEELE VENDA LERCH JANE LONON SUSAN LUTZ JOSEPH MILLER

DANIEL MITCHUM ALLEN MOSELEY MARK MOSKOWITZ PETER PETSCHAUER STEVEN C. PRICE CHRIS ROBBINS JAMIE SCHAEFER NEIL SCHAFFEL SUSAN SHANE AUTUMN SIMMONS SANDI FINCI SOLOMON KEITH STONEMAN MARK TAFEEN SHELLEY TARBUTTON

WRIGHT TILLEY HELENE WEICHOLZ RENEE WHITENER

EX-OFFICIO MEMBERS: Vice Chancellor for University Advancement

SUSAN PETTYJOHN Senior Associate Vice Chancellor for Advancement and Chief Communications Officer

HANK FOREMAN Dean, Hayes School of Music

WILLIAM L. PELTO Director, Office of Arts and Cultural Programs

DENISE RINGLER


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FRIENDS OF AN APPALACHIAN SUMMER FESTIVAL Volunteer Coordinator:

CYN D. WEAVER Supervisors:

BILL BARBOUR, MARGOT BROWN-HAMPTON, CHRISTINE DAVE, JANA DUKE, DIANA LATENDRESSE, CARMEN PATELLA, JIMMY PITTMAN, MIRIAM PITTMAN, PAM WALKER FRANCINE BARR CAROL BROWN BILLIE JO BROWN ELIZABETH BUCHANAN BETH CARRIN KATHY COPLEY ELAINE CROWELL JIM CROWELL RUTH DAGGETT SANDY DAVIS JENNIFER DOTSON SANDRA FOLTS SUSAN GRAHAM MARGARET GREGOR KAREN GROSS SUSAN HAZLEWOOD BARBARA HUNSUCKER ROBIN HUNT JERRY HUTCHINS REBECCA HUTCHINS KAY ISENHOUR WENDY JESSEN LYNDA LASSETER ANITA LAYMON FAYE MATTHEWS JACKIE MCINTURFF AMBER MELLON RAY MORETZ SUSIE MORGAN CAMILLE NAPIER

SANDRA PERRY BRUCE PETTYJOHN HELEN PHILLIPS PHOEBE POLLITT PAULA PRESNELL JOANNE PULIATTI TERI REDDICK ANN RHYNE MIKE RHYNE MARTY RICE SUSIE ROBERTSON EDWARD ROBERTSON BARBARA ROBINSON JOHN ROGERS TISH ROKOSKE KITTY ROMIGER JAN ROWE TRACI ROYSTER MARRY RUPP DOROTHY SAGEL JOANIE SHIRLEY ROBERT SHIRLEY LYNNE SLASOR CAROL THOMPSON NANCI TOLBERT NANCE JERRY TRAUDT DUSTY WASHBURN RUTH WILLIAMS BARBARA WOODROW

An Appalachian Summer Festival is presented by the Division of University Advancement Vice Chancellor

SUSAN PETTYJOHN Senior Associate Vice Chancellor for Advancement and Chief Communications Officer

HANK T. FOREMAN

Director, Arts and Cultural Programs

DENISE RINGLER

SALES, MARKETING, MEMBERSHIP & DEVELOPMENT Director of Sales and Patron Relations, Arts and Cultural Programs

SARAH HEUSTESS

Director of Marketing and Public Relations, Arts & Cultural Programs

ANNA GAUGERT

Advertising Manager, Office of Cultural Affairs

SARAH MCBRYDE

Visitor and Donor Services Director, Turchin Center for the Visual Arts

NEALY ANDREWS Director of Development

AUDRA VAZ

ARTIST RELATIONS Director of Artist Relations, Arts and Cultural Programs

SALI GILL-JOHNSON

TECHNICAL MANAGEMENT Director of Technical and Production Services, Arts and Cultural Programs

SCOTT HAYNES

Lead Technician, Arts & Cultural Programs

CONOR MCKENZIE

ARTS EDUCATION & OUTREACH Director of Arts Education and Outreach, Office of Cultural Affairs

CHRISTY CHENAUSKY

Education and Outreach Coordinator, Turchin Center for the Visual Arts

PEGGE LAINE

ADMINISTRATION Director of Administration

SANDRA BLACK

Special Assistant, Associate Vice Chancellor for University Communications & Cultural Affairs

LINDSAY MILLER

VISUAL ARTS PROGRAMMING Director and Chief Curator, Turchin Center for the Visual Arts

HANK T. FOREMAN

Curator, Turchin Center for the Visual Arts

MARY ANNE REDDING

Lead Installer, Turchin Center for Visual Arts

CRAIG DILLENBECK


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REMEMBERING BUDD MAYER: This past spring, Appalachian State University and An Appalachian Summer Festival lost a beloved friend, leader, and long-time arts patron whose generosity, character, wisdom, and vision helped to foster the growth and the development of the summer festival for more than three decades. The Turchin Center for the Visual Arts, the Center for Judaic, Holocaust and Peace Studies and other areas across our campus has also been the beneficiaries of the Mayers’ support and generosity. The festival’s performance by Kelli O’Hara on Saturday, July 9th will be dedicated to the memory of this man who left an indelible impression on Appalachian State University and all who knew him. With many thanks to the Mayer Family, we are pleased to share the following biography.

STUDENT & TEMPORARY STAFF Artist Relations Assistants, Arts and Cultural Programs

KARAH SMITH (Dance Studies) HAYLEY HORTON (Elementary Education) Sales/Marketing Assistants, An Appalachian Summer Festival

BRIAN ARMSTRONG (Biology Education) ASHLEY CHILDERS (Nutrition) ABBY COCKERHAM (Management) SAVANNAH DRUM (Public Relations) DARIUS GREGORY (Theatre Performance and Dance Studies)

ADDIE HALL CHRISTINA O’BRIEN (Marketing) SMIT PATEL (Political Science) CARLIE PIERCE (Exercise Science) JASON SMITH (Exercise Science) MADISON VITERITO (Theatre Arts) Production Staff, An Appalachian Summer Festival

SHEA MCKISSACK (Music Industry Studies, Recording and Production)

JACOB BRITTAIN (Instrumental Music Education) HENRY NEAL (Music Industry Studies, Recording and Production)

CHRISTOPHER POPE (Music Industry Studies, Recording and Production)

CALLOWAY JONES (Music Industry Studies, Recording and Production)

TYLER PIETTE (Music Industry Studies, Recording and Production)

ROSS ROBINETTE (Music Education) ALEX LISOWSKI (2016 Alumni, Music Industry Studies, Recording and Production)

Budd Mayer passed away Friday May 13th having lived a magical life. He was born in Pittsburgh, Pa. and graduated from University of Pittsburgh. Following his graduation, he went to the Cleveland Playhouse and then on to New York to try his luck in the theater. His love of theater continued. Wartime changed all of that, and he went into Special Services in the Air Corps. Prior to serving, he met his future bride, Nanette, and they married on his return. While still serving in Washington D.C., they moved to Arlington, VA. This was the beginning of a career in the food industry. He was a forward thinking, creative original, and because of the lack of automobiles and the distance of grocery stores, he started the first mobile service to the communities. “Frosted Foods” was new to the market place; he converted a bus into a home delivery service calling it FROSTMOBILE. This was the first of his food business adventures. He became a Food Broker in Miami in 1951 as a one-man operator. This business grew to cover not only Florida but most of the eastern part of the country. He was known for his generous spirit both with his employees, friends and his beloved family. He was a strong competitor both in business, on the golf course and at the gin rummy table. One of his great joys was spending summers in the North Carolina mountains. His involvement with Appalachian State University resulted in an honorary doctorate. He was also honored by Lees McRae College in Banner Elk, N.C. for creating an advisory board for their summer theater program. He chaired that board for many years and had great joy in their productions. Most of all, he was kind, generous, respectful of all, and his greatest love was his family. He leaves behind his adoring wife, Nanette, daughter Riki Alexander, her son, Taro Alexander, son Robert Mayer and his wife Pat, their children, Andy, Daniel and Kevin Mayer, and eight precious great grand children. He will be missed by all who had the privilege of knowing and loving him.

JODHI MATHER-PIKE (Music Industry Studies, Recording and Production)

JOHN HARGETT (Music Industry Studies, Marketing and Promotion)

NIC PRESSLEY (Music Education) DYLAN PINKERTON (Southern Cross University (New South Wales, Australia), Contemporary Music)

JONATHON SALE (Music Composition and Theory) SAM ELIA (Music Industry Studies, Recording and Production)

Visual Arts Gallery & Exhibition Staff, Turchin Center for the Visual Arts

KENDALL ATWATER (Commercial Photography) CLAUDIA AUSLEY (Art Management) BETH DELEON (Art Education) MADISON ERICKSEN (Expressive Arts) MELLANEE GOODMAN (Art Management) BRANDON JACKOMIN (Criminal Justice, Art History)

KIMI KASTE (Studio Art, Graphic Design) RAVEN MOFFETT (Studio Art) DAVID VERTREES (Studio Art) JASON WRIGHT (Graphic Design) The Arts and Cultural Affairs staff wish to thank our colleagues in University Communications for the exceptional photography, design, web and video production work they provide An Appalachian Summer Festival.


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BECOME A SUPPORTER! Artistic excellence, accessibility, and audience engagement are elements that make An Appalachian Summer Festival unique among arts festivals. But quality arts programming is expensive, and because the festival is committed to maintaining affordable ticket prices, revenues from ticket sales cover only 43% of the festival’s costs. Private support must fill the gap, thereby ensuring a continued commitment to both quality programming and affordable ticket pricing. We are extraordinarily fortunate that our community embraces the arts so passionately, and that festival donors have chosen to support An Appalachian Summer Festival so generously. This loyal annual support is the critical element in sustaining the artistic quality of the festival, enabling it to thrive for three decades. If you are not a current festival donor, we hope you will consider making a tax-deductible gift or pledge. Visit our website at appsummer.org/supporters, call 828.262.6084, ext. 105 or inquire at the ticket counter.

FESTIVAL REVENUE

57 percent of festival expenses must be covered by critical private support Your support will make it possible to build the audiences of tomorrow, showcase rising artists, raise national visibility and public awareness of the festival and continue to present the “best of the best!�

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LIFETIME CUMULATIVE FESTIVAL SUPPORT: Since the festival’s inception in 1984, many individuals, corporations and foundations have made significant contributions to the creation and growth of An Appalachian Summer Festival. This list recognizes their cumulative commitments. $1,000,000 AND ABOVE

Blue Ridge Electric Membership Corporation Arnold & Muriel Rosen/Rosen-Schaffel Endowment for Classical Music Programming Rowland’s & Westglow Resort & Spa/The Bonnie and Jamie Schaefer Family Foundation

$500,000 - $999,999

The Broyhill Family Foundation Mr. Paul H. Broyhill The Cannon Foundation, Inc.

Mariam Cannon Hayes Nanette & Budd Mayer Martin & Doris Rosen

$250,000 - $499,999

Mr. & Mrs. John Cooper/ Mast General Store Ford Motor Company

McDonald’s of Boone/ Venda Lerch Northern Trust Company Robert and Lillian Turchin

The Max & Victoria Dreyfus Foundation, Inc. Mr. & Mrs. Willard A. Gortner Anthony & Deborah di Santi Mrs. Florence Hecht, Neal & Isabelle Amdur, & the Flagler & Naples-Fort Myers Greyhound Tracks

Joan & Bernie Keele/Storie Street Grille Mr. & Mrs. Roger Michelson National Endowment for the Arts North Carolina Arts Council Joni & Peter Petschauer R.Y. & Eileen L. Sharpe Foundation

Michael & Judy Adler Allen Wealth Management, LLC Appalachian Hospitality Management Barbara & George Ball Hanes & Lida Boren/ Footsloggers Outdoor & Travel Outfitters Boone Area Visitors Bureau/Town of Boone Boone Ford-Lincoln Sen. & Mrs. James T. Broyhill Mr. & Mrs. Keith Cloyed Appalachian Ski Mountain/ The Moretz Family Drs. William & Sally Atkins Frank & Kay Borkowski Wendy & Mike Brenner Kathleen Price Bryan Family Fund Mr. & Mrs. Arthur Courshon Byrdie & Ed Denison Dewoolfson Down Products Susan & Harvey Durham Ted & Adrienne Finkel The Friedman Family: Ingrid, Mary & Nick Mr. Jim Furman – Wendy’s of Boone Dr. & Mrs. Lowell Furman Mr. & Mrs. Robert F. Gilley Homer & Margie Barrett William & Linda Blanton Blue Ridge Mountain Club Charter Communications, Inc. Sue & Steve Chase Cheap Joe’s Art Stuff, Inc. Creekside Electronics Helen Clabough Foundation Alan & Sally Cone Crestwood Resort & Spa Dr. Pamelia S. Cromer Deer Valley Racquet Club Dianne Davant Interiors Foundation of Jewish Philanthropies Ralph Glaser, Jr. & John A. Pfeifer Mr. & Mrs. Julian Good Mr. & Mrs. Harold Granoff The Bruce J. Heim Foundation

$100,000 - $249,999

$50,000 - $99,999

Armfield & Rachel Coffey A.J. Fletcher Foundation Lawrence & Barbara Freiman J.C. Goodnight William S. Goodnight Goodnight Brothers Produce, Inc. Dr. & Mrs. Brent Hall Mr. & Mrs. Sol Halpert Dieter & Karyn Herterich Dr. & Mrs. Marc Kadyk

$25,000 - $49,999

Sonya Rabin Greenfield Susie Greene Billy & Ray Howell Mr. & Mrs. Harry F. Jacobs Ethel & George Kennedy Family Foundation Laurelmor – A Ginn Company Resort Edgar & Nan Lawton Lexington Furniture Industries Linville Ridge Country Club Mr. & Mrs. James T. Lynagh Hospitality Mints, Inc. Karen P. Minges Daniel & Harlene Mitchum Rosanne & Ken Peacock Edith S. Peiser Betty & Jesse Pike

$10,000 - $24,999

Mr. & Mrs. Ronald G. Hester Holiday Inn Express Kenneth Hubbard Anne C. & Myron B. Liptzin Michael & Sara Mayhew Larry & Nanci Tolbert Nance Nationwide Insurance/The Charles Eyler Agency The Nesor Foundation Old World Galleries Edmund F. Perls Anonymous Ron Redmon & Tom Normand Fred & Priscilla Robinette Mr. & Mrs. Frank Ross, Jr. Gerard & Judith Rothschild Sazingg Jewelers The Sesame Foundation

Mr. & Mrs. Neil Schaffel SkyBest Communications, Inc.

(a wholly-owned subsidiary of SkyLine Membership Corporation)

Mrs. Nan Van Every Mr. and Mrs. Ken Wilcox

J. Bernard & Shirley Spector Mrs. Allene Broyhill Stevens Keith & Letty Stoneman Mark & Nancy Tafeen Helene & Stephen Weicholz

Harold Libby & Wanda Rayle-Libby Dr. & Mrs. Berge Markarian Peabody’s Wine & Beer Merchants Tina & Gary Silverstein Bob & Minnie Snead Kent & Shelly Tarbutton/Chetola Resort Mr. J. Wallace Wrightson Mr. & Mrs. Arthur Yergey

Perfection Equipment Company Drs. Raymond & Judith Pulley The Martin & Doris Rosen Giving Fund/ Debbie Rosen Davidson and David Rosen/ Charles & Nancy Rosenblatt Foundation John & Joy Safer Mr. & Mrs. Lawrence Singer Sandi Finci Solomon T.G. Solomon Marshall Stein & Denise Grohs David & Ginny Stevens Ms. Helen Taulman Park Terrell/Nationwide Insurance Agency Mr. & Mrs. Dolph von Arx Cindy Wallace & Allen Moseley Mr. & Mrs. Samuel Whalen The Shane Family Foundation Gus & Frances Stavros Tarheel Capital Charles Gordon Travis Tweetsie Railroad Mary Underwood & Ben Henderson/ Bare Essentials Natural Market United Technologies Corp. US Airways Mr. & Mrs. Alberto Vadia Mr. Edward Vincz Jeffrey & Cher Zavik Betty E. Yount


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2016 FESTIVAL SUPPORTERS An Appalachian Summer Festival deeply appreciates the support of its contributors. This list reflects contributions and pledges made solely to An Appalachian Summer Festival’s Annual Campaign from October 1, 2015 through June 8, 2016. Please note this list does not include gifts to other areas within Appalachian State University. PREMIER SPONSORS

$100,000 and Above Bonnie & Jamie Schaefer / Westglow Resort and Spa & Rowland’s Restaurant (in memory of Budd Mayer) Nancy & Neil Schaffel /The Rosen-Schaffel Endowment for Classical Music Programming (in memory of Budd Mayer)

LEAD SPONSORS

$50,000 - $99,999 Blue Ridge Electric Membership Corporation

FESTIVAL SPONSORS

$25,000 - $49,999 The Martin & Doris Rosen Giving Fund / Debbie Rosen Davidson and David Rosen/ Charles & Nancy Rosenblatt Foundation The Muriel & Arnold Rosen Endowment for the Arts Keith & Letty Stoneman Helene & Stephen Weicholz

CHANCELLOR’S CIRCLE

$10,000 - $24,999 Boone Area Visitors Bureau Wendy & Mike Brenner Broyhill Family Foundation, Inc. Goodnight Brothers Produce Company Brent & Tricia Hall Mast General Store/John & Faye Cooper (in memory of Budd Mayer and in honor of Susan Pettyjohn) Nanette & Budd Mayer McDonald's of Boone/Venda & Ralph Lerch

National Endowment for the Arts North Carolina Arts Council Northern Trust Company Tina & Gary Silverstein SkyBest Communications, Inc.

(a wholly-owned subsidiary of SkyLine Membership Corporation)

Sandi Finci Solomon (in loving memory of Leonard A. Solomon)

ARTIST’S CIRCLE Chetola Resort/Kent & Shelley Tarbutton Harold Libby & Wanda Rayle-Libby Peter & Joni Petschauer (in memory of Budd Mayer and in honor of Susan Pettyjohn)

$6,000 - $9,999

Mark & Nancy Tafeen (in memory of Budd Mayer and in honor of Susan Pettyjohn)

BRAVO! CIRCLE

$3,000 - $5,999 An Appalachian Summer Festival Outreach Endowment Boone Ford-Lincoln/Alfred & Josette Glover Natalie & Penn Broyhill (in memory of Jere Dabbs) The Satie Hunt Broyhill Endowment for the Performing Arts Sue & Steven Chase (in memory of Muriel Rosen, Florence Hecht and Budd Mayer) Country Inn & Suites Courtyard by Marriott Creekside Electronics, Inc. Lynn & Barry Eisenberg Dick Goosman & Vicky McLean

The Friedman Family – Ingrid, Mary & Nick Holiday Inn Express Anne C. & Myron B. Liptzin Roger & Helen Michelson (in memory of Budd Mayer) Sharon Mills Drs. Daniel & Harlene Mitchum Panoramic Hospitality Peabody’s Wine & Beer Merchants Scholars Bookshop at the University Bookstore Winston-Salem Foundation

BENEFACTOR’S CIRCLE Michael & Judy Adler Bruce J. Heim Foundation Lisa Cooper Susan & Harvey Durham (in memory of Budd Mayer) Susie Greene (in memory of Budd Mayer) Sandy & Marc Kadyk

$1,200 - $2,999

Edith S. Peiser (in memory of Budd Mayer) Steven Price & Christopher Frye (in memory of Emma Carter Price) R.Y. & Eileen L. Sharpe Foundation Minnie & Bob Snead Edmund & Louise Reiss Kenneth & Gerry Wilcox


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PATRONS

Ira & Brenda Abrams Joanne Brannon Aldridge Dick & Margaret Beckman Hanes & Lida Boren Frank & Kay Borkowski (in memory of Budd Mayer) Jack Branch Lisa Cooper Byrdie Rae Denison (in memory of Edward L. Denison) Adrienne Finkel (in honor of Susan Pettyjohn) Judith Feinberg & Sonny Harris Larry & Barbara Freiman (in memory of Budd Mayer)

$600 - $1,199 The Friedman Family Endowment for An Appalachian Summer Festival Ralph Glaser, Jr. & John A. Pfeifer Molle Grad (in memory of Budd Mayer and in honor of Susan Pettyjohn) Denise Grohs & Marshall Stein Megan Hayes & Michael Kitchell (in honor of Kaaren & Lowell Hayes, and in memory of Budd Mayer and Dot Barber) Sarah & Troy Heustess (in memory of Budd Mayer) Jerry & Rebecca Hutchins Judith M. Liersch & Allen L. Jennings

Morris & Katia Lioz Barbara & Mark Moskowitz Larry & Nanci Tolbert Nance (in memory of Budd Mayer and in honor of Susan Pettyjohn) Lori & Michael Novick Bill Pelto & Linda Larson Russell & Sally Robinson Sam Tallman & Mike Zuravel Tweetsie Railroad/Chris and Cathy Robbins Mary Underwood & Ben Henderson Cindy Wallace & Allen Moseley (in honor of Susan Pettyjohn)

CONTRIBUTORS

Connie Adams LaTanya & Tunde Afolayan Anonymous Blowing Rock Yacht Club Howard & Kathryne Brafman Fred & Arline Darrow Merle & Louis Feinberg Peggy & Dick Flah Tracey & Paul Ford (in honor of Susan Pettyjohn) Hank Foreman & John Baynor (in memory of Budd Mayer and in honor of Susan Pettyjohn)

$300 - $599 Gaugert Financial, Inc. Scott & Kathleen Haynes Millie King ReneĂŠ & David Lieberman Cheryl & James Long Jane & Grady Lonon Dr. & Mrs. Berge Markarian (in memory of Budd Mayer and in honor of Susan Pettyjohn) Susan & Bruce Pettyjohn (in memory of Budd Mayer)

Denise & William Ringler (in memory of Budd Mayer and in honor of Susan Pettyjohn) Traci Royster (in memory of Budd Mayer and in honor of Susan Pettyjohn) Drs. Bernard & Michaela Segall Dr. Morry & Mrs. Margie Segall Cyn D. & John Weaver Janet H. Wilson

FRIENDS

Kate Barrett Anonymous John & Bettie Bond James & Margaret Bragg Craig & Rose Bridgeman Nakita Sargent Brooks Dennis & Anne Carlton-Jones Stephanie Poet Cohen Christy & Brad Chenausky (in memory of Budd Mayer and in honor of Susan Pettyjohn) Dr. & Mrs. Dinesh Dave Dee Dundon Mrs. Billy Elliott (in memory of Michael S. Elliott) Anna Gaugert (in memory of Budd Mayer and in honor of Susan Pettyjohn)

$125 - $299 Sali Gill-Johnson (in memory of Budd Mayer) Gwen & Bernie Golan Syndey & Gerald Gura Laura & Kenny Kaufman (in honor of Susan Pettyjohn) Ed & Linda Kelly Ernest & Shelby Lane Gregg & Bonnie Marland Bonnie C. Marmor Conor McKenzie Susan B. Morgan (in memory of Dot Barber) Doug & Susan Morton Dr. and Mrs. Richard F. Newman Sandra & Mike Perry Miriam & Jimmy Pittman

Priscilla Rich Tish & Tom Rokoske Patrick Setzer (in honor of Susan Pettyjohn) Bernice Snow Barbara Sugerman (in memory of Barry Sugerman) Dr. & Mrs. W. Chandler Thompson Claudia Van Essen Marlene Walter (in memory of Muriel and Arnold Rosen) Jim & Brenda Fisher Wetmore Carolyn G. Witt

MEMBERS

Gerald & Julia Adams Joe & Dolores Amoroso Ellis & Barbara Aycock Francine Barr Michael & Joan Bell Elaine & Jim Crowell Helen O. Dellinger Lynn & Barry Eisenberg (in memory of Budd Mayer) Sandra & Edward Folts Dan & Dodie Glowa (in memory of Ben Bradley)

up to $124 Susan Graham Robert Grumet Jeff Handler Rosemary Horowitz & Jerry Hyman Murrell & Kathy Johnson Dr. & Mrs. Gerhard Kalmus Susan Lutz Patricia Mauldin Mr. & Mrs. Dan K. Moore, Jr. Margaret R. Polson Mary Reichel & Rao Aluri Jim & Sandy Sheatsley

Helen Sirett & Ken Hendrix Carol & Henry Thompson, Jr. Daisy Goodnight Waldrep Lou Weaks Ralph Wenger (in memory of Ruth Ann Wenger) Charles & Lynne Weiss (in honor of Dr. John Pfeifer) ReneĂŠ Whitener


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WELCOME TO THE HIGH COUNTRY! From the scenic overlooks on the Blue Ridge Parkway to the majestic peaks of the Blue Ridge Mountains, the festival is privileged to call the High Country home. Spend the day in the great outdoors hiking, cycling, rafting or relaxing by the river, followed by an evening of great entertainment! Small town friendliness, cool summer temperatures and mountain breezes complete the picture–offering the perfect summer getaway!

NEED A PLACE TO STAY? Festival packages are available at the following establishments:

WESTGLOW RESORT & SPA 800-562-0807 westglow.com

CHETOLA RESORT & THE BOB TIMBERLAKE INN

COURTYARD BY MARRIOTT 828-265-7676 marriott.com/hkybn

800-243-8652 chetola.com

LA QUINTA INN & SUITES

HOLIDAY INN EXPRESS

828-262-1234 visitboone.com

828-264-2451 expressboone.com

COUNTRY INN & SUITES

828-264-4234 countryinns.com/appsummerfest For more information on these packages, visit appsummer.org/visit

FINE ARTS & GREAT FOOD Make it a memorable evening with dinner and a show! These restaurants offer discounts to festival ticket holders:

IN BOONE: Makoto’s Japanese Steakhouse & Sushi Bar Red Onion Pepper’s Restaurant The Local Lost Province Brewing Co.

IN BLOWING ROCK: Rowland’s Restaurant at Westglow Resort & Spa Storie Street Grille Timberlake’s Restaurant at Chetola Resort


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THE ARTS AT APPALACHIAN

HAYES SCHOOL OF MUSIC 828.262.3020 • music.appstate.edu

DEPARTMENT OF THEATRE AND DANCE 828.262.3028 • theatre.appstate.edu

TURCHIN CENTER FOR THE VISUAL ARTS

The Turchin Center for the Visual Arts, named for university benefactors Robert and Lillian Turchin, fulfills Appalachian State University's long-held mission of providing a home for world-class visual arts programming. The largest facility of its kind in the region, the center features works of nationally and internationally renowned artists, as well as many of the finest artists in the region. The center presents multi-dimensional exhibits and programs and is a dynamic presence in the community, creating opportunities for people of all ages and backgrounds to experience the power and excitement of the visual arts. tcva.org • 828.262.3017

THE SCHAEFER CENTER PRESENTS…

Presented during the academic year, this series supports the teaching mission of the university by presenting a diverse array of music, dance and theatre events designed to enrich the cultural, educational and economic landscape of the campus and surrounding region. By creating memorable performance experiences, the series promotes the power and excitement of the live performance experience; provides a "window on the world" through the artistry of nationally and internationally renowned artists and showcases some of the finest artists of our region. Musical events range from symphony orchestra and chamber music performances to jazz, folk, traditional, international, and popular artists. Theatre productions run the gamut from serious drama to musical comedy. Dance performances offer an equally wide array of styles, from ballet to modern dance to international companies representing cultural traditions from around the world. theschaefercenter.org • 828.262.4046

APPLAUSE! K-12 PERFORMING ARTS SERIES

Appalachian State University’s arts education and outreach program strives to broaden and deepen arts experiences for audiences of all ages, while ensuring access to the arts for young audiences, building future audiences for the arts, and inspiring a love of learning through the arts. 2016-17 SERIES: Havana Cuba All-Stars Appalachian Department of Theatre & Dance, “Selkie: Between Land and Sea” Theatreworks USA’s “We the People” North Carolina Youth Tap Ensemble “Percussive Dance Review” Banff Mountain Film Festival World Tour: Student Edition The Nile Project Cathy Fink & Marcy Marxer

DEPARTMENT OF ART 828.262.2220 • art.appstate.edu

THE HUGHLENE BOSTIAN FRANK VISITING WRITERS SERIES 828.262.2337 • visitingwriters.appstate.edu

CANNON MUSIC CAMP 2016 PERFORMANCE SCHEDULE Thursday, June 30 7 pm

Faculty Recital I

Sunday, July 3 2 pm

“Kaleidoscope Concert” Featuring a variety of large & small ensembles

Friday, July 8 7 pm

Faculty Recital II

Sunday, July 10 2 pm 7 pm

Honors Recital I Selected camper solo performances PIANO PERFORMANCES

Tuesday, July 12 7 pm

Honors Recital II Chamber Groups

Thursday, July 14 7 pm

FINALE CONCERT I Percussion Ensemble String Orchestra

Friday, July 15 7 pm

FINALE CONCERT II Women’s Choir Chamber Singers Concert Choir Wind Ensemble

Saturday, July 16 10 am

FINALE CONCERT III All Things Jazz

12 pm

FINALE CONCERT IV Symphonic Band

1 pm

FINALE CONCERT V Symphony Orchestra

Cannon Music Camp 813 Rivers Street, Rosen Concert Hall Appalachian State University, Boone, NC Concerts are free and open to the public. Concerts are subject to change: Please check our website www.cannon.appstate.edu for updates or call 828-262-4091.


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Young People’s Global Film Series THURSDAY, JULY 7

Oddball and the Penguins

1 PM, SCHAEFER CENTER FOR THE PERFORMING ARTS Recommended for All Ages

Oddball is the heart-warming true story about an eccentric chicken farmer who, with the help of his granddaughter, trains his mischievous dog Oddball to protect a wild penguin sanctuary from fox attacks and in the process tries to reunite his family and save their seaside town. AUSTRALIA; RATED G; DIRECTED BY STUART MCDONALD (2015); 95 MINUTES

THURSDAY, JULY 14

On the Way to School 1 PM, SCHAEFER CENTER FOR THE PERFORMING ARTS Recommended for 8+ (Film features subtitles)

2014 César winner for Best Documentary, On the Way to School interweaves the stories of four children from around the world whose desire to learn and better their lives through education forces them to contend with arduous, often perilous journeys every day on their way to the classroom. FRANCE; NOT RATED; DIRECTED BY PASCAL PLISSON (2012); 75 MINUTES

THURSDAY, JULY 28

Belle and Sébastian 1 PM, SCHAEFER CENTER FOR THE PERFORMING ARTS Recommended for All Ages (Dubbed in English)

Based on the acclaimed children’s novel by Cécile Aubry, Belle and Sébastian follows the courageous adventures of a young boy and his giant sheepdog amidst the stunning backdrop of the snow-covered Alps. FRANCE; RATED PG; DIRECTED BY NICOLAS VANIER (2013); 104 MINUTES

THURSDAY, AUGUST 4

Marie’s Story

1 PM, SCHAEFER CENTER FOR THE PERFORMING ARTS Recommended for 10+ (Film features subtitles)

At the turn of the 19th century, an artisan and his wife have a daughter, Marie, who is born deaf and blind and unable to communicate. The Heurtins send Marie to the Larnay Institute, where an order of Catholic nuns manage a school for deaf girls. Based on true events, Marie’s Story recounts the courageous journey of a nun and the lives she would change, confronting failures and discouragement with joyous faith and love. FRANCE; NOT RATED; DIRECTED BY JEAN-PIERRE AMÉRIS (2014); 95 MINUTES

With special thanks to our host for this Film Series, Dr. John Pfeifer.


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THE HELENE AND STEPHEN WEICHOLZ GLOBAL FILM SERIES

TUESDAY, JUNE 28 7 PM, SCHAEFER CENTER FOR THE PERFORMING ARTS

Johann Radmann is a young and idealistic public prosecutor who takes an interest in the case of Charles Schulz, a former Auschwitz extermination camp commander, who is now teaching at a school in West Berlin. Radmann is determined to bring Schulz to justice, but the horrors of the past and the hostility shown toward his work make it nearly impossible for him to find his way through the maze and to the truth. GERMANY; RATED R; DIRECTED BY GIULIO RICCIARELLI (2014); 124 MINUTES.

Pre-film talk with Dr. John Pfeifer begins at 7pm, with the film beginning at approximately 7:30pm. Concessions, including popcorn, beer, wine and cold beverages are available for purchase. With special thanks to our generous sponsors for this series, Helene and Stephen Weicholz.

Labyrinth of Lies

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THE TURCHIN CENTER FOR THE VISUAL ARTS TCVA.ORG

SUMMER EXHIBITION CELEBRATION July 1 | Friday, 6-10pm FREE EVENT

Celebrate summer at the Turchin Center and “engage, discover and connect through the arts!” The Summer Exhibition Celebration is an opportunity for art lovers to meet the artist, enjoy food and drink, and spend time with fellow arts patrons, while wandering one of the most exciting venues in town: a collection of six galleries filled with diverse mix of contemporary art by local, regional and international artists.

Color Me This: Contemporary Art Jewelry July 1-October 8, 2016 Mezzanine Eliana Arenas is the guest curator for an exhibition of contemporary art jewelry showcasing the use of explosive color and non-traditional Laura Wood; Stone Cluster Broach; materials. Artists include: Julia Brass, sterling silver, rainbow Barello (Strange Gardens), Ashley moonstone, coral, powder coat Photo courtesy of the artist Buchanan, Kat Cole, Bob Ebendorf, Maria Eife, Teresa Faris, Anne Fiala, Laritza Garcia, Young Joo Kim, Lorena Lazard, Marissa Saneholtz, Rachelle Thiewes, Vincent Pontillo Verrastro and Laura Wood.

FEATURED EXHIBITIONS Show Me the Way to Go Home: Brad Thomas April 1-August 6, 2016 Gallery B Based on a single image of a clown, known only as “HE,” Brad Thomas reveals his secret identity, and yet, to the artist, Council of Revision; Brad Thomas; 2000; the clown’s meaning– in all its Acrylic transfer, Plexiglas, copper, pressed manifestations– remains a tin, and archival print mounted on panels Photo courtesy of the artist mystery– a reflection of the human condition. The exhibition includes mixed-media collage/ paintings and illustrations for hand-made artist’s books.

Vik Muniz; Liz (from pictures of cayenne, black pepper, curry, chili pepper); 1999. Photo courtesy of the artist and Galeria Nara Roesler.

International Series: Contemporary Artists from Brazil July 1-December 3, 2016 Main Gallery As part of the Turchin Center’s commitment to showcasing international artists and bringing the world to Boone, Contemporary Artists from Brazil includes artwork from Vik Muniz, Raul Mourão, Brígida Balter and Sérgio Sister.

A Sense of Place: Eliana Arenas July 1-October 8, 2016 Community Gallery Eliana Arenas was born in Cuidad Juarez, Mexico. She currently lives in Charlotte, North Carolina with her husband and two children. Arenas’ Eliana Arenas; Bracelet: Ideologias Encontradas; Brass, jewelry and installation work explores newspaper; 2015; Photo: the capabilities of human beings to Michael F. O'Neill adjust to difficult situations. Her work has been exhibited nationally and internationally and is included in the collection of the Museum of Contemporary Craft in Portland, OR. Arenas has participated in selected exhibitions such as La Frontera, SOFA, 13 Annual International Expositions of Sculpture and Functional Art, Touching Warms the Art and Absence and Discomfort.

CONTINUING EXHIBITIONS Melting: Marietta Patricia Leis & David Vogel, Gallery A Strange Gardens: Julia Barelloa, Mayer Gallery


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TURCHIN CENTER FOR THE VISUAL ARTS:

LUNCH & LEARN WEDNESDAYS

NOON, TURCHIN CENTER FOR THE VISUAL ARTS LECTURE HALL FREE EVENT

These interactive and informative lectures offer an insider’s look exciting arts projects from experts in the field. Bring a bagged lunch to enjoy during the lecture! July 6- Melting: Marietta Patricia Leis and David E. Vogel On View in Gallery A Marietta Patricia Leis and David Vogel are quietly eloquent activists. They recently traveled to the Antarctica aboard a Russian research icebreaker under strict conservation guidelines established to allow visitors to observe but not disturb the pristine wilderness. The artists hope that if people are drawn to the beauty of their art from the expedition they will become acutely aware of the fragile future of Antarctica and its natural inhabitants. July 13- Karen Sabo and Derek Davidson, In/Visible Theatre In/Visible Theatre makes meaningful, beautiful, and socially relevant theatre for the permanent and temporary residents of our dynamic mountain town, and to tour outside our region. In/Visible Theatre operates under the philosophy that great art is in service to others, and recognizes that to engage audiences in whole and moving theatre, all aspects of production– from the scripts to the acting– must be of equally high quality. In this presentation, Karen Sabo and Derek Davidson, writer and director of the company’s newest work, Mauzy, will lead a discussion about this ghost tale set in Appalachia, which is being commissioned by the summer festival and presented during the upcoming season. July 20- A Sense of Place: Eliana Arenas On View in the Community Gallery Eliana Arenas was born in Cuidad Juarez, Mexico. She currently lives in Charlotte, North Carolina with her husband and two children. Arenas’ jewelry and installation work explores the capabilities of human beings to adjust to difficult situations. Her work has been exhibited nationally and internationally and is included in the collection of the Museum of Contemporary Craft in Portland, OR. Arenas has participated in selected exhibitions such as La Frontera, SOFA, 13 Annual International Expositions of Sculpture and Functional Art,Touching Warms the Art and Absence and Discomfort. July 27- Bettie Bond and Eric Plaag, The Digital Watauga Project Join historians Bettie Bond and Eric Plaag for a fascinating journey into our town’s past, as reflected by selections from the Bobby Brendell Postcard Collection, a compelling assortment of more than 400 postcards from the local area collected by Brendell during his lifetime. The postcards have been archived by the Digital Watauga Project, launched in early 2015 as a

partnership between the non-profit Watauga County Historical Society and the Watauga County Public Library. The project aims to permanently digitize Watauga County’s remaining visual and documentary history while building trust between the community and its surviving repositories. August 3 - Beth Davison, Presenting her Film The Denim Dynasty “The Denim Dynasty” is a documentary about the legacy of the Cone family that shaped prominent features of North Carolina’s landscape. A national park, a regional medical center, an amazing art collection, roads and schools all bear the name of the family whose corporation made North Carolina a leading producer of textiles for much of the 20th century. The documentary explores the early days of North Carolina’s textile history through stories of the Cone family and the textile workers who lived and raised their families in the mill villages. Together, the Cone family and workers helped make Cone textiles a world leader in producing denim. The Cone family’s story encompasses many of the themes that form the American narrative: immigration, reconstruction, industrial revolution, paternalism and philanthropy. “The Denim Dynasty” includes interviews of former Cone mill villagers and features faculty members from Appalachian. Moses Cone was one of the first financial contributors and board members of Watauga Academy, now Appalachian State University. The documentary runs approximately 50 minutes. A question and answer session with Davison will follow.

VISUAL ARTS WORKSHOPS Explore your inner artist with a workshop! Artist of all skill levels welcome. Advance registration and payment required. Enrollment is limited so register today! FOR KIDS & YOUNG ADULTS:

TIME TRAVEL June 27-July 1, 2016 Ages 11-16

EXPLORING THE MODERN WORLD THROUGH ART July 11-15, 2016 Ages 12-16

AROUND THE WORLD WE GO July 25-29, 2016 Ages 11-16

MOVING PIECES July 25-29, 2016 Ages 12-16


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THE HELENE AND STEPHEN WEICHOLZ GLOBAL FILM SERIES

TUESDAY, JULY 5 7 PM, SCHAEFER CENTER FOR THE PERFORMING ARTS

From executive producer Angelina Jolie Pitt comes the award-winning drama Difret, based on the inspirational true story of a young Ethiopian girl and a tenacious lawyer embroiled in a life-ordeath clash between cultural traditions and their country’s advancement of equal rights. When 14-year-old Hirut is abducted in her rural village’s tradition of kidnapping women for marriage, she fights back, accidentally killing her captor and intended husband. Local law demands a death sentence for Hirut, but Meaza, a tough and passionate lawyer from a women’s legal aide practice, steps in to fight for her. With both Hirut’s life and the future of the practice at stake, the two women must make their case for selfdefense against one of Ethiopia’s oldest and most deeply-rooted traditions. Difret paints a portrait of a country in a time of great transformation and the brave individuals ready to help shape it. ETHIOPIA; NOT RATED; DIRECTED BY ZERESENAY MEHARI (2014); 99 MINUTES

Pre-film talk with Dr. John Pfeifer begins at 7pm, with the film beginning at approximately 7:30pm. Concessions, including popcorn, beer, wine and cold beverages are available for purchase. With special thanks to our generous sponsors for this series, Helene and Stephen Weicholz.

Difret

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BROYHILL CHAMBER ENSEMBLE MUSIC: SO WHAT’S THE STORY? PART I

TUESDAY, JULY 6 8 PM, ROSEN CONCERT HALL

Sponsored by McDonald’s of Boone

Gil Morgenstern, violin; Caroline Stinson, cello J.Y. Song, piano; Mickey Solis, narrator Lee Spencer, actor; Haily Weddington, actor Mystery Sonatas (various) Heinrich Ignaz Franz von Biber Gil Morgenstern, violin; J.Y. Song, piano; Mickey Solis, narrator The Cellist of Sarajevo David Wilde Caroline Stinson, cello; Mickey Solis, narrator Concerto de l’Adieu Georges Delerue Gil Morgenstern, violin; J.Y. Song, piano Anthony Arkin, video editor

INTERMISSION

Piano Trio in g minor, Op. 15 Bedřich Smetana Gil Morgenstern, violin; Caroline Stinson, cello; J.Y. Song, piano

The Broyhill Chamber Ensemble Concert Series is generously supported by the Broyhill Family Foundation (in memory of Faye Broyhill), and by Ralph and Venda Lerch/McDonald’s of Boone. Additional performance underwriting has been provided by Budd and Nanette Mayer, Neil and Nancy Schaffel, Peter and Joni Petschauer, the Muriel and Arnold Rosen Endowment for the Arts and the Rosen-Schaffel Endowment for Classical Music Programming. With special thanks to Appalachia Cookie Company, for a generous donation of refreshments during this evening’s performance. Biographical information for this evening’s performers beings on page 85.

Acclaimed for his artistry and technical brilliance, violinist Gil Morgenstern is devoted to expanding the traditional classical music concert experience. His vision is THE BUDD AND NANETTE MAYER CHAIR to unlock the mystery surrounding classical music by presenting the audience with a more complete concert experience, meticulously curated from start to finish, placing music in an historical and artistic context, and organically integrating it with other artistic disciplines in innovative and unexpected ways. The New York Times describes him as a “brilliant and musically curious artist.” Morgenstern founded Reflections Series International with the goal of creating original programs combining music, visual art, cinema, dance, poetry and prose. Morgenstern invites audiences to reflect on the relationships between artistic disciplines and to reflect anew on universal themes. Since its inaugural performance in 2007, Reflections Series International enjoys a presence throughout the United States and Europe. Morgenstern is also the co-founder of Nine Circles Chamber Theatre, a creative organization dedicated to exploring the collaborative nature of inter-disciplinary performance, and of the Broyhill Chamber Ensemble which specializes in Baroque, Classical, Romantic and contemporary chamber music. A violinist with a long history of performing in the world’s great concert halls, Morgenstern’s career has taken him to international venues including Wigmore Hall, London; Cultural Center Concert Hall, Hong Kong; the American Academy, Rome; Palazzio Vecchio, Florence; El Teatro Sucre, Quito; and Arts Centre and State Theatre, Melbourne, Australia. He has also toured the U.S. extensively, performing in recitals and as guest soloist with many leading orchestras including the symphonies of St. Louis, Baltimore, Louisville, Indianapolis, Denver, Milwaukee, New Jersey and North Carolina. The New York Times has hailed his playing as, “a perfect demonstration of supreme ability.” The South China Morning Post describes him


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as “a rare poet of the violin” and according to The Washington Post “Morgenstern played a program that tested every part of a violinist’s equipment and he did it all beautifully.” Gil Morgenstern has also shared the stage with such eminent musicians as Lynn Harrell, Philippe Entremont, André-Michel Schub, Jeffrey Kahane, Sharon Isbin, and Heinz Holliger, and has collaborated with United States Poet Laureate Robert Pinsky, Pulitzer Prizewinning poet Yusef Komunyakaa, the actress Claire Bloome, and performance artist Laurie Anderson. Morgenstern’s discography includes works by Beethoven, Fauré, Copland, Ravel, Kodaly, Sessions and the awardwinning American composer George Tsontakis. His latest recording, 20th Century Duos for Violin and Cello, was the No. 1 classical CD for over a month on eMusic, the largest online store for independent music in the world, and was one of the top ten best-selling classical music albums on Amazon. The New York Times raved, “the music is

terrific and the performances compelling on this surprisingly exciting and excellently engineered recording.” Morgenstern records for the Koch International Classics, MMC and Engine Company labels, and can regularly be heard on National Public Radio and classical music radio stations across the country. Morgenstern is also deeply committed to education, specializing in the synthesis between academic subjects and the arts. In 2014, Morgenstern was named Artist-in-Residence for Interdisciplinary Studies at Avenues: The World School in New York City. Gil Morgenstern’s many honors include a command performance at the White House when he was just 21 years old, a performance at the inaugural festivities for President Clinton, and a citation from the floor of the House of Representatives entered in the Congressional Record for outstanding service in the arts. Highlights of Gil Morgenstern’s recent and upcoming seasons include interdisciplinary performances at Lincoln Center, New

York City’s 92nd Street Y, and Harvard University, as well as performances in Rome, Florence, Venice, Capri, Toronto, London, and Alaska. Gil Morgenstern lives in New York City.

PROGRAM NOTES: Heinrich Ignaz Franz Biber Mystery Sonatas (various) (Born August 12, 1644 in Wartenberg, Bohemia; died May 3, 1704, in Salzburg) Biber was acknowledged in his time to be the only German violinist comparable to the brilliant players of France and Italy. Although he wrote several operas and many works of other kinds, the originality of his violin music can be credited with keeping his name alive through the centuries. Some of his works are programmatic music, like those he intended to describe the joyful, sorrowful and glorious religious mysteries. Biber composed a large body of instrumental music and is most famous for his violin sonatas, but he also wrote a large amount of sacred vocal music.


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Presumably, the Mystery Sonatas were completed around 1676, but they were unknown until their publication in 1905. Once rediscovered, the Mystery Sonatas became Biber’s most widely known composition. The work is appreciated both for its virtuosic vocal style, its programmatic structure and its scordatura tuning. The Fifteen Sonatas on the Mysteries of the Rosary (“Fünfzehn Sonaten über die Mysterien des Rosenkranzes”), also known as the Copper Engraving Sonatas, (as each is headed by a copper engraving depicting the particular event which inspired the piece) are religious meditations, which combine secular dance forms with ecstatic quasiimprovisation. The work is divided into three larger sections: I. “The Five Joyful Mysteries” II. “The Five Sorrowful Mysteries” and III. “The Five Glorious Mysteries.” In this concert, you will hear various selections from the sonatas. Each of the fifteen sonatas has a title related to the Christian Rosary devotion practice. The Sonatas are usually concluded with the famous “Passacaglia,” the sixteenth part of the grouping, for violin alone, called The Guardian Angel, (“Der Schutzengel”) which repeats a simple descending scale-wise figure 65 times while the embellishments and counter-melodies become more elaborate until effects almost like bursts of sound or fireworks take the music into the high registers. The original and only manuscript of the Mystery Sonatas is in the Bavarian State Library in Munich. It has no title page; the manuscript begins with a dedication to Biber’s employer, Max Gandolph, Prince-Archbishop of Salzburg. Because of the missing title page, it not clear what Biber intended the formal title of the piece to be and which instruments he intended for the accompaniment. There is some evidence that the sonatas were not all composed at the same time or in the same context. In his violin sonatas, Biber integrated new technical skills with new compositional expression. The Mystery Sonatas include very rapid passages, demanding double stops and an extended range, reaching positions on the violin that musicians had not yet

been able to play. However, they are assembled into a remarkably coherent large-scale form. The Fifteen Mysteries of the Rosary, practiced in the so-called “Rosary processions” since the 13th Century, are meditations on important moments in the life of Christ and the Virgin Mary. During these processions, believers walked around fifteen paintings and sculptures that were placed at specific points of a church known as the Stations of the Cross. In this tradition, at each station a series of prayers was to be recited and related to the beads on the rosary, explaining why there are fifteen sonatas and they are also named the Rosary Sonatas. When the ritual was performed, the faithful listened to the corresponding biblical passages and commentaries, and it is presumed that they would also listen to Biber’s musical commentary to accompany the ritual of meditation. Thus, each sonata corresponds to one of the fifteen Mysteries; a Passacaglia for solo violin was appended at the end which possibly was linked to the Feast of the Guardian Angel which then was a celebration that occurred near in time to the rosary processions in September and October. The fifteen sonatas are organized into the same three cycles as the Fifteen Mysteries. The music is not, strictly speaking, programmatic, yet often vividly illustrative of events that occurred in the life of Christ. Each sonata represents one of the Mysteries of the Catholic Rosary, which are divided into five Joyful Mysteries (the Annunciation), five Sorrowful Mysteries (Christ’s crucifixion), and five Glorious Mysteries (centered on the Resurrection and on Mary’s Assumption). As the music reaches its spiritual climax in the “Resurrection” sonata, Biber specifies that the violin be played with its two central strings crossed. Biber invented a new way to tune the violin differently from the usual arrangement using “scordatura,” from the Italian word discordare meaning “out of tune”; scordatura dictates tuning the strings up or down a note beyond their normal tunings, creating different intervals between the strings than the

norm, so that the violin could play passagework and chords with new multiple stops that would otherwise have been impossible. This alternate tuning allows for new resonances with richer sonorities and unusual timbre. Here the usual G-D-A-E tuning, where the violin strings are consistently a perfect fifth apart, is only used for the opening sonata and the closing passacaglia. The other fourteen sonatas each have a different scordatura, each producing a sound relevant to the theme of the particular mystery. Biber also developed new bowing techniques, so advancing the art of the violin that Emperor Leopold I of Austria elevated him to the nobility. Biber is generally recognized as the founding father of the Germanic school of violin playing and something of a 17th century Paganini in both his talent and innovation. David Wilde The Cellist of Sarajevo (Born 1935 in Manchester) David Wilde is an English pianist and composer currently living in Scotland. During the 1990s, Wilde composed many works in which he protested against human right abuses and was twice honored by the city of Sarajevo for his music. He composed The Cellist of Sarajevo in 1992 and dedicated it to Vedran Smailovic. As a pianist, Wilde has received several major prizes, including one from the Liszt-Bartòk Competition in Budapest in 1961 in which the legendary teacher of many leading 20th century composers, Nadia Boulanger, was a jury member; she invited Wilde to Paris for further study. Wilde was Professor of Piano at the Music Academy in Hannover from 1981 to 2000, and since his return to Britain in 2001, he has been Visiting Professor in Keyboard Studies at the University of Edinburgh. About his inspiration for The Cellist of Sarajevo, Wilde wrote: “On May 27th, 1992, a grenade was thrown into a bread queue at the bakery in the pedestrian precinct Vase Miskina in Sarajevo. Twenty-two people were killed. Every day after this tragedy, the cellist


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Vedran Smailovic, until recently with the Sarajevo Opera, went to the spot, in full evening dress, at four o’clock precisely, and risked his own life by playing in memory of the dead, regardless of mortar and machine gun fire and the risk of further grenade attacks. The report by John Burns The New York Times of this heroic musical declaration made an impact more immediate than any political statement up to that time. I first read about it on a train from Nurnberg to Hannover. As I sat in the train, deeply moved, I listened; and somewhere deep within me a cello began to play a circular melody like a lament without end.” The Cellist of Sarajevo was immediately performed by many distinguished cellists in America, Britain, Australia, New Zealand, Thailand and Germany. Alexander Baillie gave the first performance in Queen Elizabeth Hall in London. Yo Yo Ma premiered the work and described the music as consisting largely of low, mournful sounds, which seem to describe elemental feelings and somehow connect us with a historical event we can do nothing about. In rondo form, the work opens with an immediately striking sequence: three long notes, a low C, the D-flat above and then back to the low C, a theme which conveys the agony of the loss of the twenty-two lives. The lament is suffused with anger, grief and a numbing sense of loss. It is deeply moving and direct in its expression.

Georges Delerue Concerto de L’Adieu (Born March 12,1925 in Roubaix, France; died in Los Angeles March 20, 1992) Georges Delerue was raised in a musical household; by the age of fourteen, he was playing clarinet at the local music conservatory. In 1940, he was forced to stop studying music in order to work at a factory to help support his family, but he continued playing clarinet with local bands, eventually transitioning to piano. Following a long convalescence after being diagnosed with scoliosis, Delerue decided to become a composer. In 1945, after completing studies at the Roubaix Conservatory, he was accepted at the Conservatoire de Paris. He began writing stage music during the late 1940s, and became friends with Pierre Boulez. By the early 1950s, Delerue was composing music for short films and writing theatrical music for the Théâtre Babylone and the Opéra Comique. Throughout the rest of his career, he wrote music frequently for major film directors including Truffaut, Godard, Resnais, Malle and Bertolucci as well as for some Hollywood productions. Delerue won numerous important film music awards, including an Academy Award for A Little Romance (1980), three César Awards, (1979, 1980, 1981), two ASCAP Awards (1988, 1990), three Golden Globe Awards, and he was also nominated for four additional Academy Awards for Anne of the Thousand Days (1969), The Day of the Dolphin (1973), Julia (1977), and Agnes of God (1985). The French newspaper Le Figaro named him “the Mozart of cinema.”

One of his late notable works, Concerto de l’Adieu was excerpted from his 1992 soundtrack for the war docudrama Dien Bien Phu. In the film, in Hanoï at the time of the battle of Dien Bien Phu, a talented violinist, Béatrice Vergnes, cousin of captain Kerveguen, gives a concert at the opera, playing music which sounds like a farewell. All the elite Vietnamese and French were there to hear. The first notes of the work are strong and majestic until the violin enters and introduces a note of melancholy. The battle is then evoked. Grenades light up the night. The noise of the cannons sometimes covers the music. The overwhelming sound is sadness of the violin, but tenderness, melancholy, distress, desolation and great loss all are found in the work. The Concerto ends on some sweet, throbbing, memorable notes. Bedřich Smetana Piano Trio in g minor, Op. 15 (Born March 2, 1824, in Litomysl, Bohemia; died May 12, 1884, in Prague) Smetana, a champion of nationalism in music, described the Czech countryside in his musical compositions and preserved its songs and dances in his works. He held a leading role in Prague’s musical life, serving as principal conductor at the National Theater, a position that gave him considerable power. Smetana not only created a place in the opera house and concert hall for music that expresses the character of the Czech people but also composed symphonic poems that described several aspects of Bohemia and its people.


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Among his works are three chamber music compositions: two string quartets and this trio. Quartet No. 1, which he described as “a tone-picture of my life,” and this trio both directly reflect his personal history. In the Trio he internalizes his experience of a family tragedy. In the period of a little over a year, Smetana’s two young daughters both died. The four-year-old, who succumbed to scarlet fever, was a gifted child, her father’s favorite, “an angel whom Death has stolen from us,” he wrote in his diary. Within two months of her death, he composed this Trio as a musical memorial to her, his little Bedriska. Smetana played the piano part in the Trio’s first performance on December 3, 1855, as the opening work on a program of chamber music that continued with Schubert’s String Quintet, which had been rediscovered only two years earlier, and Schumann’s Piano Quintet. The Trio did not have a successful reception. “The critics condemned it harshly,” the composer later wrote to a friend, “but a year

afterward, when we played it at our home for Liszt, he embraced me.” When Smetana spent ten days with Liszt in Weimar in 1859, his host honored him by again taking the piano part in a performance of the work. The violin opens the first movement, Moderato assai, playing the somber principal theme, a chromatic melody with a descending line that falls a fifth. (This grief-laden motif appears again in the second movement and, somewhat disguised, in the third.) The cello presents the second theme, one of tender melancholy, and then passes it to the violin. Recitative solo passages in this movement musically give vent to Smetana’s personal anguish. The restless musical development of this intense and lyrical movement, with its chromatic harmony and contrapuntal complexity, reflects the composer’s gloomy preoccupation with his recent tragic losses. Next comes a polka-scherzo, Allegro ma non agitato, the music of a Czech child at serious play. Derived from the main theme of the first movement, it consists

of two contrasting sections to which Smetana gave the old name of alternativi: a lyrical, pastoral Andante and a grave but majestic Maestoso. The Finale, Presto, an energetic rondo, was written nine years earlier for a Piano Sonata that Smetana withheld from publication during his lifetime. He also appropriated a fugato figure from his Variations on a Czech Folksong for inclusion here. The trio becomes rich in incident, with contrasting episodes that suggest an elegiac song and a funeral march. At the end, the music turns from the more funereal minor key to the major to close with an optimistic affirmation of life. Program Notes: Susan Halpern, © 2016


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WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE’S LONG LOST FIRST PLAY (abridged)

THURSDAY, JULY 7 & FRIDAY, JULY 8 8 PM, VALBORG THEATRE

Written and Directed by Reed Martin & Austin Tichenor Starring

Reed Martin

Teddy Spencer

Tustin Tichenor

as (in order of appearance) Chorus Oberon Lady Macbeth Proteus Beatrice Bottom Cardenio Marina Goneril Kate Henry V

Antipholus Holofernes Dauphin Valentine 1st Witch Viola Pericles Cleopatra Cordelia Bear Henry IV Timon of Athens

Dromio (of Syracuse) Puck Ariel Hamlet Mistress Quickly Sir John Falstaff Juliet Richard III 2nd Witch 3rd Witch Cesario Pompey King Lear Prospero Richard II Sycorax Regan Caliban Malvoliago Petruchio Henry VIII Julius Caesar Dromio (of Ephesus)

William Shakespeare’s Long Lost First Play (abridged) was first performed by the Reduced Shakespeare Company at the Folger Theatre (Janet Alexander Griffin, Artistic Director) April 21 - May 8, 2016. Directed by the authors, the script was workshopped and developed in a non-RSC production at Shakespeare Napa Valley (Jennifer King, Artistic Director). That production then moved to Notre Dame Shakespeare Festival (Grant Mudge, Producing Artistic Director). The cast was Dan Saski, Teddy Spencer, and Chad Yarish. These performances have been supported by a generous gift from Peter and Joni Petschauer.

CAST Reed Martin co-created and performed in the original productions of America, Bible, Western Civilization, All The Great Books, Hollywood, Sports, Christmas and Comedy– all (abridged). He also contributed additional material to The Complete Works of William Shakespeare (abridged). He has performed in London’s West End, at Lincoln Center, Kennedy Center, Seattle Repertory Theatre, American Repertory Theatre, Pittsburgh Public Theater, ACT San Francisco, McCarter Theatre, Old Globe Theatre, La Jolla Playhouse, The White House and Madison Square Garden, as well as in 11 foreign countries. He toured for two years as a clown/assistant ringmaster with Ringling Brothers/ Barnum & Bailey Circus. Reed has written for the BBC, National Public Radio, TBS, Britain’s Channel Four, RTE Ireland, Public Radio International, Sky TV UK, the Washington Post, and Vogue magazine. Reed’s work has been nominated for an Olivier Award in London, a Helen Hayes Award in Washington, DC, and a San Francisco Bay Area Theater Critic’s Circle Award. He lives in Northern California with his wife and two sons, all three of whom are much funnier than he is. Teddy Spencer is a Northern California native and having a “hella sweet” time since joining the RSC for the World Premiere of William Shakespeare’s Long Lost First Play (abridged). Regionally, Teddy has worked with the Dallas Theater Center, Milwaukee Repertory Theatre, the Folger Theatre, Capital Stage Company, Sacramento Theatre Company, Notre Dame Shakespeare Festival, Texas Shakespeare Festival, Arabian Shakespeare Festival, Napa Valley Shakespeare, the Theatre at Monmouth, the Undermain, and Summer Repertory Theatre. Teddy holds a BA in both Musical Theatre and Psychology from California State University, Chico, and an MFA in Acting from Southern Methodist


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University. He is an Artistic Associate with the Arabian Shakespeare Festival, a Company Member with SF PlayGround, and the proud father of a dog named Dweebs. Austin Tichenor has performed with the RSC around the world, off-Broadway, in London’s West End, and in the PBS version of The Complete Works of William Shakespeare (abridged). He has written stage adaptations of Frankenstein, a Kafka-for-kids adaptation of “The Metamorphosis” called Dancing on the Ceiling, and (with Reed Martin) the irreverent reference book Reduced Shakespeare: The Complete Guide for the Attention-Impaired (abridged), the comic e-book memoir How The Bible Changed Our Lives (Mostly For The Better), and the stage comedies America, Bible, Western Civilization, All The Great Books, Hollywood, Sports, Christmas, and Comedy– all (abridged)– all of which are published and/or translated into over a dozen languages. TV credits include recurring roles on Alias, 24, The Practice, Ally McBeal, and Felicity; and various Guys in Ties on ER, X-Files, West Wing, Gilmore Girls, Nip/Tuck, and shows like them. Austin produces and hosts the weekly RSC Podcast, available on iTunes and at ReducedShakespeare.com. Follow him on Twitter @austintichenor.

you count Reed) and teaching Theater at Sonoma Valley High School. Elaine M. Randolph (Stage Manager) Credits include stage management (compulsive) and lighting design (creative) in theater, music, and dance, for the Kennedy Center, Walnut Street Theater, Actors’ Theater of Louisville, among many others. Recent projects include Barbara Cook in Concert, The International Ballet Festival, and The Sondheim Celebration. Favorite projects include: Quilters, A Midsummer Night’s Dream, Noises Off, Pump Boys & Dinettes, Radio Gals, A Tuna Christmas, Forever Plaid, and A Christmas Carol. Daniel Singer (RSC Founder) has been a theatrical impresario from the moment he looked up ‘impresario’ in the dictionary. Upon his return from studying “proper dramatic technique” in London, he became a director at the original Renaissance Pleasure Faire, where he founded the subversive Reduced Shakespeare Company. In 1989 Daniel hung up his doublet-andhose to design theme park attractions at Walt Disney Imagineering, and became a freelance designer, writer and event producer in Los Angeles. His new hit comedy A Perfect Likeness chronicles Lewis Carroll’s (fictitious) attempt to get his literary hero Charles Dickens to pose for a photograph in 1866 Oxford. Coming soon to a theater near you!

BACKSTAGE

Since its pass-the-hat origins in 1981, the Reduced Shakespeare Company has created ten world-renowned stage shows, two television specials, several failed TV pilots, and numerous radio pieces, all of which have been seen, performed, and heard the world over. The company’s stops have included the White House, off-Broadway, the Kennedy Center, Lincoln Center, London’s West End, Seattle Repertory Theatre, American Repertory Theatre and Montreal’s famed Just For Laughs Festival, as well as performances in Israel, Australia, New Zealand, Hong Kong, Japan, Malta, Singapore and Bermuda, plus countless civic and university venues throughout the USA, the UK, and Europe.

Alli Bostedt (RSC Office Manager) took her first foray into theatre at age four. She soon discovered that every stage has a backstage and has attempted to remain there ever since. A native of Las Vegas, Alli lives in California with a talking shower curtain and an extensive rubber ducky collection. Jane Martin (RSC General Manager) Prior to joining the RSC and sleeping with Reed, Jane was Artistic Director of the Hawk’s Well Theatre in Sligo, Ireland and then producer of the physical comedy troupe The Right Size in London, England. In her copious free time away from RSC business, Jane spends time raising two boys (three, if

A REDUCED HISTORY

The RSC’s first three shows – The Complete Works of William Shakespeare (abridged), The Complete History of America (abridged), and The Bible: The Complete Word of God (abridged)– ran for nine years at the Criterion Theatre in Piccadilly Circus as London’s longestrunning comedies. For years the RSC had more shows running in the West End than Andrew Lloyd Webber. They were also funnier. In 2016, in honor of its 35th anniversary and the 400th anniversary of Shakespeare’s death, the RSC premiered its 10th stage show William Shakespeare’s Long Lost First Play (abridged) at the Folger Shakespeare Theatre in Washington DC to both critical and commercial acclaim. It also received its European premiere at the Edinburgh Fringe Festival in August 2016. And in 2013, the RSC premiered the subject it was born to reduce – The Complete History of Comedy (abridged)– at Cincinnati Playhouse in the Park. The “Bad Boys of Abridgment” have also applied their fast, funny and physical approach to World History in Western Civilization: The Complete Musical (abridged) [original title: The Complete Millennium Musical (abridged)], which toured simultaneously in the US, UK and Australia); Athletics in The Complete World of Sports (abridged), which played in London during the 2012 Olympics; Literature in All the Great Books (abridged); and the Movies in Completely Hollywood (abridged), which skewers the 197 greatest films of all time. All these shows have received critical acclaim across the US, UK, Belgium, Holland, Hong Kong, and Barbados, and played to packed houses at the Kennedy Center, Pittsburgh Public Theatre, San Diego Repertory Theatre, Cincinnati Playhouse in the Park, Seattle’s ACT Theatre, Alabama Shakespeare Festival, and Sweden (in Swedish!). And in 2011, the world premiere of The Ultimate Christmas Show (abridged) became Merrimack Repertory Theatre’s best-selling holiday show ever, and the third-best-selling show in MRT’s history. For TV, the RSC compressed the first five seasons of Lost into a ten-minute film called Lost Reduced, and was a


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Jeopardy! category in the 2005 and 2006 Tournaments of Champions. They wrote and starred in The Ring Reduced, a half-hour version of Wagner’s Ring Cycle for Channel 4 (UK), and reduced the Edinburgh Festival for BBC and the soap opera Glenroe for RTE Ireland. Shakespeare (abridged) aired on PBS and is available on DVD, as is America (abridged). For National Public Radio, the RSC has been heard on All Things Considered, Weekend Edition, Talk of the Nation, Day to Day, West Coast Live, and To The Best of Our Knowledge. The BBC World Ser- vice commissioned the six-part Reduced Shakespeare Radio Show. The Reduced Shakespeare Company Christmas was heard on Public Radio International. The RSC won the prestigious Shorty Award in New York City and the Delft Audience Award in Holland. They’ve also been nominated for an Olivier Award in London, two Helen Hayes Awards in Washington, DC, the SF Bay Area Theatre Critics Circle Award. RSC scripts are published in the US and UK, and translated into over a dozen languages. The RSC also creates unique entertainments for corporate events, working with such companies as Sky-TV, Time Magazine, Motorola, and Rotary International. Hyperion published their irreverent reference book Reduced Shakespeare: The Complete Guide for the Attention-Impaired (abridged). The company established its own imprint Reduced Books to publish the comic memoir How The Bible Changed Our Lives (Mostly For The Better) in all e-book formats. And the RSC Podcast, a free 20-minute audio glimpse of life backstage and on the road, is available every week at iTunes and www.reducedshakespeare.com.

ADDITIONAL CREDITS General Manager. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Jane Martin Office Manager. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Alli Bostedt Stage Manager . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Elaine Randolph Backdrop Design . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Tim Holtslag Costume Designer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Skipper Skeoch Masks & Puppets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Freya Marcelius Props . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Alli Bostedt Wardrobe Supervisor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Alli Bostedt Sound Design . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Austin Tichenor, Brandon Roe Poster Art. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Lar DeSouza Webmaster . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Matt Rippy U.S. Tour Direction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Baylin Artists Management Legal Counsel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Sharon Colchamiro, Esq. Company Founder . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Daniel Singer For their contributions to the development of the script, the Authors wish to thank: Dee Ryan, Adrian Scarborough, Rob Richards, Dominic Conti, Jennifer King, Michael Faulkner, John Tichenor, Andrew Klein, Dr. Catherine Woodring, Benedict the Mad, Quincy & Daisy Tichenor, Peter Holland, Samuel Taylor, Elaine Randolph, Alli Bostedt,

Campbell & Cian Martin, Kate Powers, Grant Mudge, Christopher Moore, Freya Marcelius, Cameo Cinema in St. Helena CA, Ron Severdia and the Shakespeare Pro App, Sonoma Valley High School Drama Dept, Dan Saski, Teddy Spencer, Chad Yarish, the late great Howard Ashman, and Jane Martin. Folger Shakespeare Library Editions are the Official Complete Works Resource for this play. The actors and stage managers in this production are members of Actors’ Equity Association, the union of professional actors and stage managers in the United States. Follow the RSC on Twitter for funny and random reduction, as well as the most up-to-date news, pictures, and blogs. Twitter.com/reduced 19445 Riverside Drive, Suite 132 Sonoma, CA 95476 (707) 935-7600 ReducedShakespeare.com

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An Evening with Broadway Star Kelli O’Hara A SCHAEFER POPULAR SERIES EVENT

SATURDAY, JULY 9 8 PM, SCHAEFER CENTER FOR THE PERFORMING ARTS

Tony Award-winning Broadway leading lady Kelli O’Hara has dazzled audiences and critics alike in the most recent revivals of The King and I, South Pacific and The Pajama Game. Ms. O’Hara was the recipient of the highly coveted Tony Award for Best Leading Actress in a Musical, for her portrayal of Anna Leonowens in the critically acclaimed revival of The King and I in 2015, along with Drama League and Outer Critics nominations. Performing with a quintet, this beloved star takes the stage for an evening of Broadway showstoppers and familiar favorites from the Great American Songbook. This performance is dedicated to the memory of Budd Mayer, a beloved friend of Appalachian State University and An Appalachian Summer Festival.

SERIES SPONSORSHIP PROVIDED BY WESTGLOW RESORT & SPA AND ROWLAND’S RESTAURANT, MADE POSSIBLE THROUGH THE GENEROSITY OF BONNIE AND JAMIE SCHAEFER. PERFORMANCE SPONSORSHIP PROVIDED BY: MAST GENERAL STORE, BOONE AREA VISITORS BUREAU, NORTHERN TRUST, GOODNIGHT BROTHERS, SKYBEST COMMUNICATIONS, INC.

This evening’s performance has also been supported by a generous gift from Nancy and Mark Tafeen, in memory of B. Richard Grant and Budd Mayer.

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EASTERN FESTIVAL ORCHESTRA Gerard Schwarz, conductor Marco Núñez, flute Julian Schwarz, cello

SUNDAY, JULY 10 4 PM, SCHAEFER CENTER FOR THE PERFORMING ARTS

Flute Concerto in g minor, RV 439, “La Notte” Antonio Vivaldi Largo Allegro Largo Allegro Largo Allegro Marco Núñez, flute (2015 Rosen-Schaffel Competition Winner) Cello Concerto in b minor, Op. 104 Allegro Adagio ma non troppo Finale: Allegro moderato Julian Schwarz, cello

Antonín Dvořák

INTERMISSION Symphony No. 3 in E-flat Major, Op. 55 Allegro con brio Marcia funebre: Adagio assai Scherzo: Allegro vivace – Trio Finale: Allegro molto

Ludwig van Beethoven

This performance has been supported in part by the Rosen-Schaffel Endowment for Classical Music Programming at An Appalachian Summer Festival, and is dedicated to the memory of Muriel and Arnold Rosen, whose vision and generosity led to the founding of An Appalachian Summer Festival. Additional performance underwriting has been generously provided by Harold Libby and Wanda Rayle-Libby.

2016 marks Gerard Schwarz’s 12th year with the Eastern Music Festival. He joined the festival as music advisor in 2005, became principal conductor in 2006 and music director in 2008. Schwarz also serves as music director of the All-Star Orchestra, an ensemble of top musicians from America’s leading orchestras which includes eight members of the EMF faculty. The All-Star Orchestra is featured in an American Public Television series designed to encourage a greater understanding and enjoyment of classical music. All 12 programs have been released by Naxos and have been awarded four Emmy Awards and the Deems Taylor Television Broadcast Award from the American Society of Composers, Authors and Publishers. Schwarz is conductor laureate of the Seattle Symphony and is a renowned interpreter of 19th century German, Austrian and Russian repertoire, in addition to his noted work with contemporary American composers. Schwarz’s considerable discography of nearly 350, showcases his collaboration with some of the world’s greatest orchestras, including Philadelphia Orchestra, Czech Philharmonic, London Symphony, Berlin Radio Symphony, Orchestre national de France, Tokyo Philharmonic, Los Angeles Chamber Orchestra, New York Chamber Symphony and Seattle Symphony, among others. A gifted composer and arranger, Schwarz has expanded his compositional activities in recent years. His Trio for Violin, Horn and Piano was called a work of “sophistication and intelligence” by critic R.M. Campbell. Earlier works include In Memoriam and Rudolf and Jeanette (dedicated to the memory of his grandparents who perished in the Holocaust), both recorded by Naxos; Human Spirit, a composition for children’s choir and orchestra and his duos for violin and cello were called “redolent of the gentle humanism central to much of the music Schwarz loves to conduct” by The Seattle Times. His arrangements of suites from Strauss’ Der Rosenkavalier, Debussy’s Pelléas et Mélisande and


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Humperdinck’s Hansel and Gretel as well as many orchestral works are programmed in concerts worldwide. A Journey, a large scale orchestral tone poem, was commissioned by Dave Gannet and received its world premiere at the Eastern Music Festival in July 2012. Schwarz’s work for concert band Above and Beyond was premiered by the United States Marine Band in 2013 and is now available on Naxos. His newest work for that ensemble, a transcription of Rudolf and Jeannette, was premiered in February 2016. His orchestral work A Poem was recently given its first performance by the Hartford Symphony. A sought-after guest conductor, Schwarz has led the most renowned orchestras throughout the world. He is also known for his operatic performances in addition to his concert work, having appeared with the Juilliard Opera, Kirov Opera, Mostly Mozart Festival, San Francisco Opera, Seattle Opera (where he has led 21 productions) and Washington National Opera conducting the operas of Wagner, Janáček, Strauss, Mozart, Bizet, Weber, Debussy, Bartók, Stravinsky, Beethoven and Gluck. Born in America to Viennese parents, Schwarz began studying music at the age of five and soon focused on the trumpet. A graduate of both New York City’s High School of Performing Arts and The Juilliard School, he joined the New York Philharmonic in 1972 as co-principal trumpet, a position he held until 1977. Schwarz’s numerous previous positions include music director of New York’s Mostly Mozart Festival, where he presided over sold-out houses, developed the orchestra’s international touring, maintained a nine-year residency in Japan, considerably expanded its Mozart repertoire and through its televised Live from Lincoln Center appearances earned several Emmy nominations. His tenure as music director of the Royal Liverpool Philharmonic Orchestra (RLPO) initiated the long-standing partnership between the orchestra and Classic FM, expanded recordings on the RLPO Live label, initiated a new partnership with Avie records, created the enormously popular Sunday matinee Musically

Speaking concert series, led highly acclaimed tours to Spain and Prague and brought the orchestra to National Television in BBC Proms broadcasts. As music director of the Los Angeles Chamber Orchestra and New York Chamber Symphony he expanded concert series and audiences, made award-winning recordings and championed new works. In addition he served as artistic advisor to the Tokyo Philharmonic. In his nearly five decades as a respected classical musician and conductor, Schwarz has received hundreds of honors and accolades. Over the years, he has received four Emmy Awards, 14 Grammy nominations, eight ASCAP Awards and numerous Stereo Review and Ovation Awards. He holds the Ditson Conductor’s Award from Columbia University, was the first American named conductor of the year by Musical America and has received numerous honorary doctorates, including from his alma mater, The Juilliard School. In 2002 the American Society of Composers, Authors and Publishers honored Schwarz with its Concert Music Award and in 2003 the National Academy of Recording Arts & Sciences gave Schwarz its first IMPACT lifetime achievement award. Active in music advocacy on a national and state level, he served on the National Council of the Arts and is honorary chairman of the Board of Young Musicians Excelling, an organization in Washington State which supports music education in the Pacific Northwest. Most recently, the City of Seattle recognized his outstanding achievements by naming the street alongside the Benaroya Hall “Gerard Schwarz Place” and the State of Washington gave him the honorary title of “General” for his extraordinary contributions as an artist and citizen. Born in Seattle into a musical family, Julian Schwarz is recognized as a cellist destined to rank among the finest of the 21st century. In August 2013, he was awarded first prize in

the professional cello division of the inaugural Alice and Eleonore Schoenfeld International String Competition in Hong Kong. Schwarz made his orchestral debut at the age of 11 playing the Saint-Sa ns Concerto No. 1 with the Seattle Symphony with his father, Eastern Music Festival Music Director Gerard Schwarz, on the podium. Since then, he has appeared with the Seattle, San Diego, Puerto Rico, Columbus (OH), Syracuse, Virginia, Hartford, Grand Rapids, Springfield (MA), Greensboro, Memphis, Sarasota, Grand Rapids, Omaha, Wichita and Modesto symphonies, among others, and performed recitals at the Casals Festival in Puerto Rico and in Palm Springs. Schwarz’s recent performances include concerts with the Charlotte, Des Moines, West Virginia, Toledo, Amarillo and Washington/Idaho symphonies, Louisville Orchestra and Symphony Silicon Valley in San Jose; return engagements with the Hartford and Boca Raton symphonies and the Northwest Sinfonietta; and recitals in Palm Springs, Washington, D.C., Pennsylvania and Nova Scotia. Internationally, he made his Australian debut with the Queensland Symphony in Brisbane as well as his debut in Hong Kong appearing at the Intimacy of Creativity Festival. In 2010, he was one of the featured soloists on a 13-concert U.S. tour with the Moscow State Radio Symphony Orchestra. In August 2012, Julian Schwarz recorded the Samuel Jones Cello Concerto, which was written for him, with the newly formed All-Star Orchestra which was founded by Gerard Schwarz. The All-Star Orchestra, comprised of orchestral musicians from major American orchestras, taped eight programs at that time, all of which were broadcast on public television in the fall of 2013 and then issued on DVD by Naxos. Schwarz’s previous recordings for Naxos include In Memoriam for the Music of Remembrance series and the Saint-Sa ns Concerto No. 1 and Haydn C Major cello concertos with the Seattle Symphony. He has also been heard on NPR’s acclaimed radio program From the Top and on a live recording of


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his Brahms Double concerto with Caroline Goulding and the Eastern Festival Orchestra. An avid chamber musician, Julian Schwarz has performed at the Aspen, Bellingham, Interlochen, California Summer, Encore and Eastern Music festivals. He has been the featured young artist at both the Seattle Chamber Music Festival and the Cape Cod Music Festival and performed at the prestigious Verbier Festival in Switzerland. He performed in Pollack and Weill halls as part of the Montréal International String Quartet Festival and a Carnegie Hall workshop, respectively. In 2013, he premiered a new concerto by Richard Danielpour, A Prayer for Our Time, at the Eastern Music Festival where he has been associate principal cello since 2012. Schwarz started piano lessons at the age of five and began his cello studies the following year with the late David Tonkonogui; subsequent teachers include Toby Saks, Lynn Harrell, Neal Cary and Ronald Leonard. He received his bachelors of music degree from The Juilliard School in New York City in May 2014 where he studied with Joel Krosnick and is currently pursuing his masters of music degree, also at Juilliard. He currently performs on a cello made in Naples by Gennaro Gagliano in 1743. Flutist Marco Núñez is currently in his second year at Indiana University in the Jacobs School of Music, pursuing his master’s degree in flute performance under the tutelage of Thomas Robertello. Prior to attending the Jacobs School of Music at Indiana University, Marco earned his bachelor’s of music degree at the University of North Carolina School of the Arts (UNCSA) where he studied with Tadeu Coelho. Before he began his studies at UNSCA, Núñez was a student at the Escuela Superior de Música y Danza de Monterrey, Mexico, studying with Luis Alfredo González. He has played in master classes for world-renowned

flutists, including Sir James Galway, Emmanuel Pahud, Michael Hasel, András Adorján, Carol Wincenc, Leone Buyse, Gary Schocker, Robert Dick and Susan Hoeppner, among others. Núñez recently won the Rosen-Schaffel Competition for Young and Emerging Artists and the Jacobs School of Music Woodwind Concerto Competition. He also won the 2014 James and Helen Pellerite Orchestral Excerpts Competition at the Jacobs School of Music, UNCSA’s 2013 Fall Concerto Competition, received second prize at the 2011 Rubén Islas Flute Competition, first prize at the 2011 Raleigh Area Flute Association Review and Contest and was one of the winners of the South Carolina Flute Society Masterclass Competition. Núñez is currently the principal flutist of the Indiana University Symphony Orchestra. He was born in El Paso, Texas, and raised in Monterrey, Mexico. This is his first performance with the Eastern Music Festival.

PROGRAM NOTES: ANTONIO VIVALDI Flute Concerto in g minor, RV 439, “La Notte” (Born in Venice on March 4, 1678; died in Vienna on July 27 or 28, 1741) As part of his collection of six concertos written for the flute, the Flute Concerto in g minor subtitled “La Notte” (The Night) is most unusual for its six movements, a doubling of Vivaldi’s standard three movement concerto structure. As the programmatic subtitle implies, this concerto describes a narrative of nighttime events. The first four movements are performed continuously, and the title of the second movement, “Fantasmi” (Ghosts), implies the nightmarish scenario Vivaldi is representing. With the fifth movement, titled “Il sonno” (Sleep), the fears of the first four movements are resolved and the soloist literally rests until returning in the finale. You may even recognize passages from the slow movement of “Autumn” from The Four Seasons, which Vivaldi reworked in this concerto.

ANTONIN DVORÁK Concerto for Violoncello in b minor, Op. 104 (Born in Nelahozeves, Bohemia on September 8, 1841; died in Prague on May 1, 1904) The music of Antonin Dvořák is part of a lineage of great nationalist Czech composers, beginning with Smetana and continuing through the works of Janáček. While Dvořák’s recognition seems unquestionable today, Dvořák himself was uncertain that he could succeed as a composer after several early setbacks and financial stresses in his career. He earned the respect and assistance of Johannes Brahms after Brahms judged his compositions over several years as Dvořák applied for grant assistance from the Austrian government. Quickly thereafter Dvořák became an international success, and spent significant periods of times in London during the 1880s and in American during the mid-1890s. During his residency at the National Conservatory of Music in New York, Dvořák composed some of his enduring compositions, including his Ninth Symphony ‘From the New World,’ the String Quartet No. 12 known as the “American Quartet,” and his Cello Concerto. Dvořák’s Cello Concerto in b minor was his last concerto, composed in 1894-5 for his friend and fellow Czech musician Hanuš Wihan. Even though this concerto was composed during his tenure in America, it does not invoke the same sense of Americana as Dvořák’s other works written in the States. In fact, it was one of the most personal of his compositions. While Dvořák was working on the concerto, his sister-in-law became extremely ill, and during the second movement he quotes the melody of the song Lasst much allein in her honor. In May of 1895, before completing the concerto, Dvořák’s sister-in-law died of her illness, and he poignantly quotes the same melody again in the finale of the concerto, honoring her both in life and in death.


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LUDWIG VAN BEETHOVEN Symphony No. 3 in E-flat Major, Op. 55, “Eroica” (Born in Bonn, Germany on December 17, 1770; died in Vienna on March 26, 1827) Beethoven initially titled his Third Symphony “Bonaparte” in recognition and admiration of Napoleon. However, he quickly scratched out this title following Napoleon’s self-appointment as emperor in 1804, and replaced it with the title “Eroica” (“Heroic”). Did Beethoven perceive the truly heroic implications of this symphony, beyond the obvious political statement, in making a statement with his strongest voice – his music? The “Eroica” marks a dramatic shift in the tradition of symphonic composition and in Beethoven’s style across all genres, is a personal emblem of triumph following Beethoven’s internal reconciliation with his hearing loss, and laid the foundation for the great romantic composers of the nineteenth century. The so-called middle period of Beethoven’s compositional output, from 1803 to 1812, is often referred to as his

“heroic” period. With the Third Symphony, Beethoven broke from the classical tradition of his first two symphonies. At almost an hour in length, this is the longest symphony Beethoven’s audiences had ever experienced, and the initial reviews immediately focused on this aspect. As musicians and audiences continued to perform and hear the Third Symphony, their initial reactions gave way to admiration for what Beethoven had accomplished and excitement for what innovations his next works could bring. In the opening of the “Eroica” symphony, Beethoven immediately throws unexpected sounds at the listener– from the C-sharp in the cello melody that momentarily derails the established tonic key to the unexpected theme in the extended development section and the seemingly premature entrance of the horns in the recapitulation– and open the door for a new way of thinking about the symphony. The funeral march of Adagio assai second movement remains among the most influential of Beethoven’s

compositions. While funeral marches themselves were not unfamiliar to European listeners during this period of revolutionary events, the manner in which Beethoven constructs this march was revolutionary in itself. The c-minor tonality is interrupted by bright and even triumphal moments in C Major, followed by a remarkable fugal passage, and ending not with a full return of the theme, as expected, but with transformed and fragmented thematic material. Beethoven’s third movement scherzo immediately dispels the emotions of the second movement, with its pizzicato strings at the opening and truly heroic horn fanfare. The theme and variations of the final movement invokes a melody Beethoven used previously, most notably in his ballet music The Creatures of Prometheus. This finale is the great destination of the previous movements, and is truly an arrival of “heroic” proportions. Program Notes by Catherine Keen Hock

EASTERN MUSIC FESTIVAL ROSTER VIOLIN I

Jeffrey Multer, Concertmaster John R. Kernodle, Jr. Concert Master Chair Qing Li, Assoc. Concertmaster John Fadial, 1st Asst. Concertmaster Shawn Weil, 2nd Asst. Concertmaster

Ariadna Bazarnik-Ilika Anne Donaldson Joan Griffing Fabian Lopez** Elizabeth Phelps Jennifer Rickard Uli Speth Jonathan Sturm** David Yarbrough

VIOLIN II

Randall Weiss, Principal Timothy W. Lane Chair Jenny Grégoire, Asst. Principal

CELLO

Neal Cary, Principal Julian Schwarz, Assoc. Principal Amy Frost Baumgarten, Asst. Princ. Marta Simidtchieva Julie Sturm** Rebecca Zimmerman

BASS

Leonid Finkelshteyn, Principal Rion Wentworth, Asst. Principal Luciano Carnéiro Marc Facci Meredith Johnson Rick Ostrovsky

FLUTE

Les Roettges, Principal Ann Choomack Brian Gordon, Flute/Piccolo

Cathy Cary Ioana Galu Daniel Skidmore Diana Tsaliovich Erin Zehngut

OBOE

VIOLA

CLARINET

Dan Reinker, Principal Ben Geller, Assoc. Principal ** Sarah Cote Jamie Hofman Chauncey Patterson Diane Phoenix-Neal

Randall Ellis, Principal Susan Eischeid Karen Birch Blundell, English Horn/Assoc. Principal Oboe

Shannon Scott, Principal Anthony Taylor Kelly Burke

BASSOON

George Sakakeeny, Principal Karla Ekholm

HORN

2016 ORCHESTRAL FELLOWS

Gregory Cox, Principal Michael Kris, Bass Trombone

Hannah Barrow, violin Annaliese Kowert, violin Alexandra Matloff, violin Tania Moldovan, violin David Parks, violin Jessica Ryou, violin Peter Dutilly, viola Brandon Gianetto, viola Justin Ouellet, viola Stephanie Barrett, cello Sean Hawthorne, cello Roman Placzek, cello Alex Krawczyk, trombone Nick Sakakeeny, percussion

TUBA

ON SABBATICAL LEAVE

Kevin Reid, Principal Thomas Jostlein** Kelly Hofman Andrew McAfee

TRUMPET

Chris Gekker, Principal Jeffrey Kaye Judith Saxton, 3rd/Assoc. Principal

TROMBONE

Tom McCaslin, Principal

TIMPANI

Eric Schweikert, Principal

PERCUSSION

John Shaw, Principal Matthew Decker

HARP

Anna Kate Mackle, Principal

PIANO

Marika Bournaki ** *Section strings are listed alphabetically and seated in rotation **One Year Position

Joy Branagan Corine Brouwer Meredith Crawford Danielle Guideri Courtney LeBauer Yuka Kadota Jennifer Puckett Beth Vanderborgh


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Eggers, Eggers, Eggers, & Eggers, PLLC AT T O R N E Y S AT L AW Proud Supporters and Alumni of Appalachian State University 7 3 7 W E S T K I N G S T R E E T • B O O N E , N C 2 8 6 0 7 • ( 8 2 8 ) 2 6 4 - 3 6 0 1 • W W W. E G G E R S - L AW. C O M


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THE HELENE AND STEPHEN WEICHOLZ GLOBAL FILM SERIES

TUESDAY, JULY 12 7 PM, SCHAEFER CENTER FOR THE PERFORMING ARTS

Based on The New York Times bestselling novel, The Dinner turns an ordinary meal among family into a taut morality play as the limits of polite society are tested and two brothers discover just how little they know about each other. To Massimo, a gutsy defense attorney, the monthly dinners with his pediatrician brother Paolo and their wives at a posh local restaurant are a status symbol, even if the time is spent in forced familiarity and inconsequential conversation. When disturbing security camera footage reveals an incident involving both couples’ children, their fragile balancing act of respectability and class is shattered and the two families must navigate the reprecussions. CANADA; NOT RATED; DIRECTED BY IVANO DE MATTEO (2014); 92 MINUTES

Pre-film talk with Dr. John Pfeifer begins at 7pm, with the film beginning at approximately 7:30pm. Concessions, including popcorn, beer, wine and cold beverages are available for purchase. With special thanks to our generous sponsors for this series, Helene and Stephen Weicholz.

The Dinner

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A SCHAEFER POPULAR SERIES EVENT

FRIDAY, JULY 15 8 PM, HOLMES CONVOCATION CENTER

Pat Benatar & Neil Giraldo and Melissa Etheridge will take the stage for a memorable night of stellar artistry and great hits! This co-headlining show will feature Grammy and Oscar-award winner Melissa Etheridge, with four-time Grammy-winning rock duo Benatar and Giraldo. Performing their classics hits, fans can expect Etheridge’s “Ain’t It Heavy” and “I’m the Only One,” as well as Benatar and Giraldo’s chart topping “Hit Me With Your Best Shot” and “Love Is a Battlefield.”

SERIES SPONSORSHIP PROVIDED BY WESTGLOW RESORT & SPA AND ROWLAND’S RESTAURANT, MADE POSSIBLE THROUGH THE GENEROSITY OF BONNIE AND JAMIE SCHAEFER. PERFORMANCE SPONSORSHIP PROVIDED BY: GOODNIGHT BROTHERS, SKYBEST COMMUNICATIONS, INC., BOONE AREA VISITORS BUREAU, NORTHERN TRUST, MAST GENERAL STORE

This evening’s performance has also been supported by a generous gift from Wendy and Mike Brenner.

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ROSEN-SCHAFFEL COMPETITION FOR YOUNG AND EMERGING ARTISTS

FINAL ROUND OF COMPETITION

SUNDAY, JULY 17 1 PM, SCHAEFER CENTER FOR THE PERFORMING ARTS

Piano Concerto in a minor, Op. 16 Edvard Grieg Allegro molto moderato Adagio Christina Lai, piano; Inara Zandmane, piano

ABOUT THE COMPETITION The festival, in partnership with the Hayes School of Music, proudly presents the sixth season of the highly acclaimed RosenSchaffel Competition for Young & Emerging Artists. During the spring of 2016, North Carolina institutions were invited to nominate competitors. A panel of distinguished musicians and collegiate educators from across the state served as preliminary jurors to select eight finalists to compete in the live final round of the competition. During the final round of the competition on July 17, a panel of esteemed conductors will designate three top prizewinners and the audience will have the unique opportunity to select an audience choice award winner. In addition to a cash prize, the first-prize winner will receive the opportunity to perform with conductor Gerard Schwarz and the Eastern Festival Orchestra during the 2017 season of An Appalachian Summer Festival.

ARTIST BIOS Concerto in E-flat Major for Trumpet, Johann Baptist Strings and Continuo Georg Neruda Allegro Largo Vivace Terri Smith, trumpet; Anastasia Bryant, piano

Violin Concerto in d minor, Op. 47 Jean Sibelius Allegro moderato Avital Mazor, violin; Nancy Johnston, piano

Sonate en ut diese pour Saxophone Fernande Decruck Alto et Orchestre Tres modéré, expressif Noël Fileuse Nocturne et Rondel Hunter Bockes, saxophone; Inara Zandmane, piano

Concerto for Coloratura and Orchestra, Op. 82 Reinhold Glière Andante Allegro Alicia Reid, soprano; Nancy Johnston, piano

Saxophonist Christopher “Hunter” Bockes currently studies at the North Carolina School of the Arts (UNCSA). Hunter has been a member of the UNCSA Wind Ensemble as well as uncsaX. During his time at UNCSA he has collaborated with the dance, drama, guitar, and percussion studios and has been in collaboration with Olympian Jeremy Abbott at the U.S. Figure Skating Championships with uncsaX. Hunter has been a member of the award-winning Atchara Saxophone Quartet, the Half and Half Saxophone Quartet, and the awardwinning Minerva Saxophone Quartet. As part of the Atchara Saxophone Quartet and the Minerva Saxophone Quartet he has won the state round of the Music Teachers National Association “Chamber Winds” Competition. Hunter has also been a finalist in the past two UNCSA Concerto Competitions. He has performed with the Fayetteville Symphony Orchestra and the North Carolina Saxophone Ensemble. Mezzo-soprano Kimberly Hilton has sung in major cities on the East Coast and the Midwest, including New York & Chicago, with credits in the many different genres of film, jazz, musical theater and opera. A


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INTERMISSION

Piano Concerto for the Left Hand Maurice Ravel Stephen Mulvahill, piano; Inara Zandmane, piano

“Stride la vampa” from II Trovatore Giuseppe Verdi “Must the Winter Come So Soon?” from Vanessa Samuel Barber “Habanera” from Carmen Georges Bizet “Va! Laisser couler mes larmes” from Werther Jules Massenet “Smanie implacabili” from Cosi fan tutte W. A. Mozart Kimberly Hilton, mezzo-soprano; Susan Slingland, piano

Concerto for Flute and String Orchestra André Jolivet Andante cantabile – Allegro Scherzando Largo – Allegro risoluto Natalie Jefferson, flute; Inara Zandmane, piano

Schelomo: Rhapsodie hébraïque pour Violoncelle Ernest Bloch Solo et Grand Orchestre Eli Kaynor, cello; Nancy Johnston, piano

The competition program is dedicated to the memory of Mrs. Muriel Rosen, who with her husband Arnold, served as a founding patron of An Appalachian Summer Festival. The festival extends its deepest appreciation to the Rosens’ daughter, Nancy Schaffel, and her husband, Neil Schaffel, whose vision and generosity have made possible this annual competition. The 2016 Rosen-Schaffel Competition for Young and Emerging Artists has also received generous support from the Bruce J. Heim Foundation, Nanette Mayer, and Mark and Nancy Tafeen. These gifts have enabled the program to increase the amount of its cash awards to the competition’s winners. The festival expresses its appreciation to Maestro Gerard Schwarz, Music Director of the Eastern Music Festival, and Dr. Bill Pelto, Dean, Hayes School of Music, for their assistance and support in developing and implementing this program. Please join us for a reception in the lobby of the Schaefer Center following the competition program. Refreshments have been provided by Appalachia Cookie Company.

Competition Founders and Patrons, Nancy and Neil Schaffel

native of North Carolina, Ms. Hilton is currently pursuing her Master’s degree in Vocal Performance at Appalachian State University in Boone, North Carolina, under the tutelage of Dr. Joseph Amaya. Ms. Hilton’s recent projects include Florence Pike in Opera in the Ozarks Albert Herring and La Zia Principessa in Chicago Summer Opera’s Suor Angelica. A native of northern Virginia, Natalie Jefferson is a fourth year undergraduate student at the University of North Carolina School of the Arts, studying flute performance under Dr. Tadeu Coelho. She has performed in master classes for notable flutists such as William Bennett, Jeanne Baxtresser, Denis Bouriakov, and Jonathan Keeble, among others. In 2015, Natalie was one of the winners of the Mid-South Flute Society Masterclass Competition and a winner of the National Flute Association Masterclass Performers Competition. She was also one of the winners of the 2015 UNCSA Concerto Competition. In addition to her solo work, Natalie was a performer in UNCSA’s Flute Tour in 2013 and 2014 and is currently a member of the UNCSA Symphony Orchestra and Wind Ensemble. John Elia Kaynor is pursuing a Professional Artist Certificate at the University of North Carolina School of the Arts, where he is the graduate teaching assistant to Dr. Brooks Whitehouse and collaborates actively in the Giannini String Quartet of the Chrysalis Chamber Music Institute. Eli holds a Master of Music degree from UNCSA, and also a Bachelor of Music degree from Chapman University as both a cello performance major in the Conservatory of Music and a presidential scholar in the University Honors Program. As cellist of the Giannini String Quartet, Eli has had recent success with the group, including sharing the stage with pipa virtuoso of the Silk Road Ensemble, Wu Man, and performing for world-renowned cellist Yo-Yo Ma. Giannini has also appeared in master classes at the Chamber Music Society of


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Lincoln Center for Emerson Quartet musicians, Paul Watkins and Philip Setzer, and violinist Sean Lee. This past year the group earned second prize and the alternate slot for the National Finals of the MTNA Chamber Music competition. In May of 2015, Giannini completed a tour of Spain, leading concerts and master classes in Barcelona, Madrid, Valencia, and Alicante. Eli has won major competitions performing Haydn’s C Major Cello Concerto with the Pro Arte Chamber Orchestra in Boston, MA, and most recently, performing the Schumann Cello Concerto with the Chapman Orchestra in Orange, CA. Eli is also an avid runner, contradance cellist, and comic book enthusiast. Pianist Christina Lai, from Plantation, FL, began her musical training at the age of five. She was one of four chosen as a William R. Kenan Jr. Music Scholar at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and graduated with a Bachelor’s of Music and a chemistry minor. Among several achievements, Christina won the UNC Concerto Competition in 2014 and was invited to play as a soloist with the UNC Symphony Orchestra. This past summer, she attended the Aspen Music Festival and School as a Thomas S. Kenan Fellow. She placed third in the National Association of Negro Musicians Piano Competition and alternate in the Young Artists Piano Competition of the North Carolina Music Teachers Association. Christina competed in the Ettlingen International Competition for Young Pianists in Ettlingen, Germany, was one of nine national recipients of the Chopin Foundation of the United States’ scholarship awards, and was chosen to receive the Marilyn Caldwell Piano Solo Award from the National Federation of Music Clubs. Additionally, she has also performed in master classes for Nelita True, John Perry, Phillipe Entremont, Gerard Schwarz, Leon Bates, and Molly Morkoski. Complementing her musical ventures, Christina was an avid volunteer in the music therapy department of the North Carolina Memorial Hospital. She also thoroughly enjoys teaching and has given lessons for UNC’s Musical Empowerment, a non-profit organization designed to provide free lessons to underprivileged children, and Aspen

Music Festival and School’s Passes and Lessons Scholarship Program. In the summer of 2014, she and a fellow Kenan Scholar, travelled to France to work with student composer Yuying Weng on a collaborative piece synthesizing Chinese and Western Classical music elements. Christina is currently pursuing her Master of Music in piano performance under the guidance of Professor Read Gainsford and currently teaches applied lessons at Florida State University. Avital Mazor was born in Israel and began studying the violin at the Jerusalem Conservatory. He graduated from the Jerusalem Academy of Music and Dance under the guidance of Michael Gaisler. His public appearances include performances with the Holon and Ameritus orchestras as well as the Israel Philharmonic. He has participated in numerous competitions, including the Clairmont and the Gritz competitions. Avital has taken part in master classes with some of today’s most distinguished musicians such as Ivry Gitlis, Vadim Gluzman, Daniel Phillips and Miriam Fried. He has attended renowned music festivals around the world, including Festival d’Aix en Provence in France and Keshet Eilon, Jerusalem Chamber Music Festival and Green Mountain Chamber Music Festival. Currently studying with Prof. Kevin Lawrence at the University of North Carolina School of the Arts, Avital has been a recipient of the America Israel Cultural Foundation scholarship annually since 2007. Hailed as a “dynamic and engaging” performer, pianist Stephen Mulvahill was born to be a musician, but discovered it late. When he was thirteen, his parents bought a piano, and in one summer his interests abruptly shifted from his dream of being a professional skateboarder to falling headoverheels in love with music. He progressed quickly, and his precollege career was marked by both distinguished musical accomplishments and outstanding intellectual achievements, culminating with the prestigious National Merit Scholar award upon entering college.

While earning his bachelor’s degree in piano performance at the University of Houston, Mr. Mulvahill simultaneously maintained an active career in the school’s Honors College. While at UH, Mulvahill continued to distinguish himself musically, taking first prize in the San Jacinto Young Artist Competition, performing two solo recitals for Houston Methodist Hospital’s Crain Garden Performance Series, and establishing himself as a highly soughtafter collaborative pianist with a reputation for intelligent, insightful, and sensitive partnering. Mr. Mulvahill entered the master’s program in piano performance at the University of North Carolina School of the Arts in the fall of 2014. Highlights from 201516 include performing with the Giannini String Quartet at Lincoln Center in New York City as part of the CMSLC Master Class Series, giving solo performances across North Carolina and Virginia, performing with the UNCSA Symphony in Orff’s Carmina Burana, teaching a growing studio of piano students, and playing for weekly contemporary worship services at First Presbyterian Church of WinstonSalem. Alicia Reid is a college senior at the University of North Carolina School of the Arts, studying voice with Dr. Marilyn Taylor. Originally from Canada, Alicia has studied music for most of her life; she is also a classically trained harpist. She has been a national finalist for the Classical Singer Vocal Competition in high school and college divisions and has received superior ratings in the National Association of Teachers of Singing competitions, most recently placing 1st in her category at the state level. In high school she performed principal roles in drama productions, including Kate from Kiss me Kate. She has most recently performed the role of Lauretta in Bizet’s Doctor Miracle, Phyllis in Iolanthe with Greensboro Light Opera and Song, First Spirit in Die Zauberflöte with Piedmont Opera, Papagena in Die Zauberflöte with the American Singers Opera Project, and in Dr. Siggy’s Fantastic Plan, a children’s outreach opera with the A.J. Fletcher Opera Institute. She has also participated in the ensembles of La Rondine, Les Contes d’Hoffmann, and Die Fledermaus at UNCSA, and South Pacific with Piedmont Opera. After completing


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her degree, Alicia plans to go on to a graduate degree in opera performance, and begin a solo vocal career. Terri Smith is pursuing a Bachelor of Arts in Music at the University of North Carolina at Pembroke where she performs with the Wind Ensemble, Jazz Ensemble, and Faculty Brass Quintet. She has performed with many regional ensembles, including the Long Bay Symphony, the Raleigh Symphony Orchestra and the Triangle Youth Brass Band, where she held the position of concertmaster. As a member of TYBB, Terri won the Youth Solo Division at the North American Brass Band Association Competition. She also held the position of principal trumpet for the North Carolina All-State Band for five years. Terri’s other awards include being a past state winner of the Music Teachers National Association (MTNA) Senior Brass Category, as well as the winner of the Harlan Duenow Concerto Competition, where she was a featured soloist with the Fayetteville Symphony Orchestra. Most recently, Terri was a 2015-2016 winner of the UNCP Concerto Competition, where she had the honor of performing as soloist with the UNCP Wind Ensemble. In addition to performing, Terri taught brass at El Sistema inspired Kidznotes (Durham, NC) as well as her own private studio. She has had many influential teachers, including Dr. John Entzi (Mars Hill College) Dr. Karl Sievers (University of Oklahoma) and Dr. Aaron Vandermeer (UNCP). Terri currently studies trumpet with Dr. Timothy Altman at UNCP.

FINALIST JURORS Biographical information for Gerard Schwarz appears on page 43. Robert Moody has been Music Director of the Winston-Salem since 2005, Artistic Director of Arizona Musicfest since 2007, and Music Director of the Portland Symphony Orchestra (Maine) since 2008. In October 2015 he was named Principal Conductor of the Memphis Symphony Orchestra. Mr. Moody’s 2015-2016 season includes debuts with the Vienna Chamber Orchestra and Columbus Symphony, as well as return engagements with the Pacific Symphony and the Oklahoma City Philharmonic. His most recent guest conducting appearances include the Chicago Symphony at Ravinia, and the Los Angeles Philharmonic at the Hollywood Bowl, in addition to the symphonies of Toronto, Houston, Indianapolis, Detroit, Seattle, Ft. Worth, San Antonio, Buffalo, Louisville, and, in Europe, the Slovenian Philharmonic. Summer festival appearances include Santa Fe Opera, Spoleto Festival USA, Brevard Music Center, Eastern Music Festival, PortOpera, and the Oregon Bach Festival. Equally at home in the opera pit, Moody began his career as apprentice conductor for the Landestheater Opera in Linz, Austria. He has gone on to conduct at the opera companies of Santa Fe, Rochester, Hilton Head, and the Brevard Music Center. He also assisted on a production of Verdi’s Otello at the Metropolitan Opera, conducted by Valery Gergiev. He debuted with the Washington National Opera and North Carolina Opera in 2014. Moody served as Associate, then Resident Conductor, of The Phoenix Symphony (AZ) from 1998 through 2006. There he

conducted a wide variety of concerts, including Classics, Chamber, Pops, Family, Handel’s Messiah, and the New Year’s Eve gala. His ability to speak with ease from the podium helped new converts to classical music and enthusiasts alike to gain a greater appreciation for orchestral music. Audiences at his concerts grew considerably during his time in Phoenix. Moody also founded The Phoenix Symphony Chorus, and for seven years was Music Director of the Phoenix Symphony Youth Orchestra. Maestro Moody has accompanied many of the world’s greatest performing artists, including Yo-Yo Ma, Itzhak Perlman, Renee Fleming, Denyce Graves, Andre Watts, Nadja SalernoSonnenberg, Midori, Time for Three and Chris Thile. Described by the Atlanta Constitution Journal as a “genuine talent,” Portuguese-American Jacomo Rafael Bairos enjoys an emerging career as an inclusive and imaginative conductor, dedicated collaborator and educator, and genuine facilitator for young living composers. In 2013 Bairos was appointed the Amarillo Symphony’s 17th Music Director and Conductor. His fresh and inventive programming, establishment of the first ever composer in Residence, as well as his community-driven initiatives have helped transform the Amarillo Symphony into a multifaceted vehicle for expression and community partnerships. Along with composer Sam Hyken, Bairos is co-founder and Artistic Director of Nu Deco Ensemble, a virtuosic and eclectic chamber orchestra designed for the 21st Century. Bairos oversees the mission of executing adventurous and exciting classical based collaborative performances, while presenting various styles of music, art, and media in both traditional and alternative concert venues. Winner of the 2013 Solti Foundation US Career Assistance Award, Roger Kalia has been hailed as a conductor who conducts with “vigor” and “commitment” by the Charlotte Observer and for bringing a “fresh view to classical music” by The Republic. Roger is the newly appointed Assistant Conductor of the Pacific Symphony and Music Director of the Pacific Symphony Youth Orchestra. He recently completed a successful two-year tenure as Assistant Conductor of the Charlotte Symphony, and served for three years as Music Director of the Young Musicians Foundation Debut Orchestra of Los Angeles. During the summer, Roger serves as Music Director of the Lake George Music Festival in upstate New York. Upcoming engagements include appearances with the National Symphony Orchestra, Chicago Sinfonietta, and a 10-day tour of China with the Pacific Symphony Youth Orchestra in the summer of 2016. Roger has worked with orchestras across North America and Europe including the Pittsburgh Symphony, Seattle Symphony, Utah Symphony, Fort Worth Symphony Orchestra, Danish National Symphony Orchestra, Winnipeg Symphony Orchestra, Royal Scottish National Orchestra, Cabrillo Festival Orchestra, Chelsea Symphony, and the Orquestra de Cadaques, among others. During the 2014-2015 season, he guest conducted the

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Bakersfield Symphony, and served as a guest cover conductor with the St. Louis Symphony and Indianapolis Symphony. That same season, he was invited as a finalist to the Assistant Conductor audition for the New York Philharmonic. As co-founder and Music Director of the Lake George Music Festival, Roger conducts the Lake George Festival Orchestra and chamber ensembles every summer in upstate New York. The first classical music festival of its kind in Lake George, the orchestra brings together young professionals and current students from many prestigious institutions including the Czech Philharmonic Orchestra, the Philadelphia Orchestra, the symphonies of Atlanta, Charlotte, Richmond, Kansas City, New World, Dallas, Boise, Detroit, San Antonio, and the premier conservatories in the nation including the Curtis Institute of Music, the Juilliard School, and the Eastman School of Music. The orchestra has been featured on a variety of radio programs including American Public Media’s Performance Today with Fred Child. A strong advocate of music education and audience development, Roger created an annual Family Concert series and Late Night Concert series. These collaborative projects recently resulted in a $50,000 grant from the New York State Council of the Arts.


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Appalachian Energy Summit Keynote Address with Bill McKibben MONDAY, JULY 18 7:30 PM, SCHAEFER CENTER FOR THE PERFORMING ARTS

Best-selling author and environmental activist Bill McKibben will serve as the keynote speaker for the 2016 Appalachian Energy Summit, an annual gathering of progressive energy thought-leaders and innovators from 17 public institutions and seven private colleges and universities. Referred to by many as "the nation's leading environmentalist," McKibben is founder of 350.org, the first planet-wide, grassroots climate change movement. He has written over a dozen books, and is considered “the world’s best green journalist” for his features in publications such as The New York Times, Rolling Stone and The Atlantic. Following the keynote, McKibben will be joined by Amory Lovins for a lively discussion with the audience.

ABOUT THE APPALACHIAN ENERGY SUMMIT The 2016 Appalachian Energy Summit is the 5th annual energy leadership gathering of UNC’s 17 campuses and many colleges and universities from across the country. This one-of-a-kind event convenes academia, industry, and students in a transformational effort that is truly delivering meaningful ecological, financial and social benefit. The Summit’s 2016 theme, “Knowledge. Collaboration. Action.” speaks to the knowledge we possess as a collective, the collaborative opportunities that exist between higher education and our valued business partners, and ultimately, the sense of urgency and action we all must embrace in this important work and its meaningful goals.

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Baba Joon THE HELENE AND STEPHEN WEICHOLZ GLOBAL FILM SERIES

TUESDAY, JULY 19 7 PM, SCHAEFER CENTER FOR THE PERFORMING ARTS

Yitzhak is proud to maintain the same turkey farm that his father built when the family moved from Iran to Israel. Now that Yitzhak’s son Moti is thirteen, the expectation is that he will learn the familial trade and, in his own time, take over the business. But Moti is more interested in reconstructing old cars and trucks, a trade for which he obviously has a tremendous talent. The rebellious boy is not at all shy about letting his father know that he has no interest in turkeys, but for Yitzhak this rejection isn’t just a matter of personal interest– it’s an insult to all the values he holds most dear. ISRAEL; NOT RATED; DIRECTED BY YUVAL DELSHAD (2015); 91 MINUTES

Pre-film talk with Dr. John Pfeifer begins at 7pm, with the film beginning at approximately 7:30pm. Concessions, including popcorn, beer, wine and cold beverages are available for purchase. With special thanks to our generous sponsors for this series, Helene and Stephen Weicholz.

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Enjoy the show. 896 Blowing Rock Road • Boone

McDonald’s is proud to serve as a sponsor for An Appalachian Summer Festival


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BROYHILL CHAMBER ENSEMBLE MUSIC: SO WHAT’S THE STORY? PART II

WEDNESDAY, JULY 20 8 PM, ROSEN CONCERT HALL

Sponsored by McDonald’s of Boone

Gil Morgenstern and Nurit Pacht, violin; Kathryn Lockwood, viola Ole Akahoshi, cello; Rieko Aizawa, piano Aubade Lointane George Enescu Harumi Rhodes, violin; Kathryn Lockwood, viola; Ole Akahoshi, cello Wedding Day at Troldhaugen Rieko Aizawa, piano

Edvard Grieg

Riconoscenza per Goffredo Petrassi Gil Morgenstern, violin

Elliott Carter

Sonata for Violin and Piano Leoš Janáček Gil Morgenstern, violin; Rieko Aizawa, piano INTERMISSION String Quartet in F Major, Op. 96, “American Quartet” Antonin Dvořák Gil Morgenstern, violin; Harumi Rhodes, violin; Kathryn Lockwood, viola; Ole Akahoshi, cello The Broyhill Chamber Ensemble Concert Series is generously supported by the Broyhill Family Foundation (in memory of Faye Broyhill), and by Ralph and Venda Lerch/McDonald’s of Boone. Additional performance underwriting has been provided by Budd and Nanette Mayer, Neil and Nancy Schaffel, Peter and Joni Petschauer, the Muriel and Arnold Rosen Endowment for the Arts and the Rosen-Schaffel Endowment for Classical Music Programming. With special thanks to Appalachia Cookie Company, for a generous donation of refreshments during this evening’s performance. Biographical information for this evening’s performers beings on page 85.

PROGRAM NOTES: Georges Enescu Aubade Lointane (Born August 19, 1881, in Liveni-Virnaz, Romania; died May 4, 1955, in Paris) Georges Enescu was a child prodigy on the violin and also the piano. He entered the Vienna Conservatory at age seven and graduated when he was 13. At 14, he continued his studies, this time at the Paris Conservatory, where he studied with Massenet and Fauré. Enescu became a virtuoso violinist, the teacher of Yehudi Menuhin, a conductor who appeared with most of the world’s leading symphony orchestras, and the composer of operas, chamber music and many orchestral works. In recognition of his valuable contributions to the arts in Romania, both the village where he was born and a street in the capital city of Bucharest were renamed for him. Enescu is remembered today mostly for his two Romanian Rhapsodies for Orchestra, but he wrote in virtually every genre and produced a considerable amount of fine chamber music. He completed the Aubade in 1899, and it was published three years later, with the dedication to the King and Queen of Romania, “composée à l’occasion de l’anniversaire de il: mm. le Roi et la Reine de Roumanie.” From his very early days as a child prodigy, Enescu had been a favorite with the Romanian royal family, especially with the artistic and eccentric Queen Elisabeth, who supported his studies abroad. She was a gifted woman who published numerous literary works under the pen name of Carmen Sylva, and she was also known to be a great music-lover. An aubade is generally regarded as a love song, one sung in the morning at the time that lovers must part. This lovely music certainly is romantic with the lower voices, the cello in particular performing the role of a strumming guitar. The work was originally entitled Serenade, but Enescu crossed out this name and replaced it with Aubade, perhaps to emphasize the youthful, fresh feeling he wanted to convey. This playful serenade (its original title) Allegretto grazioso, is a pleasant work; it is lilting and full of light-hearted interchange. It begins with a


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carefree and casual main theme has a little bit of folk dance in its center section. At the end, the noble Romanian national anthem, Tr iasc regele (“Long live the king”), suddenly appears in the viola part, in counterpoint with the opening theme. Edvard Grieg, arr. M.L Williams Wedding Day at Troldhaugen Op. 65 No.6 (Born June 15, 1843, in Bergen, Norway; died there September 4, 1907) Edvard Grieg received his first piano lessons from his mother and began to compose when he was nine. At fifteen, he was sent to the Leipzig Conservatory where he disliked the curriculum because it looked back to Classical principles. Grieg’s interests were progressive; he wanted to write a new kind of music that would be Scandinavian and specifically Norwegian in character. A few other artists shared his nationalist ambitions, but the prosperous Scandinavian middle-class, like its American counterpart at the time, insisted that music from Germany was the only music of value. By his early twenties, Grieg had composed many works based on Norwegian and old Norse legends, among them the incidental music for Ibsen’s Peer Gynt, which gained more popularity internationally than the music of any other Norwegian composer. The emblematic center of Grieg’s work can be found in his miniatures: he composed 66 short works, known as the Lyric Pieces, between 1867 and 1901. In them, a wide range of tonal coloration made up of delicate pastels, harmonies and sudden shades of light and dark contribute a nationalistic and romantic tribute to Norwegian folk music. Wedding Day at Troldhaugen was originally a piano solo. Composed in 1892 and presented to his wife Nina as a 25th wedding anniversary gift, Grieg intended this vivacious work to interpret wedding celebrations as well as recollect his own. Five years after its composition, it appeared in published form in the eighth book of the Lyric Pieces. Years later, commenting on the Lyric Pieces, Grieg remarked to his biographer: “The

realm of harmony has always been my dream world…I have understood the secret depths that one finds in our folk songs is owing to the richness of their untold harmonic possibilities…” Elliott Carter Riconoscenza per Goffredo Petrassi (Born December 11, 1908, in New York; died there November 5, 2012) Elliott Carter was internationally recognized as a very influential American voice in classical music and a leading figure of modernism in the 20th and 21st centuries. Andrew Porter hailed him as “America’s great musical poet.” In Carter’s lengthy career of 75 years, he composed more than 150 pieces, ranging from chamber music to orchestral works to opera, often characterized by a sense of humor. A two-time Pulitzer Prize winning American composer, Elliott Carter developed his interest in music seriously when he was in high school, by which time the composer Charles Ives encouraged Carter, after being shown some of his pieces. Ives recommended that Carter continue his music education at Harvard University where he studied theory and composition with Walter Piston and Gustav Holst, the English composer who was then a visiting professor. Carter then went to Paris for three years of work with Nadia Boulanger, the renowned teacher with whom Aaron Copland and many other American composers had studied. On return to the United States, he taught at the Peabody Conservatory, the Juilliard School of Music, Massachusetts Institute of Technology and at Columbia, Yale and Cornell Universities. Carter was the first composer to receive the US National Medal of Arts, and was inducted into the American Classical Music Hall of Fame. In France he was named Commander of the “Ordre des Arts et des Lettres” and Commander of the Legion of Honor. Riconoscenza per Goffredo Petrassi, (“In Gratitude, Goffredo Petrassi”) one of Four Lauds for solo violin, was composed for the 1984 Festival Pontino, which was a celebration of the 80th birthday of Goffredo Petrassi, (1904-2003) an

Italian modernist composer. Riconoscenza, Carter’s first piece for solo violin, was debuted in the medieval refectory of the Abbey of Fossanova, Priverno, Italy, by Georg Mönch on June 15, 1984. Four Lauds for solo violin (1984-2000) is a collection of solo violin pieces written at different times, intended to express gratitude to some of the musicians whose friendship meant much to him. The others were intended for Aaron Copland, Robert Sessions, Robert Mann, Ole Bøhn and Rolf Schulte. Like many of his recent multi-movement scores, they are disparate works assembled later into a set, though in this case each piece is a tribute to a colleague, and similarities of language and gesture help to bond them. Carter’s early works gained admiration for their vigor and solidity and for showing an independent and original mind at work, although they are strongly rooted in traditional harmony and counterpoint. They have a neoclassical style influenced by his contemporaries Copland, Hindemith, and Stravinsky. Considered a “late bloomer,” Carter was praised in recent decades as an innovator, especially in the areas of tempo relationships and texture. His principal works, four string quartets, several concertos and a symphony, have vast proportions, much complexity and dramatic expression. Carter composed atonal and very rhythmically complex music in which he explored tempo relationships. He developed and cataloged all possible collections of pitches (all possible three-note chords, five-note chords, etc.) and all possible chords of a particular number of pitches, which music theorists systematized into musical set theory. He explained how he journeyed from his earlier style to his more complex, multidimensional music: “I found myself in direct opposition to the static repetitiveness of most early 20th-century music...in which ‘first you do this for a while, then you do that.’ I wanted to mix up ‘this’ and ‘that,’ make them interact in ways other than by linear succession.” Carter’s relationship with Petrassi was a long and beneficial one. It had its origins in the many years Carter spent


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as a visiting composer at the American Academy in Rome, where he and Petrassi were colleagues. Riconoscenza is a single-movement work, written like the music of its dedicatee, utilizing procedures of the second Viennese school of Schoenberg, Webern, and Berg. The virtuosic Riconoscenza is a tour-de-force incorporating many successive registral leaps and quickly moving lines, intricate rhythmic relationships, double, triple and quadruple stops, as well as very difficult harmonics. Riconoscenza also has great emotional breadth, including three radically distinct feelings: a poignant and expansive lyrical line, a discordant, agitated episode, and a more introspective, thoughtful interlude. Each of these three appears multiple times. The work begins with the lyrical line, Dolce, legatissimo, scorrevole (Sweet, as smoothly as possible, flowing, gliding), but yields to the intrusion of the second, Giocosamente, furioso, martellato, (cheerfully, furious, hammered). The mood of the opening returns, only to have the third mood, marked Tranquillo, ben legato (tranquilly, quite smooth) interrupt. Each of the three feelings does not occur in equally spaced or predictable ways, and the work is not bound structurally by them. As for its pitch structure, Carter severely restricts the types of intervallic movement from note to note, using many minor and major seconds and thirds, the occasional tritone, and a few perfect fourths. Leos Janáček Sonata for Violin and Piano (Born July 3, 1854, in Hukvaldy; died August 12, 1928, in Ostrava) Leos Janáček, a musician from the Moravian region of Czechoslovakia, was born in the middle of the 19th century, but his late flowering and his independent musical thought made him a significant figure of the 20th century. He began his musical education in a monastery at Brno where he was a choirboy. Later, he continued his studies in Prague, St. Petersburg, Leipzig and Vienna, but returned to Brno, where he founded and directed a school of

organ-playing that developed into the Brno Conservatory of Music. Janáček devoted an important part of his work to the advancement of the native Slavic cultures, in particular regional folk music and a study of speech intonations, in the regions under Austrian rule that became the Republic of Czechoslovakia. He also had a profound concern for the human condition, especially that of women, which became the subject of several of his operas and other works. His opera Jenufa was first performed in Brno in 1904; its performance in Prague in 1915 was of significance because it exposed Janáček to a wide audience. He completed his last opera, From the House of the Dead, based on the novel by Dostoyevsky in 1928. Janáček began writing his only mature violin sonata in 1914. He worked on it during World War I, and completed it in 1921; it had its premiere a year later. This short and concentrated work in four movements has been called both an epigrammatic sonata and one of suspense. Short motives, swift changes of tempo, and intense emotional expression, all features of his late style, are prevalent. The intense first movement, Con moto, has been said to reflect Janáček’s concerns about the war, yet it is lyrical and begins with a passionate rising figure in the violin. Agitated piano tremolos accompany the plaintive melody that follows. Together the violin and piano carry on a restless dialogue. The development culminates in a troubled climax that leads to the recapitulation section. The second movement, Balada, con moto, has a subject built on a simple motive with folk character, with broken chords in the piano as support. This movement, said to be the only one not revised, has the character of a pastorale. The third movement, Allegretto, consists of a very short scherzo, which again uses a folklike theme, this time in the piano. The violin accompanies the melody with trills and scale passages. The finale, Adagio, opens with the composer’s direction of “ferocious.” The middle section reaches a strained climax before returning to the opening material. Near the end, the presence of the war

intrudes once more when the violin sings out an august subject accompanied by a piano trill used, according to Janáček, to signal “the Russian armies entering Hungary.” The work concludes somewhat abruptly and quietly, but powerfully nonetheless. Antonín Dvořák String Quartet in F Major, Op. 96, “American Quartet” (Born September 8, 1841, in Nelahozeves; died May 1, 1904, in Prague) Dvořák studied the violin and organ as a child, and at the age of sixteen, left home to study in Prague. Five years later, he joined the orchestra of the National Theater as a violist (in those days an instrument usually taken up only by failed violinists), but he was almost thirty before one of his own major compositions was successfully performed. Then his career took off, and he eventually became a figure of world importance. He held a post as professor of composition at Prague Conservatory, was the recipient of honorary degrees from Cambridge University in England and the University in Prague, and, during his three-year residence in the United States, was director of a conservatory in New York. Chamber music had an important place in Dvořák’s life; many of his earliest works were quartets and quintets, modeled after those of Beethoven and Schubert that he played with his colleagues while developing his craft. One of the gifted and eager youths who flocked to Dvořák’s classes in New York was an African-American musician, Henry Thacker Burleigh (1866-1949), who was to have a distinguished career as a composer and singer. Burleigh spent long hours teaching the composer the spirituals and slaves’ work songs that Dvořák had in mind when he wrote, “The future music of this country must be founded upon what are called Negro melodies. These beautiful themes are the product of the soil, the folk songs of America, and composers must turn to them. All great musicians have borrowed from the songs of the common people.” Dvořák borrowed from them, but not by quotation. As he later explained, “I tried


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to write in the spirit of the American folk melodies.” After his first academic year, Dvořák happily left the noise and tumult that even then plagued New York to spend the summer in Spillville, Iowa, a tiny town settled by Czech immigrants, where he felt very much at home. There, paradoxically, he composed two major works in his newly invented “American” style, this Quartet and the String Quintet, Op. 97. (The New World Symphony, which he had completely sketched in New York, was orchestrated in Spillville.) He arrived there on June 5,1893, and between June 8 and 10, sketched the entire quartet, noting, “It went quickly, thank God. I am satisfied with it.” On the 12th, he began to write out the finished score, headed, “Second composition written in America.” On the 23rd, he completed the work. As soon as parts were copied out, he and some friends played through it, and on January 12, 1894, the Kneisel Quartet gave the premiere in New York.

The quartet’s beauty and freshness of expression have less to do with America than with Dvořák’s delight on discovering Bohemia here, in Spillville. The syncopated rhythms and the pentatonic scales may possibly suggest the kind of melody that he learned from his African American students, or as is sometimes claimed, from the Native Americans who lived near Spillville, but he would probably not have learned enough of the latter’s style to begin using it in so important a work only three days after his arrival there. The simple truth is that many of the music’s characteristics that vary from the classic standards of Germany and Austria can also be heard in the folk music of Bohemia and in many works that Dvořák wrote long before he arrived in America. The Quartet opens, Allegro, ma non troppo, with a quietly joyous, expansive movement, whose original themes, clearly stated and defined, are classically organized and treated. The Lento slow movement is an extended melancholy duet for the first violin and cello, or

sometimes the second violin, with a gently rocking accompaniment. Next comes a scherzo, Molto vivace, in which the predominance of a single theme makes the music seem almost to be a set of free variations. The warbling figure is a witty reflection on the song of what Dvořák called “a damned bird, red, but with black wings,” perhaps the scarlet tanager. The Finale is a rondo, Vivace, ma non troppo, a jolly romp that pauses only for a brief chorale of the kind that Dvořák improvised at the Spillville church organ. Program Notes: Susan Halpern, © 2016


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30TH ROSEN SCULPTURE WALK Sculpture Walk with juror Willie Ray Parish and Turchin Center director Hank Foreman

SATURDAY, JULY 23 10 AM, SMITH GALLERY, SCHAEFER CENTER FOR THE PERFORMING ARTS FREE EVENT

The Rosen Sculpture Competition and Exhibition is a national, juried competition presented annually by the Turchin Center for the Visual Arts on the campus of Appalachian State University. To celebrate the 30th anniversary of this important program, join competition juror Willie Ray Parish and Turchin Center director Hank Foreman on an educational outdoor tour of the ten selected pieces from this year’s competition. The tour concludes at the Schaefer Center with an awards reception. Walter Early The Gate Hangs Well

Mike Hansel Intestinal Fortitude

Hanna Jubran Balance Point

Stephen Klema Hobbes’ Claw

Kyle Van Lusk Ian’s Hammer

Shawn Morin Hybridized Daylily

Mike Roig Aeriel

Bob Turan Windsong

Adam Walls Self Portrait

Davis Whitfield Wrapped Around You

Made possible by the continued generosity of the Rosen Family: The Martin & Doris Rosen Giving Fund/Debbie Rosen Davidson and David Rosen/Charles & Nancy Rosenblatt Foundation.

THE ROSEN SCULPTURE INVITATIONAL SCULPTORS: Walter Early, Welded Steel (Chicago, IL) Mike Hansel, Intestinal Fortitude (Middletown, RI) Hanna Jubran, Balance Point (Grimesland, NC) Stephen Klema, Hobbes’ Claw – Unsheathed (Winsted, CT) Kyle Van Lusk, Ian’s Hammer (Brevard, NC) Shawn Morin, Hybridized Daylily (Bowling Green, OH) Mike Roig, Aeriel (Carrboro, NC) Bob Turan, Windsong (Earlton, NY) Adam Walls, Self Portrait (Hope Mills, NC) Davis Whitfield, Wrapped Around You (Sylva, NC)

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SATURDAY, JULY 23 10 AM, SMITH GALLERY, SCHAEFER CENTER FOR THE PERFORMING ARTS

Building Sculpture, Building Community: Extending the Reach of the Rosen Outdoor Sculpture Exhibition adds an exciting new dimension to the national juried sculpture competition that has been a cornerstone of An Appalachian Summer Festival, for the past 30 years. Local artist Pam Brewer worked with underserved community groups to design, fabricate and install a public sculpture that will be prominently featured as part of the competition’s popular Sculpture Walk during the summer festival's 2016 season. An exhibition documenting the creative process of the community sculpture project is on display through August 6 in the Smith Gallery. This project has been generously supported by the Challenge America Program of the National Endowment for the Arts

Building Sculpture/Building Community: Extending the Reach of the Rosen Outdoor Sculpture Exhibition


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ABOUT THE COMPANY

SATURDAY, JULY 23 8 PM, SCHAEFER CENTER FOR THE PERFORMING ARTS Artistic Director and Choreographer Pascal Rioult Associate Artistic Director Executive Director Joyce Herring Amy Harrison Company Catherine Cooch Brian Flynn Charis Haaines Jere Hunt Melanie Kimmel Corinna Lee Nicholson Michael Spencer Phillips Sara Elizabeth Seger Sabatino A. Verlezza Holt Walborn Musicians of the Broyhill Chamber Ensemble Gill Morgenstern and Nurit Pacht, violin; Kathryn Lockwood, viola; Ole Akahoshi, cello; Rieko Aiawa, piano Production Manager Spencer Anderson Scenic Design Harry Feiner Projection Animation Brian Clifford Beasley

Lighting Design David Finley Costume Design Karen Young

Major supporters of RIOULT Dance NY include: The Atlantic Philanthropies Director/Employee Designated Gift Fund; Berkshire Taconic Community Foundation; Exploring the Arts; Fund for New Works, a Kenneth French Legacy; Google Ad Grants, Gordon & Harriet Greenfield Foundation; The Geoffrey C. Hughes Foundation; Greenberg Traurig LLP; Harkness Foundation for Dance; Kendall-Parker Associates LLC; LaGuardia Performing Arts Center; New York City Department of Cultural Affairs, in partnership with the City Council; New York State Council on the Arts with the support of Governor Andrew Cuomo and the New York State Legislature; The Shubert Foundation; Sidley Austin LLP; and TAG Creative.

VIEWS OF THE FLEETING WORLD (dedicated to the memory of Harriet and Gordon Greenfield) Choreography: Pascal Rioult Music: J. S. Bach, The Art of Fugue Projection Design: Harry Feiner Projection Animation: Brian Clifford Beasley Lighting: David Finley Costumes: Karen Young Catherine Cooch Brian Flynn Charis Haines Jere Hunt Melanie Kimmel Corinna Lee Nicholson Michael Spencer Phillips Sara Elizabeth Seger Sabatino A. Verlezza Holt Walborn Orchard: The Company Gathering Storm: The Company Wild Horses: The Company Dusk: Corinna Lee Nicholson and Michael Spencer Phillips Summer Wind: Charis Haines and Jere Hunt Moonlight: Sara Elizabeth Seger and Brian Flynn Flowing River: The Company J. S. Bach’s The Art of Fugue is beautifully wrought with both purity and strength and provides a most inspiring canvas on which to choreograph a work that celebrates beauty and humanity in art, as in life. This is the tribute I want to offer to the memory of two exceptional people in dedication to their belief in the transforming power of the performing arts. Pascal Rioult, June 2008 (First performed June 3, 2008 – Skirball Center for the Performing Arts, NYC) Commissioned by the Harriet & Gordon Greenfield Foundation.Views of the Fleeting World was developed while in residence at the Kaatsbaan International Dance Center which was supported in part by the Geoffrey C. Hughes Foundation and with a New York State Residency grant from the New York State Council on the Arts and through a space grant with LaGuardia Performing Arts Center’s lab program.

Founded in 1994, RIOULT Dance NY fast became an established name in modern dance with a reputation for presenting the sensual, articulate, and exquisitely musical works of Pascal Rioult. The New York City-based dance company presents an annual New York season, tours internationally, conducts extensive inschool arts education and community outreach programs, and offers dance training to the public through classes, workshops, and intensives. Extraordinary for an organization its size, RIOULT Dance NY is highly committed to its dancers, providing steady employment and year-round health insurance. Each dancer’s creative development is fostered through training classes, teaching opportunities, and challenging repertory while maintaining comprehensive rehearsal and performance schedules. The company is fortunate to have welcomed new dancers over the years and retained many, some of whom have danced with the company for over a decade. Education and community outreach have been integral to RIOULT Dance NY since its inception. RIOULT’s arts-in-education program, DanceREACH, offers an interactive approach to introducing students to the world of modern dance. It has impacted thousands of students and community at home, in the U.S., and abroad. Ongoing relationships with schools in New York City and the metropolitan area allow the company to continually inspire new generations of dancers and audiences. RIOULT Dance NY has performed in theaters and festivals throughout North America including New York City Center Fall for Dance (New York, NY), Lincoln Center Out-of-Doors (New York, NY), American Dance Festival (Durham, NC), the Annenberg Center (Philadelphia, PA), the Raymond F. Kravis Center for the Performing Arts (West Palm Beach, FL), and Zellerbach Hall (Berkeley, CA), among others. Widespread international touring has brought the company to Pascal Rioult’s homeland of France for the Cannes International Festival, Danse à Aix, Festival du Val du Marne, Temps le Danse Festival, Paris Opera Bastille, and La Maison de la Danse, as well as to the


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Catherine Cooch

Pause CITY Choreography: Pascal Rioult Music: J. S. Bach, “Sonata for Violin and Piano No. 6 in G major Projection Design: Brian Clifford Beasley Lighting: David Finley Costumes: Karen Young Corinna Lee Nicholson Michael Spencer Phillips Holt Walborn

(First performed January 19, 2010 – The Joyce Theater, NYC) City was developed in residence at the Kaatsbaan International Dance Center supported, in part, with a New York State Residency grant from the New York State Council on the Arts, and through a space grant with LaGuardia Performing Arts Center’s lab program. Additional support was provided by the National Endowment for the Arts and The Kenneth French Fund for New Works.

Intermission POLYMORPHOUS Choreography: Pascal Rioult Music: J. S. Bach, selected Preludes and Fugues from The Well-Tempered Clavier Scenic Design: Harry Feiner Projection Design: Brian Clifford Beasley Lighting Design: David Finley Costume Design: Karen Young Brian Flynn Charis Haines Jere Hunt Sara Elizabeth Seger (First performed February 6, 2015 – DeBartolo Performing Arts Center, Notre Dame, IN) Support provided by the National Endowment for the Arts and the Fund for New Works, a Kenneth French Legacy. Additional creative and technical support provided by the University of Notre Dame’s DeBartolo Performing Arts Center.

Pause CELESTIAL TIDES Choreography: Pascal Rioult Music: J. S. Bach, Brandenburg Concerto No. 6 in B-flat major Projection Design: Harry Feiner Projection Animation: Brian Clifford Beasley Lighting: David Finley Costumes: Karen Young Catherine Cooch Brian Flynn Charis Haines Jere Hunt Melanie Kimmel Sara Elizabeth Seger Sabatino A. Verlezza Holt Walborn I Allegro The Company II Adagio Charis Haines Jere Hunt Sara Elizabeth Seger Michael Spencer Phillips III Allegro The Company (First Performed June 14, 2011 – The Joyce Theater, New York City) Celestial Tides was developed in residence at the Kaatsbaan International Dance Center supported, in part, with a New York State Residency grant from the New York State Council on the Arts, and through a space grant with LaGuardia Performing Arts Center’s lab program. Additional support was provided by the National Endowment for the Arts and The Kenneth French Fund for New Works.

Performances by the Broyhill Chamber Ensemble Concert Series are generously supported by the Broyhill Family Foundation (in memory of Faye Broyhill), and by Ralph and Venda Lerch/McDonald’s of Boone. Additional performance underwriting has been provided by Budd and Nanette Mayer, Neil and Nancy Schaffel, the R.Y. and Eileen L. Sharpe Foundation, and the Muriel and Arnold Rosen Endowment for the Arts. Biographical information for the musicians can be found on page 85.

Bermuda Festival of the Performing Arts (Bermuda), the Tamaulipas International Festival (Mexico), Le Grand Théâtre De Québec (Canada), and on stages in Italy, Switzerland, Germany, Belgium, and others worldwide.

WHO’S WHO IN THE COMPANY PASCAL RIOULT (Artistic Director/ Choreographer). A former track and field athlete in France, Mr. Rioult came to the United States on a fellowship from the French Ministry of Culture to study modern dance in 1981. After performing with the companies of May O’Donnell and Paul Sanasardo he was invited to join the Martha Graham Dance Company. He interpreted many of the most prestigious roles in the Graham repertory as a principal dancer, and in 1990, Ms. Graham created the central role (Death Figure) in her ballet Eye of the Goddess for him. Mr. Rioult performed opposite Mikhail Baryshnikov and Joyce Herring in El Penitente and was featured in two television specials: “Martha Graham in Japan” and “Five Dances by Martha Graham,” filmed at the Paris Opera. Since starting his own company, RIOULT Dance NY in 1994, Mr. Rioult has dedicated his energies to developing his own choreographic style and nurturing a robust ensemble of dancers. Of his work, Black Diamond, Anna Kisselgoff of The New York Times wrote, “...he has met the challenge of comparison with George Balanchine.” Mr. Rioult’s works have been commissioned by the American Dance Festival; Cal Performances Zellerbach Hall in Berkeley, CA; the Ballet du Nord in Roubaix, France; the Geneva Ballet, Switzerland; The Orchestra of St. Luke’s; the Gordon & Harriet Greenfield Foundation; the Grand Marnier Foundation; the Théâtre de Saint Quentin en Yvelines France; Lehigh University in Bethlehem, PA; and Marymount Manhattan College; among others. He is a two-time recipient of the Choo-San Goh Award for Choreography. JOYCE HERRING (Associate Artistic Director).A founding member of RIOULT Dance NY, Ms. Herring danced with the company until 2004 while holding the


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positions of Rehearsal Director, Regisseur, and, in 2008-2009, Executive Director. Ms. Herring and Mr. Rioult met while dancing with the Martha Graham Dance Company, where she was a principal dancer until 1999; they were married in 1988. During her career with the Graham Company she interpreted many leading roles including Lamentation, Deep Song, Jocasta in Night Journey, the Bride in Appalachian Spring, the Virgin in Primitive Mysteries, Heretic, Joan of Arc in Seraphic Dialogue, Helen of Troy in Clytemnestra, and the Conversation of Lovers in Acts of Light, among others. A former director of the Martha Graham School, Ms. Herring remains a regisseur of the Graham Trust. She has been on the faculties of the Conservatory of Dance at SUNY Purchase and Marymount Manhattan College, and has taught as a guest teacher at the Juilliard School, Rudra Bejart (Lausanne), Alfredo Corvino’s Dance Circle, the Neighborhood Playhouse, Harvard Summer Dance Center, North Carolina School of the Arts, Ballet du Nord, the Lyon Opera Ballet, the Conservatoire Nationale Superieure de Musique de Lyon, the Geneva Ballet and the Ballet de Lorraine, Interlochen Academy of the Performing Arts, and more. Ms. Herring continues to stage Mr. Rioult’s work on companies and universities throughout the U.S. and abroad.

DANCERS CATHERINE COOCH (Dancer) is from Fairfax, VA and began dancing at age three. Ms. Cooch studied modern, ballet, pointe, tap, jazz, and contemporary. She also trained at Maryland Youth Ballet under Michelle Lees. In May 2013, Ms. Cooch received a BFA in Dance from Marymount Manhattan College under the direction of Katie Langan, where she performed works by Loni Landon, Maxine Steinman, and Anthony Ferro. Ms. Cooch joined RIOULT Dance NY in 2013. BRIAN FLYNN (Dancer/Assistant Rehearsal Director) is originally from Walpole, MA. Mr. Flynn earned his BFA from the Conservatory of Dance at Purchase College and has performed the works of choreographers such as Paul

Taylor, Merce Cunningham, Mary Anthony, Eun Me Ahn, and Kevin Wynn. He has also performed with the Boston Ballet in Ben Stevenson’s production of Cleopatra. Mr. Flynn has taught and set works for RIOULT at the Alvin Ailey/ Fordham University BFA program, Goucher College, and the Bermuda Civic Ballet. Mr. Flynn joined RIOULT Dance NY in 1999 and is co-founder of RIOULT Circle. CHARIS HAINES (Dancer) is originally from Carpinteria, CA. She graduated summa cum laude from the University of California, Santa Barbara with a BFA in Dance, where she received the Alice Condodina Performance Award upon graduation. In NYC, Ms. Haines has performed with Wendy Osserman, Silver-Brown Dance, Jessica Gaynor Dance, Katherine Howard, Sue Hogan, and Lux Dance. She is a teaching artist with RIOULT’s DanceREACH program and is also a certified Pilates instructor. Ms. Haines was first introduced to the company while working at The Joyce Theater as the Assistant House Manager. She joined RIOULT Dance NY in 2007. JERE HUNT (Dancer), a native of Huntsville, AL, holds a BFA in Dance from Marymount Manhattan College. While there, he performed works by David Parsons, Christopher d’Amboise, Martha Graham, Molissa Fenley, Edgar Zendejas, and others. Mr. Hunt was an apprentice with the Alabama Ballet under the direction of Wes Chapman. In NYC, he has worked with Veracity Dance Theatre, SYREN Modern Dance, and DeMa Dance. He also had the privilege of staging Pascal Rioult’s Bolero at Adelphi University. Mr. Hunt joined RIOULT Dance NY in 2010. MELANIE KIMMEL (Dancer) is originally from Baltimore, MD. She graduated cum laude from Marymount Manhattan College with a BFA in Dance. She has performed works by Dwight Rhoden, Kataryzna Skarpetowska, Elena Comendador, Jae Man Joo, and Pascal Rioult. Ms. Kimmel is also a certified yoga instructor. She joined RIOULT Dance NY in 2015. CORINNA LEE NICHOLSON (Dancer) is originally from Houston, TX. She graduated summa cum laude from

Southern Methodist University, receiving her BFA in Dance Performance with an award for Outstanding Achievement. While at SMU, Ms. Nicholson performed the works of Martha Graham, Maurice Béjart, Alvin Ailey, Paul Taylor, Robert Battle, and Pascal Rioult’s Wien. Since moving to NYC, Ms. Nicholson has worked with Amy Marshall Dance Company, Mazzini Dance Collective, and Taylor 2. Ms. Nicholson joined RIOULT Dance NY in 2015. MICHAEL SPENCER PHILLIPS (Dancer) is a graduate of the University of Michigan (BFA, Dance) where he was also a member of the Peter Sparling Dance Company. He attended the Merce Cunningham School on scholarship and performed in the Cunningham Repertory Group. Other performance credits: New York City Opera, Battleworks Dance Company, Jennifer Muller/The Works, Risa Jaraslow and Dancers, and an apprenticeship with the Bill T. Jones/Arnie Zane Dance Company. Mr. Phillips is a teaching artist with RIOULT’s DanceREACH program and has had the privilege of restaging Mr. Rioult’s work. He joined RIOULT Dance NY in 2002 and is co-founder of RIOULT Circle. SARA ELIZABETH SEGER (Dancer). Originally from New Jersey, Ms. Seger attended high school at the University of North Carolina School of the Arts, where she performed works by Mark Morris, José Limón, Larry Keigwin, Diane Markham, and others. She then attended the Fellowship Program at The Ailey School and performed Memoria with the Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater during their New York City Center Season. Other credits: Lincoln Center Institute, Cool NY Dance Festival, Triskelion Arts, Jennifer Muller/The Works Hatch Series, and American Dance Festival. Ms. Seger joined RIOULT Dance NY in 2011. SABATINO A. VERLEZZA (Dancer) grew up in Shaker Heights, OH. He received a BFA in Dance from Kent State University, where he graduated summa cum laude with honors from the National Honors Society for Dance Arts. While at Kent State, he also sat on the Board of the National Dance Education


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Organization. He began his dance education at the Cleveland San Jose Ballet/Cleveland School of Dance and continued his training with Nancy Lushington and his parents Barbara and Sabatino Verlezza. He has performed multiple works by May O’Donnell and is a certified teacher of the O’Donnell technique. Mr. Verlezza joined RIOULT Dance NY in 2012. HOLT WALBORN (Dancer), from Western Kentucky, started dancing at 13 and studied at Interlochen Arts Academy. He graduated from Butler University with a BFA in Dance, where he worked with Marek Cholewa, Tong Wang, and Susan McGuire. Performance credits include: Paul Taylor’s Cloven Kingdom, Antony Tudor’s Dark Elegies, and the Nutcracker Prince in Butler Ballet’s The Nutcracker. In May 2010, Mr. Walborn moved to NYC where he worked with Spark Movement Collective and The Hoover Dam Collective. Mr. Walborn joined RIOULT Dance NY in 2011. EMMA SADLER (Apprentice) is originally from Grapevine, TX. In May of 2015, Ms. Sadler graduated with honors from the University of Oklahoma under the direction of Mary Margaret Holt. While there, she performed the works of Alvin Ailey, José Limón, Jessica Lang, Donald McKayle, Austin Hartel, and others. Emma is also a certified IM=X Pilates instructor. Ms. Sadler joined RIOULT Dance NY in 2015.

BOARD OF DIRECTORS Hope Greenfield (Chair) Donald L. Holley, Esq. (Honorary Chair) Joseph W. Armbrust Susan P. Fraser Judy S. Gordon Joyce Herring Hazel Kandall Lisa Mueller Keith M. Pattiz Terry Rieser Pascal Rioult Lee Traub (Emerita)

STAFF

Artistic Director/Choreographer . . . . . . . Pascal Rioult Associate Artistic Director. . . . . . . . . . . Joyce Herring Executive Director . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Amy Harrison Chief Financial Officer. . . . . . . . . . . . . . Judy Boomer Manager of Institutional Giving . . . . . . . Jenna Purcell Marketing Manager. . . . . . . . . . . . Penélope González Production Manager . . . . . . . . . . . Spencer Anderson Artistic Director of Youth Programs Marianna Tsartolia Administrative Director of Youth Programs . . . . . . . . . . . . Anastasia Soroczynski

BOOKING INFORMATION:

Amy Harrison, Executive Director RIOULT Dance NY 246 West 38th Street, 11th Floor New York, NY 10018 Tel: 212-398-5901 Cell: 646-232-3604 www.rioult.orgamy@rioult.org

LifeStore Bank, Boone Boone Point, Boone Casey & Casey Law Offices, Boone Elk Park Town Hall, Elk Park Graystone Eye Center, Boone Grandfather Mountain Renovations, Linville

Animal Emergency and Pet Care Clinic of the High Country, Boone Five Guys Burgers & Fries, Boone Western Carolina Eye Associates, Boone Lodges at Winkler’s Creek, Boone Many fine residences in the High Country


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A SCHAEFER POPULAR SERIES EVENT

MONDAY, JULY 25 8 PM, SCHAEFER CENTER FOR THE PERFORMING ARTS

Featuring a dozen musicians, Pink Martini performs a stylish and sophisticated blend of jazz, classical, and old-fashioned pop on concert stages around the world. Thomas Lauderdale founded Pink Martini in 1994 to provide more beautiful and inclusive musical soundtracks for political fundraisers for causes such as civil rights, affordable housing, the environment, libraries, public broadcasting, education and parks. Twenty years later, Pink Martini continues to tour the world, singing in 22 languages and bringing together unique melodies and rhythms to create an eclectic and modern sound. In 2014, Pink Martini was inducted into both the Hollywood Bowl Hall of Fame and the Oregon Music Hall of Fame.

“This is rich, hugely approachable music, utterly cosmopolitan yet utterly unpretentious. And it seems to speak to just about everybody... from grade-schoolers to grandmothers to the young and hip and beautiful.” – The Washington Post

SERIES SPONSORSHIP PROVIDED BY WESTGLOW RESORT & SPA AND ROWLAND’S RESTAURANT, MADE POSSIBLE THROUGH THE GENEROSITY OF BONNIE AND JAMIE SCHAEFER.

PERFORMANCE SPONSORSHIP PROVIDED BY: NORTHERN TRUST, GOODNIGHT BROTHERS, SKYBEST COMMUNICATIONS, INC., MAST GENERAL STORE, BOONE AREA VISITORS BUREAU

PINK MARTINI

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3 Hearts THE HELENE AND STEPHEN WEICHOLZ GLOBAL FILM SERIES

TUESDAY, JULY 26 7 PM, SCHAEFER CENTER FOR THE PERFORMING ARTS

A touching and tense drama about destiny, connections, and passion, 3 Hearts presents a romantic look at a classic love triangle. One night in provincial France, Marc meets Sylvie after missing his train back to Paris. Instantly and intensely drawn to one another, they wander through the streets until morning in rare, almost choreographed, harmony. A thwarted plan for a second meeting, however, sends each in a separate direction which will change their lives forever. FRANCE; NOT RATED; DIRECTED BY BENOĂŽT JACQUOT (2014); 106 MINUTES

Pre-film talk with Dr. John Pfeifer begins at 7pm, with the film beginning at approximately 7:30pm. Concessions, including popcorn, beer, wine and cold beverages are available for purchase. With special thanks to our generous sponsors for this series, Helene and Stephen Weicholz.

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THE CAST IN/VISIBLE THEATRE PRESENTS A BIG WEENIE PRODUCTION

THURSDAY, JULY 28 AND

FRIDAY, JULY 29 8 PM, VALBORG THEATRE

Directed by Derek Davidson Producer: Karen Sabo Scenic Design: Aaron Bridgeman Costume Design: Rebecca Cairns and Ann Hoskins Stage Manager: Bridget Mundy Tech Director: Tim Snyder There will be no intermission. Setting: The Mountains of Central Appalachia, late October, 1929 An ASL interpreter will be available for the performance on July 28. With special thanks to Kevin Warner and the Appalachian Department of Theatre and Dance, Elaine and Jonathan Topodas, Cindy Ball, the artists of the Mauzy Visual Art Program, the In/Visible Theatre Board and Committees.

Jared H. Coble (Sonny) Jared recently finished his schooling at both Appalachian State and Pennsylvania State University’s theatre departments. He has performed in a variety of roles, including Bobby Strong in Urinetown, Moritz Steifel in Spring Awakening, Wyndham Brandon in Rope, and Damis in Tartuffe. He also enjoys playing percussion, singing acapella, and writing bad poetry during any time spent outside a theatre. This is his first time working with In/Visible Theatre and is honored to be associated with such an incredible organization. Kadey Lynn Ballard (Ensemble) Kadey Lynn Ballard is a multimodal artist and performer based in Charlotte, North Carolina. She is returning for her second summer season with In/Visible Theatre. Kadey Lynn is a member of experimental theatre company, XOXO performance. International: Forum Theatre Workshops (Modi’in, Israel); Off-Off Broadway/New York Theatre: Wiseacre Farm (Thirteenth Street Rep Co), Proof (TKC); Regional/ Local: I Won’t Hurt You (XOXO), Later Rain (Triptych Collective), Without Words (In/Visible Theatre). Education: BA Performing Arts Studies, Lees McRae College 2011. Lauren Hayworth (Musician) Lauren Hayworth moved to Boone in 2006 to pursue a graduate degree in music, and has since made the High Country her home. She currently works in administration in Appalachian’s Hayes School of Music, and lives with her husband Jake and their two cats in Sugar Grove. She performs regularly with the Boone-based big band Swing Set, the gypsy jazz combo The Djangovers, and the close harmony vocal trio, The Mercury Dames. Her most recent stage role was Sister Mary Amnesia in the Beanstalk Theatre’s production of Nunsense. Savannah Bennett (Ensemble) Savannah Bennett is so honored to be performing with In/Visible Theatre again this summer! Savannah is a junior at Appalachian State University majoring in Molecular Biology with a minor in Theatre Arts. Regional/Local: Urinetown (Hope Cladwell), Assassins (Ensemble), Without Words (Pianist/Ensemble), Chicago (Velma), The Vagina Monologues.


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Teresa Lee (Villager/ Puppeteer) Teresa Lee is a professor teaching acting, movement and children’s theatre in the Department of Theatre & Dance at Appalachian State, where she also directs. She is an Artistic Collaborator with In/Visible Theatre, directing, performing and choreographing stage fights and was last seen on the Valborg stage in their production of Kill Will. Teresa has performed in several In/Visible Theatre staged readings, including A Man’s World and Cassandra Singing. She also appeared in Fellow Traveler, produced by Triad Stage for An Appalachian Summer Festival. She is thrilled to be a part of this exciting new work! James Alton Gaither (Musician/Isaac) James was born and raised in Hickory, and became interested in music and drama while in High School in nearby Newton, North Carolina. He spent a year at North Carolina A&T University studying fashion, then transferred to Catawba Valley Community College. He now lives in Winston Salem, where he studies drama at the University of North Carolina School of the Arts. He will be entering his junior year in the fall, and is more than happy to share his love and passion for storytelling with audiences from all over. Julie Chiles (Musician) In her native home of Columbia, South Carolina, Julie started playing the violin at a young age. At Appalachian State University where she received a degree in Music Therapy, she discovered a newfound passion for Appalachian music and culture. More recently, she went on to graduate from North Carolina State University master’s program in Agricultural Education. Julie performs with several folk bands including The Buck Stops Here and has played at various festivals and venues across the state. She currently teaches music classes and lives in Purlear, NC.

PRODUCTION Alexa Hughes (Production Assistant) Alexa Hughes is a senior at Appalachian State University majoring in Women’s and Gender Studies, and minoring in Theatre Arts. She has spent her life in various theaters, performing and

working in many roles. Following graduation, Alexa plans to work with non-profit organizations, and to bring the arts into as many people’s lives as possible. This is Alexa’s first time working with In/Visible Theatre, and she is excited to be a part of such a wonderful theatre company. Bridget Mundy (Stage Manager) Bridget Mundy is a recent graduate of Appalachian State University with a BA in Theatre. She is excited to work with In/Visible Theatre again this summer. Regional/Local: Clybourne Park (ASM), Chicago (Stage Manager), Without Words (Stage Manager) Assassins (ASM). Bridget also works as a playwright, and has had her works performed at Appalachian State, as well as by In/Visible Theatre. Caitlin Neal-Jones (Dramaturg) Caitlin holds degrees in international affairs and anthropology, and higher education counseling. As a pastime she enjoys studying history, sociology, and multicultural studies which she incorporates into her new hobby of dramaturgy. She teaches online courses for Lees-McRae College and she recently moved to Louisiana to further her career in school counseling and administration. Caitlin has been a friend of In/Visible Theatre since its inception and is appreciative of the chance to participate in Mauzy as a member of the company. David Sabbagh (Sound Designer) David Sabbagh is a recent graduate from Appalachian State University. This is his second year working with In/Visible Theatre, having been the technical director for Without Words last summer. His past sound design credits include Holmes: The Art of Deduction and English Without Effort at Appalachian State, as well as Miss Saigon at Theatre Alliance in Winston-Salem. He’s grateful for the opportunity to work with this wonderful company again! Derek Davidson (Director/ Playwright) Derek Davidson is Artistic Director of In/Visible Theatre, and is a playwright, director, and AEA actor. He was an Associate Artistic Director for the Barter Theatre in Virginia where his play The Road Where it Curves Away won “Best Play” in the 2004 Appalachian Festival

of Plays and Playwrights. Davidson wrote and directed the independent feature “This is Not the South,” which played at numerous festivals, and won ‘Best Feature’ in the Southern Appalachian Film Festival 2009, ‘Best Film’ in Skyfest 2009, and ‘Best Tennessee Film’ in the Secret City Film Festival. His play Bumbershoot premiered at FringeNYC 2012, and was e-published by IndieTheatreNow.com as one of the best new scripts of 2012. His show Groundwork, co-created with actor Mike Ostroski, has been produced nationally, and most recently appeared in the Hollywood Fringe Festival. Derek has taught dramaturgy at Carnegie Mellon University, and currently teaches playwriting at Appalachian State University. He is married to Karen Sabo, and has a daughter, Mary Owens Davidson. John Marty (Lighting Designer) John Marty teaches and designs for the Theatre and Dance Department at Appalachian State University. He has designed for several local and regional theatre companies including Barter Theatre, Ensemble Stage, The Blowing Rock Stage Company, and Temple Theatre. A native of Minnesota, he earned his MFA in lighting design from the University of Wisconsin, Madison. He wishes to thanks his wife, Paulette and his two plucky daughters, Fiona and Zea, for all their support. Karen Sabo (Producer) Karen Sabo is the Artistic Producer of In/Visible Theatre, and is also a director, teacher, and union actor. She has been a member of three different resident acting companies, most recently at the Barter Theater in Virginia where she also became a resident director, dialect coach, and Director of Education. Karen studied acting with the American Conservatory Theatre, the San Francisco Mime Troupe, the Saratoga International Theatre Institute, and Shakespeare and Company. She has two degrees in liberal arts; a BA from Hampshire College in Massachusetts and an MA from ETSU in Tennessee. She is the Executive Director of the Women’s Fund of the Blue Ridge, which allocates money to improve the lives of women and girls in the High Country. She lives in Boone,


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with her husband, Dr. Derek Davidson, and her daughter, Rachel Sabo-Hedges. Rebecca Cairns & Ann Hoskins (Costume Designers) Rebecca Cairns and Ann Hoskins have worked together to costume over forty productions. Favorite shows include The Tempest, Devil Boys From Beyond, Elizabeth Rex, Much Ado About Nothing, and Arcadia. They are delighted to be working with the lovely folks at In/Visible Theatre again this summer. Tim Snyder (Technical Director) Tim works in theatrical design and technical production across western North Carolina. He collaborates regularly with the ASU Department of Theatre and Dance, with recent projects including the lighting and sound design for Clybourne Park, audio engineering for Avenue Q, and lighting design for the North Carolina Dance Festival 2015. He also designed lights for SG Dance Theatre’s Nth and Horn in the West 2016. Additionally, Tim is the technical director at Harvest House Performing Arts Venue in Boone and a professional

A/V system designer and integrator with Selah Media Productions. Cody Watkins (Props Master) Cody Watkins is a senior Theatre Education Major here at Appalachian. He is a North Carolina native, born and raised, and is an avid participant in the arts. He has a major interest in

puppetry and hopes to hone his craft through his work. His last work was building Moving Box Puppets for App State’s Spring Production of “Avenue Q.” He hopes to help expand the idea of what a puppet can be and can do!


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A SCHAEFER POPULAR SERIES EVENT

SATURDAY, JULY 30 8 PM, SCHAEFER CENTER FOR THE PERFORMING ARTS

New Orleans native Trombone Shorty is the bandleader and frontman of Trombone Shorty & Orleans Avenue, a hard-edged funk band that employs hip-hop beats, rock dynamics and improvisation in a jazz tradition. Trombone Shorty began his career as a bandleader at the young age of six, and toured internationally for the first time at age 12. He spent his teens playing with brass bands throughout New Orleans before joining Lenny Kravitz’ horn section on a worldwide tour. In 2010, Trombone Shorty released his debut album, the Grammynominated Backatown, followed by For True in 2011, which topped Billboard magazine’s contemporary jazz chart for 12 weeks. His newest album, Say That to This, was released in 2013 and features funk/jazz elements of New Orleans. Trombone Shorty appeared in several episodes of HBO’s Treme, and has recently appeared on The Tonight Show with Jay Leno, Jimmy Kimmel Live, Late Night with Jimmy Fallon and Conan. In 2012, he performed at the White House in honor of Black History Month with music royalty B.B. King, Mick Jagger, Jeff Beck and Booker T. Jones. At this year’s Grammy Awards, he performed alongside Madonna, Macklemore & Ryan Lewis, and Mary Lambert. In 2012, he received the President’s Medal from Tulane University in recognition of his charitable work with the Trombone Shorty Foundation, which donates quality instruments to schools across New Orleans.

SERIES SPONSORSHIP PROVIDED BY WESTGLOW RESORT & SPA AND ROWLAND’S RESTAURANT, MADE POSSIBLE THROUGH THE GENEROSITY OF BONNIE AND JAMIE SCHAEFER. PERFORMANCE SPONSORSHIP PROVIDED BY: BOONE AREA VISITORS BUREAU, NORTHERN TRUST, GOODNIGHT BROTHERS, SKYBEST COMMUNICATIONS, INC., MAST GENERAL STORE

This evening’s performance has also been supported by a generous gift from Keith and Letty Stoneman.

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BROYHILL CHAMBER ENSEMBLE SUNDAY, JULY 31 8 PM, ROSEN CONCERT HALL

Sponsored by McDonald’s of Boone

Gil Morgenstern, violin; Kathryn Lockwood, viola Alexis Gerlach, cello; Wendy Chen, piano Quartet for Piano and Strings Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart No. 1 in g minor Gil Morgenstern, violin; Kathryn Lockwood, viola; Alexis Gerlach, cello; Wendy Chen, piano Piano Quartet in a minor, Op. 67 Joaquín Turina Gil Morgenstern, violin; Kathryn Lockwood, viola; Alexis Gerlach, cello; Wendy Chen, piano INTERMISSION Quartet for Piano and Strings Johannes Brahms No. 2 in A Major, Op. 26 Gil Morgenstern, violin; Kathryn Lockwood, viola; Alexis Gerlach, cello; Wendy Chen, piano

The Broyhill Chamber Ensemble Concert Series is generously supported by the Broyhill Family Foundation (in memory of Faye Broyhill), and by Ralph and Venda Lerch/McDonald’s of Boone. Additional performance underwriting has been provided by Budd and Nanette Mayer, Neil and Nancy Schaffel, Peter and Joni Petschauer, the Muriel and Arnold Rosen Endowment for the Arts and the Rosen-Schaffel Endowment for Classical Music Programming. With special thanks to Appalachia Cookie Company, for a generous donation of refreshments during this evening’s performance. Biographical information for this evening’s performers beings on page 85.

PROGRAM NOTES: Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart Quartet for Piano and Strings, No. 1, in g minor, K. 478 (Born January 27, 1756, in Salzburg; died December 5, 1791, in Vienna) In 1785, the Viennese music publisher Franz Anton Hoffmeister ordered three quartets for piano, violin, viola and cello from Mozart. He published the first one early in 1786 but complained that it did not sell well because the music was too difficult. Mozart released Hoffmeister from the contract after negotiation, and the publisher allowed the composer to keep the advance payment for all three on condition that he did not write the two additional works. “And, if you do not write in a more popular style,” Hoffmeister warned Mozart, “I shall neither commission nor publish any more of your work.” Mozart did not keep his promise to his publisher. The piano quartet was a new form that he could not resist. He wrote a second piano quartet later that year and sold it to another publisher. Hoffmeister must have been furious, but he did not abandon Mozart, and the composer, to make amends, made him a gift of the beautiful D-Major String Quartet, K. 499 for publication, as well as some shorter works, too. If the public did not take quickly to Mozart’s Piano Quartet No. 1, it was because of the problems he presented to the music-loving amateur of the day in his new kind of ensemble writing. At the time, chamber music for piano and strings was by convention pretty much the equivalent of a sonata for piano with added strings playing along. Mozart’s quartet was very different. He combined features of the piano concerto and the string quartet. Where the strings accompany the piano, they are more nearly like the orchestra in a concerto. Elsewhere, they consist of an ensemble of solo players, with much to do individually, on their own. The result of Mozart’s new departure was evidently that the music of the quartet was more difficult than most pianists expected and much too difficult for many string players who could get through more conventional works satisfactorily.


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Of the two piano quartets, this one is generally the more somber and dramatic, for the key is one that Mozart reserved for some of his most tragic, most impassioned instrumental music. He uses g minor only in the opening Allegro movement, and it is chiefly there that the mood is dark and ominous. The Andante is beautifully serene, and the finale a charming Rondo. The less demanding Piano Quartet No. 2 must have had a considerable success when the Artaria publishing house issued it, in 1787, much to everyone’s surprise. In the year 1788, Hoffmeister, who was a prolific composer as well as a publisher, sat down and composed six piano quartets himself. He did so apparently to satisfy the market and to get even with Mozart and Artaria, while the latter hastened to issue three piano quartets that were merely arrangements of earlier works by Haydn’s pupil, Ignaz Pleyel. This piano quartet is the first example of a piano quartet as we know that structure today. In it, Mozart pits the three strings, written for in trio groupings, against the piano. The first movement, Allegro, is passionately urgent, the second, slow movement, Andante, in B-flat Major, is more relaxed, and the final brisk third movement, Rondo, is a light, cheerful brio. Joaquín Turina Piano Quartet in a minor, Op. 67 (Born December 9, 1882, in Seville; died January 14, 1949, in Madrid) The works of Turina are highly flavored by the folk music of his native region of Spain, Andalusia. Turina first studied piano and composition in Seville, then enrolled in Madrid at the Royal Conservatory under José Tragó in 1902. At that time, Turina, who had already become recognized for his first compositions when he was still in Seville, developed a particular affinity for the typical Spanish zarzuela. From 1905 to 1914, Turina lived in Paris, where he was a composition student of d’Indy and a piano student of Moszkowski, as well as a friend of Debussy and Ravel. From the influence of d’Indy, Turina’s music was to develop a respect for

classicism, reflected in his chamber music in its use of traditional form. A school of nationalist Spanish composers developed at the beginning of this century with Isaac Albeniz (1860–1909), Enrique Granados (1867–1916), Manuel De Falla (1876-1946), and Turina as its chief representatives. All became prominent composers and all studied with Felipe Pedrell (1841-1922), a central figure in the nationalism movement in music. All of these composers drew on a common influence: their encounter with France and its high regard for the national music culture. Turina, however, was the only one of the four who wrote a sizable amount of chamber music. Among his chamber compositions are string violin sonatas, piano trios, a piano quartet, quintet and sextet, as well as a work for soprano and a piano quintet. On the occasion of the performance of his first published work, the Pianoforte Quintet in g minor (1907), Albeniz took Turina and De Falla to a café in the Rue Royale in Paris where, the composer said he had a great epiphany: “There I realized that music should be an art, and not a diversion for the frivolity of women and the dissipation of men. We were three Spaniards gathered together in that corner of Paris and it was our duty to fight bravely for the national music of our country.” The Piano Quartet, written in 1931, draws heavily on folklore and the musical style of Turina’s native Andalusia. In this work, Turina departs from the tradition of the classicalromantic piano quartet with his choice of an unusual sequence of movements: Lento, Vivo and then Andante, a slowfast-slow sequence. The first movement, beginning with an introduction, is lyrical and impressionistic. The main theme and much of the rest of the movement follows the lead of the violin alternating with the piano. Of particular note is one charming episode in which the cello carries the melody in its high register with the other instruments accompanying. The second movement has a dance-like character and is pervaded with the melody and rhythm of folk music. In the central section of this movement, Turina quotes from the

first movement, creating a musical link between the two movements. The rhapsodic last movement begins with what sounds like violin improvisation. Throughout this movement, there are themes reminiscent of folk music alternating with subjects Turina has excerpted again from the first movement. Johannes Brahms Quartet for Piano and Strings No. 2, in A Major, Op. 26 (Born May 7, 1833, in Hamburg; died April 3, 1897, in Vienna) In his first twenty-five years, Johannes Brahms made an astonishing journey from living life as a miserable youth in the harborside slums of Hamburg where he worked as pianist in sailors’ bars, to an intimate friendship with Robert Schumann and a position on the musical staff of the Prince of Lippe-Detmold. Brahms was a largely self-taught composer whose horizons were lifted by the lively musical life of the little princely court, and it was there that he began to write his first great compositions. In January 1860, Brahms returned to his hometown to settle down and work as a composer, consolidating the knowledge and experience acquired in Detmold, polishing his skills and exercising his craft. Among the compositions in progress was a group of quartets for piano, violin, viola and cello that he had been sketching since 1855. Two of the quartets were soon near completion and later were published as his Op. 25, in g minor and Op. 26 in A Major. A third, in c minor, was put aside until 1873 and 1874, when he rewrote it and gave it the Op. No. 60 designation. Brahms supported himself in Hamburg by giving piano lessons to untalented young girls, he told a friend, until he could afford to move out of a wretched rented room where he lived like a servant to better housing in a beautiful building in the suburbs. In his new lodgings he held Friday evening musicales, and it was at one of those at which the A-Major Piano Quartet was probably first tried out, and when the music was published, it bore a


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dedication to his landlady, Frau Dr. Elisabeth Rösing. In 1862, Brahms decided to see what the musical life of Vienna was like, before settling down permanently in Hamburg. He set off in September, and in the course of the next few years, he traveled back and forth between the two cities, but eventually made Vienna his home, joining the great Viennese Pantheon of Haydn, Mozart, Beethoven and Schubert, who had lived there before him. He rented a room in a house where Mozart had lived almost a century earlier, and on November 16, 1862, made his Vienna debut. He demonstrated that he was both composer and pianist with a program that included the Op. 25 Quartet, which had been given a public performance a year earlier in Hamburg by Clara Schumann, Robert’s widow and one of the great pianists of the time. His success was so great that two weeks later, on November 29, he gave another concert, at which the Op. 26 Quartet had its first public performance, and his new career was launched. The important violinist, Joseph Hellmesberger, said, “He is Beethoven’s heir,” and the powerful critic, Eduard Hanslick, who was to become a lifelong friend, immediately recognized the extraordinary quality of young Brahms and his music of “untamed genius.” The A-Major Piano Quartet is a huge work, serious but high-spirited, the composition of a youthful master who had much to say and needed a large framework in which to say it. Where another composer would have had single melodies as the subject of his musical discourse, Brahms has groups of them. His wealth of material is all organized, extended, varied and developed with great skill and with perfect musical fluency. The first movement, Allegro non troppo, may be interpreted either as a Schubertian idyll or as an intense and powerful declaration of passion. Brahms uses two themes in this movement instead of the usual single subject, but the second theme can be understood as an offshoot of the first. Second is an unusual, slow rondo, Poco adagio, whose principal theme, muted and

serene, is like a beautiful song. Often the strings work together against the piano arpeggios and solo line. Next comes a broad and deliberate Scherzo, Poco allegro, with a canonic, central trio section for which Brahms must have found his model in the works of Haydn. The Finale, Allegro, is a movement of great and sustained power. It is, in a way, a counterpart to the finale of the g minor first piano quartet (Opus 25), but it is less Hungarian in rhythm and embellishments. The dance-like feel is dominant in this concluding movement. Program Notes: Susan Halpern, © 2016

Biographical information for Gil Morgenstern appears on page 31. Having performed at world-renowned locations including Lincoln Center’s Avery Fisher Hall, Boston’s Symphony Hall, Chicago’s Orchestra Hall and THE NEIL AND NANCY Vienna’s Konzerthaus, SCHAFFEL CHAIR Japanese pianist Rieko Aizawa is praised by The New York Times for her “impressive musicality, a crisp touch and expressive phrasing.” Studying at the Curtis Institute and the Julliard School, Aizawa was the youngest-ever participant at the Marlboro Music Festival and has become an active chamber musician. Aizawa is a founding member of the Horszowski Trio and of the prize-winning Duo Prism, and became the artistic director of the Alpenglow Chamber Music Festival in Colorado in 2010. Aizawa has established her own unique musical voice after opening concerts of Tokyo’s Casals hall and debut concerts at the Kennedy Center and Carnegie Hall under conductor Alexander Schneider’s New York String Orchestra. She currently lives in New York City with her husband, violinist Jesse Mills, and is on faculty at Longy School of Music of Bard College.

Cellist Ole Akahoshi from Germany has performed in recitals and as a soloist with many of the world’s leading orchestras on four continents. He has won numerous THE NEIL AND NANCY SCHAFFEL CHAIR competitions including Concertino Praga and Jugend Musiziert. He is also recipient of the fellowship award from Charlotte White’s Salon de Virtuosi. Akahoshi has performed in many prestigious concert halls worldwide and his performances have been featured on CNN, NPR, Sender-Freies-Berlin, RIAS-Berlin and Korean Broadcasting Station, among others. He has also made recordings for the Albany, New World Records and Composers Recording Inc., to name a few. He has collaborated with distinguished artists such as Sarah Chang, Ani Kavafian, Wolfgang Schultz, Naoko Yoshino and Hyuna Yu. At age 11, Ole Akahoshi was the youngest student to be accepted by Pierre Fournier. He has received his bachelor’s from Juilliard and master’s degree from Yale University. Akahoshi has served as teaching assistant for both Aldo Parisot and Janos Starker. He has been teaching at the Manhattan School of Music since 2004. He joined the faculty of the Yale School of Music in 1997 and is assistant professor of cello at Yale University. Wendy Chen debuted with the Los Angeles Philharmonic at the age of 15 under conductor André Previn. She won First Prize in the National Chopin Competition, THE R.Y. AND EILEEN L. the Young Concert SHARPE FOUNDATION CHAIR Artists auditions, was an inaugural recipient of the Gilmore Young Artists Award, and was named a Presidential Scholar by the National Foundation for the Arts. Ms. Chen is one of the most sought after pianists and chamber musicians, performing on many of the world’s most prestigious concert stages. She has appeared in unique programs that also featured


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musical legends Art Garfunkel and James Taylor, performed in a private concert for The Justices at the US Supreme Court presented by The Honorable Ruth Bader Ginsburg, at the White Oak Conservation Center, and in an all Chopin recital at the National Philharmonic Hall in Warsaw, Poland. Other highlights have included opening night with The Boston Pops, Spoleto USA tours, appearances in South America, Finland, New Zealand, at The Kennedy Center, Zankel Hall, The Forbidden City in Beijing, and at Festival Week in Tokyo, presented by CHANEL. She has given numerous recitals with cellists Andrés Díaz and Carter Brey, violinists James Ehnes, Chee-Yun, Andrés Cardenes, Elina Vähälä, and Anne Akiko Meyers, with whom she also gave a benefit concert for Japan tsunami relief. Ms. Chen’s performances are regularly heard on NPR’s Performance Today. She gives masterclasses and lectures throughout the US, and serves as panelist for the National Endowment for the Arts. Cellist Alexis Pia Gerlach has been lauded by the press for the “gripping emotion” and “powerful artistry” of her interpretations; qualities which have THE RALPH AND VENDA LERCH CHAIR led to a career striking for its wide range of artistic collaborations. She has appeared extensively in recitals and as a soloist with orchestras across the United States, as well as in Europe, Asia, the Middle East and South America, with such conductors as Mstislav Rostropovich, James DePreist and Peter Oundjian. Ms. Gerlach is a founding member of the acclaimed Trio Solisti, with whom she performs throughout the US on major concert series. The piano trio has recorded extensively, including a 2-CD set of the Tchaikovsky and Rachmaninoff Trios to be released on Bridge Records in July this year, and a critically acclaimed 2014 recording of trios by Ravel and Chausson, which was met by rave reviews from both The New York Times and Gramophone. Next

season the ensemble gives the world premiere of a new trio written by composer Jennifer Higdon, commissioned for them by Arizona Friends of Chamber Music and the Harvard Musical Association. As a founding member of Concertante, a string sextet based in New York City, she has toured throughout North America, Asia and the Middle East. Ms. Gerlach has performed at major festivals including Marlboro, Aspen, Bridgehampton, La Musica di Asolo, Caramoor, and as a guest artist with the Chamber Music Society of Lincoln Center. She has played extensively with Musicians from Marlboro, performing on both national and international tours. A frequent collaborator with dancers, Ms. Gerlach has performed as solo cellist with the Paul Taylor Dance Company on tour in India and at New York’s City Center, and in a duo with New York City Ballet principal dancer, Damian Woetzel. She is active in commissioning and premiering new works from many preeminent composers, such as Kevin Puts, Lowell Liebermann, Shulamit Ran, Richard Danielpour, Tigran Mansurian and Paul Moravec, and has worked with many others including Philip Glass, Thomas Ades, Osvaldo Golijov and Bright Sheng. Ms. Gerlach was born in New York City, and studied with Aldo Parisot at The Juilliard School and The Yale School of Music. Kathryn Lockwood has been hailed as a violist of exceptional talents in reviews around the country and abroad for her performances as a chamber musician THE ARNOLD AND MURIEL ROSEN CHAIR and soloist. Formerly a founding member of the Pacifica Quartet, she currently performs with the Lark Quartet, duoJalal with percussionist and husband Yousif Sheronick, and teaches at the University of Massachusetts, Amherst. Lockwood is frequently invited back to her homeland of Australia to perform with the Camerata of St. John’s and to teach at her alma mater school at the Queensland Conservatorium of Music. Lockwood plays on an unknown Italian

viola from the 18th Century Brescian School and performs during the summer for the Broyhill Chamber Ensemble, at Elm City ChamberFest in Connecticut and at the Telluride ChamberFest in Colorado. Violinist Nurit Pacht was a prize winner in international competitions including the Irving Klein International Music Competition in California and THE PETER AND JONI the Tibor Varga PETSCHAUER CHAIR International Violin Competition in Switzerland. She has toured the world as the soloist in stage director Robert Wilson’s “Relative Light” and in projects with Bill T. Jones and his dance company performing works for solo violin by J.S. Bach. Nurit performed Philip Glass’ duos for violin and piano with the composer at the piano and premiered Noam Sheriff’s Violin Concerto “Dibrot”, a work dedicated to her, with the Israeli Contemporary Players. She was the soloist on a tour of China with the Young Israel Philharmonic performing Sibelius and Tchaikovsky Concertos. She has toured as soloist with the Israeli Chamber Orchestra, the Pacific Symphony, the Houston Symphony and has performed as guest soloist with the Brooklyn Philharmonic, the Rhode Island Philharmonic, the Des Moines Symphony, Santa Rosa Symphony, most of the major orchestras in Romania, the National Symphony in Columbia, Wroclaw Chamber Orchestra and Filarmonica di Roma. She has performed in recitals and in small chamber music formations at the festivals including Santa Fe, Monadnock, Sienna, Mecklenberg and, at the invitation of Christoph Eschenbach, at Ravinia’s Rising Stars Series. She has worked closely with world renown composers such as Pierre Boulez, Shulamit Ran and John Corigliano. One of her live performances at Wigmore Hall in London was released by Nimbus Records. Highlights from this past season include a performance for Pope Francis during his visit to New York City and a recital tour in Ukraine organized by the State Department.


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On the piano faculty at Mannes College in New York City, J.Y. Song has been noted for her varied programming and idiosyncratic musical tastes. Critic Harris THE ARNOLD AND MURIEL ROSEN CHAIR Goldsmith commented on her “truly astounding technical and imaginative resources,” and has described her performances as “tigerishly intense” and “exquisite.” J.Y. Song’s recordings on the Pro Piano label have received rave reviews. Her recording of Debussy Etudes was distinguished with a Diapason d’Or and designated a “Desert Island Selection” by Gramophone’s International Piano Quarterly. Among Ms. Song’s numerous awards are the Petschek Award (Juilliard’s highest honor to a pianist), the first ever Christel Award from the American Pianists Association, the Gold Medal at the Palm Beach Invitational International Piano Competition, and the distinction of Pro Piano Artist of the Year. In addition to providing insightful reinterpretations of traditional repertoire, J.Y. Song has been an advocate of new music, recording works by Ezequiel Viñao and Jiang Wen Ye. This last recording inspired a film by the celebrated director Hou Hsiao-Hsien, Café Lumière, which was nominated for a Lion d’Or at the Venice Film Festival. Raised in Switzerland, J.Y. Song studied at the Conservatoire de Genève and the Conservatoire de Lausanne with Alexis Golovine, Eduardo Vercelli, and JeanFrançois Antonioli. She graduated from Stanford University with distinction and honors, acquiring both a B.S. in Microbiology and Immunology and a B.A. in Music, and receiving the Sudler Prize for outstanding achievement in the creative arts. She earned a D.M.A. at The Juilliard School, where she studied with Jerome Lowenthal, and completed an M.B.A. at NYU Stern School of Business. Ms. Song has served for eight years as artistic director of the EAMA and Classics Abroad piano programs at the Ecole Normale de Musique de Paris. Her diverse interests have led her to explore entrepreneurial opportunities in music, most recently founding a tech

startup, ToneRow, dedicated to bringing performing arts training to enthusiasts worldwide. She now teaches Leadership & Innovation at The Juilliard School. Canadian cellist Caroline Stinson performs widely as a soloist, recitalist and chamber musician and has appeared at Carnegie’s Zankel Hall, Boston’s Gardner THE BROYHILL FAMILY Museum and FOUNDATION CHAIR Washington D.C.’s Smithsonian; the Koelner Philharmonie, Lucerne Festival and Cité de la Musique in Europe, and the Centennial Centre in Canada. In recent seasons she appeared in recital in New York sponsored by the Finnish Consulate, in recital in Brussels, Belgium, with Accroche note in Strasbourg France, and as a soloist with the Stamford Symphony in Connecticut under Eckart Stier, where she also serves as Principal Cellist. Ms. Stinson has commissioned and premiered works from solo cello to concerti, as well as chamber music with the Lark Quartet and Open End Ensemble, and has had the privilege of working closely with Pierre Boulez, John Corigliano, Peter Eötvös, John Harbison, Aaron Kernis, Paul Moravec, Shulamit Ran, Steven Stucky, Joan Tower and Andrew Waggoner. In 2011 she performed Esa-Pekka Salonen’s “YTA III” for solo cello at Scandinavia House in New York at the composer’s recommendation, and in 2013 premiered John Harbison’s Invention of a Theme of Shakespeare for solo cello and string quartet at the composer’s festival in Token Creek, WI. As a member of Lark, she will celebrate the group’s 30 years from 2016-17 with commissions from Harbison, Waggoner, Bunch, Weesner and Hatke. As a recording artist, Caroline’s CD Lines was released on Albany and she has contributed to more than a dozen chamber music recordings with reviews and features on this continent and abroad. Born in Edmonton, Ms. Stinson studied with Alan Harris (Cleveland), Maria Kliegel (Germany), Joel Krosnick (Juilliard) and Tanya Prochazka, with grants from the Alberta Heritage

Scholarship Fund and the Canada Council. She has given masterclasses in Canada, the U.S., Mexico and Europe, and teaches cello and chamber music at The Juilliard School. Together with her husband, Andrew Waggoner, Caroline is Co-Artistic Director of Weekend Chamber Music in the Delaware River Valley. Video Editor Anthony Arkin is an awardwinning director and editor of such films as “State of Rock,” “Future Rob,” “An Introduction to the Schelling 3000” and the upcoming feature film, “Sender.”


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TANGERINES THE HELENE AND STEPHEN WEICHOLZ GLOBAL FILM SERIES

TUESDAY, AUGUST 2 7 PM, SCHAEFER CENTER FOR THE PERFORMING ARTS

In the wake of the Soviet Union’s dissolution, a large minority of Estonians are forced to leave their adopted home in the Abkhazeti region of Georgia and to flee for the safety of their ancestral land. Ivo and Margus stay behind in an effort to save their tangerine crop as the Abkhazia conflict surrounds them. When a bloody skirmish between Georgian and Russian-backed forces erupts on his doorstep, Ivo must bury the dead soldiers and care for two wounded survivors. Unfortunately, the temporarily bedridden soldiers are from opposing sides, and the Estonian finds himself in the middle of someone else’s war. ESTONIA; NOT RATED; DIRECTED BY ZAZA URUSHADZE; 87 MINUTES

Pre-film talk with Dr. John Pfeifer begins at 7pm, with the film beginning at approximately 7:30pm. Concessions, including popcorn, beer, wine and cold beverages are available for purchase. With special thanks to our generous sponsors for this series, Helene and Stephen Weicholz.

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Jerry Douglas Band WITH SPECIAL GUEST

Mipso

A SCHAEFER POPULAR SERIES EVENT

SATURDAY, AUGUST 6 8 PM, SCHAEFER CENTER FOR THE PERFORMING ARTS

Dobro master and 14-time Grammy-award winner Jerry Douglas is a freewheeling, forward-thinking recording artist whose artistry incorporates elements of bluegrass, country, rock, jazz, blues and Celtic into his distinctive musical vision. Since 1998, Douglas has been a key member of “Alison Krauss and Union Station featuring Jerry Douglas,” touring extensively and co-producing and playing on a series of platinum albums. He has produced albums for Krauss, the Del McCoury Band, Maura O’Connell, and Jesse Winchester and is is co-Music Director of the acclaimed BBC TV series Transatlantic Sessions, and his latest solo album Traveler features guest appearances by such notable friends as Paul Simon, Mumford & Sons, and Eric Clapton, among others. The renegade traditionalists of Mipso– Jacob Sharp on mandolin, Joseph Terrell on guitar, Libby Rodenbough on fiddle and Wood Robinson on double bass-- are doing their part to take three-part harmony and Appalachian influences into new territory. Formed in Chapel Hill in 2010, these musicians draw continual inspiration from their rich North Carolina roots.

SERIES SPONSORSHIP PROVIDED BY WESTGLOW RESORT & SPA AND ROWLAND’S RESTAURANT, MADE POSSIBLE THROUGH THE GENEROSITY OF BONNIE AND JAMIE SCHAEFER. PERFORMANCE SPONSORSHIP PROVIDED BY: SKYBEST COMMUNICATIONS, INC., MAST GENERAL STORE, BOONE AREA VISITORS BUREAU, NORTHERN TRUST, GOODNIGHT BROTHERS

This evening’s performance has also been supported by a generous gift from Brent and Tricia Hall.

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The Office of Arts & Cultural Programs, Office of the Chancellor, APPS Concerts, and University Athletics present a special post-festival event:

AN EVENING WITH THE AVETT BROTHERS THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 8 8 PM, HOLMES CONVOCATION CENTER (Doors Open at 7pm)

With roots in traditional folk and bluegrass, The Avett Brothers’ sound combines a refreshing blend of country, punk, rock and roll, and pop that the San Francisco Chronicle describes as having the "heavy sadness of Townes Van Zandt, the light pop concision of Buddy Holly, the tuneful jangle of the Beatles, the raw energy of the Ramones." Known for their honest and powerful lyrics, the band’s hits include “November Blue,” “Live and Die,” “Slight Figure of Speech,” “I And Love And You,” “Murder in the City,” and “February Seven.” The Avett Brothers’ new album, True Sadness, will be released on June 24, 2016. With special thanks to Mr. John Carter from WBTV, our emcee for the evening. SPONSORED BY BLUE RIDGE ELECTRIC MEMBERSHIP CORPORATION

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