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ISSUE 45.

UPDATE 57 WOLGYE-RO 45GA-G I L , NOWO N- G U, S EO UL , 0 1 87 4 , KOREA

IN THIS ISSUE:

■ NPC Academies ■ Basketball Season Outlook ■ Read Across APIS

■ T. 0 2 .9 0 7 .2 7 4 7

■ F. 0 2 .9 0 7 .2 7 4 2

■ WWW. A PIS .O RG

IN THIS ISSUE:

■ 2016 KAIAC Large-Group Festival ■ Elementary Chinese & Japanese ■ Student Spotlight ■ Faculty Retreat ■ Community Quilt Project


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What Does It Mean to Belong? Second Grade Community Quilt Project By Kim House, Second Grade Teacher, and Anna Sea, Art Teacher

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n second grade, we have been working on an integrated unit called “Belonging.” The essential question we focused on was, “What does it mean to belong?” It was a great topic to tie in with art, so Anna Sea (art teacher) joined our class five different Tuesday afternoons during the integrated unit time. We discussed how we belong in the community in and outside of APIS. Students took a tour of the school from the fifth floor gymnasium to the basement to see different ways people belong and engage with their school community, and we also walked around the community outside of school. Suki Park said, “We went outside to look for groups and there were lots of groups!” We took pictures and brought them into the art room to create different artworks of the various community “belongings” that we observed in and outside of the school. Jodi Nielson (counselor) visited the art room to talk about cultural art and quilts. Students learned how each culture can be another group of “belonging” and how people around the world show their culture and identity through art, especially through quilts. For many students, it was their first time seeing quilts. Ms. Neilson showed us her own quilt design, as well as quilts from Australia and Laos. On Oct. 14, 2016, second grade students, Ms. Sea, and Pastor Choi went on a field trip to the Chojun Textile and Quilt Art Museum near Myeongdong. Students had a chance to learn about traditional fabric, ways of making a book bag and tissue case without sewing, and how artists from different cultures influence each other. “The quilts were so beautiful!” Luca Magnone said. Yin Choi said, “I liked the Japanese quilts!”

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“It was a real treat to tag along with the second graders to the quilt museum. Seeing them get excited picking out fabrics and then having to discuss and compromise the fabric patterns that would be used for the overall design of their group quilt was definitely the most memorable aspect of the trip. I'm looking forward to seeing the looks on their faces when they see it put together in their own functional piece of artwork,” said Pastor Choi. We saw more than 90 pieces of quilts from different countries including the United States, South Korea, North Korea, Japan, China, Australia, Laos, Uzbekistan, and Mexico. Students were able to see the difference in color, design, and symbols in the quilts. We also saw more than 500 dolls representing 50 countries and learned more about culture through traditional clothes. Next, we went to the Podo quilt and fabric store to pick our own fabric for our quilt project. Students learned how to pick the pattern fabric that will go well with their artworks and also show a good sense of belonging. We discussed how to work together and how to be a good shopper by thinking about budget, listening to each other’s feedback, and taking advice from the store owner. Back at APIS, we were excited to finish making our own artworks for the quilt project. We tried our best to draw the different groups of people that we saw in our community and painted them with special fabric paints. Yurina Kimura explained, “It was a great idea to make a quilt about the groups we saw outside and inside.” When the artworks were finished, we sent our finished pieces to the Podo quilt and fabric store so the quilt shop owner could put our artworks together with the fabric frame that we chose. The quilt now hangs on one of the front doors at APIS! We think it is a perfect way to bring different “belongings” around us together into one complete community quilt. We hope you enjoy it!

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Read Across APIS

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eading is an everyday celebration at APIS, and from Oct. 31-Nov. 4, elementary school students enjoyed bonus reading celebrations with our annual Read Across APIS event. This year’s theme was comics and graphic novels. Judy Park (Grade 3 teacher and ES literacy coordinator) said, “To kick off Read Across APIS, on Monday, students marched through the entire school with their cool book character costumes and received applause, high fives, and cheers from supportive secondary students and teachers. Our awesome elementary teachers dressed up as ‘The Incredibles’ to share the excitement of reading.”

Student translators - back row, left to right: Esther Kim (G4) and Yeonsue Arata (G4); front row, left to right: Jiwoo Jung (G4), William Yoo (G4), Henry Kuo (G5), and Noa Lee (G5).

Tuesday included comic-themed stations, where the elementary school was divided into multi-age groups that rotated through a series of activities, including super cookie baking, make-your-own reading tote, and create a superhero. Further fun throughout the week included guest readers, guest teachers (e.g., high school illustration club students), working with Richard Harris (digital media art teacher) in the Mac lab to create digital superheroes, reading buddies, and a fabulous Skype visit with author/illustrator Jarrett J. Krosoczka. Sarah Wood (Grade 4 teacher) said, “Many of my students love to draw and create art, so when literacy and art came together for this year’s theme, they were thrilled. In fourth grade, the students read a variety of graphic novels. The students can’t put the books down! In addition to the joy of reading graphic novels, the students had a blast with Pastor John and high school students, Mei Mei and Joyce. All three of them came into elementary school classrooms to help students fine-tune their comic skills. Many students have continued creating comics at home after Read Across APIS.” To prepare for the guest author/illustrator visit, classes read different books in Jarrett J. Krosoczka’s famous Lunch Lady series. Students prepared questions to ask the visiting artist ahead of time, and a surprise visit by the Lunch Lady herself had both students and the Skype guest laughing. Mr. Krosoczka, based in Massachusetts, United States, wowed students by sharing the number of books he has under his name (either as author/illustrator, illustrator, or contributor) – 33! He gave students a tour of his home-based studio that includes different work spaces for stages of his art process, and a separate area for writing. He even drew the Lunch Lady, so students could see how he creates her. To demonstrate how many times he has drawn the Lunch Lady and how practice leads to consistency and fluency, Mr. Krosoczka then drew the Lunch Lady with his eyes closed, while answering questions! Jimin Jung (Grade 3) asked, “What did you want to be when you were young?”

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Mr. Krosoczka answered, “When I was a kid, I wanted to be an author and illustrator for books for kids. So, I’m doing what I always wanted to do. I’ve always loved to draw pictures, tell stories, and invent characters.” Students also asked about color selection in the Lunch Lady series, how many copies of each book get printed, where he got his idea of the Lunch Lady series (inspired by running into his lunch lady from when he was a child), how many years he has been publishing books, how long it takes for him to write a book, and how how he deals with rejection. To this, Mr. Krosoczka said, “I was a little bit sad [the first time], but I knew that was part of the process. Every artist, and most who want to achieve anything, won’t succeed the first time.” To conclude the visit, Mr. Krosoczka read aloud from his forthcoming book (due out in May) “Naptastrophe!” This book is inspired by his daughter. A midweek elementary-wide visit to the Korea Manhwa (comic) Museum allowed students to take in the history of comics in Korea, and see many examples of past and contemporary comics.

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Ms. Park noted, “We want to especially acknowledge our upper elementary student translators (Jiwoo Jung (G4), Yeonsue Arata (G4), William Yoo (G4), Noa Lee (G5), Henry Kuo (G5), and Esther Kim (G4)) who helped serve as translators for the non-Korean speakers. They were specifically chosen to help serve students and teachers in our school community. What a great way to reach out and serve when there is a need in our community!” Throughout the week, and throughout the school year, APIS students have opportunities to be writers and illustrators themselves. Hands-on learning and connecting with experts help encourage and support a strong art and literacy foundation, and contribute to lifelong learning.

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I feel privileged to teach all elementary students and always wanted to do a project that ties all of us together. This year's Read Across APIS, under the theme of comics and graphic novels, was a perfect chance to create a collaborative project in the art room for kindergartners through fifth graders. I shared a lesson on narrative art with all of my kindergarten through fourth grade students by looking at an artist named Edward Hopper. The students learned how to show a character's personality, emotions, and actions through the character's gestures and facial expressions, and how to create a background by showing the season, time of the day, and setting. Once the kindergartners through fourth graders had completed their illustrations, I I passed out the artworks in a random order to the fifth graders and had each fifth grade group come up with a story. Every group was so creative considering none of them knew about the artworks beforehand. We were all amazed how the narrative artworks inspired us to create a story. We even ended up making a cover design to go along with the story. ~ Anna Sea, Art Teacher

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The Man's Adventure By Margaret Cheon and Selina Chung (Grade 5 Students)

Once upon a time, there was a man who loved the letter M.

It was a beautiful day. The man had two beautiful kids.

The man always made robots.

He once made a robot called Bob, but Bob was so crazy that the man tied him up.

The man was so hungry that he went to his favorite McDonald's. He loved that place because McDonald’s starts with an M.

In McDonald’s, there were little tiny dolls of food and on television, there was a comic show about fast food and veggies.

When he went home, he started to upgrade his robot. After he upgraded his robot, he went to the contest. He fought with a man called Baby. Baby became like a pancake, and the man won the trophy!

When he was going home, there were ninjas EVERYWHERE.

He didn't want to die, so he jumped out an airplane and he went to heaven and had a wonderful life. But he missed his daughter called Selina.

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Story illustrations by: Bao Do (G2), Soomin Ahn (G1), Peyton Webster (G3), Katrien Knox-Nielson (G3), Esther Kim (G4), Matthew Jeon (G4), Connor Lee (G3), Joshua Oh (G3), and Jayden Kim (G4). w w w. a p i s . o r g

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David Jeong (Grade 4) Awarded First Place at Chinese Speech Contest

n Oct. 30, David Jeong (Grade 4) participated in the ninth annual Chinese Bridge Speech Contest, a Chinese language speech contest held in Seoul and sponsored by the Seoul Confucius Institute (an organization funded by the Chinese government) and Chinese Education Bureau. The contest draws hundreds of submissions, which are reviewed to determine the finalists selected to present in person before a panel of judges. After each participant delivers their speech, judges pose spontaneous questions to evaluate students for their knowledge of Chinese language and culture. To prepare for the contest, David first had to decide what his speech should be about, craft the speech, and submit a recording of himself delivering the speech. He only had one week to prepare his submission. The theme for the contest was “interesting Chinese story.” David’s mom, Grace Gao, encouraged David to think of something from his own life that reflected Chinese culture. David decided to share a story about learning how to write his name in Chinese and how his early attempts, and mistakes, led his father to say to him, “马马虎虎(mǎmǎhūhū),” which literally translates as “horse horse tiger tiger.” David went to his mother to ask why his father was calling him a horse and tiger, which prompted Ms. Gao to share the story behind this Chinese idiom with David. Once, there was a Chinese artist who drew a tiger’s head but a horse’s body. One of the artist’s sons asked what it was and he said, “tiger.” The other son asked what it was, and the artist said, “horse.” Later, one of the sons went hunting and saw a tiger, but thought it was a horse, so he tried to ride it, and the tiger bit him and he died. The other son saw a tiger that was really a horse, and he shot it. The artist had to pay the horse’s owner. From then on “马马虎虎(mǎmǎhūhū)” meant someone who is very careless, or something that is so-so/mediocre. The story inspired David to continue working hard to perfect writing his name. Once improved, his father made a comment about a cow, which led David to find his mom again. This experience led David to write a speech that reflected his personal story of how he came to learn about the history behind the idiomatic use of the Chinese words for horse, tiger, and cow. After delivering his speech, David was asked about a Korean and Chinese cultural comparison. David said, “It was difficult, so I had to think first. After I thought about it, I answered slowly, but then they complimented my answer and thanked me for sharing.” As the first place winner competing against first through sixth graders, when asked what advice he could offer others interested in participating in the contest in the future, David said, “You need to write about something that really happened to you, and practice!” Ms. Gao said, “I think participating deepened his enthusiasm for learning Chinese.” She also shared that his award is recognition of a speech that stayed on people’s minds long after David’s speech was over. After his speech, numerous people approached David and asked, “Are you the person who shared the horse, tiger, and cow story?”

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David’s award is a celebration of an expertly crafted and delivered speech, as well as a deeper understanding and appreciation of Chinese culture and language.

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Basketball Season Outlook Coaching this group of girls is such an outstanding experience! This year, we look to a group of returning players to offer experience, leadership, and strength to our team. We have some new players and look forward to the addition of their skills and presence on the court. We plan to step up both offense and defense with the addition of new options in both. These players have a strong foundation to build on and the heart and hustle that it takes to move their playing to a new level. They are dedicated to improving and to growing together as a team. We couldn't ask for a more coachable group of young women, and we are excited to see what the season has in store for us! Go Greenhawks! Meg Hayne, Varsity Girls Coach It is such a pleasure to be back coaching again! The girls and I are looking forward to growing together as a team – understanding the rules of basketball, the skills of basketball, and the joy of playing great basketball together. At the JV level, we are all about building a foundation of skills and understandings that will support the varsity teams of the future. Learning defensive tactics, offensive plays, and general game smarts will be our focus for the year, while winning as many games as we can. We are all looking forward to a fantastic season. Bruce Knox, Junior Varsity Girls Coach

We are very excited about the 2016-2017 season. This year's boys varsity basketball team is a senior-heavy team, which means we have a team with some quality basketball experience. We will rely heavily on the seniors for their leadership, as they guide the younger players. The boys are working hard to learn, to improve, and to come together as a team. The team has high aspirations, but also realizes that in order to achieve their goals, they will need to put in tremendous effort, energy, and focus. Andy Murphy and Jason Webster, Varsity Boys Coaches

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I am excited to work with a new group of boys in my first year here at APIS. It will be fun getting to know them and building the program. Fitness will be a focus for us as we have some all around physical size this year. I believe that this should should give us an advantage in certain situations. We will focus on moving the ball quickly on offense and controlling the flow of games with a strong defense. We have a lot of preparation to do before we play our first game so practices are very important at this stage of the season working toward the KAIAC tournament in February. Jay Leroy, Junior Varsity Boys Coach Upcoming Games! 12/7 Varsity home game (CI @ APIS) 3:30 p.m. 12/10 Varsity home game (GSIS @ APIS) 4 p.m. 1/11 Varsity home game (SIS @ APIS) 3:30 p.m.

1/13 Varsity and JV away game (APIS @ GSIS) 3:30 p.m. 1/18 Varsity and JV away game (APIS @ KIS) 3:30 p.m. 1/26 Varsity home game (YISS @ APIS) 3:30 p.m. w w w. a p i s . o r g

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NPC Academy Hawaii By Scott Paulin, Deputy Head of Academics

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ows of students maniacally zipping along frothy waves on boogie boards, grinning ear to ear, provides a stark contrast to rows of silent children that most likely characterized education throughout the 19th and 20th centuries. For 15 glorious days, APIS middle school students traded in textbooks for a dizzying array of hands-on educational activities and adventures. They hiked jungle trails, snorkeled in clear ocean bays, dug in the dirt, built things with tools, laughed, and learned on the APIS Hawaii campus and all around the beautiful island of Oahu. The (NPC) New Pacific Century Academy was an opportunity for middle school students from the APIS Seoul campus to work and learn alongside our local Hawaii campus students to develop important skills that will prepare them for success in the 21st century. In his book ”A Whole New Mind,” author Daniel H. Pink writes that we are "moving from the Information Age to the Conceptual Age." He argues that the workplace is changing and the skills necessary for success in the 21st century workplace are different from those needed in the 20th century. Pink notes that while the "defining skills of the previous era are necessary, they are no longer sufficient." This conceptual age Pink describes, led by Asia, abundance, and automation, is what we at APIS refer to as the New Pacific Century. "The future belongs to a very different kind of person with a very different type of mind," warns Pink. Workers will need to build on the skills of the 20th century by mastering a new and different set of skills in the 21st century. The APIS New Pacific Century Academy provides our students a strategically focused opportunity to practice these 21st century skills and receive targeted feedback to help them develop their skills in communication, collaboration, critical thinking and creativity, and cultural citizenship. The sixth grade program was titled “Hanguk to Hawaii.” Sixth grade students investigated Hawaiian culture through the question, “What does it mean to be Hawaiian?” This leading question challenged students to examine ways that people have maintained their traditions and resisted external influences (e.g., generational gaps, migration patterns, or globalization). Through a variety of activities exploring Hawaiian art, language, food, and landscapes, our students had the opportunity to discover and learn to reflect and inquire about their own identity – that is, what does it mean to be Korean, American, Chinese, or belong to any other ethnic or national group?

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The seventh grade program was titled “Outriggers to Internet.” Seventh grade students explored how innovations in communication and transportation transform a society from isolation to globalization. With its position as a global tourist destination, Hawaii was the perfect laboratory to examine this central question, allowing students to take advantage of great locations from the North Shore to Waikiki Beach to investigate the transformation of Hawaiian society and culture. Students engaged in hands-on experiences, such as rowing traditional outrigger canoes and building their own boats, to visiting a modern television news studio, flying drones, and designing and building model airplanes. These experiences launched into the bigger understanding of how adoption of scientific knowledge and use of technologies influences cultures, the environment, economies, and the balance of power. The eighth grade program was titled “Seeds to Citizens.” Eighth grade students explored each step of local food production from farm to table. Beginning with a critical analysis of the students’ own ecological footprints and consumption habits, students were tasked with researching and developing a proposal for building their own sustainable garden. They learned farming techniques by planting their own garden plot, and explored the symbiotic relationships between fish and plants at our aquaponics garden. A highlight event included students constructing a mural using recycled plastic cleaned up from beaches near the campus. Students also planned, cooked, and served a nutritious meal utilizing locally produced goods. Through these learning activities, students examined sustainable lifestyles and explored ways to nurture community identity committed to sustainability.

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Over the course of the Hawaii NPC Academy, our students learned a lot about culture, innovation, and sustainability, but, more importantly, they had the opportunity to grow and develop the 21st century skills we know will be important for their future. For over two weeks, students lived and learned side by side, communicating, creating, thinking critically, collaborating, and considering how their lives impact the world around them. On the final day of the academy, each group had the opportunity to present their learning experiences at the Learning Expo. The sixth grade led it off with a mural of the different Hawaiian Islands, as well as individual presentations on Hawaiian culture. The seventh grade followed up with seven interactive stations including a virtual reality experience, drone flying station, airplane building, postcard making, photo timeline competitions, tin-can-phone experiments, and a station to listen to the podcasts the students created. The eighth grade then led tours throughout the campus on the different farming techniques used in Hawaii and what sustainability means. They also presented the incredible mural created from microplastics they cleaned from the beach. The sixth grade ended the day with a concert, performing a song they composed using traditional Hawaiian instruments and singing a farewell song in Hawaiian. The Hawaii NPC Academy was an action-packed time of exploration, experiential learning, and personal growth for our students, as they stretched both their intellectual and social boundaries. To read more about NPC Academy Hawaii, go to: http://apisteach.wixsite.com/npca.

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NPC Academy Hawaii

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NPC Academy Seoul By Helen Kim, Grade 8 Student

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his November, every APIS middle school student participated in the NPC (New Pacific Century) Academy program. The program split the middle school into two groups. One group travelled to the APIS Hawaii campus while the other stayed in Seoul. For the two weeks of the Seoul program, students focused on researching, team-building, and inquiry skills. Jeany Park (Grade 8) said, “This inquiry program taught me to always choose a topic you have strong interest for. When you are interested, you are curious.” The program began with students asking various questions about themselves and the world. These questions eventually led to the program’s two main themes: music and social issues. Using these two themes as a guide, students developed many different research projects and questions. When choosing their project topics, students formed groups based on their individual interests. While some chose to work in groups, other students chose to work individually. After forming her group, Charissa Kim (Grade 8) said, “I chose to work with my partner because as we continued talking to each other, I realized that a lot of what we both wanted to research and study about crossed paths. In fact, not only did we have the desire to learn about the same specific aspect of music, but we both wanted our final product to be some sort of experiment!” During the first week of the program, students volunteered with youth with disabilities at the Jusarang Orphanage and Gabriel House. Through these two trips, students took away many valuable lessons. After volunteering at Gabriel House, Clara Oh (Grade 8) said, “I felt very uncomfortable at first because I didn't know how to help the people at Gabriel House. However, later on when I learned it was important to be accepting, I was able to help the people there with a loving heart.”

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The first week of the program also consisted of field trips to places that tied in with the program’s two main themes of music and social issues. On Nov. 11, the Seoul NPC Academy students split into two groups, one going to the K-Pop Exhibition Hall and one going to the Korean War Memorial. Due to some mistakes when planning the trip to the K-Pop Exhibition Hall, students were not able to go inside the exhibition. Meanwhile, the students who went to the Korean War Memorial strengthened their research about war and healing. At the Korean War Memorial, students focused on the impact war has on people. According to Carly Althauser (social studies teacher), the field trip was helpful for the students’ research projects. “The reason we went to the Korean War Memorial was to learn more about what wars are like and how they affect people. Many students are doing projects about how music can be used to improve people's lives or to help people heal after living through wars. The museum helped students have a better understanding of the terror and pain people have to overcome.”

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While reflecting on his trip to the memorial, Matthew Kang (Grade 7) said, “Going to the Korean War Memorial helped me research about the traumatic events people lived through during the war.” During the second week of the program, students went on field trips to the Museum of Gugak and the Seodaemun Prison. Additionally, students began working on their final products for their research projects. From paintings to websites, many different products were produced through the program. At the Museum of Gugak, students looked into how music affects culture. The museum displayed many Korean traditional instruments and even allowed the students and teachers to play them. Megan Vosk (writer’s workshop teacher), said, “The field trip to the Museum of Gugak provided students with an opportunity to explore their Korean musical heritage. The students learned about how music influences and shapes cultures. They also reflected on how the music we listen to has changed over time as a result of modernization.” w w w. a p i s . o r g

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At the Seodaemun Prison, students had an opportunity to understand the misery of Korean patriots during the Japanese colonial rule. When walking through the prison, students focused on how colonialism impacts a country. Ms. Althauser said, “We went to the Prison History Museum to show students how occupation can be a consequence of war. Students were able to see the levels of violence occupiers have gone to in order to hold onto power – and how people fight back against an occupying force.” During NPC Academy Seoul, students were also involved in an advisory program. Every student was assigned to their own teacher advisor, and met with them for 15 minutes each day. Students discussed their learning and progress with their advisors. Using a daily reflective journal, students created paintings, sketches, and writing entries to express and reflect on their research, understanding, and questions. On Nov. 21 (the last day of the program), teachers and students dedicated a day to fun. The day was spent playing at a bowling alley and having lunch at Pizza Hut. Over the course of the program, middle school students learned to connect their creativity to school projects. Their learning was displayed in their final products. To read more about NPC Academy Seoul, go to the blog, which has posts from students and faculty members: http://npcaseoul.wixsite.com/mysite/blog-1.

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NPC Academy Seoul

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한국 사회와 한국인의 정체성, 한국인은 누구인가? Identification of Korean Society: "Who Are Koreans?"

Mural created by Emily Kim's Korean Studies and Comparative Perspectives of East Asia students.

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orean Department Chair Emily Kim began the school year by asking her Korean Studies and Comparative Perspectives of East Asia (Grade 12 course) students, all native Korean speakers, to look closer at their cultural roots and reflect on how they might describe Korea to a foreigner. Many students said, “rushing.” “How would you describe another country?” she asked. “The U.S., for example?” “Freedom,” was one answer. Ms. Kim observed that the students held positive perceptions of another place, but the first word that came to mind about Korea was one with a relatively negative connotation. She sought not necessarily to change the students’ minds, but rather to expand them, by asking them to look deeper. “The fact is, our Korean ancestors have a sad past. Japanese colonization, Korean war, severe poverty … we want to overcome the negative circumstances of our history. I want to introduce students to the idea of ‘don’t give up.’ I want to emphasize the persistence of our Korean ancestors … to see what we can learn from our cultural roots, and apply to our lives today.” Through guided small group discussions and mind mapping to different prompts, students did look deeper. Over their course of study, they came to see the world around them not as a hurried, busy place, but rather as a prospering, resilient, thriving country, surviving because of perseverance and aspirations held and nurtured over decades and generations. Michelle Suh (Grade 12) explained how the class, in the end, landed on a different, far more positive “r” word, “resilience.” “We were invaded by different countries. We had to face our demise a few times. We really had to suffer. But, then, the thing that’s really special about Koreans is that they never give up. They

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always come back up. Fifty years ago, we needed help from other countries. Now we’re giving help to other countries. I think that’s an amazing trait to have as a nation and ethnicity. We wanted to portray that resilience in our big picture. That’s how we came up with the image – fighting.” To translate their understanding and insight in a tangible way, the class came together to create a mural on the theme “resilience.” Two students, Michelle Suh and Sally Oh (Grade 12), created the outline of Taekwondo fighters as a mural background, and each student in the class received an A4 piece of paper on which to depict something of cultural significance. The finished project presents a stunning reflection of Korean resilience over time. Regarding the end result, Ms. Kim observed, “I’m really proud of my students. They made such an effort.” Alice Chang and Nam Hee Kong, fellow Korean language teachers, each teach sections of the same Grade 12 Korean Studies course. Teachers plan collaboratively on course objectives and themes, and then each teacher tailors the content to meet different students’ needs. Alice Chang shared, “We start from point of view – how to look at other countries’ cultures with open minds, and look at our own country in comparison.” For students from Asia, Ms. Kong added, “Understanding one’s own Eastern culture helps create a bridge to Western culture,” a key piece of the APIS mission statement to create globally enlightened citizens, who are able to bridge the gap between East and West. Ms. Chang said, “When we see other countries, we can better understand why they do what they do when we understand our own values and culture.” Stephanie Kim (Grade 12) shared, “Before I knew about Korean history, there were some things I couldn’t understand about my parents. But, after I understood that there were significant economic hardships when our parents were young, now I understand things I couldn’t before … In our age, I think we seek freedom. In our parents’ age, what they thought about was saving our country. They lived their whole life just for that. Now I see why they are so into their children’s education; they want them to have economic power and support the country. [This class] helped me shift my thinking.”

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Michelle Suh concluded, “A popular term we use when we describe ourselves, 의지의 한국인, literally means ‘resilient Koreans’ if you translate it, but it means much more to us. We always believe we can do it if we work together. We can work for a better future. If we come together, there’s nothing we can’t do.”

Grade 12 Korean Studies and Comparative Perspectives of East Asia students.

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2016 KAIAC Large-Group Festival By the Music Department

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ur high school music department participated in the KAIAC Large-Group Festival on Nov. 1, 2016 for the sixth consecutive year. The band, choir, and orchestra traveled to Korea International School and performed for a panel of three professional judges where each ensemble was critiqued, rated, and given a clinic following the performance. In preparation for the festival, students experienced the valuable effects of detail-oriented rehearsals, sectionals, and critical listening. Tasks and assessments assigned by the music teachers encouraged positive thinking and growth mindset in the music realm. One pre-performance task was to listen to a class recording two weeks before the festival and compare it with a second recording taken one week later. The students became judges and compared each category of music-making. Then, the students knew exactly what to rehearse in the final days leading up to the performance. This attention to detail heightened the students awareness to every aspect of their musical skills, which ultimately improved their final performance. As veteran choir member Noah Kim (Grade 11) explained, “I like how we compete with ourselves in order to improve our skills and challenge ourselves further.” Orchestra member Huck Jun Hong (Grade 11) said of his experience, "The most memorable part of the KAIAC performance for me was the beautiful sounds and harmony. There was a sense of the world's beauty in which drastic contrast of order and disorder, peace, and chaos coexisted. The biggest takeaway is that we became more of a family." The teachers are proud of the students for not only being able to make music on a high level, but also for each student’s individual contribution towards making the class a positive family environment for everyone in the room. Flute player Erin Oh (Grade 12) said, “KAIAC is one of my favorite band memories throughout my high school years. Going to other schools and presenting what we've prepared for two months makes me feel a sense of belonging as well as achievement.” Eugenie Kwon, a junior musician in both band and choir, added “It is always a fun experience to sing and play in front of judges and peers and get a rating and feedback after the performance. I thought we blended really well with the harmonies and melodies.” The APIS music department aims to inspire lifelong music making. We hope the students’ love of music continues far beyond this event. As first-year choral student Gia Kim (Grade 11) said, “My favorite memory from this event was that we were still singing the song after the performance was over!” May all of the students keep the melodies in their hearts forever! Choir Soloists: Donna Kim (G11), Jennifer Kang (G11), Gia Kim (G11), and Sarah Yoon (G12) Band Soloists: Sally Oh (G12), Claire Shin (G11), Eugenie Kwon (G11), Eric Lee (G9), and Shinyoung Lee (G12)

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KAIAC Judges’ Results High School Orchestra - Gold High School Choir - Gold High School Band - Platinum


NOVEMBER 2016

SECONDARY SCHOOL NEWS & EVENTS

APIS Forensics Team

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n Nov. 18 and 19, forensics students headed to Seoul International School to participate in the second KAIAC (Korean-American Interscholastic Activities Conference) forensics competition of the 2016-2017 school year. Sarah McRoberts (debate coach) said, “The speech and debate kids continued to show great improvement this tournament. The debate team improved to a 66 percent win-loss record (we had 50 percent at the first tournament). For the season, the team has now amassed 28 wins!” Debate student James Park (Grade 11) said, "I saw myself improve from the last tournament to this one. I've also seen my team really grow, and I felt proud."

Speech student Gia Kim (Grade 11) observed, "[With it] being my first year on the APIS speech team, I was a little worried. I thought that all the other, much bigger, schools would be way more prepared; what I found out was that our team, though small, is truly strong. Together we have come a long way in a short time and I am really proud of everyone."

Tyler Sgrignoli (speech coach) echoed Gia’s sentiments. He said,"I am continually amazed by the astounding results of our speech and debate students. While we may be small in size in comparison to many of the other KAIAC teams, there is something to be said for the fact that APIS is frequently found in the winner's circle following each tournament. What's more, is that, as a school, APIS students always retain an air of camaraderie and sportsmanship in relating and responding to other schools. And, I can honestly say that my students' many successes in these past two competitions are the result of their natural communicative abilities and eagerness to learn and grow as speakers."

Ms. McRoberts added, “Please congratulate our forensics students when you see them around APIS. We are very proud of them!” Students Participating Speech: • Prose: Richard Jo (G11), Rose Lee (G11), and Andrew Kim (G12) • Poetry: HJ Hong (G11), Claire Park (G12) • Solo Acting: Gia Kim (G11) • Impromptu: Jeff Kim (G11) Debate: • Public Forum: Angelina Ahn (G12) and Cathy Lim (G12); John Cheng (G10) and Henry Kim (G10) • Parliamentary Procedure: Tommy Lee (G11) and Max Park (G11); Cole Kim (G11) and James Park (G11)

Speech Award Winners: • Gia Kim (G11), finalist, Solo Acting • HJ Hong (G11), finalist, Poetry Interpretation • Richard Jo (G11), finalist, Prose Interpretation Best Speaker Round Winners: • HJ Hong (G11) • Richard Jo (G11) Honorable Mention • Rose Lee (G11)

Debate Award Winners: • Angelina Ahn (G12) and Cathy Lim (G12), semi-finalists in Public Forum Best Speaker Round Winners: • Angelina Ahn (G12) - Public Forum • Cathy Lim (G12) - Public Forum • Cole Kim (G11) - Parliamentary Procedure • James Park (G11) - Parliamentary Procedure • Tommy Lee (G11) - Parliamentary Procedure • Max Park (G11) - Parliamentary Procedure • Henry Kim (G10) - Public Forum Honorable Mention • Tommy Lee and Max Park (G11) • Cole Kim and James Park (G11)

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NOVEMBER 2016

S C H O O LW I D E N E W S & E V E N T S

Snapshots

Yurina Kim (Grade 2) receiv es

y during high school chapel. Tyler Sgrignoli shares testimon

Grade 2 art class.

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"Coolest Kicks" award at ES Chapel.

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performs for the Camarata Greenhawks Children's Choir Children's Choir.

Ms. Shinners honors economics class plays Monopoly as part of a study of real-life monopolies.

Japanese embassy visit.


PTO board members (l eft to right) Henry Kuo : Ms. Myo ’s mom), M ung Joo Sim s. Bu Ja Le mom), Ms. e (G5 Noa (G5 Jin Young P and G7 Ne ark (G12 G Lee (G11 Je o Lee’s race Y. Kim nnifer Lee's 's mother), an mom). d Jina

ing session. Art department hosts figure draw

NOVEMBER 2016

S C H O O LW I D E N E W S & E V E N T S

High school STEAM class.

Grades 8 science experim ent

with Grade 5.

Grade 2 birthday celebrations.

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NOVEMBER 2016

S C H O O LW I D E N E W S & E V E N T S

Principal's Note: Does Sleep Really Matter? YES!

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By Jillian Iwanuk, Middle School Principal

o you remember the last time you didn’t get enough sleep? It’s not fun, right? I know when I don’t get enough sleep, I feel groggy, cranky, and it’s really hard for me to concentrate. As an adult, it’s a struggle. Imagine what it must feel like to be a kid and not get enough sleep. Kids can’t just have a cup of coffee (nor should they!) or shake it off or just go to their desk and hide from other people like many adults can. Kids have days full of high expectations and energy requirements. Sleep is the key to making productive days possible. While this is true for adults and children, let’s focus on the kids. How is sleep helpful? Sleep is required for every single living thing on our planet and, for our children, whose brains are still developing, sleep is even more important. Scientists have learned that sleep not only allows for the brain and body to rest and recharge, it’s also when the brain stores information in long-term memory. This is when connections are made between parts of the brain and it’s these connections that make learning possible. Children who get enough sleep see benefits in learning, focusing, and regulating emotions. What if we don’t get enough sleep? We all know how we feel when we don’t get enough sleep, but the long-term effects go even deeper. Not only are people not able to concentrate as well after a night of not enough sleep, but, with children, lack of sleep has been linked to long-term struggles with behavior and memory, two of the most important aspects of success at school. Research also shows that the human brain will stop retaining information when it does not get enough rest. In other words, sending a child to after-school programs may not be beneficial at all because students can’t retain the information that’s being taught. Besides learning issues, children and adults who suffer from not enough sleep often find themselves sick more often because their immune systems aren’t as strong. What Can We Do? Let our kids sleep! Research recommends that children ages 5-12 get at least 10 consecutive hours of nighttime sleep per night. It’s not until age 13 that the average lowers to about 8-10 hours per night. The benefits of good sleep are clear. Our children will perform better in and out of school and, in general, have a healthier, happier life. Socktober Update: Special thanks to anyone who supported Socktober! A total of 281 pairs of socks were donated, and will be distributed among the following orphanages: 지온보육원 (Geon Children’s Home), 송죽원 (SongJuk Children's Home), 시온원 (Zion Children's Home), and 명진보육원 (Myungjin Children’s Home). Thanks also to ES SRC and fifth graders for leading Socktober, and to Wendy Wilson (Grade 5 teacher), Pastor John Choi, and John-Michael Becker (October Chapel guest speaker), for their leadership and for helping to deliver the donations.

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Librarian's Pick: Winter Books for Snowy Days

all season is coming to an end, and winter is coming!

This month we feature three charming tales that are themed around “snow.” Even though it will be cold and gray during the winter season, it is worth getting outside to enjoy the snowflakes. These picture books will help you feel cozy during winter and warm your heart. Let’s all welcome the winter wonderland!

Frederick

By Leo Lionni This book follows a family of field mice as they prepare for the cold winter, and shows how they spend the dark winter all together. While the other field mice work to gather food to survive for winter, Frederick sits on a sunny rock by himself doing nothing. He says that he is gathering sunrays, colors, and words for winter. At first, It appears that Frederick is ignoring winter’s imminent arrival, but, if you read the whole story, you’ll realize he was preparing for winter in his own unique way. Winter comes, and the first snow falls. At first, the mice family is happy with so many things to eat and stories to enjoy. However, sooner or later, no one feels like chatting. At that moment, the dreamer and poet, Frederick, stands up and warms the cold winter.

There Was a Cold Lady Who Swallowed Some Snow!

By Lucille Colandro

The main character of this story is a cold lady who swallowed some snow … then swallowed a pipe, some coal, a black hat, a stick, and a scarf. The reason behind the woman’s odd behavior finally makes sense when, at the end, the cold woman hiccups twice and pops back out everything she swallowed. Read this book, and you’ll find out what happens next.

White Snow Bright Snow

NOVEMBER 2016

S C H O O LW I D E N E W S & E V E N T S

By Alvin Tresselt

It starts with a rhyme about white snow coming to the world during the gray night. The postman and farmer, the policeman and his wife, these grown-ups prepare for the snow and the cold winter in their own ways. But the children just dance and laugh and enjoy the excitement of the snow. It snows during the night, and, the next morning, the whole town is covered in white. Black and gray background, white snow, and other colorful surrounding pictures reveal the mystery and magic of a snowy winter scene. EDITORIAL TEAM: ■ Euysung Kim Director ■ Kate Kim Art & Design Editor ■ Caroline Webster Lead Writer/Editor

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Issue 45 APIS Online Update November 2016