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Winter / Spring 2014

APIS UPDATE

Address: 57 Wolgye-ro 45ga-gil, Nowon-gu, Seoul, 139-852, Korea Website: www.apis.seoul.kr

In this issue Winter / Spring Highlights Student Achievements Faculty Spotlight Alumni Spotlight College Acceptances

“Life Cycles” A Grade 1 Musical Production


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From

Dr.Kim’s Desk Euysung Kim, Ph.D. Director

“Failure” as Crucible of Development and Learning

In a recent issue of The Chronicle of Higher Education, Professor Anne Sobel of Northeastern University argues it’s unfortunate that schools and universities “still work from a grading scale that supports only success.” That is, from a young age, students learn that getting the right answer is the only thing that counts. We know however from our own experience as well as those of people with grand achievements that failure is the crucible of development and learning. Sobel quotes Thomas Edison: “I have not failed. I’ve just found 10,000 ways that won’t work.” Edison knew precisely that “failure” is a must discovery process. In fact, persevering through these “failures” to achieve “success” is what learning is all about. A “failure” is hence not the opposite of “success,” but, in fact, a path to it. Professor Angela Lee Duckworth of the University of Pennsylvania has reached the same conclusion in her research on “grit.” “When experts are doing the kind of practice that makes them better,” she says, “they are frequently failing, frequently confused, not necessarily seeing gain for what will feel like a very long time.” According to Duckworth’s research, “grit”—which can be defined as passion coupled with the tenacity to overcome obstacles or challenges—is shown to be a greater determinant of a student’s future success than IQ or socioeconomic status. Once you agree that grit is something we must nurture and encourage in school, we cannot simply reward or give credit only when the end result of a successful venture is achieved. Yes, achieving success is the goal but in order for them to achieve success regularly, they must see the relationship between practice and failure. We must give our students permission to fail and to learn from it (certainly not discouraged by it). Here are some of Sobel’s suggestions as to how educators may nurture grit in the classroom:

• Create an Ethos. It should be clear to students, right from the start, that failure is okay, that this is a safe space to experiment and make mistakes. Sobel suggests sharing “famous failure” quotes from Michael Jordan, Steve Jobs, Walt Disney, the Beatles, Oprah Winfrey, and Albert Einstein, playing an appropriate TED talk, and sharing anecdotes at strategic points in a course. It’s important, of course, to distinguish between stumbles on the road to success and lackadaisical performance.

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From Dr.Kim’s Desk

• Find New Definitions of Success. Sobel creates a “con-

trolled failure scenario” in her course on film production. Students are given four hours to create a one-minute video of one page of a script, and she evaluates them on how well they support each other, solve problems, and keep a positive attitude under stress. “The only way to fail at this assignment is by refusing to adapt,” she says. Personally, I do not see this as a new definition of success. It simply is establishing “grit” as a learning goal and assessing student learning accordingly. (By the way, “grit” is a part of APIS values: a combination of aspire and persevere. APIS is founded with the belief that integrity and spiritual growth must also be added to define a true meaning of success in life).

• Give Real-Time Feedback. It’s often a waste of time to give students suggestions at the end of a course

or project, says Sobel. Timely formative feedback is far more productive. Sobel says, “When students have a chance to refine their work on the basis of feedback, it creates a deeper experience with the material.” Students should never expect to hand in a perfect paper or exam always first time around. Doing a revision or re-take of an exam should become a natural process of learning and meeting high standards.

• Build It Into Your Grading. In her course, Sobel has an assessment category titled Execution Versus Level of Difficulty: students understand that final grades depend partly on the challenge of the project. She says, “A grading category that takes difficulty into consideration offers a safety net that gives students the confidence to take calculated risks.” • Reflect on Failure. At the end of a project or course, it’s very helpful for students to share successes

and mistakes, realize that everyone makes mistakes, and think about what to do differently next time. She concludes, “Learning to fail could help our students become more resilient, self-aware, innovative, and compassionate.” Having read Sobel’s article, I got to think that one of the school’s roles is to provide a controlled environment where students could experience failures and learn from them. As parents and teachers, we are sometimes too eager to intervene preemptively to stop students altogether from failures. It is actually very difficult not to intervene as our children struggle to deal with challenges and failures. But, in order to nurture our kids to become robust leaders of the New Pacific Century, we need to exercise the wisdom of sometimes just stepping back and cheering from the sidelines.

Reference: Sobel, Anne (May 9, 2014) “How Failure in the Classroom Is More Instructive Than Success,” The Chronicle of Higher Education, (Vol. LX, #34, p. A32)

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From Dr.Kim’s Desk

“실패”는 성공이 요구하는 배움의 고된 과정입니다

Northeastern University의 Anne Sobel 교수는 The Chronicle of Higher Education에 게재한 최근 기고문 에서 여전히 정답만을 요구하는 오늘날 교육의 현실에 탄식하고 있습니다. 다시 말해, 학생들은 어렸을 때부 터 정답만 중요하고 정답을 맞혀야만 좋은 성적을 받 고 성공한다고 배운다는 것입니다. 그러나 우리는 인 생을 살아오면서 실패는 성공을 위한 배움의 고된 과 정이라는 것을 깨닫게 됩니다. Sobel 교수는 기고문 서두에 실패에 관한 토머스 에디슨의 명언을 우리에게 전합니다: “나는 실패하지 않았다. 단지 효과가 없는 10,000가지 방법을 발견했을 뿐이다.” 이외에도 비슷 한 여러 격언이나 속담을 많이 접하셨으리라 생각합니 다. 그런데 문제는 우리가 이렇게 잘 알고 있는 교훈을 교육에 반영을 못 하고 있을 뿐만 아니라 오히려 “실패”에 대한 잘못된 인식을 심어주고 있다는 것입니다. “실패”가 정답을 얻는 과정에서 차지하는 중요성을 가르치기보다 “실패”를 성공의 반대 개념으로, 피해야 하는 것으로만 인식하게 합니다. (즉, Sobel 교수가 말하는 오늘날 교육평가 시스템의 문제는 에디슨처럼 인내와 창의적인 이니셔티브를 통해 얼마나 많은 “실패”의 교훈을 얻었는지를 성적에 반영하지 않 는다는 것입니다.) “실패”를 “성공”의 반대개념으로 인식할 때 아이들은 나약해집니다. 운 좋게 성공을 지속해 왔을지 라도 단 한 번의 실패를 통해 절망하고 포기하게 됩니다. “실패”를 성공으로 향하는 길목에서의 당연한 “과정”으로 인식할 때 우리 아이들은 인내를 가지고 과감하게 성공을 향 하여 나아갈 수 있다고 Sobel 교수는 강조합니다. 21세기에 필요한 skill set을 연구해온 University of Pennsylvania의 Angela Lee Duckworth 교수도 실패와 관련하여 똑같은 결론을 내렸습니다. Duckworth 교수는 “전문가들은 성공적인 결과를 위해 끊임없이 실패의 장벽에 부딪히며, 오랫동안 성과물을 내지 못하는 경우가 허다하다”고 말합니다. 이러한 과정에서, Duckworth 교수는 목표를 향해 열정을 가지고 실패와 어려움을 극복하려는 의지를 “grit”으로 정의하며, IQ 나 사회경제적인 배경보다 “grit”이야말로 성공을 좌우하는 결정적인 능력이라고 주장합니다. APIS 학생들이 “grit”을 키워가도록 교육하기 위해서는 단순히 최종 과제의 완성도만 가지고 평가하고 칭찬해서는 안 됩니다. 물론 성적평가에서 높은 수준의 학습결과를 얻는 것이 궁극적인 목표지만 미래에도 지속적인 성공을 거두기 위해서는 연습과 실패의 필요성을 이해해야 합니다. 학생이 실패를 경험할 기회를 주고 그 실패로부터 (낙담하지 않 고) 극복해 나아갈 수 있도록 격려해야 합니다. Sobel 교수는 “grit”을 가르치기 위해 부모와 선생님들께 다음과 같은 조언을 합니다.

•실패에 대한 올바른 인식을 심어줘야 합니다. 첫 수업 시간부터 학생들에게 새로운 도전을 하도록 하고, 실수를 허용하는 분위기를 조성해야 합니다. 이것은 실패에 만족하라는 것이 아닙니다. 더군다나 실패해도 좋으니 최선을 다하지 않아도 좋다는 것 더욱 아닙니다. 최선을 다했음 에도 불구하고 실패를 할 때 낙심하거나 그 결과에 승복하지 않고, 성공을 위한 새로운 도전을 끊임없이 해 나갈 수 있 는 환경을 만들어 주어야 합니다. 이런 환경을 만드는 한 예로 Sobel 교수는 학생들에게 마이클 조던, 스티브 잡스, 월 트 디즈니, 비틀스, 오프라 윈프리, 아인슈타인과 같은 “성공한 실패자들”의 이야기나 일화를 늘 상기시켜주는 것도 도 움이 된다고 합니다. 학생이 열심히 노력했음에도 실패하는 것과 태만의 결과로 얻은 실패는 확실히 구분해야 합니다.

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From Dr.Kim’s Desk

• 성공적인 “결과”에만 집착하지 말고 성공에 도달하는 “과정”을 가르쳐야 합니다. Sobel 교수의 영화제작 강의시간에는 학생들이 팀을 이루어 4시간 안에 한 장의 대본으로 1분짜리 영화를 만드는 과제가 있습니다. 이 과제는 학생들이 결과물을 도출하는 데 실패 할 것을 염두에 두고 만든 과제이기 때문에 최종 결과물의 완성도 보다는 학생들의 협력자세, 문제 해결 능력, 긍정적 태도를 평가하여 피드백을 준다고 합니다. 즉, 이 과제의 의도는 성공적인 결과보다는 성공적인 결과를 얻는 과정을 연습하고 평가받는 것이 핵심입니다. Sobel 교수는 “이 과제를 낙제하는 유일한 방법은 주어진 상황에 적응하기를 거부하는 것이다”고 말합니다. 제가 보기에 Sobel 교수의 의도는 좋은 영화가 어떤 것인지도 알아야 하지만 더 중요한 것은 좋은 영화를 만들려면 어떤 어려움 과 위기에 직면하더라도 극복하려는 의지, 즉 Duckworth 교수가 말한 “grit”이 있어야 한다는 것입니다. APIS에서 도 성공하는 데에 grit의 중요성을 강조합니다. APIS의 목표중 Aspire (목표를 향한 포부)와 Persevere (인내심)의 조합은 “grit”을 나타내며, 이에 Integrity와 Spiritual Growth를 더하면 학생들이 인생에서 성공의 진정한 의미를 찾 을 수 있다고 생각합니다.

• 피드백은 바로바로 제공해야 합니다. Sobel 교수는 수업 또는 과제가 다 끝난 후에 학생에게 피드백을 주는 것은 시간 낭비라고 합니다. 피드백을 수업 이나 과제 도중에 제공하면 훨씬 생산적이며, 성공을 얻는 과정을 가르치는 데 효과적입니다. 더불어 Sobel 교수는 “피드백을 받고 과제를 수정할 기회가 주어진다면 학생들은 과제를 더 깊게 이해할 수 있다”고 말합니다. 처음 제출 하는 과제 또는 첫 시험이 완벽하리라고 기대해서는 안 되므로 학생이 과제에서 잘못한 부분을 수정하거나 재시험 을 보는 것은 자연스럽고 당연한 것이 되어야 합니다.

• 성공적인 결과 외에 성공을 위한 도전적인 자세와 노력도 평가 항목이 되어야 합니다. Sobel 교수는 과제를 평가할 때 가장 기본적인 항목 (전체구성, 내용, 등) 외에 “Execution Versus Level of Difficulty”를 평가항목으로 추가한다고 합니다. 이것은 올림픽 피겨스케이팅 경기에서 깔끔한 경기 내용도 중요하지만, 구성의 난이도를 반영하여 추가 점수를 주는 것과 비슷합니다. Sobel 교수의 의도는 어려운 시도를 하는 정도에 따 라 성적을 평가해서 학생이 도전할 수 있는 자신감을 심어주는 것입니다. 저는 더 나아가서 grit 같은 character도 학 교에서 수학과 영어 같은 과목처럼 평가하고 커리큘럼에 반영해야 한다고 생각합니다.

• 실패에서 교훈을 찾는 습관을 길러줘야 합니다. 한 과제 또는 한 학기 수업을 마친 후 학생들이 잘한 부분과 못한 부분에 관한 이야기를 함께 나누며 다음번에는 어 떻게 달리할지 생각하는 기회를 얻는 것이 중요합니다. Sobel 교수는 “실패를 극복하는 법을 배우는 것은 학생이 강 인한 정신, 스스로에 대한 깨달음, 그리고 혁신적이며 남을 배려하는 인격을 만들어 나가는 데 있어서 가장 좋은 방 법”이라고 말합니다. Sobel 교수의 글을 읽고 저는 학교의 핵심적인 역할이란 안전한 울타리 안에서 우리 아이들이 실패를 경험하고 어 려움을 딛고 일어서는 법을 가르치는 것이 아닌가 생각하게 됩니다. 때때로 부모나 선생님 입장에서 너무 자주 예방 적 개입 (preemptive intervention)을 통해 우리 아이들이 실패를 아예 안 하도록 “보호”하는 우를 범하고 있지 않나

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돌이켜 보아야 합니다. 위태로워 보일지라도 섣불리 나서지 않고 우리 아이가 스스로 문제를 잘 헤쳐나갈 수 있도록 한 발짝 떨어져서 지켜보며 응원하는 지혜가 우리 아이들을 New Pacific Century의 리더로 키우는 데 필요합니다.

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Elementary Principal

From the

Stephen Massiah Elementary School Principal Winter has come and gone and spring is on its way out the door. I am not certain where the time has gone however as I look at the events and activities that have transpired since our last newsletter, the list is long. The Christmas concert was a wonderful event as always and it was our first opportunity to begin to see the results of our new Orff music program; fantastic. As we moved into the new year, second quarter report cards were sent home with your child and MAP assessments for the elementary students were completed during the last week of January. MAP results continue to be very positive, with the vast majority of our students scoring significantly above their grade level norm. Other events have included a parent coffee, Write Across APIS, Read Across APIS, Parent Teacher Conferences and the school Culture Fair. Our Parent Coffee was led by our College Counseling Director, Mrs. Shana Russell. I think some parents arrived wondering, “Why should I start thinking about my child’s college in elementary school,” but by the end of the session they were asking that we do the same workshop next year. Thank you Mrs. Russell it was very helpful! Both Read Across and Write Across APIS continued to showcase our students literacy ability and where we are with our elementary school-wide goal for every child to love reading and love writing. It has been a treat to watch this continue to grow over the past number of years under the guidance of Mrs. Mona Cammarata and Mrs. Suzanne Forrester, our two great literacy specialists. With less than a couple of weeks left of school we will continue to focus on our students achieving all that they can in these remaining weeks. Coming up we have the Elementary Field Day on Friday June 6 and Moving Up Ceremonies for K5 and Grade 5 on Tuesday June 10. As always I would like to express my sincere appreciation for the support from our parent community and express my great appreciation for the continued dedication of the faculty and staff here at APIS. Please continue the great support you provide your child in their learning, as this is an essential part of their growth and our partnership.

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From the

Secondary Principal Scott Paulin Secondary School Principal

Winter in Korea can seem cold and bleak. The daylight hours grow short, and the air is gripped in winter’s icy fingers. Despite the cold outside, however, life inside the halls of APIS remains vibrant and alive even in the depths of winter. It is during the chilly winter months that our students dig into their studies and continue to grow, incubating the intellectual potential that will one day blossom into the flowers of success. Over the course of the winter term, students were challenged to connect the concepts and content from their courses to bigger questions in life and consider how the various academic disciplines are connected, how knowledge is complex and intertwined. It is my hope that our students will begin to develop a genuine curiosity for life and nurture that curiosity so that it will produce fruit in their lives. Our classrooms and halls are teeming with budding young scientists, authors, artists, and innovators. At times, I am sure students and teachers alike can find their spirits in a wintery mood, dampened by doubt and weary in the journey, but the hope of spring can carry us through. You see, that is the beauty and mystery of winter. The time of year when the acorns have fallen from the branches and now lay waiting in the ground, small pods of potential, seemingly inconsequential, but programmed and packed with everything they need to become mighty oaks. This is what I see throughout the school-year at APIS – acorns and saplings, students learning and growing and fulfilling their potential. I am so proud of the growth I have seen in our students this winter. Students have begun to adapt to the new math program and push themselves to become problem solvers able to think about the bigger picture rather than simply memorize steps to solve equations. In the social studies, students are grappling with big questions and applying their thoughts to the world they live in rather than simply memorize names, dates, and facts. In the sciences, students are focusing on deepening their understanding of content as they develop the critical inquiry and reasoning skills valued by colleges and universities. In the English language arts, students are becoming critical readers and writers adept at exploring the thoughts of others through exploring literature and non-fiction, and putting their own thoughts in writing as they reflect on these readings. In addition to all this, our students are deepening their understanding of the world around them through the study of foreign languages, the arts, and the language, literature, and culture of Korea. Bodies and spirits are developing through physical education, athletics, and weekly chapels. Yes, winter in Korea can seem cold and dead outside, but inside APIS, it is alive with passion, potential, and production as our students continue to grow and learn. Here’s to the promise of spring – something I am reminded of every time I see the promise of the bright future in the efforts of each of our students. Here’s to the blossoming hearts and minds that make it such a pleasure to be a part of the APIS family - spring, summer, fall, and winter.

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From the

Dean of Students Matthew Johnson Dean of Students

During 3rd quarter parent-teacher conferences, all current 9th-11th grade students met with administration to schedule their classes for next year. This was a wonderful opportunity for students and parents to meet with administration and have the chance to map out their remaining academic years at APIS. The meetings led to meaningful conversations on topics such as having a balanced high school life (including rigorous academic classes, extracurricular activities, and enjoyable life experiences), the prospect of taking AP courses, and the value of pursuing classes during high school that students plan on pursuing in their college/ professional career. APIS will continue to have these meetings on a yearly basis to support all students and families. At APIS, we administer a number of different standardized tests throughout the school year in order to better meet the needs of all students: The MAP test (highlighting math, language, and reading), the STAMP test (taken in Japanese and Chinese) and the WrAP test (focusing on middle school writing). The results from these different tests are used by teachers in order to work more effectively with individual students as well as entire classes. As the final weeks of the 2013-2014 school year come to a close, I’d like to remind all students of the importance of staying strong to the end academically and socially. Students need to commit to the same amount of effort and determination that they had throughout the first three quarters of the school year. Students also need to be reminded that maintaining good attendance and wearing the proper uniform is expected until the very end. Let’s all work together and commit to making the last few weeks of school truly memorable.

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From the

Activities Coordinator Andrew Murphy Activities Coordinator This past winter and spring APIS offered a wide variety of special events, activities, sports, and after school activities for children to participate in outside the classroom to enrich and enhance their educational experiences. These co-curricular activities are saddled with the purpose of providing students opportunities to meet APIS’ core values; Aspire, Persevere, Integrity, Spiritual Growth. Activities at APIS are first and foremost about fun for the students. Additionally, they form a useful additional avenue for self-expression and help to initiate and cement friendships.

Music, sports, and events like the Culture Fair, Pacific Pencil, Science Fair, and after school activities figure highly on our list of priorities for students of all ages. Our aim is to encourage active participation, and give students the opportunity to excel in activities for which they have passion and desire for. In our experience, young people who are able to explore their interests and express their talents in a wide variety of fields make better scholars, employees, friends, family members and citizens. Asia Pacific International School’s aim is to help you learn what it is like to be a member of a team or group, to develop skills and acquire self- discipline. APIS diligently works hard to do everything in our power to nurture student talent to provide students opportunities to allow students reach their potential. This past winter and spring saw many activities for which this happened. Although the school year is winding down, many events and co-curricular activities continue on. APIS is offering more opportunities for students to develop their skills, passions, and talents in its summer school programs. Upcoming summer programs in elementary school will allow student opportunities in technology, drama, music, vacation bible study, and a sports camp. In secondary, APIS has expanded its summer program to include activities such as basketball, volleyball, soccer, and chamber music which will be putting on their 3rd annual concert this June. With the summer holidays approaching, I recommend to both parents and students to keep one thought in mind, and that is to stay active. Rather than wasting time on the sidelines during the summer holidays, I encourage students to participate in activities that first and foremost about fun but allow them to build skills, develop self-expression, help to initiate and cement friendships, and express their talents.

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A D M I N I S T R AT I O N

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Exciting Enhancements to Next Year’s Schedule

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PIS is always looking for innovative ways to educate and prepare our students for the New Pacific Century. Last year, we added the optional 9th period in the elementary division to offer foreign language instruction (Chinese and Japanese) as well as an after-school art program. The response has been overwhelming as almost 100% of our elementary students signed up for the 9th period offerings. As a result, APIS is the only international school in Korea to offer such a fully integrated K through 12 foreign language curriculum and an extensive art program. Next year, APIS will be extending the 9th period option to the secondary division as well. This will allow us to offer more instrumental classes (Band and Orchestra) per week for middle school students. Furthermore, the Chorus and Orff curriculum will be offered to all middle schoolers, providing them better foundational music. In high school, the optional 9th period will greatly enhance our school’s offering of elective courses. APIS will be able to introduce new and innovative courses including architectural design, woodworking, aeronautics, web programming, and drama / theater. By spreading our electives more evenly, it will also be possible for a student to take more music and art classes because they will be offered in different time periods, instead of being offered at the same time. The optional 9th period will be a good opportunity for students who want to further engage in developing 21st century skills, emphasizing elements of design, play, story, symphony, empathy, and meaning.

New Pacific Century의 비젼을 가지고 저희 학교는 늘 최고의 교육을 하 고자 노력하고 있습니다. 올해는 초등학교에 9교시 수업을 개설하여 외 국어(중국어/일본어)와 방과후 미술 프로그램을 선택적으로 운영하였습 니다. 초등학교 학부모님들의 많은 관심속에 거의 100%의 초등부 학생 들이 Optional 9교시 프로그램에 등록하여 외국어와 미술을 배우고 있습니다. 저희 학교처럼 extensive한 미술 프로그램과 외국어 교육을 유치원부터 고등학교에 이르기까지 체계적으로 가르치는 학교는 외국인학교를 떠나 한국에도 없습니다. 성공적으로 운영되고 있는 9교시 프로그램 경험을 토대로 내년부터는 선택적 9교시를 중,고등부에도 확대 제공하고자 합니다. 중 등부에는 밴드와 오케스트라 수업을 9교시에 추가적으로 개설하여, 일주일에 밴드/오케스트라 수업 횟수를 늘릴 계획입니다. 또한, 중등부학생 모두 Chorus와 오르프(Orff) 커리큘럼을 접목한 과정을 공부하게 되는데 이는 초등학교 음악과정부터 중등과정까지 체 계적으로 이어지는 Music Foundation 교육 입니다. 고등학교에서는 선택적 9교시를 활용하여 다양한 선택과목을 제공하고자 합니다. 9교시에는 이전에 제공하지 않았던 많은 창의적 인 수업들을 개설하고(예: 건축디자인, 목공미술, 항공학, 웹 프로그래밍, 연극, 리코딩 아트, 등), 또한 음악, 미술교육을 심도 있게 할 수 있도록 스케줄을 조정할 계획입니다. 예를 들어, 내년에는 Chorus를 7교시에, Band나 Orchestra를 8교시에, Art나 연극수업 을 9교시에 들을 수 있습니다. 3개 교시 전부 미술관련 수업을 들을 수도 있습니다. 내년부터 도입되는 선택적 9교시는 APIS가 다른 학교와 차별화되는 또 하나의 특징이 될 것 입니다. APIS는 늘 혁신적인 Mindset을 가지고 저희 학생들이 21세기에 꼭 중요한 skill set을 기를 수 있도록 최고의 교육환경과 프로그램을 제공하도록 노력할 것입니다.

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The Spirit of Christmas

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ruly, Christmas is the most wonderful time of the year and the spirit of Christmas was alive and well this past December at APIS. Here are a few key events that helped us remember the reason for the season. APIS’ Spirit of Giving When the community of APIS heard about Typhoon Haiyan and all of the devastation in the Philippines, we wanted to do something to show our support. Through donations, a charity basketball game, and a giving tree, the entire student body and faculty were able to contribute to a great cause to support those in need. Through our collective efforts, APIS raised $2320.96 and donated boxes of items to the Christian Light Foundation, a ministry located in Quezon City, The Philippines with the mission of “Leading people to Christ in Southeast Asia in partnership with local churches while providing opportunities for other ministries and church multiplication”. Hear the Sounds of Christmas CD Chaplain Zach Luginbill and a number of students were hard at work writing the songs and recording the music soundtrack for the all-school Chapel presentation of “A Christmas Carol.” One of the great parts about Christmas is that it is a time of year all ages can celebrate together, which is shown with this recording project because there are students from elementary, middle school, and high school all joining together. APIS Christmas Chapel tells Dickens’ Classic Tale Played before an audience of parents, faculty, staff, and the entire student body on December 20, “A Christmas Carol” brought the message of hope and forgiveness. This story, written by Charles Dickens and adapted by Sean Forrester and Zach Luginbill, brought to the audience a vision of how one person’s choices in life can reflect upon their character and future success.

APIS 나눔 행사

Sounds of Christmas CD 제작

하이옌 태풍으로 인해 필리핀에 발생한 피해 관련 소식

작년 겨울에 Zach Luginbill 목사님과 많은 학생들은 APIS 채플 공연인 A

을 접했을 때 APIS는 작은 기부 부터 시작하여, 자선 모

Christmas Carol의 노래를 작사하고 녹음하는 작업을 진행하였습니다. 모

금을 위한 농구 경기와 Giving Tree 등 APIS의 모든 학생

두가 함께 모여 기뻐하는 성탄절인만큼 APIS 학생들도 초등부, 중등부, 고

들 뿐만 아니라 선생님들도 동참해 피해민들에게 도움의

등부 학년 구분 없이 모두 함께 녹음에 참여하였습니다. CD 제작에 참여한

손길을 뻗었습니다. 모두의 힘으로 APIS는 총 $2320.96

학생들은 주변 사람들의 가정과 삶에 “Sounds of Christmas” (크리스마스

기부금과 구호 물품이 가득찬 모금 상자를 Christian

음악)이 깃들 수 있기를 바라며 음악 CD를 선물로 나눴습니다.

Light Foundation으로 전달했습니다. Christian Light Foundation은 필리핀 퀘존 시티에 소재한 기독교 NGO 단체로 동남아시아에 있는 교회와 협력하여 선교 및 긴 급구호, 의료 봉사 등 활발한 활동을 펼치고 있습니다. APIS의 도움으로 태풍 피해민들에게 구호 물품 뿐만 아 니라 우리의 마음도 함께 전해졌기를 바랍니다. 후원해

APIS 크리스마스 채플에서 준비한 연극 “A Christmas Carol”

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12월 20일에 학부모님, 선생님, 그리고 모든 학생들이 지켜보는 가운데 희 망과 용서의 교훈을 전하는“크리스마스 캐롤” 공연의 막이 올랐습니다. 원 작가 찰스 디킨스의 작품을 Mr. Forrester와 Luginbill 목사님이 재구성하여, 한 개인의 선택이 자신의 성격과 미래에 어떻게 반영되는지 전해 주었습 니다. 공연은 관객들의 힘찬 박수소리와 함께 성황리에 막을 내렸습니다.

주신 모든 APIS 가족여러분들께 감사드립니다!

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Winter & Spring Music Concerts

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Christmas

he sights and sounds of the holiday season were in the air December 18-19 as the APIS Music Department presented their annual Christmas concerts. This year’s concerts were a veritable trip around the world with songs that spanned the globe; from Argentina to Australia, Spain to Africa. Some Christmas classics, like “Angels We Have Heard on High,” were presented with a slight twist and a Caribbean beat. During the Elementary Concert, songs were sung in French and a favorite of many was the Korean Musical. By the looks of the smiles on the faces of everyone in the audience and the students on stage, the APIS Christmas concerts were the best way to conclude the first semester of school and start the winter break with joy. 작년 12월 18-19일에 눈과 귀가 즐거운 크리스마스 콘서 트를 개최하였습니다. 이번 콘서트는 아르헨티나에서 호 주, 스페인, 아프리카까지 마치 세계 일주를 하는 것과 같 이 전 세계의 노래로 가득찼습니다. 초등부 학생들은 “천 사들의 노래가”와 같은 크리스마스 노래에 캐리비안 비 트와 음색을 입혀 새로운 음악을 탄생 시키기도 하고 불 어로 노래를 부르기도 했습니다. 초등부 콘서트의 하이라 이트는 역시 Korean Department에서 준비한 뮤지컬로, 많은 박수 갈채를 받았습니다. 다양하고 색다른 음악을 선보였던 APIS 크리스마스 콘서트 덕분에 한 학기에 마 침표를 찍고 신나는 겨울 방학을 시작할 수 있었습니다.

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Spring

y the time the middle of March had arrived, the weather in Seoul had signified that change was definitely in the air. An annual tradition at APIS to help recognize and remember this change in seasons is the Middle and High School Spring Music Concerts. William Cowper is credited with saying in 1785 that, “variety is the spice of life.” That phrase encapsulates the spirit of the song choices presented in the concerts by the ensembles. From the middle school choir’s presentation of the slave spiritual, “Elijah Rock” to the high school band’s interpretation of “Crown Him with Many Crowns,” audience members were treated to a wide range of sacred and secular numbers that displayed the students’ musical maturity. 3월 중순이 다가오자 서울의 날씨는 겨울에서 봄으로 변 하고 있었습니다. 이러한 계절의 변화가 다가올 때 즈음 APIS는 연례 행사로 중등부와 고등부 Spring Concert를 개최합니다. William Cowper 시인의 “다채로운 경험은 인생을 즐겁게 한다”는 말 처럼 이번 Spring Concert는 우리 APIS 구성원 모두 삶에 활력을 불어넣어주었습니 다. 중등부 합창단이 연주하였던 “Elijah Rock”와 고등 부 밴드가 “Crown Him with Many Crowns”를 재해석한 연주 등 다양한 공연을 통해 학생들의 음악적 성장도 엿 볼 수 있었습니다.

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APIS Science Fair & Foreign Language Contest

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pring has brought about a few “firsts” for APIS. April 3-4 were exciting days as our future scientists participated in their first Science Fair exposition. They set out to answer some questions like, “What liquid is most effective in plant growth?” as well as, “What beverage stains teeth the most?” At APIS, students are required to participate in the school science fair and are encouraged to participate in the Google International Science Fair as a culmination to the research process. In May, APIS’ Foreign Language Department presented its first annual Foreign Language Speech Contest. In order to keep true to our mission of helping our students bridge the gap between the East and the West, our foreign language program aims for the level of proficiency that would help our students to code switch with fluency between a foreign language and other cultures. At the event, selected middle school students gave speeches in languages that were not their native tongue. Korean Language Department Chair Emily Kim said, “APIS students were perfectly prepared for this presentation; not only in language but also cultural awareness.” Given the choice between Korean, Chinese, or Japanese, it was exciting to see student presenters dressed in Korean hanbok or a Japanese kimono telling stories of what they loved about their particular culture.

봄의 시작과 함께 APIS에도 “첫” 행사들이 많았습니다. 4월 3-4일에는 미래의 과학자 들의 첫 Science Fair가 열렸습니다. “식물의 성장에 가장 효과적인 액체는 무엇인가?” 또는 “어떤 음료가 치아를 가장 상하게 하는가?”와 같은 문제들에 대한 해답을 찾기 위 해 학생들은 몇 달동안 연구하고 실험을 수행하였습니다. APIS 학생들은 학교 Science Fair에 참석해야 하며 과학 관련 연구를 더욱 깊게 하고자 하는 학생에게는 Google International Science Fair에 참여하도록 권장합니다. 5월에는 APIS Foreign Language Department에서 첫 Foreign Language Speech Contest를 개최하였습니다. 동서양의 가교 역할을 하는 학생들을 양성하는 APIS 교육 철학 처럼 APIS의 외국어 프로그램은 학생들이 언어 뿐만 아니라, 문화에 대한 이해도 증진 시켜 언제든지 어느 문화에서든지 상황에 맞추어 쉽게 code-switch 할 수 있도록 양성 하는 것이 목표입니다. 선발된 중등부 학생들은 모국어가 아닌 외국어로 연설을 하였으

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며, Korean Language Department의 Chair인 Emily Kim 선생님은 “APIS 학생들은 이 대회를 위하여 언어적인 측면 뿐만 아니라 문화적인 측면에서도 완벽히 준비하였다”며 자랑스러워 했습니다. 우리나라의 한복, 일본 기모노 등 전통의상을 입고 한국어, 중국 어, 또는 일본어로 그 나라의 문화에서 가장 좋아하는 점에 대해 발표한 이번 행사는 발 표한 학생, 듣는 관중 모두가 뿌듯해지는, 성공적인 행사였습니다.

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Literacy Celebrated at APIS

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uring the spring months, the APIS Elementary School was abuzz with the celebration of literacy. To enhance our Reader’s and Writer’s Workshop curriculum, APIS partnered with events and organizations around the world to find new ways to get the students excited about reading and writing. These events continue to strengthen the APIS literacy program which emphasizes building strong literacy skills in all of our students. This March, APIS partnered with Lit World’s World Read Aloud Day (WRAD), a day to celebrate reading and storytelling and also a chance to raise awareness of the need for global literacy. Mr. Underhill (Grade 5 Teacher) initiated APIS’ involvement with this movement, sharing that “My goal as a teacher was to create an opportunity for students to enjoy reading with peers across elementary grade levels in an authentic, collaborative way.” The celebration of reading continued in April during the 5th Annual Read Across APIS event, as part of the Read Across America movement in the United States. The celebration was a day-long event beginning with a school-wide read aloud time in the morning, followed by guest and mystery readers visiting each classroom, and concluding with a Book Character Parade where students could show off their costumes and the literary inspiration behind them. To celebrate and encourage our student authors, this year’s Write Across APIS event gave students the opportunity to use their own original artwork to inspire their writing. Working alongside Elementary Art Teacher, Ms. Anna Sea, students selected a piece of their artwork, and then spent a week in March writing about that piece in any genre they preferred. Their writing was published along with their artwork in the 2014 APIS Pacific Pencil, an annual literary magazine featuring a collection of student artwork and writing. The celebration of literacy culminated with the 4th Annual Pacific Pencil Publishing Party where students, faculty, and families gathered for a presentation and exhibition of art and written works. Guest speaker, Ms. MinJee (MJ) Kang, a fashion illustrator and writer, explained how her love of drawing as a child led her to pursue this career. She demonstrated how she creates her illustrations; drawing a special APIS picture for all of the students. Her presentation was a great way to encourage our young student writers and artists to continue to pursue excellence and to follow their dreams.

Welcome to the 2014 Pacific Pencil Exhibition!

Matthew Jeon (Grade 1) checks an artwork off his list during a fun scavenger hunt activity.

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The elementary faculty and principal dress up as the characters of the books they read to students during Read Across APIS.


Literacy Celebrated at APIS

봄 학기 동안 APIS 초등부는 학생들의 읽기와 쓰기 실력을 선보이는 행사들로 떠들썩하였습니다. 3월에는 독서와 storytelling을 장려하고 세계적으로 읽기와 쓰기 능력의 중요성을 일깨워주는 World Read Aloud Day (WRAD) 행사를 했습니다. WRAD 행사에서는 학생들이 서로 다른 학년 학생들과 짝 을 이루어 서로에게 책을 읽어주었습니다. 이 행사를 기획한 5학년 Jeff Underhill 선생님은 “초등부 학 생들이 서로 협력하여 친구들과 함께 독서를 즐길 수 있는 자리를 만드는 것이 늘 선생으로서의 목표였습니 다”고 말했습니다. 미국에서 진행되는 Read Across America의 일환인 제 5회 Read Across APIS를 통하여 4월에도 독서를 권장하는 행사는 계속 되었 습니다. 오전에는 선생님들이 초등부 학생들에게 여러 이야기를 소리내어 읽어주었고, 그 후에 초대 손님과 깜짝 손님이 각 교실을 방 문하여 책을 읽어주었으며, 마지막에는 학생들이 자신의 의상과 의상에 담긴 문학적 의미를 자랑하는 Book Character Parade로 마 무리 지었습니다. APIS의 어린 작가들을 장려하기 위한 Write Across APIS에서는 학생들이 자신의 미술 작품을 통하여 얻은 영감으로 글을 썼습니다. 초 등부 미술 선생님이신 Anna Sea 선생님과 함께 미술 작품을 선택하여 작품을 보며 떠오르는 생각으로 일주일 동안 글을 작성하였습 니다. 매년 출판되는 APIS Pacific Pencil에 각 학생의 글과 미술 작품이 함께 실렸습니다. 5월에 있었던 제 4회 Pacific Pencil Publishing Party에서는 학생, 선생님, 그리고 가족이 참석하여 전시된 학생들의 작품을 감상한 후 학생들의 작품이 수록된 올해의 Pacific Pencil 책을 받았습니다. 초대 손님으로는 패션 일러스트레이터이자 작가인 Ms. MinJee (MJ) Kang이 참석하여 어렸을 때부터 즐겼던 그림 그리기가 현재 직업까지 이어온 과정을 설명하였습니다. Ms. Kang은 작품을 만들어내 는 과정을 보여주며 즉석에서 APIS 그림을 그려 스티커로 출력하여 학생들에게 선물하였습니다. 이 행사는 미래의 작가와 화가가 될 학생들이 계속해서 실력과 꿈을 키워나갈 수 있도록 격려하는 자리였습니다.

Students huddle to listen to Mrs. Forrester at Read Across APIS.

Ms. Wood reads, “How I Became a Pirate“ to elementary students.

APIS invited a guest speaker to the Pacific Pencil Publishing Party.

Visitors appreciate the art/written works at the Pacific Pencil event.

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2014 Culture Fair

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by Kirstan Beatty, School Counselor

n Friday, April 18, APIS hosted its second annual APIS Culture Fair with the theme, “Around the World in a Day.” Twenty-five cultures were represented through food, activities, clothing, and music. Students were able to eat lamb chops from Saudi Arabia, baklava from Greece, and gumbo from New Orleans. Students also got to try their hand at Canadian curling, create a Taiwanese lantern, and learned why Chicago dyes their river green for St. Patricks Day. There were tea ceremonies from Japan, a real life Tin Tin from Belgium, and Vegemite from Australia. Students were truly able to travel the world in a day! The event culminated with an interactive Gaelic sports and music presentation. Conor Melvin shared with the students the ancient game of hurling (a Gaelic sport with similarities to lacrosse, field hockey, and baseball) and Gaelic football (similar to rugby and American football). Simon Oh (Grade 11), Rian Kwak (Grade 5), and Louise Schattle (Grade 3) became “Hurlers in Training” by trying out their hurling skills on stage. Conor then invited Grainne Barrett, our own Brian Kim (Grade 12), and Ms. Emmalee Johnson, APIS Orchestra teacher on stage. Using a bodhran drum, accordion, Irish whistle, and fiddle, we were treated to traditional Irish jigs and reels. Grainne Barrett and Ms. Meg Hayne, APIS Biology teacher, also showed us traditional Irish dancing for the secondary school and later the entire elementary school joined in as well. We might have spotted a leprechaun or two! Conor represents the Seoul Gaels Gaelic football team, one of the largest foreign sports clubs in Korea. Seoul Gaels Gaelic football team recently set up a kids team which travelled to Ireland to play an exhibition game in front of 42,000 people and met the prime minister. We are looking forward more cultures represented next year so gather your items from around the world and host a booth for next year. Interested? Contact Kirstan Beatty, School Counselor, at kbeatty@apis. seoul.kr

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4 월 18일 금요일에 APIS는 제 2회 Culture Fair “하루 안에 세계 일주” 행사를 개최하였습니다. 이 행사에는 다양한 음식과 놀이, 전통 의상, 그리고 여러 나라의 음악으로 25개국의 문화가 전시되었습 니다. 학생들은 사우디 아라비아의 양고기 요리, 그리스 간식인 바클라바 그리고 뉴 올리언스의 검보 요 리를 맛 볼 수 있었습니다. 그 뿐만 아니라 캐나다 스포츠인 컬링을 직접 해보고, 대만식 연등을 만들었 으며, 시카고는 성패트릭의 날에 왜 강물을 초록빛으로 물들이는지 배울 수 있었습니다. 일본의 다도 체험 과 벨기에의 Tin Tin 캐릭터를 실제로 만났으며 호주의 Vegemite 잼도 맛보았습니다. 덕분에 학생들은 하루 안에 세계 일주를 할 수 있었습니다. 게일식(아일랜드식) 경기와 음악 공연으로 Culture Fair의 열기가 정점에 다다랐습니다. Mr. Conor Melvin 은 학생들과 함께 헐링 경기(라크로스, 필드하키, 그리고 야구와 비슷한 게일식 스포츠)와 게일식 풋볼(럭비와 미식 축구와 비슷한 스포츠)을 즐겼습니다. Simon Oh(Grade 11), Rian Kwak(Grade 5) 그리고 Louise Schattle(Grade 3)은 무대 위에 서 헐링 기술을 익히며 잠시동안 “헐링 연습생”이 되었습니다. Mr. Melvin은 그 후에 Grainne Barrett, Brian Kim(Grade 12) 그리고 APIS Orchestra 선생님이신 Emmalee Johnson 선생님과 함께 무 대 위에 섰습니다. 보드란 드럼, 아코디언, 아일랜드식 피리, 그리고 피들을 이용하여 전통 아일랜드 곡을 연주하였습니다. Grainne Barrett와 Biology 선생님이신 Meg Hayne 선생님은 중고등부 학생들을 위하여 전통 아일랜드 춤을 선보였으며 나중에 초등부 학생들 도 함께 춤을 즐겼습니다. Mr. Melvin은 국내 최대 외국 스포츠 모임 중 하나인 Seoul Gaels Gaelic 풋볼 팀원으로 최근 어린이 팀을 꾸려 아일랜드에서 42,000 명의 관중 앞에 경기를 펼치고 수상과 만남을 가졌습니다. 내년에 더 다양한 문화를 선보일 예정이므로 내년 Culture Fair에 많은 관심과 기대를 해주시기 바랍니다.

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Global Citizens Program 2014

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ach year, students look forward to APIS’ Global Citizens Program (GCP), an opportunity for secondary students to leave the walls of the school behind and spend a week experiencing a new location and culture. Students embarked on each trip with the mission to “dedicate our minds to inquiry, our hearts to compassion, and our lives to service and global understanding.” This year students traveled all throughout Asia to Thailand, Indonesia, Vietnam, the Philippines, and Jeju Island, Korea. While each trip was unique, they each presented an opportunity for students to experience new cultures, challenge themselves, deepen their relationships with their classmates, work as a team, and gain a new understanding of the world around them. Their days were filled with service opportunities, adventure activities, team building games, and fun times with classmates, teachers, and new local friends. By the end of the week, students arrived home full of new stories, memories, pictures, and anticipation for next year’s GCP! “Without a doubt, I believe the GCP is one of the finest ‘classroom experiences’ we offer at APIS. Where else can young people learn the value of serving the needy, relying on each other, meeting new friends and building relationships that will last a lifetime...all while standing on a distant shore?” - Mr. Andy Murphy, GCP Coordinator

“APIS believes GCP is critical in reaching our mission of creating globally enlightened citizens in that it takes students out of the textbook and actually places them on the ground, providing them a rich experience interacting with other cultures. Thereby, transcending the typical tourist experience by including aspects of Service Learning, Cultural Exchange, Team Building, Adventure, and Spiritual Growth.” - Mr. Scott Paulin, Secondary Principal

매년 중고등부 학생들은 학교를 떠나 일주일 동안 외국에서 봉사활동을 하며, 다양한 경험을 하는 Global Citizen’s Program(GCP)를 다녀옵니다. 올해는 태국, 인도네시아, 베트남, 필리핀, 그리고 제주도 프로그램이 있었습니다. 각 지역의 특색은 달랐지만, 학생들은 모두 새로운 문화를 경험하고, 자신의 한계에 도전하며, 친구들과의 우정을 쌓고, 팀워크를 기르며 견문을 넓힐 수 있었습니다. GCP 에서의 일주일이 끝난 후 학생들은 추억과 사진, 그리고 내년 GCP에 대한 기대감을 품고 집으로 돌아올 수 있었습니다. “APIS에서는 글로벌 시민을 양성하는 데에 GCP가 매우 중요한 역할을 한다고 믿습니다. 학생들에게 교실 밖, 낯선 땅에서 다양한 문 화와 소통할 수 있는 기회를 제공하기 때문입니다. 봉사 활동, 문화 교류, 팀워크 형성, 모험, 그리고 영적 성장을 포함하기 때문에 일 반 탐방 프로그램과는 차원이 다른 경험을 하게 됩니다.” - Mr. Scott Paulin, Secondary Principal “의심의 여지 없이 저는 GCP가 APIS에서 제공하는 가장 훌륭한 ‘수업 경험’이라고 생각합니다. 학생들이 낯선 땅에서 어려운 사람들을 도와 봉사 정신을 배우고, 서로에게 의지하며, 새로운 친구들을 만나기도 하고 평생 동안 이어나갈 우정을 쌓기도 하는 경험을 어디서 할 수 있을까요?” - Mr. Andy Murphy, GCP Coordinator

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Student Achievements

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uring the second and third quarters, APIS had the pleasure of congratulating many of our elementary and secondary students for their achievements in art, music, sports, history, foreign language, math and science. Well done, everyone!

Bryan Jung (5A), Jack Song (5A), Jin Lee (5A), and Rian Kwak (5B) received awards from the

2014 International Hyo Cartoon Competition organized by Kyungmin University and sponsored by the Ministry of Culture, Sports and Tourism. All of our 4 participants got recognition and, in particular, Bryan received the main prize “Multicultural Award.” Among the 8,800 participants from kindergarten to college level in and outside of Korea, APIS was the only international school (elementary level) in Korea to receive the main prize. Bryan’s artwork is displayed in the Gyeongbokgung Palace Station along with other 20 works of art. Max Park (Grade 8)

Clara Park (Grade 6) Edwin Lee (Grade 9)

received the Overall Middle School and High School Awards for their science projects in the first annual APIS Science Fair in April. Among the grade 6 through grade 10 students who completed a science project and presented during the science fair exposition, 26 students received awards for their projects.

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received the APIS Overall 1st place award at the American Math Competition on November 19. All APIS middle school students participated in the contest and for each grade level, the Gold awards went to Andy Oh (Grade 6), Henry Kim (Grade 7), and Max Park (Grade 8).

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Shinyoung Lee (Grade 9, trumpet), Grace Kim (Grade 9, clarinet), and Brian Park (Grade 12, Bass II) were selected to participate

in the AMIS International Honor Choir and Band Festival in London in March Jackie Lee (Grade 11) Noa Kim (Grade 8, monologue), Yejin Chung (Grade 8, oral interpretation), Jinny Choi (Grade 8, original oratory), and Gia Kim and Sung Hwu Song (Grade 8, duos) were announced first place win-

ners in the 2nd annual APIS Middle School Speech Competition. A total of 15 students received awards for their performances in four different categories.

competed in and won a bronze medal at the Korea Science and Engineering Fair sponsored by Intel Korea. The competition was held January 19, 2014 and her project was titled, “Loss of antibiotic resistance on bacteria according to different types of sugar sources.”

Jinny Choi (Grade 8), Jinwoo Choi (Grade 10), and Jeho Hahm (Grade 10) received the highest

scores at the American Math Contest (AMC) on February 4 and 19, one of the most recognized math contests in the world. Jinwoo Choi and Jeho Hahm also received the young student certification of achievement, certificate of distinction.

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Eddie Kim (Grade 10) received

the Top Award in the Annual Korean Writing Contest held April 3 and 4. A total of 23 Kindergarten through Grade 12 students received awards for their writing on the theme, “Pondering Life...On the Road” (길 위에서, 묻다).

Jimin Lee (Grade 12) received 3 Gold Keys, 1

Silver Key, and 1 Honorable Mention; Ho Jin Kim (Grade 10) received 1 Silver Key; Jae Suk Kim (Grade 11) received 1 Silver Key and 5 Honorable Mentions; and Hee Jae Yoon (Grade 9) received 1 Silver Key for their artwork(s) in the Scholastic Art & Writing Awards by The Alliance for Young Artists & Writers.


Clair Choi (Grade 12, jersey #3) received top

defensive player for KAIAC Red Division Varsity Girls Soccer on April 26.

Eleven APIS middle school students were se-

lected to participate in the Middle School KIMEA Honor Choir held at Chadwick International School on March 7. Students from international schools in and around Seoul joined as one mass choir with an afternoon concert after rehearsing during the day.

Chris Kim & Jeremiah Kim (Grade 12) were

selected as National Merit Finalists. The National Merit Finalists are judged to have the strongest combination of academic skills and achievements, extracurricular accomplishments, and represent the top 1% of the senior students in the U.S.

Twenty-three student musician delegates

Sixteen secondary students participated in

the 1st APIS Foreign Language Speech Contest held May 2 celebrating all that they have achieved in their foreign language studies this year.

participated in the National Honor Music Festival held at Seoul Foreign School on February 14-15. Students were accepted after successfully completing a rigorous audition process. APIS students joined 215 other musicians from 11 international schools throughout Korea to comprise the National Honor Choir, National Honor Orchestra, and National Honor Band.

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Six APIS secondary students received awards at APIS music students participated in the KIMEA

Solo & Ensemble Festival on May 10 hosted here at APIS, and received 5 Platinum ratings and 11 Gold ratings - two of our groups who performed got a perfect score!

the National History Day competition held at Seoul International School on February 22. Brian Kim (Grade 12) won 3rd place; Gia Kim and Huck Jun Hong (Grade 8) received The Asiatic Society of Korea Award for Excellence in Korean History; Jakin Jeong (Grade 7), Clara Park (Grade 6), and James Park (Grade 8) won the Middle School Quiz Master Awards. W W W. A P I S . S E O U L . K R

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FA C U LT Y S P O T L I G H T

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Faculty Spotlight: Jeff Woodrow

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r. Woodrow teaches Communications Technology, Digital Middle School Art, Computer Animation and Film Production at APIS. Prior to finding his calling as an educator, Mr. Woodrow worked in the film industry for over ten years as a visual fx artist and editor. Mr. Woodrow then founded his own e-commerce company, Joy Apparel in 2006, a socially conscious T-shirt company built on more than 1500 hundred hand drawn portraits of real people from all over the world. Every face comes printed over the heart and when you wear your Joy T-shirt, you are encouraged to think about that person and how your everyday actions can affect others and the world we live in. After you receive a shirt, you upload your own photo to the website, so your face can be drawn by hand and worn by others. The aim of Joy Apparel, Mr. Woodrow says, is “to promote peace and equality on a global scale.”

hes of random es to draw sketc Mr. Woodrow lik mple of his ters. Here is a sa people he encoun s.” er ep Sle y , “Subwa drawing themed

At APIS, Mr. Woodrow is constantly writing curriculum and discovering new methods to successfully integrate technology into the classroom. As an educator, Mr. Woodrow believes it is important to use technology, but also to disconnect and engage in meaningful conversations about why we use it and how it affects us.

Outside of school Mr. Woodrow enjoys painting, travelling around Seoul with his wife, visiting art galleries, going on hikes and exploring new neighborhoods. Mr. Woodrow plays hockey in the Canadian Ball Hockey League of Korea, and enjoys playing pick up basketball with his colleagues every Tuesday night. He also enjoys challenges and adventures--Mr. Woodrow and his wife, Tori, have cycled all the way from Busan to Seoul! Mr. Woodrow is also very passionate about photography and each year he publishes a book entitled “Close Up” featuring portraits of random people that he meets on his travels around Asia. Mr. Woodrow is currently working a series of drawings titled “Subway Sleepers” which features sketches of people who have fallen asleep while riding the subway.

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“Close Up” is a book Mr. Woodrow publishes each year. It features portraits of random people.


Alumni Spotlight: JK Park 1. Where are you going to school now? I’m a freshman at Stanford University. I couldn’t be happier with my choice. Stanford has world-class academics in every field, and there are countless opportunities. The best thing is going to school with awesome people, which definitely motivates and inspires me to do better. In addition to having California weather all year round, Stanford is in the heart of Silicon Valley where the rising entrepreneurship and tech companies help in the bountiful opportunities in learning. Stanford has an atmosphere of relaxedness and fun that I don’t think there is anywhere else coupled with its academic focus.

2. What is your daily schedule like?

Stanford freshman Joon Kee Park (Class of 2013) poses with the former prime minister of Korea, Kim Hwang-sik.

College life is defined by freedom and personal choice. There is less structure in your day; you choose your own schedule. Being successful in this environment requires much more self-motivation and control. Academics are far more rigorous. In a humanities program, for example, we read one or two major works like “Plato’s Republic” or “Dante’s Inferno” a week, and engage in group discussions with a professor at a very high level. Then again, there are a lot of fun things to do—day trips, student plays or concerts. Students here love to go to football games (Go Cardinal!), play sports or go to the beach.

3. What are your memorable moments at APIS? My most memorable moments were personal interactions. I enjoyed talking with my favorite teachers— asking about the subject material or just talking about life in general. APIS is a small school which makes it possible to have a deep personal connection to the teachers. The student clubs were really fun and I think they were really important in helping me develop my leadership and passions. I really miss playing soccer on the varsity team. It was a great bonding experience and a whole lot of fun. Nothing is really like high school sports in college.

4. What was the most challenging part in preparing for college applications? It’s the first time in life where you are putting yourself out there to be judged. That you have but one chance to present yourself in the truest way possible is a hard reality to swallow. Looking back, I realize that my most successful essays were the ones that took a great deal of reflection—those that I wasn’t trying to impress anyone but actually put forth a value or belief as representing my identity as a whole. I talked to many people about my ideas and always carried around a notebook and pen so that I could jot down ideas! It’s also hard to put together a stellar resume of activities, but the most impressive activities to admissions committees are those that come from real passion. At APIS, I had a couple of teachers who mentored me throughout the whole process. Mr. Maldonado, my college counselor, was a great resource. I also participated in the college advising sessions with Mr. Walsh, which was definitely a big help.

5. What advice do you have for our seniors and juniors? The answer to the riddle of college admissions is to simply do what you love. I have talked with admissions officers from the USC, Duke Scholarship Committees, and Stanford, and they all said that they admitted students who followed their passion and excelled at it, which naturally showed leadership, proactivity, and drive. You don’t want to be just another face in the crowd, find something that will set you apart! Additionally, my advice is to just have fun! The experiences you have in high school really shape who you become. Become an expert. Become a leader. Also, what I’ve learned at Stanford is the importance of skills. Get interpersonal skills in your interactions at school—conveying your thoughts well and leadership are the traits you want to bring to college.

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CHRISTIAN LIFE CENTER

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From the

School Chaplain Zachary Luginbill School Chaplain

Continuing on with our year long theme Life on Purpose, we began a secondary chapel series in January called “APIS: You’ve Got Talent.” God has made us all unique with many different gifts and as students, this is a good time to try new things and explore hidden gifts which we can use to serve Him and others. Next, we went a little deeper for a few weeks talking about our identity. We all have things about us that identify who we are and what we believe. Even here at APIS our school identity is built on being a loving caring Christian community which means we should be proud of who we are and respect others regardless of where they are from. During the Easter season our chapel theme was called Easter Theatre as we watched a few clips from a movie called Son of God which brought to life the events of the life of Jesus and the people who were there to see him die and come back to life. This single event is what the Christian faith is built upon enough so that 2,000 years later movies are still being made. Elementary chapels have been so much fun this past season as we have enjoyed worshipping God with some great songs and amazing stories from the Bible. We began in January talking about knowledge in order to learn how to make wise choices. Next we learned about faith, which is believing in what you can’t see because of what you can see. Great job students and thank you teachers for helping with worship at the beginning of each chapel. Blessings to you all as we finish out our school year!

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From the

Music Department Chair Sophie Holbrook Music Department Chair

What an exciting winter it was for the music department! On December 18 the secondary music department held the biggest Christmas Concert yet, with over 150 students performing Christmas carols and Classical music pieces. The Grand Finale included all music students in grades 6-12 and was the most exciting sound of the night! The following day, elementary students had their turn and performed an array of Christmas songs from around the world. You could see Christmas cheer on the students’ faces as they took their bow at the end of their performance! As 2014 began, so too did the music festival season. The APIS music department participated in five music festivals in January-March: KIMEA Middle School Honor Band/Choir/Orchestra, KAIAC-KIMEA High School National Honor Music Festival, and AMIS International Honor Band/Choir. On February 14-15 at Seoul Foreign School, APIS had 23 student musicians represent our music department as part of the National Honor Festival. Each ensemble (Band, Orchestra, Choir) had professional conductors who travelled to Korea for the weekend event. Joining hundreds of other students from international schools around Korea, the musicians worked together during rehearsals and performed an extraordinary culminating concert. Students were visibly touched by their experience and did not want the day to end. One student stated, “This experience made me love choir even more!” and another exclaimed “The band conductor was too special to ever forget!”. Throughout February and March, each section of the music department had the opportunity to send middle school students to KIMEA Honor Festivals – Band, Orchestra, and Choir. Hosted at various international schools within Korea, the students rehearsed music and gave a performance in the same day. What a great opportunity for our growing middle school musicians! In March, three high school students travelled to England to take part in a 3-day festival at the American School of London. These exceptional students were notified of their acceptance to the AMIS International Honor Choir/Band in November and had been preparing for their trip since. At the festival, our APIS students joined others from all over the world to make music together. The final concert was broadcast live on the internet and attended by music educators from across the planet. Participating in music is an outstanding way to communicate globally, when languages and cultures differ. Having these special experiences can build character and provide the best memories. Keep up the great work, APIS musicians, and always look for the next challenge!

WINTER/SPRING 2014

MUSIC

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WINTER/SPRING 2014

COLLEGE COUNSELING

From the

College Counseling Director Shana Russell Director of College Counseling

It has been a busy semester in the college counseling office. The Class of 2014 have all received offers of admission and every senior has chosen the school they will attend in fall. We are all very excited for this new chapter in their lives to begin. Here are a few statistics regarding their acceptances:

100% of students were accepted to four year colleges or universities. 11% of the students were accepted Early Decision to their “top” choice college or university. 92% of the students received multiple college acceptances.* 61% of the students received four or more college acceptances.* 6% of the students received Ivy League acceptances; combined, they received a total of five Ivy acceptances (Dartmouth College, Cornell University (2), Brown University, University of Pennsylvania).

75% of the Class of 2014 received college acceptances to Top 50 National Universities or Top 50 National Liberal Arts Colleges as ranked by U.S. News & World Report. *does not include single or early decision applications

Throughout March, I met and talked with parents on the topic, “Helping Your Child Prepare for College” at a series of coffee meetings for Kindergarten through Grade 11 parents. College may seem far-fetched for elementary students, but the foundation for how to answer college essay questions actually begins in elementary school. For example, “What makes you happy?” is a real college essay question from a prestigious liberal arts school in the United States. My best advice for elementary parents, the advice I am taking as a parent myself, is for them to provide unconditional support for their child. Give them hugs, give them high-fives, healthy meals, the chance to sleep in on the weekends, and the opportunity to just be a kid. To the parents of middle and high school, I want to emphasize that a really high SAT or ACT score does not necessarily guarantee admission to any school. Rather than high SAT scores, the most important thing that colleges look at in terms of academic achievement is the high school transcript because it isn’t just a reflection of one exam on one day, but three plus years of cumulative work. I would also encourage parents to help their child spend their middle and high school years discovering who they are, and what they have passion for. A student’s passion is reflected in the extracurricular activities they take part in, and ideally, students should participate in these activities for all four years of high school. I have been working with the Class of 2015 since February. They are beginning the journey of understanding the college admissions process, building a list of “best fit” colleges, and beginning to brainstorm the college application essay. There is much work to be done and time moves quickly, but I’m excited about learning and growing together as a class and watching each student grow as an individual.

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From the

School Counselor Kirstan Beatty School Counselor The Second Step curriculum continued to be implemented for students K-8. After completing the unit “Skills Needed for Learning,” students focused on showing empathy and compassion for others. Students learned how to consider someone else’s perspective and “walk in their shoes.” K5, Grade 1, and Grade 2 learned from the puppets, “Puppy and Snail,” how to have empathy. The rest of the grade levels watched videos of other students their age dealing with typical problems they could face and considered scenarios of how they would react in the same situation.

We then moved on to “Emotion Management”—showing students how to recognize big emotions in their lives and then how to calm down. The elementary students learned how to “Stop, Name Your Feeling and Calm Down” by counting, taking deep belly breaths, and using positive self-talk. Middle school students were able to add to their list of strategies on how to deal with anger and stress. When you have empathy for others and can recognize and control your emotions, students are better able to do “Problem Solving.” Elementary students have learned to STEP to solve their problems—Say the Problem (without blame), Think of Solutions (safe and respectful), Explore Consequences (what would happen if…) and Pick the Best Solution (did it work?). 7th and 8th grade students were able to take that information and determine a SMART goal to be completed by this time next year. Expect some excellent athletes and new guitar players by May, 2015! Our goal as educators is to give students the skills they need to no longer need us. Second Step curriculum provides instruction for student to be able to solve their own problems related to emotions and daily problems experienced at school and home. Once these skills are taught, students are expected to implement them to the best of their ability. They realize they have control over their behavior and need to take responsibility to make good choices. These are the important skills that make APIS students stand out from others. Classroom guidance makes up only a portion of my day. My office continues to be open for all students needing additional support from kindergarten through Grade 12. I work with students in groups or one-on-one to provide an outlet or instruction skills to address certain areas. Just stop by any time and set up an appointment!

WINTER/SPRING 2014

COUNSELING

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WINTER/SPRING 2014

LITERACY

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From the

Literacy Specialist Suanne Forrester Literacy Specialist APIS continually strives to develop students who love to read and write. Teachers continue to engage students in a variety of meaningful activities that are both fun and beneficial to student learning. This spring has been no exception! At APIS we are building student literacy skills in reading, writing, listening, and speaking.

The spring kicked off with Read Across APIS. Students participated in multiple events during the day to support literacy skills. Students read with others, engaged in book conversations during read alouds, listened to audio books, and watched “video books.” Experiencing literature through different media helps to build 21st Century literacy skills in students. For success in our technological world, students must be able to discuss literary elements from reading, hearing, and viewing texts. Write Across APIS and the Pacific Pencil joined forces this year to support students in visual arts and writing. Students worked independently through the writing process to compose a piece of writing inspired by their own artwork. Students were able to use all their writing skills and choose the genre of their writing, giving them the experience real authors have. One way we supported this was through a visiting artist and author. Ms. Min Jee Kim presented to the students and showed them how she works through the process of writing and designing artwork for customers from the initial contact through publication. Parents and students were excited to see the final published pieces in the Pacific Pencil. This original APIS publication truly highlights our outstanding students! The school year ended with a bang with the production of the Grade 1 musical, “Life Cycles” and “Grammarosaurus” performed by Grades 2 and 5B. Musicals are not only fun, but packed full of valuable literacy learning! Students are able to lift the level of their comprehension by becoming a character. They are able to think about character motivations, characters actions, and voices. The art of performing a character means students internalize these literacy skills at a deeper level. Performing in a musical or play also teaches students how to listen to others and work together. They practice speaking in front of others and develop valuable presentation skills. Once again, APIS teachers have gone above and beyond to provide meaningful (and fun) learning experiences for our students.

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From the

Curriculum Coordinator Elaine Park Curriculum Coordinator

Multiple Pathways: A Broader Vision for School Reform The goal at APIS is for our students to love the process of learning. With that, we believe all students can learn and we, as educators, take responsibility to ensure they continue to progress on the learning continuum. A report by the Harvard Graduate School of Education titled, “Pathways to Prosperity,” argues that American schools have been too narrow in their one-size-fits-all approach of preparing students to go on to fouryear universities. The report states that “preparing for college and preparing for a career should not be mutually exclusive options.” It focuses on the need to develop meaningful career training as a part of comprehensive school reform. In other words, the implication of this work is that a focus on college readiness alone does not properly equip people with all of the skills and abilities needed in the workplace. The report emphasizes on the need to evolve from single-track systems through high school to the development of multiple pathways leading from high school to post-secondary education or career training. At APIS, we want our students to become career-ready along with being college-ready. Lessons from other countries, such as in western and north Europe, strongly suggest that a curriculum preparing for college and career as mutually integrated options will allow our young adults who earn a post-secondary degree to embark on a meaningful career. With this foundational belief, our programs at APIS are starting to have a focus on Personal Pathways. Each student moves through a personalized academic pathway that is based on their individual needs and performance. While all students move through the same sequence of courses, they can also, depending on their strengths and needs, move through them at different rates. For example, college-bound students who plan to enter fields that do not necessarily require a very strong mathematics background can take a sequence of courses that may include Geometry, Algebra II and Core Pre-calculus. Meanwhile, collegebound students who plan to enter fields requiring a very strong foundation in high mathematics (e.g., engineering, pure sciences) can take a sequence of courses which could include Algebra II/Trigonometry, Pre-Calculus, AP Calculus (AB or BC) and/or AP Statistics. Given our pathways, Algebra II or Pre-Calculus can be taken as early as the first year in High School. We are extending our Computer Science and STEM curriculum with the same goal of letting our students develop at their appropriate rate and interest. For example, we are adding Advanced Programming and C++ as electives for next year. In the near future, we would like to continue increasing opportunities in this field by adding AP Computer Science with Data Structure, Programming Languages, Discrete Structures, Software Engineering and Computer Architecture.

WINTER/SPRING 2014

CURRICULUM

Meeting the Pathways challenge will require more collaboration, coordination, effort to monitor outcomes and additional resources. The intent of providing these opportunities, however, aligns with our belief at APIS that all children can learn and that students can achieve high standards given the means to achieve them.

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WINTER/SPRING 2014

T H A N K Y O U A P I S PA R E N T S

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THANK YOU ! APIS PARENTS We would like to extend our heartfelt gratitude to all the parents who participated in and supported the school events during winter and spring!

Culture Fair

Pacific Pencil Art Exhibition

Pacific Pencil Fundraising

Pacific Pencil Planning

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Read Across APIS


Publishing Parties

Field Trip

Grade 1 Musical

Korean Musical Recording

Science Fair

WINTER/SPRING 2014

WINTER SPRING EVENTS

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Asia Pacific International School

Class of 2014  College & University Acceptances  As of June 3, 2014

* Number in parenthesis denotes more than one acceptance

Allegheny College Arizona State University Art Center College of Design (2) Azusa Pacific University Bard College Binghamton University Biola University Boston College (3) Boston University Brown University California College of the Arts (San Francisco) (3) Carnegie Mellon University (5) Case Western Reserve University (4) Colgate University College of the Holy Cross Cornell University (2) Dartmouth College Drexel University (2) Duke University (2) Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University - FL Emory University (4) Ewha Womans University Fashion Institute of Technology (2) Georgia Institute of Technology (2) Hamilton College - NY Hofstra University Hope College (2) Indiana University at Bloomington (3) Johns Hopkins University Knox College Lehigh University Lewis & Clark College London School of Economics Maryland Institute College of Art Muhlenberg College New York University (7) Northeastern University (3) Northwestern University Occidental College Ohio University Otis College of Art and Design (2) Oxford College of Emory University (3) Parsons The New School for Design Pennsylvania State University, Abington Pennsylvania State University, Erie: The Behrend College Pennsylvania State University, Harrisburg Pennsylvania State University, University Park (6) Pepperdine University (3) Pratt Institute (3) PrattMWP Purdue University (4) Queen’s University Rhode Island School of Design Rochester Institute of Technology Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey at New Brunswick (3) Saint Louis University

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Santa Clara University Sarah Lawrence College School of the Art Institute of Chicago (3) School of Visual Arts (4) Smith College Stony Brook University (3) SUNY College of Environmental Science and Forestry Syracuse University (2) Texas A&M University The University of Arizona The University of Georgia (3) Trinity College (2) University of California at Berkeley University of California at Davis (5) University of California at Irvine (8) University of California at Los Angeles (5) University of California at Merced University of California at Riverside (5) University of California at San Diego (9) University of California at Santa Barbara (3) University of California at Santa Cruz (2) University of Colorado at Boulder University of Connecticut (2) University of Hong Kong University of Illinois at Chicago University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign (5) University of Massachusetts, Amherst (4) University of Massachusetts, Boston University of Michigan University of Michigan, Dearborn University of Michigan, Flint University of Notre Dame University of Oregon (2) University of Pennsylvania University of Rochester (4) University of Southern California (3) University of the Pacific University of Virginia (3) University of Warwick University of Washington (6) University of Wisconsin, Eau Claire University of Wisconsin, Madison (2) University of Wisconsin, Milwaukee University of Wisconsin, Parkside University of Wisconsin, Platteville University of Wisconsin, Richland University of Wisconsin, Stout University of Wisconsin, Waukesha Ursinus College Villanova University Washington University in St. Louis Wesleyan University Wheaton College IL Williams College Yonsei University Yonsei University-UIC (2) York University

EDITORIAL TEAM: ■ Euysung Kim Director ■ Nicole Suh Art & Design Editor ■ Josephine Shim Communications & PR Team Leader ■ Ashley Stapleton Writing / Editing Staff ■ Brian Beatty Writing / Editing Staff ■ Soora Koh Communications Officer

www.apis.seoul.kr

APIS Update Winter/Spring 2014 (Print Edition)  

APIS Update Winter/Spring 2014 (Print Edition)