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Fall 2013

APIS UPDATE

Address: 57 Wolgye-ro 45ga-gil, Nowon-gu, Seoul, 139-852, Korea Website: www.apis.seoul.kr

In this issue First Quarter Highlights Student Achievements Faculty Spotlight Alumni Spotlight


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From

Dr.Kim’s Desk Euysung Kim, Ph.D. Director Tough Love is What our Children Need to Succeed! There was a thought provoking article in the Wall Street Journal by Joanne Lipman about Mr. Kupchynsky, her infamously gruff orchestra teacher at East Brunswick High School in the 1960s. Mr. K, as students knew him, would call students “idiots” if they messed up and shout “Who eez deaf in first violins!?” if someone played out of tune. “He made us rehearse until our fingers almost bled,” she says.

But when Kupchynsky died a few years ago, Lipman tells that there was an outpouring of love and respect from hundreds of former students who had gone on to success in a variety of fields. “Research tells us that there is a positive correlation between music education and academic achievement,” says Lipman. “But that alone didn’t explain the belated surge of gratitude for a teacher who basically tortured us through adolescence.” Lipman’s question: “What did Mr. K do right? What can we learn from a teacher whose methods fly in the face of everything we think we know about education today, but who was undeniably effective?” Stressing that she doesn’t support abuse (“I’d be the first to complain if a teacher called my kids names”), what she points out is that we have come full circle in education. She identifies the following 8 principles, once dismissed as old-fashioned, but now supported by the latest research as effective ways to foster learning: 1. A little pain is good for you. The much-quoted study by psychologist Anders Ericsson showing that 10,000 hours of practice is needed to attain true expertise also found that the path to true proficiency requires teachers who give “constructive, even painful, feedback,” according to his 2007 Harvard Business Review article. High-performing violinists, surgeons, computer programmers, and chess masters “deliberately picked unsentimental coaches who would challenge them and drive them to higher levels of performance.” That is, we cannot challenge our children to aspire if we allow them to be satisfied and settle for mediocrity. 2. Drill, baby, drill. Fluency in basic math facts is the foundation of higher achievement, but many American students aren’t learning their times tables and basic math facts. Lipman says one reason Asian students do so much better in math is the hours of drill in their schools. I think there is a lot of room for misunderstanding here. I don’t think Lipman is advocating rote memorization is the way to prepare our kids for the 21st century. The point is that a deep understanding of concepts through analytical scientific inquiry, however, cannot be nurtured without a solid basic foundation, which sometimes requires memorization and drills. The typical Asian education stops at memorization and drills but the education for the 21st clearly needs to take it one step further: to teach them how to think. The right way to frame Lipman’s point is not that “students need to think, not memorize” but rather “students need to think, not just memorize.”

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From Dr.Kim’s Desk 3. Failure is part of the learning process. In a 2012 study, French sixth graders were given extremely challenging anagram problems. One group was told that failure and persistence were a normal part of the learning process, and this group consistently outperformed their peers on subsequent assignments. Lipman says American parents and educators worry too much about failure being psychologically damaging and haven’t given children the right messages about failure being intrinsic to the learning process. 4. Strict is better than nice. A study of Los Angeles teachers whose students did exceptionally well found that they combined strictness with high expectations. Their core belief was, “Every student in my room is underperforming based on their potential, and it’s my job to do something about it – and I can do something about it.” A fourth grader summed it up: “When I was in first grade and second grade and third grade, when I cried my teacher coddled me. When I go to Mrs. T’s room, she told me to suck it up and get to work. I think she’s right. I need to work harder.” 5. Creativity is not spontaneous combustion. “Most creative geniuses work ferociously hard and, through a series of incremental steps, achieve things that appear (to the outside world) like epiphanies and breakthroughs,” says Lipman. Creativity is built on a foundation of hard work on the basics. Temple University Professor Robert W. Weisberg’s research suggests that there is no such thing as a born genius. According to Professor Weisberg, creativity goes back in many ways to the basics: “You have to immerse yourself in a discipline before you create in that discipline.”

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6. Grit is more important than talent. Angela Duckworth’s study of 2,800 high achievers found that the best predictor of success is passion and perseverance for long-term goals, not innate talent. Another key element of grit is students’ belief that they have the ability to change and improve, and this can be inculcated by teachers and parents who share that belief. 7. Praise must be strategic. As Stanford Professor Carol Dweck (on whose work I have written about many times) has found, complimenting students for being “smart” has negative consequences, whereas praising a student for being a “hard worker” leads to greater effort and success. 8. Moderate stress makes you stronger. Researchers have found that being exposed to challenges – including “a tough and mean kind of teacher” – builds resilience and confidence. What’s going on here? Lipman believes it’s that students are picking up on an underlying faith in their ability to do better. Thinking back to Mr. K’s super-tough approach to his orchestra, she says, “There is something to be said about a teacher who is demanding and tough, not because he thinks students will never learn, but because he is so absolutely certain that they will.”

Reference: Lipman, Joanne (Sept. 27, 2013) “Why Tough Teachers Get Good Results,” The Wall Street Journal

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From Dr.Kim’s Desk

월스트리트저널(Wall Street Journal) 기사 중에 의미 있는 글이 있어 학부모님들께 소개하고자 합니다. 저자 Joanne Lipman은 본인의 학창시절을 회상하며 까칠하기로 유명했던 미국 East Brunswick High School 오케스트라 선생님 Mr. Kupchynsky에 대한 기억을 떠올리면서 우리 아이들이 성공하기 위해 어떤 교육이 필요한가를 말합니다. Mr. K(Mr. Kupchynsky의 애칭)는 학생들이 실수하면 “얼간이!”라고 부른다든가, 음정이 틀리면 “제1 바이올린에서 귀먹은 사람은 누구야!” 버럭 소리를 지르고, “심지어 손에 거의 피가 날 때까지 연주하도록,” 시키는 선생님이었다고 합니다. 그런데 몇 년전 Kupchynsky 선생님이 돌아가셨을 때 각계각층에서 성공한 수많은 제자가 장례식을 찾아 애도와 존경을 표의 하는 것을 보면서 우리를 그토록 ‘고문’한 선생님을 향한 제자들의 사랑을 어떻게 설명해야 할까 Lipman은 기사에서 질문을 던 져 봅니다. Mr. K가 잘하신 일이 무엇인가요? 효과적인 교수법에 관련하여 그간 많은 연구가 이루어졌지만 Mr. K가 스승으로서 수 많은 제자들을 성공적으로 교육할 수 있었던 이유는 아주 전통적인 교수법에서 찾을 수 있다고 합니다. Lipman은 한때 진보적이지 못하다고 내쳐졌던 8개의 원칙을 재조명하며, 최신 연구를 통해 그 원칙들이 얼마나 효과적인지를 우리에게 말해줍니다.

1. 적당한 “배움의 고통”은 유익할 뿐만 아니라 필수입니다. 어느 한 분야의 전문가가 되려면 10,000시간의 연습시간이 필요하다고 주장한 심리학자 Anders Ericsson의 연구에 (2007년 Harvard Business Review) 따르면, 뛰어난 사람이 되려면 건설적이지만 고통스럽기까지 한 피드백을 주는 선 생님이 반드시 있어야 한다고 합니다. 실력이 특출난 바이올린 연주가, 의사, 컴퓨터 프로그래머, 체스왕 등은 “일부러 도 전의식을 심어주고 발전할 수 있게끔 채찍질하는 까칠한 코치와 함께 일하였다”는 것입니다. 평범한 것에 만족하고 안주 하게 하면 아이들에게 포부나 도전의식을 심어줄 수 없기 때문입니다.

2. 연습, 연습, 그리고 또 연습. 기초 수학을 잘해야 고차원적인 수학도 잘할 수 있는데, 여전히 많은 미국 학생들은 구구단이나 산수를 제대로 공부하지 않고 있습니다. 이에 반해, 아시아 학생들은 수학문제를 많이 푸는데, 이러한 많은 연습 시간 차이가 실력차이로 이어진다 고 합니다. 하지만 여기에 작은 오해의 소지가 있습니다. 저자는 결코 단순 암기가 21세기 교육의 미래다라고 주장하는 것 같지 않습니다. 수학적 개념을 깊이 이해하려면 기초가 튼튼해야 하는데, 이러한 기초는 때때로 암기능력과 연습을 요한 다는 것입니다. 전형적인 아시아 교육은 암기와 연습에 그칠지 모르지만, 21세기형 교육은 한 단계 더 발전시켜, 학생들에 게 생각하는 방식을 가르쳐야 합니다. 따라서 Lipman의 핵심을 제대로 표현하자면, “학생들은 암기해야 한다”가 아닌 “학 생들은 단순히 암기만 하는 것이 아니라, 생각할 줄도 알아야 한다”고 설명할 수 있습니다.

3. 실패도 배움의 한 부분입니다. 2012년 연구에서는 프랑스인 6학년 학생들에게 굉장히 어려운 애너그램(글 순서를 바꿔서 다른 단어 조합) 문제를 주 고, 한 그룹에게는 실패와 끈기는 자연스러운 것이라고 설명해주었는데 그 그룹은 모든 분야에서 다른 학생들 보다 뛰어 난 성과를 보였다고 합니다. Lipman은 학부모들과 교육자들은 실패가 아이를 심리적으로 위축시킨다는 것에 대한 걱정 이 너무 앞선 나머지, 아이들에게 실패가 배움에 있어서 빼놓을 수 없는 중요한 일부분임을 일깨워주지 않는다고 합니다.

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From Dr.Kim’s Desk 4. 엄격한 것이 절제 없는 사랑보다 낫습니다. 우수한 미국 교사들의 특성을 조사한 연구를 보면 이들은 엄격하고 학생들에게 많은 것을 요구하는 것이 공통점입니다. 그러한 교사들은 “모든 학생은 자신들이 가진 잠재성보다 성취도가 낮은데, 그 잠재성을 발굴해내는 것은 선생님의 몫이 다”는 신념을 가지고 교육에 임했다는 것입니다. 이런 선생님 지도로 공부한 한 4학년 학생은 이렇게 말했습니다: “초등 학교 1, 2, 3학년 시절 제가 울면 선생님이 다독여주시곤 했습니다. 하지만 Mrs. T는 찡찡거리지 말고 얼른 가서 공부하 라고 따끔하게 한마디 하셨습니다. 생각해보면 Mrs. T 선생님이 옳았던 것 같습니다. 저는 더 열심히 공부해야 했습니 다.” (1, 2, 3학년 선생님이 틀렸다는 것은 아닙니다. 컸는데도 유치원 아이한테 하는 것처럼 감싸기만 한다면 좋지 않다 는 것입니다.)

5. 창의성은 우연히 마술처럼 표출되는 것이 아닙니다. Lipman은 “사실 창의적인 천재들은 평소에 굉장히 많은 노력을 하고, 그 작은 노력이 점점 쌓이다 보면 바깥세상에서 흔 히 ‘에피파니 혹은 돌파구’로 보는 굉장한 일들을 해내는 것이다”고 말합니다. 미국 템플대 Robert W. Weisberg 연구에 따르면, 천재로 태어나는 사람은 없으며 “어느 한 분야에서 새로운 것을 창조하려면, 기본적으로 그 분야에 푹 빠져있어 야 한다는 것입니다.”

6. 재능보다 중요한 것은 이를 악물고 노력하는 것입니다. Angela Duckworth의 뛰어난 능력을 갖춘 2,800명에 대한 연구 조사 결과에 따르면, 성공을 결정짓는 중요한 요인은 타 고난 재능이 아니라 열정과 장기적인 목표를 향한 인내심입니다. 이를 악물고 하는 노력과 더불어 학생 스스로 무엇인가를

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변화시키고 발전시킬 수 있다는 믿음을 갖는 게 중요한데, 이와 같은 믿음은 선생님과 부모들이 줄 수 있습니다.

7. 칭찬은 전략적이어야 합니다. 스탠포드 대학의 Carol Dweck 교수가(제가 여러 번 글을 통해서 소개해드렸던) 연구했듯이, 학생들에게 “똑똑하다”고 칭 찬하는 것은 오히려 악영향을 미칩니다. “열심히 한다”고 칭찬하는 것은 더 많은 노력과 성공으로 연결됩니다.

8. 어느 정도의 스트레스는 유익하며 사람을 강하게 만듭니다. 많은 연구에서는 사람이 어려운 도전(엄격한 선생님께 배우는 것 포함) 앞에 놓일 경우 견고해지고 자신감을 키운다고 합 니다. Lipman은 학생들이 자신 안에 내재된 “잘할 수 있다”는 생각을 발굴해내기 때문이라고 설명합니다. 앞에서 말한 Mr. K의 굉장히 엄격하고 까칠한 행동을 다시 생각해볼 때 “기대치가 높고 엄격한 선생님들이 그와 같이 행동하는 데에는 다 이유가 있습니다. 학생들이 못 알아듣고, 배우지 못해 화내는 게 아니라, 반대로 학생들이 반드시 배울 수 있고 능력이 충분히 있다는 믿음과 확신이 있기 때문에 많은 것을 요구하는 것입니다.”

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Elementary Principal

From the

Stephen Massiah Elementary School Principal

What a great start we have had to the school year! Three years ago, we began a four-year curriculum review and growth program that has us now in its final year. In previous years you have seen the introduction of the Workshop model for the teaching of reading and writing, the introduction of new standards for science and a new math program that is much more inquiry based and deeper in the explanation of math. This year we are aligning our Social Studies program from K5 to Grade 5 and have introduced the Orff approach to the teaching of music in most of the elementary grades. The Orff approach to music is used throughout the world to teach students in a natural and comfortable environment. This is a “child-centered way of learning” music that treats music as a basic system like language. Orff teaching believes that just as every child can learn language, so can every child learn music. It is often called “Elemental Music Making” because many of the materials needed to teach students are “natural and close to a child’s world” in their daily life. Ms. Melinda Baum, a specialist in Orff music and our new elementary music and choral teacher, is thoroughly enjoying bringing this to our students and our students are enjoying their learning. As well as Ms. Baum joining our staff this year, it is my pleasure to also welcome Mrs. Kirstan Beatty who is our new guidance counselor, Ms. Rebecca Cyrus in grade four, Ms. Jennifer Hisko as our new P.E. teacher and Ms. Landy Hwang in K5 who has replaced Mrs. Stacey Wucherpfennig who needed to return to the US for health reasons. Welcome one and all! By the time you are reading this we will have had our first Parent Coffee of the year. Parent Coffees are one of the ways we work at keeping in touch with our families. I would encourage parents to attend these when you can and to keep in regular contact with your child’s teacher, bringing any concerns directly to their attention. I would like to thank our grade level moms for helping to organize parents to support student activities in our classes. This support is so helpful. Please remember that our “parent moms’” role is to support the classroom but their role is not to voice concerns a parent may have. If you as a parent have any concerns about your child and their learning please contact your child’s teacher directly. You are also always welcome to contact and/or meet with me. Please continue the great support you provide your child in their learning, as this is an essential part of their growth and our partnership.

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From the

Secondary Principal Scott Paulin Secondary School Principal

This year, APIS secondary school is challenging students to consider the power of community and to commit themselves to intentionally build positive relationships that foster a deeper sense of community. Community serves a vital role in terms of offering camaraderie and acting as a support system for people. With our society moving at a faster and more detached manner due to technology, busy schedules and the frequency at which we change schools or move from one country to another, it makes it harder and harder to feel any sense of community. With the pressure on students to take increasingly rigorous course-loads and maintain high academic marks, it can leave little room for connecting with others. Social media, entertainment, email and chat provide virtual connections, but are not a replacement for actual human interaction. Add to this the distance some students travel to and from school each day, and it can be difficult for them to get involved in student activities. It is very easy here in Seoul to be continually surrounded by 10 million people, and yet live a daily reality of loneliness and isolation.

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Research, though, tells us that people who feel a sense of belonging tend to lead happier, healthier, and more successful lives. Schools, likewise, foster an environment more conducive to learning, and students demonstrate greater success and more resilience when there is a strong sense of community. This is why building and maintaining a strong community here at APIS is so important. Communities thrive when people are better connected, but sometimes small schools like APIS can have a tendency to become complacent around community building. We can tend to think it will just happen naturally instead of intentionally taking steps to connect with others and make sure others feel connected to our community. Community means caring for everyone who is part of our school, and it is hard work. It also takes intentionality. I would like to challenge each of us as members of the APIS family to take an active role in promoting a stronger, more inclusive community here at APIS. We can do this by taking some simple steps: • Greet new members of your community • Smile • Be kind to people around you • Say hello to people • Forget about yourself for a while and take the time to get to know others • Become active in school events – come to some ball games or concerts, etc. • Join school groups or clubs and encourage others to get involved too • Allow others to help you • Challenge yourself to use English more as an inclusive language • Volunteer to help with events • Spend more time with people and less on your cell phone or computers • Be aware – look around a bit and see if you notice someone who is alone

Together, we can build a healthier, more productive school environment. Community impacts all of us, and building a stronger community today is the foundation for a positive tomorrow.

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From the

Dean of Students Matthew Johnson Dean of Students

The thing I enjoy most as Dean of Students is walking the hallways and experiencing the energy and excitement that can be found among the students of APIS. Students scamper from class to class talking about homework, friends, or other current news/events. It is great to see them smile and laugh, enjoying being teenagers and ready for the challenges that lay ahead; either in their next class, over the weekend, or the more distant future of university. As our seniors finish their first round of college applications and anxiously look forward to replies, I feel it is important to keep in mind the present and focus on the “here and now.” We have so much to be thankful for within our school community and I hope everyone after reading this article will give that special person a hug or a sincere thank you for the ways in which they have strengthened and encouraged their actions and character. We have already had a plethora of activities and events thus far during the first quarter that have contributed to our school’s mission and philosophy; the school Carnival, the secondary retreat, exciting sports seasons (high school volleyball, middle school soccer, elementary soccer), the middle school music concert, classroom field trips, SRC elections, college visits, and etc. A part of my role at APIS is also to ensure that students are adhering to different policies and procedures throughout the school day. I not only remind students of the proper uniform, but also monitor student grades and attendance to ensure that students are on task and reaching their maximum potential throughout the school day. Please keep in mind the following policies as winter and the end of the semester approaches: • November 1st is the first day that all students are required to wear the full winter uniform. Please check the student and parent handbook for further information and details. • Students are expected to show up on time and be present for all classes. Please be reminded of our attendance policy in secondary, which states that “accumulating in excess of 9 period-absences in a class per semester, whether excused or unexcused, will result in a loss of credit for the course or courses involved.” • English is the language of instruction as well as an essential part of the inclusive and collaborative learning culture at APIS. All students are expected to speak English at all times, while on the APIS campus, with the exception of Korean and foreign language classes.

My role as Dean of Students is to advocate for all APIS students; to help provide them with the tools to be successful both inside and outside of the classroom. I encourage students and parents to stop by my office as often as possible to share their thoughts and ideas on how we, as a school community, can positively contribute to the spirit and culture of APIS. All the best!

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From the

Activities Coordinator Andrew Murphy Activities Coordinator

With the first semester now complete, it is a great time to reflect on the amazing events that APIS has had in the months of August, September, November and December. It also a great time to look ahead to some of the exciting events still to come. APIS has many different and special events and activities occurring in the next few months

Athletics: The first half of the year brought some very exciting times in athletics, with some great success stories in middle school soccer, varsity volleyball, and not forgetting the exciting Thursday elementary soccer. This past fall our elementary soccer players played in their first ever jamboree against other schools. With the first of 3 sports seasons finished we are now in the second season of athletics that involve, varsity and junior varsity basketball, middle school volleyball, and elementary floor hockey. An exciting event to look forward to in athletics will be the varsity boys basketball championships on February 8th, which will be held at APIS.

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Activites/Events: December wrapped up in a grand fashion with some wonderful concerts and performances. The Secondary Christmas Concert, which featured both middle school, and high school students dazzled the audience in choral, orchestra, and Band performances. The grand finale which featured all secondary APIS musicians and special singing performances from faculty sent the audience home in awe. The Elementary Christmas concert was equally impressive. Once again the amazing talents of APIS students were on display, in Choral, Orchestra, and Band performances. In addition to this the Korean department also participated in the concert and put on quite the show. They showed not only their musical talents, but their Korean language skills as well. APIS’ last event for 2013 was the annual all school chapel which was one of the greatest yet! The Christian Life Department, with the help of Mr. Forrester, put on an adaptation of “Christmas Carol” which was by far the most impressive drama performance ever at APIS. The first semester at APIS was filled with some wonderful events including fantastic concerts, plays, athletic events, and major school-wide events like the fall carnival. They were not only enjoyable, but illustrated the many talents students at APIS, practice, develop, and possess in and outside of class. Although APIS is starting a new semester, many more special events are just around the corner to once again demonstrate the wonderful talents our students have. In 3 weeks time, our boys and girls basketball teams will head to their championship tournaments with the boys tournament being held at APIS. In just over a month’s time a drama performance will be put on by our after school drama club. Shortly after that our secondary school will leave for their Global Citizens Program Excursions.

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FALL 2013

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Introducing New Programs in Elementary School

O

Foreign Language Program

ver 50 elementary students began studying Chinese or Japanese this year as an optional 9th period class that meets two or three times a week. During the first quarter, students began learning the basics of each language. They worked on saying hello, introducing themselves, telling their ages, learning numbers, and other vocabulary such as body parts. Students have been excited to present in front of their classmates, practicing their vocabulary and pronunciation. The Chinese teachers at APIS have noticed how elementary students are particularly good at imitating sounds and for that reason, they have really good pronunciation. They have been able to get used to the different tones of Chinese and become familiar with Chinese characters which will help them tremendously as they continue to study through the years. In the Japanese classes, Grade 4 and 5 students have already learned 200 vocabulary words and will practice writing more during the next quarter. Each class is full of fun activities to keep students engaged; Japanese students even learned how to make Japanese noodles, ramen. All the Chinese and Japanese classes are working towards a publishing party that will happen in December. During this publishing party, parents will be invited to come and see all that the students have been learning so far this year.

올해부터 초등학교 학생들은 9교시 선택 수업으로 중국어 또는 일본어를 일주일에 2회(저학년), 혹은 3회(고학년) 배울 수 있게 되었습니다. 학 생들은 인사, 자기 소개, 숫자 세기, 신체 부위 등 기초 단계에서 부터 다양한 어휘력을 키워나가고, 자신의 친구들 앞에 서서 발표하는 연습을 통 하여 언어를 배우는 즐거움을 알아가고 있습니다. 중국어 수업의 경우, 한자를 익히고 다양한 성조로 발음 연습을 하면서 앞으로 중학교, 고등학교 올라가서도 배울 외국어에 대한 기반을 탄탄히 쌓고 있습니다. 일본어를 선택한 4, 5 학년 학생들의 경우 이미 200개가 넘는 단어를 배웠으며 남은 학기 동안 글쓰기 연습을 합니다. 일본어 수 업은 수업시간마다 학생들이 즐겁게 참여할 수 있도록 다양한 활동으로 구성되어 있으며 일본식 라멘을 직접 만드는 방법을 배우기도 했습니다. 모든 중국어/일본어 수업은 12월에 열리는 Publishing Party를 열심히 준비하고 있습니다. 12월의 Publishing Party는 학부모님들을 초 청하여 그동안 학생들이 배운 외국어 실력을 마음껏 발휘할 수 있는 자리가 될 것 입니다.

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FALL 2013

F I R S T Q UA R T E R H I G H L I G H T S

Introducing New Programs in Elementary School

A

Orff Now Offered to Elementary Students!

PIS began a new music program in the elementary school this year. Grades K5, 1, 3, and 4 are now taking music classes using the Orff approach. Orff is a way of teaching children about music that engages their mind and body through a mixture of singing, dancing, acting, and the use of percussion instruments. Through their classes, students are given the chance to “play.” They use xylophones of different shapes and sizes to create different sounds. They then carefully listen to their classmates and learn how to work as an ensemble to create musical harmonies. Elementary music & secondary chorus teacher, Melinda Baum, explains, “The emphasis is on the process rather than performance; on participation by all of the students, each at his or her own level. A typical lesson involves rhythmic speech, movement, singing, body percussion and transferring those skills onto the Orff instruments and recorders.” By experiencing various sounds, beats, melodies, and rhythms, the Orff approach is allowing students to build a solid foundation in music all while having a great time “playing” in class.

올해부터 APIS 초등부에서 새로운 음악 프로그램을 도입하였습니다. 유치부, 1,3,4 학년은 Orff 접근법으로 음악 수업을 진행하고 있습니 다. Orff 는 노래, 춤, 연기, 그리고 타악기의 조합을 이용하여 음악을 접하도록 가르치는 방식입니다. 수업시간에 학생들은 “놀이”를 통하여 음악의 모든 요소를 자연스럽 게 배우게 됩니다. 예를 들어, 다양한 크기와 모양의 실로폰으로 수업 을 진행할 때 학생들은 친구가 연주하는 악기의 소리에 귀를 기울이면 서 서로 협력하여 하모니를 만드는 법을 배우게 됩니다. 초등부 음악/중등부 합창 선생님이신 Melinda Baum 선생님께서는 “보여지는 공연보다 그 과정이 중요합니다. 각자 음악적인 레벨이 다를 지라도 모든 학생이 다 함께 참여할 수 있다는 것이 중요합니다. 수업은 주로 리듬있는 발성, 율동, 노래, 그리고 몸으로 타악기 소리를 내면 서 진행하며, 이러한 스킬을 Orff 악기와 리코더로 옮겨서 표현합니다” 라고 설명합니다. Orff 접근 방식은 학생들이 다양한 소리, 박자, 멜로디, 그리고 리듬을 통하여 수업시간에 “놀면서” 음 악에 대한 탄탄한 기반을 쌓을 수 있게 도와줍니다.

Information Box: The Orff Approach to music education was created by Carl Orff, a German composer, in the 1920s. This approach was based off of his idea that students learn best by experiencing. He also believed that children should learn music in their natural environment of play. These beliefs founded the Orff Approach to music education where students are active during music class exploring, imitating, improvising, and creating. They learn musical concepts through singing, dancing, moving, and playing percussion instruments.

Orff 란? Orff 접근법은 독일 작곡가인 Carl Orff가 1920년대 에 발명한 음악 교육 방식입니다. 이 접근법은 학생들이 경험을 통하여 가장 잘 학습할 수 있다는 생각에 기반을 둡니다. Orff 는 어린이들이 자연스러운 환경에서 놀이를 통하여 음악을 배워 야 한다고 믿었습니다. 이러한 믿음은 음악을 가르칠 때 학생들 이 활동적으로 탐색하고, 흉내내고, 즉흥적으로 창조해낼 수 있 도록 격려하는 Orff 접근법을 만들어냈습니다. 학생들은 노래, 춤, 움직임, 그리고 타악기의 연주를 통하여 음악적 개념을 이 해하게 됩니다.

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FALL 2013

F I R S T Q UA R T E R H I G H L I G H T S

Changes in Secondary School A Peek into Recording Arts & STEM

A

sk anyone who has been around APIS long enough and they will tell you of the school’s passion to stay on the cutting edge, especially when it comes to utilizing technology that aids and assists the development of its students. From digital animation classes to a new 3D printer and projector, these are only a couple examples of the technological investments that have been made in the past few years. A new plateau has been reached this Fall as the Recording Arts studio is up and running and the STEM (science, technology, engineering & mathematics) elective has been introduced. The Recording Arts class offers an exciting opportunity for students to learn about sound recording and music production, using high-end, professional equipment. Mr. Robert Sim leads the students through a very thorough process of understanding digital recording fundamentals. They begin by learning the foundational basics of recording theory and studio practice. Once they are comfortable in the studio, they will begin working on their own creative projects; recording audio, creating beats, looping samples, and MIDI (Musical Instrument Digital Interface) programming. Ms. Meg Hayne is heading up the STEM elective, that strives to push students to the next level of learning. The STEM elective is a challenge based learning class in which students gain knowledge through designing solutions to real world problems. Ms. Hayne selects a challenge that is rooted in at least one of the four topic areas and then works as the facilitator for student groups. Students pull from a base knowledge of math, science, critical thinking, and artistic expression to explore these challenges. Ms. Hayne provides only the parameters and rules of the challenge, and then allows students to explore possible solutions. From the initial challenge to the presentation, students are innovating, creating, critically thinking, and preparing for a world where these skills are no longer optional. The Recording Arts Studio and STEM elective are only two of the many ways our APIS students are being introduced to and embracing technology in the classroom. It is our goal to deepen and enhance the learning process for students by embracing technology rather than shunning it. By doing so, APIS will continue to bridge the gap between East and West and produce some of the finest educated talent possible.

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Changes in Secondary School

FALL 2013

F I R S T Q UA R T E R H I G H L I G H T S

A PIS는 언제나 학습의 현장에서 최첨단 테크놀로지를 도입하고 활용하는 데에 있어서 적극적이며 열정적입니다. 디지털 애니메이션 수업 부터 3D 프린터와 프로젝터는 APIS에서 최근 몇년 동안 시도하고 있는 창의적이고 혁신적인 교육 프로그램을 보여주는 몇가지 예시입니다. 올 가을에는 Recording Arts 전문 스튜디오에서 이루어지는 녹음 수업과 STEM(과학 Science, 기술 Technology, 공학 Engineering, 수학 Mathematics) 이라는 새로운 통합형 수업을 개설함으로써 학생들의 생각의 범위를 확장시키고 다양한 테크놀로지에 접할 수 있는 기회를 더욱 더 많 이 제공하고 있습니다. Recording Arts 수업은 학생들이 전문 장비를 이용하여 녹음과 음악 제작을 배울 수 있는 기회를 제공합니다. 스튜디오에서 오랜 경험 이 있는 Robert Sim 선생님은 녹음 이론과 스튜디오 실습을 통하여 학생들에게 디지털 녹음 과정에 대한 기초를 가르칩니다. 스튜디오 의 장비에 익숙해지면 개별적으로 창의적인 프로젝트 구상, 오디오 녹음, 비트, MIDI 프로그래밍 등을 시작하게 됩니다. Meg Hayne 선생님이 가르치시는 STEM 선택 수업은 학생이 적극적으로 학습하고 스스로 다음 단계로 나아갈 수 있도록 설계되어있 습니다. 이 수업은 도전 정신에 기반한 수업으로, 학생이 실제로 발생하는 실 생활 문제들에 대한 해결책을 스스로 제시함으로써 지식 을 습득하게 됩니다. Hayne 선생님은 과학, 기술, 공학, 수학 이 네가지 분야 중 한가지에 기반한 도적적인 과제를 제시하면 학생은 수 학, 과학, 비판적 사고, 그리고 예술적 감각을 이용하여 과제를 탐구하며 해결방안을 제시합니다. Hayne 선생님께서는 기준과 규칙만 을 제공하여 학생들이 다양한 해결 방안을 모색할 수 있도록 돕습니다. 과제의 시작에서 부터 완성 후 발표에 이르기까지 학생들은 이 세상을 살아가는데 반드시 필요한 혁신적, 창조적, 비판적 사고력을 기르게 됩니다. Recording Arts Studio와 STEM elective 수업은 APIS에서 테크놀로지를 활용하는 수많은 수업 중 두개에 불과합니다. APIS는 급변하 는 시대에 발맞추어 학생들이 능숙하게 테크놀로지를 다룰 수 있도록 기회를 제공하고, 테크놀로지와 늘 가까이하는 학습 환경을 조 성하고자 노력하고 있습니다. 이렇게 함으로써 APIS는 동서양의 가교 역할을 하는, 그리고 모든 분야에서 뛰어난 인재를 계속해서 양 성해 나갈 것입니다.

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FALL 2013

F I R S T Q UA R T E R H I G H L I G H T S

Changes in Secondary School

CPM: Keeping Up with the Trends in Math Education

B

eginning in the 2013-2014 school year, APIS Secondary School introduced College Preparatory Math (CPM), a math resource which utilizes standards-based, and research-supported tasks to advance the mathematical skills of students of varying ability levels. For a smooth transition, training sessions were provided for faculty, and a CPM trainer, Chris Mikles, was invited to APIS to provide an information session for parents on the goals of this program. In addition, Curriculum Coordinator, Ms. Elaine Park, met with secondary parents and discussed the program in depth during the coffee meetings.

What is the reason for introducing this program? Education is changing in response to the advancements in the global community. It is also changing in response to brain-based research. In the past, the U.S. curriculum was set by each state, but now the federal government is playing a key role in setting the standards, called Common Core State Standards (CCCS). CCCS reflects the changes in education today, and SAT and AP tests are also moving in this direction. CPM is aligned with the Common Core State Standards. Moreover, when we analyze the MAP test scores, our students tend to score lower in problem solving skills. These skills are critical in preparing for college admissions, and to be successful in college as well. CPM not only teaches information but also teaches the skills that will help students to succeed in college.

How is a CPM course different from a typical math course? In short, there are no significant changes in the content – it is simply a difference in the method of teaching math. While a traditional math class would involve a teacher lecturing in front of students, giving the formula and asking students to solve a problem, a CPM course would require students to think and discuss the math problem with their peers first. Then the teacher would go around in each group and give “mini� lessons tailored to each group. CPM is structured in a way that enhances learning retention. Hence, students will be able to understand more deeply.

How are the students assessed? Students are assessed primarily through individual exams. Though there are team tests, these tests are given out mainly for the purpose of assessing the ability to work as a team in solving the problem.

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Changes in Secondary School

A PIS에서는 2013-2014학년부터 CPM이라는 수학 프로그램을 도입하였습니다. CPM은 많은 연구 결과로 개발된 수학 프로그램으로써, 어떠한 수학 능력을 가진 학생들일지라도 실력을 향상 시킬 수 있도록 고안되어있습니다. 학교에서 CPM 채택을 위해 사전 조사, 교사 트레이 닝, CPM 강사를 초빙하여 학부모님들께 어떤 프로그램인가에 대해 설명을 드리고, APIS Curriculum Coordinator를 통해서도 다시 한번 자 세히 안내해드렸습니다.

FALL 2013

F I R S T Q UA R T E R H I G H L I G H T S

도입하게 된 배경은? 교육은 글로벌시대의 요구 뿐만아니라 뇌에 대한 연구로 인해 점점 변화하고 있습니다. 과거의 미국 교육과정은 각 주정부 자율에 맡겼다면 점 차 연방정부에서 관리하는 형식(Common Core State Standards)으로 바뀌고 있는데, Common Cores State Standards는 교육에서 현재 변 화하고 있는 부분들을 반영하고 있으며, 이에 따라 SAT, AP시험도 변하고 있습니다. CPM은 현재 변화하고 있는 미국의 교육 과정에 발맞추어 가는 프로그램입니다. 또한, 우리 학교 학생들의 MAP testing 시험 결과를 분석해보면 문제 해결능력에 대한 부분에서 상대적으로 점수 분포가 낮은 것을 확인할 수 있었습니다. 이는 대학 입시 준비를 위해서도 개선이 필요한 사항이며, 무엇보다도 대학 입학 이후에도 학업 생활을 잘 하기 위해서는 반드시 계 발시켜야하는 능력입니다. CPM은 수학적 지식을 가르치는 것과 더불어, 문제 해결 능력을 함께 개발시켜주어 대학 입학 이후에도 학업생활을 잘 해나갈 수 있도록 준비시킵니다.

CPM은 기존 수학수업과 어떻게 다른가요? 커리큘럼면에서는 크게 바뀐 부분은 없으며 수업 방식의 차이 입니다. 기존에는 선생님이 칠판 앞에서 전체학생들에게 수학 원리를 가르친 후 학생들에게 공식을 알려주고 문제풀이를 하는 일대 다 형식으로 진행하였다면, CPM은 먼저 그룹별로 문제에 대해 토론하고, 선생님이 소그룹 별로 돌아다니며 여러번 맞춤식으로 설명을 하는 방법으로 진행된다고 이해하시면 됩니다. CPM 수업 방식은 머릿속에 더욱더 오래 남게하여 깊이있게 이해할 수 있도록 도와줍니다.

학생들은 어떻게 평가 받나요? 학생들은 여전히 개별 시험으로 평가 받게 됩니다. 팀 시험도 있으나, 팀 시험은 주로 팀 원들과 함께 문제를 해결할 능력이 있는가, 활발하게 참여하는가 등을 평가하기 위함으 로 생각하시면 됩니다.

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FALL 2013

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Annual Events Back to School Night

A

PIS celebrated the beginning of the 2013-2014 school year on August 30 with its annual Back to School Night event. Parents were invited to visit homerooms and see the academic goals that the students are hoping to achieve this year. These homeroom presentations provided an opportunity for parents to better understand what their child will go through during the 2013-2014 year. Prior to the homeroom presentations, senior parents were invited to a session on college admissions by APIS’ College Counseling Director, Shana Russell. More than half of the senior parents attended this year, reflecting the deep involvement and support of APIS parents in the admissions process. Mrs. Russell explained in detail how parents can be actively involved in the process of college admissions through Family Connection, an online tool for collaboration among students, the counselor, and parents. At the end of the session, parents received individual registration codes for Family Connection, and also a copy of the Class of 2014 College Counseling Handbook. The Convocation Service began at 6 p.m. with a wonderful performance by the APIS High School Band. Dr. Kim introduced the entire faculty to the parents and the principals outlined the goals of the year. “Beginnings are important,” emphasized Elementary Principal Mr. Massiah, “and that is why elementary school is important.” He also emphasized how parent involvement is essential for successful learning. Secondary Principal, Mr. Paulin’s presentation focused on nurturing future leaders. By emphasizing APIS’ 4 core-emphases in education, he explained how the APIS community provides students with necessary skills and knowledge for the future. Their speeches provided the framework for parents to understand exactly how education at APIS fulfills the mission of “Nurturing future leaders of the New Pacific Century.” Back to School Night concluded with the faculty, administration, and parents dedicating the upcoming school year to God. Mr. Paulin delivered the convocation message focusing on Jesus’ commandment to love God and love others. His message was followed by a time of praise and a prayer of dedication. The night ended with everyone excited about the year ahead and anticipation over all the great things that are to come.

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Annual Events

8 월 30일 APIS는 새학기 시작을 축하하기 위하여 연례 행사인 Back to School Night를 개최하였습니다! 학교에 도착한 학부모님들은 먼저 자녀의 담임 선생님과 만나 올해 학업의 목표, 학교 생활에서 전반적인 부분에 대해 알아보는 시간 을 가졌습니다. 12학년 학부모님들의 경우, 별도로 마련된 워크숍을 통해 APIS College Counseling Director이신 Russell 선생님과 인 사를 나누고 어떻게 입시 준비를 하면 되는지 세부적인 내용에 대해서 알아갔습니다. 특히, Russell 선생님은 학부모님이 자녀의 대학 입학 준비 과정에 활발하게 참여할 수 있는 방법 및 프로그램 Family Connection을 소개하셨습니다. Family Connection은 학생, 카 운슬러, 그리고 학부모가 협력할 수 있는 온라인 웹사이트로, 서로 정보를 공유하고 의견을 교환하는데 편리한 프로그램입니다. 대학 입학 관련 워크숍이 끝난 후 학부모님들은 Family Connection을 가입을 위한 개별 등록 번호를 부여 받고 APIS에서 제작한 Class of 2014 College Counseling Handbook도 받았습니다. APIS 고등학교 밴드의 아름다운 연주는 6시부터 열리는 Convocation Service의 시작을 알렸습니다. APIS의 김의성 이사장님이 전체 교사진을 소개한 뒤, 교장 선생님들은 이번 학사년도의 목표를 설명하였습니다. Massiah 초등학교 교장 선생님은 “시작은 중요합니 다. 그렇기 때문에 초등학교 교육이 굉장히 중요합니다”고 말씀하시면서 이와 더불어 자녀의 성공적인 학교 생활을 위해서는 학부모 님의 관심과 참여가 중요한 부분을 차지한다는 말씀도 잊지 않았습니다. Paulin 중고등부 교장선생님은 APIS의 4가지 core emphases 를 강조함으로써 APIS에서는 미래에 필요로 하는 기술과 지식을 학생들에게 어떻게 가르치고 준비시키는지 설명하였습니다. 교장 선 생님들의 발표를 통해 APIS의 “Nurturing Future Leaders of the New Pacific Century”를 보다 잘 이해할 수 있는 자리가 되었습니다.

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끝으로 교사진, 교직원, 학생, 학부모 모두 함께 드린 예배에서 Paulin 교장 선생님은 하나님을 사랑하고 이웃을 사랑하라는 예수님의 말씀을 전한 후 기도와 찬양하는 시간을 가졌습니다. 한해에 대한 기대와 앞으로 있을 즐거운 일들에 대한 설렘을 가득 안은채 모두 힘찬 발걸음으로 돌아갔습니다.

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F I R S T Q UA R T E R H I G H L I G H T S

Annual Events

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Secondary Retreat: Challenges, Growth, and Fun

he start of a new school year is an exciting time for everyone at APIS, especially for secondary students and faculty as they take part in the annual Secondary School Retreat, the official kick off to the new year. Three days away from the school campus is a perfect way for middle and high school students to get energized for the new semester, establish new and rekindle old friendships, and get to know their teachers better. Each day of the retreat was filled with activities designed to challenge the students, create team unity, and allow them to have fun and create new memories. They enjoyed activities like zip lining, high ropes courses, and orienteering. The students were also divided into teams based on grade level and had to work together to complete various tasks within the 2-minute time limit. Middle School and High School SRCs also teamed together to host dances for students to enjoy. Special performances from students were the highlight of the night as they sang karaoke, rapped, and DJ’d for their friends. No retreat is complete without an opportunity for everyone to spend time focusing on spiritual matters. This year’s special guest was Bret Martin, pastor of the 101 Church in Ventura, California. Bret challenged the students with a series of messages based on the theme of this year’s Chapel series, “Life on Purpose.” His primary point challenged students that their time here on earth matters and that Jesus is the key to living life to the fullest. He also encouraged them to, “get pumped for the life that Jesus has for you to live and live life on purpose.”

새 학기의 시작은 누구에게나 신나고 설레는 일입니다. 특히 중고등부 학생들과 교사진은 연례행사인 Secondary School Retreat을 떠나 더 욱 더 신이 납니다. 2박3일 동안 진행되는 Secondary Retreat은 에너지를 충전하고, 친구들과 새로운 만남을 가지고, 방학 동안 못 본 친구들도 다시 만나고, 선생님들과 더욱 가까워질 수 있는 시간입니다. 이번 Retreat에서는 학생들의 도전 정신을 기르는 재미있는 활동(zip-lining, high rope courses, orienteering)이 많이 준비되어 있어 두려움도 극복하고 팀워크를 기르는 즐거운 추억거리를 만들었습니다. 이와 더불어 학년별로 팀을 형성하여 다양한 과제를 제한 시간 2분 안에 완성해 내는 일도 했습니다. 중고등학교 SRC(학생회)는 밤에 학생들이 즐길 수 있는 댄스 시간을 마련하여 노래와 랩 공연을 하고, 직접 DJ로 나서 분위기를 고조시키기도 했습니다. 3일간의 여정에서 빠질 수 없었던 중요한 행사는 영적인 부분을 되돌아보는 시간이었습니다. 올해 특별 초대 강사로 함께한 캘리포니 아 101 교회의 Bret Martin 목사님은 올해 채플 주제인 “Life on Purpose”에 대한 메세지를 전했습니다. 그는 현재 학생들이 보내는 시 간들은 매우 귀한 시간이며 예수님을 통해 삶을 더욱 의미있고 완전하게 살아갈 수 있다는 내용의 메세지를 전했습니다. 그는 또한 학 생들이 “예수님께서 주신 삶에 대한 기대를 가지며, 가치 있게 살도록” 격려하였습니다.

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Annual Events

Middle School Concert

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n anxious and excited crowd of parents, faculty, and fellow students packed the APIS Auditorium the evening of October 29 for the Middle School Fall Concert. Nearly eighty students made up the Chorus, Orchestra, and Band, who rehearsed for weeks leading up to their performance. And their practice paid off. Onlookers enjoyed a wide variety of selections, including a rousing and rhythmic rendition of a traditional Swahili song as well as a quirky orchestral number paying homage to zombies.

10월 29일 저녁 APIS 소강당에는 중등부 가을 콘서트에 대한 기대로 가득찬 학부모, 선생님, 그리고 학생들이 모였습니다. 열심히 연습하고 준비해온 중등부 학생들은 각자 속해있는 코러스, 오케스트라, 그 리고 밴드에서 훌륭한 공연을 선보였습니다. 관객들은 경쾌하며 리듬있게 편곡된 전통 스와힐리 노래와 더불어 독특한 음색의 좀비 음악을 표현한 오케스트라까지 다양한 음악을 즐겼습니다.

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F I R S T Q UA R T E R H I G H L I G H T S

Concert Program Middle School Chorus, directed by Mrs. Melinda Baum Yesu Ni Wangu (traditional Swahili Song) Shalom, Pacem, Peace The Water is Wide with Bring Me a Little Water, Silvie Middle School Orchestra, directed by Ms. Emmalee Johnson Andante from Symphony No. 6 Rosin Eating Zombies from Outer Space Middle School Band, directed by Mrs. Sophie Holbrook Beyond The Stars Electricity (Race Around the Circuit)

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F I R S T Q UA R T E R H I G H L I G H T S

Annual Events

C ARN IVA L A

crisp chill and spectacular blue skies welcomed students and faculty for the annual Fall Carnival. In only the second time in the history of APIS, the entire student body descended upon the soccer field to participate in games, inflatable obstacle courses, and paint their faces for the primary purpose of helping refugees from North Korea who now attend the Mulmangcho School. Mulmangcho School is an organization dedicated to helping North Korean defectors by educating them and helping heal the physical and psychological wounds. The school is named after a flower called forget-me-not in English. Mulmangcho School is run by Dream Makers for North Korea, led by former lawmaker Park Sun-young. In the weeks leading up to the Carnival, students could support Mulmangcho School by donating school supplies, books, and sports equipment in exchange for tickets to be used throughout the day. Items donated exceeded those collected last year and the Mulmangcho School welcomed them with open arms. In addition to the supplies, APIS students also raised over 500,000 won. Plans and preparation for this year’s Carnival started when the faculty arrived in August. The Student Representative Councils (SRC), under the leadership of Janice Young, Megan Pendleton, Dawn Johnston, Brittany Lawson, Jeffrey Underhill, and Kirstan Beatty, devoted their time and energy to give their fellow classmates a fun, yet meaningful diversion from the school day. No one left disappointed.

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ect f r Pe

’s Let e Havn Fu

Enj oy~

Annual Events

가 을의 청명한 하늘과 시원한 바람은 가을 축제를 반겼습니다. APIS 에서는 두번째로 열리는 행사로써, 모든 학생들이 운동장에 모여 다양 한 게임, 공기로 부풀려진 기구들, 그리고 페이스 페인팅을 즐겼습니다. 그러나 이 카니발은 재미에만 초점을 맞춘 축제가 아니었습니다 - 물망 초 학교를 다니고 있는 탈북 학생들을 돕기 위한 기부금 행사이기도 하였습니다. 물망초 학교는 탈북 학생들을 위한 학교로, 그들의 육체적 심리

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적 상처를 치유해주는 기관입니다. 물망초는 “나를 잊지 마세요”라는 꽃말을 지니고 있으며 박선영 전 의원이 이사장으로 있는 사단법인 물망초 (영문명 Dream Makers for North Korea)에 의해 설립되었습니다. 축제를 개최하기 몇주 전부터 학생들은 물망초 학교로 보내게 될 학용품, 책, 그리고 운동 용품을 기부하여 축제에서 사용할 수 있는 티켓으로 교 환하였습니다. 올해는 학생들이 작년보다 더 많은 물품을 기부하였고, 물망초 학교에서도 감사하는 마음으로 기부된 물품을 수령했습니다. 기부 한 물품과 더불어 학생들은 50만원 이상의 후원금도 모금할 수 있었습니다. 올해 축제에 대한 계획은 8월 부터 초,중고등부 학생회(Student Representative Council)는 Janice Young, Megan Pendleton, Dawn Johnston, Brittany Lawson, Jeffrey Underhill와 Kirstan Beatty 선생님의 지도하에 모든 학생들이 즐거우면서도 의미 있는 시간을 보낼 수 있도록 준비하였습니다. 올해 가을 카니발도 역시 대성공이었습니다!

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STUDENT ACHIEVEMENTS

Student Achievements

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uring the first quarter, APIS had the pleasure of congratulating many of our elementary and secondary students for their achievements in art, music, sports, history, and science. Well done, everyone!

Louise Marie Choi-Schattle (Grade 3) won first place in the 50-meter breaststroke in her age group’s girls competition at the Goyang Mayor’s Swimming Competition on October 27, 2013.

Grace Lee (Grade 4) received an award for playing the cello for the disabled. She said that she felt especially proud for being able to present music to people who could not see.

Bryan Jung (Grade 5) was awarded for his musical performance ability as shown in the Hyun-Eum Music Competition hosted by HyunEum Music & Edu on August 24, 2013.

Sun Woo Kim (Grade 5) won the Bronze

Award on July 27, 2013 for displaying distinguished talent in the 54th National Student Fine Art Grand Festival held by the Korea Art Promotion Association.

Hara Choi (Grade 4) won 2nd place in the

National Children’s Art Contest that was organized by the Ministry of Foreign Affairs in October. Hara also received a prize, sponsored by Korean Airlines, valued at 1,000,000 won.

Sally Oh (Grade 9) won an award for her cartoon submitted to the 9th annual Unification Culture Art Interchange Contest by South-North Koreans’ Youth Interchange Federation. A book featuring all the winning entries will be published and distributed throughout Korea and abroad.

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Student Achievements

Joseph Kim (Grade 12) was featured in Brian Kim (Grade 12) won first prize in

the 2013 National Students’ Storytelling Competition on History and Cultural Heritage held by the Cultural Heritage Administration under the Ministry of Culture, Sports, and Tourism for his documentary on Unhyeon Palace.

an article on September 24 in the Korea Herald for his volunteer service, assisting the hearing impaired. Joseph has founded a new organization called “Pure Sound” where he and a group of other APIS students perform as a clarinet ensemble. They successfully raised over 1 million won to donate to people with hearing disabilities.

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STUDENT ACHIEVEMENTS

Chris Dae Hong Kim (Grade 12) won

two big prizes for his science research. His research paper titled, “Investigation of Water Safety in Non-treated Drinking Water with Trace Toxic Metals,” was published in the science journal, Toxicology Research. He and his team also won the Grand Master Piece Thesis Award for his research, “The Diagnoses of Diabetes Assay Using Electrochemical Skin Film Electrode” in a competition hosted by Korean Oil Chemists’ Society. For these achievements, Chris received a “Youth Leader Award” from the organization, UN Future Forum: The Millennium Project Korea.

APIS High School music classes each participated in the KAIAC music festival hosted at Seoul International School where 11 ensembles from five schools participated as well. Three judges (local professional musicians, including members of the Seoul Philharmonic Orchestra, retired member of the Army Band, and the founder of Camarata Music Company) listened to each group’s performance and APIS received the highest rating given which was Gold for all three High School ensembles: Chorus, Orchestra, and Band.

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FA C U LT Y S P O T L I G H T

Brian Kim and Ms. Draskiewicz in the shadow of the East Gate of Gyeongbokgung Palace and the Blue House.

“A Faithful Tour Guide” by Renee Draszkiewicz

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huseok break is always a warm welcome for APIS faculty and students. This past Chuseok break was even more of a delight for myself as I was hosting my father who made his first trip outside of America since he served in the Vietnam War. In an effort to make the trip the most enjoyable for my father I planned out several days to show him the highlights that Korea has to offer from Namsan Mountain, the art in Insa-Dong, authentic Korean foods, and of course the vast history of Korea. After showing him the ropes in Korea, I helped him cross off his very short bucket list by taking him to China to see the Great Wall in Beijing and the Terracotta Warriors in X’ian. My excitement about this trip was challenging to conceal. Brian Kim, a senior who has been in my history classes Ms. Draszkiewicz and her father on the grounds the past two years knew about my father’s upcoming visit of Gyeongbukgung. and asked if he could show us around Seoul to give him the accurate history of both Korea and China. It was such an honor to hear that he wanted to thank me in exchange for sharing my history with him in class by sharing his own history. He wanted to pay it forward and take my father and I out to show us Korea. Brian’s knowledge was stunning, to say the least.

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Faculty Spotlight

Our journey to discover Korea’s history began at Gwanghwamun Gate and Gyeongbukgung Palace. We walked up to the palace gates, and the granite square guarded by the Statue of King Sejong disappeared behind us as we entered into what felt like a whole new world. Brian kept a tentative eye on us as we sauntered through the many buildings of the palace. He told us of the many beliefs that founded the infrastructure of the buildings including the reasons why they kept large cauldrons of water to put out fires, and also to scare away dragons, as if they saw their reflection the dragon would be scared away. While I had had the experience of walking through these palace walls myself before, this experience was quite unique as Brian made sure to tell us the many differences and similarities that we would find among Korean Palaces and Chinese Palaces. By the time we left the palace walls I felt as though I had become an expert and had a new fondness for Korean culture as a result of Brian’s pride and knowledge in his country.

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FA C U LT Y S P O T L I G H T

Days later upon our arrival in the bustling city of Beijing we had the luxury of putting our new knowledge to use. My father was stunned by the size of the palaces in Beijing. Despite Brian’s warning that they were larger; there was no way to describe the massive size differences until we walked through them. The landscapes were different, as Korea’s palaces have the magnificent mountains in the picturesque background and China has less landscaping. The colors in China’s palaces were much more primary whereas Korea uses a wide arrangement of colors to represent the different elements. Our whirlwind Asian tour was a true success as a result of our new perspective. Thanks to our tour with Brian Kim, we were able to look at each experience we had in Korea and China with a true authentic lens, which made our trip globally enlightening.

Ms. Draszkiewicz and her father in the Forbidden City. W W W. A P I S . S E O U L . K R

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ALUMNI SPOTLIGHT

Alumni

Spotlight Bill Kim (Class of 2012) 1. Where are you going to school now?

Currently I go to the Pennsylvania State University, University Park, and I am very happy with my decision. We have strong programs in Engineering, Business, Education and so on. What I love about Penn State is that the school offers a vast amount of research opportunities. For instance, “International Internship in Materials” offers you an internship in a lab in foreign countries, such as China, Germany, Spain, France, Japan, and Poland. I’m trying to go to Germany during my Junior year as a intern lab researcher.

2. What is your daily schedule like?

Life in college is definitely different from life in high school. In high school, you have to go to school Monday through Friday. I had to wake up at 6:30 in the morning and went to bed after midnight. In college, I have one class each on Mondays and Wednesdays at 6:30 p.m. and NO CLASS on Fridays. I have four classes that starts at 11:15 a.m. and that ends at 9:00 p.m. on Tuesdays and Thursdays. You can go to school whenever you want and you can go to bed whenever you want to, too. However, your GPA won’t look pretty if you choose partying and hanging out with your friends over studying. I am not telling you not to have fun, but time management and selfdiscipline are critical in college life.

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What do you miss the most about being a student at APIS?

4.

What was the most challenging part in preparing for college applications?

Definitely Sports. I miss the APIS varsity basketball team very much. I miss every single game and every single practice. I do play a lot of basketball but I can’t get something that I had from the APIS varsity basketball team. When you play varsity sports, you learn how to play sports but you also learn about many life lessons. If you are considering playing varsity sports, DO NOT HESITATE. Trust me. I understand that there are a lot of burdens from GPA, SAT and AP tests, but you can do much more than what you think. I played varsity basketball in my Junior year while I was the SRC president. I also recommend that you get involved with SRC or clubs. You will learn how to communicate with people and be responsible. When you are in college with a bunch of strangers, responsibility and communication skills are important. You will know later but I just want to say try to have various experiences as many as possible. Years in high school can change who you are. Be ambitious. I didn’t know that until I got into college.

To me it was the SAT Reading section and having no upperclassmen. It was the weakest part among my college app materials. Of course I studied and spent a lot of time on it, but it could have been helpful if I had more interest in it. Moreover, since we are the first graduates of APIS, we didn’t have upperclassmen to give us advice about college applications. So I spent a lot of time web-searching about college apps and schools that have strong engineering programs.

5. What programs or sessions at APIS were helpful in preparing for college applications and what advice you have for our seniors and juniors? Mr. Walsh’s college application session was helpful. It helped me to figure out how to apply to colleges and what kinds of materials are needed to be prepared. Take a deep breath. Don’t panic. I know you will panic when important days are coming. Believe in yourself. As I said, you can do so many more things than you think. If you have questions about college, don’t be afraid to ask. Good luck!

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From the

School Chaplain Zachary Luginbill School Chaplain The Christian Life Department has been challenging students recently to know what they believe, not only in their heads but also their hearts, in order to intentionally live in a loving and Christ-like way. In Secondary School Chapel, our themes connect directly to our school values: Aspire, Persevere, Integrity, and Spiritual Growth. Elementary Chapel has also centered on Godly character traits of obedience and courage. We’ll be looking at Honor in November.

During the Secondary retreat, the theme of the weekend was “Life on Purpose.” We all need a purpose in life. Without purpose, our lives are aimless because we are unable to know what direction to aspire towards. God not only wants us to know our purpose in life, but He wants to be our purpose in life. The theme verse we used is found in Colossians 1:16, which (paraphrased) says that everything is made by God and is for God.

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CHRISTIAN LIFE CENTER

In September, we introduced a new series in Secondary Chapels titled, “The Upside Down Movement.” Often, what we assume as true in life ultimately turns out to be misleading and the opposite of Truth. Jesus offered many challenges that go against the normal ways of life. He said to lose your life is to find it, and in order to save your life you have to lose it (Luke 17:33). Jesus also said that if you want to be great, you need to serve (Matthew 20:26). When we choose the life God offers us it requires some personal sacrifices but God will help us persevere through tough times. This is especially true for middle school and high school students, who are making major life decisions and building life-long habits now. Elementary chapels have been so much fun as students and teachers help the Bible stories and lessons come alive. The first theme we talked about was obedience, because God wants us to trust those who lead us by doing what we’re asked to do. The students learned about Adam and Eve who didn’t obey what God had asked them to do. They also learned about Abraham who trusted God and obeyed even when it would have cost him his son whom he loved. God offered His Son for us, and it is because of Jesus that we are able to have a relationship with God, as well as learn to live and obey Him every day. The second elementary chapel theme the students have been learning about is how to have courage. God gives us courage to be brave even when we are afraid. Everyone gets afraid, but God is bigger than our fears. We see how God gave courage to Moses as he lead the Israelites to freedom. This is also like Jesus who gives us freedom as we trust Him and allow Him to give us courage. This year has been amazing so far and we look forward to learning more about how much God loves us. If you would like more information about our Christian Life programs, please contact me at zluginbill@apis. seoul.kr. W W W. A P I S . S E O U L . K R

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MUSIC

From the

Music Department Chair Sophie Holbrook Music Department Chair

The music department welcomed the new school year with two new teachers, Ms. Emmalee Johnson and Ms. Melinda Baum. Working with me, the new music team has planned an exciting year filled with concerts, music festivals and competitions, opportunities for audition-level ensembles at the national and international level, and daily lessons designed to improve each student’s musicianship. Ms. Melinda Baum, elementary Orff specialist and secondary chorus director, has brought a new and improved elementary music program to grades K5, 1, 3, and 4. Students have discovered the joy of playing Orff instruments, wooden and metal xylophones played with mallets, and are able to create harmony in two, three, and four parts by playing musical lines in their class ensemble. The children rotate turns on the soprano (small), alto (medium), bass (large), and percussion instruments. As the students rotate, they learn different music for each part. Orff ensembles promote listening and following within the class, reading notes, keeping a steady beat and rhythm, and balance of all parts. In preparation for playing Orff instruments, the younger children use song, speech, and body percussion. In Grades 3 and 4, students also play recorder and sing folk songs which correlate to the notes on the Orff instruments. By learning through this holistic approach, learners are better able to understand the construction of music and are able to participate in many forms of music-making. The students are challenged and engaged in every lesson, and it has been a pleasure to see and hear them during music class! In the secondary school, music students are busy preparing for upcoming concerts and music festivals. The Middle School students perform in a Fall Music Concert on October 29 and the High School students compete in the KAIAC LargeEnsemble Festival on November 5 at Seoul International School. Both events require hours of rehearsal time and individual practice. For a ten-minute performance, students practice approximately 50 hours to perfect their musical skill and ensemble blend. Music is not a subject with a right or wrong answer; instead, students must learn how to play or sing their music with expression, dynamics, control, and balance all while maintaining correct notes and rhythms. In his book “Outliers,� Malcolm Gladwell suggests that it takes 10,000 hours of practice to master a skill. This concept can be applied directly to music when thinking about practicing for upcoming events; it takes time and repetition to get ready for a performance. By perfecting our skills, we create beauty together in class and on stage!

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From the

College Counseling Director Shana Russell Director of College Counseling

FALL 2013

COLLEGE COUNSELING

Fall is such an exciting and busy time of year for our seniors who are applying to college. Not only have students been navigating the process for schools in the United States, we also have students who are currently submitting applications to schools in the United Kingdom as well as Korea. It will be so exciting to see what happens with these applications over the next few months. We have spent the first quarter of the year talking in the Senior Seminar class about major themes in the college counseling process, discussing the most effective way to approach the college essay, and strategies to choose the best fit college for each student. We have also had numerous colleges present information to the entire senior class to give students different perspectives in the process; Liberal Arts and Sciences, co-op programs, and Christian-focused educational opportunities. In our one-on-one meetings, I have been working with students to craft their personal college list, to answer questions about the application process, and to revise essays. It has been a challenging but exciting process, and I love seeing a student’s face when they have discovered a perfect match program or have had a brilliant essay topic idea. November will be an exciting month, so please stay tuned for more information from the College Counseling office. In the meantime, don’t forget to reference the 100-page College Counseling Handbook that was distributed on Back to School Night. This valuable resource contains extensive information about the entire college application process and covers topics including college counseling policies, choosing the best college, attending college abroad, standardized testing, helpful tips for the college application, financial aid, and more. APIS has also translated some of the key chapters in the College Counseling Handbook. Copies are available for parents at every grade level (including the elementary division!), so if you have not received one yet, please come by the school and pick up your copy.

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FALL 2013

COUNSELING

From the

School Counselor Kirstan Beatty School Counselor

The primary focus of the school counseling philosophy is to treat one another as you would like to be treated, otherwise known as The Golden Rule. A significant way this message is communicated here at APIS is through the comprehensive Second Step Program: Skills for Academic and Social Success (www. secondstep.org). Using this evidence-based curriculum, I provide direct instruction in social and education skill development from Kindergarten through 8th grade. In the 1st quarter, the elementary students practiced skills for learning and ways to implement empathy. The middle school students focused on empathy and healthy communication. Every lesson concentrates on a specific skill with the intention of bringing about a broader culture of respect and unity amongst APIS students and staff. Additionally, all APIS students, K5 through Grade 12, are provided with tools to resolve conflicts in their personal lives while also generating meaningful plans to attain short and long term goals through small group and/or individual counseling. The needs related to these sessions can be resolved in one meeting or continued throughout the year. Many of these meetings are voluntary but some may develop through teacher or parent requests. In the coming months, the students will be asked to determine ways to implement empathy in their daily lives through in-class, school-wide and community projects. Ideas will be generated by students but additional input from parents is always welcomed!

Please contact me at kbeatty@apis.seoul.kr.

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From the

Literacy Specialist Suanne Forrester Literacy Specialist

One strength of APIS is their commitment to literacy. Developing the skills of effective communication through writing is essential for success in today’s world. Students today must be proficient writers, learning to communicate in many ways. The elementary program has a strong foundation in writing, which has been built through Writer’s Workshop. In Writer’s Workshop, students are taught the skills of writing. The goal is to develop students who are excited about writing and emulate the skills of authors. Writing begins in the early grades with students writing true stories about themselves. Students engage in studying the craft of writing in books and then replicating these craft techniques in their own writing. As students progress into the upper elementary grades, they begin to write for more academic purposes. At this level, students begin to study essays and persuasive writing. They develop opinions on topics of interest and learn to support those ideas with strong evidence. Writers must also be able to teach others about topics through research and informational writing. The focus is more than simply retelling information. Students must develop critical thinking skills and develop new ideas on topics.

FALL 2013

LITERACY

The commitment to writing continues into the secondary program. Students in Middle School have a writing class, in addition to their Language Arts class. This year, we are excited to move Writer’s Workshop into the Middle School curriculum. APIS is one of a few schools in Asia, and the only school in Korea, to make Writer’s Workshop an important piece of the curriculum. Once again, APIS is leading the way in its use of best educational practices. In order for students to be prepared for the future they must be able to think critically and communicate effectively. Writer’s Workshop builds skills in both areas. Students hone skills in narrative, persuasive, and informational writing along with developing research skills that support their other content areas. APIS continues to prove their dedication to educating leaders of the New Pacific Century. A well aligned curricular program in writing enables students to build strong communication skills they will need in the future.

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FALL 2013

CURRICULUM

From the

Curriculum Coordinatior Elaine Park Curriculum Coordinator Many educational leaders are calling for changes. Some voices tell us that we need to go back to the basics. After all, reading, writing and arithmetic have always been essential and continue to be so. Other voices claim that the current structure of the school system is obsolete. Created during the Industrial Age, the assembly line system we have in place now has little relevance to what our kids will actually need to thrive in the 21st century; therefore, there is a need to make learning more flexible - to include various learning styles and to make learning more experiential and collaborative. Still others want both. The perspective brought up on this issue is framed by the emerging brain research and by what is happening to society as it moves into the Information Age where working with communication and a global community will be the future for most of the students we teach.

Brain research is revealing that the approach of fragmenting curriculum into parts and time is not compatible with how the brain learns best. We now know that the brain processes parts and wholes simultaneously and that we are all innately motivated to search for meaning. In addition, we now know that when the brain is fully engaged, then students acquire more than memorized surface knowledge. They acquire knowledge that is not static or fragmented but dynamic and connected – learning that is acquired in authentic interactions in the real world. APIS is actively responding to the recent brain-based findings and to the changes in our global community in order to ensure that our students are ready for the rigor and challenges in both the academic and entrepreneurial world. One example of the APIS’ commitment to educating our students with these realities is our approach to mathematics. The math program being implemented at APIS, College Preparatory Math (CPM), is an inquiry and problem-based approach. The program began over fifteen years ago with the belief that the primary goal of teaching mathematics should be long-term knowledge and the program researched the most effective ways to foster long term learning. The program was built around three fundamental principles informed by both theory and practice: 1. Initial learning of a concept is best supported by discussions within cooperative learning groups guided by a knowledgeable teacher. 2. Integration of knowledge is best supported by engagement of the learner with a wide array of problems around a core idea. 3. Long-term retention and transfer of knowledge is best supported by spaced practice or spiraling. These principles derived from research provided a philosophy of how to develop independent learners while reinforcing acquired knowledge with communication and problem solving skills, both needed for success in the near future and beyond. CPM nurtures life-long learners by structuring activities to involve every student in the process of discovering mathematics with the guidance of our teachers. The problembased lessons provide a balance of basic skills, conceptual understanding, and problem solving strategies. APIS continues to develop its curriculum based on research-supported practices in order to deliver our commitment to provide an authentic and quality education. We continuously reflect on the changes happening in the 21st century and on our current practices to improve ourselves in order to position our students to succeed in university and beyond.

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W W W. A P I S . S E O U L . K R EDITORIAL TEAM: ■ Euysung Kim Director ■ Nicole Suh Art & Design Editor ■ Josephine Shim Communications & PR Team Leader ■ Ashley Stapleton Writing / Editing Staff ■ Brian Beatty Writing / Editing Staff ■ Soora Koh Communications Officer


APIS Update Fall 2013 (Print Edition)