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Aesthetics Practitioners Journal

AESTHETICS

PRACTITIONERS Journal The official publication of the Aesthetics Practitioners Advisory Network Pty Ltd ISSN: 1836-9812

Spring Volume 26. 2015

Spring Issue Volume 26.

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Our Mission is to provide you with the Knowledge, Training and Tools required, so you have the power to prosper as Your Success Is Our Priority!

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INDUSTRY REPORTS, NEWS AND PRODUCTS 8-9 16-18 82-85 110-112 113-115

Heart-2-Heart Aesthetic Bulletin Product Innovations Scientific News Business News

REGULATIONS, EDUCATION & TRAINING 30-32

How can businesses protect themselves from incidents of Termination of Employment? 38-40 Topical Anaesthetics Under the Spotlight 41 Educational Course in Topical Anaesthetics has finally arrived 42-44 Are you aware how regulations will impact your business? 70-72 APAN Medical Cosmetic Tattooing Postgraduate Training Brisbane 100-101 APAN Medical Cosmetic Tattooing Postgraduate Training Sydney 108 Removing Tattoo Pigment by Injecting Liquids into the Skin 118-119 The Triad that is shaping Medical and Aesthetics Integration

SCIENTIFIC RESEARCH, TREATMENTS AND TECHNOLOGY 34-36

Update on Dermal Fillers in Australia New innovations and advances 48-49 Tattoo Removal: a business on the rise 52-54 Frankincense the new Star of Essential Oils 62-64 The Cellular structure of the Immune System: Part 2 102-105 Make progress with Chemical and Enzyme Peels 106-108 Putting out the Flame: Aged Garlic

BUSINESS AND PERSONAL AND PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT 10-11 12-14 26-27 32

Member Profile: Sara Naderi Cover Story: An Industry Perspective The best-kept secret for Business Growth Warning Message from the ATO: Beware of Tax- time scams 33 Ask the Blog Guru 50-51 What I have learnt about Leadership: Confessions of a business owner 76-80 Member Profile: Spa Lotus by Advanced Body Image 88-89 Business Recordkeeping Made Easy 90-91 Staff Management: From conflict to harmony 116-117 Being a star in your industry is a matter of Attitude 100

SEMINARS, EXPOS AND CONFERENCES 20-23 58-61 66-68 92-95 96-98 99 120-122

APAN Aesthetic Conference (Melbourne) 2015 MyFaceMyBody Awards Australasia APAN Aesthetics Conference: Brisbane, A Great Success A5M Delivers another powerful conference APAN Aesthetics Conference Sydney 11th National Laser & Cosmetic Medicine Conference Cosmoprof North America 2015

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EDITOR’SNOTE As our industry continues to evolve through innovative technologies and techniques it is becoming increasingly appealing as a career path. The plethora of light-based services and the potential income that they promise is a strong attraction drawing many to enter the cosmetic and aesthetics industry. While this is creating positive momentum and greater consumer visibility for our services, it is also contributing to the growing issue of competitiveness and many businesses are starting to feel the pressure. It is commonly understood that competition is a good force that presses us to do our best. When we are pressed to achieve we grow. When we grow, our potential to achieve grows with us. While excessive competition, if not handled correctly, can be unhealthy, as a rule competition can be a positive and powerful motivational tool and often the very basis for our survival as we develop resilience in both business and life. Show me someone who has faced adversity and overcame it and I will show you a survivor and an individual with substance, understanding and often compassion. Competition exists in every field and it is no different for the aesthetics industry. Competition brings out the best in people – the disciplined mind, the hard worker, the reliable achiever in both treatment results and sales. If it were not for http://www.facebook.com/laserandipl?fret=ts competition businesses would not be pressed to do better, whether it is for creating innovative products or attracting and retaining loyal clients. It was Andrew Carnegie who said, "While the law of competition may be sometimes hard for the individual, it is best for the race, because it ensures the survival of the fittest in every department". Innovation and growth are just some of the numerous positive outcomes from healthy competition. Innovation creates the latest gadgets, the newest ingredients and better ways of solving problems. It pushes us and our potential to new levels. It keeps the cycle of improvement alive and well. How can an industry grow if everyone is doing the same thing? Change, advancement and progress bring forth innovative leaders and keep the market from becoming stagnant.

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APAN Website: http://www.apanetwork.com APAN Office Email: info@apanetwork.com

AESTHETIC

For strategic consideration, I would propose that we focus on competing, but also in avoiding following what the competition is doing. As a reaction of fear many have fallen into this trap, entering the price war and competing by discounting alone and this has led to their downfall. While it is important to become aware what your clients are considering as alternatives to what you are offering, it is also important to understand that your real competitive advantage is to focus on what you do well and seek ways to constantly do it better. That is the best way to beat the competition. Devote specific time to read, study and stay current with new advances, technologies, industry concepts, ingredients and introducing more effective protocols. You are a professional and you can never learn too much. Remember, the new consumer mentality is not about "cheap cheap" as much as it is about "what is the best value that I can get for my money". This is how the ongoing development of your skills and Follow Tina on knowledge will make you the attractive option every time. Remember that competition is part http://www.facebook.com/APAN.page of life and it is here to stay – outsmart it and win http://www.facebook.com/laserandipl?fret=ts by doing things better.

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Editor Tina Viney Phone: (07) 5593 0360 Fax: 07 5593 0367 Email: info@apanetwork.com Web: www.apanetwork.com

Welcome to APJ

Typesetting & Graphics Mark Viney Kharis Enterprises Pty Ltd

Advertising and Marketing Tina Viney Phone: 07 5593 0360 Aesthetics Practitioners Advisory Network PO Box 5448 Q Super Centre Qld 4218 Australia Fax: 07 5593 0367 Mobile: 0412 177 423 Email: info@apanetwork.com

Publishers Kharis Enterprises Pty Ltd

Design & Production Artwork and Editorial Kharis Enterprises Pty Ltd Shop7D 76-84 Robina Town Centre Drive Robina Q 4226 Phone: 07 5593 0360 Fax: 07 5593 0367 Mobile: 0412 177 423 Email: info@kharis.com

Printed for Aesthetics Practitioners Advisory Network Pty Ltd ACN 136 987 169 ABN 25 136 987 169

Accounts Payable Aesthetics Practitioners Advisory Network PO Box 5448 Q Super Centre Qld 4218 Australia

Journal Advisory Board Terry Everitt – Education features Wendy Neely – PR and Marketing Dr Douglas Grose – Scientific content Caroline Nelson – Business Features

National Advisory Council John Fergusson Terry Everitt Bill Anton Gill Fish Vanessa Kirkham Maureen Houssein-Mustafa

ISSN: 1836-981 Print Post Approved [100000257]

Circulation 6900

FRONT COVER ClinicalPRO SKINCARE + HEALTHCARE + EQUIPMENT + CUPRON Phone: 1800 628 999 OR 07 3350 6898 or email ask@clinicalpro.com.au www.clinicalpro.com.au For further information see pages 12-15 The Aesthetics Practitioners Journal is the official publication of the Aesthetics Practitioners Advisory Network Pty Ltd, a network organisation established to service the needs of the aesthetics industry in the area of professional development and business networking. The Aesthetics Practitioners Journal is published quarterly for the benefit of its members and subscribers and aims to inform and educate its members on better business practices and industry advancements. All editorials and articles that are submitted for publishing remain the property of Aesthetics Practitioners Advisory Network Pty Ltd. Reproduction in part or in whole is not permitted without prior written authorisation by the publishers. Every effort has been made to ensure that all scientific and technical information presented is as accurate as possible at the time of publishing. However, members and readers are highly recommended to also seek external advice from their accountant, registered financial adviser or healthcare professional for their recommendations.

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Heart-to-Heart A message from the President and CEO Dear Colleagues and Friends, For so long we have all wanted to see our industry cleaned up and defined with greater integrity and credibility and now that regulations are on our doorstep there are many panicking and overwhelmed. While I have already covered the strategic outline on the process of regulations in my article on pages 42-46 in this report, I wish to speak from my heart. Often challenging and sometimes confusing, but when things are made clear, choice becomes more recognisable.

level that your association and industry bodies can influence change. Governments are not influenced by individuals pursuing an outcome, they look to peak industry bodies to provide accurate, objective representation for the benefits and needs of the industry they wish to represent. Unfortunately, commercial companies have very little sway when it comes to regulations and this is no fault of their own, but simply because they are a commercial entity that has as its primary objective their commercial interests, and this is perceived as a conflict of interest when it comes to regulatory issues.

WHAT ARE REGULATIONS? I want to reassure everyone that over the past three years while being actively part of the Working Group appointed by ARPANSA I have never strayed from my focus and commitment to defend the rights of the aesthetics industry. I believe as an industry representative body I have a duty-of-care and a responsibility to rigorously defend your interests and your right to practise the various modalities of IPL and Laser just as much as medical practitioners, because at the end of the day it all comes down to competency and correct training regardless as to who is the practitioner. Over the past 23 years I have been involved in areas of governance for the industry and have participated and contributed at length to several government working groups, including Health Regulations, Wage Awards, Wholesale Retail and Personal Services (for 10 years), three different university programs and now with ARPANSA. I have also been successful in securing government funding for businesses to gain qualifications through two separate government entities – the National Workforce Development Fund in 2014 and this year, through the Industry Skills Fund. Between these two funds I was able to help salons and their staff gain substantial financial support to gain qualifications by securing $1.4 million for the benefit of their education. This is an area that I am experienced in and I know how to navigate and help reach desired outcomes for the industry. So from the outset I want to assure you that while I have breath I will continue to strive to achieve breakthroughs for the benefit of our members and the industry. In Terry Everitt’s report on Cosmoprof USA he indicated there were no lasers on exhibition at this expo as these services are considered Medical Only. Have you ever wondered why? This is also common – place in several countries in Europe. The reason that the aesthetics industry has lost the right to practise these modalities is that no-one took the time and made the effort of fighting for their rights at government levels. This is where an industry representative body has an obligation and a key role to play in defending its industry. This is not an easy task and it requires special skills, persistence and patience. You also need to be the right entity to negotiate. It is at this

In essence the purpose of regulations is to establish boundaries with the aim of protecting the consumer. They achieve this by establishing a benchmark of standards that is objective, measurable and compulsory for practitioners to comply with. Regulations are also able to protect an industry from exploitation and not the opposite. If standards are not compulsory they offer no protection. That is the purpose and nature of standards – to protect, define and raise the standard of a profession to a higher level. Furthermore, the intention of regulations is not to restrict trade for the sake of it. The objective of regulations is altruistic and their intention is to protect an industry from ill repute, and from stakeholders who are unqualified and uncommitted to standards and therefore pull down the reputation of any industry and contribute to consumer risk. With regulations therapists will, however, need to step up their qualifications if they have not already done so to include a licence and a qualification that is at the minimum level as the legislation will stipulate. This should be everyone’s goal and it is very attainable. For those who have been in the industry for many years and have good recordkeeping, there will be an option for RPL (recognition of prior learning) to step them up to the required qualification. Furthermore, the Grandfather Clauses will allow industry professionals with past experience to be given due consideration. Suppliers will have the biggest challenge as they will no longer be able to sell to anybody, and no doubt this is somewhat unsettling for them. It is my belief, however, that something else will happen. With better qualifications available that define our profession and establish a uniform standard, we will see the entrance of a better – calibre candidate who will seek a career as an aesthetic professional and a dermal therapist. The nature of the candidate will change and not necessarily the volume of candidates.

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UNITY IS STRENGTH What that will mean is that those who are totally inappropriate for this profession such as the plumbers, the panel-beaters and the likes who are performing treatments in IPL or Laser will have a choice – qualify or get out of the market and go back to what you were doing before. I don’t think that is such a bad thing. The power of Option 3 is that it is a full regulatory model that will establish compulsory standards which EVERYONE WILL BE REQUIRED TO COMPLY WITH. This will mean that those who are prepared to meet the standards will have the right to perform the appropriate procedure, and this includes beauty therapists. In essence, regulations will PROTECT the rights of the beauty therapist to practise and not the opposite. For standards to provide full benefit to an industry they need to be compulsory in order to offer protection and in order to raise the standards and professionalism of an industry. Isn’t that what we all want? It is time we stopped navel gazing. There comes a time when we need to look up and support what is for the greater good of our industry that has the power to shape a better future. We need to understand that regulations are there to protect an industry and not to kill it.

THE FUTURE In the next few years we will see some major changes in our industry. As further regulations are introduced educational standards will also rise, and these two key pillars will contribute to the aesthetics industry gaining greater recognition and consumer trust and confidence. In essence, high standards will be our competitive advantage over the internet and other distractions. It’s time that we gained our voice back as the experts in skin and age management that consumers can trust and turn to as the most credible source for accurate, expert information as well as high standards of professional services. Our industry is coming of age and regulations will help us regain our position as a respected and credible profession – a condition that has been unstable in past years to say the least.

APAN’S VISION In the next issue of APJ we will reveal to you APAN’s greater plan for the future of the industry. We have always been leaders and innovators and we are currently working at finalising the construct of some amazing initiatives that will aim to revolutionise the industry. We have a strong commitment to this industry and we intend to continue towards raising consumer awareness and give our members greater visibility and reasons why consumers should choose them over other options. Whatever we develop is for your success. Please join us as a member and let us help you make your journey to success a fun one. The best is yet to come.

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memberprofile

SARA NADERI Making her mark as a Specialist and Expert in Cosmetic Tattooing and Cosmetic Services

APJ Q2: Since coming to Australia tell us about your business activities and how you adapted to Australian industry standards?

Passionate, hardworking and determined is how you would describe Sara Naderi, a beauty therapists who specialises in skin and cosmetic procedures. However, one of her greatest passions is Cosmetic Tattooing, for which she is also qualified as a trainer. Sara has an amazing story and we caught up with her to share it with us.

APJ Q1: Sara, tell us a little about your background and how you got involved with Cosmetic Tattooing and this industry? I am originally from Teheran in Iran. While living there in the ‘70s and ‘80s I trained in Beauty Therapy and makeup. At that time women were very fashion conscious and loved to be well groomed and fashionable, so the need for beauty services was in high demand. From the beginning I loved my profession and in particular enjoyed makeup, and therefore I chose to specialise in various techniques for which I was well-known and my services were sought after by many. Then in 1988 I came to Australia with my little boy as a divorced single mother and pursued a new life in Sydney, Australia. I immediately enrolled to complete training in Australia as I wanted my skills and credentials to be also recognised here. During those early days I set up a salon business and started gaining regular clientele. Then one day one of my clients who came to me had beautifully defined eyebrows and so I enquired about the procedure and she confirmed it was cosmetic tattooing. As a result I immediately enrolled to study Cosmetic Tattooing and completed my initial training course with Val Glover Hoven. As I discovered a real passion for Cosmetic Tattooing I continued my education and over the years completed several courses in the US, England and Germany, as well as several here in Australia with other experts such as Stefania Capitelli and Faye Rielly.

Since coming to Australia I have not stopped attending various training programs, both in beauty and in cosmetic tattooing. In fact, I have studied at four different colleges and specialised in both beauty and makeup techniques. These included Petersham College in Sydney and Gamia College. By 1989 I was running two successful salons. My passion for this industry led me to set up seven different salons as well as a training college. However, today, I have decided to only retain one salon – Manly Creative Hair and Beauty, so that I can focus my on my training at Sydney College of Hair and Beauty and the distribution of PUREBEAU Cosmetic Tattoo products, as well as my latest venture – the development of my own organic skincare brand, which I have just launched.

APJ Q3: What do you enjoy the most with your work? I would have to say that I love makeup artistry and cosmetic tattooing with a passion, and in recent years I really enjoy training others in the various skills and techniques that I have mastered over the years. In the early days I started with the bamboo technique, but progressively new technologies and techniques have given practitioners a lot more options and more sophisticated tools to work with, which makes our work easier. Today the 3D technique that utilised strokes and shadowing is very popular. However, from my earlier days I developed my own 3D technique as I discovered that it gave a more natural and aesthetically appealing finish, and clients loved it as it improved their appearance without looking heavy or artificial.

APJ Q4. What training do you provide? I provide everything from government-approved qualifications in cosmetic tattooing, which I am able to offer through a collaborative arrangement with a Registered Training Organisation, to short, specialised postgraduate courses in specific cosmetic tattooing procedures such as 3D Eyebrow techniques, lips and eyeliner, as well as a special technique for baldness, which is amazing. This is beneficial both for men and women who are experiencing hair loss or who are going bald. I also specialise in several other areas such as threading, which I introduced to Australia since I first arrived, as this is a technique I had trained and mastered in Iran. I offer threading for not just the eyebrows, but also the full face. When this technique is done correctly is can achieve amazing results, and the beauty of it is that it is not invasive or painful.

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APJ Q5: What are your thoughts about cosmetic tattoo equipment and products and why did you select the products you currently use? Colour is very much an area that I specialise in, and having tried several cosmetic tattoo brands I was not totally happy with their stability and noticed that many colours changed with time. In my search for solutions I came across a German product called PUREBEAU, which I absolutely loved. Having tried this over many clients I realised it was superior to anything else that I had worked with, so I approached Germany for further details and I was offered the distribution rights for Australia and New Zealand. I was very impressed with the professionalism of the company and the quality and stability of not just their colours, but also the amazing technology of their sophisticated equipment, which they also manufacture. These products are of a very high standard and allow you more easily to deliver amazing results.

Become An

EXPERT Cosmetic Tattooing has come a long way over the years. New, more sophisticated tools, new techniques and trends can allow a skilled and welltrained practitioner to become very much in demand. Ever-growing in popularity, Cosmetic Tattooing offers an amazing and very fulfilling career with tremendous scope, both for those who are artistic and those who are compassionate and nurturing. Sara Naderi is a qualified beauty therapist and Cosmetic Tattooist who has international training and over 20 years’ experience in Cosmetic Tattooing. Training with Sara will allow you to benefit from her expert techniques, while you can also qualify to receive government-approved qualifications in SIBBSKS504A Design & Perform Cosmetic Tattooing.

Sara is a APAN Corporate Platinum (Cosmetic Tattoo) Member Member of the Australasian Cosmetic Tattoo Professionals

COURSES AVAILABLE: ! Initial Training in Cosmetic Tattooing to Governmentapproved qualifications ! Refresher courses to advance your skills and knowledge in Eyeline, Lipliner, Full lip, Eyebrow techniques Sara is also a specialist in Eyebrow Threading and offers highly skilled training in her unique method. Other courses also available.

APJ Q6: What changes have you identified in the industry over the years? In terms of cosmetic tattooing, seven to 10 years ago consumers were more sceptical about having cosmetic tattoo procedures. Back then we mainly performed procedures with people who had problems and wanted something corrected, such as scarring, hair loss, etc. Today, as our techniques are becoming more natural and sophisticated, more and more consumers are comfortable and confident to have a variety of grooming procedures such as cosmetic tattooing as well as advanced skincare treatments such as IPL and Laser. As consumer demand is growing, I am also finding a growing number of salons who wish to train and qualify in cosmetic tattooing and a variety of other services so that they can offer them to their clients rather than referring them to others. This is great because it enables salons to support and grow their businesses.

Over the years Sara Naderi has developed a reputation not just as a highly skilled expert and cosmetic tattoo practitioner, but is now extending her legacy through her training of others within the industry. If you would like to speak with Sara about training or accessing supplies of the PUREBEAU Cosmetic Tattoo products and equipment please contact: Manly Creative Hair & Beauty Phone: (02) 9976 0500 Shop C, 13 The Corso, Manly, NSW 2095 www.sydneycollegehairandbeauty.com.au

PUREBEAU NEW GENERATION COSMETIC TATTOO PIGMENTS AND EQUIPMENT Sara is also the Exclusive Distributor of the German-made world-leading Cosmetic Tattooing pigments and equipment PUREBEAU. Sophisticated and outstanding new high-tech equipment that meets with European and Australian standards and offers state-of-the-art solutions to allow for safe, effective and precise application of cosmetic tattooing and medical pigmentation. For further information on training or to enquire about our amazing world-leading devices and pigments contact PUREBEAU Australia E: info@purebeau.com.au P: 1300 667 719 | M: 0405 463 636 W: www.purebeau.com.au | W: www.schb.com.au APJ 66

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An Industry Perspective Tracing our company's steps over the past 32 years in this exciting industry By Metro-Dora Clifford B.Sc., MBA, AFABth, MELA As I trace back our steps in the beauty industry over the past 32 years, I realised that the picture would be incomplete without inclusion of the first years of our existence when Clinical Skincare and Equipment Pty Ltd actually evolved. It was from humble beginnings in 1981 that I launched a wholesale Distribution and Consultancy Centre from my spare bedroom just four months after landing in Australia as a new bride, excited about making new friends. Listening to a talk-back radio show, I responded to a request for help from callers suffering from skin problems, and invited them to bring what they were using on their skin at that time; then by adding specific, carefully selected active ingredients, I was able to give them solutions for their specific skin condition. Thus an idea was born from where I started a healthcare consultancy with neighbours and friends, working on weekends and after-hours (while holding a full-time accountancy job in a wholesale car company). With a clear vision of where I was headed and a passion for skin health, I purchased a shelfcompany, believing it would remain a homebased hobby business. With no more than a small capital outlay for purchase of active ingredients from USA to make specific skincare products, I was able to build my first Skin and Healthcare Clinic at my home grounds, which soon grew into an Australiawide Distribution and Training Centre still in existence at Chermside and Alderley in Brisbane.

Microdermabrasion system from Italy and the E-2000, a noninvasive micro-current equipment from the U.S. with our antiageing skincare range. Each year since we introduced various pieces of equipment – from the UPL for photo-rejuvenation and hairremoval systems, and were the first to introduce the Nd:YAG Laser for treating all skin types for permanent hair removal of all hair colours. Following this specialised Nd:YAG laser therapy device, we introduced the gold standard CO2 resurfacing lasers that were instrumental in attracting the medical profession into this industry. In 1998, the company name was changed to Clinical Skincare, Healthcare & Equipment Pty Ltd. Our new goal and strategy was to be the “Trend Setters” and added a new product to our skincare or healthcare range while expanding the equipment distribution lines and adding new cutting-edge technology equipment for supply into other fields of medicine. This growth necessitated us moving to premises 20 times larger to accommodate a sales office, warehouse and an in-house training facility at 10

ADDING HEALTHCARE TO CLINICAL SKINCARE While carrying out my research and trials in my beauty clinic at Alderley it became obvious to me that I was filling a void, as I was soon able to add seven others. Our comprehensive skincare range was first released as “Clinical Skincare with A Natural Difference”, that was specifically tailor-made for the Australian skin, with active ingredients, economical, not tested on animals and independently tested to be non-comedogenic with proven results for professional use only. A temporary downturn in the Beauty Industry in 1987 led us to adding healthcare products to boost our market share, when I became aware of a crying need in the industry for innovative aesthetic equipment to complement and synergise with our skincare range. My global research led me to some truly reputable U.S. and European manufacturers of top-quality equipment. This resulted in us introducing the Australian beauty industry to a wide range of innovative aesthetic equipment for non-invasive treatments. It soon became clear to us that this was the way ahead for us.

THE SEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT OF INNOVATIVE TECHNOLOGY As a national wholesale distributor in the Beauty and Cosmetic Medicine industry, we took our responsibility to introduce the latest high-technology equipment to the market very seriously, and in 1994 we introduced the Transdermal Electrolysis system, for which we were awarded the “Meritorius Award” in 1995. This resulted in the sale of over 120 machines in Australia alone over a three-year period. The same year we also introduced the Pepita

Valente Close, Chermside on the northside of Brisbane, while opening two State offices in Sydney and Melbourne and serviced every State in Australia. The supply of the biggest range of lasers for the Aesthetic and Medical markets at very competitive prices was a dream-come-true for many small salon owners, many of whom went on to make their first million in their first 2-3 years of purchasing a Laser Hair Removal system. In 2001 we introduced the Lamprobe, now known as Clinical Skin Clear System, for superficial removal of lesions and the UPL for hair removal, vascular, skin tightening and photo-rejuvenation treatments for the Baby Boomers. In 2003 we introduced the first Body Shaping device with Diode Laser and suction for Lymph Drainage when we were awarded the National Industry Award for the year 2002. In 2006 we added the Smart Lipolysis Laser System to our range, for breaking fat cells using a Nd:YAG laser beam. This device was featured on A Current Affair which termed it as a “lunchtime miracle fat melter”. The same year we were nominated for and were one of the finalists for the Telstra Business Women’s Award 2006.

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Training and education are both a part-and-parcel of our business philosophy. While completing my Diploma in Beauty Therapy in 1989 to gain an understanding of what was being taught, I realised there was not enough training provided in the area of Cosmetic Chemistry and felt the need for students to be educated in this field to enable them to gain an understanding of the ingredients used in products and their effects on the skin. Shortly thereafter I began teaching Cosmetic Chemistry part-time at the Beauty Schools, which later became a government-accredited course that still exists today. This achievement earnt me many awards in the Beauty Industry for lifting beauty education standards to what it is today. In 2001 and 2002 I earnt the prestigious National Salon Excellence awards for “Services to the Industry” and “Commitment to Education & Raising the Standards” from the National Association of Professional Aestheticians of Australia.

BACKED BY QUALITY EDUCATION With a commanding presence in the industry spanning over three decades, we have been able to maintain our competitive edge in the marketplace. We achieved this by introducing advanced technologies and then providing the appropriate education essential for their safe and efficacious use in the medical and aesthetic fields. This education was also further supported by bringing experts into Australia as guest speakers at clinical workshops and industry trainings. Hands-on workshops are conducted on a monthly basis in the major Australian cities, and advanced training courses are offered for those with more demanding needs. One of our most sought-after courses is the Queensland Radiation Health Accredited Laser Safety Officers Course for hair removal, tattoo removal, vascular and pigmented lesions removal and skin resurfacing, being the most important step for those wishing to pursue a career in laser therapy. These courses ensure the clinics are able to provide efficient treatments to their clients/patients within safe parameters thus continually raising their standards and that of the industry.

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THE BRAND EVOLUTION OF THE COMPANY NAME Instituted in 1981 as Clinical Skincare and Equipment Pty. Ltd., the company changed its name to Clinical Skincare, Healthcare and Equipment Pty. Ltd. in 1998 and again in 2009, to its acronym, CSHE Australia Pty Ltd, trading as ‘ClinicalPRO’. The company has stood the test of time and we are justifiably proud of this fact.

The president of the Australian College of Cosmetic Surgeons, Dr Russell Knudsen, says the demand is being driven by Baby Boomers who want to reverse the ageing process. "They're affluent, they're educated and they're living longer than ever," he said. "If you used to live until 60, then you looked like 60 when you died. But if you live until 85, you may still want to look 60.”

Again, having beauty treatments and cosmetic procedures now is not The backbone of any successful organisation is its staff dedicated to just about turning back the clock and looking younger. The fact is offering customers the best possible service, training and that people are increasingly time-poor yet image-conscious, and the knowledge. Without this focus on personalised service and desire to look good expands beyond beauty and cosmetic medicine. enthusiasm, our business would not be one of the most profitable, Fitness is among the most sought-after services these days, with long-lasting and credible businesses in the industry today, offering people willing to work out at the gym even after a innovative solutions to salons and clinics. Apart long and hard day’s work. from strictly following a 12-point work ethic, CLINICAL’S MILESTONE every team member is involved in the planning MOMENTS AT A GLANCE Anti-ageing and skin-renewal are the primary process and brainstorming, and every input is The RF- CEYA (Cap propositions drive demand for skincare products taken into account while setting our goals for the Energy Youth Activator) and treatments. While these features are next year. This practice has stood us in good stead for non-invasive muscle particularly sought by those around 35 years of age, in maintaining our high standard of customer toning & management of the increasing ageing population provides a natural satisfaction. various skin problems growth engine for these propositions. The continued growth of Baby Boomers, the traditional Variations of Laser Our industry direction, like most others, is Platforms with improved consumer base for anti-agers, is also benefiting determined by public demand, and due to such IPL versions anti-agers, while Baby Boomers seek to remain rapid changes in technology in this field there is active and attractive in their 50s and 60s and Laser Platforms with always a machine being manufactured Erbium glass laser for beyond. At the same time, women in their 20s and somewhere in the world, that is more advanced non-invasive Fractional 30s are looking to prevent the early signs of ageing. and more innovative. It is therefore important for resurfacing Furthermore, continuing advances in technology us to keep vigilant of changes in order to stay at The first combined CO2 and perceived benefits motivate consumers to the forefront of progress and provide our clients Fractional Laser with RF s p e n d m o r e o n a n t i - a g e i n g p r o d u c t s . with the competitive edge. Our long-term source Manufacturers continue to introduce new active direction is to continue to maintain the steady Fat cavitation for Body ingredients promising more dramatic results. growth that we have had over the past 32 years. Sculpting with the Clinical Power In tough economic times, such as the one we are NOT JUST FOR WOMEN Shaper - I currently experiencing, there are several areas Beauty, it seems, is no longer a woman’s

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where people cut spending, but health and wellness is not one of them, and the fallout from this is a boom to the beauty industry. One factor contributing to the industry’s boom during the last global financial crisis was its effect on people’s savings and superannuation dreams. Then, as now, Baby Boomers and others who were planning on retiring found themselves needing to get back into the workforce and logically want to look as good as their younger counterparts.

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KEEPING UP APPEARANCES Beauty is no longer a matter of vanity so much as it is about keeping up appearances and performing their best at an older age. And with human life expectancy increasing, it is more important to look as young as we feel.

2015

Fractional RF with Skin Needling and LED source Power Shaper-II with Cool sculpting by freezing the fat cells Uro-Gyne & Capenergy CIM for Tecar Therapy & Pain Management Magma Super-fast Diode, Nd:YAG & IPL combined laser for permanent hair reduction and Anti-ageing treatments for all skin and hair colours, which was introduced in August this year.

According to research company IBISWorld, in 2011-12 people spent almost $7 billion on plucking, injecting, tanning and exercising their way to an improved appearance. This figure is up by approximately 19% since the previous year and it equates to an average spend of $313 per person per year. Much like the “lipstick index” – a phenomenon in which people spend money on cosmetics and other small luxuries to lift their spirits during tough economic times – the popularity of non-invasive cosmetic procedures seems to have intensified during the global financial crisis. IBISWorld also says that a growing number of people – particularly older women – are indulging in weekly beauty rituals such as facials, hair removal and personal training as well as regular cosmetic procedures to preserve their looks.

“preserve” as statistics will tell. Interestingly, while women account for about 80 per cent of cosmetic procedures, according to the Australian College of Cosmetic Surgeons men are steadily increasing their appetites for skin treatments and nip and tuck procedures and account for the remaining 20%. In 2011, 62,000 people underwent surgical cosmetic procedures, while another 68,000 had non-surgical procedures. Australians are now spending about $1 billion a year on cosmetic surgery and treatments, and the industry is still growing rapidly.

Metro-Dora Clifford (B.Sc, MBA, AFABth, MELA) is the CEO and Training Director of CSHE Australia Pty Ltd, trading as ClinicalPRO, She has an Accounting, Management, Clinical Science & Biochemistry background and is a member of the APAN and the European Laser Academy. With over 30 years’ experience in the industry, she has made an enormous contribution to the advancement of Beauty and Healthcare professionals in Australia. Metro-Dora is dedicated to helping small business owners operate successfully and gives liberally of her knowledge and expertise to support their growth.

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For more tips and ideas on how to grow your business in any situation call Metro-Dora on 0411 862 362 or visit www.clinicalpro.com.au or email us at ask@clinicalpro.com.au. Free Call: 1800 628 999.

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AESTHETIC INDUSTRY BULLETIN This section presents the latest news, training dates and other Aesthetic Industry information.

Val was an industry luminary who loved the beauty industry with a passion. She was one of the early founding members of the APAA and was on the National Executive Committee of that Association for several decades. Initially trained in beauty therapy in 1977 through Madame Korner and the Dorothy Faye Beauty College, Val was passionately committed to this industry and eventually in 1995 established her own highly successful training college which she ran for many years and was responsible for training thousands of beauty therapists through which her legacy will continue. The Australian College of Beauty Therapy (NSW) was one of the first Registered Training Organisations in Australia located in East Maitland, NSW. Val had an amazing ability to make others feel special. She was an incredible human being who was loved and appreciated by many within the beauty industry. Plagued with rheumatoid arthritis and despite her ailing health that often caused her a great deal of pain, Val never failed to always look her very best and always exhibited a positive and optimistic attitude. She was an admirable woman who brought others together and was greatly admired and an inspiration to many, both as an individual and as a professional.

TRIBUTE TO A GREAT LADY It is with great sadness that we report the passing away of Val Shoesmith on Friday 24th July, 2015 – just three days before her 74th birthday.

The beauty industry has lost an amazing advocate. She may have left us, but she will always be remembered. Our condolences to Val's family for their great loss.

As a photojournalist, he captured the essence of New York City in the 1960s – key figures in the civil rights movement, beat poet, artist and images central to the burgeoning environmental movement. As a beekeeper, he connected intimately with the bees, whose profound relationship to humans, our food and our environment is only now being more fully understood. As an icon and namesake, he was and still is the inspiration for Burt's Bees – natural products that many around the world have grown to love, the sustainability practices we all champion, and the offbeat, cheerful personality that shines through that yellow school bus he loved so much and that features on many of his products.

CO-FOUNDER OF BURT'S BEES DIES On July 6, 2015 co-founder Burt passed away among family and friends in his home town in Maine. He was a unique character who was very devoted to nature and lived a full life into his 80s. He will be remembered as the heavy-bearded and free-spirited Maine man.

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Burt was a complex man who sought a simple life in pace with the seasons of nature on his land. If there is one thing we will remember from Burt's life in our fast-paced, hi-tech culture, it's to never lose sight of our relationship with nature.

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Scientific Director Dr Des Fernandes contributed to the international line-up of guest speakers over the three-day symposium. Dr Dernandes presented three scientific presentations of his extensively researched and world-renowned work: “Ten Years’ Experience of Home Mesotherapy System for Facial Rejuvenation”; “Complementary Modalities in Achieving Optimum Result in Skin Needling” and “Rejuvenating Skin by Protecting the DNA”.

Pioneer of skin needling Dr Fernandes presents latest research on augmenting results with needling Margi Fox Distributors, distributors of Environ Skincare for QLD & VIC, were honoured to have been accompanied by Dr Des Fernandes while showcasing the new Environ skin-needling system at the recent Non-Surgical Symposium 2015. South African-based Plastic Reconstructive Surgeon and Environ

The Plus Size Movement Is it empowering, shaming or just plain unhealthy? Times are changing for plus size women. Looking back over the past 12 months, genuine progress was made as consumers called out fashion designers, manufacturers and retailers on their regressive attitudes towards plus size individuals. This pushback has led to significant changes in the global marketplace for beauty, but what about the global mindset? From Renoir to Reubens to Botero, artists have always embraced curvy girls. Admiration for the many incarnations of the female form is not limited to the past. In a contemporary photo essay, “We. Women,” the Lithuanian photographer Neringa Rekasiute provides an opportunity to observe women of all shapes, sizes and colours. The models are captured looking at their own reflection in a mirror, a source of pain for so many women who perceive their bodies as imperfect. The portraits are strong and powerful. They show beauty in every kind of figure, and encourage us all to revamp our visions of beauty.

"Given my background in advanced skincare it was rewarding to hear Dr Fernandes, pioneer of the method of medical needling, deliver his extensive work in the field of both home mesotherapy and medical needling to delegates of the symposium, both of which are becoming increasingly popular regenerative treatment approaches,” said Environ QLD & VIC Brand Manager Daphne Walsh. During his visit to Australia Dr Fernandes also presented workshops on medical needling in various States to eager skin and dermal therapists who were delighted to learn more about his famous technique. .

For more information on Environ Skincare visit www.environskincareaustralia.com.au or www.margifox.com.au or call 1300 888 708. Where Size Acceptance and Health Collide There are detractors who say we are overlooking the negative aspects of a positive body image. They believe you can’t be positive about your body when you’re actively damaging it. Optimal weight advocates say that being positive about the way you look is not enough. You must be positive (and proactive) about your health, too. The obvious ill effects of obesity – on organs, joints, energy levels and mood – go totally against the idea of being positive. There is nothing more negative than treating your body with disregard. While no-one should ever be body-shamed, there are questions about whether embracing the message of “body diversity” campaigns is also a celebration of unhealthy living. Jillian Michaels, the notoriously famed Biggest Loser trainer, represents a different viewpoint on plus size acceptance: “I also don’t believe that even though you might be 100 pounds overweight, you’re going, ‘Oh I’m good the way that I am’. I don’t believe that you don’t wake up in the morning and feel uncomfortable in your skin. I don’t believe that you don’t feel insecure when you pick your kid up from school. I don’t believe that you don’t feel uncomfortable when you’re naked in front of your husband or your wife for that matter. I don’t believe you.” As you can see, it’s not all sunshine, lollipops and roses in the world of plus size women, especially models. Author: Louisa McKay from Costhetics. For more information please call Gina Fink at Savage PR on 0414 383 917 or email gina@savagepr.com.au

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trend in eyebow extensions has added to the focus on techniques and products to beautify the eyes.

BOLD EYEBROWS TREND SEES SPIKE IN EYEBROW MAKEUP SALES

A recent report stated how the defined eye trend is helping boost multi-outlet sales of eyeliner, with sales increasing by 5% since 2014. New innovations in eyeliner products are now focusing on formulas that deliver longer-lasting results and precise application. For lips it is no longer about large lips, but rather about quirky, bold colours like tangerine, hot pink and a variety of undertones in red lipsticks. A recent survey in the US confirmed that American women ranked long-lasting results and dramatic colours as being crucial to their lipstick requirements.

The trend for more prominent eyebrows is leading to a global rising demand in makeup according to a new report. While in recent years full lips was the huge trend, the focus in now going to the eyes. Lash extensions started the focus and the latest

Researchers believe that bold colours create greater visibility and will drive consumer access to products, leading to a robust growth potential for colour cosmetics.

Wedding Bells Taking time out of her busy schedule, Angela Smith, Principal of the Beauty Therapy Training Australia, celebrated her wedding vows in the presence of family and friends on the 9th May in Noosa. For those who know Angela, she is a passionately committed trainer and educator specialising in light-based therapies and in particular laser and IPL as well as other skin management procedures such as dermal needling, microdermabrasion, RF and Fraxel. We take this opportunity to wish her and her husband Colvin every happiness.

International Aesthetic Show Calendar Produced by Terry Everitt Sept18-19 3rd Aesthetic & Anti-Aging Medicine World Congress Eastern Europe World Trade Centre, Moscow T: + 33 (0)1 56 83 78 00 F: +33 (0)1 56 837 805 E-mail: registration@euromedicom.com Sept 20-21 International Congress of Esthetics & Spa Long Beach Convention Center Long Beach, California T: +1 305 443-2322 F: +1 305 443-1664 Email: registration@lneonline.com Sept 27-28 Esthetique SPA International Montréal Convention Centre Montreal (QC) Canada T: + 450 434-4738 Fax: +450 435-2027 Email: info@spa-show.com Oct 8-10 International Congress of Aesthetic Dermatology Bankok Convention Centre Centralworld T: +66 (0)2 716 6857 F: +66 (0)2 616 6255 E-mail: registration@euromedicom.com

Oct 11-12 Professional Beauty Dublin RDS Dublin T: + 44 (0)844 557 0914 Email: info@professionalbeauty.co.uk

Oct 18

Introducing #ProjectWonderful – the official hashtag for The Global Beauty Group #ProjectWonderful ties in perfectly with The Global Beauty Group’s mission to make people feel wonderful. They do this by connecting businesses and individuals

with the very latest in aesthetic innovations while providing the highest standard of personalised customer service and support. Join the #ProjectWonderful journey by following The Global Beauty Group on Facebook and Instagram and get a frontrow seat to the latest developments in beauty, aesthetic and medical technology and industry insights. And of course, you c a n s h a r e y o u r o w n #ProjectWonderful moments to connect with The Global Beauty Group and other forward-thinking beauty businesses! For more information on how The Global Beauty Group can make you feel #ProjectWonderful, search for The Global Beauty Group on Facebook and Instagram or call 1300 006 607.

APJ 18

APAN Aesthetic Conference MELBOURNE Pullman Albert Park T: 07 5593 0360 F: 07 5593 0367 E-mail: info@apanetwork.com

Oct 19-21 Beauty World Japan West Intex, 1-5-102, Nanko-Kita, Suminoe-ku,Nanko, Osaka T: + 49 69 75 75-0 F: + 49 69 75 75-64 33 Email: beautyworld@messefrankfurst.com

Oct 23-24 11th Aesthetic & Anti-Aging European Congress Palais Des Congress, Paris T: + 33 (0) 1568 37800 F: +33 (0) 1568 37805 Oct 25-26 Premier Birmingham Birmingham/Jefferson Convention Center Birmingham, AL USA T: +1 407.265.3131 F: +1 407.265.3134

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Do you want to be first to gain industry insight on impending changes and how you can use these to your advantage for growth and profitability? Then the APAN Aesthetics Conference will give you the knowledge and tools to achieve just that. This will be the third Conference that APAN will be conducting this year and they have left the best until last. Six high-impact lectures will deliver advanced educational topics, upto-date industry news and powerful business strategies that will aim to transform your business and equip you with professional development like no other program. Here is what one delegate said of the Sydney conference: “Best conference I have attended EVER. The topics were of amazingly high quality, diverse and were delivered through dynamic speakers. The day was presented in a professional manner, the networking with suppliers and other colleagues was superb, food glorious and I filled my pad with enough information to inspire me for at least 12 months. I love the professionalism and passionate commitment of APAN in support of the industry and their rights to practice. No organisation comes even near them in their involvement with regulations and their depth of services and credibility. It was amazing value for money. So glad I attended and will not miss these events for the world.” Mary Inglestone, NSW.

CONFERENCE PROGRAM AND SPEAKERS

prepare for the future? As the aesthetics industry enters the new transitional phase are you well prepared to take advantage of growth opportunities and do you know what they are? Tina Viney is the foremost expert in Australian in the area of trends and government regulations. Working closely with several Government Departments, she is a passionate advocate of the rights of qualified professionals to practise advanced procedures and is an active member of Working Groups that are responsible for the drafting of regulations. Tina is a multi-award winner for her commitment and contribution to the advancement of the aesthetics industry. Learning objectives: ! How to best prepare and be ready for the new regulations ! Impending industry changes and how they can offer you the competitive advantage ! Defining the new aesthetic therapist ! The most important strategies for guaranteed success

NETWORKING BREAK AND MORNING TEA 9.45am – 10.15am

TIME: 10.15am – 11.00am TOPIC: SUCCESSFUL MODERN STRATEGIES OF PROVEN BUSINESS GROWTH SPEAKERS:

8.15am – 8.45am REGISTRATION, PICK UP DELEGATE'S KIT AND NETWORKING TIME: 8.45am – 9.00am MC’s Welcome and Introduction 100

TIME: 9.00am – 9.45am TOPIC: AN INDUSTRY IN TRANSITION SPEAKER: Tina Viney, CEO of APAN

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With the recent updates and pending legislations for laser and IPL there is much industry unrest. Do you know how best to

Do you want to learn the secrets to dynamic and effective social media marketing that immediately engages consumer interest and drives

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Conference PULLMAN Hotel Albert Park the Aesthetics Industry

new and existing clients to you? Experts tell us that much of what is currently being shared across the internet space is ineffective. Be first to learn the new language that will get your audience listening and responding to your message. Lynette Rouse holds qualifications in Health Science, Advanced Aesthetics and is currently studying for a Master’s Degree in Business with a Marketing Major. Jeshua Madden is recognised as a highly talented multi-media specialist who is currently completing his Business Degree with a Multi-Media major. As a dynamic team they will present the very latest information that you must have in place to succeed in today’s competitive business environment. Learning objectives: ! Establishing the correct foundation for successful marketing ! Staying untangled on the NET and how to get your audience listening ! How and what minute details can lose you clients or bring you a whole new audience ! Identifying the roadblocks to your success

NETWORKING BREAK 11am – 11.30am

TIME: 11.30am – 12.15pm TO P I C : U N D E R S TA N D I N G ANAESTHETICS: SAFETY AND RISKS SPEAKER: Chris Testa, Compound Pharmacist

Pain management is increasingly becoming an important issue as new innovative technologies target the deeper layers of the dermis where there is an abundance of nerves and blood supply. As topical anaesthetics are classified as drugs, the regulators are currently reviewing new guidelines and licensing as to their use. If you are performing dermal needling, laser, cosmetic tattooing or tattoo removal this lecture is a must. Chris Testa is a highly experienced compounding pharmacist and a lecturer at Griffith University on the subject of compounding pharmaceuticals.

Learning Objectives: ! The risks associated with the use of anaesthetics ! How formulations differ and why one formula does not meet all needs ! Why it is important to understand their chemistry ! Getting efficacy and safety in balance

LUNCH BREAK AND NETWORKING 12.15pm – 1.15pm

TIME: 1.15 – 2.00pm TOPIC: HOW TO POSITION YOURSELF AS A MASTER OF TREATMENT RESULTS SPEAKER: Gay Wardle, BSc (Dermal Therapies) As new scientific research, regulations and education standards are coming to the forefront they are redefining our identity to new standards, and so our treatment results are now facing the challenge to meet with higher expectations. Regulations will now tighten the rules on who can practise what, and while this may be perceived as a threat by some, it also offers an excellent opportunity for the astute therapists and business owners to gain a stronger, more credible and more competitive position within the industry. Meeting the new standards will qualify you as a competent and trusted practitioner that consumers will preferentially single you out from the general beauty therapist. Gay Wardle is a highly qualified, multi-award winner and a highly skilled trainer and educator. She understands the changes and will present how to best position your business to achieve recognition and growth. Learning objectives: ! Updating your treatment menu for a higher level of results ! The protocols for effective Aesthetics and Medical integration ! Master the new Educational Marketing trend and watch your business grow ! Effective strategies to grow your business

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TIME: 2.30 – 3.15pm TOPIC: DISCOVERING THE ATTRIBUTES OF AN AMAZING VISIONARY AND ENTREPRENEUR SPEAKER: This is a face-to-face interview with Maureen Houssein-Mustafa – OAM Experts tell us that our ideas in life are shaped by the influence of our thoughts and associations. As a special treat at this conference we are interviewing the highly accomplished Maureen Houssein Mustafa – OAM. She is considered the foremost visionary/entrepreneur in the Australian beauty and aesthetics industry. In this interview we will uncover her genius as we examine her amazing journey from humble beginnings to achieving amazing success. This candid interview will reveal the highs and lows of success and how to overcome vicious attacks and adversity in order to achieve your dreams.

his ability to take complex subjects and communicate them in an easy way to understand. Whether you wish to improve your working relationship for your GenY’s or wish to capture them as clients, this lecture will give you the strategies of how to do it successfully. Learning objectives: ! Understanding the GenY mentality and mindset ! Effective strategies in addressing GenY needs ! Understanding how GenYs learn and find information ! Practical areas you need to engage in and master

REGISTRATION This is a fully catered for event, including meals, morning and afternoon tea, delegates’ kit and Professional Development Statement of Attendance. Enjoy a day of great education, business support and networking opportunities. Visit our exhibition for great products and equipment and also go in the draw for prizes.

PRE-REGISTRATION IS ESSENTIAL FOR CATERING PURPOSES

Learn from the woman who two decades after starting with $1600 and a leased shop on Sydney’s Broadway went on to launch the Australasian College of Health and Wellness, and has joined the likes of the ANU and RMIT as a registered higher education provider offering The Bachelor of Applied Health Science (Clinical Aesthetics) as a higher education institution. For her achievements Maureen was award the Order of Australia Medal in 2011 on Australia Day. Here are some of the questions we will be asking Maureen:

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What does vision mean to you and which is the most powerful way to use it when planning your direction? What do you look for and value the most in others and in particular in your staff? How important is planning to business success and should the plan be fixed or flexible? Talk to us about failures and mistakes and how to deal with them? Business is fiercely competitive, so what are the three most important considerations you would advise someone who is contemplating to quit or fight on?

NETWORKING AND AFTERNOON BREAK 3.15pm – 3.45pm TIME: 3.45 – 4.30pm TOPIC: WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW WHEN EMPLOYING GEN-Ys SPEAKER: Mark Viney This lecture was highly successful with amazing feedback when presented in May in Brisbane. Because of high demand from many who heard about it we are repeating it with minor changes. If you are hiring staff that are in the GenY age group this lecture is a must for you. Mark Viney will uncover the unique mentality of this age group and show you how to communicate with them to achieve success in their performance that will meet with your expectations. Many employers come from the Baby Boomer generation with a totally different mindset of how things are done and how they approach work and achievement. Mark Viney is a qualified teacher and is renowned for

APAN MEMBERS: $220 Non-members: $239 If you wish to register three or more SPECIAL RATE IS $200 FOR MEMBERS, $220 for non-members. To register for the conference visit www.apanetwork.com and complete your registration form on-line or phone 07 5593 0360 for any further questions. For accommodation you have two options: Mercure Melbourne Albert Park (4 star) The Mercure provides a sense of comfort with contemporary-style room features Superior King/Twin – $200 Room Rate Pullman Melbourne Albert Park (5 star) The Pullman is a newly refurbished upscale, vibrant hotel featuring next generation comfort solutions Classic King/Twin – $250 Room Only Rate * The rates offered are per room per night based on single or double occupancy. Extra charge for 3rd person of $40 per night applies if required * Full Buffet Breakfast is $25 per person per day (discounted from $31.50) Contact: Bettina Encomienda, Group Reservations Coordinator, Ph: 03 8554 2511 Email: H8788-Re@accord.com PULLMAN & MERCURE ALBERT PARK 65 QUEENS ROAD MELBOURNE 3004

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APAN AUSTRALIAN AESTHETICS CONFERENCES

Leaving the Best until Last The Business of Skin Management Taking it from Theory into Practice

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Melbourne Sunday 18 October Your Date with DESTINY

Pullman Hotel Albert Park

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Latest Anti-ageing techniques New concepts and principles Leadership Strategies for Better Staff Performance Winning Business Growth Strategies

Visit apanetwork.com for full Conference Program

Register today and secure your place. Visit www.apanetwork.com Ph: 07 5593 0360 Email: info@apanetwork.com

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advancedtraining

Training and upgrading your skills and knowledge with

The Aesthetic Academy At Australian Skin Clinics we take pride in the quality, consistency and safe practices of our laser and dermal technicians. Our inclinic technicians are highly skilled, professional and above all compliant with government regulations. This high level of technician quality across the brand is largely due to the training department of Australian Skin Clinics. The Aesthetic Academy, which specialises in professional, highquality training for dermal and laser technicians. The Aesthetic Academy offers concentrated training with highly experienced trainers in an environment that is structured to replicate a clinic environment rather than a training school. With ample facility space, state-ofthe-art technical equipment and trainers it offers you a real world experience. The Aesthetic Academy also offers a platform for personal development, where you can learn from professionals who specialise in the field of medi-aesthetics. As an employee of Australian Skin Clinics we offer training at all stages of development, whether you are new to the industry or a seasoned professional looking to improve your skills and update your knowledge base. For those who currently hold a trainee Laser Hair Removal, Rejuvenation or even Superficial Vascular Lesions Use Licence our team at The Aesthetic Academy can also provide you with the practical hours required by Queensland to apply for your Full User Licence. Previously this service was only available to employees and has now been opened to the public.

AMAZING CLINICAL TRAINING ENVIRONMENT As a student of The Aesthetic Academy you will have the opportunity to participate in a range of practical and theoretical aesthetic courses, designed to provide participants with hands-on experience, improve client communication skills and assist in the understanding and prevention of skin reactions. You will have access to educators with years of practical experience and a wealth of knowledge, fully equipped and functioning laser and dermal treatment facilities and support from a team who share the same goals – providing quality services that make our clients feel amazing! We see The Aesthetic Academy as a potential pathway to employment within Australian Skin Clinics, where participants are provided with skills that abide by government protocols as well as professional development and communication skills specific to our brand. Successful candidates who graduate to employment within

the Australian Skin Clinics brand will receive a 50% rebate on the total cost of their training. We are looking for individuals who are eager to learn, are excellent communicators and who really believe in delivering the ultimate in customer service and results. If you are ready to take the next step in your career, or simply looking for a new set of skills to add to your portfolio, please contact our friendly team at Australian Skin Clinics who can assist you with the application process.

Please call us on 1300 303 014 or visit www.ozskin.com

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APJ 24


Be in business for yourself...but not by yourself We are a forward-thinking company with a proven strategic business model and an ongoing goal of maximising the returns on your investment from day one.

Who are we?

Australian Skin Clinics has been one of the industry leaders since 1996, providing quality, affordable cosmetic treatments. We offer highly effective laser and skin treatments together with cosmetic injectables, acne programs and skin care.

Our franchise benefits • Centralised marketing • IT support and customised software • In-depth practical training programs for therapists and managers • Accredited laser safety training courses • A suite of full operations manuals, sales tools, procedures and protocols • Exceptional franchise support + many more benefits

www.ozskin.com/franchise 1300 303 014


salonbusiness

The best-kept secret for

BUSINESS GROWTH Small business and in particular those in the service industries, such as our industry require a very different approach to conventional marketing. We are not just selling a product that someone can read about and front up to purchase. They do that on-line or in a department store. Most people that come through our doors need to be assured of much more. As professionals, we are not just providing a service with only our hands or equipment, just as a tradesperson would. To grow our businesses we also need to educate our clients in a way that they can value our knowledge and establish a respect for you and seek you and your information time and time again. Mastering that skill is called Education Marketing. Bojan Schianetz is an expert master at training in business and personal empowerment. He is known as a new generation business mentor and trainer who specialises in service-based businesses such as medical and anti-ageing clinics. He provides high-leverage training programs, events and coaching for small business owners and entrepreneurs ready to take themselves and their businesses to the next level. In this interview Bojan sheds some further light on what is Education Marketing and how it works.

APJ Q1: Bojan, what is Education Marketing and how does it differ from other forms of marketing? Education in marketing is not a new concept. Research confirms that clients and customers are more likely to engage at a greater level with marketing that contains educational aspects. In fact, studies

confirm that they are up to 29 times more likely to engage and more likely to make a purchase than those engaged by traditional ads alone. However, what’s even more important is that those customers are up to 94% more satisfied about their purchase and 90% more likely to discuss their experience with friends and relatives. In my experience, education-based marketing (EBM) has grown my businesses more than any other marketing approach; and I am convinced that it will do the same with businesses in your industry. I hope salons and clinics will embrace this amazing strategy for their business and use it for all their marketing content – their business cards, flyers, brochures, free reports, workshops, seminars and any sort of communication they use online and offline. OK, let’s start with what is EBM? EBM simply means using education in your marketing material and providing value to your audience before they even pay you. With this, you give your potential customers the opportunity to learn about a solution and how you can help them solve a real-life problem. In the eyes of your audience, you are giving them a piece of valuable information related to a problem that is significant in their life, something they have struggled with emotionally or physically. You are genuinely giving, without asking for anything back, which generates immediate trust and you build the foundation of a lasting relationship.

APJ Q2: Most of our members are clinic or salon owners and they wish to capture clients from their local region. How does Education Based Marketing work for them? This is a two-part question. Let me answer your second part. The

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Education Based Marketing strategy is the most powerful strategy to get new clients and specifically suited for any kind of serviceoriented businesses. It is the foundation for any kind of marketing tactic. The first part is related to specific strategies to attract local clients. This is a complete new topic and quite complex. I’ll try to give you a bit an overview. At first, every business owner who relies on a local market need to implement local marketing strategies! Local Marketing tactics consist basically of following seven areas: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7.

Google + Local listing Optimised Website Local Directories Social Media Optimisation Content Marketing Local Backlinks Five-star reputation online

As a result of this strategy you’ll be able to differentiate your business from your competitors, because you can position your service in a completely unique way.

APJ Q5: What skills can a business gain from your training program? It’s great that you’re asking this. Our training program is specifically designed for service-oriented businesses, helping them to attract new clients without hiring anyone. In our ‘Magnetize Your Clients Program’ we teach Education Based Marketing. As a result our clients are able to market their businesses in a highly efficient manner and establish a reputation with their client as the go-to expert who will solve their problems. This program is a step-by-step process teaching you how to craft highly persuasive and intimate marketing messages, how to choose the perfect niche market, how to position any service in a unique way, and finally how to design a revenue model that makes profit.

As you can see it’s quite an extensive process and requires a deeper knowledge of this topic. I recommend you start working with a local marketing agency to quickly get set up and start generating local leads.

APJ Q6: Can you give us examples of how businesses were transformed through your training and offer us some statistics?

APJ Q3: In your opinion why are personal service businesses failing in today's rapidly changing markets? What do they fail to understand and do?

I am the co-founder and CEO of two successful six and seven-figure service-oriented businesses in Queensland. For the past seven years I was applying Education-based Marketing strategies and refining them continuously. I am ‘walking the talk’ so to speak and teaching only what I tested and approved in my own businesses.

In my experience most service-oriented businesses fail in three areas. First area is not having enough knowledge on how to effectively market their business. For this reason my first program, Magnetise Your Clients, teaches exactly this aspect, helping them to double or triple their clients. The second major problem is that most service-oriented businesses don’t have a sophisticated revenue model in place. In most cases many businesses spend too much money in order to get new clients in their Front-End through ineffective marketing. Then as soon as they gain the client they don’t have a solid Product/Service strategy in place to keep the client long-term and generate enough profits. The third problem I see is that most service-oriented businesses exchange time for money, and don’t have strong service programs in place. This type of business model is very time intensive and requires a continuous stream of new clients.

APJ Q4: Exactly what skills gap have you identified in the way that companies deliver marketing strategies? Most marketing messages are not focusing on the need of potential clients. They are too focused on presenting the features of their offerings, but without really giving away any value or information. This is probably the main reason why we all find mainstream marketing sometimes so annoying. Most importantly, 99% of all marketers fail in combining valuable education and strategic positioning at the same time. Let me explain this. As a beauty salon owner you need to make sure that your potential clients understand why you are using certain products and devices. For example, if your product and treatment is protecting the skin structure naturally, then you have to let your clients know about this. This is also called ‘setting buying criteria’. I can assume that many of your clients are concerned about their skin health. Their buying criteria in this case is ‘health’. Through valuable education you have the chance to educate them about this specific aspect. Potential clients will read this and say ‘Great, that’s for me, that exactly what I want for my skin’.

APJ Q7: Can a business trial your information/service prior to engaging with you through a more comprehensive training program? We do conduct free training session for businesses to trial. I am more than happy to let you know about our upcoming dates.

To learn more about the Magnetize Your Clients program please phone Be Empowered Academy on 07 3040 7527 or email: support@attractnewclients.com.au Bojan Schianetz is the founder and CEO of Be Empowered Academy. He has 25 years’ experience in entrepreneurial, business and corporate marketing experience in Germany, Brazil, Chile and Australia. Known as the “Transformational Business Mentor”, he helps small business owners as well as entrepreneurs to shift from being unseen and under-paid to expanding their reach and impact and becoming wellcompensated for their products and services. His recent book, Wealth Through Passion And Business is dedicated to helping small business owners and entrepreneurs build and grow their authentic and abundant businesses.

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starperformer

Multi-functionality at its best Amazing New-Generation

Measured Micrograins + The concept of multi-functionality is the new trend in product formulations. Consumers today want more than just one benefit from their skincare or makeup. BB and CC Creams are a classic example. However, with new advances in formulation technology this concept is now introduced in skincare formulations. Measured Micrograins+ is a new, next-generation formula by Bioelements that provides multiple benefits. It exfoliates, controls oil, strengthens the skin and then soothes and calms it. Measured Micrograins+ is packed with known calming, oil-balancing and skin-strengthening ingredients, plus an invigorating blend of plant extracts and essential oils to leave skin with a refreshingly cool physiological sensation. This amazing product will now allow you to physically exfoliate and refine even the most sensitive or reactive skin without irritation. It is also the perfect product to turn to if a skin is unpredictable. Measured Micrograins was first launched 25 years ago as one of the original products in the Bioelements line. For years it remained a client favourite, but our world has changed and so have the daily needs of many with unpredictable skin who complain of sensitivity, acne breakouts, rosacea, stinging or allergies. Contributing factors are environmental toxicity, the use of medications, hormonal imbalances or poor sleeping habits. It's no wonder salons and clinics often identify confused skin with unpredictable manifestations that can change at any given moment.

A PRODUCT TO THE RESCUE This new multifunctional Measured Micrograins + formula has been developed specifically to address such concerns that can

plague any skin type. With carefully selected ingredients to target these multiple concerns, it can effectively restore skin balance, while renewing the skin to a healthier-looking state. Containing an amazing blend of active and nature ingredients such as envorinmentally responsible jojoba beads to provide exceptional exfoliation, iris root extract, zinc sulfate and vitamin A control excess oil and refine skin. After exfoliating and refining pores it’s crucial to strengthen and calm the skin, which Measured Micrograins + does thanks to potent Chinese herbs, aloe, oatmeal and allantoin. Aesthetic and dermal therapists really love the versatility of Measured Micrograins +. It provides them with amazing options a straightforward exfoliating scrub or facial mask, or it can be mixed with a cleanser to create an effective, non-irritating exfoliating cleanser. Either way the skin will experience the same benefits without irritation.

!Plus of course, Measured Micrograins + can be Custom-Blended in the treatment room for both salon use as well as an effective athome use option. Measured Micrograins+ give you the ability to create a one-of-a-kind professional formula for customised results. This product has been newly launched in Australia since

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August. For this product and to consider becoming a Bioelements Certified Practitioner contact 25

Absolute Spa 1300 262 275 or visit www.absolutespa.com.au

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WE

Are you in need of a challenge? Kids left home? Returning to work after a career break can be confronting. We love mums! We have casual, part-time and full-time positions available now. Australian Skin Clinics is a leading cosmetic medical, laser & rejuvenation franchise specialising in dermal, laser and injectable treatments, and we are looking for people like you. If you already have a Diploma of Beauty Therapy, or a Certificate IV in Anatomy and Physiology and have a passion for people, then it is time to join a company where you can love your work. Successful candidates will be trained as a Dermal and/or Laser Technician at our advanced training academy. A career break should not prevent you from getting back to work.

REVIVE & REJUVENATE YOUR CAREER 1300 303 014 www.ozskin.com


productperformers

How can businesses protect themselves with incidents of

TERMINATION OF EMPLOYMENT By Pointon Partners Lawyers We regularly receive calls from members who are contemplating terminating an employee due to poor performance, and in many cases it is a straight-forward procedure if they have adhered to the regulatory requirements. Within our membership kits we include documentation for First and Second Warning right through to the dismissal processes. However, the key document that protects an employer is the Employment Contract or Agreement. APAN has templates for these documents as well, however, if you would like to have one written specifically for you we recommend Pointon Partners Lawyers as the preferred legal advisor and strategic alliance partner. In this article Pointon Partners present some interesting case studies and identify the key areas that every employee needs to have in place. A recent NSW Supreme Court case provides a timely illustration of the importance of having written employment contracts for managerial or executive employees. While such employees may not have access to the Fair Work Commission unfair dismissal regime (if their remuneration exceeds the jurisdictional threshold of $133,000), such employees may find that contractual claims are far more lucrative if they have no written employment contract or the contract is silent on the question of how much notice of termination has to be given by the employer. In that situation the Courts take the view that “reasonable notice” has to be given and what constitutes “reasonable notice” in any given situation will only be known once the Court has ruled upon it. Therefore, the absence of a written employment contract gives a disgruntled ex-employee leverage to make a significant a claim against their former employer. In the case of Susanna Ma v Expeditors International Pty Ltd, the employee was the regional financial controller for an international logistics and shipping business. Her base salary was around $70,000, but as a result of a bonus arrangement she was earning in the range of $600k-$900k each year. At the time of her termination

she had been employed by the company for 24 years. While there were letters in place specifying her salary and bonus arrangements, she did not have any written employment contract dealing with what period of notice would have to be given on termination. Her employer terminated her by giving five weeks’ pay in lieu of notice, being the relevant period of notice under the National Employment Standards. The rate of pay for this period of notice was based upon her salary without any regard to bonuses. The employee commenced proceedings asserting that the employer was in breach of an implied term of her employment by failing to provide reasonable notice of the termination of her employment. She argued that, having regard to all the circumstances, a reasonable period of notice was 12 months. The Court reviewed the relevant case law and listed the following factors that will be generally taken into account in determining what constitutes reasonable notice:

• • • • • • •

the seniority of the position; the level of remuneration; the length of service; the professional standing of the employee; the age of the employee; the qualifications of the employee; the expected period of time it would take for the employee to find alternative employment.

In this instance, the Court held that the proper period of notice was 10 months, having regard to the fact that the employee:

• • •

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was aged 49 and had been a loyal employee for 24 years; had held a position of significant seniority within the organisation, reporting to the Managing Director;

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a team of 14 people reported to her;

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received a significant remuneration package incorporating the bonuses, which was indicative of the high degree of responsibility bestowed on the employee;

since termination she had been unemployed, despite the Court finding that she had taken reasonable measures to obtain new employment.

The Court also ordered that the 10 months pay in lieu of notice be based upon the employee’s average annual income of $750,000, rather than only her salary component.

LESSON FROM THIS CASE This case demonstrates how critical it is to have written employment contracts for executive and managerial staff. If the employee in this instance had signed an employment contract specifying that she could have been terminated on five weeks’ notice then that is the period of notice that would have applied, and the question of “reasonable notice” would never have arisen. Pointon Partners have significant experience in preparing employment contracts for executive and managerial staff. If you need any advice or assistance in this area then please do not hesitate to contact Michael Bishop. About the Author Pointon Partners is based in Melbourne, Australia, and is a leading provider of legal services to businesses and their stakeholders. They are specifically known for their expertise in the following areas: Commercial Law I Property I Litigation I Taxation I Corporate Law I Intellectual Property I Employment Law I Information Technology I Personal Level. For information contact 03 9614 7707 Email: general@pointonpartners.com.au. If you are an APAN member please contact Michael Bishop.

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taxoffice

WARNING MESSAGE from the ATO

BEWARE OF TAX-TIME SCAMS In recent times there seems to be an increase in phone calls from members who report that individuals posing as Australian Tax Office representatives are phoning and demanding payments, with threats of being arrested if they don't pay. We have approached the ATO and they have issued the following warning to businesses. The ATO is reminding taxpayers to be wary of scams this tax time as scammers ramp up their efforts to defraud the public of their personal information and money. During the 2014 calendar year the ATO received in excess of 42,000 reports from the public of email and phishing scams. John Becker, Chief Information Security Officer at the Australian Taxation Office (ATO), highlights that scammers can be very convincing and trick people into handing over money, their Tax File Number (TFN) or personal information. “Their tricks include impersonating ATO representatives on the phone or sending fraudulent emails,” said Mr Becker.

KEY TIPS TO PROTECT YOURSELF

! ! !

Never share personal information, such as your TFN, myGov or bank account details, on social media. Change any passwords you may have shared with family or friends. If you receive an email or phone call out of the blue from 'the ATO' claiming that you are entitled to a refund or asking you to confirm, update or disclose confidential details like your tax-file number, press 'delete' or just hang up.

!

Don't open any attachments or click on any links or reply to these emails. They may take you to a bogus website or contain a harmful virus. ! If you're not sure whether a call or email is a scam, verify who they are by using their official contact details to call them directly. Never use contact details provided by the caller – find them through an independent source such as a phone book or online search. ! Always keep your computer security up to date with anti-virus and anti-spyware software and a good firewall. Only buy computer and anti-virus software from a reputable source. ! Never send money or give your financial details to someone you don't trust – it's rare to recover money from a scammer. ! If you think you have provided your account details to a scammer, contact your bank or financial institution immediately. ! If you use a tax agent, make sure they are registered by checking at www.tpb.gov.au/onlineregister (link is external). ! Never put your tax-file number (TFN) on your resume. Only give it to your employer after you have started your job. John recommends that if you receive a call from the ATO and are concerned about providing your personal information over the phone, ask for the caller's name and phone them back through the ATO's switchboard on 13 28 69.

“People can also forward suspect scams to ReportEmailFraud@ato.gov.au or call the ATO during business hours on 1800 060 062 to discuss a suspected scam.”

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Ask the BLOG GURU HOW DO YOU FIND A GOOD PRACTITIONER FOR INJECTABLES? Probably one of the most commonly asked questions I get on a daily basis is “How do I find a good practitioner to do injectables?” None of us want to walk out of a clinic looking like we’ve just had them, and certainly none of us want to experience the feeling of “OMG – what have I done”. Well personally, I’ve had both experiences and it’s not a lot of fun. One of the worst (or funniest now) situations is a lip cosmetic tattoo experience where I had a really exciting lunch appointment scheduled and was booked in for some lip cosmetic tattooing that morning. I thought to myself, no worries, I’ve had it done before, easy peasy, I’ll be right by lunch time. Well guess what? Yes I looked like a blowfish. I think I must have reacted to the local anaesthetic or something. I won’t even tell you what my husband said I looked like, let’s just say it was not pretty. And no way was I going to the luncheon I was supposed to go to! Another of the not ‘so much fun’ experiences was a bit of an unfortunate event. I was in for my usual bit of a zhoosh up, chatting away with my wonderful practitioner (whom I love to the moon and back!) and left feeling pretty good about myself. Only to wake up the next day thinking mmmmm, I look like I’m not feeling well. But I feel good. My forehead felt heavy. Yes, it had a bit of a ‘drop’. So if you know injectables you know this can happen, it’s just probably a bit too much (I think I may have gone back too soon), and until recently I kept no record of what I was having done, where, using what product, and when! Yes I know, my bad luck! Well things have certainly changed now. I like to know what’s going in where, and I record it to a T. I think sometimes you have to have those ‘bad’ experiences to realise how important some things are. Reputation is probably one of the most important things when choosing a practitioner. Recommendations from friends and family are great too. I’d say the best practitioners are the ones who achieve the result where you don’t even know anything has been done – so it’s up to the ‘friend’ who may have had something done to fess up to you here! I still find many people (especially living in Byron Bay), yoga-loving natural beings who don’t want anyone to know they’re having injectables, who say their youthful glow is just good, clean living – mmmmmm, really? Check out the full interview with Dr Patrick Trevidic (http://www.plasticsurgeryhub.com.au/interview-with-dr-trevidic/), a visiting Plastic Surgeon from France who presented at the ASAPS 2015 Non-Surgical Symposium, who talks about regulation, reliability, and his opinion on how to ensure you’re going to a “good” practitioner. You’ll love the bit where he says if the practitioner says “I’m 100% sure” that’s when you should make a run for it! As practitioners, this information may be helpful. Until next issue

Trish Hammond – The Blog Guru www.plasticsurgeryhub.com.au Ph: 0429 264 811 Trish is one of the industry’s most famous Blog writers. As a strategic partner of APAN she has kindly accepted to be a regular columnist. If you would like Trish to address a topic of interest please send your request to: Email: info@apanetwork.com or contact Trish direct.

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dermalfillers

Update on

DERMAL FILLERS in Australia New innovations and advances

Louisa McKay - Managing Director, Costhetics In 2011, Swiss pharmaceutical company Galderma first released Emervel1, a complete range of scientifically advanced hyaluronic acid dermal fillers. Their use was extensively documented in European randomised, double-blind, active-controlled, multicentre, split-face, comparative clinical trials. Fully vetted and deemed effective, these fillers are now also available in Australia. The science behind these new fillers is a cross-link of hyaluronic acid and Butanediol Diglycidyl Esther, or BBDE. The result is a gellike substance that is then subjected to a process known as bacterial fermentation. Following purification by dialysis, it is ready for injection and provided in pre-measured needles for accuracy. Researchers note that the measure of lifting capability (G prime) in this product range is not as high as in Restylane, Perlane and SubQ soft-tissue fillers. This is an important point for injectors to consider when determining the best dermal filler for a patient.

MORE OPTIONS FOR TREATING WRINKLES, LINES AND HOLLOWS The emergence of dermal fillers with unique properties allows practitioners to further customise treatments for patients in more specific ways. For example:

Isoluate to produce a medium lifting effect for moderate wrinkles and lines. It is recommended for nasolabial folds.

Produce a high-volume lifting effect to smooth pronounced marionette lines. This can be achieved by injecting deeper into the dermal layer where it integrates with existing skin cells.

Restore lip plumpness and redefine the lip border.

Treat fine or superficial periorbital lines.

Provide very high-volume lifting for those who have lost facial volume due to the ageing process.

The anaesthetic Lidocaine is part of the filler “cocktail” in many types of filler, which makes some of the injections more comfortable for patients. Due to a high risk of complications, however, practitioners should avoid fillers formulated with lidocaine when treating eye wrinkles. “It’s always good to have new tools in our tool box,” states Dr Naomi McCullum2, a cosmetic physician based in Sydney. “The positive practical benefits seem to be that it has better tissue integration and also reduces swelling compared to other products, as well as longevity.” Regarding her specific experience with the Galderma product line, McCullum says, “The lip swelling seemed noticeably less in the sample size that I have treated”.

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HELPING PATIENTS UNDERSTAND THE MEANING OF “BEST” DERMAL FILLER

RESTYLANE – DERMAL FILLER FOR LIP ENHANCEMENT IN AUSTRALIA

Consumers, seduced and sometimes confused by advertising and marketing claims, need to be educated. A question routinely posed by clients to their doctors and aesthetic professionals is, “What is the best dermal filler?” If you use popularity as your guide, Restylane is the number-one selling dermal filler in Australia and around the world, where it has been used in 16 million treatments worldwide since it was first launched 16 years ago3.

Restylane is an umbrella term for a broad range of products including Restylane, Restylane L, Perlane and Perlane L. Restylane and Restylane-L are extremely popular in Australia for lip enhancement.

Popularity, however, is not a measure of quality. The question that patients should be asking is, “What is the best dermal filler for me?” Practitioners have an obligation to help patients understand that the preferred dermal filler in any given situation is one that will deliver optimal results, and will be determined by a variety of issues such as the individual patient’s facial-enhancement needs, the doctor’s skill, training and experience with a specific filler and patient risk tolerance. This is why it is important to choose a practitioner who is skilled and has a good reputation for the kind of procedure that a patient is looking for. Effective patient-practitioner communication is also critical to the success with dermal fillers. In 2012, a survey4 by the British Association of Aesthetic Plastic Surgeons revealed that approximately seven in 10 surgeons had seen patients complaining of complications from dermal fillers, and over the past three years the number of problems with some filler products has tripled.

PERMANENT VS SEMI-PERMANENT DERMAL FILLERS In its most recent report on permanent and semi-permanent dermal fillers5 the Royal Australasian College of Surgeons classifies cosmetic injectables as temporary, semi-permanent and permanent. The classification is based on biodegradability or the filler’s mechanism of action. Permanent and semi-permanent dermal fillers were developed as an alternative to biodegradable fillers to increase the durability of the aesthetic effect, with a lower risk, less expense and a faster recovery time (Senglemann & Tull 20066).

MAIN CATEGORIES OF DERMAL FILLERS AND BENEFITS On its website, The Australasian Foundation for Plastic Surgery7 lists the five main categories of fillers used to improve facial contours, add volume and reduce the appearance of wrinkles, folds and facial lines:

According to the manufactures, Restylane is the safe and natural way to enhance your looks. With over 20 million treatments worldwide and an extensive clinical documentation, the products are scientifically proven to give natural results with long-lasting effects.

JUVEDERM FOR SUNKEN CHEEKS AND MID-FACE SAGGING Songs have been written to celebrate a beautiful baby face, with the plump, round cheeks we associate with youth. Young faces conform to what dermatologists call the “triangle of youth”. This refers to the greater volume in the face to be located in the upper part of the face. In Australia, Juvederm filler products are used widely to revitalise mid-face ageing issues for both men and women. Juvederm XC is a hyaluronic acid gel used to resolve mid-face sagging and reduce wrinkles. Juvederm Voluma XC is a combination of hyaluronic acid, elastin and collagen designed to address mid-face volume loss in the cheeks. Juvederm Voluma is injected deep into the tissue, where it provides support for the skin while improving the elasticity and structure of the treated areas. The result is a naturally smoother facial contour.

GOING DEEPER WITH PERLANE AND PERLANE-L Perlane is a member of the Restylane family of products. What makes this product different from other dermal fillers is the average size of the particles and the depth of the injection. Because it is placed deep, Perlane is especially effective in treating a number of kinds of facial wrinkles. A 2006 study8 revealed: “Fewer treatment sessions were required with Perlane. At six months post-treatment, 75% of patients showed a greater than 1grade improvement in Wrinkle Severity Rating Scale (WSRS). Perlane was considered superior in 64% of patients.” – Dermatologic Survey

1. COLLAGEN – connective tissue proteins derived from treated human, cow or pig tissue – The Better Health Channel considers this material to be suitable for treating deep lines and scars, with effects lasting from 4-6 months.

2. MICRO-LIPOINJECTIONS – Fat injections, from a patient’s body or a donor, offer long- lasting results and a low risk of allergic reaction. 100

3. HYALURONIC ACID GEL – Suitable for treating lines and acne scars with results lasting up to six months. This is an excellent option for people who are allergic to collagen.

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4. POLYLACTIC ACID – Works to erase deep lines and skin depressions by stimulating skin cells to produce collagen. 25

5.POLYACRYLAMIDE – Synthetic polymer gels form a soft and permanent solution suitable for treating deep lines.

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TGA ADVERTISING POLICY ON DERMAL FILLERS The Therapeutic Goods Administration has enacted legislation that prohibits by-name reference to prescription-only dermal fillers. This covers: • • • • •

Restylane, Perlane, Dermalive, Juvéderm (hyaluronic acid) Hylaform (hyaluronan, sodium hyaluronate) Collagen, Zyderm, Zyplast, Cosmoplast, Cosmoderm (collagen) Newfill, Nufill, Sculptra (polylactic acid) Aquamid (polyacrylamide)

These substances are listed on Schedule 4 of the TGA’s “Poisons Standards”9 which means the use or supply should be by, or on the order of, medical practitioners and should be available from a pharmacist on prescription.

DERMAL FILLERS ARE HERE TO STAY! The effectiveness of dermal fillers for rejuvenating the face has triggered tremendous interest in cosmetic injectables. This interest is being fed by a tsunami of straight-to-consumer advertising, not all of it strictly on the up-and-up. Providers and consumers must work together to ensure that genuine, approved substances injected by qualified practitioners are used so the results will be beautiful.

Louisa McKay is the Managing Director of Costhetics, Australia’s leading online resource for cosmetic enhancement news and information. References: 1.http://www.galderma.com/Media/Pressreleases/articleType/ArticleView/articleId/27/GaldermaLaunches-EMERVEL-Range-of-Hyaluronic-Acid-Dermal-Fillers 2. http://www.costhetics.com.au/practitioners/dr-naomimccullum/ 3. http://www.dailymail.co.uk/femail/article-2245450/Cosmeticfillers-destroy-looks-The-truth-botox.html 4. http://baaps.org.uk/about-us/press-releases/1500-two-out-ofthree-surgeons-seeing-botched-filler-ops 5.http://www.surgeons.org/media/311037/Dermal_Filler_Review. pdf 6. http://emedicine.medscape.com/article/1125066-overview 7. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2544361/ 8. http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.2310/6350.2005.31246/ 9. https://www.tga.gov.au/publication/poisons-standard-susmp

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Technology from the future - HERE TODAY


anaestheticseducation

TOPICAL ANAESTHETICS Under the SPOTLIGHT Chris Testa B. Bus., B. Pharm. There is no doubt that treatments that target the dermis through the use of lasers, dermal needling and even cosmetic tattooing require specific levels of pain management for their effective delivery. Topical anaesthetics – the agent to turn to for this issue – are rapidly gaining momentum and becoming a concern among regulators, as there is increasing evidence that their use has often been outside regulatory guidelines. During the past few months APAN has been having ongoing meetings with both Queensland Health as well as regulatory bodies about how the regulations for the use of topical anaesthetics should be reviewed and amended to better meet the needs of a constantly changing and growing industry. Having identified the lack of education in their use, APAN approached a reputable compounding pharmacist, Chris Testa, to develop an educational course that will be launched as part of the APAN Accreditation Program in a bid to lift the industry's professionalism, standards and reputation.

In this article Chris Testa addresses some of the key areas of why understanding topical anaesthetics is so important for their safe and efficacious use. With the rapid emergence of new anaesthetic techniques and technology, the demand for effective topical anaesthesia is growing and the use of topical anaesthetics is more widespread. The most commonly used topical anaesthetics are lignocaine (lidocaine), tetracaine (amethocaine), prilocaine and benzocaine. For example Emla is a combination of lignocaine 2.5% and prilocaine 2.5%, while L-M-X 4 contains the single ingredient lignocaine 4%. 100

However, clinicians need to have a sound knowledge and understanding of these agents and their actions on the body’s biological systems, the adverse reactions associated with their use and their contraindications. Essentially, clinicians should be well educated in their safe use and appropriate methods of application. The vast majority of case reports on serious adverse events from topical anaesthetics, including coma and death, have been as a result of incorrect or inappropriate use. In many cases the total dose applied or the total surface area of the body covered, along with the

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duration of application and even the anatomic location of application, were poorly considered.

the duration of application.

ANAESTHETIC CLASSIFICATIONS In 2007 the US Food and Drug Administration issued a public health advisory reporting two instances of death when young women applied topical anaesthetics under occlusion to their legs for an extended period prior to laser hair removal.

Metabolism varies considerably between the types of anaesthetics. Anaesthetics are classified, based on their chemical structure, as either “amides” or “esters”. Lignocaine and prilocaine are amides, while tetracaine and benzocaine are esters.

To be effective, topical anaesthetics must cross the superficial layers of skin to reach the nerve endings in the dermis. Their main site of action is the nerve-cell membrane where they prevent the generation and conduction of nerve signals that manifest as pain.

The amide topical anaesthetics are primarily metabolised in the liver before clearance from the body. Lignocaine undergoes conversion to metabolites that still exhibit pharmacological activity although less potent than lignocaine before final clearance. Prilocaine itself is converted to a metabolite that, at high doses, is believed to be responsible for methemoglobinemia, a condition in which red blood cells have a severely reduced ability to deliver oxygen to tissue. Methemoglobinemia has also been frequently reported with benzocaine use.

The greater the concentration of a local anaesthetic at a particular location the greater will be its clinical action. Local anaesthetics act to block signals in all excitable membranes, not exclusively nerve fibres with the central nervous system, and the cardiovascular system are especially susceptible.

HOW ANAESTHETICS WORK, THEIR EFFICACY AND RISKS Local anaesthetics when used to manage pain are quite unique. Virtually all other pain medication, irrespective of the route of delivery, must enter the circulatory system at sufficiently high concentrations to achieve pain control. Local anaesthetics, on the other hand, cease to provide pain control when absorbed from their target site in the dermis and into the circulation. A prime factor in the termination of pain control is their redistribution from nerve fibres into the cardiovascular system. When absorbed into the circulatory system, the anaesthetics will be carried to all cells of the body. Although diluted by the circulatory system, the amount of anaesthetics delivered to the dermis, the rate of uptake from this site by the circulatory system and the extent of metabolism will influence blood concentrations of the local anaesthetic and its active metabolites at various other sites throughout the body. The toxic effects of these agents are frequently determined by their rate of systemic absorption and metabolism (biotransformation and detoxification). Systemic absorption can be influenced by integrity or thickness of skin surface, the surface area treated, the concentration and amount of topical anaesthetic applied as well as

The ester topical anaesthetics, in contrast to the amides, are rapidly broken down by blood enzymes. A primary metabolite of tetracaine is para-aminobenzoic acid (PABA) which, although nontoxic, has been associated with many allergic reactions.

SIGNS OF TOXICITY Clinically, systemic toxicity begins with signs of central nervous system (CNS) excitement – numbness of the tongue, lightheadedness, dizziness, tinnitus, difficulty focusing, disorientation and drowsiness. At higher doses, initial CNS excitement is followed by rapid CNS depression – muscle twitching, convulsions, loss of consciousness, respiratory depression, cardiovascular depression and collapse. Cardiovascular manifestations – chest pain, shortness of breath, palpitations, hypotension and loss of consciousness. Essential considerations for patient safety include:

Selection of the lowest concentration topical anaesthetic or combination suitable for the procedure;

Application for the shortest time possible and over the smallest surface area. If a large surface area is involved, consider dividing treatments into smaller anatomical portions;

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•

Selecting the appropriate topical agent for a patient. Are they sensitive or allergic to any ingredients in the selected formulation? Do they have a medical condition, using medication or supplements not suitable for the anaesthetic agents or procedure?;

•

Consideration of the amount of topical anaesthetic to be applied;

•

Considering the thickness and integrity of skin surface. Thinner skin surfaces or broken skin will allow faster penetration and enhance the risks associated with systemic absorption. In fact, in most cases application directly to the mucosa may allow rapid and complete systemic absorption of the total dose of the anaesthetic agent applied.

compounding and the regulatory aspects of compounding at Griffith University, School of Pharmacy, where he has lectured for eight years. He specialises in the compounding and formulation of topical anaesthetics and is also highly committed to educating key industry groups and practitioners across a variety of clinical settings, as well as patients, in the appropriate use and safety of topical anaesthetics. His recent endeavour has been in developing an educational program on the Topical Use of Anaesthetics for APAN as part of their Accreditation Program that is specifically aimed at practitioners in the practice of aesthetic and dermal therapies as well as cosmetic medicine. If you would like further information on the Anaesthetics Course please contact APAN on info@apanetwork.com or phone 07 5593 0360. Chris Testa can be contacted on 07 5598 2411

Swift recognition of anaesthetic toxicity is essential. Once toxicity is suspected, the anaesthetic must immediately be removed, the patient placed in a supine position and medical assistance urgently sought. Topical anaesthetics play an important role in cutaneous anaesthesia by providing patient comfort. When used appropriately, topical anaesthetics can be a safe and effective means of minimising patient discomfort and support successful therapy outcomes.

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ABOUT THE AUTHOR

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Chris Testa is the owner and Managing Pharmacist of the successful Tugun Compounding Pharmacy based on the Gold Coast, Queensland, where he continues the family tradition as the second-generation compounding pharmacist. Chris commenced his career as a management consultant with government organisations, including the Queensland State Department of Health. Chris has been a regular lecturer on the topics of pharmaceutical

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Educational Course in TOPICAL ANAESTHETICS has finally arrived! Melbourne 19th October 2015 Understanding the proper use of anaesthetics is paramount to the safety and comfort of our clients or patients. While there are regulatory restrictions when it comes to the use of topical anaesthetics, it is imperative that every practitioner who delivers treatments such as skin needling, cosmetic tattoo or uses devices such as fraxel or various levels of lasers gains a thorough scientific understanding of the different anaesthetics included in numbing creams, how they metabolise in the body and ways to ensure the safety of their use on a case-by-case basis. APAN is working closely with government regulatory bodies supporting the need for regulatory reform that better suits the aesthetics industry. At this stage every practitioner must abide by their State regulatory requirements. This course is intended to assist practitioners to gain a more in-depth understanding of topical anaesthetics, their mechanism, safety considerations and contraindications.

PART 1: INTRODUCTION TO THE SAFE USE OF TOPICAL ANAESTHETICS FOR COSMETIC PURPOSES The course will be conducted on Monday 19th October in Melbourne directly after the APAN Aesthetics Conference. Training will be delivered by Compounding Pharmacist Chris Testa, who is the owner and manager of Tugun Compounding Pharmacy on the Gold Coast. Chris is also a highly respected lecturer on the topic of pharmaceutical compounding and the regulatory aspects of compounding which he delivers at the School of Pharmacy, Griffith University.

COURSE OUTLINE:

Overhead notes Tables and templates to assist you with special calculations STATEMENT OF COMPLETION

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An historical perspective A regulatory overview How topical anaesthetics work Different types of anaesthetics How topical anaesthetics are absorbed and metabolised Medication, supplements and medical conditions that affect the use of topical anaesthetics Introduction to advanced training

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Chris Testa B. Bus., B. Pharm.

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To Register please visit www.apanetwork.com and complete a Registration Form Aesthetic Practitioners Advisory Network Email: info@apanetwork.com Phone: 07 5593 0360

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industrynews

Are you aware how Regulations will impact YOUR BUSINESS?

By Tina Viney

With the increase of embarrassing media attacks on the unprofessional practices that plague our industry it is no surprise that the catchcry of the industry has for several years been “when will our industry get regulated”.

bad publicity that these services were getting in the press, in 2012 ARPANSA appointed a new Working Group to review the need for legislation and to prepare a draft regulatory framework proposal for consideration.

We would all agree that regulations are a welcoming thing as their aim is to restrict “who can do what” by defining minimum qualifications needed to practise. However, the introduction of regulations has the potential to substantially alter how an industry is defined and how it operates, and that can be an uncomfortable change for many.

APAN, as an industry body was invited to be part of this Working Group and so I have firsthand knowledge on the work that has gone into preparing this draft. Each month (initially for five hours and later for three hours at each meeting) we worked together with other invited parties (most of whom were from the medical field) to discuss an appropriate framework for regulations. This task has been in operation for three years, and while I have vigorously defended the rights for qualified practitioners within our industry to perform skin-rejuvenation treatments, we did encounter resistance from the medical community as they constitute the majority of the representatives on this group. This has been an amazing task as we were required to work through the complex process and specific requirements in the drafting of a regulatory instrument.

I am sure that several who have cried out for regulations thought that this would just get rid of the “bad guys” and have little impact on what they are currently doing. However, regulations create a totally new playing field, and while this can be somewhat unsettling at first, regulations in the long term have the potential to improve the credibility and recognition of the industry, not to mention restrict unscrupulous and opportunistic individuals who are taking advantage of an industry with no guidelines. In this article I would like to shed some light on what is currently happening, the process towards regulations, the potential tipping point that is about to happen to the industry, and how these changes will redefine the industry.

WHAT IS CURRENTLY HAPPENING By now what most of you would have been made aware of is that the Government had appointed the Australian Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety Agency (ARPANSA) to review the need for the legislation of the practice of Laser and IPL for cosmetic purposes. While a similar task had occurred in the past, it did not eventuate to a regulatory outcome. However, with continued pressure from the industry and due to the

Finally, late last year the document was completed and was presented to the Government for consideration. While further work was required at the end of 2014, the Office of Best Practice Regulations signed off on the draft proposal. The next step was for the draft outline to be presented to the industry for public comment before it would be finalised from a draft document to a formal regulatory instrument. As part of this process, on the 26th May ARPANSA released the Regulatory Impact Statement (RIS) covering the use of Intense Pulsed Light sources and Lasers for Cosmetic and Beauty Therapy for public comment and was available on the ARPANSA website as a 64-page document. This document examined the problems associated with the use of these devices and invited industry

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stakeholders as well as State and Territory regulators to promote to the relevant stakeholders within their jurisdiction to be made aware of the opportunity to comment. The closing date for submission was 31st July 2015.

Three option statements were put forward for consideration: Option 1: Educational awareness – This would be spearheaded by ARPANSA making consumers aware of what to look for in a practitioner. This information would be put on their website. Option 2: Self-regulation by an industry accreditation scheme – This would require that industry bodies such as Associations be responsible for creating an accrediting scheme inviting industry to comply with specific industry standards of education and ongoing professional development. Option 3: Licensing (or registration) of service providers based on prior qualification and training – This would clearly define who had the right to practise certain procedures based on compulsory minimum qualification requirements. It stands to reason that this model not only restricts unqualified persons from practising IPL and laser services, but would also define how certain services would require a different level of qualification. In other words, it would also restrict practices based on levels of qualifications within the aesthetics and medical aesthetics industry. This option is a full regulatory model. There was also an additional “Status Quo” option, which would mean that everything stayed as it currently is. If the status quo was to be maintained, Queensland, Western Australia and Tasmania would be the only jurisdictions to have any control over who provides commercial services with lasers for cosmetic or beauty therapy. Consumers in other jurisdictions would largely operate under the principle of caveat emptor (‘let the buyer beware’).

THE PROCESS TOWARDS REGULATION When this document was put forward the feedback we had from the industry overwhelmingly supported full regulations or Option 3 with a few recommendations for changes, which we encourage everyone to articulate in their submissions. On the other hand, there was also a great deal of fear as they considered that some of the proposed restrictions would be detrimental to the services they currently performed. APAN conducted several phone conferences to answer any questions that various stakeholders had concerns about. These sessions were beneficial to me because it allowed me to determine how I could best support the industry in transitioning across to regulations. It also became apparent that a “grandfather clause” would need to be included in the regulations that would allow individuals with an impeccable record of consistent good practice, who may not fully fit the new educational requirements, to be given due consideration. For those who are not familiar with the term, a grandfather clause (or grandfather policy) is a provision in which an old rule continues to apply to some existing situations, while a new rule will apply to all future cases. Those exempt from the new rule are said to have grandfather rights or acquired rights. Frequently, the exemption is limited; it may extend for a set period of time, or it may be lost under certain circumstances. For example, a grandfathered practitioner coming from another industry may be exempt from the need to redo a full qualification as outlined by the new laws if their background education and work experience is taken into consideration, and if they completed a bridging course to meet with the current educational standards. Often, such a provision is used as a compromise or out of practicality to effect new rules without upsetting a well-established logistical or political situation. This extends the idea of a rule not being retroactively applied.

By the time this article is published I anticipate that the Working Group would reconvene to review the outcome of the industry feedback. Following this review process, the next step is for the final regulatory document to be completed. This process will include detailed clauses covering all aspects of time frames, grandfather clauses and more detailed information of when and how the regulations will be introduced.

THE TIPPING POINT While waiting for changes to transition we need to be mindful the potential for regulations to contribute to a tipping point for our industry. The Tipping Point is an interesting concept that was introduced by Malcolm Gladswell back in 2000 when he published a book by the same title in which he discussed how sometimes small events have the potential to totally change things. To demonstrate this concept through an example, I was reminded of our own experience with publishing. Back 20 years ago producing a publication required that you first developed the context, proceeded to graphic design and layout and then the files were sent to a Film Bureau that produced film and chemical proofs. These were checked carefully and were then send to the printer, who prepared plates and proceed to print, bind and produce the publication or book. At the time we had a wonderful relationship with a Film Bureau that produced excellent work. They were renowned for their expertise and were extremely busy with numerous magazines and publications for which they produced film and chemical proofs. They also had an incredible reputation for maintaining deadlines, and even worked overtime at no extra cost to ensure that the job was always finished on time for the printers. Then suddenly new technology was introduced that allowed files to skip the film process and go direct to plate and to print. We looked at this option and discussed this with them, but they assured us that chemical proofs would never go out of fashion with high-quality publications as they guaranteed better quality control before going to press. At that time none of their accounts were planning to leave them and move direct to plate, and nor were we. On reviewing their services they assured everyone that they were committed to quality film production that all the clients could continue to enjoy. Based on these solid relationships and an incredible reputation, they were convinced that nothing would change and that their clients would remain loyal to them. While no-one left them in a hurry, within 12 months they had lost every account as we all moved to the direct-toplate option. The reason for this was progress and economics and while it grieved us to do so, it was a matter of progress offering us a better option. The result – what was a booming business suddenly came to a standstill. I am drawing attention to the experience as I am also seeing several within our industry who are keeping their head buried in the sand. They feel that just because they are providing a good service that any changes in regulations will have no effect on them and are not being proactive to identify the best way to prepare for these changes. This is a risky practice as regulations will alter the playing field and will bring about strategic changes that may disadvantage them. It pays to review one’s current position and identify ways that impending regulations will impact them and appropriately prepare for these changes.

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HOW WILL REGULATIONS REDEFINE THE INDUSTRY? The practise of skin and age management is starting to gain momentum as statistic point to the fact that consumer demand for skin improvement is expected to rise in Australia by 20% in the next 12 months. Clearly this is where the growth opportunities lie. New

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equipment innovations, advanced skincare formulations and treatment protocols are pushing the boundaries of past limitations introducing amazing new treatment outcomes that consumers are gravitating to. The new definition of antiageing is no longer excessive lifting or volumising that hold no guarantee for attractive ageing, but rather a more healthylooking, hydrated skin with improved luminosity that is clear without blemishes and pigmentation. In fact “beautiful skin” is the new trend over too much “enhancement” that may change one’s appearance to look “different”. These new trends are bridging the divide between cosmetic medicine and aesthetics and dermal therapists. To meet the demand of such trends qualifications are pushing past boundaries with the introduction of new qualifications in cosmetic medicine such as the two Bachelor Degree qualifications from Victoria University and the Australasian College of Health and Wellness in Sydney. New advanced diplomas are also emerging in the field of dermal therapies and cosmetic medicine. AACDS are constantly adding to their qualification with the Graduate Diploma in Dermal Therapies, the Graduate Diploma in Cosmetic Nursing and the Advanced Diploma of Cosmetic Dermal Sciences. These qualifications are providing robust pathways for existing practitioners to upgrade their skills and knowledge to higher clinical levels, as well as provide new career pathways to interested candidates who are looking at an attractive career in dermal therapies, cosmetic medicine and clinical aesthetics. As the numbers in the skin management/age management sector continue to grow we will continue to see the regulatory divide create and redefine the new breed of professional that will have its own identity separate to traditional beauty therapy.

DUTY-OF-CARE APAN believes it has a duty of care to support its members through initiatives that safeguard its future. APAN is currently working with various government bodies in the drafting of new health regulations, an industry Code of Practice and an industry Accreditation program that will help to better support the industry’s new direction with greater recognition and the respect of both consumers and the medical profession. I believe that the wheels of regulatory reform are in motion and it is also my opinion that this move will not stop with just the practice of IPL and Laser. There will be more changes to come, particularly for higher-risk procedures such as dermal needling and cosmetic tattooing. Recognised, governmentapproved education will become a necessity rather than the option and educational reform will be at the forefront of change. This is the beginning of a new era for our profession, and those who seize the opportunity to embrace these changes will reap the rewards and reach new levels of professional and business success.

APAN is a member-based organisation that is strongly and passionately committed to the advancement of higher standards, education and initiatives that support the reputation and growth of the aesthetics and medical cosmetic industry both in practice and in business. If you believe they can assist you please consider the benefits of joining as a member and be part of the growing APAN professional community. To speak to a representative on how you can also be supported please phone 07 5593 0360 or email info@apanetwork.com

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starperformer

The efficacy of OIL-BASED SKINCARE What every skincare professional should know about oil-based creams The overwhelming majority of skin creams on the market are waterbased. Oil-based creams, while common in medical formulations, are rarely found on cosmetic counters and have largely been ignored by many cosmetic firms. In fact, even some doctors have misunderstood the purpose and benefits of oil-based formulations. This is no surprise when a leading US dermatologist states that ‘sebum serves no known purpose’. In Europe, however, the importance of sebum and the acid mantle as well as skin-friendly oils in cosmetics has been subject to numerous scientific and medical studies. Here are some of the results of an interesting study that compared water-based to oil-based skincare formulations.

HYDRATION OF THE SKIN Numerous studies have been conducted to determine the efficacy of skin creams. It is universally accepted that oil-based creams offer longer lasting and better hydration of the skin compared to waterbased creams. In their paper three dermatologists from Karlsruhe University in Germany measured the hydration capabilities of water-based creams and ascertained that their ability to hydrated only lasted a few minutes, while the oil-based creams ensured hydration for several hours. The importance of healthy levels of hydration have now been validated as the primary, most important consideration in restoring skin balance, the key to successfully addressing skin deficiencies.

ELASTICITY OF THE SKIN Two Italian researchers completed a 12-month study comparing water-based creams and oil-based creams and their impact on skin elasticity. This study confirmed the levels of elasticity of the skin were significantly improved with the use of oil-based cream, while the water-in-water formulations did not demonstrate any improvement in the skin elasticity.

DELIVERY OF ACTIVE INGREDIENTS Today’s cosmetic formulators have a vast array of potent active ingredients with scientifically proven efficacy at their disposal. These ingredients usually form the backbone of the marketing message for cosmetic products. Formulators know that delivery of these actives into the skin is difficult and sometimes near impossible. A study conducted by a leading German cosmetic chemist found that oil-based creams deliver 120% more alpha tocopherol (Vitamin E) into the skin compared with water-based creams. Alpha tocopherol is an oil-soluble ingredient, which might explain its compatibility and better delivery into the skin via an oil

based cream. Furthermore, another German study on urea – a water-soluble ingredient, confirms that, again, an oil-based cream is the only option if you want the ingredient to reach the area in the skin where it will be of benefit.

BIOMIMETICS – AN IMPORTANT CONCEPT The term ‘biomimetic’ refers to the concept of copying life’s processes. Formulas that have been based on this principle have repeatedly demonstrated that they can generally lead to superior results in skin treatments. We have already mentioned the two biomimetic chemicals found in the skin’s acid mantle, alpha tocopherol and urea. It should be noted that both alpha tocopherol and urea are biomimetic ingredients that are found in the acid mantle – the skin’s natural protective layer this makes them highly compatible and efficacious to skin improvement. Our acid mantle incorporates a combination of sebum, perspiration and NMFs (natural moisturising factors) and these constitute an oilbased emulsion. Sebum forms the outside phase, which is logical. If water (perspiration) is on the outside it evaporates almost immediately. To quote Florence Barrett-Hill, this phenomenon is often referred to as ‘oil sitting on top of water’. However, it is important to note that a cream that is formulated on biomimetic principles doesn’t just include biomimetic ingredients, however valuable they may be. In order to be a true biomimetic cream the principles of water-in-oil must be adhered to through the development of the formulation. In that way it will mimic the skin’s natural acid mantle. This is important for the ingredients to effectively penetrate the skin. So why do we see so few oil-based creams? Perhaps this is because standard available technology that produces water-in-oil formulations develops creams that are very greasy, making them less attractive to today’s consumer. Many years ago Dr. Horst Spiller developed proprietary formulation technology that allows his biomimetic creams to be produced with significantly lower levels of oils. They offer all the advantages of oil-based creams without the ‘glug’ of regular oil-based creams. More beneficial properties of Dr. Spiller oil-based creams not mentioned in this article are taught in the training seminars delivered by Omniderm.

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Please call OmniDerm

1800 301 007 for more information.

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advancedpathway

Establishing a successful career in

DERMAL THERAPIES Having recently introduced additional qualifications to their scope, the Australasian Academy of Cosmetic Dermal Science is forging ahead as a leading innovative and forward-thinking Registered Training Organisation that is bridging the gap between cosmetic and dermal therapies. The qualifications they are offering specifically focus in equipping both dermal therapists and nurses to gain the skills and knowledge needed to establish a successful career.

has developed new and innovative accredited qualifications to address the need for formal training in the cosmetic medical/aesthetics field and to bridge the gap between traditional beauty services and advanced dermal-therapy techniques. The objective of all AACDS qualifications is to improve the safety and efficacy of cosmetic/dermal-therapy services in Australia. As an unregulated industry with rapid technological advances, there is a strong need for formal training, that qualifies professionals specifically in this field.

In this interview we caught up with AACDS's Director, April Jorgensen, who was happy to share with us AACDS's journey as an educational provider, and how their training is contributing to equipping the growing number of practitioners who wish to qualify and succeed in this specialised area of practice.

APJ Q2: What industry and consumer changes are you observing and why is it important for practitioners to gain formal qualifications?

APJ Q1: April, can you please share with us AACDS's vision and when was the academy established? The Australasian Academy of Cosmetic Dermal Science (AACDS) was established in 2003 to meet the education and training needs of the cosmetic-medical and dermal-therapy professions. The college

There have clearly been significant changes and rapid growth occurring in the cosmetic medical and beauty industry over the past decade. In particular, light-based technologies tend to dominate the scope of services offered, along with many other new aesthetic treatment modalities such as platelet-rich plasma, Cool Sculpting速 and skin needling. Cosmetic surgeons are now taking a more holistic view of practice and employ non-physicians to provide nonsurgical aesthetic treatments. Many traditional beauty salons have

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increased their scope of practice to offer treatments such as Intense Pulsed Light (IPL), laser, microdermabrasion and epidermal peels. Gaining a formal qualification has a significant impact on the service provider as well as the industry as a whole. The media are largely responsible for consumers becoming more aware of the potential risks associated with dermal therapies and are therefore seeking providers who hold a formal qualification (ie. recognised on the Australian Qualification Framework) in dermal therapies, cosmetic nursing and/or light-based therapies. From a provider’s perspective, gaining a formal qualification leads to increased employment opportunities, better remuneration, improves professional reputation/status and decreases the risk of adverse incidents.

APJ Q3: What qualifications are you currently offering and what do they cover in terms of skills and knowledge? AACDS offers a range of nationally accredited qualifications, including the Graduate Diploma of Dermal Therapies, Graduate Diploma of Cosmetic Nursing and the Advanced Diploma of Cosmetic Dermal Science. AACDS clusters the Vocational Graduate Certificate in IPL and Laser Hair Reduction, from the national beauty training package, with all qualifications. The curriculum associated with all AACDS courses are based on our 15 years’ experience in cosmetic medicine and guided by the AACDS Curriculum Advisory Board (Dr John Flynn, Dr Jayson Oates, Dr Sharron Phillipson, Dr Kiran Shahid, Tracy Heywood RN, Sue Graham RN, Elisha Rounsevell DT and Terri Vinson B.Sc.). The knowledge and skills covered include d e r m a t o l o g y , p a t i e n t communication/documentation, fractionated Laser skin rejuvenation, Laser and IPL pigment and vascular lesion removal, IPL and Laser permanent hair reduction, epidermal resurfacing techniques, skin needling, anti-ageing medicine and cosmeceutical science. The practical competencies are delivered fulltime over a 10 to 12-day block, plus a twoweek clinical placement program at approved cosmetic medical clinics. AACDS has recently partnered with Australasian Academy of Anti-Ageing Medicine (A5M) to deliver the unit “Analyse the principles of anti-ageing medicine”. This provides graduates with credit to gain full certification in the A5M Certification program, a course that enables graduates to incorporate aspects of anti-ageing medicine in their scope of services.

APJ Q4: Who is a good candidate to undertake studies with AACDS? The ideal candidate for an AACDS course would have a

background in nursing or beauty and wish to complete a course that has a good return on investment (ie. not a three-year course requiring a significant time and financial investment that may not be recouped in the desired timeframe). The candidate’s objective should be to learn safe and effective dermal-therapy techniques to increase their scope of practice and to meet the employment needs of a modern cosmetic medical practice.

APJ Q5: With the current regulations for IPL and Laser what qualifications can AACDS help with candidates meeting the current proposed Option 3 Criteria? AACDS certainly supports aspects of Option 3 in the draft regulations for IPL and Laser. All AACDS current qualifications meet the educational requirements as outlined in the draft. All students graduate with an Australian Qualification level 7 or 8. At present, AACDS offers the highest qualification level in dermal therapies (inclusive of IPL and LASER) – the Graduate Diploma of Dermal Therapies (52707).

APJ Q6: What aspects of your training is conducted online and how do you deliver the practical component of the training? The theory component of all AACDS qualifications are offered online via a customdesigned online learning management system. AACDS has been delivering online education since 2007, so online techniques have been tried and tested to meet the needs of a busy student who maybe juggling work, study and family commitments. The practical competencies are delivered fulltime over a 10 to 12-day block with a ratio of only two students to one trainer/assessor. AACDS strongly believes that students must also practise/train by having exclusivity to equipment (such as lasers) as opposed to sharing equipment. In addition to practical competencies, students who have little or no clinical experience also complete a two-week clinical placement program in which they're placed in an approved cosmetic medical practice. The program is structured and requires the student to document a logbook of procedures observed.

APJ Q7: How has your relationship with APAN benefited you and how what aspect of the relationship do you value the most?

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AACDS has always been a strong supporter of organisations that enhance and promote security to beauty and related industries. AACDS recognises the impact and support APAN has provided to many aspects of the industry and the college is pleased remain a premium member long term.

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For further information contact AACDS Ph: 08 9328 6760.

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tattooremoval

TATTOO REMOVAL a business on the rise Louisa McKay – Costhetics Tattoos are a status symbol of independence and in some cases of rebellion from the status quo. Despite their cost they are extremely popular, predominantly with the 19-34 age group, but also with older individuals. While a relatively permanent fixture as one’s life evolves and enters another phase, sometimes this “landmark” may remind one of issues or individuals they no longer wish to associate with. For this reason the practice of tattoo removal is gaining momentum as a booming industry. In this article Louisa McKay from Costhetics presents some interesting statistics and information relating to this practice. Tattoo regrets is a common emotion for an uncommonly wide group of people. Sailors, fraternity initiates, bachelorette party girls and celebrities are notorious for inking their bodies, then wishing they hadn’t.

In 2013, the McCrindle business research organisation found that

34% of Australians with tattoos say that they regret, to some extent, having gotten them.

14% who have a tattoo have looked into having their tattoo removed.

The Australian trend is mirrored around the world. According to a 2013 statistical report issued by the American Society for Aesthetic Plastic Surgery (ASAPS), tattoo-removal procedures are up by more than 10%:

45,224 tattoo-removal procedures were performed in the U.S. in 2013

40,801 procedures in 2011

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More than half of these procedures were performed on Millennials, ages 19 to 34.

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Tattoo remorse seems to hit more women than men. They accounted for 32,888 (72.7 per cent) of procedures. Still men are certainly not immune, as can be seen in the case of film star Johnny Depp.

HOW JOHNNY DEPP MADE WINONA RYDER INTO A WINO Johnny Depp has often referred to his tattooed body as a journal of his life’s journey. It therefore came as no surprise when he chose to have Winona Forever tattooed on his bicep to express his love for Winona Ryder, his then-fiancée and Edward Scissorhands co-star:

minimise discomfort. A pre-treatment analgesic may be recommended for patients who have a low tolerance for pain. In most cases, tattoos can be faded to the point of invisibility. The tattoo does not disappear immediately after treatment, however, but rather over weeks or even months. One of the major challenges for people with tattoo regret is waiting for the laser-removal technique to do its job. The skill level of the artist that inked the tattoo can have an impact on success. Quality tattoos heal well, while badly inked tattoos heal more slowly and can result in scarring. Scar tissue, even if it is not visible on the surface, makes it harder to remove a tattoo than regular skin.

TOP FOUR FACTORS THAT IMPACT LASER TATTOOREMOVAL SUCCESS Removing a tattoo requires several considerations when determining your protocols for this procedure. These include: Source: http://thinng.com/system/images/2245/original/externalfileloader.png?1312956213

“Forever” didn’t last as long as the tattoo. Depp’s relationship crashed and burnt in 2011. He endured relentless teasing in the press for the permanent declaration inked onto his arm, but surprisingly didn’t want to remove the tattoo. He told GQ magazine: “To have it removed or erase it, is to try and say it never happened. If I alter it in some way…it would still be honest.” His solution was to take lemons and make lemonade, or more accurately, turn Winona into Wino:

Colour(s) in the tattoo – Blue and green are the most difficult to remove; black and red are the easiest.

Skin tone – Skin type is a critical factor as darker skin tones are more difficult for the laser to penetrate.

Ink type – Tattoo ink is not standardised and may have

Location – Areas of the body with a large blood and

components that make removal difficult. lymph node count (face and neck, for example) are the easiest to work on. The lower down the body you go, the more difficult removal can be. Other factors that have an impact include:

• • • •

Size of the tattoo Age of the tattoo Depth of ink penetration Immune-system health

WHO CAN REMOVE THEM? Source: http://img2.timeinc.net/people/static/h/package/johnnydepp/az/i/s/w.jpg

As the number of those who are rethinking whether their tattoo has any more relevance to their life is constantly on the increase, the practice of tattoo removal is becoming a booming industry.

SEEING THE (LASER) LIGHT FOR TATTOO REMOVAL For people whose tattoos may not be as amenable to alteration, tattoo removal is the option. Advancements in laser technology, such as the Q-switched Ruby and PicoSure lasers, make it possible to achieve significant fading or complete removal of an undesirable tattoo. What’s more, lasers achieve these results without scarring in over 95% of cases. No bloodshed, either. 20th century tattoo removal involved actually removing layers of skin. Today’s tattoo removal targets just the ink, and with laser-like precision, leaving surrounding healthy skin unaffected by the treatment.

HOW LASER TATTOO REMOVAL WORKS Laser treatment for tattoo removal consists of placing a handpiece against the surface of the skin and activating the laser light. This specific light spectrum is selectively absorbed by the ink particles of a tattoo. The laser light shatters them into smaller particles, which can then be collected by immune cells and removed harmlessly by the lymphatic system. Laser tattoo removal causes about as much discomfort as acquiring a tattoo does. A topical anaesthetic is used to minimise pain, while the laser device provides a continuous flow of cooling air to further

While there are certain acids that can remove tattoos, the most common and medically recommended method is through specialised lasers that provide the means of systematically removing each colour through specific protocols. Currently the new proposed national regulations for the use of IPL and Laser that are in the final stages of completion are indicating specific qualifications for the practise of these services including tattoo removal that will require “medical supervision”. These restrictions were proposed as there have been several incidents in Australia when a melanoma was missed as it was hidden within a tattoo and therefore not identified during a tattoo removal procedure. This has resulted in detrimental outcomes for patients.

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Article submitted by Louisa McKay, Costhetics. For further details contact Gina Fink at Savage PR Email gina@savagepr.com.au

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salonbusiness

WHAT I HAVE LEARNT ABOUT

LEADERSHIP

Confessions of a Business Owner By Billy Rickman Anyone who has ever met Billy Rickman knows that he is a positive “can-do� individual with an infectious charm that is radiated from his passion and commitment to the success of his franchise chain XY Skin + Body Specialists. His motto: Take Action, Fight Strong and Live with Passion pretty much sums up his attitude to business and life. For Billy, it's all about serious work coupled with serious fun. Indeed, his philosophy is that business should also be about rewards. As the CEO of the company he is a strong believer of leading by example, and is highly committed to his own professional development to ensure the ongoing success of his efficient and high-performance business model. This article uncovers some simple, yet relevant principles on leadership that reflect the wisdom from his personal journey into business success. We trust that from his confessions you will pick up some valuable nuggets to assist you in your own business journey. As XY continues to grow, there is nothing I have become more certain about in business than the absolute necessity to have an outstanding leader at the helm.

After a career in the Navy spanning eight years and almost the same period now in running many businesses, the number one lesson I have learnt during this time is that a strong leader is single-handedly the most important asset a business can have. In fact, without a strong leader, failure is pretty much guaranteed. I have watched floundering businesses spend huge chunks of their limited budget and resources on strategies to keep their business afloat and regain ground on their competitors. New marketing initiatives, client-retention techniques, administration and budget cuts are all small examples of the measures a business will go through to maintain solvency and market share. In my experience, very seldom do any of these strategies work long-term without a shift or change in the leadership and management teams.

MY OBSERVATIONS In my current position with XY, I am blessed to have the opportunity to speak with many business owners on a daily basis. From daily dealings with XY Franchisees to frequent communications with other business owners through networks, public speakers, consultation panels, distribution centres and manufacturers, I feel that a lot of my days are filled with interactions with business owners. As a result, through my experiences with a wide variety of entrepreneurs, I have developed this uncanny ability to sense how a business is performing almost immediately after speaking with the

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leader of the business. Do I have a magic crystal ball that tells me such things? Of course not, but by simply engaging the owner and speaking with them for five minutes, it is easy to tell whether or not they have a thriving business or a surviving one.

THE ATTRIBUTES OF A SUCCESSFUL LEADER You see, in this day and age of cutthroat business, both start-ups or established companies fight tooth and nail for the most marginal of increases in their market share. This is important because the days of passive trading are well and truly gone. What every business needs in today's market is a person who is willing to stand up and be counted. A good leader does not fear responsibility, but craves it. A good leader will inspire, motivate, energise others as well as be responsible for their own motivation. They will create momentum and actively drive a business forward. A true leader also has a strong psychology and a disciplined mind. Instead of accepting that things are the way they are, they actually see the opportunities, regardless of the economy and visualise how they can improve the situation and make it better than it is – they are the eternal optimist. The biggest poison that any business can swallow is the pill of negativity. Negativity has been proven in the past to take companies that were turning multi-million-dollar profits each year into insolvent corporations that were nomore, within just a couple of years. So what changed? Well, in most cases, it was a simple change in leadership that did it. Statistics confirm that companies who had positive, optimistic, enthusiastic, confident leaders flourished in almost any economy. These leaders inspired, motivated and encouraged their staff to do better, be better and work smarter. They welcomed innovation and new ideas, encouraged self-development and training. They created a culture of independence and cohesion at the same time, a culture where the company saw the road ahead was paved in gold. These companies relished in this culture and leadership, and in a lot of cases they are still some of the biggest, well-known companies around today. Conversely, in a vast amount of cases where companies have faltered, there too had been a leadership change and they had been replaced with a negative-minded leader. The new leader created a fear culture, a “you better work hard otherwise I'll sack you” type culture. They ignore employee suggestions and ridicule new ideas. They speak down at employees instead of treating them with respect, and are resentful of their staff for things that were in the past e.g. an old argument, an error in operations, etc. Most importantly, this new leader speaks ill of their customers, their product, their future and the economy. All of these new leadership characteristics paint a glum picture for the employees, and sure enough the employees started to believe it. They question their decision-making and they don't have the confidence to raise any suggestions or recommendations that could better the business. They treat their clients the same way that they are treated by the senior management, and instead of working hard for their boss they work mediocre for their pay cheque. They are taught to not believe in their product, their company or their future. Sure enough, this leads to having no career future in that establishment, and sometimes this can also mean that the business itself may also fail to survive.

THE BENEFITS OF GREAT LEADERSHIP Without great leadership your business will never reach its true potential. Without great leadership there will continue to be frustrations in your business. So does that mean that with great leadership there will be no frustrations? Of course not, but the frustrations will be defined by challenges such as “we have grown 60% in the past 12 months, how can we gain another 20%” vs “why are our staff always leaving”. The number one quality of a great leader is that they will always be honest with themselves. At the end of each business day, a great leader will ask themself the most important question and answer it truthfully – “Did I do everything I could today to reach our goals?” The most ironic thing is that a poor leader will not ask this question, and if by chance they do, they will not answer it honestly. A poor leader does not want to take responsibility for the business’s shortfalls and will look to blame anything else other than themself – it is that simple. That's how I developed my uncanny ability to sense a business performance within five minutes of speaking with the leader. I know that if I speak with a business leader for even two minutes and they do not spend that time blaming the economy, the clients, their experience, their location or the staff for any of the business's shortfalls, but instead spend that time speaking of an optimistic future, then I know a business is in good hands and is more than likely exceeding any goals that have been set.

ABOUT BILLY RICKMAN Billy is the CEO and Franchiser of XY Skin + Body Specialists. Through his coaching, education and own experience, Billy has developed a robust, efficient and high performance business model for XY Skin + Body Specialists.

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essentialoils

FRANKINCENSE By Tina Viney

The new Star of Essential Oils

When working with the skin and body, essential oils can be an amazing tool that can allow us to achieve targeted penetration in addressing specific concerns, whether these are skin, nervous or system concerns that are hindering our results. Aromatherapy is an amazing study and advocates who pursue it as a serious discipline invariably specialise in it and move to areas of herbal medicine and whole-body wellbeing. This is because of the amazing therapeutic properties of essential oils and their incredible ability in their pure concentration to penetrate the skin to the dermis where they can enter the bloodstream.

to cancer cells. For example, sesquiterpenes compounds found in these oils have proven an anticancer-activating capability that can arrest the proliferation of certain cancer cells. Another trial proving the effects of frankincense essential oil on J82 cells and UROtsa cells involved different mechanisms leading to cancer-cell death. In fact, frankincense essential oil was proven to elicit selective cancer-cell death via NRF-2-mediated oxidative stress. But let’s take a broader look at frankincense and its general benefits to skin and health.

Health Benefits of Frankincense Essential Oil In our modern-day advances of trans-epidermal delivery system here is a category of actives that can achieve just that all on its own without the need for human engineering. As such, essential oils can be an amazing tool to help us achieve our skin-health goals, especially when used skilfully and correct. One amazing essential oil that is gaining a great deal of research momentum is frankincense. As such this article will attempt to just introduce some of the amazing properties of frankincense. However, there will be follow-up articles that will expound on the merits of this amazing oil, with the latest discoveries being its amazing benefits in fighting cancer. If you wish to investigate some of the scientific studies on this subject I have included two references at the end of this article that are of interest, where certain components in frankincense in combination with myrrh essential oils were found to induce apotois

The health benefits of frankincense essential oil can be attributed to its properties as an antiseptic, disinfectant, astringent, carminative, cicatrisant, cytophylactic, digestive, diuretic, emenagogue, expectorant, sedative, tonic, uterine and vulnerary substance. Frankincense oil is extracted from the gum or resin from Frankincense or Olibanum trees, whose scientific name is Boswellia Carteri.

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CHEMICAL CONSTITUENTS The main chemical constituents of frankincense oil to which its therapeutic properties are attributed are ketonic alcohol (olibanol), resinous matters (30 to 60 %) and terpenes such as a-and p-pinene, camphene, dipentene and phellandrene. It also contains alpha pinene, actanol, bornyl acetate, linalool, octyl acetate, incensole and incensyl acetate.

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The monoterpenes and sesquiterpenes are the most valuable elements of frankincense oil. Monoterpenes help prevent and discharge toxins from your liver and kidneys, and have antiseptic, antibacterial, stimulating, mild analgesic and expectorant properties. Meanwhile, sesquiterpenes can go beyond the bloodbrain barrier and simulate the limbic system of your brain, as well as your hypothalamus and pineal and pituitary glands. Frankincense has been a popular ingredient in cosmetics and incense burners for centuries. It has even been found in the remains of ancient Egyptian and Anglo-Saxon civilisations. Furthermore, it is closely associated with religious traditions and rites, particularly in the Christian tradition. Apart from being used as a cosmetic and as a fragrance, frankincense oil has numerous medicinal uses, which are summarised below. Immune System: Frankincense oil is effective as an antiseptic, and even the fumes or smoke obtained from burning it have antiseptic and disinfectant qualities that eliminate the germs in the space where the smoke filters out. It can be applied on wounds without any known side-effects to protect them from tetanus and becoming septic. It is equally good on internal wounds and protects them from developing infections. Oral Health: Those same antiseptic qualities also make frankincense oil a useful preventative measure against oral issues, like bad breath, toothaches, cavities, mouth sores and other infections. Look for it in natural oral-care products that include frankincense oil if you enjoy the flavor or aroma, and want to include a strong antiseptic in your health regimen. You can even create your own all-natural toothpaste with frankincense oil and baking soda, or a mouthwash with water and peppermint oil. Astringent: The astringent property of frankincense oil has many benefits, because it strengthens gums, hair roots, tones and lifts skin, contracts muscles, intestines and blood vessels, and thereby gives protection from premature losses of teeth and hair. This astringent quality also reduces the appearance of wrinkles, and combats the loss of firmness of intestines, abdominal muscles and limbs associated with age. Above all, frankincense acts as a coagulant, helping to stop bleeding from wounds and cuts. This astringent property also helps to relieve diarrhoea of various types. Emenagogue: Frankincense essential oil reduces obstructed and delayed menstruation and delays the advent of menopause. It also helps curing other symptoms associated with menses and Post Menstrual Syndrome, such as pain in the abdominal region, nausea, headache, fatigue and mood swings. Carminative: Frankincense oil eliminates gas and prevents it from building up in the body. This removal of excess gas from the intestines also gives relief from associated problems like stomach aches, pain in the abdominal region and chest, abnormal amounts of sweating, uneasiness, indigestion and many other related conditions. Cicatrisant: This is an interesting property of frankincense oil, and so valuable to skin health and anti-ageing. When applied topically it can assist scars and marks, such as with boils, acne or chickenpox to fade at a substantially faster rate. This also includes the fading of stretch marks, surgery marks and fat cracks associated with pregnancy and delivery of children.

Digestive: Frankincense essential oil is excellent in relieving indigestion and discomfort due to excessive acidity. This oil has digestive properties without any side-effects, and it facilitates digestion the way most medicines should, unlike common antacids which only suppress the symptoms. This oil speeds up the secretion of digestive juices (gastric juices, bile and acids) in the stomach and facilitates movement of food through the intestines by stimulating peristaltic motion. This means an all-around improvement in the digestion of food. Anti-Ageing: As a cytophylactic (cell protector), frankincense oil promotes regeneration of healthy cells and also keeps the existing cells and tissues healthy. When you combine this aspect of frankincense oil with its powerful astringent capabilities at a cellular level you have potent anti-ageing properties that can provide you with excellent results when treating pigmentation and wrinkles. Frankincense is also excellent for toning and tightening the skin, not just for the face, but also for the body.

Overall tonic: Overall, frankincense essential oil tones and boosts health and is therefore considered a tonic. It benefits all the systems operating in the body, including the respiratory, digestive, nervous and excretory systems, while also increasing strength by aiding the absorption of nutrients into the body. Furthermore, frankincense oil strengthens the immune system and keeps you strong. Diuretic: If you thought that Lasix and its variants were the only drugs that could help you release water from the body through urination, you were incorrect. Those pharmaceutical options may be instantaneous, but not very safe for long-term use. Frankincense essential oil is a natural and safe alternative. It promotes urination and helps you lose that extra water weight, as well as fats, sodium, uric acid and various other toxins from the body, with the added advantage of lowering blood pressure. The best part about this is that frankincense essential oil is completely safe and has no adverse side- effects. Respiratory Issues: Frankincense can soothe a cough and eliminate phlegm deposited in the respiratory tracts and the lungs. Frankincense essential oil also provides relief from bronchitis and congestion of nasal tract, larynx, pharynx, bronchi and lungs. Its antidepressant and anti-inflammatory properties also help relax the breathing passages, which can reduce the dangers of asthma attacks, and its antiseptic qualities are what give it the reputation of being an immune system booster. It also eases body pain, headaches and toothaches and balances the rise in body temperature commonly associated with colds.

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Stress and Anxiety: Frankincense oil is also a very effective sedative, because it induces a feeling of mental peace, relaxation

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Let Us Solve Your Problems

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Can we help you too! ] Staff Wages ] Staff Conflict ] Insurance needs ] Legal matters ] Professional Business

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Salons and Clinics join APAN because they know they can access experts to solve their problems, while they concentrate on running their business.

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Documents prepared for you Regulatory compliance issues Accessing loans and leases Financial assistance for your clients to access your services

APAN has four Membership Classifications to suit your individual or business needs. GOLD MEMBERSHIP CORPORATE PLATINUM

GOLD DEGREE QUALIFICATION CORPORATE PLATINUM MEDICAL

For further information please contact APAN on 07 5593 0360 | Email info@apanetwork.com www.apanetwork.com and download a Membership Application Form.

APJ 54We GUARANTEE you results.

and satisfaction. It also awakens insight, makes you more introspective and lowers anxiety, anger and stress. When feeling anxious or if you anticipate some sort of stressful episode, add some frankincense oil to a diffuser or a vaporiser. Frankincense essential oil promotes deep breathing and relaxation, which can open your breathing passages and reduce blood pressure, moving your mental state back to calmness. Uterine: This oil is very good for uterine health. Since it regulates the production of the estrogen hormone, it reduces the chances of post-menopause tumor or cyst formation in the uterus. In terms of the premenopause period, it keeps a woman’s uterus healthy by regulating proper menstrual cycles. It is also effective in supporting the body by regulating gynecological conditions or stressors that can lead to complicated dysfunctions in certain women. Wound healing: Simply apply a diluted solution of this oil on wounds or use it blended with a skin cream, as the therapeutic constituents of frankincense will assist in rapidly enhancing the wound-healing process and protect it from infection. This oil is equally beneficial in

healing internal wounds, cuts and ulcers. It also relieves pain associated with rheumatism and arthritis, and also helps with wounds associated with acne and various types of inflammation.

CONTRAINDICATIONS There are no known adverse side-effects. That being said, frankincense essential oil should not be used during pregnancy, since it does act as an emenagogue and astringent. BLENDING Frankincense oil blends well with Lime, Lemon, Orange and other Citrus oils as well as Benzoin, Bergamot, Lavender, Myrrh, Pine and Sandalwood oil. This makes it a popular element of many herbalists for various aromatherapy combinations. In skin therapy it can be included in face and body treatments for its undisputed therapeutic properties.

References: www.organicfacts.net http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/ pmc/articles/PMC3796379/ Composition and potential anticancer activities of essential oils obtained from myrrh and frankincense http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/ pubmed/25006348

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Setting a new benchmark in AESTHETICS

Now these standards can DEFINE YOU

Bachelor of Applied Health Science (Clinical Aesthetics) THIS DEGREE BOASTS A RIGOROUS ACADEMIC PROGRAM BUILT AROUND HEALTH SCIENCE SUPPORTED BY EXTENSIVE CLINICAL PRACTICE SKILLS. IT AIMS TO DELIVER THE LATEST IN SKILLS AND KNOWLEDGE TO EQUIP GRADUATES FOR THE EXCITING AND RAPIDLY CHANGING AESTHETICS INDUSTRY. The Australasian College of Health and Wellness is now also offering PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT COURSES for those who aspire for higher learning in skin science. If you would like to grow your knowledge on skin to a higher academic level why not consider undertaking a comprehensive unit in:

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Anatomy and Physiology of the Skin Pathophysiology of the Skin Skin Differential Diagnosis Clinical aesthetics and Dermal Therapy scope of practice Aesthetics Management of Common skin Disorders

These units offered as a seminar series will give graduates an opportunity to gain the benefit of knowledge on the skin at a higher academic level as well as experiencing a learning environment that will open the door to a potential university degree. Should you wish to pursue a degree qualification with the Australasian College of Health and Wellness these units will provide the benefit credit points towards your degree.To register or for further information on these units email: info@tac.edu.au or call 1800 999 963

ENROL NOW! For further information about the Degree please contact Head of Faculty Associate Professor Sinan Ali on 02 8587 8888. Sinan.ali@tac.edu.au www.tac.edu.au/highereducation

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PREPARING FOR A BETTER FUTURE By Catherine Lawler-Rohan – Student Liaison Officer for Bachelor of Applied Health Science (Clinical Aesthetics) Australasian College of Health and Wellness Catherine Lawler-Rohan is a vivacious and highly committed new addition to the staff of the Australasian College of Health and Wellness. Passionate about the industry and with vast experience as an aesthetic therapist working in cosmetic medical clinics, she understands and is passionate about the need and value of higher education. As the newly appointed Student Liaison Officer for the Bachelor of Applied Health Science (Clinical Aesthetics) Catherine’s role is to assist potential students in identifying the best possible way to move forward and embrace higher learning. In this article she shares with us her perspective of the industry and how this qualification can open doors and be of value to new and existing therapists and professionals who wish to better prepare for the future.

Our industry is changing at a rapid pace. In the past, skin improvement and skin management was traditionally in the domain of the beauty therapist, while appearance enhancement through anti-wrinkle injectables and fillers were delivered by doctors and nurses. However, this divide is changing. Cosmetic doctors and cosmetic nurses are now progressively entering into the broader domain of aesthetic therapies offering skin-management services such as microdermabrasion, skin needling or IPL and laser treatments – services that were previously predominantly performed by beauty therapists. The evidence is clear – cosmetic medical clinics are now evolving to broaden their scope of service, luring consumers to access both skin improvement and the more “instant” procedures such as injectables, all within the cosmetic medical clinic environment.

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THE COSMETIC MEDICAL DOCTOR

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As the trend for cosmetic medical clinics in continuing to grow, so is the growing number of doctors, who were originally general

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practitioners that are now seeking to enter the field of cosmetic medicine. These practices usually tend to be very lucrative and are in high demand. Doctors wishing to enter the aesthetics industry virtually gain their training through professional development training, industry seminars and participation at specific conferences. This level of training is seen currently to be sufficient to enter the aesthetics industry, however, with the growing use of technology and knowledge of the consumer and their need for the highly regarded doctor, there is a resurgence of the necessity for further postgraduate training in what is becoming a specialty area.

CONSUMER DEMAND ON THE RISE Statistics confirm that the ageing baby boomer population is constantly increasing and as a result we are also observing another phenomenon. Hard-working and relatively high-achieving baby boomers are choosing to defy ageing and work extra years to secure a comfortable lifestyle that they have become accustomed to, for many more years to come. Procedures for skin management and age management are continually being developed to accommodate this demand. However, appearance-enhancement services are not just limited to the baby boomers. Their demand is now mainstream and commonplace across many age groups. And so we are progressively seeing more salons, clinics, medispas and wellness centres offering their brand of service to cater for this new level of service. With numerous choices available consumers are now asking the question – who is the best qualified to provide me with the best possible results that I am seeking?

THE NATURAL FACE IS BACK IN VOGUE Trends in appearance enhancement have changed. The current emphasis is no longer about extensive lifting or volumising, but more about glowing skin that has vibrancy and luminosity as the preferred treatment outcome. Cosmetic medicine is now becoming more specialised. Whereas a few year ago there were only a handful of injectable formulations, today there are hundreds of new products that offer the practitioner numerous choices to include in their “tool kit” – several formulations, each providing varying capabilities to deliver specific and targeted outcomes. Injecting is no longer a matter of anatomy, techniques and procedures are becoming more sophisticated. Doctors and nurses constantly need to update their skills. New global techniques in the use of fillers offer practitioners the ability to master the skill of appearance enhancement so that they can create subtle improvements that are delivered to achieve a totally natural and “untouched” end result, as this is what a growing number of consumers are seeking. No two faces are the same and achieving improvement that is undetectable is a skill and an art that requires training. Procedures with these objectives in mind are not just restricted to injectables. A skilled multi-discipline approach utilising various technologies and techniques can deliver amazing results in turning back the clock, while supporting the individual’s structural integrity of their skin and muscles. However, to achieve these results they require a greater depth of knowledge as more specific and personalised protocols will need to be determined, depending on the age, skin condition and the desired treatment outcome for each client or patient.

College is FEE Help approved for those who wish to access Federal Higher Education. This government support is available for successful candidates so that they can study with peace of mind. There are four subjects per semester and two semesters per year, so you can study anything from one subject to four subjects per semester, depending on your work/life balance, and you can pick another subject or drop one if the load is too high. We have two intakes per year – February/March and the second intake mid-year in August. As a student you can attend the campus or be a virtual student while the lectures and tutorials are being delivered, or download your lecture/tutorial later that evening using our virtual class delivery mode.

RECOGNITION OF PRIOR LEARNING Credits for prior learning (CPL). A student can apply who has completed prior studies. You can request such considerations prior to your enrolment with evidence of studies you have completed that may apply to subjects that are similar to those already completed. Beauty therapists have extensive training, such as a Diploma of Beauty Therapy, and will receive (CPL) for some subjects in the first year of the Degree, so you may not have to study those units again. Likewise with a Diploma or Bachelor of Nursing, you may also be eligible (CPL) for some of the first year subjects of the Bachelor of Applied Health Science (Clinical Aesthetics) that you may have already covered. To determine if you qualify for any (CPL) just email the College your qualifications or evidence of your experience.

SUPPORTING YOU EVERY STEP OF THE WAY The fear of failure is always a major factor when contemplating new studies, especially at tertiary level, but don’t entertain that thought a moment longer – as they say “where there is a will there is a way”. Here at the Australasian College of Health and Wellness we offer an eight-week tertiary preparation course when you can learn to develop the skills to research, write and understand educational units at a Degree level. We also have a mentoring program with our lecturers so that you can get maximum support during your study with us in order to achieve your goals. Along with our Learning Resource Centre, you will receive maximum support and we will hold your hand through every step of your journey from beginning to end. This qualification offers solid academic rigour through comprehensive scientific units delivered by career academics with many decades of experience. It also includes units in the latest technologies, as well as anti-ageing and wellness units that are unique to this Degree. Additionally, the course is supported by extensive practicum components to ensure students are confident and industry-ready to enter the ever-expanding and exciting field of aesthetics and dermal therapies. Graduates of the Bachelor of Applied Health Science (Clinical Aesthetics) are in high demand. Furthermore, this qualification can pave the way and open doors to a new and exiting career or simply to help you reach greater success in your current practice. As the Student Liaison Officer I am committed to helping you on your journey, so why don’t you call me today and together we can look at your prospects for an amazing future.

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GAINING A DEGREE QUALIFICATION

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These new skills require advanced knowledge. At the Australasian College of Heath and Wellness we are proud to offer the Bachelor of Applied Health Science (Clinical Aesthetics) – a three-year fulltime course that will require you to physically attend only two days a week. Alternatively, if you are currently working you can study part-time up to six years. We are delighted to share with you that our

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Call Catherine Lawler-Rohan on 02 8587 8888

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industryawards

2015 MyFaceMyBody Awards Australasia SYDNEY Hilton Hotel 28th November 2015 Australia will be host to what promises to be a wonderful night of glitz and glamour as the Australasian MyFaceMyBody Awards will be presented at the Sydney Hilton Hotel on the 28th November 2015.

industry. I wanted to make the awards prestigious hence having the consumer actually vote on their favourite brands and mystery shopping practices to identify those that have exceptional client service.

This will be the inaugural event for these awards as Aesthetics and Cosmetic Medicine clinics, practitioners, products and companies within the industry have the opportunity to enter these prestigious awards.

The awards recognise and reward those clinics, specialists and brands in the aesthetic and beauty market for their achievements and impact on this rapidly growing industry and highlights innovative trends, products and treatments.

APJ Q2: What are the primary objectives of the awards?

MyFaceMyBody strongly believes in bridging the gap between the aesthetic medicine market with mainstream beauty and fashion sectors to enable aesthetic brands and professionals to reach a much wider audience. The awards will celebrate the innovation and success within a fastgrowing and exciting industry. We caught up with the Director of MyFaceMyBody, Stephen Handisides, to present to you further information on these awards.

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APJ Q1: Tell us, Stephen, what prompted you to start the MyFaceMyBody Awards and where did the concept originate?

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MyFaceMyBody Awards are a follow-on from the popularity and concept of the MyFaceMyBody website. The awards were created to celebrate innovation and clinical excellence within the aesthetic

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APJ Q3: Name the various categories for these awards and how are they judged? In Australia the categories are: Brand Awards Cosmeceutical Range of the Year Best Anti-Ageing Product or Treatment Best Skin Tightening Product or Treatment Best Body Reshaping Treatment Best Plastic Surgery Product or Device Most Innovative Product or Service Best Customer Service by a Manufacturer or Supplier Awards for Practices/Practitioners Best Plastic Surgery Practice Best Aesthetic Practice – Vic Best Aesthetic Practice – NSW Best Aesthetic Practice – QLD Best Aesthetic Practice – ACT Best Aesthetic Practice – SA/WA/NT Best Aesthetic Practice – TAS Best Aesthetic Practice – New Zealand Best Customer Service Best Practice Team Best Practice Manager Media Awards Best Beauty Blogger Best Practice Website Here is how they are voted: A. Product and Media Awards Once companies have submitted their entries online with supporting evidence, a shortlist will be decided from a panel of experts, all leaders in the fields of cosmetic, aesthetic and dentistry. The judges will study all entries independently. The finalists will be voted on by the consumer and a final decision will be made by the judges. B. Clinic Awards Clinic awards will be judged based on their online entries and supporting evidence. Each finalist will be professionally mystery shopped at their practice where a detailed 12-page report will be reviewed by the judges and a final decision made.

APJ Q4: When and were will the Awards be held in Australia? The awards will be held in Sydney at the prestigious Hilton Hotel on the 28th November 2015.

APJ Q5: What can the cosmetic medical and aesthetics industry in Australia expect to benefit from these awards? Being recognised and even nominated for a MyFaceMyBody Award tells the consumer that these brands, clinics and specialists are trusted as being at the top of their professional game. Many of our brands have increased sales as a direct result from being nominated or winning an award. The event also gives those in the industry a huge networking opportunity, and let’s not forget, it is a great night out filled with glitz, glamour, celebrities and press, so is a huge opportunity for brands to get their names seen in some of the top publications and on-line media.

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APJ Q6: How does one register for the Gala Dinner and what are the costs?

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The cost per ticket for this prestigious event is $275 per person or $2600 per table of 10. Prices are inclusive of GST. 25

For bookings and more information contact The Production House Events – email: info@tphe.com.au

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accreditationprogram

New Theory Accreditation Program for Cosmetic Nurses and Doctors for the use of IPL and Laser Changes are afoot in the aesthetics and cosmetics industry with the release of the Australian Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety Agency’s Regulatory Impact Statement on Intense Pulsed Light sources (IPLs) and Lasers for Cosmetic or Beauty Therapy purposes and the Medical Board’s Public consultation paper and Regulation Impact Statement – Registered medical practitioners who provide cosmetic medical and surgical procedures, both which are examining safety and best practice for laser and IPL. Regardless of whether national licensing or other regulatory frameworks are implemented, it is clear that clinical education is the absolute common denominator. Elissa O’Keefe from Laser Safety Australia knows about clinical education and was instrumental in the research that has informed the Master of Nurse Practitioner courses now delivered across the country. So when she entered the aesthetics industry it was clear that she had something to contribute and this was the genesis of three accredited online laser and IPL training programs now delivered as a joint initiative with the Australasian College of Cosmetic Surgery . The combination of the introductory and the advanced courses give excellent grounding in safety and clinical practice, both sit in the registered health profession’s postgraduate space and they are Australian Health Practitioner Regulation Agency compliant. The courses are relevant whether you are new to the industry or would like to do a refresher. They are designed to be able to be done in small, manageable “bites” to accommodate the busy lives of clinicians. As one Western Australia GP puts it, “I like it, because I can do half an hour in my lunch break”. All courses are developed using the AS/NZS 4173:2004 Guide to the safe use of lasers in healthcare and the ACCS Professional Practice Standards and Scope of Practice for Aesthetic Nursing Practice in Australia (2015) and have been reviewed by clinicians with extensive experience in the industry. The online Introductory laser and intense pulsed light safety training course for aesthetic practice is an accredited laser and IPL safety course and is endorsed by the Australian College of Nursing and recognised by both the Queensland and Tasmanian Governments for an application for a licence. It gives clinicians the fundamental knowledge needed to understand the laser and IPL technology used. The unit on light physics discusses the science of light and concepts such as the electromagnetic spectrum, selective photothermolysis and the interactions between light and the skin. The unit on laser and IPL systems gives an overview of how the technology works. The unit on regulation covers legislation, regulation and standards both nationally and those pertaining to the State-based requirements set out for Queensland, Western Australia and Tasmania. The safety unit is the largest topic and ensures the participant understands the requirements for client and staff safety, personal protective equipment, controlled access to laser rooms and laser safety planning and auditing. This one takes about eight hours to complete and costs $520. The online Refresher laser & intense pulsed light safety training course for aesthetic practice is designed for experienced practitioners with a commitment to continuing professional development. Health industry best practice is that a refresher course be completed every three to five years. This one also takes about eight hours to complete and costs $520.

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The online Advanced laser & intense pulsed light accreditation for aesthetic practice course builds on the Introductory course. It has a significant section on the principles of professional and clinical practice and covers such topics as AHPRA compliant advertising and the prevention of burns. It has indepth coverage of clinical presentations, including the reduction of unwanted hair, pigmentation disorders, vascular conditions, photodynamic therapy, skin rejuvenation and resurfacing and tattoo removal. It includes a set of laser safety standard operating policy and procedure templates and a clear log book to record practical experience. An Accredited laser safety course certification (from Laser Safety Australia or equivalent) is required prior to enrolment in the Advanced laser & intense pulsed light accreditation for aesthetic practice course. The advanced course takes up to 12 hours to complete and costs $680. Ms O’Keefe says that clinicians most often ask about practical experience. She says, “The choices and quality of laser and IPL equipment is so diverse that there is no one place to be able to learn about all of it. We recommend that after you have completed your online theory courses that you work within your current scope of practice, identify a more experienced clinical mentor, ensure that you have standard operating policy and procedures in place, liaise with the manufacturer of the specific machinery that you will be using, and begin to record your practical experience in a log book as part of your portfolio of evidence for registration. This helps you to increase your scope of practice in a safe and rigorous fashion and is within the usual professional development frameworks”. References: Australian Health Practitioner Regulation Agency (2015). Continuing Professional Development. http://www.ahpra.gov.au/Education/Continuing-ProfessionalDevelopment.aspx Accessed 23 July 2015 Australian Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety Agency (2015). Regulatory Impact Statement Intense Pulsed Light sources (IPLs) and Lasers for Cosmetic or Beauty Therapy. Australasian College of Cosmetic Surgery (2015). Professional Practice Standards and Scope of Practice for Aesthetic Nursing Practice in Australia. Medical Board of Australia. Public consultation paper and Regulation Impact Statement – Registered medical practitioners who provide cosmetic medical and surgical procedures. SAI Global (2004). AS/NZS 4173:2004 Guide to the safe use of lasers in health care. Websites to access courses: www.lasersafetyaustralia.com www.accs.org.au/cosmetic-medicine-training/laser-ipl-courses

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scienceskin

The Cellular structure of the

IMMUNE SYSTEM– Part 2 By Gay Wardle The immune system controls the body’s ability to repair and heal and is critical to the success of all skin and body treatments whose aim is to repair, heal or rejuvenate. Therefore, understanding the immune system – its function and capabilities – is fundamental to how we determine the treatment outcomes we wish to achieve. In the winter issue of APJ Gay Wardle introduced the first of a three-part series that explores the role and function of the immune system. In this article she examines the cellular structure of the lymphatic system. This is the second part to this amazing system that fights to protect our bodies against invading organisms and helps manage and maintain our bodies during inflammation. So let`s have a look at some of the remarkable features of the lymphatic cells.

THE LYMPHOCYTES Lymphocytes are the mediators of the adaptive immunity that are present in the circulation as well as various lymphoid organs. The

appearance of the lymphocyte seems to be morphologically identical, but this is definitely not the case. There are many different functions performed by lymphocytes and they therefore have different origins. Let’s look at the T lymphocytes. These mature in the thymus (which is more active in young) and B lymphocytes mature in the bone marrow. These two groups have reciprocal effects. For example once a certain T lymphocytes (T helper cells) has sensitised an antigen it then can stimulate B lymphocytes. These B lymphocytes develop into plasma cells that specialise in producing antibodies. When B lymphocytes come in contact with an antigen in the lymph node they will reproduce and leave the lymph node through the efferent lymph vessels. From there they enter the blood, then enter tissues and then return to the lymph nodes. Most of the lifespan of a lymphocyte is spent in lymph nodes or other lymphatic tissue and only hours will be spent in the blood. T cells make up 60% to 70% of the lymphocytes in peripheral blood. They do not recognise free or circulating antigens. Instead they recognise only peptide fragments of protein antigens that are bound to proteins of the major

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histocompatibility complex (MHC). MHC was discovered on the basis of studies showing rejection or acceptance of tissue grafting. The function of MHC is to display peptides for recognition by T lymphocytes. Incredibly this allows T cells to recognise antigens in other cells, which enables them to perform their function of killing infected cells. It also allows them to activate phagocytes or B lymphocytes that have ingested protein antigens. B lymphocytes are the only cell lineage that synthesise antibody of immunoglobulin M (IgM) and make up 10% to 20% of the circulating peripheral lymphocyte. Where the T cells can only recognise MHC associated peptides, B cells recognise and will respond to many different structures. All of which include proteins, lipids, polysaccharides and nucleic acids. As I have previously mentioned, once a B cell is stimulated the cell differentiates into a plasma cell. These plasma cells secrete large amounts of antibodies that are mediators for immunoglobulins. These immunoglobulins are divided into five isotypes, all of which have different actions in an immune response. IgG, IgM and IgA are responsible for 95% of circulating antibodies, IgE is present in the circulation at very low concentrations and IgD is found on the surface of B cells’ although it is not secreted.

eosinophil can ingest and kill certain microorganisms at a relatively sluggish rate, the primary mode of antimicrobial activity is by secretion of lysosomal contents into a small space between it and the target to which it binds. It has granules that contain eosinophil peroxidase as well as a number of other proteins. Monocytes are cells derived from bone marrow and remain in the blood for a short time (1 to 2 days) before they travel to the tissues. Once monocytes are in the tissues they transform into large macrophages where they have a greater capacity for phagocytosis than they do when they are in the blood. They can remain in the tissues for months or years as macrophage cells. Macrophages are very large cells that are found in most connective tissues and organs. When these cells are in organs they will have a different name. Cells in the liver are called Kupffer cells, cells in the spleen are sinus histiocytes, in the nervous system they are called microglial cells and in the lungs they are called alveolar macrophages. Their role in the immune system is to be a filter against microbes and senescent cells as well as alerting T and B lymphocytes of the adaptive immune system. Macrophages have many lysosomes and once activated lysosomal enzymes are released to ingest, metabolise and destroy invading microorganisms.

Neutrophils make up to 60% of white blood cells. These cells are responsible for breaking down and engulfing bacteria, so they are a phagocyte cell. They are loaded with digestive enzymes (lysosomes) that break down and destroy bacteria. When they engulf the bacteria, this debris is deposited into phagosome sacs, and then it will discharge its lysosomal enzymes into phagosome.

Macrophages are recruited to sites of inflammation by the release of lymphocyte-derived chemokines and other cytokines. Where there is inflammation these macrophage cells are dominant and they accumulate and proliferate. Once the inflammation is eliminated the macrophage cells die off or return into the lymphatics.

Eosinophils are fully differentiated white blood cells that are specialised in the removal of parasites and allergens. Although the

Natural Killer Cells are cells of the innate immunity. They have and use a limited set of activating receptors that recognise infected

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ENROL TODAY and start preparing for your best year ever!

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For further details and to book

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Ph: 0418 708 455

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cells or cells with DNA damage. They have the ability to kill these damaged cells. These cells are capable of destroying tumor cells and they provide the first line of defence against tumor cells. Natural Killer Cells have the ability to rapidly react against cells with DNA damage, the cells that are damaged beyond repair. Mast cells are found in connective tissue throughout the body. These cells jump into action where there is both an acute and or chronic inflammation. These cells are coated with IgE, which release histamines that elicit the early vascular changes of acute inflammation. Mast cells that are coated with IgE have a very important role in allergic reactions, including anaphylactic shock. Cytokines were originally called factors. Most communication between cells was carried out by small, hormone-like protein “factors” secreted by the cells. These substances could stimulate almost all of the major events in immune responses. For example, some factors could inhibit the growth factor and activity of other cells, while others could stimulate cells to divide and even to change the cells’ function. Cytokines are a family of molecules that have many different activities. Some act on several different types of cells and can induce in each type a response unrelated to its action on the other types. Other cytokines work together, stimulating or inhibiting the activity or growth when two or more affect the same cells. When a cell is damaged the cytokines that emanate from sites of damage to bring in the necessary immune cells are called chemokines. The importance of the cytokines in the host response to injury and infection cannot be overstated. Without them, the body`s ability to fight off pathogens, repair damage and restore and maintain health would be far less effective. Cells that have been damaged or infected with microbes release chemokines, which promote an influx of white blood cells. Other cytokines stimulate these cells to emit toxic microbicidal chemicals and enzymes that begin ingesting both microbes and injured cells and antigens. Cytokines bind to and trigger responses only in cells within the immediate vicinity of the cells that produce them, including even the producing cells themselves. Cytokines are amino acids, they are short lived and enzymes in the blood and tissues rapidly destroy them. Lymphoid Tissues are divided into primary organs and secondary lymphoid organs.The primary organs are where the lymphocytes express antigen receptors and mature – the thymus and bone marrow.

The thymus is located in the upper thoracic cavity. It is the most active in childhood and as we age it shrinks and becomes a fatty tissue. The secondary organs are the lymph nodes, spleen and mucosal and cutaneous lymphoid tissues. Mature lymphocytes recirculate through the secondary organs, searching for microbial antigens to which they can recognise and respond. An important characteristic of these organs is that T lymphocytes and B lymphocytes are anatomically segregated until they are needed.

IN SUMMARY Lymphocytes are the only cells that produce specific and diverse receptors for antigens. They are the mediators of the adaptive immunity. They are present in the circulation and in various lymphoid organs. They come in contact with an antigen in the lymph nodes and are sensitised, causing them to reproduce. They leave the lymph node through the efferent lymph vessels, enter the blood, enter the tissues and then return to the lymph nodes. T lymphocytes are matured in the thymus that have antigen receptors called T cell receptors. B lymphocytes derive from bone marrow and recognise a wide variety of antigens. Natural Killer Cells destroy damaged infected cells, while macrophage cells invade antigens and activate lysosome activity that breaks down and destroys bacteria. Finally, cytonkines are involved in acute inflammation, mainly by stimulating growth or differentiation of phagocytes, fibroblasts, keratinocytes and T and B lymphocytes.

IN CONCLUSION The immune system is one of the most important areas relating to skin and human health. The lymphatic system can be divided into a superficial system and a deep system. The superficial system removes the interstitial fluid of the skin, while the deep system removes interstitial fluid from muscles, joints, organs and vessels. The cells discussed in this article all play an amazing and important role in the health of the lymphatic system. As skin therapists gaining a comprehensive understanding on the structure and function of the lymphatic system can allow us to better understand the important role it plays in optimal skin health.

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brisbaneconference

APAN Aesthetics Conference – Brisbane

A Great Success

Sunday 31st May saw the launch of the first APAN Aesthetics Conference for 2015 at the prestigious Stamford Plaza Hotel in Brisbane. This was the first of a series of three conferences that APAN staged in 2015 and were followed by Sydney, 21st June and Melbourne, 18th October.

well as suppliers who were exhibiting at the event. The feedback was overwhelmingly positive and all in attendance expressed their appreciation in gaining quality information that renewed their enthusiasm for their business and profession. Here is a brief outline on what was presented:

Buzzing with excitement and vibrancy the event attracted industry professionals and business owners who were treated to a diverse conference program of industry topics that heralded the new era of aesthetics. The event was spiced with great networking and fun, while new relationships were forged between delegates, as

Tina Viney, CEO and President of APAN, gave a brief overview of impending industry changes, including new regulations and the soon to be released Accreditation Program that APAN will be launching.

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Terry Everitt gave great clarity to the issue of Professional Development – what it means and the most credible platforms to improve ones knowledge-base in a constantly changing industry. Janet Price spoke on the all-important topic of the ageing face and presented graphic photos of structural changes from bones, muscles and skin on how features alter as we age and the latest techniques in injectables. Lynette Rouse’s passionate lecture on the new era of aesthetics focused on the importance of evaluating skin conditions not just through topical manifestations, but also examining systemic imbalances that contribute to skin deficiencies as well as in compromising skin health. Following this a panel of highly successful business owners presented valuable insight to how they have overcome challenges and some of their best-kept secrets on what has contributed to their success. Delegates were also able to ask questions of the panel and this segment proved to be highly popular with all who attended. Compounding pharmacist Chris Testa was invited to present a brief update on Anaesthetics and the importance of understanding how they are formulated and the safety perimeters of their use. A training course in anaesthetics will soon be launched with APAN as part of their Accreditation Program.

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Dr Julie Bradford presented a compelling lecture on the latest evidence-based research on various hormones and the specific ways that they impact the skin. The program was concluded by Mark Viney, who spoke on understanding the Gen-Y market and how to gain the most from a relationship with this generation group.

The APAN CONFERENCE PROGRAMS are dedicated to strengthening industry ties and supporting the growth of the industry through high quality educational programs on BUSINESS, SCIENCE and clarification on REGULATIONS. If you haven’t attended one of these events please consider attending the next APAN Conference in Melbourne. See pages 20-23 in this journal for full details.

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Oily skin and using an oil based skincare range. What are they thinking!

I just wanted to give some feedback on the Dr. Spiller skincare range! I have suffered acne (yes I say suffered because at 26yrs old it’s embarrassing!) for about 2 years now and have tried everything “that will get rid of acne”.

About a year ago I went to one of your stockists for a body massage, the lady doing my massage noticed my skin and tried to convince me that Dr. Spiller would clear my acne. Because I had heard that sentence so many times from skincare specialists and had already spent hundreds of dollars on skincare, I was a little reluctant to give it a go - especially cause its oil based, I was thinking OMG no way. Oily skin and using an oily skincare range - what are they thinking! My friend who has recently starting reviewing skincare and has started her own blog (skincare blogger) has said many good things about the Dr Spiller range so I trusted her word as she is a very good friend of mine. I headed back to my salon to get some products. After 1 week of using my new skincare range all I keep saying to myself is - WHY did I not listen to the girl who tried to convince me over a year ago to try these products. My face is completely clear after 1 week! I couldn’t even remember what I looked like without a pimple on my face, this skincare range is amazing! Well done Dr Spiller - finally a skincare that ACTUALLY works. 10/10

Emma Mahree Referred from Eden Spa, Camden

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cosmetictattoo

APAN Medical Cosmetic Tattooing

Postgraduate Training: Brisbane – On Monday 1st July six very excited cosmetic tattooists took part in APAN’s first Postgraduate Medical Cosmetic Tattoo workshop (3D Nipple Areola), held in Brisbane. To comply with Health Regulations the training was delivered at Dr Russell Price’s surgical theatre. Dr Price is a renowned vein surgeon – one of Australia’s best, and his clinic Vein Plus – Story Bridge Medical Centre is located at Kangaroo Point in Brisbane. With the support of the Breast Cancer Foundation, several eager patients who had undergone full mastectomy operations volunteered to receive 3D Nipple Areola in an attempt to regain their confidence and selfesteem after undergoing such an intense procedure due to breast cancer. Christine Comans flew from Perth to deliver the training. Christine is fast becoming recognised Australia-wide for her amazing skills in medical cosmetic tattooing procedures, and in particular is famous for her nipple areola delivered through a variety of techniques, including the amazing 3D technique that can allow the outcome to look incredibly natural. Christine is kept very busy in Perth as several surgeons and doctors who recognise and respect her skills and work refer patients to her. She also has a strong alliance with the Cancer Unit of the Sir Charles Gairdner Hospital. SCGH is closely associated with several

A GREAT SUCCESS

universities that deliver medical qualifications, including University of Western Australia, Curtin University, Notre Dame University and Edith Cowan University. During this incredible day she proved herself to be an amazing teacher and trainer with excellent communication skills and incredible attention to detail that all who participated acknowledged and appreciated. This was noteworthy as most of the candidates in this workshop were not newcomers to the profession, some having as much as 20 years’ experience in Cosmetic Tattooing. The day started with the theory component delivered at a nearby hotel. The group then congregated at Dr Price’s theatre, where Christine p e r f o r m e d a demonstration of the various techniques needed to achieve the

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In the afternoon, each candidate was able to deliver a treatment on a live model, and every patient felt so blessed and grateful with the amazing outcome that this procedure offered them, making this experience extremely rewarding for the candidates as well.

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Later in the day Dr Price gave the group a brief presentation of his work in vascular surgery, which the ladies thoroughly appreciated.

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The day started at 8.30am, and while it was supposed to finish at 4.30pm, it finally ended at 8.30pm. However, there were no complaints. Everyone was delighted in what was a most rewarding training program. The day ended with the group feeling a real sense of comradeship, with great friendships being forged as they reflected on an amazingly productive and rewarding day they had just experienced.

IN THANKS APAN thanks Dr Russel Price for graciously allowing us the privilege to conduct this training in his wonderful operating theatre. Thank you to Christine Comans for her incredible dedication, passion and generosity in sharing her knowledge with her colleagues in what ended up being a day full of great knowledge and a lot of fun as well. The feedback was amazing, as everyone said it was the best training they had ever attended. Thank you also to MBC Cosmetic Tattoo, which sponsored the event by providing each student with a wonderful kit that included some of their cosmetic tattoo pigments and products.

And last but not least, thank you to all the industry professionals with their amazing passion for ongoing education and professional development who allowed us to deliver this incredible educational program, which is only the beginning of better things to come. APAN would like to thank: Metro-Dora Clifford, Marina Zarganis, Dianne Fay Kingsley, Kylie Graham, Louise Cooper and Deanne Carney.

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who can demonstrate evidence of their practices, Recognition of Prior Learning is also available in assessing their competency. If you would to discuss this with Christine please contact her on comanschristine@gmail.com

GOVERNMENT- APPROVED QUALIFICATIONS We are delighted to also announce that Christine Comans is now associated with a Registered Training Organisation that has cosmetic tattoo on its scope. As a qualified trainer Christine can offer government-approved qualifications to new and existing cosmetic tattoo practitioners who wish to bring their qualifications to a National Approved Standards. For existing cosmetic tattooists

If you would like to become part of the APAN Cosmetic Tattoo community please contact us on 07 5593 0360 or check the website at www.apanetwork.com and download a membership application form. There are several membership classifications, however, as a C o s m e t i c Ta t t o o Professional you can join as an APAN GOLD (Cosmetic Tattoo) Member. We also encourage you to like our APAN Facebook Page as well as our new Urban Aesthetic Community Facebook and join in on news in a fun environment. Be part of the emerging new standards that are about to be introduced for Australian Aesthetic and Cosmetic Tattoo Professionals.

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Three weeks after nipple areola procedure has healed

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POWER HYALURONIC EYES AND LASHES

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A first in global salon treatment innovations and homecare to address all aspects of an ageing eye contour, dramatically lifting eyelids, strengthening and defining lashes and intensely firming. If you are looking to restore and preserve the youth and definition of the eyes, SKEYNDOR's POWER HYALURONIC EYES + LASHES does just that. This powerful biological professional formula, with its scientifically validated concentration of plant extracts, lifts drooping eyelids, strengthens and boosts lashes and diminishes dark circles.

This is the multi-functional product for eyes and eyelashes you have been waiting for. To introduce these treatments and products contact Vogue Image Group Ph: 1 800 554 545, or visit www.vogueimage.com.au.

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This exacting anti-ageing facial program is synergistically formulated to stimulate the skin's natural cellular regeneration process, revealing healthier, fresher and younger-looking skin after just one session. Skin regains its smoothness, firmness, health and radiance without the usual harmful side-effects of redness and irritation that traditionally are associated with the use of Vitamin A, commonly known as retinol. ㄰ 㤵 㜵

The treatment uses concentrated levels of pure Retinol, and anti-oxidants that work together to decrease the depth of lines and wrinkles, refine and resurface. In addition, it targets acne, congestion, scarring, dark spots and environmental damage.

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SKEYNDOR’S POWER HYALURONIC EYES + LASHES The CLOCK-STOPPER that’s making an impact The ground-breaking SKEYNDOR Power Hyaluronic Eyes + Lashes is a superior standout and stand-alone treatment for immediate and outstanding results. And, it is also salon-made as the perfect up-grade option to suit every client. The Power Hyaluronic Eyes + Lashes works equally and effortlessly in delivering exceptional results in improving the eye contour and the lashes. In addition, this high-performing antiageing eye treatment is suitable and effective for both the younger and more mature client. “The eyes age faster than any other area on the face and the skin around this area is thin and fragile,” says Luca Mora, CEO of Skeyndor in Australia. “As there is less collagen and elastin in this area, over time continual damage from the sun, pollutants, our expressions and the natural ageing process depletes the area further of collagen and elastin. The result is lines and wrinkles, sagging, dryness and dark circles.” “The other concern – puffiness, although temporary, is generally triggered by lifestyle and other behaviours, such as insufficient sleep, allergies, alcohol and a diet high in sugary and salty foods,” she adds. Lashes naturally thin with the ageing process becoming sparse and losing their oomph. In addition, everyday wear and tear on the lashes, using too harsh a cleansing routine or not removing eye makeup can cause lashes to become dry and in some instances result in lash fall. Enter, the Power Hyaluronic Eyes + Lashes, a first in global beauty and one of SKEYNDOR’s most progressive to date. It works two-

fold to address the eye contour and the lashes and can drop years in under 45 minutes. Mimicking an eye lift (without surgery or down time), the treatment significantly strengthens and enhances the lashes so they appear more dense and youthful, while at the same time lifting eyelids and intensely firming the eye contour. At the same time it expertly addresses puffiness, dark circles and depth of wrinkles to leave the eyes refreshed and renewed, way beyond expectations. In its matchless approach to rejuvenating the eye area, this SKEYNDOR exclusive boosts the length, density, strength and condition of the lashes, returning a visibly more youthful look. The treatment, with technology fresh from SKEYNDOR R + D, uses potent and pioneering formulas to transform the area in ways never before available to the aesthetician. The Power Hyaluronic Eyes + Lashes professional treatment products combine a powerhouse of actives that regenerate, improve weakened collagen fibres and hydrate while, at the same time, acting on firmness, lifting, dark circles and puffiness of the eye contour. When used as an add-on, this service is perfect to multiply the benefits and extend them to the lashes and eye contour. As an add-on service to your existing menu it: ! takes the client experience up a notch ! increases your overall service revenue ! improves your retail sales bottom line and, ! gives your business the competitive edge For a dynamic salon session, team the Power Hyaluronic Eyes + Lashes with the cutting-edge Power Hyaluronic facial program.

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Working with the skin’s hydrodynamics, this innovative facial uses a combination of very low and very high molecular weight hyaluronic acid to effectively and successfully drive ingredients into the cells. Slowing the breakdown of collagen and stabilising the skin’s internal hydrodynamics, it locks in moisture and reinforces water reserves for immediate and effective hydration and a 100% improvement in wrinkling, lines and facial contour caused by dehydration.

For more on these innovative and multi-functional SKEYNDOR treatment programs please call Vogue Image Group on 1 800 554 545/(03) 9821 0033 info@vogueimage.com.au.

This on the edge technology prevents water loss, generously rehydrates, strengthens the skin’s barrier and preserves surface hydration. The result is a visible renewal and significant improvement in skin vitality. SKEYNDOR uses Hyaluronic Acid and an Aquaporin activator to open up the water channels, delivering intense and lasting hydration. Aquaporins are membrane proteins that transport water and other actives to the very inside of the cells. Their quantity and quality allows water to be distributed and spread to all layers of the skin. The Power Hyaluronic Facial combines the advanced signature SKEYNDOR products with ultra-sensory textures and a relaxing massage technique using Selenite stones. Having a perfect affinity with water, Selenite it is one of the first minerals formed by the evaporation of seawater. Actives can alternatively be deeply infused for spectacular results using the SKEYNDOR Meso-Science technology electroporation phase. The Meso-Science technique stimulates the skin’s vital functions, activating collagen, elastin and hyaluronic acid for farreaching results in skin rejuvenation.

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At the forefront of preventative care, Meso-Science is a breakthrough approach that employs a state-of-the-art virtual needle that enlists Nobel Prize-winning technology called electroporation, a four-phase electro-therapy system of an activating current, hydro-electrophoresis, electroporation and cryotherapy. This highly specialised system uses several smooth, flat hand pieces to infuse microscopic quantities of potent and concentrated actives to significantly improve treatment results.

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memberprofile

SPA LOTUS by Advanced Body Image The birth of a new concept in skin management and wellness Situated in the suburb of Palmerston in Darwin is an amazing new and unique establishment that is challenging all the traditional concepts of spa and skin management. It is unique because it has a dual name – Spa Lotus by Advanced Body Image – and it represents a new business model that integrates skin and wellness in a way that has never been done before – not in Darwin at least. Katy Sullivan is the brains behind this innovative concept and a leader in her field. She has an incredible ability to combine results with ambience, and this is because apart from being fiercely committed to her own ongoing professional development, she also has an amazingly compassionate and generous nature that drives her to help her clients on many levels. Katy understands the importance of not only helping

improve skin conditions, but also supporting the underlying human condition through stress-management strategies that benefit the whole individual. Her beautifully presented new premises combine the duality of skin management and wellness in a complementary yet diverse manner as two separate concepts delivered in separate physical environments with their own characteristics, defined by highly specialised services while maintaining a commitment to the same high-quality standards. We approached Katy to share her story and to unveil this incredible concept that is setting the industry benchmark in Darwin at a whole new level.

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APJ Q1: Katy, tell us why and how you got started in this industry? I started in this industry 17 years ago when I was still very young. I was just 14 years old, but I knew exactly what I wanted and I was prepared to work hard for it. I inherited this tenacity from my father who is hard working and has an amazing work ethic. After qualifying in Beauty Therapy I put everything I learnt into practice and constantly sought to continue to improve my knowledge and expertise, not just in what I was taught, but also growing and expanding the scope of my practice in new areas such as cosmetic tattooing and skin management using diverse high-end lasers. I am very passionate about this industry and I love what I do, so pursuing higher standards is a joy for me and it gives me a great deal of pleasure. This industry is not at all boring. It has so much scope for diversity. As I watched new and innovative technologies enter the market I was drawn to the challenge of getting better results in skin management, and so I pursued further studies and read as many books as I could on dermatology and laser to ensure that I could deliver the best possible solutions and outcomes for difficult skin conditions.

APJ Q2: You had a very successful business in Advanced Body Image so why did you choose to launch the Spa Lotus? It was approximately three and a half years ago that I noticed that the concepts of beauty and cosmetic medicine started to blur. The market in skin improvement and appearance enhancement became very competitive and a lot of cheap machines were flooding the market, with individuals trying to capitalise on the potential growth that was happening, due to consumer demand. We had the best possible lasers and we gained a very high reputation for excellent

results. As this sector of Advanced Body Image started to grow we no longer had room for beauty. It was time to rethink our business model, while still holding true to our fundamental commitment to excellence in all our services. I realised that the old notion of spa was outdated and so we decided to reinvent it to a higher level. As a result Advanced Body Image moved to larger premises and occupied the right side of the premises, while on the left side we launched Spa Lotus – a purposebuilt luxury spa that offered an absolute haven for relaxation, a retreat with an incredible ambience that could deliver an amazing experience at the highest possible level. The whole area covers 550 square metres. Spa Lotus reflects quality with a serene and luxurious ambience that features an exotic Turkish bath theme. We cross-pollinated the same principles of excellence from Advanced Body Image to a totally different environment, thus complementing and supporting skin management with relaxation and wellness as a more complete, all-encompassing concept.

APJ Q3: What is unique about the Spa Lotus and what inspired you to develop this business model? When you really think about it, anti-ageing skin management is very much logical and clinically driven, and while we can offer impressive results, it is not at all fun or emotionally appealing. While we can fix the problem we were still leaving our clients wanting something more that was pleasurable and considerate of their need for a relaxing and amazing experience that was also appealing to the senses. , Our clients also wanted to feel special and so the concept of the Spa Lotus was born. We developed a unique polychromatic logo that reflected the concept of an amazing, multi-faceted, high-quality experience in support of the whole person. We recognised that the

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APJ Q4: What are you most passionate about in your work? I enjoy and love all aspects of my work, but I have to say that I gain the most satisfaction from my paramedical work. It is hugely rewarding to solve a person’s skin problems, see their selfesteem rise and give them a new lease in life. I also love mentoring my staff and helping them reach their full potential in what they are best gifted at. This is so rewarding – to see them grow as they passionately commit to being the very best they can be in what they love doing.

APJ Q5: What are the secrets to a successful working team that you would like to share with us?

modern consumer is also often plagued with high levels of stress and they value a service that can effectively address stress levels and enhance their overall wellbeing, not just their skin and appearance. Since launching we are receiving a huge demand for total spa packages, so clearly we are meeting a massive consumer need.

I believe you cannot build a successful business without building a strong relationship with all your staff members, both as individuals as well as a team. This is so important, and several of our staff members have been with us for seven to eight years. The secret is to identify what they are really good at and love doing and allowing them to specialise in that, cheering them on to continue to perfect their skills and to always aim for excellence. If you hate what you are doing the clients pick up on this and they are left unimpressed. I am very demanding on my girls and expect a lot from them, but I also invest heavily in them. I show my appreciation and make them feel valued. I aim to always give them the support they need to become better. It is important that I am a good leader and lead by example in the standards I want from them. It is not enough to just have a team, you also need to effectively lead them.

APJ Q6: How do you envisage the mix between wellness/spa and skin management within the one business as a business model? I believe our model works because we have totally separated the

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two. Skin management is featured and delivered in a very clinical manner and this space reflects those elements. However, once we move our clients to Spa Lotus they enter an entirely different world, with chandeliers, wonderful soft lighting, exotic colours and design – a whole different world that immerses them in a totally sensual experience that is the ultimate in relaxation – an environment that addresses the whole body and melts away stress. Each environment is totally committed to excellence, and this balance really works because it is what consumers want.

APJ Q7: You are a wife and a mother with five young children and another one on the way. How do you manage to juggle family life and business? I think it is important to be true to yourself and to be disciplined. I love my family and value them immensely. They are very important to me and my first priority. However, I also love my career, and when I am with my clients I am 100% with them and focused on giving them the very best of my skills and knowledge for their benefit. I am grateful for having the best of both worlds – an amazing family and an amazing career. There is no point in whingeing about having to juggle both. I am disciplined in being fully immersed in what I do. When I am with my family I am totally devoted to them, and when I am with my clients I am 100% devoted to them also. I only work four days a week and take the fifth day to be with my children, and I make the very most of it when I am with them.

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APJ Q8: What industry and consumer changes have you identified during the past 10 years, and how have they influenced you and repositioned you to face the future? I believe that consumers are now very savvy of new developments and they have a better understanding of what is available to them. On the other hand, I feel it is my obligation to educate them on what we are offering – the quality of our devices and products and the standards that we work to. By gaining their respect I am able to deliver the very best service and results. I believe that in moving with the times I focus on delivering results and also offering innovating and exciting solutions, without neglecting to ensure that their experience with us is a memorable one that they can’t wait to come back to. I believe consumers are now looking for the total package.

APJ Q9: Why did you join APAN and how do you view your relationship with the organisation? I have to say that my trust in APAN is based on the fact that Tina Viney is at the helm of this organisation. I have huge respect for her and I totally trust her knowledge and capabilities. The industry needs an organisation that has good governance in defending its integrity and future at a government and regulatory levels, and that is a special skill. While we are busy running our businesses it is comforting to know that a strong industry organisation is taking care of us. Furthermore, Tina has always been supportive and I value and appreciate her dedication and integrity.

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Advanced Body Image–Spa Lotus is located at 202/731 Stuart Highway, Palmerston, Darwin, NT. Phone 08 8985 6088.

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Advanced Modalities

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DANA EXPLORE FRACTIONAL RF A growing segment – with micro-needling treatments up 87.5% in 2013. > Latest in Fractional Radio Frequency delivers precise columns of micro-fractional bi-polar RF energy for a range of in demand indications > Non-invasive and invasive options > Indications include skin rejuvenation in hard-to-treat eye and lip area

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productinnovations Vitamin A Advanced Repair Serum with Natural Retinaldehyde Vitamin A Advanced Serum with Natural Retinaldehyde is a new, innovative, non-irritating topical treatment with amazing benefits for a variety of skin conditions. The unique formula containing natural Retinaldehyde, a stable form of Retinoic Acid, produces excellent results in fighting against wrinkles and ageing skin, as well as acne, rosacea, discolouration and pigmentation.Our unique patented technology brings you a perfect balance of natural Retinol with natural Cyclodextrin, resulting in a product without topical irritation, but with enhanced benefits.

Contact ClinicalPRO for further details 1800 628 999.

Vitamin C Zesty Cellular Repair Serum This calming and repairing serum contains a complex of hydrolysed wheat and soy protein combined with Tripeptide-I, which has proven UVB protection of cells from photo-damage, while selectively boosting synthesis of Collagen II to help reduce the appearance of ageing. Great for reducing puffiness around the eyes, improving the appearance of skin structure, preventing free radical damage, repairing and stabilising cell membranes to help prevent future damage. Other notable benefits include plumping, hydrating and extending longevity and healthy appearance of the skin with stem cell extracts. Vitamin C Zesty Cellular Repair Serum is a must-have for your treatments. Contact ClinicalPRO for further

details 1800 628 999.

CUCCIO – Why shouldn’t Nail Colour deliver quality? Every salon business needs a point of difference from the incredible pressure of competition, and when it comes to nail colour and nail veneer it should be no different. Your clients should be assured when they come to you they are getting the best. Cuccio colour collections offer a guarantee of amazing quality: 4th generation 100% polish-free stable formula. No evaporation, thickening or yellowing. Triple pigment – an industry first. Cures in 30 seconds LED/UV formulas. Veneer, micro-shatter resistance, reflective mirror shine, extended wear, glamorous and cost effective. Why not introduce the just released new Amazing Collection? They are super gorgeous. RRP $17.95 – salon WP $8.95 – or the display for $135. Available in both Veneer (gel polish) & Colour (normal polish).

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Phone Absolute Spa 1300 262 275. 25

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Cryo-jet Cryomed continues to be the leader in chilled-air systems with the continued dominance of the Cryo-jetTM considered to be the most reliable and cost-effective choice in the industry today, with over 200 units sold. Cryomed continues providing premium chilled-air systems with the introduction of the SIBERIAN FIT®, a revolution in technology for intensive cooling systems providing unparalleled temporary epidermal analgesia. The SIBERIAN FIT® does this with unique air-jet technology that delivers a flow rate of up to 2 kg/s at 8 different speed levels of dispersion with a maximum core temperature of -30 C.

Call Cryomed now at 1300 346 448 to learn more about epidermal protection in real time.

TOP UP WITH THESE GORGEOUS PROMOTIONAL CARDS AND GIFT VOUCHERS As we are approaching the end of the year you will need to put your promotional program in motion for the coming season celebrations. APAN has you covered with some amazing colourful Gift Vouchers, Promotional Cards, Thank You, Birthday and Congratulations cards. Show your appreciation in a tangible gesture with these beautiful BIRTHDAY CARDS and THANK YOU CARDS. We have several designs for you to select from. Additionally, themed colourful gift vouchers make it a wonderful addition for clients to utilise your services. Check out our Christmas Gift Voucher and a special Congratulations card for engagements or graduations. Give your clients a reason why your gift will be best appreciated. Visit http://apanetwork.com/gift-cardsvouchers/ and view the full range on the left and what is featured on the back of the card on the right. 50 cards single design or mixed $44 or 100 cards for just $83.

NEW – Sormé Precision Duo Eyeliner Sorme has just launched an amazing new product – Liquid Eyeliner Pen with Corrector. This product is water-based yet semi-permanent, water-resistant and smudge-proof. It is uniquely formulated to offer high-intensity colour with the ability to correct mistakes. Create the perfect winged eyeliner, or dramatic liner effect you need! With eyes being the focus this spring, Sorme Liquid Eyeliner Pen with Corrector is the perfect tool to achieve youthful, fashionable eyes in minutes.

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FREE testers and retail display when you purchase the retail stock. This is a limited time offer.

Phone Dynamic Skin Solutions Ph: 02 9525 8368

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PROFESSIONAL BEAUTY BT-ACCENT LED

TM

Lighten up with LED Have you heard of the bt-Accent LED™ yet? It’s pretty nifty. For those looking to expand their service menu with innovative aesthetic technology, this two-time award-winning device is an impressive option. This forward-thinking, hands-free LED device has received two awards – the prestigious LNE & Spa award for Best Product 2014, after claiming gold in the 2014 Asia Grand Prix de la Beauté awards. LED is a medically established therapy that uses cell-specific wavelengths to penetrate the skin and promote healing of tissue, soothe inflammation and stimulate cell renewal by boosting the anti-ageing adenosine triphosphate (ATP) molecule. The bt-Accent LED™ utilises three key LED colours, Red, Blue and Combination, to target an array of the most common skin concerns that clients seek treatment for. Treating acne-troubled skin with blue LED has been proven to kill acne-causing bacteria, while the red light stimulates cell renewal and collagen production to accelerate the healing of wounds and scarring. When used as a combination, it can produce super effective dualresults. The bt-Accent LED™ also delivers excellent anti-ageing LED facials to reduce fine lines, wrinkles and pigmentation.

To discover more about how LED technology can grow your business call The Global Beauty Group on 1300 006 607 or visit www.theglobalbeautygroup.com.au

Hydrabeauty The Hydrabeauty treatment system specialises in revitalising the face and replenishing the skin. Not only is it suitable to treat all skin types, it can also correct most skin symptoms such as persistent acne, dryness, excessive oil, enlarged pores and tired-looking skin. With its unique applicators, customisable modalities and premium solutions, everyone can benefit from a Hydrabeauty treatment, whether your skin is in need of immediate rescuing or just a nice, little maintenance treatment to prevent those nasty breakouts from coming back. With the Hydrabeauty in your rooms, there is nothing to stand in the way of making your clients’ skin clear, hydrated and beautiful. Call

Cryomed now at 1300 346 448.

NEW – Sormé Truline Mechanical Eyeliner New from Sorme come the Truline Mechanical Eyeliners, this time in six stunning shades of Gel Eyeliner. Glides on with high-intensity, long-lasting colour that is smudge-proof! You can just wind them up so there is no fuss or mess as they don’t require a sharpener. These great products are part of the Sorme Makeup Collection – the amazing treatment cosmetics from Beverly Hills – a makeup range that ticks all the boxes – good for the skin at an amazing price. Sorme is the wise business choice – great quality and great profits. FREE testers and retail display when you buy the retail – limited time offer. Phone

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De-Pigmentation Creme

CUCCIO NEW SPRING COLLECTION Just in time for spring the new CUCCIO COLOUR COLLECTIONS are a must to inspire excitement and a touch of glamour. Super gorgeous and amazingly durable, these new colour releases promise to create a stir this spring. They offer superior quality to reflect your own skincare standards. Venice Beach particularly harks back to the launch of the Cuccio/Star Nail brand back in 1981 where the now owner and amazing entrepreneur Tony Cuccio began with a suitcase and $200 of polish and sold on the shores of Venice Beach in California. From humble beginnings, it is currently now considered the NUMBER 1 professional-only global nail brand. The two new Cuccio Colour Collections offer amazing profit margins for salons, $8.95 wholesale and RRP $17.95, or the display for $135. Ph: Absolute Spa 1300 262 275.

The new pigmentation-fighting formulation from A Natural Difference using a new plant extract called Hinokitiol. Hinokitiol has been proven to inhibit tyrosinase activity, a key enzyme in melanin synthesis. An added response is the reduction of the transcription factor that orchestrates melanin production, known as the MITF expression. This formulation is not photo-sensitive and the synergistic action of its active ingredients prevents and treats various types of skin discolouration, working well on melasma, solar lentigo and postinflammation hyper-pigmentation.

Contact ClinicalPRO for further details 1800 628 999.

EGF-DNA Recovery Concentrate & Creme

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EGF-DNA Recovery is a highly efficient cell-division factor with a variety of biological activities. It can repair epidermis, delay ageing, fade speckles, inhibit wrinkles and moisten skin. The content of Epidermal Growth Factor in the body determines how old the skin is. To improve the EGF content, advise your clients to use EGF-DNA Recovery Concentrate AM & PM on clean skin and immediately after any peel treatments or prior to application of Masques during professional treatments to obtain instant and amazing visible results.

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Contact ClinicalPRO for further details 1800 628 999.

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fractionaltechnology

Fractional Radio Frequency The new technology to lead in skin rejuvenation While IPL and Laser have their use and benefits, Fractional Radio Frequency can allow you to extend your services and address a new dimension to your skin rejuvenation, and in particular skin tightening, which is achieved very effectively with Fractional RF. F-RF provides fractional ablation, allowing removal of damaged skin cells and resurfacing of the superficial skin layers to treat mild to moderate wrinkles and other textural irregularities, as well as red and brown spots.

W H AT R E S U L T S C A N B E EXPECTED FROM THE TREATMENT? After a treatment you may notice the tone and texture of the skin improving as a result of increased levels of beneficial collagen and the stimulation of new healthy skin cells that are produced. The dermal impact of the Lifton TherMatrix will notice a reduction of mild to moderate wrinkles as well as an improvement in skin discolourations.

HOW MANY TREATMENTS WILL I NEED? Simultaneously, volumetric deep dermal heating is applied to the collagen fibres causing an immediate and long-term skin tightening. This combined treatment effectively treats all skin layers for an optimal result. After repeat treatments there is a noticeable firming of the skin in the face and neck area in addition to skin-texture improvements.

HOW DOES IT WORK? The Lifton TherMatrix system's ergonomic applicator delivers radio frequency energy via a matrix Electrode in the applicator tip. The RF energy generates fractional deep dermal heating in the region of the electrode matrix to induce skin injury, thus eliciting a wound-healing response. This results in mild to moderate wrinkles and superficial skin discolouration being reduced, and skin texture becoming more smooth and elastic due to collagen stimulation.

The typical treatment protocol is three treatments 4-6 weeks apart. The total number of required treatment sessions depend on the skin condition of the client or patient.

CONTRA-INDICATIONS AND PRECAUTIONS Laser or light-based treatments should be avoided when you have a suntan or sunburn. Patients taking the drug Accutane should avoid any laser treatment until medically cleared by the physician. RetinA or bleaching creams should also be discontinued 3-7 days before treatment. During the consultation, you will need to review your client for any medication or supplements that they are currently taking to determine appropriate fluence for their treatment.

WILL IT BE UNCOMFORTABLE AND WHAT CAN I EXPECT FROM THE PROCEDURE? During treatment many patients feel a warm, prickly sensation as energy enters the skin. After treatment a pink or red “sunburn” appearance and feeling is also common. Topical anaesthetic ointment is applied for 45 minutes prior to treatment to reduce discomfort.

WHAT SHOULD I EXPECT FROM THE TREATMENT? You should expect a pink or red “sunburn” appearance with mild inflammation that can last two or more days. This is common and expected. Aftercare instructions will be given following your treatment as correct home care is important.

WHO SHOULD BE TREATED WITH FRACTIONAL RF? Treatment is a safe and effective solution for all skin types. This technology treats acne scarring, pigmentation and wrinkles and improves overall skin texture.

If you believe that this treatment could benefit your clients and your business, give us a call. Face Magic are the distributors of Lifton TherMatrix. In association with Beauty Therapy Training Australia, a Registered Training Organisation, they also offer several governmentapproved qualifications as well as post-graduate training. You will receive exceptional training and support from both companies.

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Phone today for further details: 07 5559 0889 or email us: contact@beautythrerapytraining.com

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salonbusiness

Business Recordkeeping

MADE EASY An interview with Vanessa Kirkham One task that comes high on the stress list of small businesses, and especially in our industry, is the dreaded responsibility of timely and efficient recordkeeping. In fact, the ATO rates our industry as a whole as “high risk” because so many fail to keep their books up-to-date. However, we have a wonderful solution for you. Vanessa Kirkham started out as a beauty therapist and worked in the industry for a number of years when her passion for figures led her down the path of undertaking an Accounting Degree, which she achieved in 2002. Since then she has worked as an accountant for a large accounting firm, as a financial controller for a large not-for-profit orgnanisation, and in recent times worked for three years at the Australian Tax Office. With all these credentials and experience you could not find a better-qualified professional who perfectly understands both sides of the spectrum – the realities and needs of a salon business, as well as the importance of effective money management and recordkeeping. Vanessa went on to launch her own bookkeeping services and to help the industry she really loves. In this article we explore this topic with Vanessa and uncover some of the reasons why businesses fail in the area of financial control, and simple and effective strategies to solve this problem.

APJ Q1: Vanessa, in your experience why are so many businesses forced to close their doors? There is a simple answer to this question – poor money management is the primary reason. This could be because they are miscalculating their costs and expenses, underselling their services, overextending their spending, or simply because they forget to include some of their costs that perhaps were added on at a later date from when they determined their original estimations.

APJ Q2: In your expert opinion, which area do small businesses struggle with the most? From my experience many businesses often don't understand the correct way to cost their services. They are not comfortable or familiar in breaking down all the areas of their expenses and costs. For example, a supplier may give you a breakdown per facial treatment using their products. They will give you a simple calculation on face value. However, it is not their job to determine what other costs will go into the equation when running your business. You need to do your own calculations, as well as putting aside also some funds for a rainy day.

APJ Q3: Can you give us an example of effective cost assessment? OK, let's look at a facial. From your supplier you may get the suggested cost based on the usage per treatment. You may require 5mls of a cleaner during a facial treatment. If the container was 200mls then you would get 40 cleansers. If the cost of the cleanser was $40 that means the cost of using the cleanser for your treatment is $1 per cleanse. You will then need to do the same with all the other products you will be using for this treatment. Collectively this may amount to say $6 per treatment. Many businesses then add staffing to that and then consider this is the extent of their expenses. That is, if the facial takes one hour and your staff is paid $28 for that hour they assume that the cost for delivering that treatment is $34. What they fail to calculate is the other costs that will impact their business, such as the percentage of rent, electricity, insurance, phones, consumables, including cleaning, stationery and uniforms. Additionally, they need to include a percentage of marketing and advertising costs, staff training, administration, stock and equipment purchases. If their staff is a full-timer they need to cost superannuation, holiday pay, WorkCover, cost of replacing staff if they are sick or on holidays, and let's not forget payroll tax. So now

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we have added a percentage of these costs on the list and divided them by38 hours per week to determine the hourly rate cost, but before we finalise these costs, what about consideration for the business to have extra cash for replacement of items, investment in business growth and new equipment, and what about some income for the business owner? The percentage sum cost of all these areas may mean that the treatment instead of $34 in fact actually cost $68. If they are marketing the treatment for $60 they are actually making a loss.

APJ Q4: To what do you attribute the lack of commitment in recordkeeping? A beauty therapist or dermal therapist is predominantly skilled and focused in achieving the best treatment outcome for her client. She usually has a caring nature. While science may be their strength, figures usually aren't. Most salon owners I know find doing their books a tedious and strenuous chore that they resent and therefore put it at the bottom of the list. Furthermore, as this is not an area of their strength it takes them much longer to do their books than it would take an expert. They are better off delegating this to someone else while they concentrate of running their business.

APJ Q5: How much time do you believe a small business needs to keep their books up-to-date? It's amazing, but sometimes it takes as little as just 1.5 hours to finalise a business's books each week. This will depend of course on the size and complexity of the business. For example, a business that brings in $100,000 per year would probably need less then two hours per week, while one that brings in $500,000 may require 6-7 hours per week. This of course will depend on the type of accounting program they are using and the expertise of the operator.

APJ Q6: Can bookkeeping be done remotely and if yes, how does that work?

to pay her bills and the rest is taken care of. She now is saving nearly five hours a week, which she using to build her business through marketing strategies and other planning or servicing her clients. With the larger business, after the initial set-up for just four to five hours per week, staff are paid weekly with monthly commissions. A bills list is presented to the owner on a weekly basis for payment approval. Business Activity Statement and superannuation are prepared and completed on a quarterly basis. The owner uses the Small Business Clearing House to lodge the super with a printout provided. She was previously spending more than a day a week to complete many of these tasks. Now she only needs one hour per week. Previously both businesses were behind in lodging their BAS and were struggling in meeting their expenses, and as a result were frustrated with their paperwork. Now all this is effectively taken care of in a timely and efficient manner. We are currently working together to establish benchmarks and legitimate cost for services, taking into account the personal environment. These are just two examples of how a business can run efficiently, while gaining the added benefit of also monitoring where the best growth position of the business lies and where further investments can be directed for great profit margins.

Olive Gray Business Solutions is an APAN strategic partner. For a complimentary 30-minute consultation to discuss your needs contact Vanessa Kirkham on ph: 0412 707 044.

Yes of course it can and very simply. Accounting packages can be put on-line and remotely accessed. They can take a lot of hard work from the owner. A lot of activities such as wages, PAYG withholding, super-calculations, preparing BAS statements can easily be accessed remotely. A salon for example can be in Perth and the bookkeeper may be in Queensland, yet still remotely be able to successfully manage and keep the business's records and tax obligations up-to-date. In today's technology accounting programs can be remotely accessed so that the owner can follow what is going on and discuss any issues with the bookkeeper at any given time.

APJ Q7: Can you give us a couple of examples of remote bookkeeping services you provide? I can give you two live examples that I am currently servicing – a small business that brings in approximately $100,000 and a larger one that brings in just over half a million dollars. Once the business has been set up for cloud-based accounting, invoices and summary of daily sales are provided for reconciliation. This business has two staff that require their wages and commissions to be prepared. The bookkeeping services for these tasks, including reconciling the books and preparing payments, takes approximately two hours per week. Previously the owner would take 4-5 hours per week to complete these tasks. Now she has peace of mind. She spends just 30 minutes per week

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salonbusiness

STAFF MANAGEMENT From Conflict To Harmony Caroline Nelson As dynamics change within one's personal life they can contribute to substantial behavioural and attitude changes within the workplace. These can often cause disruption to the flow of business and a decline in the level of a staff's performance. In this article business coach Caroline Nelson shares with us some valuable consideration that may contribute to behavioural changes and ways to successfully address them. Employees can be fickle. They can love their job and be happy one minute and not happy the next. They can be productive and reaching their targets one month, then crash and burn the next. This type of unstable behaviour can have the employer questioning “what happened to the fabulous therapist I hired?” In fact, employee issues can create such a high level of stress that it's one of the key factors in the 'business for sale' sign going up. I recently read that over 60% of Australian employees at some time in their employ will feel emotionally detached from their employer. These disenfranchised employees have a tendency to do the least amount of work possible, while being on the lookout for another job.

This “downshifting” in performance can also lead to bad behaviour, like answering back and questioning their manager, often in front of other team members and clients. They often don't follow directives, even doing the exact opposite, and then being defensive and shifting blame on to others. But unless you are happy to be a sole practitioner you will need staff to help operate your business and provide services for clients. This means you need to manage people and be an effective leader. But, before you start looking at your employees' attitudes you need to first look at yourself, because if you can't manage your business and your own life, how can you expect to manage your employees? To successfully manage a team requires managing the quirks, behaviour and the emotional ups and downs of others as well as your own. And that is not always easy to achieve.

MANAGER QUALITIES Yes, it's true, we all have issues, some more than others. But as a manager of people or teams you are required to solve problems, and not create more than you solve, so your management style better not be disruptive towards your team, otherwise you will be constantly back-pedalling and trying to mend bridges.

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Here are some of the qualities that a good manager needs to develop, and the processes that should be implemented: 1. Attitude and Energy – Your attitude needs to not only be positive, but it needs to convey a spring in your step. In addition, your body language needs to be open conveying sincerity, if not, regardless of what you say your views will either not be believed or understood. This is the classical 'mixed message' many mangers convey to their teams.

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Transparency – Don't beat around the bush or sugarcoat things. Handle any situations that arise in a calm, courteous, but direct and factual manner. This will avoid the potential rumour mill creating problems where there may be none. Remember also to demonstrates maturity and that you can maintain a cool head in a crisis. Structure – Good managers develop structure in the management of their teams, setting clear parameters and guidelines. They provide good examples by setting targets and goals for the business, themselves and the team to achieve with action plans and time-management processes.

4. Knowledge and Commitment – They get to know their team and what motivates and challenges them. They know each one’s strengths and weaknesses and train to develop each employee to achieve their 'personal best'. They commit to support their team to achieve goals, and even during trying times they pull the team forward, and are happy to get their hands dirty if the need arises.

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Flexible – Great managers are flexible and versatile. They have the ability to work through situations in a decisive but non-reactive way, to pick themselves up, dust off and get them and the team refocused and back ontrack. Accountability – They are obsessed with accountability, for themselves and their team. They conduct regular staff appraisals, one-on-one meetings, staff training, all designed to reinforce objectives and outcomes, and individual and team responsibility. They foster a continued learning environment.

7. Vision – They embrace the “Big Picture” for their business and know that it will take a talented team to achieve it. They develop great talent, put effort into choosing the right people, then encourage and mentor them. While thinking big, they are aware that small actions by many lead to high achievement, and paying attention to the small details is part of the skill of good management. But even with the best management skills a formerly good employee can suddenly go off-track due to circumstances beyond your control. You must quickly find out what happened? What were the contributing factors? And how do you fix it? You may think the situation struck you like a bolt out of the blue, but this is rarely the case. Often when you drill down there may not be any clear-cut answers but the most common reason I find is change. Change that may have occurred in your employee's personal life you have no influence on, but you may need to offer support while they are going though whatever it may be. What has changed and what has created a significant challenge, so much so that this former high

achiever has lost traction, lost focus and commitment to the job? Whatever has happened you need to find out what that might be as soon as possible.

Here are typically some of the common changes that can impact performance that you should investigate: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

The addition of a new manager or team member New technology, services or products that have been introduced they are not familiar with A promotion – theirs or others – that has altered the status quo Staff cutbacks add additional duties for the employee New working hours

Many people just do not handle change well. Change can freak them out. In fact, it has been said that change can be even more stressful than public speaking. No-one really likes change. Humans by nature are creatures of habit. We all develop our own comfort zone and habits and will go out of our way to avoid disrupting them. Avoidance will often be exhibited by downshifting as previously discussed. Sometimes things need to be changed if a business is to grow and prosper. However, if you have practised the seven manager's qualities and processes you should be able to guide and ease your team through the difficult stages of change. Try not to make too many changes too quickly. Keep open communications, listen to employees’ views and if you can, adapt things to make it more workable for them to try to do this. On occasion, and regardless of what you do or say, an employee will just not fit with you, your team or the business. It could be a personality clash or even that an employee is just not suited to being part of the aesthetic industry. More often than not they have just chosen the wrong career path, but feel they have no choice but to stick with it. Beauty therapy is not glamorous work. It can in fact be hard work, hard physical work, so it's not for the faint-hearted or lazy person. Unfortunately, many who enter the profession are not fully aware of the commitment necessary. The trouble is their dissatisfaction can fester their behaviour, and this can cause difficulties in the business. As the saying goes “it takes two to tango”, and if you and the employee are so out of step things can't be fixed or repaired, then termination may be the only option. Having said all the above, there is no one best way to deal with conflict, however, regardless you should have the processes in place that reduce the fallout and keep the damage to a minimum. © Copyright Caroline Nelson 2015

Caroline Nelson is a beauty industry expert who specialises in helping businesses to develop their brand, improve productivity and increase bottom-line profit. For a free 30-minute Business Consult register on www.SalonSpaBusiness.com or phone 0410 600 440.

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A5M delivers another powerful Conference Program

by Tina Viney

I was once again privileged to attend the 9th Annual A5M Conference held this year on the 1st and 2nd August at the beautiful Sofitel Melbourne in Collins Street with the theme this year – Research, Treatment and Prevention – Evidence Based Medicine. The conference was divided into two streams – Diet, Nutrition and Ageing, and the second stream was on Innovations in Aesthetic Medicine.

Fatigue syndrome and effective treatments was amazing. Dr Peter Lewis spoke on the use of stem cells and PRF in musculoskeletal conditions. Dr Xanya Softa spoke about NeuroFrequency for Rejuvenation and Body Contour and Gina Thompson spoke on Clinical integration of aesthetic produces and services. I was able to interview her, so I am presenting an article with the outcome of the interview in this journal. Several other interviews will be presented in the summer issue of APJ due to space and time restrictions in this issue.

It was very enlightening to identify the growing ways that medicine and aesthetics are engaging in more meaningful dialogue on how to best meet the changing needs of the consumer. While there were numerous topics covering internal medicine and how new findings are providing more effective solutions for chronic and acute diseases, there were also some incredible observations on how aesthetics is now more closely relating to wellness as an essential element of client/patient expectations.

Overall, however, I would have to say that Dr Andrew Heyman's presentation on Sunday morning on Integrative Medicine: Industry trends and professional opportunities offered an amazing overview that shed some light on the new consumer mindset, their shifting expectations and how these are dictating the need for integrative medicine to broaden its scope and include wellness and aesthetics.

While I always love the internal medicine stream and I could write several chapters on the information presented, I have chosen to share with you just a few of the key highlights and take home messages that I believe offer some interesting parallels to our own aesthetic world.

Heyman, who among his endless credentials is also Program Director of Integrative and Metabolic Medicine at the George Washington University in Michigan, shed some incredible insight on how current changes will shape the future and the opportunities they will bring.

In brief, several world authorities and amazing speakers covered diverse and extensive topics. Of particular interest was Dr Al Sears who shared with us new findings in longevity and nutrients that contribute to telomerase activation and new findings on the use of testosterone. Dr James Wilson, international authority on Chronic

He observed that health and wellness is now becoming a social institution that has been shaped by socio-economic forces and practitioners are now required to respond appropriately. Heyman challenged delegates with, "The question we need to ask ourselves is, where do we best fit and how can we meet the challenges and

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concerns of the changing consumer expectations?� Dr Heymen went on to clarify that consumers are becoming increasingly educated and opinionated on their options. They want to have a say on how their health concerns are addressed. They are concerned about environmental issues and they want solutions that fit comfortably into their thinking and values. While statistics reveal that consumers are not quick to articulate exactly what they are looking for, studies show that overwhelmingly they are seeking not just cures, but also preventative solutions and guidance in the best lifestyle choices. While herbs, remedies and natural alternative therapies were dismissed in the 1900s, they are resurfacing as part of a counterculture that is viewing traditional thought as too limiting. There are growing consumer communities that consider themselves underserviced by the traditional medical model and are seeking to take power back on their health. The approach of traditional medicine to chop the body in different parts and establish areas of specialisation is no longer considered as adequate. People recognise that they are interconnected as a human being and they want to be seen as a whole person. They are also keen in not just fixing what is broken, but in learning how to take charge and how to prevent diseases that plagued past generations. There is now a growing consumer interest in prevention, wellness as well as their aesthetic care. New statistics that emerged in the US revealed that the consumer demand for alternative or integrative practitioners is now five times higher than conventional practitioners. Taking a closer look at Integrative Medicine, it can be defined as the 100

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practice of medicine that reaffirms the importance of the relationship between practitioner and patient. It focuses on the whole person, is informed by evidence, and makes use of all appropriate therapeutic approaches, healthcare professionals and disciplines to achieve optimal health and wellbeing of the patient. In essence, consumers are wanting their healthcare providers to be wellness experts, and to achieve this medical practitioners need to partner with wellness and aesthetics experts as the marketplace is changing rapidly. To embrace these new approaches there are shifting rules that support these changes. So how do we unhinge ourselves from past mindsets and approach? The answer to this is by being prepared to view what we are doing with new tools and with a fresh and a more detailed and personalised approach in patient and client evaluation. Meanwhile, technological advances are bringing some incredible tools to help us access more detailed information so we can evaluate and treat. This amazing marriage of hitech and high touch is helping us navigate and observe through more sophisticated lenses. As practitioners we need to be less predictive and take a more pattern recognition and analysis approach as to what is really happening in the individual's life. Our process must be more personalised and more relational. Our patients are seeking practitioners who fit in with their thinking and values. This is not g o i n g t o g o a w a y. W h i l e sophisticated technology changes how we practise, we are now required to reassess and determine how to make meaning of the information we are gathering. What are we observing? How do we measure what we see and what solutions can we deliver? It is now important that we gain new insight as to how we are looking at information. We need to become our own researchers and retain more detailed data on our patients. If we don't change we will be left behind. To successfully move into these new dimensions we need to improve our modes of education. We also need to recognise how we can network with other practitioners for not just the health, but also the wellness and the

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aesthetic needs of the changing consumer. Five to 10 years ago medicine was based on a systems biology approach, today evidence based is a wonderful tool that sits side-by-side as an intellectual framework that gives further meaning to health and wellness assessment. We will continue to see a continually growing transitional role of on-line services and platforms that will enable technology and wellness to work more efficiently together. While currently integrative medicine is a new definition of consumer preference, labels will serve their purpose and eventually change once therapies evolve and old definitions become too restrictive. In future years we will probably go beyond "integrative", however, at present this is the model that is experiencing a consumer demand.

THE PARALLELS TO AESTHETICS There is no doubt that aesthetics and wellness is the next-generation client service modalities that forwardthinking practitioners who are identifying these shifts will embrace. Working collaboratively with injectors or healthcare providers is now essential, but we will also need to ensure as our duty of care that we practise within our own qualification boundaries. Furthermore, the process of referral needs to be integrative so that the transition from practitioner to practitioner is smooth and not disruptive. To achieve this we need comprehensive education not just in what we can do better, but also a thorough understanding of the services we are referring our clients or patients to. Progressively we are seeing medical conferences incorporating aesthetic integration. This is a powerful educational model that will allow us to gain confidence to work intelligently and collaboratively together in ways that will better meet with consumer expectations and will also allow us to achieve best practice in our own aesthetic goals. As a strategic partner with A5M, APAN values and supports this alliance and we encourage all our members to also gain value from this relationship.

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For further information on A5M please visit www.a5m.net

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sydneyconference

APAN Aesthetics Conference Sydney – An event of intense learning and fun It was a cold but sunny day as members of the industry congregated to attend the APAN AESTHETICS CONFERENCE in Sydney on Sunday 21st June. The momentum of industry concerns with regulations was at an all-time high and the conference program did not disappoint, as the calibre of speakers and content was praised by all as being very high, diverse and valuable.

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The theme of the conference was Mastering the business of aesthetics, and in light of this the key focus was on standards, education and effective business strategies. Professor Hayek started the lecture with the timely topic of Neuropathy – how the nervous system impacts the skin and body. Professor Hayek highlighted how the body registers pain and mechanisms in pain management when delivering aesthetic treatments such as dermal needling, laser, fraxel, radiofrequency or cosmetic tattooing. Chris Testa picked up on this subject with a brief introduction on anaesthetics which attracted a great deal of interest from delegates as the issue of legislation on the use of numbing creams was also a subject of great concern by many. While Chris was only given 15 minutes for the introduction to this topic, he will be delivering a full lecture and a full day of training following the APAN Melbourne Conference on Sunday 18th October, with the Anaesthetic Training Course on Monday 19th October. Gay Wardle gave a compelling presentation on Medical and Aesthetic integration and shared with delegates some of her knowledge and experience on advanced procedures to introduce and the right and wrong way of establishing a professional collaboration with other healthcare professionals. Tina Viney presented the impending regulatory changes and highlighted the three key options for regulations. The topic created a great deal of discussion and interest.

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Caroline Nelson presented the seven habits of highly effective business operators and discussed among many other things the secret to how a business can be unique in a saturated market.

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Following the success of the Industry Expert Panel in Brisbane, Sydney

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followed with its own Panel consisting of Daniel Clifford (Marketing), industry supplier Lynette Rouse (Branding and Social Media expert), Sarah Hudson (Salon Owner) and Gay Wardle (Trainer and Salon Owner). The panel presented some key winning strategies for business advancement and profitability. Mark Viney discussed the issue of effective communication with both staff and clients and how technology can allow you achieve costeffective client and business growth. APAN was pleased to receive a sponsorship of four vouchers for Laser and Intense Pulse Light Safety Training courses valued at $520 each, kindly presented by Elissa O’Keefe, Director of Laser Safety Australia and the Australasian College of Cosmetic Surgeons. The event was supported also by a small exhibition of industry companies and trainers that contributed to the buzz of fun and excitement, where valuable business connections and friendships were forged. Each APAN event delivers a totally different program that is carefully designed to cover a well-balanced educational program that covers both science and business strategies to support professionalism, growth and business success. If you have not attended one of these events please check out our next conference program in Melbourne on pages 20-23 and plan to be there.

Visit www.apanetwork.com to register or phone 07 5593 0360 for further details.

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11th National Laser and Cosmetic Medicine Conference 14 – 15 November 2015, Surfers Paradise Marriott Resort & Spa For 10 consecutive years the National Laser and Cosmetic Medicine Conference (LCMC) has been providing medical professionals and cosmetic technicians with the knowledge and skills to assist them in keeping up to date with this rapidly expanding area of medicine. In 2015, the 11th National Laser and Cosmetic Medicine Conference will be held from 14-15 November at the Surfers Paradise Marriott Resort & Spa. Once again, the conference program will include quality plenary sessions, demonstrations, concurrent streams and workshops. This conference is designed for medical professionals such as; cosmetic physicians, cosmetic and plastic surgeons, dermatologists and other cosmetic practitioners, seeking to update their skills or expand their expertise in laser and cosmetic medicine. The program will introduce current and new treatments, review established therapies and showcase a wide range of equipment and products, which support our industry through the concurrent industry exhibition. It will offer delegates two streams of learning; an intermediate level for those looking to introduce laser and cosmetic medicine into their practice and an advanced stream for the more experienced practitioner. Program topics include: ! Pigmentation and Q-Switches ! Non-surgical management of skin cancer ! Non-surgical fractional lasers for vaginal rejuvenation

! ! ! ! ! ! !

Management of Onychomycosis Alopecia areata and female pattern hair loss Treatment of varicose veins Combination therapies for better patient outcomes Wound healing using LED lighting Successfully setting up your own practice PRP – The real story

Held in conjunction with LCMC, an intensive pre-conference three day theoretical and practical Introduction to Cosmetic Medicine workshop is also available to registered doctors. This workshop is aimed at medical practitioners new to the field of cosmetic medicine. The conference will also be hosting a Laser Safety Training Course on Saturday 14 November 2015. This course is suitable for anyone wishing to be licensed to use laser apparatus for surgical and cosmetic procedures, or those who wish to obtain a radiation safety officer certificate for laser practices. LCMC 2015 and the Introduction to Cosmetic Medicine workshop are both accredited with the RACGP QI and CPD program and address the need for medical practitioners working in the area of cosmetic medicine to participate in a program of peer reviewed ongoing education. Registrations are now open.

Register before 1 October to take advantage of the early bird deadline. For program see: www.dcconferences.com.au/lcmc2015

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cosmetictattoo

APAN – Advanced Post-Graduate Training – SYDNEY

MEDICAL COSMETIC TATTOOING 3D Eyebrow/Eyeliner Techniques Reaching a new industry standard Following the APAN Sydney Conference on Monday 22nd June, APAN was delighted to sponsor another exciting hands-on training workshop for qualified cosmetic tattooists who wished to advance their skills and knowledge in the latest techniques and protocols in Eyebrow and Eye-liner procedures that also apply specifically to medical cosmetic tattooing. Enthusiastic cosmetic tattoo practitioners attended a full day postgraduate training program conducted by Janette Zakos. Janette is a

qualified Cosmetic Tattoo practitioner with over 25 year's experience and particularly in medical cosmetic tattooing. She is also a qualified trainer and can deliver training to a government approved level. This training program started with the morning dedicated to theory where Janette set a foundation for the practical work that followed. Appointments were established with several keen ladies with various needs and concerns. These included faded colours or adverse colour changes that needed correction, as well as scarring from a previous eyebrow procedure that unfortunately led to a permanent keloid scar due to excessive pressure during the initial procedure. Janette covered various concerns and addressed in detail, ways to avoid some of these unfortunate errors. Her skill and knowledge on colour choice and application was greatly appreciated by all who participated in this, extemsive handson workshop. The training covered a variety of techniques as well as the 3D techniques for which Janette is a real expert.

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Gaining comprehensive hands-on training allowed practitioners to develop a new level of confidence in perfecting their skills and techniques, while gain a better understanding of advanced procedures that are evolving within this amazing profession. Dianne Kinglsey, despite being in practice for many years, participated in the Cosmetic Tattoo (Nipple Areola) training in Brisbane and gained so much from it she decided to also participate in the Sydney training. Following their training both Dianne and Priscilla Huynh were happy to confirm that they thoroughly appreciated the detailed training they received that in their words, "was worth every cent".

COSMETIC TATTOO APAN REGISTERED PRACTITIONER As part of their commitment to educational advancement APAN's duty of care is to provide training opportunities to their Cosmetic Tattooing Members that is in-depth and specialised. After extensive discussions with several cosmetic tattoo practitioners, and the APAN Cosmetic Tattoo Facebook community, as of August 2015, in response to industry recommendation, a specialist membership category will be launched for advanced practitioners – COSMETIC TATTOO APAN REGISTERED PRACTITIONER. This classification will be linked to an accreditation program for ongoing education. Registered practitioners under this classification will receive special recognition and privileges within the industry as well as being promoted for their standards and credibility to the consumer. The accreditation program will require that practitioners commit to their on-going education for which credit points will be allocated. Minimum educational qualifications will also be required in order to qualify for this classification and members will be required to adhere to certain standards of practice as well as the Code of Ethics. As the aesthetics industry is entering an era when regulations will be introduced, formal qualifications will become the baseline benchmark on which to build on. This will allow the industry to gain a level of uniformity that will raise the reputation of the profession to a high status. Cosmetic Tattooing is no different. While there is excellent training available through various skilled individuals with excellent

reputation, without an industry benchmark there is no mechanism for stopping those who feel they can deliver training as a means of making money, regardless as to their own lack of experience or sufficient depth of knowledge. This is already starting to bring the profession into disrepute. APAN believes that the purpose of formal qualifications as the base entry level is important. As Australia has government approved qualifications it is important that the industry embraces them as the baseline benchmark. Some would argue that they are not high enough. If that is their concern then there is an opportunity to bring this to the government's attention when the unit of competency SIBBSKS504A - Design and Perform Cosmetic Tattooing is up for review in November. Our own Cosmetic Tattoo board is certainly intending to make certain recommendation. If you would like to give us your feedback you are most welcome. IN THANKS For the Sydney Postgraduate training APAN would like to thank Jeanette Zakos for sharing of her amazing knowledge and skills. Thank you also to the Sydney Beauty and Dermal Institute for allowing us to use their training rooms. A big thank you also to MBC Cosmetic Tattoo for donating products to the participants. And last but not least thank you to Dianne Kingsley and Priscilla Huynh for their dedication to their on-going education. If you require further information on the COSMETIC TATTOO APAN REGISTERED PRACTITIONER membership classification please phone 07 5593 0360 or email info@apanetwork.com and give us your name and phone number so that we can contact you at an appropriate time that may suit you.

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medicalpeels

Make Progress with

CHEMICAL AND ENZYME PEELS by Merrilyn Clancy, B. App. Sc., M.A., Ph.D., CCC Senior Lecturer, Faculty of Clinical Aesthetics The Australasian College of Health & Wellness

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The use and application of chemical and enzyme peels have been around for over a decade. However, as research identifies their mechanism in greater detail, more specific protocols can be determined to achieve the most advantageous results with their application. Dr Merrilyn Clancy has a special interest and conducted extensive research into photoageing, acne, hyperpigmentation and targeted topicals. She is currently on the Faculty of Clinical Aesthetics at The Australasian College of Health and Wellness in Sydney. In this article she identifies the mechanism of various peels and recommends appropriate protocols to ensure the best possible treatment outcome from their use. Imagine prescribing a treatment regimen for clients that produces immediately visible results that continued to improve over time and can be maintained for years. This is possible with peels.

PEEL CHANGES Peels induce measurable changes in the skin that improve skin tone, thickness and texture and reduce atypia, roughness and dispigmentation. Deep peels, which ablate the epidermis, stimulate dermal retraction and remodelling. Overall, these changes stimulate improvement in the skin’s ability to reflect light – a key indicator of youthful skin. With a carefully prescribed peel protocol, and commitment to a maintenance program, these benefits can last for years.

PEEL PROTOCOL One misconception about peels, and other noninvasive procedures such as laser, is that a one-off treatment is all that is needed. This is an over simplification. Most peel and laser therapies must be performed in a series, and followed up with a daily regimen to achieve the desired result. This approach is preferred because it is less invasive, thereby reducing the possibility of side-effects, thermal injury and complications (e.g., hyperpigmentation). In addition, progressive peels can be prescribed with increasing or decreasing strength according to the emerging improvement. Deep peels, such as a phenol peel or an ablative laser procedure, may seem more desirable because only one treatment is given. However, these treatments are best reserved for the severest of cases of elastosis and photo-ageing because they completely destroy the epidermis. A peel protocol that is conducted in a series over time has minimal downtime and tolerable post-treatment side-effects. There is also more flexibility in the prescription of peel formulae throughout the protocol and modifying the strength of daily topicals.

HOW PEELS WORK Peels can be categorised by depth, degree of frosting or grades, but here, the categories of superficial, medium and deep work best as they most closely relate to results. Superficial means that the peel formula penetrates any or all of the epidermal layers. These peels stimulate epidermal regeneration – both cell turnover and desquamation. With repeated applications, the outermost layer of

the epidermis the stratum corneum, becomes more compacted, contributing to a smooth texture. Medium peels penetrate the epidermis to the papillary layer of the dermis, leaving the epidermis partially intact in the rete ridges that interlock in waves, with the dermal papillae. These peels accelerate regeneration and over time, produce a thickened epidermis, and more regularity in the waviness of the rete ridges/dermal papillae. Cellular atypia and dispigmentation is also reduced thus removing solar lentigines (age spots) and actinic keratosis (scaly patches), along with accelerated dermal regeneration for a tighter and denser extracellular matrix. Deep peels penetrate to the reticular dermis, with the epidermis and dermal papillae being completely ablated. Dermal retraction occurs, which produces a tightening effect, and a remodelling of collagen and elastin fibres – more alignment in the arrangement of tensile fibres. Regrowth of the epidermis occurs from the basal keratinocytes lining the shafts of hair follicles.

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MECHANISM OF ACTION The pH of the skin is approximately 4 to 5.5, with surface lipids and sebum contributing to this acidity. This provides a protective effect because the acidity is both anti-bacterial and anti-imflammatory. The pH of peels is usually <2, which is necessary to interrupt the

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sallow skin colour, hyperpigmentation, photoageing, rosacea, melasma, keratosis pilaris, seborrheic keratosis, rough skin texture and xerosis (dry skin) as well as sensitive skin. Any part of the body can be peeled. The skin of the arms and body is thicker, and as such can tolerate higher-strength peels with thicker bases. Peels can also be used on a regular basis to maintain normal skin and to enhance the penetration of topical agents. There are many over-the-counter (OTC) products available for the maintenance of normal skin. Although these are often very weak and so need to be applied more frequently. Peels can be used with all skin types (Fitzpatrick 1 through VI). However, there are some restrictions with the darkest skin types (Fitzpatrick V and VI) because deeper peels can stimulate pigment irregularities.

TYPES OF PEELS The choice of peels is endless because of the ability to compound formulae to different strengths, apply peels in layers and combine peel compounds for more effective results. There are many peels available commercially, both single ingredient and blended peels, but peels may also be compounded individually with a doctor’s prescription.

protein and lipid chains of the stratum corneum, desmosomes and natural moisturising factors of the extracellular space. Some peel formulae are hydrophilic (e.g., all AHA acids such as glycolic) and so disturb the lipids of the desmosomes, but are not absorbed into the skin. Others are lipophilic (e.g., salicylic, TCA etc), dissolve the lipid-soluble chains as well as denaturing the proteins. Phenol peels can be absorbed through to the blood supply and are cardio-toxic. Therefore, phenol peels must be performed under medical supervision (often with cardiac monitoring). Enzyme peels (in the superficial category) dissolve the enzymes in the extracellular space, releasing the contacts between the corneocytes triggering desquamation. The effect of desquamation from any peel occurs from some or all of the following actions: ! KEROLYTIC EFFECT – dissolving the horny outside layer of keratinocytes ! DENATURING PROTEIN – dissolving the keratin content of keratinocytes ! LIPID BREAKDOWN – dissolving the lipids in the desmosomes and other lipid bonds that connect keratinocytes ! ENZYMATIC RELEASE – combining with enzymes in the extracellular matrix to release keratinocytes.

PEELS FOR EVERY PURPOSE Peels are effective for a variety of skin condition such as acne (face and body), acne scarring, fine lines and wrinkles, enlarged pores,

There appears to be a division between “chemical” peels, such as glycolic, salicylic and trichloroaceticacids used in the medical community and “enzymatic” peels used more often in the beauty domain. This division has come about because the chemical group is mixed from a prescription and the enzyme group is derived from naturally occurring ingredients and more likely to be sold over the counter. For the most part, all acids and enzymes are derived from naturally occurring substances (e.g., glycolic from beetroot or sugarcane, salicylic acid from willow tree bark, papain enzyme from papaya, bromelain enzyme from pineapple) and processed in laboratories to arrive at its concentrated state. These substances – chemical or enzymatic – are formulated in a base that allows them to remain stable in the jar, not degrade over time, and be safe for use by the public. This buffering occurs with all products, and so to consider one type more “natural” than the other is misleading. The true difference between these peels is how they act on the skin as mentioned above.

AHAs: Alpha hydroxy acids are derived from many natural substances. Some examples are mandelic acid (almonds), malic acid (from all fruits but most commonly apples), kojic acid (mushrooms), tartaric acid (grapes), lactic acid (milk), phytic acid (rice), citric acid (citrus). These acids break the bonds between corneocytes, accelerating desquamation. There are other advantages inherent within each of these ingredients – advantages that are well-suited to certain skin conditions. For example, lactic acid has a hydrating effect, so is good for dry skin. Kojic acid, with its skin lightening effect, is good for pigment disorders. There are some downsides as well. For example, glycolic acid has no visible end point and must be timed (not self-neutralising).

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BHAs: Beta hydroxy acids are derived from willow tree bark and

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sweet birth. Salicylic acid is lipophilic so it can dissolve sebum. Lipohydroxy acid (LHA) is absorbed more slowly and has been

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shown to produce better compaction of the stratum corneum upon regrowth. Both of these acids are less likely to cause postinflammatory hyperpigmentation (PIH). For these reasons, both of these acids are preferred in the treatment of acne.

Trichloroacetic acid (TCA): A true chemical, derived from acetic acid and chlorine, this acid can be used to achieve superficial to deep level peeling and combines well with other acids such as lactic and salicylic. It is used in varying concentrations up to 35%, although 20% is more common (e.g., Obagi blue peel). Typically, frosting or whitening occurs on application in patients who have not undergone peels previously. This occurs as the proteins/keratins in the corneocytes are denatured. This effect is also a clinical endpoint. The level of frosting indicates how deep the peel has penetrated. Various strengths of TCA are indicated, depending on what part of the body is being peeled.

Jessners and other blended peels: Jessner peels are a standard formula combining salicylic and lactic acids with resorcinol, at identical levels (14%) in a base of alcohol. This mild peel does not penetrate beyond the epidermis and is easily tolerated. Because resorcinol is a derivative of phenol, a prescription is required in Australia. TCA is more likely to be delivered in combination with other acids today, rather than alone. Arbutin, hydroquinone and azelaic acids are all ingredients that suppress melanogenesis and so these are common additives. Many of these peels are selfneutralising, which means that the effects spontaneously terminate once they have evaporated. This allows for the application of several layers, extending the peel depth. Retinoids: The unwanted dry scaling that can occur with topical use of retinoids (Vitamin A derivatives) can be corrected by adjusting the strength or type of retinoid. However, it can also be strengthened to achieve peeling. Because of the different types of retinoids – retinoic acid, retinaldehyde, retinol, retinylpalmitate/acetate, it is meaningless to mention percentages, but as an example, a 15% retinol peel converts to retinoic acid in the skin, reducing the corneocyte adhesion (cells sticking together, failing to shed). It is often combined with lactic acid and used as a maintenance peel or to boost the effect of a Jessner’s peel. Retinoid peels are characteristically yellow because this is the colour of Vitamin A. This can be rinsed away after four to eight hours (maximum absorption time).

Enzymes: Enzymatic peels have a different mechanism because they break the bonds between cells by dissolving the proteolytic enzymes in the skin. Enzymes in common use today are bromelain, papain, lactose (from soured milk), pepsin (from pigs’ stomach), bisabolol (from chamomile), saponins (from ginseng), pumpkin, tomato, mushroom extracts, etc. These often require activation by water. Because they are hydrophilic, they are a form of superficial peel, so don’t penetrate below a few layers. A downside is that they often have a pungent odour, but this does not affect performance. They produce a mild warming sensation on the skin, rather than the erythema produced by acid peels. Their active period lasts a few minutes and can then be rinsed off.

such as salicylic or gycolic acid cleanser or toner is to be used. This is followed by a topical retinoid, once daily, which is ceased 24 hours prior to the peel. Post-peel: The use of a corticosteroid may be indicated, but it is usually not necessary. For seven days after the peel, this post-peel regimen is followed: wash face with a neutral cleanser, apply emollient or occlusive moisturiser as desired. If the patient dislikes the flakiness that occurs over the first few days of a peel, he/she may wash the area up to three times throughout the day, but must not peel off any skin, no matter how tempting (can cause PIH). Routine care: After seven days the daily regimen resumes using the following targeted topicals twice per day: AHA cleanser or toner, or gentler for sensitive or dry skin, an ascorbic acid (Vitamin C, which can be formulated with Vitmain E and/or ferulic acid), optional peptide or growth factor serum and preferred moisturiser. In the morning a reflective sunscreen is added (e.g., zinc or titanium dioxide). At night, a retinoid is used. If continued correctly, a moisturiser will not be necessary.

CONCLUSION Carefully prescribed peels – both chemical and enzymatic – show effective results when used in a series. Significant changes in the compaction of the stratum corneum, with increased epidermal thickness, improved surface texture and a more uniform skin tone are produced when peels are performed in a series. The cost of these services to the client is far less than with laser therapies, and a much lower risk of injury. The changes that are produced can be maintained by the continued use of daily topicals, and these changes can last for years and keep new symptoms at bay.

Merrilyn Clancy, B App Sc, MA, PhD, CCC, is on the Faculty of Clinical Aesthetics at The Australasian College of Health and Wellness. Dr Clancy’s teaching and research interests are in photoageing, acne, hyperpigmentation and targeted topicals for the prevention of these conditions. Her current research is to determine the optimal frequency for peels for these conditions. Dr Clancy has a holistic approach to skincare that incorporates healthy nutrition and exercise. Her career in health sciences began in Australia, but continued in the USA for many years where she built her medical aesthetics practice, founded in science. “Give me your skin, I’ll give it back new”. Dr Clancy can be reached at merrilyn.clancy@tac.edu.au 100

PROTOCOLS FOR TARGETED DAILY TOPICALS Accelerated regeneration, the prevention of hyperpigmentation and maintenance of results are the three key outcomes of peels. These are best achieved by using a pre-treatment regimen two weeks prior to the peel, a post-treatment regimen for a week following the peel, and thereafter, routine daily use of prescribed topicals that target the key goals of the patient. Pre-peel: To prepare the skin for optimal outcome, an AHA product

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Beer, K., & Beer, J. (2009). Overview of facial aging. Facial Plastic Surgery, 25(5), 281 – 84. Rendon, M.I., Berson, D.S., Cohen, J.L. et al (2010). Evidence and considerations in the application of chemical peels in skin disorders and aesthetic resurfacing. Clinical and Aesthetic Dermatology, 3(7), pp. 32 – 43. International Peeling Society www.peelingsociety.com

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nutritionalscience

PUTTING OUT THE FLAME New research findings on the benefits of AGED GARLIC in cardiovascular health and skin inflammation

An interview with Dr Budoff The virtues of garlic and its benefit to health have been anecdotally known throughout the ages, however, there is now over 700 papers that support its benefits to cardiovascular health and in even reversing heart disease. Coronary heart disease claimed 20,046 lives in Australians in 2012 and kills one Australian every 26 minutes. Each year, nearly 55,000 Australians suffer a heart attack, or one heart attack every 10 minutes. Additionally, research confirms impressive results on aged garlic in mimimising inflammation in the body. As aesthetic practitioners we understand the impact of inflammation as the underlying cause of ageing of the skin and body, therefore non-drug recommendations that have a solid scientific evidence base may be useful information that we should consider educating our clients about. Recently the results of a double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical study focused on metabolic syndrome was conducted using Aged Garlic Extractâ&#x201E;˘ . To discuss these studies we interviewed worldrenowned cardiologist Dr Matthew Budoff, who was recently in Australia to unveil international findings into the multiple benefits of Age Garlic Extract â&#x201E;˘ at the Port Douglas Heart Meeting in June this year. Dr Budoff is Professor of Medicine, David Geffen School of Medicine, Harbor-UCLA Medical Center, Program Director and Director of Cardiac CT, Division of Cardiology, Harbor-UCLA Medical Center and Chair of Preventive Cardiology.

APJ Q1: Dr Budoff, what started your interest in researching aged garlic? My colleague, Dr Niihara, was doing research on Aged Garlic Extract and uncovered many clinical studies related to heart health, so I contacted the company and they agreed to support my research into Aged Garlic Extract (AGE). There is now substantial scientific evidence of the benefits of aged garlic in heart health and in particular in support of the health of coronary arteries.

APJ Q2: What chemical constituents are responsible for the therapeutic properties of garlic and what are the advantages of aged garlic over fresh garlic? S-Allyl Cysteine is the active compound of aged garlic extract, a different approach than Allicin. This allows none of the harshness of raw garlic (oxidation and harm) and all the benefit of a purified medication. Much like grapes are changed as they age into wine and have different medicinal properties, thus, too, garlic as it ages can change to a more smooth, less toxic compound with heart benefits. Aged garlic extract is also odourless and is better tolerated than raw garlic, which sometimes can contribute to stomach pain and discomfort.

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APJ Q3: What are the most exciting scientific discoveries on the benefits of aged garlic? We found that aged garlic actually causes reversal of heart disease, so patients taking aged garlic extract had less plaque on their followup scan than at baseline. We found that with those in the placebo group their plaque actually progressed. We also found it slows calcification build-up in the arteries.

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APJ Q4: Specifically, what are the benefits of aged garlic to health? Our test results found that aged garlic extract lowers blood pressure, lowers cholesterol, lowers inflammation and reduces plaque buildup in the heart. Age garlic extract has been proven to reduce the markers of inflammation. This is good news for overall health, and for aestheticians it means that by mimimising inflammation AGE can assist in combatting the signs of ageing due to underlying inflammation. Also, the sulfur compounds help aged garlic extract lower homocysteine, which has been tied to blockages in the blood vessels of the heart and legs and other areas of the body. Elevated homocysteine levels have been associated with heart attack, stroke, blood-clot formation and perhaps the development of Alzheimer's disease. AGE is therefore a simple and effective way of supporting the body against such health risks.

APJ Q5: What about inflammation that contributes to skin disorders? Age garlic extract has proven benefits in lowering systemic inflammation. This will invariably benefit any condition, including skin conditions that manifest inflammation such as acne or rosacea â&#x20AC;&#x201C; in fact any skin condition that is a result of poor capillary health. Additionally, let us not forget premature ageing skin can substantially benefit for minimising inflammation, and this is important in your industry where your goals and aims are to improve the health of the skin and enhance its youthful appearance. -APJ Q6:

Can people with low blood pressure take aged garlic as there is a perception that it can continue to lower their blood pressure? Also, can you indicate if

there are any contraindications to taking aged garlic? There are no contraindications for the use of aged garlic extract. I am not aware of any problem with low blood pressure. Most people tolerate it well, however, if anyone is concerned they can take the necessary precaution to start with a low dose and slowly increase, while monitoring any adverse reaction. It is important to understand that aged garlic extract is clinically proven to benefit health in so many areas without the digestive irritation of, say, fresh garlic, so it is advantageous that one does not discard its benefits just because they may have at some stage reacted to fresh or odourous garlic.

APJ Q7: Why are people allergic to garlic, or is this a perception of a therapeutic reaction? I really don't believe that what they are experiencing is an â&#x20AC;&#x153;allergyâ&#x20AC;? as such. This is probably just a reaction to the oxidation of raw garlic. I have not had this problem with the 1000 or so patients I have on AGE in my practice or clinical trials. If someone is concerned however, I would suggest that they start with low doses, as I have mentioned above, rather than avoid it altogether.

APJ Q8: What are your thoughts on fresh garlic? How can one identify the best quality and should fresh garlic be used in large doses for therapeutic purposes? It is hard to use enough raw garlic for medicinal purposes as it not only causes one to smell like garlic (partners and spouses are not happy about that), but also causes stomach problems at high doses. For this reason I use aged garlic extract for medicinal purposes and raw garlic for cooking. In cooking, fresh garlic can enhance the flavour of food and it is also useful with protein foods such as meat or fish as it also has excellent anti-bacterial properties, so that is an added benefit.

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References: Budoff MJ, Takasu J, Flores FR, Niihara Y, Lu B, Lau BH, Rosen RT, Amagase H. Inhibiting progression of coronary calcification using Aged Garlic Extract in patients receiving statin therapy: a preliminary study. Prev Med. 2004;39:985-91.

Removing Tattoo Pigment By Injecting Liquids Into The Skin NEW LICENSING REQUIREMENTS There will soon be a new licencing requirement in Queensland if you remove tattoo pigment by flushing it from the skin (with equipment that uses very fine needles) at your business. This new requirement will be passed in September 2015, but comes into effect in the first half of 2016. This time before the new law comes into effect allows you to plan. The new requirement about removing tattoo pigment will become law through an amendment to the Public Health (Infection Control for Personal Appearance Services) Regulation 2003. The power to do this comes from section 14 (e) of the Public Health (Infection Control for Personal Appearance Services) Act 2003. The new law isn’t expected to affect many businesses, as most tattoo pigment is removed by laser.

This new requirement will mean that:

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If you own a business where tattoo pigment is removed by flushing it from the skin, you must have a high risk personal appearance services licence (issued by your local council) If you own the business, you need to be mindful of requirements like a sink for hand washing and a sink for washing equipment If you personally remove tattoo pigment this way, you must have an approved infection control qualification. (Currently, approved courses have a course code of HLTIN402C).

This new requirement is meant to protect you and your customers from infection with blood-borne viruses, like Hepatitis B and Hepatitis C. Infection with these viruses can cause liver failure and/or liver cancer. Tattoo artists and other people who provide treatments which are expected to cause bleeding must already have a ‘high risk personal appearance service’ licence issued by a council.

WANT FURTHER INFORMATION? Contact your local council if you have any questions about matters like fees for high risk personal appearance service licences or the fit out of your business. P l e a s e c o n t a c t K a t r i n a . S m i t h 3 @ h e a l t h . q l d . g o v. a u o r David.Gould@health.qld.gov.au if you would like to provide feedback about when you reasonably be ready for this new requirement. C h e c k h t t p s : / / w w w. l e g i s l a t i o n . q l d . g o v. a u / A c t s _ S L s /Acts_SL_P.htm if you want to check the Public Health (Infection Control for Personal Appearance Services) Act 2003. Article prepared by Katrina Smith, Public Health Regulation Team, Health Protection Unit, PO Box 2368 Fortitude Valley BC, Qld 4006.

Budoff MJ, Ahmadi N, Gul KM, Liu ST, Flores FR, Tiano J, Takasu J, Miller E, Tsimikas S. Aged garlic extract supplemented with B vitamins, folic acid and L-arginine retards the progression of subclinical atherosclerosis: a randomized clinical trial. Prev Med. 2009;49:101-7. Ahmadi N, Tsimikas S, Hajsadeghi F, Saeed A, Nabavi V, Bevinal MA, Kadakia J, Flores F, Ebrahimi R, et al. Relation of oxidative biomarkers, vascular dysfunction, and progression of coronary artery calcium. Am J Cardiol. 2010;105:459-66. Budoff M. Aged garlic extract retards progression of coronary artery calcification. J Nutr. 2006;136(3 Suppl):741S-4S. Lrijani VN, Ahmadi N, Zeb I, Khan F, Flores F, Budoff M. Beneficial effects of aged garlic extract and coenzyme Q10 on vascular elasticity and endothelial function: The FAITH randomized clinical trial. Nutrition. 2013;29(1):71-5. Zeb I, Ahmadi N, Nasir K , Kadakia J, Nabavi V, Flores F, Li D, Budoff MJ. Aged garlic extract and coenzyme Q10 have favorable effect on inflammatory markers and coronary atherosclerosis progression: A randomized clinical trial. J Cardiovasc Dis Res. 2012:3;185-90.

Dr. Matthew Budoff is at the forefront of the medical community's efforts to develop early detection methods for cardiac disease, the number one cause of death in the U.S. Given that approximately 50 per cent of U.S. heart disease victims learn of their illness by experiencing a sometimes fatal heart attack, Dr. Budoff has devoted much of his time over the past 20 years to advancing procedures that can help Matthew J. Budoff, M.D. doctors identify cardiac patients early, and place them on a therapeutic path to prevent a heart attack. Dr. Budoff works on at least 20 active medical research trials at any given time, and is a frequent lecturer on topics of cardiology at symposia, congresses and annual conferences on every continent. He has authored or co-authored over 700 research papers, six books, and 38 book chapters. In the past two years alone, Dr. Budoff has been honored with multiple awards recognising his professional skills and accomplishments. Of particular note is his receipt of the Einstein Award for Scientific Achievement from the International Biographical Centre, Cambridge, U.K.; his inclusion in five respected lists of top doctors in America; being named to the US News list of Top Doctors for 2011; and, most recently, named to “World’s Most Influential Scientific Minds” in 2014. In 2015, he was named the Endowed Chair of Preventive Cardiology at his institution and was awarded the Arthur S. Agatston Cardiovascular Disease Prevention Award. Dr. Budoff graduated cum laude from the University of California, Riverside, with a major in biochemistry. He went on to graduate with distinction and a member of Alpha Omega Alpha from the George Washington University School of Medicine, in Washington, DC, before returning to his native California to complete an internship and residency in internal medicine, and a fellowship in cardiology, at Harbor-UCLA Medical Center in Torrance, where he currently acts as Program Director for the Cardiology Fellowship and Director of Cardiac Computed Tomography.

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When you want the perfect fit you need an

INDUSTRY SPECIALIST INSURER Take the five point business check-up for busy salons...


SCIENTIFIC NEWS ageing," said Lithgow. "The iron was causing dysfunction and aggregation in proteins that have already been associated with the ageing process. Now we're wondering if excess iron also drives the ageing process."

WHEN HEAVY METALS GO OFF-KILTER: STUDY IN C. ELEGANS SHOWS EXCESS IRON PROMOTES AGEING Maintaining a delicate balance of metals may be a key factor in healthy ageing according to US-based researchers at the Buck Institute for Age Research. It's been known for decades that some metals, including iron, accumulate in human tissues during ageing and that toxic levels of iron have been linked to neurologic diseases, such as Parkinson's. Common belief has held that iron accumulation happens as a result of the ageing process. But research in the nematode C. elegans in the Lithgow lab at the Buck Institute shows that iron accumulation itself may also be a significant contributor to the ageing process, causing dysfunction and malforming of proteins already implicated in the ageing process.

Ref: Citation: Iron promotes protein insolubility and aging in C. Elegans

PSORIASIS ASSOCIATED WITH CARDIOVASCULAR DISEASE, INCREASED MORTALITY

likely to be men (95.5 per cent vs. 88.2 per cent). After age, sex and history of hypertension, diabetes, dyslipidemia (abnormal cholesterol levels) and smoking status were controlled for, patients with psoriasis were significantly more likely than controls to carry a diagnosis of atherosclerosis," the authors wrote. Patients with psoriasis were also more likely to have an additional diagnosis of another blood-vessel disease, including ischemic heart disease (affecting vessels leading to the heart), cerebral vascular disease (vessels leading to the brain) or peripheral arterial disease (vessels outside the heart and brain).

The skin disease psoriasis is associated with atherosclerosis, a buildup of plaque in the arteries, characterised by an increased prevalence of ischemic heart disease, cerebrovascular disease, peripheral artery disease and an increased risk of death, according to a report in the June issue of Archives of Dermatology. Psoriasis affects nearly 2-3 per cent of the world's population, including seven million Americans, according to several reports. In addition to its effects on the skin, psoriasis is associated with arthritis, depression and a lower quality of life.

Similar to what happens in humans and other mammals, researchers found that levels of calcium, copper, iron and manganese increased as the worms aged. But iron accumulated much more than the others said Buck faculty Gordon Lithgow, PhD, senior scientist on the project. "We were drawn to iron because there is all this literature that links excess iron to Alzheimer's and Parkinson's."

More recently, psoriasis has also been shown to be a systemic inflammatory condition, with similarities to other inflammatory immune disorders. Since the risk of myocardial infarction is increased in rheumatoid arthritis and systemic lupus erythematosus, which are both inflammatory conditions, attention has been focused on the association between psoriasis, cardiovascular risk factors and myocardial infarction.

Researchers began manipulating the nematode's diet. "We fed iron to four-dayold worms, and within a couple of days they looked like 15-day-old worms," said Lithgow. "Excess iron accelerated the ageing process." Lithgow says excess iron is known to generate oxidative stress and researchers expected to see changes in the worm based on that toxicity. "Instead, what we saw looked much more like normal

Srjdan Prodanovich, M.D., of the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, and colleagues analysed the computerised records of 3,236 patients with psoriasis and 2,500 individuals without psoriasis who w e r e s e e n a t t h e s a m e Ve t e r a n s Administration facility. Patients in the psoriasis group were slightly older than those in the control group without psoriasis (average age 67.9 vs. 65.1) and were more

â&#x20AC;&#x153;This result is not surprising, given the systemic nature of atherosclerosis," the authors write. "It has tremendous and farreaching clinical implications, as all of these vascular conditions represent a major financial cost to the healthcare system, as well as a major cause of disability and death. The latter finding was corroborated by our analysis, whereby we concluded that psoriasis is an independent risk-factor for mortality; i.e., we found a higher percentage of deaths among patients with psoriasis than among patients without psoriasis (19.6 per cent vs. 9.9 per cent)." Future studies should investigate whether aggressive treatment of either cardiovascular risk factors or psoriasis will lead to an improvement in atherosclerosis in these patients, the authors conclude.

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"In the meantime, we recommend that skincare and healthcare providers who are caring for patients with psoriasis be vigilant with respect to traditional risk factor screenings," they write. "It would be prudent for dermatologists to be familiar with suggested screening for cardiovascular risk factors and recommendations for aspirin

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use. If not, it is imperative that they work in collaboration with a primary care provider or another internal medicine specialist, who also needs to be aware of our findings." Ref:www.chinaview.cn 2009-06-16 02:33:52

3D IMAGING MEASURES WRINKLE-BUSTING EFFECTS OF BOTOX, OTHER NEUROTOXINS 3D speckle tracking photogrammetry may help measure the efficacy of injectable wrinkle reducers such as Botox and Dysport, according to new research from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania.

NEW NON-INVASIVE TECHNIQUE TO DETECT SKIN CANCERS

The findings appear in the May issue of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery. Using the new technique, researchers can measure dynamic facial wrinkles and their subsequent reduction following injection. Results are presented as a colour-coded heat map. By comparing before-and-after treatment heat maps of patients, physicians can objectively evaluate wrinkle reduction and other variables such as optimal dosage for obtaining maximum aesthetic benefit.

determine wrinkle reduction. In addition to colour changes that signal improvement, the system allows precise measurement of wrinkle reduction. In the study, horizontal compression or wrinkling in the treated area decreased from 9.11% to 2.60% and from 4.83% to 0.83% in the forehead following injection. Average vertical stretch (another form of wrinkling) of the area during brow furrowing decreased from 2.51% to 1.15%, and average vertical stretch in the forehead decreased from 6.73% to 1.67%.

Software visually maps horizontal movement of the face. (Left) Before injection, the light blue in the centre indicates compression of the skin between the eyebrows and above the nose. (Right) Two weeks after injection. The new colours show decreased compression.

Evidence-Based Medicine in Action In a major breakthrough, a new non-invasive technique that allows clinicians to accurately detect various forms of skin cancer has been developed. The new Raman spectroscopy method could be an improvement upon the current clinical "gold standard" non-invasive technique, called dermoscopy, which is a highly subjective method. The Raman spectroscopy, hitherto used in chemical experiments, is named after prominent Indian scientist Sir C.V. Raman, the winner of the Nobel physics prize in 1930. "The non-invasive and label-free nature of Raman spectroscopy enables the application in various medical fields. The method could be applied through an endoscope in order to reach internal organs," said co-author Johannes Schleusener from the Department of Dermatology, Venereology and Allergy, Charite - Universitatsmediz in Berlin. "Besides the detection of skin cancer, applications to detect cancer of the urinary bladder, esophagus or cervix have been shown," Schleusener said. By using Raman spectroscopy, Schleusener and his team found that malignant melanoma could be detected with an accuracy of 91 per cent and non-melanoma skin cancers could be detected with accuracy between 73 per cent and 85 per cent. The study appeared in the Journal Experimental Dermatology.

Current attempts at measuring wrinkle reduction mostly rely on static photographs and subjective visual assessments. “With more people turning to this procedure, it is important to have evidence-based ways of improving cosmetic and reconstructive surgical results,” writes senior author Ivona Percec, MD, PhD, director of Basic Science Research and associate director of Cosmetic Surgery in the division of Plastic Surgery at Penn. Researchers evaluated 14 subjects using a dual camera system and 3D optical analysis. White foundation and black speckle makeup were randomly applied to each patient before and two weeks after injection of 20 units of filler in the area between the eyebrows. Movement of the speckles was tracked by the digital camera for analysis. Wrinkles in treated areas were analysed, resulting in before- and after-treatment heat maps. In the pretreatment heat map, light blue represented wrinkles. Two weeks after treatment, the light blue had been largely replaced with light green and yellow. These new colours were representative of decreased skin compression or wrinkling. A subject prepared for imaging. White foundation and black speckle makeup are applied to each patient. The speckles are then tracked by the digital camera, a n d t h e i r displacement is measured to

Software highlights vertical motion. (Left) Before injection, the forehead shows increased stretch. (Right) After injection, stretch of the forehead is decreased, as evidenced by the light blue colour being replaced with yellow. Application of the technique raises the possibility of objectively answering several open questions in cosmetic medicine. For example, in the United States there are currently two other approved formulations for reducing wrinkles. Objective evidence of which formulation provided maximum wrinkle reduction could guide physician and consumer choice in individual cases. Controversy also exists regarding preparation, dilution, and dosing efficacy of a given toxin, as well as how soon to expect results and how long the results last. Previous investigations of questions such as these largely used static photography with subjective, although validated, scoring scales; these scoring methods could be replaced by three-dimensional speckle tracking photogrammetry. In addition, different dose efficacy in various populations (such as male versus female patients from various age groups) could be determined. “As new therapies and expanded applications become available for anti ageing and the treatment of neuromuscular

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disorders, this method may make it possible to quantify clinical efficacy and establish precise therapeutic regimens,” Percec says. “Although future studies will be needed to explore the use of digital image correlation in larger groups, our results are the first to show the modality can be applied to study a range of challenges in plastic surgery.” The procedure may also help quantify how well the injectables work in reducing facial paralysis associated with stroke and Bell’s palsy. See more at: http://www.plasticsurgerypractice.com/201 5/05/3d-imaging-measures-wrinkle-bustingeffects-botox-neurotoxins/

FAT GRAFTING WIDELY USED IN FACELIFTING Fat grafting as part of facelift surgery has gained considerable ground in recent years, according to a study in the July issue of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery®.

One of the main sites of fat injection was the malar area. The area below the lower eyelids and the nasolabial folds between the nose and the corners of the mouth were other common sites for fat grafting. While some of the injected fat is reabsorbed over time, the plastic surgeons believed that most of the transferred fat was still present at up to one year after facelifting. If necessary, follow-up procedures were performed to refine the results after four to six months. Patient and surgeon satisfaction rates with the results of fat grafting were good. Researchers write that the use of fat grafting can provide additional volume when the desired facial shape and “volumetric highlights” can’t be obtained by repositioning the existing facial fat. “The results of our survey demonstrate most surgeons currently believe that facial fat repositioning in combination with volume addition increases the ability to utilise these two complementary techniques to restore the volumetric highlights noted in youth, thereby enhancing facial shape.” Ref:http://www.plasticsurg erypractice.com/2015/06/fat -grafting-widely-usedfacelifting/#sthash.5a8Zrun1.dpuf

RADIOFREQUENCY

In fact, 85% of plastic surgeons polled said they used fat grafting during facelift procedures. Consistent with the recent increase in use of this technique, more than 70% of surgeons said they had started performing fat grafting to the face within the past 10 years. The researchers surveyed a random sample of American Society of Plastic Surgeons members regarding their use of fat grafting for facelift procedures. Responses were received from 309 ASPS Member Surgeons. The survey also collected details on the techniques used to collect and transfer fat grafts, including fat collection, processing, and transfer steps. Fat was commonly collected from the abdominal area and injected in small amounts. The total amount injected was typically between 11 and 25 cc – no more than a few teaspoons.

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TECHNOLOGY USED SUCCESSFULLY TO REPAIR VARICOSE VEINS A minimally invasive treatment for superficial venous reflux developed by VNUS® Medical Technologies has been

used successfully by physicians to treat painful varicose veins – a condition that affects up to 40 million Americans. While past technologies have employed lasers that reach 1,000 degrees Celsius, the new VNUS catheter – VNUS ClosureFASTTM – uses radio frequency energy to quickly heat and close diseased leg veins, with heat levels similar to what a microwave uses. "The radio frequency catheter goes to 120. The tissue injury is just inside the vein. With the laser, it can go outside the vein. That's why the patients have more pain," says Dr. Charles Dunn, a general surgeon. "Laser treated patients in my experience had a lot more pain. They required narcotics after surgery. With the VNUS closure procedure, they have no pain." The Closure system uses radiofrequency energy delivered via a collapsible catheter to heat and occlude damaged saphenous veins. Using an ultrasound image, the surgeon guides the catheter to the damaged area. The VNUS delivers 20-second bursts of thermal energy to the vein walls, heating and closing the diseased veins. A typical 45-centimeter vein segment is sealed in five minutes or less. The procedure is performed on an outpatient basis, using either local or regional anaesthesia. "A surprising number of primary physicians still aren't fully aware that we've advanced so far beyond vein stripping, and it makes perfect sense to educate them on the availability of such an effective, minimally invasive alternative for people with painful varicose veins that haven't responded to conservative treatment," says Dr. Joseph Magnant of Fort Myers, Florida. "The procedure is fast and well tolerated, and patients have none of the pain or bruising of laser." And according to the authors of a GroupHealth Clinical Review Criteria, "Endovenous obliteration may offer advantages over the conventional stripping operation in terms of reduced postoperative pain, shorter sick leaves and faster return to normal activities, and it appears to be cost-saving for society, especially among employed patients.

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Because the procedure is also associated with shorter convalescence, this new method may potentially replace conventional varicose vein surgery." Ref: https://www.youtube.com/results?search_

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BUSINESS NEWS

Business & Legislation, New Tools and Research Outcomes E-NEWSLETTERS BACK IN VOGUE We are all familiar with the good old eNewsletters that marketing gurus have told us no longer work. This ‘ugly duckling’ of digital marketing techniques also happens to be one of the most effective, despite increasing competition from newer and shinier tactics. In fact as recently as last year, email marketing was again adjudged by marketing professionals to rule the roost when it came to return on investment on not just digital marketing techniques, but marketing techniques of any vintage.

schedule. So if your recipient is in ‘inbox culling’ mode, your carefully considered and composed message will quickly be dispatched without so much as opening it. This culling often happens when the recipient has not had a chance to attend their emails for an extended period. Typically after these times, your recipient will be keen to clear their inbox to make way for more important emails. So anything that is vaguely irrelevant or inconsequential will soon get culled.

Timing is everything

The massive advantage email has over its younger and sexier digital marketing siblings is the intimacy it has with its recipient.

Closer to the heart No other digital medium quite has the same cutthrough as the email, which by its nature has to be considered by its recipient prior to action being taken. Mobile advertising (by text) is considered as being more invasive of its recipient, while posting or advertising within social networks is easily bypassed and hence ignored.

newsletter

On the other hand, email sits politely in our inboxes until we do something about it. Even if they delete it, we have still captured the attention of the recipient for at least a few seconds, which reminds them that we are still here and still interested in doing business with them.

A privileged marketing position Even just to be in their inbox at all means that we occupy a fairly important place in the recipient’s world, or otherwise we would be unsubscribed at the earliest opportunity. So the value of becoming and staying subscribed cannot be underestimated. It’s a lofty position to occupy. So once a recipient does opt in to our list, is there an optimum time at which to send your email? At first glance, the answer appears to be ‘no’. Email is a ‘time-shifting’ medium. You can view and respond to it whenever you like. But closer inspection and experience in fact tells us otherwise.

Bob’s Nurseries

Are you sending your promotional emails at the right time? Times that fit this description will depend on the kind of recipient you are targeting. Business (or B2B) recipients will typically work during office hours. So emails will accumulate after hours, on weekends and during holidays, so any email sitting in their inbox after these times has a greater chance of being mercilessly deleted. Conversely, if you can hit their inbox when it is relatively empty, your chances of being read and even opened are much higher – you have much less competition for its attention. To this end, I schedule my business emails to be sent out after 10am and before 4pm between Tuesday and Thursday, because Mondays will be competing with a whole weekend of inbound email and Fridays are a day when recipients are working hard to get their tasks completed prior to the weekend.

Consumers will also experience extended times when their inbox overflows. However, these are less predictable than business recipients whose timetables are generally fixed. Consumers may only open their email once a week or less, which gives it plenty of opportunity to overflow.

Using your data to determine best practice The great thing about the various email marketing systems that are now available is that they provide accurate and extensive information about your email campaign. Open rates, bounces, forwards and so on are all measured and reported, allowing you to assess the success of your campaign. They also mean that you can experiment with various ‘send times’ to find out exactly what the most effective times are.

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Modes of email handling While we may have a compelling piece of advice or product information to impart, if the recipient isn’t in the correct ‘mode’ your email will hit the trash faster than you can say ‘click through rate’. Because despite the value of your message, recipients still consider email sorting and viewing another task in their already demanding

Once you nail this, your emails will enjoy a higher success rate, which ultimately will lead to more conversions into sales – for no extra cost at all, so it’s an exercise well worth embarking on. Ref: www.smartcompany.com.au

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2. Punitive System We have decided to give you a bonus of $xx this week, which will be paid to you in addition to your normal weekly wage. However, if you sell less than your weekly quota this week your bonus of $xx will be taken away. This is worded negatively. 3. Gift We have decided to give you a bonus of $xx this week, which will be paid to you in addition to your normal weekly salary on your payday.

MONEY AND QUOTAS THAT BEST MOTIVATE SALES TARGETS Bonus programs are effective for motivating your staff to increase their sales figures, but also costly for companies to maintain. Here, two experts studied several compensation schemes to see which works best.

While the outcome of the “Bonus System” is the same as the “Punitive System”, the best results were achieved with the Bonus System as the emphasis was on the reward rather than the punishment of failing. The “Gift” option, while appreciated as an afterthought of performance, is not the best option for motivating an incentive for sales growth figures. The research confirmed that setting targets as prerequisites for reward was the most successful option for improving performance. Source: Incentives versus Reciprocity: Insights from a Field Experiment.

It's well understood that cash bonuses often motivate a sales force to step up its game, but they don't work in every scenario and in some cases can backfire, a new study from Harvard Business School has found. The key variable is whether the staff member had to do something to earn the bonus or was just given it – in other words conditional or unconditional. Doug J. Chung, an assistant professor in the Marketing unit, and Das Narayandas, the James J. Hill Professor of Business Administration, explain what kind of bump managers can expect from different bonus plans in their working paper, Incentives versus Reciprocity: Insights from a Field Experiment, released in May this year.

The power of quotas The researchers' main finding was that the company saw an approximate 20 per cent gain in sales when the bonus was conditional to the staff member hitting a quota. When there were no strings attached to the bonus, the gains dropped to half that in one scenario, and to a net decrease of 8 per cent in another. "In the sales-force setting, people work harder if they're told a specific goal," says Chung, noting that 80 per cent of firms use some type of bonus to reward employees. The field experiment spanned six months in the second half of 2013, and involved 80 full-time salespeople from branches in four major cities. Within the six months there were 14 weeks of different compensation schemes tested, assigned randomly by branch, interspersed with control weeks. At the beginning of a test week, the company would send a text message to members of the sales force in a given branch, telling those employees they were getting a certain bonus. The branches were under different conditions at different times. Here are various bonus options communicated to an employee: 1. Bonus System This week if you sell more than your weekly quota we will give you an additional bonus of $xx, which will be paid to you in addition to your normal weekly wage.

NEW TAX LAWS FOR CAR EXPENSES Claiming work-related car expenses is a common tax-time claim for many taxpayers. In fact, almost four million taxpayers claim the deduction each year. There are of course certain rules that must be adhered to in claiming these expenses and these days, the Australian Tax Office takes a close interest in such claims given the cost to the revenue. Since 1st July 2015 new, important legislation now applies to such expenses. The Treasurer announced in the 2015-16 federal budget that the methods used for calculating work-related car expense deductions would be simplified and modernised – in other words, changed. Draft legislation to implement this has now been released for public consultation. Currently, taxpayers have an option to use one of four methods to determine their work-related car expense deductions: • cents per kilometre • logbook method • the 12% of original value method, and • one-third of actual expenses incurred. Currently, over 80% of people use the cents per kilometre method by which they receive a deduction according to the size of the car's engine. For small cars (up to 1600cc), it is 65 cents, medium cars (1601 - 2600cc) 76 cents and large cars (2601cc and over) 77 cents per kilometre, up to a cap of 5000km each year. That is going to change.

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The Government is proposing to reduce the number of methods by removing the "12% of original value method" and the "one-third of actual expenses method". The other two methods, the "cents per kilometre method" and the "logbook method", would be retained. The "cents per kilometre method" is also being standardised by replacing the three current rates based on engine size noted above with one rate set at 66 cents per kilometre, which will apply to all motor vehicles irrespective of engine size or the type of engine (e.g. petrol or rotary engines). The Government says motoring association data shows that the average running cost for the top five selling motor vehicles is 66 cents per kilometre, so it's going to go with that figure. Based on 2012-13 figures, this would see those who drive smaller vehicles getting a slight increase in deductible expenses and those who drive larger cars having a decrease in their deduction. For example, under the current rules, a person with an eligible 2.5 litre sedan would be able to claim at 76c/km compared to only 66c/km under the new rules. On a 1000km journey, this would mean a $760 deduction under the current rules, but only $660 under the proposed rules. The average impact overall for those driving medium and larger cars would be a loss of $85 a year.

identify and investigate claims that differ from the "norm" is improving each year at a rapid rate due to enhancements in technology and the use of data. The ATO will also be paying particular attention to claims:

• •

that have already been reimbursed by employers; and for private expenses such as travel from home to work.

Claiming deductions for work-related car expenses is commonplace, but the rules applying to those claims need to be carefully followed. Terry Hayes is the editor-in-chief of tax news reporting at Thomson Reuters, a leading Australian provider of tax, accounting and legal information solutions.

While the changes are intended to help cut compliance costs, those drivers who believe their deductible car-related costs are greater than the 66 cents average, or those who drive more than 5000km per year, will still be able to claim the deduction for the full amount based on keeping a logbook. The Commissioner of Taxation will have responsibility for updating the rate in later income years. The Commissioner will consider factors including the fixed costs, such as depreciation, registration and insurance as well as variable costs including maintenance, repairs and fuel costs of running a vehicle. The rate will be set at beginning of the tax year rather than at the end of the year as occurs under the current legislation. The Government says the changes to the cents per kilometre method will enable taxpayers who drive electric and hybrid cars to access the cents per kilometre method as those cars do not qualify to use the current rates that are based on rotary engine size. Taxpayers will continue to be able to choose to apply the cents per kilometre method (for up to 5000 business kilometres travelled), or the logbook method, depending on which method they feel best captures the actual running costs of their vehicle. The changes will also affect the way untaxed allowances are calculated. For example, if an employer currently pays their employee an allowance in respect of their motor vehicle use and the allowance is calculated using one of the repealed methods, the employer will need to update the method of calculating the allowance. Further, if the rate of the allowance paid by an employer is higher than 66c/km, then the employee will need to report this allowance in their tax return. The employee will be entitled to claim a deduction for the amount, up to 66c/km and be subject to tax on amounts exceeding 66c/km. Alternatively, an employee may utilise the logbook method to claim for their work-related car expenses. The ATO has also reminded taxpayers that this year, it will be focusing on unusually high work-related expense claims across all industries and occupations, a much wider approach than in previous years so all businesses are warned to take note. Assistant Commissioner Adam Kendrick said the ATO's ability to

RETAINING CLIENTS THE KEY TO ON-GOING BUSINESS GROWTH Attracting and retaining customers are the most challenging issues for Australian businesses, according to research commissioned by the Australian Retailers Association. Despite this, the study found 51% of small retailers do not have a customer experience strategy in place. However, there is good news, with almost 90% of retailers surveyed saying they have a website, while 80% of respondents had an active social media presence. The findings confirmed that two thirds of shoppers now go online before visiting a bricks-and-mortar store. Paul Greenberg, the executive chairman of the National Online Retail Association, previously said the concept of researching online and buying offline – or vice versa – is becoming more popular with consumers. “Established retailers need to have a very strong online strategy, and in-store experience needs to be well optimised,” Greenberg said. “There is no room for uninformed associates on the retail floor; they have to be on their game. Businesses in the retailers and personal service industry struggled recently thinking it’s either an offline strategy or online strategy. But it’s not a straight line. It’s a combination of them both,” Greenberg stressed. While most in the aesthetics industry consider it inappropriate to sell on-line APAN recommends on-line booking options as these have contributed to substantial business growth for many salons and clinics. They also recommend selling novelty products that are not necessarily prescriptive skincare. There are numerous other products that can attract momentum and consumer interest and lead to increased revenue. APAN also recommend that you include a subscription option on business’s websites to receive your salon’s newsletter. There are many cost-effective ways to grow your database, so use innovative strategies to draw traffic to your site and business.

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salonetiquette

Being a star in your Industry is a matter of

ATTITUDE

By Julie Hyne What makes a star in this industry is a matter of attitude. Have you As competition because fierce we need to also turn to the ever heard the expression ‘She’s got attitude?’ Has anyone ever said intangibles that can define our point of difference. Every that to you? How did that make you react or feel? business wants staff that have that little bit extra – a quality that makes them stand out and attract clients that constantly On hearing that expression, some might disregard it and blindly gravitate back to them not just because they enjoy their continue travelling down the same path, never to question their current success levels or how they might be able to improve. Others treatment, but also because of how they make them feel. This might scoff, and have a sense of complacency, that there’s nothing is referred to as the STAR quality. It is the intangible quality wrong with them and it’s the other that is made up of various elements person who has the attitude. But that can be summed up by what is “Ability is what you are capable of doing, there will be a few, who take that motivation determines what you do, known as ATTITUDE. As a comment on board and make a business owner you must also attitude determines how well you do it.” conscious decision to evaluate Lou Holtz reflect qualities that make you

exceptional as this will help you identify them also in your current and potential staff.

their characteristics and behaviour, and ultimately make the right and positive changes to impress, engage and succeed in everything they do.

In this article Julie Hyne explores and defines what these qualities embrace and how they can transform a business.

WHAT IS ATTITUDE? Attitude is a way of thinking that you can physically express simply by standing a certain way, for example, hands on your hip, rolling

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your eyes, avoiding shaking hands. These are all exhibitions of your attitude towards a person, object or situation. On the other hand, how another person, your client or peers, receives your attitude will determine your ability to positively engage, communicate and influence how they feel about you. In life there are two kinds of attitude - food and bad. Which one you adopt on any given day can influence your choice of action and responses to challenges, incentives and rewards that your employer chooses to extend to you.

If you are a salon owner reading this, and have been faced with staff challenges think about whether it could be your attitude that is affecting your results. Often it’s the flaws that aggravate you the most about others that are the ones others see in you, reason being that they are the ones you are most familiar with. Being a star operator does require attitude, but of the right kind. To help you I have listed some of the best tips for maintaining a great attitude, taken from my online Business4Beauty program for therapists and salon owners.

A good attitude will fill you with energy, optimism, care, gratitude and joy. A poor attitude will hide your potential from both yourself and others and will limit your opportunities. Those who have a continual poor attitude often live their life as a disgruntled observer, who always sees others getting the fabulous breaks and they don’t. Could this be you? As an example, I have been watching with interest the current news bouncing around about the behaviour of notable sporting stars during Wimbledon, and whether they are worthy of the attention and rewards they receive. The argument has stemmed from very negative behaviour exhibited in public during and after a game. What I see is an exhibition of bad manners, lack of respect and forward thinking by these athletes. Instead of complaining about their misfortune and bad management, they could be honouring the opportunity they have to play on the world stage and in doing so, make a real difference to other peoples’ lives, through delivering quality tennis matches, displaying superb sportsmanship and motivating others to display the right characteristics to be a star - characteristics such as discipline, good self respect, communicating with maintaining a positive attitude through moments of stress. What we too often see now sadly, are toxic traits like pettiness, overreactions, profanity, aggressive behaviour, angry outbursts and arrogance. Whether its golf, tennis, cricket or football, the success of the individual is delicately balanced between ability, belief, motivation, and lastly attitude.

Great attitudes to live by:

• • • • • • •

The real heroes in sport are the ones who have an undying belief in their ability, their motivation to always improve and an unquestionable positive “can do” attitude.

Isn’t it true that we remember the greats of sport, and forget the ones who drew attention because of their poor attitude as they very quickly fade from the spotlight.

• •

In this industry, it is no different. There are individuals who will do OK through sheer hard work and application, and there will be the ones who will exceed expectations and go above and beyond. The people who do go above and beyond, do so not because they have been incentivised or rewarded extrinsically, but because they are intrinsically driven to deliver a level of service that is unquestionably excellent. They also hold a belief of continual improvement. It’s this attitude that wins loyal clients, presents opportunities, and delivers rewards. When your positive attitude controls your delivery, everything flows the way you want it to.

Mistakes are learning opportunities, not failures To invite success, you must change your inner dialogue from one that criticizes, complains and destroys confidence to one that praises, motivates and congratulates Look for the good in all situations, motives and people Think “This is only my point of view, let me try to understand the situation from their position” Your attitude towards others will determine their attitude towards you Think, act, talk, walk, dress, behave, in a way that is a characteristic of the person you ultimately want to become If you make another person feel important and appreciated, they will return this to you Do not broadcast problems, it probably will not help you and it cannot help others Send out positive verbal and non verbal signals in all contacts, including the telephone, Deal with people in an honest, ethical and moral way Of your two choices in the morning, one is to be in a bad mood and let things get you down and the other is to be in a good mood and enjoy the day. Which one are you going to choose?

In conclusion, let me finish with a timely quote from Thomas Jefferson “Nothing can stop the person with the right mental attitude from achieving their goal, nothing on earth can help the person with the wrong mental attitude”.

For more information on the Business4Beauty professional salon program, or to be sent a quick Attitude and Action check up contact Julie Hyne on 0433114841

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THE TRIAD THAT IS SHAPING MEDICAL AND AESTHETIC INTEGRATION An interview with Gina Thompson The word integration is currently gaining great momentum, fuelled by the growing consumer appetite for more inclusive modalities that incorporate appearance, wellness and health. This trend is redefining and shaping the new aesthetics practitioner. At this year's A5M Medical Conference in Melbourne this new consumer mindset was comprehensively addressed, and the need for effective collaborative practice models that integrate aesthetics, wellness and medicine was very central to many of the lectures. Gina Thompson, who was one of the lecturers, is an expert in this area with over 20 yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s experience in the aesthetic medical field. She is certified in Medical Aesthetics and also holds credentials in Integrative Nutrition. We caught up with Gina to share with us about this new consumer mindset and the challenges and opportunities it brings to the evolving field of aesthetics and the medical aesthetics field.

APJ Q1: Gina, in your lecture you spoke about the importance of presenting a complete story when attracting clients and patients to your care. Can you explain this to us? As consumer preferences change so must our message and the narrative we communicate. In the past, for example, plastic surgery was restricted to its own sphere of expertise, while skincare was

separate and injectable procedures were yet again another separate area of expertise. We are now required to switch that model upside down, and we need to tell a different story. We are now required to first look at the wellness issues, then the aesthetic concerns, and finally any need for plastic surgery if it is still required. We need to understand our client or patient at a more personal level â&#x20AC;&#x201C; has she just had a baby and needs to lose a few pounds, is she experiencing hormonal issues and needs to address these first? We need to explore the underlying causative issues first and see if we can solve them with wellness strategies, rather than heading straight for surgery. Today's consumers are really looking for ways to feel better and not just look better. By addressing and mitigating underlying issues in support of their overall wellbeing we are also building a relationship that can offer them value over time. Our services need to be presented as inclusive of a more complete picture that can benefit them not just in the immediate present, but also in the long term.

APJ Q2: What elements should be in the story? The story is all about the emotional connection that taps into what that person really wants. People need permission to make a decision without feeling guilty about wanting to look more beautiful. They value the freedom to be presented with choices that can support their overall wellbeing â&#x20AC;&#x201C; rebalance what is currently compromised so that physical changes needed will be minimal. They appreciate the opportunity to find out more about how they can also participate in their improvement. The message of the "story" needs to be about encouraging them to engage into the consultative process that will allow you to build a relationship with them. At this stage you will

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have the opportunity to investigate what is really going on in their life. For example, if they have recently undergone a major emotional trauma should they be a candidate for surgery first up or are there other modalities that can support their wellbeing first? To assist you to correctly determine how best to help them it is important to have a very thorough health questionnaire that will allow you to determine their skin health and lifestyle. You may have many options to offer them. For example, you identify a very busy mum with five children, it would not be realistic to give them a sixstep routine. Also, by thoroughly investigating the best possible way to ensure they achieve their goals this will substantially minimise the possibility of complaints or misunderstanding in the future. It will also allow you to identify ways of maintaining an on-going relationship with them in the future through a broader scope of services and products.

Finally, they come up with a product formulation. With scientifically-based products, they first establish the medical research that supports an ingredient, then they create a product that utilises this research. In other words they lead with science and product efficacy before anything else. With this level of transparency it will also be easier for your staff to validate their choice of product for the client or patient based on the product's integrity.

APJ Q3: In your lecture you mentioned about becoming a curator. What do you mean by that? In the past the expert's job â&#x20AC;&#x201C; whether a surgeon or an aesthetician, was to dictate or tell the client or patient what to do. However, it is different today. Many consumers come to us with quite a bit of information that they have been able to research themselves. They have a good idea as to what they want as well as their options, and often what they are looking for is to gain guidance from us on how to fill in the gaps. Our job is to listen, and through our conversation with them sift through the information and pull out what is relevant and suggest what will best meet their needs. Our role is to decipher and partner with them to help them achieve their goals. This is a very different approach to the past model of expert advice that was one-way.

APJ Q4: Gina, what is the best way to educate your client or patient? Education should start with your website. This is usually where people start to find out about you before they even talk to you. In today's market it is also useful to include video snippets, Youtube channels on specific, topics as today's consumer also appreciates visual presentations. However, during the consultation process is when the real educational process starts. During the consultation try to identify their needs and then create a program that will best provide solutions for them. It is also important to explain to them why you have chosen certain skincare and procedures. Emphasise the active ingredients and the purity of the formulation and why they need a combination. Define each ingredient by its action â&#x20AC;&#x201C; peptides for their action on wrinkles, hyaluronic acid to correct dehydration, etc. This is so important. Examine what they are currently using and identify the gaps. For example, you may find they are using a cleanser, toner and a moisturiser, but they don't have a serum. In this instance you will need to explain which serum will best suit them and also explain its action and why they need it so they understand its purpose and benefit.

APJ Q5: How would you define a good product brand for clinical aesthetic purposes? There are numerous cosmetic formulation, for professional use. Before deciding which one to choose, ask the company about the scientific validation behind the product. There is a difference in how products are formulated. Many companies identify a consumer need and then develop the marketing that will appeal to the consumer.

APJ Q6: Can you give us the most important considerations in team-building that will best service both the client/patient as well as the clinic or salon? I think that we need to understand that positive outcomes with lasting results do not happen necessarily with one procedure, but rather through a team effort. If you choose to work collaboratively with other experts such as healthcare providers, nutritionists, injectors, etc, it is important that this extended team has mutual respect for the speciality, skill and the ability of each practitioner to assist the consumer to achieve their intended goals in health, wellness and appearance. Connection, education, understanding and respect are all critical components to effective referral. When referring you need to be authentic and have total trust in the services the other party will provide. You therefore need to work on positive communication strategies where all parties have a solid understanding of the other team members' skill sets and know how to effectively utilise them to the benefit of the client or patient.

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COSMOPROF North America 2015 A report from Las Vegas by Terry Everitt The 13th COSMOPROF North America exhibition was held this year in Las Vegas on the 12-14th July 2015. This is part of the Comoprof group of exhibitions that also occurs in Hong Kong and Bologna, Italy.

These companies are organised into ‘Country Pavilions’ that allow small and medium-sized companies from within select markets to participate in Cosmoprof North America with the objective of obtaining direct “face time” with distributors and retailers to secure distribution in the U.S.

Bolognafiere Group are the leading international organisers of exhibitions for the beauty industry, starting with COSMOPROF Bologna (1967) in Italy, then COSMOPROF Asia (1996) in Hong Kong as well as COSMOPROF North America (2003) in Las Vegas.

COSMOPROF North America provides a showcase for smaller and even start-up companies to showcase their wares – the expected ‘big name’ companies are not in attendance here.

While there are many similarities of the three international exhibitions, each takes on a local flavour adapting to the location the exhibition is held in.

In reading this journal you are probably more familiar with COSMOPROF – the exhibition of beauty products and equipment, particularly as it is in Australia’s nearest – Hong Kong, held each November.

I have been to COSMOPROF Asia many times and previously written about them in this journal, and this was my third time for COSMOPROF North America. Each year it grows bigger and stronger. In America, the Bolognafiere Group team up with PBA (Professional Beauty Association) to put on this extravaganza of a show. With some 1,017 exhibiting companies from 39 countries covering 21,649 sq m of space at the Mandalay Bay Convention Centre in Las Vegas and 35% of exhibitors (356 individual companies) representing 39 different countries, it provides a true international perspective.

COSMOPROF and COSMOPACK

Actually COSMOPROF is two separate yet interconnected exhibitions – COSMOPACK and COSMOPROF. COSMOPACK is an exhibition primarily for the people and companies involved in the production and packaging of beauty products. Here you can see (and buy) the equipment needed for manufacture of product plus all the requirements of packaging the product – which includes the bottles, jars, tops, sprays and labelling (which alone provides an amazing array of possibilities).

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While this show is smaller than the other two (Hong Kong and Bologna), it still is impressive, with the aisle numbering 2,000 to 30,000 – some 29 very long aisles to get through, all with plush white carpet. Hair plays a big role here along with nails and skincare, with equipment in each discipline. I am sure there is a valid reason, however, I found it to be a crazy, random selection of which booth was placed next to their neighbour. There is not a defined nails, hair or skin section – all are mixed in together in three major sections; Cosmetic and Personal Care, Professional Beauty and Packaging and Contract Manufacturing. These are all on the same floor, with additional floors being used for education, of which there is a massive listing. This is not the same as you may be used to in Australia – there are no ‘cash and carry’ type selling going on. It is not for the aesthetician or beauty therapist wanting to get a ‘show special’ as this does not occur. It is however, more for the business owner who wishes to develop their business in a different perspective. If you were thinking of having a private-label product line, then here is definitely the place you need to be. What is totally different to the Australian shows and indeed Cosmoprof Asia is the complete lack of IPL/Laser equipment – such is not allowed to be used by the therapist in the USA. In fact, I only saw one LED unit in the entire show, other than an array of smaller equipment for home use. A few things of interest were that just about every booth had something to eat – from chocolates to muffins and cookies and almost everything in-between. Some with self-serve coffee. On the savoury side, cheese and crackers with sparkling wine was the go. There were a number of silent seller booths – just product displays and nothing else, with no-one in attendance.

Tones of Beauty This was intriguing as it was devoted to the evolving shades and types of the multicultural client base that is now so apparent. The term ‘skin of colour’ is now rightly becoming and more correctly so as ‘skin of tones’. Skin colour is of course not as easy as white, black, yellow or brown. It is the multiple tones of each and the interplay of genetics and epigenetics that is the base of professional skin and haircare. The classic contraindications are being redefined dependent on the underlying tone of melanin production and distribution, rather than the visually obvious skin colour. This is something I have been a keen observer of – the multiplicity of colour that is displayed in skins in the present age. Intense education and deep understanding of melanogenesis is required, along with the client’s lifestyle to accurately predict the effect of treatment modality and product interaction. I personally was very happy to see this area being explored.

THESE WERE DIFFERENT COSMOPROF North America put together some interesting areas of note that brought together exhibitors to provide an interactive experience for attendees; these being the Interactive Experience, Interactive Technology, Tones of Beauty, Discover Scent and the Boutique Sample Program.

Interactive Experience Here you could have a multisensory experience with colour, sound and scent. Immersion with fragrance balanced with Chromatherapy; then these two are balanced with music for a total experience all suited to your mood experience. Amazingly, these could all be altered easily to create different scales of relaxation or excitation and a whole in-between.

Interactive Technology In this area you could take an interactive quiz to determine your digital marketing IQ. From here a printout was provided customised for you to provide guidance to enhance (or to begin) your business’s online performance. This came with a list of action items to implement to increase your business potential online. All based on best practice by some of America’s leading online corporations.

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Discover Scent This was an area of sophisticated fragrance brands of companies with a small footprint in industry – i.e. the newcomers. Niche products perhaps that provide a different and distinctive alternative to the major fragrances available. Available ‘as is’ in an amazing collection of bottle shapes, colours and sizes, or could be incorporated to create a ‘salon brand’ unique to the individual salon.

BOUTIQUE SAMPLE PROGRAM Another area that was new to me was this program where you could select seven deluxe samples (meaning almost full retail size) from over 20 different products, which were donated from brands that were exhibiting at Cosmoprof North America. After choosing your seven samples they are nicely wrapped in a cute sample carrycase and all for a suggested $10 donation to the City of Hope. City of Hope is a major America charity organisation focused on rapidly transforming scientific discoveries into better treatments and prevention strategies for cancer, diabetes, HIV/AIDS and other life-threatening diseases.

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS FORUM AND EXHIBITION A new initiative was presented, the International Business Forum & Exhibition, to be held in New York, September 16-17th, 2015. In talking with Duccio Campagnoli, the President of Bolgna Faire, he explained the forum as a streamlined concept aimed as a Business-to-Business opportunity for suppliers to network with buyers from different countries. This might be of interest to some of APAN’s Premier Club members in exporting their product/equipment. If interested then do contact simona.antonini@cosmoprof.it for further information or www.cosmoprof.it/cosmopack

GET OUT AND GET TO VEGAS COSMOPROF North America is an interesting exhibition and in many respects very different to that of the Australian experience. Expand your horizons and do something different – plan for an American work trip to Cosmoprof North America 2016. If you have never been to Las Vegas, then it is time to make the journey. Next year Cosmoprof North America will be held July 24-26th and once again at the Mandalay Bay Convention Centre. You can check it out at www.cosmoprofnorthamerica.com FUTURE DATES COSMOPROF Esthtiworld, Milan, Italy – 10-2th October 2015 COSMOPROF Asia, Hong Kong – November 11-13th 2015 COSMOPACK New York – 16-7th September 2015 COSMOPACK, Bologna, Italy – 17-20th March 2016 COSMOPROF Worldwide, Bologna, Italy – 18-21st March 2016 COSMOPROFNorth America, Las Vegas – 24-26th July 2016

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LEADING BODY IN SERVICES AND REGULATORY ADVICE SERVING AND SHAPING THE NEXT GENERATION OF INDUSTRY LEADERS

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APAN – AESTHETICS PRACTITIONERS ADVISORY NETWORK Please contact us for further details Ph: 07 5593 0360 | Email: info@apanetwork.com www.apanetwork.com to download an Application Form

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Profile for APAN - Aesthetics Practitioners Advisory Network

APJ Vol 26 2015  

Aesthetics Practitioners Journal Volume 26 Spring 2015 - The official publication

APJ Vol 26 2015  

Aesthetics Practitioners Journal Volume 26 Spring 2015 - The official publication

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