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ALPHA PHI ALPHA FRATERNITY, INC. VOLUME 68 NUMBER 3 FALL

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1982


Sphinx Volume 68 Number 3 Fall 1982 Pages 19 through 26 are missing (Pages 27 - 34 were bound in twice, but only appear once in the digital version) The best copy available was scanned


wiA editor's review Greetings . . . In the printing trade they're known as gremlins; the Brotherhood more commonly refers to them as excuses — those little things that adhere to Murphy's law. They can and do go wrong! Like Brother Gene Upshaw, also of California, the Los Angeles Convention encountered contractual problems which kept us from obtaining full photographic coverage. Try as we could, the gremlins wouldn't go away — so we, regrettably, go to press with a less than complete pictorial review of that event. But, not to worry, well catch you in New Orleans! For those photographs that we do have, we thank Brothers: Berve Power (Xi Lambda, Chicago) who provided, among others, our excellent cover photograph; and Alonzo Taylor (Iota Delta Lambda, Chicago) . . . Another goof also came to our attention recently. We've been in the process of preparing a special feature on Brother Sydney P. Brown, author of The House of Alpha; delaying publication until all was in place. In the interim, we failed to provide official notice that Brother Brown entered Omega Chapter in the spring. A full story on his life, including an article he wrote this year especially for The Sphinx, will be contained in our Winter Issue . . . As usual, a number of Brothers volunteered their efforts to make this issue possible. In Legacy, an account of Mu Lambda's salute to its 50-year members is presented. Believe it or not, there are approximately 50 of these "Golden Brothers" in this one chapter; and most are sixty year members, with Brother Louis Russell leading the way with seventy-one years of Alphadom. Thanks to Brothers William Calbert, Isham Baker and J. Leon Langhorne for assistance . . . Our cover story presents the 1982 Brothers Of The Year — Randolph Williams, Alumni and Derrick Warren, College . . . The Struggle Continues is a printing of the General President's Address at the 76th Anniversary Convention. You Are There! . . . Also from the convention is the Public Policy Statement, which sets forth the Fraternity's official position on major issues of the day — as adopted by the General Convention assembly . . . This issue's segment of The Black Colleges features two outstanding institutions: Benedict College in Columbia, South Carolina — headed by Brother Henry Ponder; and the Morehouse School of Medicine, headed by Brother Louis Sullivan, M.D. The cooperation of these Brothers and Brothers Walter Sullivan (incidentally, he's the real Brother of the Morehouse med school president) and Waldo E. Johnson is gratefully acknowledged . . .Speaking of Brother Johnson, his new column, Speaking of Programs, will be a regular feature. The Fraternity's program specialist, Brother Johnson's employment (as Assistant Executive Secretary) is but another indication of Alpha's commitment to provide service to the nation. This column is one of the ways in which he will assist chapters in programming . . . Finally, we thank Brother Bertram Ashe for his Alpha Athletes feature on Brothers Brian Hawkins and Dirk Hunter-Ellis . . . WHAT ABOUT MY CHAPTER? We are still questioned by Brothers who want to know why The Sphinx features certain chapters, when "their" chapters do such wonderful things. So, once again, here are the rules. Articles for Chapter News (accounts of chapter activity) and Alphas On The Move (profiles of individual Brothers) are printed automatically — limit, one per issue. If you send it in by deadline, well print it - at no charge and with only minor editing changes. We also solicit other articles for inclusion, especially Alpha Athletes and Legacy (events with historical significance). However, these are subject to space limitations and editorial discretion. Future deadlines are: January 1st — Spring Issue; and March 1st — Summer Issue . . . Until next time . . . MJP.

on the drawing board * Chapters of the Tear * The House of Alpha * Grambling's Great Coach


VOLUME 68 NUMBER 3 FALL 1982

OFFICIAL ORGAN OF THE ALPHA PHI ALPHA FRATERNITY, INC. MICHAEL J. PRICE, Editor-in-Chief Associate Editors: Julius R. Hall, Bradford Spencer, Roderick Odum. Editorial Assistant (Intern): Demetrius Bryant. Contributing Editors: James B. Blanton, Alpha Workshop; Laurence T. Young, Sr., Omega Chapter; Walter Sullivan, Education Foundation; William Ross, Jr., Reclamation & Membership; Ozell Sutton, Ex Officio. Commentary Columnists: Erwin A. France, Lu Palmer, Huel Perkins, Michael I. Price.

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— BROTHERS OF THE YEAR - The respect of Brothers well served is accorded to these dedicated Alpha Men. 1 2 — LEGACY — Mu Lambda honors its 50-year members - all fifty of them! 1 4 — THE STRUGGLE CONTINUES - The General President's Address to the 76th Anniversary Convention. 1 6 — ALPHA ATHLETES - Two Brothers are pro prospects at San Jose State. 2 3 — CONVENTION '82 - What happened in Los Angeles? 2 8 — THE BLACK COLLEGES - A glimpse of Benedict College and Morehouse School of Medicine. 3 1 — PUBLIC POLICY STATEMENT - Alpha speaks on the issues of the day. 2 3 4 6 7 10 37 43 61 65 66

— The General President Speaks — The Executive Secretary's Desk — There Goes An Alpha Man — Alpha Workshop — Speaking of Programs — Million Dollar Fund Drive - Alphas On The Move — Chapter News — Omega Chapter — Directory of Officers — Chapter Directory

ABOUT THE COVER College Brother of the Year Derrick Warren, right, and alumni winner, Randolph Williams.

Commentary Huel Perkins Page 19

Warren Ali Page 20

Thomas Shropshire Page 21 The Sphinx (USPS 510-440) The Sphinx is the official magazine of the Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity. Inc , 4432 Or Martin Luther King Dr. Chicago. IL 60653 Published four times a year Spnng, Summer. Fan and Winter Send all editorial mail and change ol address (send both addresses) to Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity. 4432 Or Martin Luther King Drive. Chicago. IL 60653 Manuscripts or art submitted to The Sphinx should be accompanied by addressed envelopes and return postage Editor assumes no responsibility for return ol unsolicited manuscripts or art Opinions expressed in columns and articles do not necessarily reflect the views and policies ol Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity, Inc , and use of any persons name in fiction, semi-fiction articles or humorous features is to be regarded as a coincidence and not as the responsibility of The Sphinx It is never done knowingly Copyright 1976 by The Sphinx. Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity, Inc Reproduction or use. without written permission, of the editorial or pictorial content in any manner is prohibited The Sphinx has been published continuously since 1914 Organizing Editor: Bro Raymond W Cannon Organizing General President: Bra Henry Lake Dlckason Second class postage oak) at Chicago. IL Postmaater Send form 3579 and at correspondence: 4432 Or Martin Luther King Dr. Chicago. IL 60653.


THE GENERAL PRESIDENT SPEAKS Let's Complete the Million Dollar Drive! On To New Orleans At the 76th Anniversary Convention in Los Angeles, as you may recall, the Brotherhood set a date certain for completion of the Million Dollar Fund Drive — benefiting the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP), National Urban League (NUL) and the United Negro College Fund (UNCF). In a vote reaffirming wholehearted support of this drive, the convention mandated completion of this effort (by fully reaching our goal) by the 77th Anniversary Convention next year in New Orleans, Louisiana. The Fraternity thus rededicated itself to this effort and directed that campaign leaders, Fraternity officers at all levels, and all those who abide with "The House of Alpha" pursue the goal with renewed vigor. As Brothers of our beloved Fraternity, you and I will move to accomplish this mission. To date, the Fraternity has collected approximately $725,000 toward our million dollar goal and has allotted a total of $600,000 - $200,000 to each of the three recipient organizations. The remaining $275,000 can and must be raised by next August's convention.

Remember Our Founders A special Founder's Day effort has been initiated to benefit the Million Dollar Fund Drive. I am making a special request to each chapter — asking that the Million Dollar Fund Drive become the central focus of your Founder's Day celebrations. In some way, each chapter should collect a minimum of $1,000 toward our goal during this special thrust. You - as leaders all — are also being asked to make a significant contribution to the drive in honor of the Founding Jewels. If you have not completed your pledge, please make an effort to pay it out by the end of December. If you have completed your initial goal, we are asking that you make an additional Founder's 2

Day contribution. What better way to honor our Founding Jewels than by rallying to this sustaining effort on behalf of the NAACP, National Urban League, and UNCF7 Reports on this special Founder's Day thrust will be made at the Leadership Weekend — President's Inaguration — to be held in Atlanta, Georgia, January 21-23, 1983. Here we will call the Chapter Roll, as well as the Fraternity Leadership Roll. With your help and support, we will raise at least $137,500 during this special drive; with the balance to be collected between January and August, 1983.

Let's Do It! Colonel to Captain: "Take your company and hold this point because it is essential to the war effort." Captain to Colonel: "We will do our best sir." Colonel to Captain: "Don't do your best Captain, hold." Captain to Colonel: "We will hold or die trying, sir."

Colonel to Captain: "Don't die trying, Captain, hold." Captain to Colonel: "We will hold, sir." Colonel to Captain: "Dammit, hold!" The above scenario clearly indicates the position of Alpha Phi Alpha - the nation's oldest and largest historically Black fraternity. Please join 'The House of Alpha" as we reaffirm our commitment to this historic effort — one that will prove for all time that Black Americans can and will support those institutions essential to their welfare. Brother, let us not try; let us not do our best; lefs do it! Please send in your contributions (see Page 11 for ways in which you may contribute). Thus will history record Alpha's dynamic leadership at this critical time in the Black American experience. Fraternally,

Ozell Sutton General President The Sphinx/Fall 1982


THE EXECUTIVE SECRETARY'S DESK DUAL-REPORTING SYSTEM REQUIRED FOR 1982 FIRING UP THE COMPUTERS!!! The 1983 fraternal year will be the first in which Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity operates a computerized system for the processing of financial transactions and the maintenance of membership records. Because this is our first year of operation, the General Office staff will maintain a dual system keeping records both manually and on computer. This represents an additional workload and makes it important that the General Office receive your cooperation in responding to special requests, especially in the collection of data. In order to prevent any delay in the processing of remittances, each Chapter will be requested to follow a two-part procedure for the remittance of membership fees (payment of Grand Tax or final Life Membership installment), as follows: 1) Complete the Remittance of Funds form, as usual; 2) C o m plete the Computer Data Forms (White for Grand Tax Payers; Blue for Life Members) with the appropirate information, including Social Security Number, for each person for w h o m payment is made. Both forms should be submitted with your payment of fees to the General Office. Payments received which do not include both forms cannot be processed and will be returned to you for completion.

Chapter Check-List:

Welcome Back

Has your Chapter taken care of the following essential business to begin your year?

The General Office staff would like to welcome all chapters of Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity, Inc. "back" — for the beginning of another successful fraternal year. We begin this year by welcoming two new members to our staff: Brother Waldo E. Johnson, Jr. (from Americus, GA) joins us as Assistant Executive Secretary for Programs — and will work with you in the implementation of Alpha's community service and educational projects; and Brother William A. E. Boyd III (from Hampton, VA) will work in the area of chapter services, in his position as Administrative Assistant. These Brothers, and all the members of the staff, are committed to providing our chapters with "first-

• Filed a Chapter Directory (listing Officers and Chapter Address for 1982-83). • Submitted Address Changes for any Brothers who have moved over the summer — or — who are not receiving mail (Life Members and 1982 passcard holders). • Received your Chapter Guide — either at the Regional Convention or from your State / District Director. • Cleared up any unfinished transactions with the General Office from the previous year. The Sphinx /Fall 1982

class" service. You can help us serve you — by keeping abreast of proper procedures and offering your full cooperation.

Chapter Bulletin Our first monthly issue of the Chapter Bulletin, which is designed to keep you (the Chapter Officers) up to date on important matters, has been mailed. In it were the following materials: 1) Fee and Tax Schedule - 1983 which lists all fees, including the 1983 Chapter Tax; 2) Chapter Directory forms — to Chapters for which we are now using an old (1982) address; 3) Computer Data Forms (see first article above); and 4) Program Bulletin — including "A-Phi-Aid" brochures, information on "Operation Big Vote," and (for College Chapters) Undergraduate Scholarship Applications for 1983. We look forward to serving you for another outstanding year in the history of Alpha Phi Alpha. Fraternally yours, ^

James B. Blanton Executive Secretary 3


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Left: Brother Charles Rangel, Congressman from New York, congratulates Brother Dick Campbell upon his receipt of the President's Distinguished Volunteer Service Award.

Campbell cited for "volunteerism" President Ronald Reagan and Harlem Congressman Brother Charles B. Rangel may not agree on most things, but they both agree that Brother DICK CAMPBELL, Executive Director of the Sickle Cell Disease Foundation of Greater New York, is New York City's "No. 1 Volunteer. That fact was evident when the President's Distinguished Volunteer Service Award for 1982 was presented to Brother Campbell recently in the Harlem office of Brother Rangel by a special representative from the Health and Human Services Department (HHS), Bernard Kilbourn, D.D.S., Director of Region II, (New York, New Jersey, Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands). The President sent Campbell a special note, in addition, which said: "Nancy and I congratulate you for your outstanding and dedicated volunteer service to your community and fellowman. Our nation is enhanced because of caring people like you. With our heartfelt appreciation and best wishes. Ronald Reagan"

No stranger to award-winning honors for volunteer services, Campbell — a veteran producer, director and theatrical manager before founding the Sickle Cell Foundation of Greater New York over ten years go — was awarded the Audelco Pioneer Award in 1979 and received the Distinguished Service Award in 1977 from the Federation of Negro Civil Service Organizations, a group of some 60,000 Blacks in civil service. He has received over 25 awards for various volunteer services and activities during the past thirty years from such organizations as the Harold Jackman Memorial Committee; the Tobago Benevolent Society of America; the National Urban League Guild; the NAACP; the Seagram Vanguard Society Award; the Manhattan Borough President's Citation (NYC) from former Borough President Percy Sutton; Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity (66th Annual Convention, Denver, Colorado), presented by former President Ernest Morial; and scores of churches, lodges, clubs, community centers, colleges, schools and PTA's.

The Sphinx / Fall 1982


THERE GOES AN ALPHA MAN There goes a man of high impulse Of princely mien and grace There goes a man of humble i faith A credit to his race There goes a man of conscience vast with will to reach his goal There goes a man of lordly rank Of heroes' stock and soul— Southern Vice President W. Mingo Clark, left, honors retiring North Carolina State Director A. M. "Gus" Witherspoon.

North Carolina Honors A. M. "Gus" Witherspoon At the 17th Annual State Convention in Winston-Salem, North Carolina, February 5-6, 1982, the Association of North Carolina Alphamen honored Brother A. M. "Gus" WITHERSPOON. Brother Witherspoon was commended for his outstanding service and total dedication to the cause of human progress. At the convention luncheon, there were tributes to Gus of five minutes each by Brothers: Ray Perry, on behalf of the ANCA; Larry Clark, on behalf of the Raleigh, North Carolina community; Harold Freeman, on behalf of Phi Lambda Chapter; Jesse Artis, at large; Rudy Hendricks, Chairman of the Executive Committee of ANCA; and, an additional presentation, "This man Gus," by Andrew A. Best. General President Ozell Sutton then made a special presentation to Brother Witherspoon — the State Director Emeritus Award. A gracious acknowledgement was then in line and it was followed by the presentation of the award by Brother W. Mingo Clark, Vice President of the Southern Region. Brother Clark then melodiously sang The Sphinx/Fall 1982

"Invictus" and received a standing ovation and much applause from the audience. As an Alphaman since 1949, Gus has distinguished himself as a "Servant of All." He became Assistant State Director in 1970, and ascended to the full Directorship in 1973. Under his sterling leadership, the number of college chapters increased from nine (9) to nineteen (19). The number of graduate chapters increased from nine (9) to seventeen (17). This citation not only recognizes his fraternal services, but also seeks to spotlight his contributions and achievements in educational, and human welfare circles as well. As Assistant to the Dean of the Graduate School of North Carolina State University, he stands out as a true pioneer. He is held in highest esteem by his fellow professionals, and students alike, for his contributions and achievements in the area of Environmental Science. As an organizer, administrator, and as an overall leader, he has few peersll Genuine concern, and compassion for people are his hallmarks. Brother "Spoon" is — an Alpha Man!

There goes a man of noble casti Whom hardship cannot break There goes a man in merit clad Whom duty won't forsake I here goes a man in cultured verse Who holds a sportsman's creed I here goes a man too vigilant To bow to lust or greed There goes a man whose life is spent in service not in scorn There goes a man whose majesty Shines like a May time

7 here goes a man who is a friend To love and duty truth there goes a man to help uplift I he lives of wholesome youth There goes a man with industry and faith at his command. There goes the best man in and out lor he h an Alpha Man 5


Alpha Workshop GENERAL OFFICE James B. Blanton, Executive Secretary Waldo E. Johnson, Assistant Executive Secretary Michael J. Price, Assistant Executive Secretary Editor-in-Chief, The Sphinx

Don't Forget the "7th Step" Yes, we k n o w that there are Seven Jewels, et al . . . but the 7th Step referred to in this article is a non-ritualistic matter. It refers to the seven administrative steps required to process membership materials for new initiates. For over two years n o w , we have been following the administrative procedures contained in the Standing Orders. However, it appears that some chapters still haven't gotten the word; or that, in the euphoria which follows initiation ceremonies, the important task of follow-through is neglected. Under the Standing Orders the 7th and last step in the administrative process is to complete, have certified (by the initiation supervisor) and forward to appropriate officials Copies #3 - #5 of the Notice of Initiation Form

. . . indicating that a successful initiation did take place as a p p r o v e d . Even though the initiates were earlier approved by the Regional Vice President (or his designee); monies were duly receipted by the General Office; and, an Authorization to Conduct Initiation was issued — n o initiation materials will be prepared by the General Office until it receives Copy #3 of the Notice of Initiation. T o date, a number of initiates remain to be properly processed — awaiting only this one simple form! If y o u r chapter is one of these, finish the 7th Step . . . and forward this form immediately. If your chapter has not received materials from spring or summer initiations, it would be advisable to contact the General Office on h o w to proceed.

ADMINISTRATIVE STEPS IN THE PLEDGE PROCESS STEP #1

STEP #2

Prior to Sphinx Club Induction . . . The Chapter should secure from each applicant for admission the following materials: • Application for Membership • Transcripts (Proof of Degree for alumni aspirants) • Medical Statement Following chapter vote, the Chapter is to forward the abovementioned materials to the Regional Vice President,* along with the Notice of Intent to Conduct Pledge Activities (Copies 1 & 2) of Pledge Form). This should be done not later than two (2) weeks prior to the scheduled Sphinx Club Induction Ceremony.

STEP #3 - The Regional Vice President will certify eligibility of applicants and indicate approval of the pledge program by returning Copy 2 of the Notice of Intent to the chapter. Pledging Begins . . . STEP #4 - Upon the receipt of the approval from the Vice President, the chapter may induct approved applicants into the Sphinx Club and begin the pledge program. The pledge program shall not exceed six (6) weeks in duration — from Sphinx Club Induction through the initiation ceremony.

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Prior to Initiation Ceremony . . . STEP #5 - No later than fifteen (15) days prior to the initiation ceremony, the Chapter is to forward all initiation fees to the General Office. These monies should be accompanied by the Remittance of Funds and Pin Order forms. STEP #6 - Following receipt of fees in the General Office, the Regional Vice President will issue an Authorization to Conduct Initiation. No initiation is to be conducted without a signed authorization. Following Initiation . . . STEP #7 - Within three (3) days following the initiation ceremony, the Chapter is to complete the Notice of Initiation (Copies 3-5 of the Pledge Form) — to indicate which candidates were successfully initiated. Copy 3 is sent to the General Office (which will issue membership materials); Copy 4 to the Regional Vice President and Copy 5 is retained for the chapter files. *The Regional Vice President, where appropriate, may designate state/district/area officials to act in his behalf in this process. It must be stressed that the above is a condensed outline for the information of the entire Brotherhood. Please consult The Standing Orders for full information. The Sphinx / Fall 1982


Greetings Brothers in Alpha: I am pleased to serve you as Assistant Executive Secretary for Programs. In this capacity, I will provide technical assistance in chapter planning, implementation, coordination and evaluation of the New Alpha Thrust Programs. I will also take responsibility for acquisition of funds to implement the various New Alpha Thrust Programs. The Education Foundation is primarily responsible for the creation of this position, and much of the work will be educational in nature. In order to facilitate chapter implementation of the program thrusts, a manual is being developed by the Education Foundation. It will provide college and alumni chapters with guidelines and procedures for implementing the various program components. The manual will be completed shortly and distributed for chapter usage. During the interim period, please direct all

The Sphinx/Fall 1982

questions and / or concerns to me at the General Office. In Brother Walter Sullivan's preceding column, the A-Phi-Aid Program was addressed. As promised, the Education Foundation has developed a brochure to assist college and alumni chapters in counseling pre-college and college students with the various types of financial aid which are available to them. Comparable to the "Go to High School — Go to College" campaign of earlier years, this program provides an invaluable service not only to collegebound students but also to their families as well as to secondary and postsecondary institutions. Chapters should seek and enlist the skills of target school guidance counselors as well as financial aid personnel at local and nearby post-secondary institutions to serve as resource personnel. The Financial Aid Counseling Program can be developed to serve as a one-shot orientation to Student Financial Aid Programs or as a workshop involving students and parents where technical assistance is provided in filing the various financial aid forms. There is a great deal of flexibility in the structure chapters may choose to implement. "Operation Big Vote - Crusade '82" is a national campaign to maximize Black voter participation. As a member of the Board of Directors of the National Coalition on Black Voter Participation, Inc., the sponsoring organization, Alpha Phi Alpha fully supports Operation Big Vote and strongly encourages all chapters to mobilize for full participation. Several cities have been designated as target areas for "Operation Big Vote — Crusade '82" and convenors for those cities are presently being identified. Alpha Phi Alpha chapters in these cities should begin to form coalitions with the convening individuals and / or organizations as well as others committed to this cause. Passage of the Voting Rights Act Extension does not conclude the struggle for suffrage and sovereignty. The unfinished task of registering the scores of thousands of unregistered voters remains before us. The potential of such a massive electorate is great. Operation Big Vote, through your support, can bring this potential into reality. In planning chapter activities, greater attention should be given to program planning. All too often, good and meaningful chapter activities fail to fully impact upon the communities they seek to serve. This is generally due

to conflicting timeframes, inappropriate locations, and a lack of effective publicity, evaluation, and follow-up. Even the smallest activity can bring about outstanding results if proper attention is given to the planning process. In these inflationary times, numerous cutbacks in human services will be felt by the consumers of these services. More and more public service organizations (such as Alpha Phi Alpha) will be called upon to fill the gaps. Alpha Phi Alpha's potential for mobilization in this area is unlimited. If chapter activities are carefully and effectively planned before implemented, the potential to serve even greater numbers is realized. In planning the chapter's annual program, the chapter's Program Committee should take the following steps into consideration: (A) Resolve to carry out the national program of Alpha Phi Alpha as outlined in the New Alpha Thrust. (B) Take inventory of resources available to the chapter (i.e., chapter personnel, community personnel and facilities, financial support, etc.). (C) Outline each activity thoroughly by designating who, what, when, where, how, why, and budget (if necessary). (D) Plan early in order to secure the best dates and locations possible. (E) Use effective publicity techniques to maximize participation. (F) Use evaluative response for follow-up activities. The time has come when we must carry out in its entirety our basic theme . . . "Securing the Future." The tendency has long been to salute those past achievers and achievements associated with our great brotherhood, without much regard for implementing and promoting those programs and individuals seeking to secure the future. However, if Alpha Phi Alpha is to remain in the forefront in the struggle for human dignity and justice, a united effort, such as the New Alpha Thrust puts forth, must be implemented in all communities. Only then will we be able to secure the future for those we seek to serve. Fraternally,

WALDO E. JOHNSON, JR. Assistant Executive Secretary Programs

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A ^L

Jt^miable,

Kindly,

Fraternal. Those three words, from Brother Sydney P. Brown's The House of Alpha, perhaps best describe Brother RANDOLPH WILLIAMS. Many Brothers might not even know him — he's not one of those who jump to the convention floor on every issue — but he has demonstrably provided "quality service" — to his Fraternity, his profession, and his community. A native of Baltimore, Maryland, Brother Williams attended Baltimore City College (Senior High School), majoring in pre-engineering. He went on to graduate from Morgan State College as a Physics major. While at Morgan, he was initiated in Beta Alpha Chapter, on November 15, 1962, and has been an active member of the

Fraternity since that time. He is now serving his third term as President of Kappa Epsilon Lambda Chapter in Prince Georges County, Maryland. Previously he had served the chapter as Financial Secretary for three years. He is also in his third year as Treasurer of Alpha's Eastern Region. In this position he has received acclaim as both a superior manager (computerizing the region's financial records) and a fund-raiser (overseeing the region's successful sales program of personalized Alpha pocket seals). He served as CoChairman of the 1978 Eastern Regional Convention in New Carrollton, Maryland and has been cited by the Fraternity for outstanding leadership in the national Life Membership Program. Since January of this year, Randy has served as an Export License Officer at the U.S. International Trade Administration (U.S. Department of Commerce). Here he serves as a specialist in the export of high technology, electronic components and instrumentation to Soviet Bloc countries. An acknowledged expert in this field, Brother Williams is presently Co-Chairman of a National Advisory Committee for Instrumentation; and Acting Co-Chairman of a U.S. Technical Task Force for Electronic Instrumentation. In these capacities, and as the Commerce Department's representative for an inter-departmental working group (WG-I), he is involved in formulating the United States' positions in the upcoming NATO Nations Export Conference (COCOM). Prior to joining the trade administration, Brother Williams spent fifteen years with the National Bureau of Standards (NBS). Much of this time was spent in the laboratory, where he worked on the design and implementation of instrumentation and computers for aerospace studies, wind dynamics studies, structural engineering and data

acquisition. His job titles at NBS included: Senior Instrumentation Scientist, Structures and Materials Division; Laboratory Coordinator and Chief, Laboratory Coordination Group, Structures and Materials Division; Group Leader for Instrumentation, Structures and Materials Division; Physicist (Instrumentation), Structures Section; and Physicist, Instrumentation Application Group. He also served as EEO representative and member of the EEO Advisory Committee to the Laboratory Director; Safety Representative at the section, division and center levels; member of the Computer Advisory Committee at the division and center levels; and Special Computer Advisor to the Director, at the agency level. Randy's favorite area of community service involves working to increase the interest of minority youth in computers, science and electronics. He makes numerous presentations on these subjects to area junior high and high schools, and also participates in workshops sponsored by the Minorities in Engineering Council at the University of Maryland. He is also a representative to the Prince Georges County PanHellenic Council and is Treasurer and Chief Budget Officer of the First Baptist Church of Highland Park — shepherding the operation of the congregation's $1 million facility and a $350,000 annual budget. A quiet, behind-the-scenes worker in fraternal affairs, Randy's selection as Alumni Brother of the Year bears out Brother Charles Garvin's contention (in Espirit de' Fraternite) that an Alpha man's attitude should reflect the spirit of service, not personal gain; and that due reward will come from service through "the respect of Brothers well served." In 1982, that respect is fraternally accorded to Brother Randolph Williams.

RANDOLPH WILLIAMS


n August 13, 1978, Derrick Warren arrived on the campus of Southern University in Baton Rouge, Louisiana to audition for the school's Jaguar Marching Band. This was the beginning of a journey that would take him, literally, from coast to coast — to the White House in Washington, where he joined the President of the United States at a luncheon to witness the signing of an executive order designed to assist Black colleges; and, to Los Angeles, California, where he was named College Brother of the Year — 1982 by the Fraternity's Committee on Awards and Achievements. Needless to say, Derrick became a member of the band; he was drum major in high school and plays piano, trombone, baritone, euphonium, E-Flat and F hourns. And that was but the start of his involvement in the student life of the nation's largest historically Black college. By now, Derrick is no stranger to regular readers of The Sphinx. He was featured twice during the past year; first, as one of several college Brothers who served as student government heads; and, with many of these same Brothers, in the annual Distinguished Collegians feature. Derrick's first elective office at Southern was, appropriately, that of President of his Sphinx Club (he was initiated on March 27, 1980) at Beta Sigma Chapter. He went on to serve a successful year as Junior Class President and was then elected President of the Student Government Association (SGA). During his tenure, Southern hosted the first Louisiana Black College Day; the SGA instituted several programs, including a Student Loan Fund and a Legal Aid Counseling Service, which advised students on matters ranging from buying or renting cars, homes or apartments to criminal misdemeanors or felonies. Another project,

still in the works, was to institute a system to allow student ID's for travel on city buses (through payment of a fee each semester). That Derrick was one of only four SGA heads invited to attend the White House luncheon is indicative of his leadership, both on campus and among America's student leaders. More than just being an elected leader, however, Brother Warren's involvement in student life spanned the range of social, academic and cocurricular activity. He has maintained a 3.4 grade point average (4-point scale), securing a straight A average during the first half of his tenure as SGA President. He is a member of the following honor societies: Alpha Chi, national honor society; Alpha Kappa Mu, national honor society; Kappa Kappa Psi, national band honorary; Kappa Phi Kappa, education honorary; and Pi Omega Pi, honorary business society. Brother Warren's studies were supported by a number of scholarships: Sigma Gamma Rho scholarship; Physics scholarship; Naval ROTC scholarship; and Mwani Bakari Asina Civic and Social Club scholarship. Derrick was active with the Student Senate; the Student-Industry Cluster; the Jaguar Yearbook, as Band Editor and Sports Editor; the Young Democrats; NROTC: United People Organization; Association of Computer Machinery; Data Processing Management Association, as well as the band and SGA. He was also a charter member of Southern's John G. Lewis Lodge, Prince Hall Masons. In addition to being honored by his SGA election, Brother Warren was named to "Who's Who Among Students at American Universities and Colleges" and received the Outstanding Male Student Award from the Men's Federation at Southern. He was also named Mr. Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority (1980-81) and Sweet-

heart of the Association of Women's Students. The computer science major was also active beyond the college setting, serving as an intern in the Louisiana State Legislature for three summers and as President of Boys Town of the Louisiana Baptist Youth Encampment. And, this past summer, the Mayor of Bastrop, Louisiana (Derrick's hometown) presented him the Distinguished Service Award — in recognition of his community service throughout the state. In closing, we should note that Derrick's selection marks the second consecutive year that a Beta Sigma member has captured this honor (following 1981 awardee Cedric Holloman). The above article clearly explains why this is so.

DERRICK WARREN


Million Dollar Fund Drive Rolls On Alpha Phi Alpha's MILLION DOLLAR FUND DRIVE continues to edge toward completion. Brother I. J. Lamothe, Jr., National Drive chairman, reported to the 76th Anniversary Convention that there had been a recent resurgence in interest and commitment of the Brotherhood to the point where some convention speakers had referred to the drive in the same perspective as other great Alpha programs, such as "Go To High School; Go To College" and "A Voteless People Is A Hopeless People." The Board of Directors reaffirmed its support of the drive to its completion, and Brother General President, Ozell Sutton, stated that, in his travels around the country, he had never found anything that attracted more attention and precipitated more comment and commendation than the Million Dollar Fund Drive. Brother Lamothe also reported that Brother Sutton had made further distributions to the United Negro College Fund and the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People in the amounts of $33,334 each — bringing our total contribution to each of them to $200,000. Brother Sutton indicated that a similar distribution would be made to the National Urban League in the near future. The five regional drive chairmen, in the persons of Brothers Walter Sapp of the Southern region, H. Gray Gillem, Eastern region, Gus T. Ridgel, Midwestern region, Roosevelt Johnson, Southwestern region and Rogernald Jackson, Western region, were busily upied throughout the convention. .other Larry Charles provided upto-date individual and chapter reports. These were distributed for the delegates to take back to their respective chapters. Brother Lamothe reminded the convention that the "primary and most significant reason for the collection of the great majority of monies thus far has come as a direct result of the efforts of the regional drive chairmen. For it was they who organized their individual regions; it was they who calculated individual chapter assessments; it was they who got commitments from the chapters to accept their pro rata shares; it was they who 10

Brother I. J. Lamothe, Jr., Chairman of Alpha's Million Dollar Fund Drive, confers with National Urban League President John Jacob at the league's headquarters in New York.

The West's drive chairman, Rogernald Jackson (left), provides information to a chapter representative during the General Convention. traveled to convention after convention (state, regional and national — and even chapter meetings) many times at their own expense; it was they who utilized telephones and supplies from wherever they could scrounge them; it was they who kept records of their own regional activities; it was they who familiarized themselves with their constituencies to the point where they were able to solicit $1.25 million dollars in pledges from the Brotherhood and it was they who have been responsible for the collection of the biggest part of our monies thus far." At the first business session of the convention, a roll call was conducted whereby each regional drive chairman requested payments from his region. The roll call was interrupted by a lively discussion between two of our Past General Presidents — Brothers Lionel

Newsom and Walter Washington — concerning the official approval of the drive from its inception. A motion was then duly made and seconded that the convention affirm the Million Dollar Fund Drive in its present form. The vote was overwhelmingly in favor, and the roll call was resumed. A total of $20,084.50 was collected. This, added to the $703,661.12 previously reported by Brother General Treasurer, James Trent, gives us a total of $723,745.62 collected thus far. Brother Lamothe reminded the Brotherhood that our original commitment to the three organizations was $1,000,000 and that they had stated, both publicly and privately, that they were anxiously expecting the balances of our promises to them. Brother Frank A. Dee presented a check for $500 bringing his total contribution to $2,500, thus becoming the highest individual contributor to the Million Dollar Fund Drive. Brother Dee is closely followed by Brothers H. Gray Gillem, Sylvester Johnson and James R. Williams, each of whom has contributed $2,000 or more. The Million Dollar Fund Drive Committee considers the drive a great success to date, but they reminded the Brotherhood of the urgency of collecting the balance of the pledges. A gigantic effort will be made during the next year to complete all contributions so that we may hopefully end the drive by the time of the 77th Anniversary Convention in New Orleans. The Sphinx/Fall 1982


Participate in a matching gift.

Which You May

a. Contact your company's contribution officer b. Ask for your company's matching gift form c. Fill out the form in the a m o u n t that you wish to contribute to the UNITED NEGRO COLLEGE FUND, and write a check in the same amount to the UNCF. d. Identify your check as being sent from an Alpha m a n . e. Mail the form and your check to: United Negro College Fund c / o Ms. Judith Walburg 500 East 62nd Street New York, NY 10021 f. You and your Chapter will get credit for the gift and the match.

Join the combined federal campaign. For Federal Government employees only — participate in the combined federal campaign: a. Fill out a pledge card for the payroll deduction of your choice. b. Earmark your pledge to the UNCF, N A A C P OR N A T I O N A L URBAN LEAGUE. c. Send a duplicate copy of the pledge card to: Alpha Phi Alpha Education Foundation, Inc. P . O . Box 6669 Church Street Station New York, NY 10249 d. You and your Chapter will get credit for the entire a m o u n t of your pledge after the last payment is deducted.

Let us draft on your bank account. 1. Write a check!

^ -

^

~

^ *

Write your check in any amount you desire to Alpha Phi Alpha Education Foundation, Inc., and mail to: Alpha Phi Alpha Education Foundation, Inc.

P.O. Box 6669 Church Street Station New York, NY 10249

a. Fill out the Bank Draft Authorization attached. b . Do not exceed twelve (12) monthly payments. c. Send the Authorization Form and one of your checks — (blank and voided) to: Alpha Phi Alpha Education Foundation, Inc. P . O . Box 6669 Church Street Station New York, NY 10249

DRAFT AUTHORIZATION

MY CONTRIBUTION To

Bank Name

Enclosed please find my contribution in the amount of $ ; to be credited to the Alpha Phi Alpha Million Dollar Fund Drive.

Name Address

City

State

Date City

Chapter.

State

Zip Code

Zip Code

This is your authority to honor drafts in the amount of: $ Each Month $ Each Quarter $ Each Half Yr. $ Each Yr. Ending. Beginning. Date

Drawn by Alpha Phi Alpha Education Foundation, Inc. Name Please Print

Bank Account Number Bank Identification Number. Signed T h e Sphinx / Fall 1982

Above all, give!! And give generously!!

Date_

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LEGACY

Three Thousand Years Of Service Mu Lambda Honors Its 50-Year Members Bit.

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Pictured are some of the fifty 50-year Brothers honored by Mu Lambda Chapter in Washington, D.C. Even if you don't believe your own 3ss," sometimes it's just nice to read -he clippings. Take, for example, Bill Alexander's article in the March 18 edition of The Washington Post, to wit: 'The roll call of Brothers is splendid, overpowering: educator-author W.E.B. DuBois, civil rights leader the Rev. Martin Luther King, Jr., Congressman Adam Clayton Powell, Jr., super athlete Jesse Owens, former senator Edward Brooke, comedian Dick Gregory, historian Rayford Logan. They are all sons of Alpha Phi Alpha, bonded in a 76-year-old Black fraternity founded on the principles of equality, fraternity, racial uplift, honor and pride." And, as Alphamen 12

everywhere can testify, all of the above is true. The event triggering the Post's retrospective on Alpha Phi Alpha was a special dinner hosted by Mu Lambda Chapter in Washington, D.C. — in honor of 51 chapter members who have been Alpha Brothers for 50 years or more. And, as noted by Mu Lambda President William Calbert, 'This is an historic occasion. We're honoring a group of men of national and international stature who have made great contributions to both the Fraternity and the world community." "These men are giants," added former D.C. Council Chairman Sterling Tucker, "(who) have made contributions in all

fields of endeavor: the law, medicine, the social science — you name it. They deserve to be honored." And honored they were — on Sunday, March 14,1982 at the Blackburn Center of Howard University. Brother Frederick J. Laney presided at the dinner program and introduced the Alpha Phi Alpha speakers. Reverend William E. Calbert, President of Mu Lambda Chapter, welcomed those in attendance. Remarks were provided by Washington, D.C. Mayor Marion S. Barry, Jr.; Vice President Owen D. Nicholls, of Howard University; Sterling Tucker, former Chairman of the D.C. Council; and Malvin Goode, a Continued next page The Sphinx / Fall 1982


Continued from Page 12 consultant with the National Black Network. The presentation of honorees, the 50-year Alpha Phi Alpha members, was conducted by Brother J. Leon Langhorne. Brother Thomas R. Hunt, Eastern Regional Vice President of Alpha Phi Alpha, awarded Golden Certificates to those honored. The Alpha Chorus, directed by Brother Thomas Reid, and soloist Brother Robert Brown, provided the musical program. The Mu Lambda Chapter, founded as the eleventh graduate alumni chapter of Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity in 1923, was established at the old Beta Chapter House at 2447 Georgia Avenue, NW, Washington, D.C. The chapter was established in response to the desires of the graduate Brothers in D . C , many of them Howard Alumni, who wished to set up a graduate unit for themselves, and to eventually give to the undergraduate Brothers. The first chapter President was Harold Stratton, and the preliminary organizational meetings were held at the home of Victor Daly, the chapter Secretary. Mu Lambda Chapter has grown and developed throughout the 59 years of its existence. The group has, at times, been a powerful lever in molding public opinion in regard to current, critical issues of the day. It has developed educational and social uplift programs for minority groups and has demonstrated its adaptability to the changing needs and conditions of contemporary life. Those 50-year members of Alpha Phi Alpha honored were: Norris H. Atkins, Xi, Wilberforce, 1924; Charles H. Baltimore, Beta, Howard, 1929; Walter M. Booker, Alpha Rho, Morehouse, 1928; George Butler, Beta, Howard, 1931; Theodus R. Conner, Beta, Howard, 1927; Victor E. Daly, Alpha, Cornell, 1915; Walter G. Daniel, Gamma, Virginia Union, 1924; Samuel B. Danley, Alpha Delta, University of Southern California, 1921; Millard R. Dean, Alpha Theta, Northwestern, 1927; John C. Eason, Jr., Gamma, Virginia Union, 1931; James C. Evans, Sigma, M.I.T., 1921; C. C. House, Upsilon, Kansas, 1926; John W. Howard, Omicron, Pittsburgh, 1925; Nunley Keets, Nu, Lincoln, 1930; J. Leon Langhorne, Epsilon, Michigan, 1925; Belford V. Lawson, Jr., Epsilon, Michigan, 1922; Arnett G. Lindsay, Beta, Howard, The Sphinx/Fall 1982

Pioneering television newsman Mai Goode, himself a 50-year Brother, keynoted the Mu Lambda affair. 1915; Rayford W. Logan, Omicron, Pittsburgh, 1914; H. Reginald Mitchell Gamma, Virginia Union, 1926; George B. Murphy, Nu, Dickinson, 1926; Rufus P. Perry, Alpha Omicron, ]. C. Smith, 1923; Frank E. Pinder, Beta Nu, Florida A and M, 1932; Leon H. Reaves, Alpha Zeta, West Virginia State, 1927. Addison E. Richmond, Sr., Kappa, Ohio State, 1923; Hilyard R. Robinson, Psi, Pennsylvania, 1921; Floyd W. Rowe, Beta Gamma, Virginia State, 1927; Louis H. Russell, Beta, Howard, 1911; Arthur Hugh Simmons, Sigma, Harvard, 1919; Wesley B. Speller, Beta, Howard, 1931; William C. Syphax, Beta, Howard, 1928; Ivan E. Taylor, Beta, Howard, 1929; Charles H. Wesley, Zeta, Yale, 1913; Clarence B. Wheat, Beta, Howard, 1931; Elijah B. Williams, Beta, Howard, 1926; Henry G. Williams, Beta, Howard,

1925; Louis T. Williams, Beta, Howard, 1927; Melvin A. Williams, Iota, Hamilton, 1927; Walter Bowie Williams, Alpha Kappa, Williams, 1926; Wesley S. Williams, Gamma, Virginia Union, 1928; Charles E. Burbridge; Chauncv I. Cooper; Averette Corley; Todd \. v can; William S. Hudson; Joseph I Johnson; Thurgood Marshall; Paul L. Piper; Charles H. Prudhomme; Burke Syphax; and Kermit Trigg. Unfortunately, space doesn't permit a thorough chronicle of the individual and collective achievements of these men. A few are, of course, instantly recognizable; others less so, but no less worthy of emulation. Above all, it's astounding when one realizes that this group alone (in a single Alpha Chapter) represents nearly 3,000 years of Service to All Mankind." That is indeed a fitting testament to the vision of the Seven Jewels. 13


To Brother Newsom, the distinguished Past General President . . . whose kind words warm my heart. To Brothers Wesley, Cannon, Washington, and Williams, Past General Presidents . . . who have given dynamic and dedicated leadership to Alpha Phi Alpha and who have been a constant source of inspiration and help to me. To the Vice Presidents, Assistant Vice Presidents and other members of the Board . . . who share with me the burdens and honors of national leadership. To the Chairmen of committees, commissions and foundations . . . who give of their talents and time in service to Alpha. To State Directors, Regional Directors, Chapter Presidents and other local leaders . . . who are stewards of the ideals of Alpha and who make manifest those ideals in terms of genuine service.

Black experience in America. We come at a time when devastating nuclear destruction threatens us all. We come at a time when the mood of the nation has turned from support of human rights and legitimate human yearnings to opposition to those yearnings. We have turned from "War on Poverty" to a war on "the poor." We come at a time when parts of Mother Africa are bursting forth from hundreds of years of dehumanizing, debasing and cruel colonialism to the uncertainty and often frustrating era of nationalism and self determination. On the other hand, a large part of the dark continent remains under repressive

THE

worst of times," said Dickens. "It was the age of wisdom, it was the age of foolishness. It was the season of light, it was the season of darkness. It was the spring of hope, it was the winter of despair. We had everything before us, we had nothing before us." The setting of "A Tale of Two Cities," as you recall, is 18th century France and it describes conditions of the French Revolution of 1789. With dramatic eloquence, Dickens brings to life a time of terror and treason, a starving people rising to frenzy and hate to overthrow a corrupt government. Alpha Phi Alpha was born in times like these. Seventy-six years ago, seven young men at Cornell University at Ithaca, NY, conceived the idea of struggle against oppression and formed a fraternity they appropriately named Alpha Phi Alpha. They did not just organize a fraternity. They initiated a fraternal movement that resulted in Alpha Kappa Alpha, Delta Sigma

STRUGGLE CONTINUES w g IB Hi E3D D El El B D IH El

The General Presidents Address

To my Brothers Beloved of the "House of Alpha," assembled in convention this 7th day of August, 1982 in the Los Angeles Hilton Hotel. It is a distinct honor and a genuine pleasure to have the opportunity, once again, to address you as your General President. Our theme at this our 76th Anniversary Convention is "Securing the Future — The Struggle Continues." I shall address you today from the simple but profound subject "The Struggle Continues." All this year, all over the land, I have been speaking from this simple but profound subject. It will continue to be my theme throughout the rest of 1982. We come to our 76th Anniversary Convention at a time critical in the 14

white governments where the Black majority remains practically enslaved. Yes, we come at a time critical to the Black experience in America, a time so critical that we run the risk of permanent relegation to second class status. Charles Dickens, in his classic "A Tale of Two Cities," speaks to just these times when he begins his book with a profound, provocative and prophetic statement. You remember, in the very first paragraph of his book Dickens describes what he calls "The Period" — a period of history much like our times. His perspicuous commentary on that period causes us pause, as he makes alternative expressions of good and bad, of magnificent hope and utter despair. "It was the best of times, it was the

Theta, Zeta Phi Beta, Sigma Gamma Rho, Omega Psi Phi, Kappa Alpha Psi and Phi Beta Sigma. Since its formation in 1906, three years before the founding of the NAACP and five years before the founding of the National Urban League, Alpha has given dedicated and creative leadership to Black America, specifically, and all America, generally. It has made manifest its ideas and ideals of "Manly Deeds, Scholarship and Love for All Mankind" in a nation in stubborn opposition to these ideas and ideals. Alpha Phi Alpha for 76 years has turned clouds of despair into rays of hope. Alpha Phi Alpha has for 76 years Continued on Page 15 The Sphinx / Fall 1982


Continued from Page 14 instilled hope when hope died unborn. Alpha Phi Alpha has inspired a people to "Lift every voice and sing until earth and heaven ring" when it appeared that there was nothing to sing about. When Black people were disfranchised and denied the right to vote, Alpha waged a furious legal battle against the closed Democratic primaries. With the rallying cry "A Voteless People is a Hopeless People," the Fraternity called Black America to fight for its rights and its freedom. When Black Americans were denied educational opportunities, it was Alpha Phi Alpha that kindled its hopes and shocked a people into action with

of the Voting Rights Act. Let me remind you though, Brothers, of the fact that "The Struggle Continues." From the chronicles of the pages of history, from the celestial observatory of Omega Chapter, from the heightened expectations of the poor and deprived, from the yearning aspirations of Black youth, come the signal that "The Struggle Continues." The call is to Alpha, as it was in 1906, to rise up and give innovative, creative and dedicated leadership to the legitimate hopes and aspirations of Black America. We must lead Black America in a thrust that will force all America to achieve America. We must force America to achieve a level of liv-

To "Continue the Struggle" we must first shed our middle class intoxication with suburban tranquility, our preoccupation with split-level serenity, the ecstasy we derive from our wellstocked food freezers, the comfort of our recliners, the breeze from our central air, the softness of our knee deep carpets, the security afforded by walls, bars and burglar alarms, the privileges extended to us by Master Card, American Express and a line of credit in the bank, the status conferred by our fraternity and private club membership, the arrogant sense of superiority that often results from our academic degrees, the personal access to influence and power that can engulf

its "Go to High School, Go to College" campaign. When Blacks were denied basic rights of the ballot in the 60's, it was Brother Martin Luther King, Jr., joined by hundreds of Alpha men and others, who crossed the Red Sea of the Selma Bridge that resulted in the Voting Rights Act. When human freedom, human dignity and human justice were on the scaffold in 1963, it was an Alpha man, Brother Martin Luther King, Jr. who led 300,000 men and women, Black and White, in a march on Washington that pricked the nation's conscience and resulted in passage of the Civil Rights Act of 1964. When the right to vote was again threatened and the one-man one-vote concept was at stake, Alphas joined many others in petitioning the Congress and the President and forced extension

ing, loving and learning where the measure of a man will be his ability, not his race; where there will be no double standards in housing, in education and in the use of public facilities; when the old and the infirm will not suffer pain due to the lack of good medical care nor experience hunger for the lack of adequate income. Some 75,000 men have crossed the burning sands and entered into this communion of Brotherhood that we call Alpha Phi Alpha and a nation has felt the impact of its existence, its vast reservoir of talent and leadership. We are the legatees and beneficiaries of the responsibility to Continue the Struggle — to continue the pursuit of liberty and justice for all people, to relieve the burdens of the poor, to attack the evils of illiteracy and encourage the highest and noblest form of man and womanhood.

us with a synthetic sense of well-being and can insulate and isolate us from "The Struggle that Continues" and the battle line we must form to meet the challenge of the 80's. Our Brothers long gone into Omega Chapter and our forefathers have left us a legacy of a dedication to leadership, a level of education and even an economic level that will serve us well in "Continuing the Struggle." We are a part of a group that spends 150 billion dollars in the consumer market annually. This is more money than the entire national budgets of 70 percent of the countries of the world. There were in 1981, 1,200,000 Black students in colleges and universities of the United States, 2.2 million in high schools, and 4.3 million in elementary schools. This is because men and women

The Sphinx/Fall 1982

Continued on Page 35

15


ALPHA ATHIETES By Bertram D. Ashe San Jose State University has a long tradition of placing football players into the National Football League. Wilson Faumina of the Atlanta Falcons; Louis Wright, with Denver, and Jewel Thomas of the Los Angeles Rams are only a few of the many Spartans playing professional football. This time next year, it's possible that two Alphamen could leave San Jose State and join the pro ranks: starting safeties Brian Hawkins and Dirk HunterEllis. Although both Brothers ended up in the same defensive backfield for their senior years, they took totally different routes to get there. Brian Hawkins,

Brian Hunter

Dirk Hunter-Ellis

11

for myself." Brother Hawkins, also known as a bone-crunching hitter, stresses he's not just out to kill. "It's not a matter of being bloodthirsty, it's a matter of seeing something coming your way and you want to stop it because you know if it gets by you it makes you look bad." As a free safety, Hawkin's job is to "not get beat deep and pick off as many passes as possible. I'm really like a receiver on defense," says Hawkins. Aggressive against both the run and the pass, Hawkins tied for the team lead in interceptions with 4 and fumble recoveries with 2 — despite missing two games with a broken arm. As the strong safety,

Alpha's Hard-Hitting Safeties At San lose State"

who has spent his entire collegiate career at SJSU, made the team as a walk-on in 1979. "I walked on as a sophomore," says Hawkins ( 6 ' 2 ' , 190). "I hadn't really planned on playing any football when I got here, I just decided to do it once I saw the team and talked to a few people." He's been playing ever since, breaking into the starting lineup midway through last season. Dirk Hunter-Ellis (6'0", 210) is starting his first year as a Spartan after transferring from Washington State University. Before WSU, 16

Hunter-Ellis played two years of junior college football at Spokane Falls Community College in Washington. While at Spokane CC, he earned Defensive Player of the Year, All-League, and Ail-American recognition. Hunter-Ellis had two reasons for transferring from Washington State to San Jose. "I didn't like the athletic program they had. It's a good place to go to school, but the athletic program just wasn't for me. I transferred basically so I could get an extra year of school in."

Both Hawkins and HunterEllis were impressive during spring drills — where Hawkins retained his starting position and HunterEllis quickly won his. One reason these Brothers are so popular with their coaches is their fondness for the physical aspect of the game. "The violence . . . the contact," says Hunter-Ellis, aptly described in the Spartan press guide as a "violent" hitter. "It's the intensity of the game. The competition motivates me. Everyone out there has a name for themselves and I want a name

Brother Hunter-Ellis is more responsible for protecting the ground game. "Basically, I'm in to add strength against the run," he says. "In passing situations, I'm dropping underneath into the flat areas." Hunter-Ellis was a linebacker at Washington State and made the change to safety at San Jose State. "They told me they would look at me at both linebacker and safety and I could stick with whichever one I liked, so I stayed in the secondary." Twenty-two year old Continued next page The Sphinx / Fall 1982


Continued from Page 16 major, twenty-three year Dirk Watise Hunter-Ellis old Brian Hawkins is an was born in Tacoma, Wash- easy-going Brother who is ington, soon moved to well liked by everyone who Texas for 13 years, and then knows him. After spending moved back to Tacoma for his early years in Kansas City, Hawkins moved to high school. The epitome of Long Beach at age 14 and the strong, silent type, eventually lettered in footHunter-Ellis is a quiet, articball, basketball, track, and ulate student-athlete who baseball at Long Beach Polyleads a very private life. "I technic High School. Brian like to get into myself and could have graduated this be alone a lot. Maybe somepast June but elected not to. times chase a few girls, but "I had one more year of basically I like to be alone and do a lot of intimate eligibility left," he states. "Plus, instead of straining thinking." Hunter-Ellis is a neophyte Brother, crossing myself as far as classes go, I decided to spread it out a into Epsilon Mu chapter on March 27, 1982. Says little bit and continue on. Hunter-Ellis: "In the begin- Five years may seem like a ning I wanted to find an long time, but in the end it'll identity for myself and I be worth it." figured frat life would do it. It's important to Hawkins, I did a little inside reviewing who pledged Alpha as a on all the fraternities and I freshman, to be a good role knew Alpha was for me model to the young football because a lot of my buddies fans. "I talk to them a lot, were Alphas. It's all in the give them some attention. perspective that I want to You know, a couple of autogo into . . . the same line graphs here and there. It and direction." makes me feel good and it Active in chapter activities, makes them feel good — it Hunter-Ellis was a member goes both ways." of Epsilon Mu's undefeated As for the future, Hawkins 1982 march team, helping has already been contacted win the Western Regional by several NFL teams. "San title. He says that he would Francisco, New England, have marched on what New York Giants, Minneproved to be Alpha's Na- sota. Right now I've just tional Championship march been looked at, but I've got team — but couldn't get to perform this year. If I away from his job for that have a good season this weekend. year, then I can say what A Telecommunications will happen." major, Hunter-Ellis is a canSan Jose State plays in didate for the Academic the tough, underrated Pacific All-America team with a Coast Athletic Association 3.17 grade point average. for league play and has Wisely, he is not depending annual battles against such solely on professional foot- Pacific-10 powers as Stanball. "I'm not really banking ford and California. This on it. A lot of people bank year the Spartan's first four on it, but I'm just going to games are against Pac-10 take it in stride. I feel that if teams. Although coming off I stay healthy, something a 9-2 year, the Spartans are will happen. Whether it's not favored to repeat as the NFL draft, the WFL, the PCAA champions. Hawkins new league (USFL) or sees it differently. "There's Canada, I'm going to play been a lot of talk about somewhere. It really doesn't that. Some people say 6-5, I matter if I get drafted, or say 10-1." After losing how high, as long as I get several starters, including paid for doing what I like Alphaman Eric Lane (lineto do." backer, drafted by the Kansas A Business-Management City Chiefs), SJSU will be The Sphinx / Fall 1982


It's good business Equal employment opportunity and affirmative action are laws designed to enrich lives. And like many laws, they are subject to interpretation and change of emphasis. At Control Data, we're working to enrich lives-not because it's a legal obligation, but because it's good business. If you think that's just rhetoric, look closely at our corporate mission statement. It commits our vast computing, technical, financial and human resources to "addressing society's major unmet needs as profitable business opportunities" This commitment is demonstrated by our leadership role with City Venture Corporation whose purpose is economic and social revitalization, job creation and education and training. It's typified in our Business and Technology Centers and Business Advisors groups dedicated to a healthier small enterprise sector. It's felt by our employees who strive to better themselves and build a stronger company; people who are counted on, not counted. A number of profit-producing products and services we sell today came directly from our programs to improve the quality of education, rebuild America's inner cities, strengthen small businesses, revitalize family farms and make better health care more accessible and affordable. At the same time, we are applying hightechnology resources to help business and industry produce better products, control costs, increase productivity and create more jobs. Enriching lives; it is good business. If you'd like to know more about us, and our unique business strategy, contact Control Data, Staffing Services, HQW01T, P.O. Box 0, Minneapolis, MN 55440. An equal opportunity!affirmative action employer.


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For A Job Well Done Distinguished service to the Fraternity and society — by both individuals and institutions — is recognized at each General Convention through the Awards and Achievements program. In addition, the lighter side of convention action features its own competitive activities. The 1982 winners are as follows:

The Eta Gamma delegation, led by President Percival Roberts (center right), celebrates a victory.

Fraternal Awards • College Brother of the Year: Beta Sigma's Derrick Warren, Student Government President at Southern University, became the second Brother from that chapter to capture this award in as many years. • Alumni Brother of the Year: This citation went to Brother Randolph Williams, Eastern Regional Treasurer and President of Kappa Epsilon Lambda in Landover, Maryland. • College Chapter of the Year: Eta Gamma Chapter (Prairie View A& M University, Texas) completed the Southwestern sweep of college awards by winning in this category. • Alumni Chapter of the Year: Breaking a monopoly held over the past nine years by only two chapters, Beta Beta Lambda (Miami, Florida) was given top honors in this competition. • Senior Alpha Service Award: Cited, in absentia, was Brother Charles Lunsford — a sixty-year Brother from Eta Rho Lambda Chapter in Rochester, New York. • Alpha Award of Merit: The Fraternity's highest accolade to one of its members was given, in absentia, to newsman and Alpha par excellence Malvin R. Goode. • Distinguished Service Awards: Past General Presidents Raymond W. Cannon and Myles A. Paige, both Los Angeles residents, received citations for their pivotal roles in the development of Alpha Phi Alpha. • Distinguished Service Awards: The Fraternity saluted the five regional College Brothers of the Year for their outstanding contributions to the Fraternity. They were: Ronald Thomas, Virginia State University, Eastern; Ron Russell, Southern Illinois University, Midwestern; Ennis Pant, University of South Carolina, Southern; Derrick Warren, Southern University, Southwestern; and, Brian Conley, California State University at Hey ward, Western.

Achievement Awards • Alpha Award of Honor: The Fraternity's highest honor to a non-member was bestowed upon Los Angeles Mayor Tom Bradley. • Distinguished Educator Award: The Alpha Phi Alpha Education Foundation, Inc. cited Dr. Walter Wash-

The Sphinx/Fall 1982

ington, President of Alcorn State University (Lorman, Mississippi). Brother Washington was the Fraternity's 24th General President, 1973-76. • Distinguished Service Award: The Alpha Phi Alpha Building Foundation, Inc. honored Los Angeles businessman and physician Edward H. Ballard for 27 years of service as a Director of the foundation. • Equitable Employment Opportunity Award: The 1982 EEO Award was presented to the IBM Corporation — in recognition of its outstanding record of community service and a demonstrated commitment to minority employment. • Scholastic Achievement: Also honored by the Education Foundation were the five recipients of Alpha Phi Alpha Undergraduate Scholarships: Lincoln A. Carter, Brown University; Glenn D. Oliver, Michigan State University; Albert L. Amey, Clark College; Kenneth W. Ferguson, Prairie View A & M University; and, Leonard Richardson, University of the Pacific. • Centennial Citation: Virginia State University, Petersburg, was saluted on the occasion of its 100th year of service as an institution of higher education.

Activity Awards • Basketball: The tournament trophy was captured by the team from Xi Pi, California State University at Heyward, with Eta Epsilon, North Texas State University, winning second place. Brother Darryl Thornton of Eta Epsilon was named the tourney's Most Valuable Player. In the All-Comers competition, chapters without official teams, the group sponsored by Alpha Xi, University of Washington, was victorious. • Stomp Contest: The popular show competition netted the following results: 1st Place, Epsilon Mu, San Jose State University; 2nd Place, Eta Epsilon, North Texas State University; 3rd Place, Mefro Chicago Area Chapters. • Miss Black & Gold: During Monday evening's Miss Black and Gold Pageant, Miss Cheryl Pearson from Purdue University, representing the Midwestern Region, was crowned the winner. Miss DaVetta Jones, Fresno State University - Western Region, was 1st runner-up; and Miss Persephone Felder, South Carolina State College - Southern Region, was 2nd runner-up.

27


THE BLACK COLLEGES A series by the Alpha Phi Alpha Education Foundation — in recognition and support of historically Black colleges.

B

ENEDICT COLLEGE Progress In Spite Of Adversities

The entrance to Benedict College in Columbia, South Carolina. A few feet from the noise and exhaust fumes of a busy intersection on the edge of downtown Columbia sits the sixth wealthiest black private college in America. Benedict College — founded on a former slave plantation by Bathsheba Benedict, a white Baptist missionary from Rhode Island — struggled financially for most of its 110-year history. In the post-integration era, mafiy Black colleges are worried about survival. But since breaking most of its ties to the Baptist church in 1967 and recruiting wealthy white businessmen and industrialists onto its Board of Trustees, Benedict has successfully bucked that national trend. Under former President (Brother) Benjamin Payton (1967-1973) and incumbent President (Brother) Henry Ponder, Benedict's enrollment has increased from 900 to 1,600, gleaming concreteand-glass buildings have sprouted and its endowment fund has grown from $840,000 to over $8 million. Benedict's heaviest contributors have been the Ford Foundation and the 28

federal government. But South Carolina business and industry have also given large a m o u n t s . When Brother Ponder took over in 1973, coming from Alabama A&M where he was Vice President for Academic Affairs, he set out to build Benedict's endowment fund. The Ford Foundation, a long-time supporter of Benedict, gave nearly $3 million. Millions of dollars from other grants have been applied to operating expenses, allowing the college to save general revenues for the endowment. Meanwhile, Benedict has held down expenses — reducing the number of employees from about 300 to 280 by attrition in the past seven years, postponing construction of an arts center and double-checking purchases of everything down to ballpoint pens. "It isn't raising the money that's difficult," says Brother Ponder, "it's managing it after you get it. That's the difference between what Benedict has been able to do and what others have not." The result, says Brother Ponder, is that Benedict's investments now

supply about $300,000 of its annual $8 million operating budget. Benedict College is ranked among the nation's strongest Black colleges. The 1982-83 enrollment is slightly higher than last year's total, and the freshman class includes more academically gifted students than ever before. The percentage of faculty with doctorate degrees is 47 and several program changes are underway to upgrade the academic offerings.

Benedict's President — Dr. Henry Ponder

Brother Ponder has made academic excellence a watchword. The academic program was reorganized into five divisions and a number of new majors were added. Among them were accounting, banking and finance, criminal justice, journalism, marketing and management. The science programs at Benedict prevail as the foremost area of study pursued by students. In addition to extensive course offerings, opportunities for scientific field experience are equally expansive, namely in the medical and allied health fields. Last summer, nine (9) Benedict students were participants in Summer Science Institutes held at the Medical University of South Carolina, Fisk University, and other post-secondary institutions. Opportunities for student scientific research are created by faculty members involved in various research studies, as well as by programs sponsored by external organizations. One such faculty research project involved a 2-year grant from the Department of Health and Human Services to study the contributions of Black Women to America between 1776-1977. In addition, another Benedict student carried out an original research project at Stanford University last summer. The Minority Access Research Careers (MARC) Program further provides science-related opportunities in addition to internships/field study in mathematics, economics, business administration, accounting, etc. The college is unique in that it offers a baccalaureate degree in news editorial/ broadcasting and has the only fully-accredited Bachelor of Social Work Continued on Page 30 The Sphinx/Fall 1982


r

THE BLACK COLLEGES

OREHOUSE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE Producing A New Breed Of Physician The future looks bright for 32 first-year medical students who have just begun their studies as the fifth class to enroll in the Morehouse School of Medicine — the nation's first predominately Black medical school to be established in this century. The future also looks bright for 16 of the new school's Charter Class — students who were among the first to enroll in the twoyear basic medical sciences program in 1978. They have now become medical doctors, having graduated last spring from four-year medical institutions affiliated with Morehouse. In between the enrollment of the first class in 1978 and the fifth class in 1982, a great deal has happened that bodes well for the future of the emerging Morehouse School of Medicine — its faculty, students, and alumni. Consider these developments, all within the space of a year: • The school has dedicated and occupied its first permanent facility on its own campus. • It has been authorized by the Georgia Board of Education to award the degree of doctor of medicine and has begun the conversion to a four-year institution. • It has received important federal, state and private funding to assure its successful transition to degree-granting status in 1985. The Morehouse Medical School was conceived and created in the past decade with a mission to help alleviate a shortage of primarycare physicians in medicallyunderserved areas, primarily The Sphinx / Fall 1982

The first permanent building of Sciences Building. inner cities and rural areas where most minorities and low income people live. In 1969, the Task Force for Physician Manpower of the Georgia Comprehensive Health Planning Council noted that, although some 17 percent of the citizens of Georgia were Black, less than 3 percent of the physicians in Georgia were Black. Among the recommendations of the Task Force was the need to establish greater opportunities in Georgia for the education

the Morehouse School of Medicine — the $6.5 million Basic Medical and training of more Black physicians. The School of Medicine was founded in 1975 by Morehouse College to address this need. Morehouse was the logical and appropriate institution to launch the new m i n o r i t y - o r i e n t e d school and to set it upon its high mission. Established in 1867, Morehouse College is deeply steeped in the tradition of community service and is one of the nation's premier Black liberal arts colleges.

In 1973, Morehouse College received a federal grant to study the possibility of developing a two-year medical program. This 18-month study convinced the college and its far-sighted president, (Brother) Dr. Hugh M. Gloster, that the program was feasible. In 1974, Morehouse received a follow-up federal grant to begin detailed planning, and in 1978 the School of Medicine enrolled its Charter Class — 16 members of which received their medical degrees in May and June 1982. These new physicians are now in residency training at prominent hospitals affiliated with Emory University, the Medical College of Georgia, the John Hopkins University, the University of Alabama at Birmingham, Howard Univer jty, Brown University, Tuijne University, the University of Tennessee, the University of Florida, C a s e - W e s t e r n Reserve University and the Medical College of Virginia. Vice President George Bush (right), keynote speaker at the dedica- The driving force behind tion of the school's first building, congratulates President and Deanthe Morehouse School of Louis W. Sullivan, M.D. Continued on Page 30 29


THE BLACK COLLEGES

BENEDICT COLLEGE Continued from Page 28 degree program in the state of South Carolina. There is also a cooperative Army ROTC Program with nearby Furman University. The college is fully-accredited by state, regional and national agencies. Benedict is located on twenty-two (22) acres in the center of Columbia. There are seventeen (17) buildings on the campus, including the Fine Arts Building. This building, which will cost approximately $2.5 million was originally slated for completion earlier. However, the construction of the

MOREHOUSE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE Continued from Page 29 Medicine is Louis W. Sullivan, M.D., President and Dean. A native Georgian, Dr. Sullivan grew up in both Atlanta and rural southwest Georgia and was graduated from Atlanta's Booker T. Washington High School. He attended Morehouse College and graduated magna cum laude in 1954. While a student at Morehouse, Louis Sullivan was inducted into Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity via the Alpha Rho Chapter, in 1951. Brother Sullivan received his medical degree cum laude from Boston University, in 1958, and completed his internship and medical residency at New York Hospital-Cornell Medical Center in 1960. He has held faculty positions at Harvard Medical School and New Jersey College of Medicine and is a nationally noted hematologist. In 1975, Brother Sullivan was persuaded to return home to Georgia to become Dean of the developing 30

building was delayed in order to put Benedict on a sounder financial basis. Now nearing completion, this building will be dedicated as the Henry Ponder Fine Arts Building. Benedict's library contains more than 250,000 volumes, including subscriptions to many of the major periodicals. Since d e s e g r e g a t i o n , more top Black students have been enrolling in predominantly white colleges and universities, Brother Ponder said. Benedict has been working to reverse that trend. Once considered an elitist school for the sons and daughters of the Black middle class, "Benedict now has

become more an institution for the masses," Brother Ponder says. "We've been forthright about it (lower attendance cost)," Brother Ponder adds. "We talked about it with our faculty and staff, so they would understand that the students coming now are not the kind they might have been accustomed to. I think we've been successful, because we've had more teachers who have accepted that than those who have not." Today, Benedict College is a thriving institution. By unbonded faith and concerted efforts, the college has continued to move far on a steady course, despite

the world of uncertainties which could have halted its progress. An editorial in The State, South Carolina's largest newspaper, has predicted a bright future for Benedict. "Our government might learn a lesson from Benedict College," the editorial said. "Benedict sacrificed yesterday so it could survive to meet tomorrow's needs. Now tomorrow is here, and the Columbia institution is financially sound and poised for challenges that face predominantly Black colleges." A c c o r d i n g to Brother Ponder, Benedict cannot take a breather. Brother Ponder says, "We can't get too smug."

medical program at Morehouse College. It is under his leadership that the Morehouse School of Medicine — has become an independent institution within the Atlanta University Center and is now well along the road to becoming a four-year, degree-granting medical school. The entering class of 1981 will be the first to complete the fouryear course at Morehouse and will receive the M.D. degree in 1985. Brother Sullivan explains that special efforts are made to attract and motivate students who are most likely to fulfill the Morehouse mission to serve as primary care physicians in medically underserved areas. "From the outset, Morehouse has concentrated its recruitment efforts and its curriculum development on finding, training, and motivating physican candidates who will set up family-care practices in the inner cities and rural areas," Brother Sullivan said in a recent speech. "To achieve this goal, we give preference to entering students whom, we feel, are most inclined toward our ideal," he continued. "We

have introduced into the traditional medical education format special courses, special emphasis, special clinical training, and special counseling that we hope will further inspire our graduates to locate in medically underserved areas. What we hope to do, in short, is to bring forth a new breed of physician — one with a special sensitivity to human needs, equal to his or her skills in clinical medicine." To fulfill its mission, Morehouse School of Medicine draws financial support from state and local governments, and from private sources: foundations, corporations, and individuals. Black physicians from throughout the nation — many of whom are alumni of Morehouse College — are among the medical school's most generous donors. On July 21, Morehouse School of Medicine observed a significant milestone in its development with the dedication of its $6.5 million Basic Medical Sciences Building, the core unit of the school's physical plant. The school previously had

been housed in facilities provided by Morehouse College. Vice President George Bush headed a group of national, state, and local leaders in government, medicine, and education who participated in the dedication. In his keynote remarks, the Vice President announced that Morehouse had been selected for a major federal challenge grant to assist in the transition to four-year status. The federal challenge grant has been matched by a $3 million appropriation from the State of Georgia. In his remarks, Mr. Bush praised the Morehouse School of Medicine mission to train more minority students as primary care physicians and said: "Morehouse School of Medicine is the first and only predominantly Black medical school to be established in the United States in this century. No one can deny that the faculty and students of Morehouse are deserving of our praise and warrant our continued support for what they have done to advance the health care of our most needy citizens." The Sphinx / Fall 1982


STATEMENT OF

1982

PUBLIC POLICY THE RATIONALE Increased opportunity for service and greatness is thrust upon the Brothers in Alpha Phi Alpha. Even if we did not wish to be servants of all, there is no turning back. Leaders must lead, explain, and do. Some of those gains that Black Americans thought we had secured during the past twenty-five years are being whittled away, with an abandon that seems quite unconscionable. Black men and women have looked to the highest human resource that this country has ever known. Like all Americans, we have turned to the Federal Government to right the wrongs which befall us. We Blacks, we minorities, we poor . . . we looked, and we LOOK; we saw, and we SEE that the Federal Government — our Federal Government — no longer hears the appeal of the cities nor is concerned about the plight of the poor. "Let the dead bury its own dead,"says the old saw. "Cities will become strong and stronger when they take care of themselves," say the new sophists. Affirmative action is passe'. Quotas of any kind are out. The military, however, must be provided for. "We as Alphas," writes our distinguished Brother and Past General President, the Honorable Ernest N. Morial, Mayor of the City of New Orleans, "find ourselves facing perhaps our most difficult time . . . America is faced with difficult times. There has been a tidal wave of feeling in our country that the welfare of the cities, . . . of what has become known as the 'underclass,' is not important in the overall scheme of things." The picture is not pretty. Unfortunately, there are no apparent signs of retouching by the Executive Branch of Government. So — what is to be done? With the conviction and determination that American mores, economy, politics, outlook, practice and action must not in the twenty-first century be molded and determined by the COLORLINE . . . With the firm knowledge that we must "set as our task the opening of the eyes of a nation to the plight" of oppressed and ignored Americans and that "we must bring the light of day into the dark corners of racism and bigotry" (Morial) . . . With full recognition that the opportunity for greatness in serving mankind is thrust upon us — Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity, Inc. issues the following proclamation. A VOTELESS PEOPLE IS A HOPELESS PEOPLE The slogans, marching, songs, and rhetoric of the Civil Rights Movement of the sixties are no more. Gains are being abrogated; other gains remain. But so does racism. Marching may still be needed, and songs and slogans. One essential that is non-debatable in American life, however, is power. Within the ballot lies much power — power that is available abundantly. This fraternity is justifiably proud of its record. The nationwide campaign conducted by the NAACP and Alpha's own campaign contributed immensely to the successful passage of the Voting Rights Extension Bill. But much more must be done. Alpha men and Alpha chapters must take the leadership, or work diligently with already existent structures and institutions — such as the NAACP and the churches - to inform the potential Black voter of just what power the ballot actually has, that it is one's duty and obligation to vote; that his very survival is dependent on what happens at the polls. We must go far beyond even that. Alpha must The Sphinx /Fall 1982

engage in registration campaigns, to add literally thousands of Black Americans to the lists of registered voters. Alpha must go further. We must see to it that Blacks who are registered DO IN FACT GO TO THE POLLS AND VOTE. In many, if not in all communities, leadership must indicate what issues and what persons should be voted for. Courage and determination are prerequisites for those who will serve their fellowman. 'THE BIG THREE" - THE NAACP, THE URBAN LEAGUE, THE UNITED NEGRO COLLEGE FUND The NAACP is the fountainhead, the socio-civic progenitor of us all. Lest we forget, the NAACP is not "those people." The NAACP is we, and we are it! For seventy-three years this organization has represented and protected the interests of the Black American. Also, the NATIONAL URBAN LEAGUE has served generation after generation of Black Americans in the job market, including the creation of new positions in corporate management. The UNITED NEGRO COLLEGE FUND is the youngest of The Big Three." From its inception until now, the UNCF has been a mainstay in the life of private colleges and universities which are dedicated to educating Black people. Alpha Phi Alpha has recently donated over $600,000 to these three institutions that are so basic to the existence and the success of all of us. Alpha Phi Alpha will unequivocally continue to commit its resources and financial support to these all-important institutions. We urge all other forward-thinking and fair-minded individuals and organizations to support, and wherever possible to engage in their work with them. Support and action are especially needed during this period in American history when Blacks, the elderly, and the poor are the scape-goats of a misguided "federation." THE KU KLUX KLAN AND OTHER RACE-HATE GROUPS The infamy of groups whose very purpose is to malign, persecute, and war against ethnics and minorities can neither be condoned, tolerated, nor ignored. Our country must wake up! It must wake up now. How detestable in the United States and in a world weary of strife and war and persecution that such groups can function. Applications to join the Klan were distributed in the library of a well-known Iowa university during the past school year. In Ohio, two of the mainline fraternities at a major university gave a party on the eve of Martin Luther King's birthday. The partygoers were urged, through fliers circulated on campus, to come depicting Blacks. The suggestions included bringing a bucket of chicken, a radio bigger than your head, a cancelled welfare check, or "Your father . . . if you know who he is." The resurgence of the Ku Klux Klan and other hate groups has spotlighted the damning fact that bigotry and prejudice are nationwide — in the south, in Boston, Connecticut, as well as New York. That membership in the Klan, the neo-Nazis, and such groups is on the rise and that the tactics and flagrant activities of these groups are brought out into the open are stubborn proof that racism is a destructive part of the American character. Group hatred is fostered and developed among all age and economic levels. The increasing responsibility that these groups enjoy and the apparent sanction of the terror and violence they cause reveal a clear and present danger to good human relations in this country. Added to the general attitude of the present executive branch of government, 31


the situation becomes dire and threatening to Black people, Puerto Ricans, and — how can it be escaped — to Jews. We advise the United States to listen. For the good of our country and of the Black and other minorities therein, Alpha Phi Alpha declares that we shall resist this rise in racial bigotry wherever we can, on all fronts. We advise the United States Department of Justice to take immediate and decisive action to stop the emergence and resurgence of these extremist hate groups. More than that, we of Alpha Phi Alpha pledge ourselves, and we urge all Americans who are not ashamed to believe in justice for all, to speak out against those who try to foment their racist, AntiSemitic, and fascist views through scare activities a n d / o r lawless acts. Recognizing as we do (and as any other thinking body will do also) that the recent death of the Black transit authority worker in Brooklyn — death by kicking and beating, by white hoodlums — is the result of prevailing racism and passive tolerance; we further urge enactment of legislation to prohibit the establishing of KKK paramilitary camps in any state. And, we demand that the Department of Defense develop and issue a much more stringent policy against Klan activities in the U.S. Armed Forces. NUCLEAR WAR In June 1982, in New York City, 750,000 people from all over the United States, Canada, and countries extending into the Orient marched up Fifth Avenue into Central Park to protest nuclear arms. The effect was nothing short of a marvel. The hundreds of thousands of marchers were orderly, and they were determined to show to the world that no country, no human beings could win in a nuclear war! (Alpha Phi Alpha was represented among the marchers.) To understate the case, we find our government's strategy on nuclear weapons control quite disturbing. The United States apparently maintains that the best way to discourage use of nuclear arms is to possess a large supply. Such thinking is paranoid, illogical, and unrealistic. It can lead to self-destruction and to a world-wide nuclear holocaust. How frightening it is to know that either by accident or design, civilization could be wiped out, erased, destroyed. The world has witnesssed the outbreak of three separate military actions within the past several months, one of which persists. Wars, of course, threaten world peace and heighten the possibility of a United States-Soviet confrontation. On February 19, 1982, the "Friends Committee on National Legislation" of Washington, D.C., issued a cost-fact sheet which deserves attention. The total contributions which the United States made to United Nations program agencies (excluding the World Bank and IMF) came to over $866 billion. Even such an imposing sum loses its significance, however, when we are further told that 'The Pentagon spends this amount in 1 day, 4 hours, and 46 minutes." By way of further contrast, the United States' contribution to U.N. peace-keeping during the calender year of 1980 was over $59Vi million. Our spending for the military during FY83 will be over $2631/2 billion. That averages out to $502,000 per minute! The manufacture and sale of sophisticated armaments is now an integral part of the budget of many major countries. It is rear "liable to assume that any third-rank nation with a moderate industrial base may very well build its own nuclear arsenal. Already, the world is stocked with nuclear power that exceeds a million of the atomic bombs dropped on Hiroshima. E. Raymond Wilson of the "Friends Committee" cited above, in a letter to Mr. Reagan advises that the President has "unprecedented opportunity" for earning historic high and lasting praise and award "by exerting the kind of statesmanship the world desperately needs now." What Mr. Reagan is urged to do is "Persist in negotiations for the complete elimination of nuclear weapons on both sides of the Iron Curtain in Europe which were started in Geneva, November 30, 1981." The world we are talking about is Alpha Phi Alpha's world, too. We call for sanity and commitment. We insist that our government work toward nuclear arms control, with on-site inspection. The only real goal humankind can have is the elimination of the possibility of nuclear war, which is a technical and sophisticated way of saying human annihilation! 32

BLACK AMERICANS IN THE ARMED FORCES There may be problems ahead — problems which are different from the multitude of difficulties that Blacks in the military have faced for many years. As of June 1982, there were 410,000 Blacks in the U.S. Armed Forces. This figure represents 20% of the Navy's enlisted ranks, 16.5% in the Air Force, and 22% in the Marine Corps." Actually, one out of every three enlisted persons is Black. What will happen, the Brookings Institution queries, if during a war, the majority of American personnel killed from the very outset are Black7 The issues raised by the Brookings Institution cannot be taken lightly. There was much criticism when it became clear during the Vietnam "conflict" that a highly disproportionate number of young American Blacks were killed in combat. Two questions arise: Why is there such a proliferation of Black Americans in the nation's armed forces7 and is our country so positively divided that fighting units must be composed ethnically? As for Black representation, economic conditions are a persistent and stubborn factor. Frequently, poor and unemployed Black men and women enter the military because it is the "employer of last resort." How brittle and bitter is the irony of American racism. This Fraternity urges the nation to be aware of the dangers that divisiveness and unfair treatment evokes, on any and all levels. Specifically Alpha Phi Alpha advises that a fair racial and economic climate will make the U.S. Armed Services more democratically proportioned than the Brookings Institution's findings indicate. When will we Americans ever understand that United, We Stand; Divided, . . . EDUCATION: DRUGS, TUITION TAX CREDITS, BLACK COLLEGES DRUGS: Education is perhaps more essential to a democracy than to any other form of community living. Free people make choices for themselves. Sometimes, to do what the crowd does is the popular choice. So free people must be informed. Drug abuse in the United States has reached epidemic proportions. Street sales are now estimated at 35 billion dollars annually. As many as 17 million Americans have experimented with cocaine (according to the National Institute of Drug Abuse). The recent revelations by National Football League players remind us again that careers and lives can be and are ruined by drug use. Alpha Phi Alpha pleads with its younger Brothers — indeed, with all young people — to control temptation and to use common sense. The mind is simply too precious to destroy with drugs. We call upon our educational systems from grade one through college, to develop aggressive programs for teaching young people the consequences of drug use. We call upon the Church, the press, and appropriate social agencies to renew attempts to reach the adult population. We know that the international drug traffic can be curbed by a more vigilant use of specially trained American military forces. Economic pressures and emotional barrenness conspire to dupe the underprivileged. Alpha Phi Alpha insists that youths be correctly informed — beforehand; and that the adult population be cautioned as much as possible. TUITION TAX CREDITS: Ironically, at a time during which the nation's public school systems are experiencing financial crises resulting from Mr. Reagan's attempt to reduce the Federal budget, some politicians are seeking a new massive expenditure in the form of tax credits for private school tuition. These proposals may sound reasonable and noble but are, in effect, veiled attempts to weaken this nation's historical commitment to public education. Public tax funds may not be provided for the support of nonpublic educational institutions. However, partial repayment of tuition to parents of children attending non-public schools would really be a federal subsidy for those schools. Consequently, any proposal to grant tuition tax credits seems to be constitutionally unsound. If tuition tax credits were enacted into law, it is likely that many students would transfer to private schools. The result would be a loss of state funds for public institutions, since they are largely funded from state revenues, on the basis of student attendance. The Sphinx / Fall 1982


Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity, in accord with this nation's heritage, maintains that there should be an even greater federal role in support of public education than there is at present. In a democracy, citizens must have equal educational opportunities. And since the majority of students who attend the private institutions come from families with above-average income, to ferret off dollars from the needy public to the private institution would result in further distress to the poor, the learning-disabled, and the emotionally and physically handicapped - with the net result of further socio-economic and racial isolation. This Fraternity is opposed to any legislation designed to provide tax credits for tuition paid to any private elementary or secondary school. We are emphatically against reducing federal aid to public education while at the same time adding a new expenditure to private and parochial schools. We wish to make it clear that we neither criticize nor oppose non-discriminatory private or parochial schools which provide an alternative to public education. Parents have the right to choose the kind of school their children shall attend. But again, we emphasize that the Federal Government must not subsidize this choice. To do so would be detrimental to our national system of free public education. To do so would be undemocratic. BLACK COLLEGES: The Black college has survived throughout the years. It began at a time during which only a very few Black youngsters were able to enter the nation's white institutions, all, of course, north of the Mason-Dixon line. As integration has spread from the successful achievements of the Civil Rights Movement of the '60s, Black colleges have naturally lost many potentially good students to larger institutions. They have lost faculty people also. Albeit, many of our Black colleges have passed the 100-year mark. They have met accreditation requirements, have provided a quality education that prepared many of their graduates to achieve distinction in their fields of endeavor, and have inspired and given a new way of life to thousands. In spite of tremendous handicaps, Black colleges have overcome prejudices and other obstacles to make worthy contributions in about every phase and stratum of American - that is, of human endeavor. Alpha Phi Alpha proudly, and without apology, proclaims in favor of the Black college. The accomplishments of these institutions not only justify, but actually demand their full inclusion as an integral part in America's higher educational system. BUSINESS ENCOURAGEMENT AND DEVELOPMENT Business enterprise remains the foundation of the American economic system. In spite of the wide and varied accomplishments of American Blacks, we have not made anything that approximates an inroad into the business development of this country. Yet, until we do, we shall never really be free of the stigma of second class citizenship. Alpha Phi Alpha's 'BUSINESS ENCOURAGEMENT PROGRAM" has been on the Fraternity's agenda for a number of years. A few chapters have active programs in business development, but most of us have no well-defined nor formal program. This Fraternity goes on record as firmly endorsing and actively working to foster business development in our communities. We must conduct seminars and workshops on business management and capital investment. We must make Black people aware of the fact that Black business men and women make contributions to their communities through entrepreneurial efforts. As recently as July 18, 1982, William F. Buckley, Jr., writing under the caption "Making Black Dollars Work for Black People," New York Daily News, reminds his readers that "ChineseAmericans living in New York did 95% of their business with other Chinese-Americans, thus helping . . . to capitalize ChineseAmerican enterprises. By contrast, Blacks in New York have tended to give their business (save to undertakers and beauty salons) to whites." This practice is far too universal. Alpha Phi Alpha encourages its younger Brothers, as well as other talented young men and women, to consider careers in business management. Financial service marketing, communications, computer service:., and accounting will afford management opportunities during the '80s. We urge secondary school educators

The Sphinx/Fall 1982

to steer young men and women of ability to these fields. Finally, we encourage Blacks who have gained experience in well-run majority enterprises to establish businesses of their own. Alpha Phi Alpha calls on the appropriate agencies of the Federal Government, such as the Small Business Administration, Department of Commerce, and the Office of Minority Business Enterprises to assist in these endeavors. FEDERAL REGULATORY CONCERNS - HEALTH It is rather extensively believed that the "de-regulation activities" of the Reagan Administration are causing the American people to lose the protection which these regulations were designed to provide; hence the health of millions of American citizens is being placed in jeopardy. Though big business profits, millions of citizens are being denied basic health protection which America can and should provide for them. Alpha is opposed to any deregulation plan which will jeopardize the health of human beings in order to provide greater profits for big business! THE ELDERLY The elderly citizens of this nation have enough pressures on them without the added frustrations of the confusion about the social security system. The Social Security Administration seeks to gain permission to scrutinize the income tax records of the elderly for the sole purpose of determining their eligibility for supplemental security income benefits. The Social Security Administration boldly threatens to withhold Social Security checks of elderly persons for failure to reimburse overpayments of supplemental security income. Alpha Phi Alpha strongly condemns these threatening strong-arm tactics. We favor a strong Social Security system. We reaffirm the belief that the United States has a moral obligation to support the elderly citizens and to strengthen their self-esteem. At one time, aging was a beautiful ascension into a state of peace and contentment, but today it is more of a descent into a state of increasing indignities. We strongly support the right of the elderly to be able to live out their lives in security and comfort, honor and respect. We therefore urge that greater attention be given to the elderly and their plight. THE REAGAN ADMINISTRATION'S LACK OF COMMITMENT TO CIVIL RIGHTS Alpha Phi Alpha wholeheartedly concurs with the United States Commission on Civil Rights that the 1983 Federal Civil Rights Enforcement Budget Proposal indicates "an increasingly passive role for Federal Civil Rights Enforcement Agencies." Thus, "unresolved civil rights problems will remain, and victims of discrimination will be less likely to obtain prompt and effective relief under the policies in the budget submitted to Congress." Here, again, it is demonstrated that the present administration is anti-Civil Rights! The budget proposes to reduce the spending power for Civil Rightes enforcement by 25%, in 5 major agencies: the Departments of (1) Education, (2) Health and Human Services, (3) Justice, (4) Labor, and (5) Equal Employment Opportu...cy Commission. Alpha Phi Alpha urges the Congress of the United States not to approve of this budget which is obviously a barrier to the programs of Civil Rights for all Americans. We further urge fair-minded citizens to make their opinions known to their Congressmen. HUMAN RIGHTS AND SOUTH AFRICA The position that the United States maintains in world affairs and all that our country stands for demand that America take a hard look at the continuing dehumanizing apartheid system of South Africa. At times, it is quite distressing to observe some of our government's actions within the State Department and in the United Nations; for it would all but appear that the Reagan Administration, for both financial and political reasons, is shrewdly maneuvering toward an alliance with South Africa! We trust that the signs are misleading. 33


Alpha Phi Alpha appeals to the Reagan Administration to use its influence to cause American corporations doing business with South Africa to support equal employment opportunities for the South African Black majority. We further appeal to our government to reconstruct its South African policies in line with this country's own concept of human rights. How proud we are that Congressman William H. Gray III, an Alpha Brother, was successful in winning passage of his bill "banning new investment in South Africa by U.S. firms." THE HAITIAN REFUGEES What the United States has done with these refugees is indeed well-known. Many Americans have publicly — and in the courts — expressed strong opposition to the tragic plight of these Haitian people. They have suffered the indignities, unfortunately, because these immigrants are poor, black, of limited education, with rural backgrounds. We must not forget that Haitian mothers with their children were drowned off the coast of Florida. In some cases, the criminals who were smuggling them into this country deliberately tossed them overboard. The survivors who did arrive were immediately put into concentration camps — because they were "not properly documented." Contrast this treatment to that given white refugees — Russian Jews, Polish exiles, the generally fair-skinned Cubans, and Asians. We cannot undo the wrongs which continue to be imposed on these human beings who, as is true of so many others who have become Americans, are seeking freedom. But our government can right the wrongs by ending them immediately. To do so is the only moral course we have. THE BLACK FAMILY The basic unit of any body of people is the family. It is, therefore, unfortunate that economic stress, emotional instability, ego retaliation, and a variety of other causes have contributed to the difficulty of the American Black family. We are told that more than 71% of urban, poor Black families are headed by a single parent, almost always, the mother. The overwhelming statistics concerning crime, poverty, teen-age mothers, drug addiction, and related pathologies can be traced in part to the breakdown of the Black family. The Congressional Black Caucus, after careful study, has published The Black Leadership Family Plan, for the Unity, Survival, and Progress of Black People. It unequivocally states at the outset that Black people themselves must take the responsibility for self-improvement and uplift. It then calls upon Blacks in positions of leadership — especially social, fraternal, and Greek-letter associations to engage actively in restoring family to its needed place. Alpha Phi Alpha determines to use its strengths in this basic, important area. As William Haskins of the National Urban League says, "Black fraternities and sororities, the Elks and Masons, Black doctors and lawyers . . . have got to come back to the inner city and volunteer to work person-to-person with young Blacks." CONCERNING THE YOUNG BLACK MALE Tee shirts tell us almost everything these days. Recently, a young Black male was wearing a shirt which said: 'Take Good Care of Me, Black Males Are An Endangered Species." The remark is only half in jest. In January 1982, U.S. News and World Report carried a long feature article entitled, "Black Teenagers Without Jobs: Time Bomb for U.S." The jobless rate among Blacks, from 16-19, was 42.2%. That means that there were three hundred fortyfour thousand (344,000) youths seeking work but unable to find it. The article, which was ominous in tone, featured several actual photos of jobless Black males hanging out in the streets. One cannot read the newspapers without constantly being informed about police officers killing some Black youth. Quite recently, it appears that a Black male's life may be in danger if he stops in certain white ethnic neighborhoods to buy foodl Conversely, the press — c.f. the New York Daily News — frequently publicizes photos of Black criminal suspects. A vicious cycle is perpetuated. 34

Recently, five young males went on a weekend rampage of rape, robbery, etc., in a swank Nassau County (NY) suburb. Although they were immediately apprehended, one doesn't have to be a wizard to recognize that the time bomb is ticking louder and louder. The tale is dreary and continuous. Black on black crime is far worse than most would imagine. Drug addiction, jail terms, unemployment, the high school dropout rate are all ills that are surely killing Black males, even if not so suddenly as a bullet or a knife. Black males are our life-blood. They are our future. While many of our fine young Black men go into college and make something of themselves, the percentage is far less than that of the Jewish, Irish, or Japanese-American ethnic grouping. Alpha Phi Alpha will develop a plan of action that will rescue young Black men — even from themselves. The alternative is slow but sure genocide. A NATIONAL HOLIDAY HONORING DR. MARTIN LUTHER KING, JR. So outstanding a national hero with such far-reaching international influence; the miracle of a man who taught non-violence in the very face of violence; the idealist whose vision he himself translated into a challenging and workable philosophy; and an articulate and sympathetic human being who felt the causes for the righteous and understood and did not condemn the unrighteous; one whose beliefs, words, and actions epitomized what the United States proudly professes to be all about: all men are free — equality and justice for all — the right to the pursuit of happiness by all human beings . . . a Black man who grew up in a segregated land and who conquered it by being the catalyst that bonded good people (and to him there was no color line) together — why history must surely ask, WHY DID IT TAKE SO LONG FOR THE UNITED STATES TO HONOR ITSELF BY HONORING MARTIN LUTHER KING, JR., THE EPITOME OF DEMOCRACY IN SO CRUCIAL A TIME? Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity believes that MARTIN LUTHER KING DAY will make all Americans examine their consciences and re-dedicate themselves, eventually, to the principles of peace and justice for all mankind.

The opportunity for greatness is thrust upon us: • We must organize neighborhood after neighborhood for registering and voting! m We must always support the NAACP, the URBAN LEAGUE, the UNCF with our money, our participation, and our vision! • We must popularize the infamy of the Ku Klux Klan and other race-hatred groups to awaken and strengthen the conscience of an America that believes in principles! m We must keep a steady stream of letters to the press, to keep before all readers what yet needs to be done, and to expose local wrongs as they occur! • We must keep President Reagan and the United States Congress informed on what they can do to improve American life! • We must insist that our schools prepare the young to avoid pitfalls such as drugs and crime! m We must face the stubborn fact that the oppressed cannot rely on racism as a crutch! • We must genuinely encourage bright young women and men to seek careers in business! Perhaps the biggest task of all is that • We must make all people we come in touch with aware that each one of them is a dignified being and owes his or her first debt to self: TO BE SOMEBODY! • We must also somehow accelerate America's discovery of its own conscience!!! THIS IS THE ROLE OF ALPHA PHI ALPHA. The Sphinx/Fall 1982


THE STRUGGLE CONTINUES Continued from Page 15 like, Harriet Tubman, Fred Douglas, W. E. B. DuBois, Booker Washington, James Weldon Johnson, Mary Bethune, Paul Robeson, Martin Luther King, Charles Wesley and Raymond Cannon Continued the Struggle. In rare moments of reflection, I muse over the progress and changes that I have witnessed. I reflect on the life of a sharecropping son of a widowed mother of eight children who dared to aspire where hope died unborn. Because of the dedication and struggle led by Alphamen, that Black boy grew up to serve as special assistant to a governor and sit in judgment over the fate of the plantation owner on whose "place" he was born. When I was serving as special assistant to the late Winthrop Rockefeller, Governor of Arkansas, the plantation owner on whose place I was born came to see the governor seeking disaster assistance due to a devastating flood that hit his county and farms. The governor was out of town and I had to pass judgment on his eligibility for assistance. I make this personal reference only to indicate the progress and change this generation has experienced upon the extreme sacrifices of our fathers. 1 would not want to live in another age if I could. I have lived through the period of lynching, injustice, deprivation, humiliation and segregation. I am thankful to God that I have been a part of the struggle for freedom and justice. I was a part of the struggle in Little Rock in 1957 and '58, when we fought to desegregate Central High School. I walked the streets of Birmingham, the lonely road from Montgomery to Selma, stood among the throng of the march on Washington when Martin unveiled his "I Have a Dream." I sat in the auditorium in Memphis in 1968 when Brother King made his famous "I've Been to the Mountain Top" speech and was at the Loraine Hotel when his life was snuffed out by an assassin's bullet. I don't believe that any generation of our race has been blessed with participation in the making of history in such diverse ways as this generation of The Sphinx/Fall 1982

Alpha men. Few people even in this generation have been so blessed as I and I shall be eternally grateful. But my gratitude should not and will not encourage lethargy and apathy. Nor should the progress, advantages, advances and comforts which Alpha men enjoy because of training and station in life lull them into callous indifference and passiveness. Let Alpha sound the alarm that "The Struggle Continues." Let me but cite a few reminders that "The Struggle Continues." If the 30,000,000 Blacks in America constituted a separate nation, it would be the second largest Black nation in the world. Only Nigeria has a larger population. There are 152 nations whose population is smaller than Black America. On the American Continent, only three nations are larger. They include "White America" with 185 million, Brazil with 91 million and Mexico with 45 million. However, with all that potential, we only have 4,112 Black elected officials out of a total of 490,265. There are only 18 Black Congresspersons out of 535; 205 Black mayors out of 134,017; no U.S. Senators or governors, all of this despite the fact that there are 480 cities whose Black population exceeds 51 percent of the total. Black Americans receive less than four percent of the doctorate degrees in the United States despite the fact that we are nearly 12 percent of the total population. We comprise less than 1.5 percent of the lawyers and judges, three percent of all the physicians, 2.2 percent of the nation's dentists and only one percent of all the engineers. It is distressing, my Brothers, that if all of a sudden we were a separate nation it would have to be characterized as undeveloped and backward. It would not have enough engineers to build its roads or bridges, nor enough doctors to attend the sick, nor enough lawyers to support a system of justice. I could go on and on with dismal statistics and conditions. I think, though, that I have said enough to remind you that "The Struggle Continues" and that our achievements fall far short of the tremendous needs of our people. Now I know that Alpha, as great and as committed as it is, cannot treat or cure all of the ills or problems of Black America. But in the words of a famous quotation, "We cannot do everything, but we can do something. And what we can do, by the grace of God, we shall do."

Alpha can give leadership to the legitimate hopes and aspirations of Black America. Alpha can promote programs to inspire Black youth to develop their talents to their highest potential. Alpha can fight for their right to exist and develop and to use their talents without the encumbering barrier of racism. Alpha can lead the charge in this nation for justice, for freedom and for human dignity. Alpha can give rise to a sense of unity among Black Americans and promote efforts of networking among their many dedicated organizations so as to establish a sense of purpose, dedication and commitment to the common good. To give the type leadership required the Fraternity must: 1) Strengthen the Brotherhood and puts its House in order; 2) Promote and implement a strong and effective outreach program to serve the needs of Black America. I see an Alpha that has oneness in purpose, oneness in direction and oneness in fraternal love. I see a Fraternity from which oneness in brotherly love emanates and spreads out to "love for all mankind." To strengthen the Brotherhood on the national level three significant steps have been taken: 1. Reclamation: A Reclamation Committee has been appointed to design and implement a reclamation program of reclaiming the Brothers and enlisting them in the fight for justice. 2. Financial Review: A Financial Overview Committee has been appointed to review the financial structure with a view toward establishing equity between life membership payments and grand tax. The committee will also do an actuarial study of the life membership program related to our investments as well as long term funding. 3. New Alpha Headquarters: One of the most glaring needs of the Fraternity is a decent headquarters for itself. I think that I can make that statement among Alpha men without one voice of dissent. You will be asked during this convention to adopt a proposal to raise $1.5 million in three years for the construction of a headquarters. The plan will call for an assessment on each Alpha man to be solicited by each chapter. Quotas will be set by regions, down to states, and down to chapters. Brothers, I call for and urge an enthuContinued on Page 36 35


THE STRUGGLE CONTINUES Continued from Page 35 siastic acceptance of this proposal and for a commitment to build a headquarters. We need the type commitment of the children of Israel when they started to rebuild the Temple — for, according to the Holy Writ, "They were of a mind to work." "If I am not for myself," reads a famous quotation, "then who shall be for me? But if I am only for myself, then what am I?" The Seven Jewels not only pulled themselves together to survive in a hostile climate but they sought the survival of other students, especially the Black ones who suffered the same discrimination that they suffered. Since its founding Alpha has been reaching out. "Mourn not the dead but rather mourn that apathetic throng, the coward and the meek who see the world's great anguish and its pains and will not speak." The author of this quotation is unknown but it addresses adequately the Alpha philosophy. Alpha will continue to speak to the needs of the poor and deprived. It will cry out against discrimination and racism. It will be a trumpeter for justice. In a role of leadership the Fraternity has adopted and initiated implementation of "The New Alpha Thrust" Program to Continue the Struggle:

1. Leadership Development - Citizenship Education — Sponsor a Leadership Training - Citizenship Education Institute in each of its five regions. These institutes will instruct Black boys and girls in public speaking, parliamentary procedures, Black heritage, group dynamics, community organization, governmental structures, self-actualization, etc. 2. Promote programs of youth motivation, youth employment, business encouragement, education and support for Black colleges, etc. The Fraternity will develop and sponsor employment conferences in 25 select cities across the nation in an effort to impact on the high incidents of unemployment among Black Americans.

1. Appointed a Social Action Committee to plan and direct our efforts for the maximum results. 2. Appointed a committee to study the impact of Reaganomics upon the Black community, so that the Fraternity can speak from an authoritative position in fighting cuts in the "people to people" programs of our Federal budget. I have listed but a few of the programs in our national efforts to give leadership to the legitimate hopes and aspirations of Black America as well as the poor, deprived and powerless Americans. We will do more. We must do more.

SOCIAL ACTION Alpha will increase its efforts in social action so as to exert a strong influence on the nation's decisionmaking, especially as decisions impact on the Black community. As a member of the Executive Committee of the Leadership Conference on Civil Rights, I participated in directing and coordinating the Black struggle to extend the Voting Rights Act. Passage of that legislation was a sweet, sweet victory for the united efforts of Black Americans and all Americans who advocate political justice. Alpha alone generated thousands of letters, petitions and phone calls in support of the measure. We have due pride in our efforts for they clearly demonstrate the power we have when we mobilize. To further our social action efforts and render them more successful, I have —

"The Struggle Continues," my Brothers. The Struggle Continues . . . until the measure of a man will be his ability, not his race. The Struggle Continues . . . until there are no double standards in housing, in education and in the use of public facilities. The Struggle Continues . . . until the old and the infirm do not suffer pain due to the lack of good medical care nor experience hunger because of inadequate income. The Struggle Continues . . . until the scourge of poverty, illiteracy and pain are erased from the land. The Struggle Continues . . . until the ugly head of racism will no longer be raised to divide our people and deny Blacks equal justice and equity. The Struggle Continues. The Struggle Continues. The Struggle Continues!

GIVE. The Alpha Phi Alpha Million Dollar Fund Drive. See Page 11 for ways you can give.

36

ftgfc; The Sphinx/Fall 1982


Brother WARREN HASIB ALI, a member of the Alpha Alpha Chapter, took office as President of the United Black Association (UBA) at the University of Cincinnati in May, 1982. Brother Ali is a native of Toledo, Ohio and a graduate of Jesup W. Scott High School. While there he was a member of the National Honor Society, received two letters for Varsity Football, served as Homecoming King, and was elected Senior Class President and "Most Likely to Succeed" by his classmates. Also, Brother Ali participated in Junior Achievement and was recognized as an outstanding science student. He received the University of Michigan Honor Trophy Award and is listed in Who's Who Among American High School Students and the Society of Distinguished American High School Students.

Brother Warren Hasib Ali Brother Ali is a senior majoring in Chemical Engineering. He is a member of the American Institute of Chemical Engineers and the National Society of Black Engineers (NSBE). He has served as High School Tours Chairperson and is presently the Chapter Executive Student Advisor and Region IV Co-Vice Chairperson for NSBE. He was recognized by NSBE for scholastic achievement (highest GPA for juniors) at their annual banquet in May, 1982. Brother Ali has been an extremely active member of Double A since his initiation on May 12, 1979. He has served as Sphinx Club President, VicePresident and Assistant Dean of Pledgees. He is presently concluding his second one-year term as President and will serve as Dean of Pledgees for

Double A's Fall '82 line. Also, he has participated in intramural football and basketball for the chapter. Brother Ali has not restricted his activities to the fraternity only. He will be entering his third year as a resident advisor in the U.C. Residence Halls this fall. He has served as Parliamentarian and Open Rush Chairperson for the Alliance of Black Greek Letter Organizations, Advisor for Minority Affairs of Sander Hall and executive council member for the Interfraternity Council (IFC). Brother Ali served as a Justice for the IFC Judicial Board which ruled on the Sigma Alpha Epsilon incident at U.C. during Winter '82. Brother Ali takes the lead of UBA after its best year aspiring to surpass last year's accomplishments by increasing membership to 1,000, motivating more membership input, securing quality speakers, increasing community involvement and, most importantly, becoming more politically active. If there is a man to lead UBA in surpassing last year's accomplishments, Brother Ali is that man — an Alpha Man!

Brother JAMES B. BL ANTON, Executive Secretary of Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity, Inc., has been the recipient of several honors during the past few months: At the 101st Session of the United Supreme Council, Ancient and Accepted Scottish Rite of Freemasonry (Prince Hall Affiliation), Northern Jurisdiction, U.S.A., Inc., held in Freeport, Bahamas, the title of "Illustrious Inspector General" was conferred upon him upon his elevation to the 33rd and last degree of Masonry — the highest honor a Mason can obtain (and at the tender age of 33). At the 89th Annual Session of the Imperial Council, Ancient Egyptian Arabic Order of the Nobles of the Mystic Shrine, held in Denver, Colorado, he was nominated for the honorary "Past Potentate" Degree — one of the highest honors bestowed upon Shriners — and will receive it at the 90th Annual Session in St. Louis, Missouri, in 1983. At the Annual Meeting of the Chicago Society for Children & Families (one of Chicago's largest headstart day care services}, the Board of Directors unanimously voted to 37


Brother lames B. Blanton name its newly-acquired facility, 'The James B. Blanton Headstart Day Care Center." The dedication ceremony for this structure is imminent. Brother Blanton serves on the Board of Directors of this city-wide community organization. The "Grand Master's Special Recognition Award" was presented at the 116th Grand Session of the Most Worshipful Prince Hall Grand Lodge, Free and Accepted Masons, State of Illinois.

NEW ORLEANS

77th Anniversary Convention 1983 38

Mu Chi Lambda's Brother of the Year, C. R. Bradford (right), presents chapter scholarships to Theresa Jones (left) and Tracy Hopkins (center).

ME± Brother C. R. BRADFORD, is Brother of the Year with Mu Chi Lambda for the 1981-82 fraternal year. Bradford was elected Brother of the Year not only because of his devotion to education — employed as the Assistant Principal at Glenview Jr. High School in East Moline, Illinois and currently working on his Doctorate degree at the State University of Iowa in Iowa City, Iowa — but for his devotion to family, community, and fraternity. Among his community involvements are United Way's New Programs Committee and the Martin Luther King Center's Advisory Board. He is an active member in both Phi Delta Kappa and the Metro-Corn Branch NAACP; and has also worked with the A. Phillip Randolph Youth Development Committee and acted as a facilitator for the Quad Cities Conference on Black Families. A Brother deeply rooted in Alphadom, since being initiated at Tau Chapter in 1968, Brother Curly R. Bradford has been affiliated with a total of three chapters, two of which he has assisted in founding. He has served as President of Mu Chi Lambda for a total of three terms, two terms consecutively, never missed a state

conference and currently serves as Western Regional Director for the State of Illinois. He has attended six regional conventions and two national conventions. C. R. Bradford, the driving force behind Mu Chi Lambda, was a unanimous choice for Brother of the Year.

Brother GEORGE M. BROWN has made Alpha "first" again — becoming the first Black (and Alpha) elected to the 88th District State Representative Seat of the Georgia House of Representatives on August 10, 1982 in the Democratic Primary. Brother Brown is a lifelong resident of Augusta, Georgia. Brother Brown began his Alpha activities during his initiation into Gamma Omicron Chapter at Knoxville College, under the tutorship of Brother James 'Tiny" Blanton, our Executive Secretary. Brother Brown was affiliated with Gamma Beta and Beta Theta Lambda Chapters, while attending law school at North Carolina Central University and was instrumental in establishing Eta Alpha Chapter at Paine College during the spring of 1970. Alpha Chi Lambda gave Brother Brown an award for meritorious service because of his dedicated effort and total devotion to Eta Alpha. Since his The Sphinx/Fall 1982


Brother George M. Brown

return to Augusta, Brother Brown has served as Dean of Pledges of Alpha Chi Lambda Chapter and has received several honors for his service.

Brother J. C. DAUGHERTY, SR., an Atlanta attorney and graduate of Clark College, retained his seat in the Georgia House of Representatives of the Georgia General Assembly in the August 10 Georgia primary election. Daugherty, a 16-year veteran in the Georgia House, will represent House District 33, which was reapportioned in the General Assembly Special Session last year. Brother Daugherty was first elected to the House of Representatives in 1965 and was seated in 1966. His last opposition for his seat was in 1976. Chairman of the House Special Judiciary Committee, the 1948 Clark College graduate received 2,842 of the 3,812 votes cast in the 17 precincts represented in District 33. Daugherty had said in his reelection campaign that his experience in the House would make the difference in meaningful change and continued success. Since elected to the House of Representatives, Daugherty has been appointed to the Appropriations Committee that administers a budget of more than three billion dollars. He is subcommittee chairman of the Appropriations Committee for the Courts, Legislature and Department of Administrative Services. In 1972, Daugherty was appointed to serve on the House Policy Committee by Speaker of the House Thomas The Sphinx/Fall 1982

Murphy. It was the first time a Black had been selected to the committee. Daugherty has sponsored legislation involving consumer protection, abolition of the death penalty, funding for Grady Memorial Hospital and a million dollar appropriation for training Blacks and other minorities to successfully take the Georgia State Merit System and Civil Service examinations. One of the highlights in his career has been the sponsoring of the Fair Employment Practices Act, designed to eliminate discrimination in employment based on race, color, creed, sex, age, national origin and the handicapped. The legislation was passed in 1978 and helped establish a Fair Employment Practice Office, now headed by a Black director. In addition to a Bachelor's degree from Clark, Daugherty has a law degree from Howard University in Washington, D.C. He is a member of the Clark College Board of Trustees, the Georgia & American Trial Lawyers Association, Gate City Bar Association and General Counsel for the General Missionary Baptist Convention of Georgia, Inc. While attending Clark College, Daugherty was President of Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity, Alpha Phi Chapter; as well as Panther Newspaper and Yearbook editor.

m

Brother ERIC T. DAY, SR., is the son of Mr. & Mrs. Joseph Day of Mobile, Alabama. He was a graduate of Toulminville High School in 1971, in which he also attended the Upward Bound Program during the summer months at Springhill College in 1970-71. He is a member of the Greater Morning Star Baptist Church in which he is a very diligent worker and held office as the president of the Young Adult Usher Board. As a college student, Eric T. began his college work at the University of South Alabama, in Mobile in 1971 with a major in Criminal Justice Administration and a minor in Political Science. Eric T. was then inducted into the United States Army in 1971 where he served his country and furthered his education through the University of Maryland. Eric T. returned home to complete his education as a student at the University of South Alabama. He remained active in a number of campus and community organizations in which he became a member of the Alpha

Brother Eric T. Day, Sr.

Sigma National Criminal Honor Society; the Lambda Alpha Epsilon, American Criminal Justice Association. Eric T. became a member of the Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity, Inc. on May 30, 1975. Since becoming a member of Theta Delta Chapter, he has received the Alpha Phi Alpha Man of the Year Award for 1976-77. Eric T. held office as Treasurer. Eric T. was elected as President of the Black Student Union in 1975-77 and received a certificate in appreciation for his outstanding leadership. In 1977 Eric T. received an award for his Scholastic Excellence in Criminal Justice Administration, and also in Political Science. He is also a member of Omicron Delta Kappa. Eric T. was also chosen to Who's Who Among College Students. Eric T. received his Bachelor of Arts degree from the University of South Alabama in 1977, in which he went on to attend graduate school and obtain his Master's degree in Guidance & Counseling. Eric T. is presently employed with the Mobile County Sheriff Department where he is the Director and Counselor of the Mobile County Work Release Program. Eric T. completed a course at Faulker State Jr. College in 1979 for the Law Enforcement Officers Training School.

Brother SAMUEL L. EURE, Colonel, U.S. Army, is currently serving as the Project Manager for the U.S. Army Smoke / Obscurants Program, Aberdeen Proving Ground (APG), Maryland. As project manager, he is respon39


Brother Samuel L. Eure sible for the research, development, acquisition, fielding and readiness of all smoke / obscurant munitions and material used by U.S. Army forces. Brother Eure is one of about fifty Senior Army Officers who are selected by Headquarters, Department of the Army, to manage key research, development and acquisition programs for the Secretary of the Army. Similar to other Army project managers, Brother Eure's mission and responsibilities are set forth in a Secretarial Charter which is personally signed by the Secretary of the Army. Brother Eure is directly responsible for managing and administering a fifty-one million dollar annual program as a part of the U.S. Army Armament Research and Development effort. Receiving this assignment in June 1979, upon graduation from the U.S. Army War College (the senior level institution for education and training of Army officers), he is currently the only Black Army officer in the key position of Project Manager. A native of Portsmouth Virginia, Brother Eure was educated in the Portsmouth public schools. He attended Virginia State University, Petersburg, Virginia and earned a B.S. degree in Chemistry in 1956. Brother Eure was initiated into Beta Gamma Chapter during his stay at Virginia State University. His military training began in college in the Reserve Officers Training Corps (ROTC) and in May 1956, Brother Eure was commissioned as a Second Lieutenant, U.S. Army Chemical Corps. His assignments have taken him to various parts of the 40

United States, West Germany and South Vietnam. In 1964, the U.S. Army selected Brother Eure to attend graduate school, full-time, for a two-year period at Army's expense. In June 1966, he earned a M.S. degree in Physics at the U.S. Naval Postgraduate School, Monterey, California and was also certified as a Nuclear Effects Engineer by the Defense Nuclear Agency. Additional graduate training led to the awarding of the Army Skill Identifier, as an Operations Research Analyst. During his twenty-six year military career, Brother Eure has earned many service medals and awards. He has served in a variety of positions ranging from Troop Commander, Research and Development Test Officer, Staff College faculty member to Headquarters, Department of the Army Staff Officer, Pentagon. During 1976-78, Brother Eure, then a Lieutenant Colonel, served as Commander, Holston Army Ammunition Depot and Plant, Kingsport, Tennessee. His performance as Commander and Senior Active Army Representative in the Upper East Tennessee area was deemed worthy of special recognition by Tennessee officials. On March 27, 1978, he was cited for outstanding performance as Holston's Commander by the State of Tennessee House of Representatives, House Joint Resolution No. 502. He was the first Black commander of Holston during its 40 year history and was the first to receive such acclaim from Tennessee state officials. During Brothe Eure's twenty-seven years in the "House of Alpha," he has lived by the principle of "maximum service to mankind." He has been and continues to be active in the civic, social and religious activities of the many communities in which he has lived. He has received numerous awards and recognitions for his service contributions. His most recent recognition was given in February 1982 at the Iota Alpha Lambda Chapter's Sixteenth Founder's Day celebration where he received the chapter's "Man of the Year Award" 1981-82. In addition to the demanding responsibilities of an Army Project Manager, Brother Eure is serving with distinction as the chapter's Dean of Pledges and Chairman of the Reclamation Committee. Over the past 15 months, the active membership in Iota Alpha Lambda has grown from fifteen to twenty-five. He states that the most satisfying event of his fraternal association with the chapter was the initiation

of seven new Brothers in October 1981. This line of seven outstanding men, who appropriately adopted the name "Golden Seven," was a unique and distinct achievement for the chapter. Brother Eure is of the Baptist faith. He is presently on the Usher Staff of the APG Protestant Chapel and serves as a volunteer for the APG Chapel Coffee House Ministry, an activity which provides an alternative weekend social and religious activity for soldiers stationed at APG. He is married to the former Vernell Joyce Brown of Norfolk, Virginia and they are the proud parents of two children. A son, First Lieutenant Samuel L. Eure, Jr., is stationed in West Germany, and a daughter, Karen L. Eure, is a junior at Hampton Institute, Hampton, Virginia, where she is a Dean's List Student (3.6 average) and an Alpha Sweetheart for Gamma Iota Chapter.

In what was truly an extraordinary session of Pine Bluff City Council, held June 25, 1982, at P. J.'s Disco Lounge, Highway 79-North, the city's community was renamed the Chester Hynes Community Center — in honor of Brother CHESTER HYNES. Bathed in soft glow of flashing disco lights, Mayor Wallis called the council into session before a crowd of more than 400 Pine Bluff residents who had gathered at an Appreciation Dinner to

Brother Chester Hynes The Sphinx / Fall 1982


honor Brother Hynes, a City Alderman from the Second Ward. In addition to Wallis and the council, State Representative Henry Wilkins III, Judge Earl Chadick, Sr., Chief Bobby Norman of the Pine Bluff Police Department, Assistant Chief Harvey Jacks of the Pine Bluff Fire Department and Sheriff W. D. "Dub" Brassell of Jefferson County also presented plaques and other tokens of appreciation. Other speakers included Brother Clifton Roaf, president of the Pine Bluff School Board; Brother H. O. Gray, president of the Pine Bluff chapter of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People; Howell Davis, president of Simmons First National Bank of Pine Bluff; and Calvin Matlock, president of Delta Sigma Lambda Chapter. Davis and other speakers praised Brother Hynes' many years of service — both during his tenure on the faculty of Arkansas AM&N College, now the University of Arkansas at Pine Bluff, and his almost 13 years on the City Council. At times during the dinner the tributes to Hynes assumed the tenor of a "roast," as speaker after speaker lampooned the Alderman's fishing exploits. Undaunted by the attacks upon his fishing skill, however, Brother Hynes rose at the conclusion of the dinner, thanked the crowd and said that the evening was but one of many indications of improving race relations in Pine Bluff. Quoting verses from a current Top 40 song, "Ebony and Ivory" by Paul McCartney and Stevie Wonder, Hynes asked the crowd, "Why can't we live in perfect harmony?" "We may not live in perfect harmony yet," he said, "but from my experience on the council, I can say we are making progress in the right direction." According to Gene Thomason, vice president of the Loan Division at Simmons Bank, about $4,000 was spent on the event. Masters of ceremonies for the event were Brother L. V. Coleman (UAPB) and Robert Dill, vice president of Simmons Marketing Division.

Brother GARVIN S. MAFFETT, [2nd Lt.] (right) speaks with Secretary of Defense Casper Weinberger at the Flag Officers Banquet, saluting the Black generals and admirals of all four services, held in Washington, D.C. Lieutenant Maffett is a Medical SerThe Sphinx/Fall 1982

^ Secretary of Defense, Casper Weiberger and 2nd St. Brother Garvin S. Maffett (right) at Flag Officer Banquet, Washington, D.C.

vices Administrator with the 111th Pennsylvania Air National Guard unit at Willow Grove Naval Air Station and serves also as an Air Force Academy & AFROTC Admissions Officer in the Southeast Pennsylvania area.

m

Brother FREEMAN MONTAGUE, a student at Meharry Medical College, participated in the "Summer 1982 Professional and Student Exchange Program in Africa." The exchange program is under the auspices of Crossroads Africa, Inc., a non-profit organization focusing on international exchange and educational exchange. The group's projects are self-help in nature, focusing on such endeavors as rural health education, clinical medical work, building schools, hospitals and dams and compensatory education. Sonja Kelly, Director of the Crossroads Africa Program, said participants are a highly select group of professionals and students who, from a field of many hundreds of applicants nationwide, are judged to be most outstanding. Brother Montague, a native of West Memphis, Arkansas, was graduated from Wonder High School in 1975 and Arkansas State University, Jonesboro, in 1980. He was named Alpha Phi Alpha's College Brother of the Year in 1980. While at Meharry, he has served as

Brother Freeman Montague

Freshman Class Vice President; Freshman Representative to the Curriculum Committee; Sophomore Class President; and Executive Vice President of the Pre-Alumni Council (equivalent to the SGA). In 1981 he was named a Meharry "Medical Scholar" — becoming one of five medical students, chosen on the basis of academic performance, to tutor entering freshmen during that year. An initiate of Theta Upsilon Chapter at ASU, Brother Montague has been extremely active with Chi Chapter at Meharry — serving as Dean of Probates and Vice President. He will serve this year as the President of Chi Chapter.

Brother CHARLES FREDERICK ROBINSON III, a news reporter from WPEC/TV, West Palm Beach, has recently joined the WCPO / TV-9 news team as a writer / reporter. WCPO is in Cincinnati, Ohio. He began his career in television news in July, 1980 as a news reporter trainee with WWBT/TV, Richmond, Virginia. Before that he was news anchor for one year with Richmond's WTVR AM-FM Radio and a news stringer for WLEE-AM Radio in Richmond. From June 1976 to November 1978, Robinson served as account executive with WENZ-AM Radio in Highland Springs, Virginia. A native Virginian, Robinson is a 1980 graduate of Virginia Common41


Brother Charles Frederick Robinson III

Brother Willie C. Robinson

wealth University where he earned a Bachelor of Science degree in Mass Communications. He was initiated into Theta Rho Chapter at VCU.

Fund; and is a member of the Board of Trustees for the University of Miami. He has been appointed to the Florida Election Commission by the Governor of Florida. Brother Robinson is married and is the father of two sons.

m Brother WILLIE C. ROBINSON, President of Florida Memorial College (Miami, Florida) was recently elected to the Board of Directors of Eastern Air Lines. Dr. Robinson, a native of Dunn, North Carolina, has been President of Florida Memorial College since 1977. In that time the college has undergone tremendous growth in both student enrollment and the physical plant additions. Brother Robinson came to Florida Memorial College from Yale University, where he had served in various positions, including Special Assistant to the President of the university. Brother Robinson is the author of several articles on Black Education including "Black Americans Struggle to Reach Higher Education" published last spring in Black Enterprise. In addition to serving on Eastern's Board of Directors, Brother Robinson also serves on the Boards of Directors of United Way of Greater Miami and the Miami-Dade Water and Sewer Authority; the Board of Governors and the Executive Committee of the Greater Miami Chamber of Commerce; the Southeast Bank Regional Consulting Board; the United Negro College 42

Brother MEZELL WILLIAMS, a former auditor for the City of Chicago, began work on March 1,1982 as Administrative Assistant to Mayor Bill Morris of Waukegan, Illinois. Morris ranked Williams' job as one of nine key appointive posts in Waukegan government. Brother Williams is the first Black to be hired in one of these positions under the Morris administration. Brother Williams holds a Bachelor's degree from Upper Iowa University

Brother Mezell Williams

and a Master of Science degree in Public Service Management from DePaul University in Chicago. Along with his work as a program auditor for Chicago's Department of Human Services, he has also worked as a program monitor for the CETA (Comprehensive Employment and Training Act) Program; a mental health worker; and a drug abuse counselor. He is listed in Who's Who in the Midwest and is one of the U.S. Jaycee's Outstanding Young Men of America. Brother Williams, now a member of Kappa Chi Lambda Chapter in Waukegan / North Chicago, was initiated into Theta Chapter in 1969 and was an active member of Xi Lambda Chapter in Chicago, from 1971 until this year. In Xi Lambda, he served as Parliamentarian and Sergeant-at-Arms, was active on numerous committees, and was honored by the chapter for loyalty and dedication in September of 1981.

GIVE. The Alpha Phi Alpha Million Dollar Fund Drive. See Page 11 for ways you can give.

The Sphinx / Fall 1982


THE STRUGGLE CONTINUES Continued from Page 15 like, Harriet Tubman, Fred Douglas, W. E. B. DuBois, Booker Washington, James Weldon Johnson, Mary Bethune, Paul Robeson, Martin Luther King, Charles Wesley and Raymond Cannon Continued the Struggle. In rare moments of reflection, I muse over the progress and changes that I have witnessed. I reflect on the life of a sharecropping son of a widowed mother of eight children who dared to aspire where hope died unborn. Because of the dedication and struggle led by Alphamen, that Black boy grew up to serve as special assistant to a governor and sit in judgment over the fate of the plantation owner on whose "place" he was born. When I was serving as special assistant to the late Winthrop Rockefeller, Governor of Arkansas, the plantation owner on whose place I was born came to see the governor seeking disaster assistance due to a devastating flood that hit his county and farms. The governor was out of town and I had to pass judgment on his eligibility for assistance. I make this personal reference only to indicate the progress and change this generation has experienced upon the extreme sacrifices of our fathers. I would not want to live in another age if I could. I have lived through the period of lynching, injustice, deprivation, humiliation and segregation. I am thankful to God that I have been a part of the struggle for freedom and justice. I was a part of the struggle in Little Rock in 1957 and '58, when we fought to desegregate Central High School. I walked the streets of Birmingham, the lonely road from Montgomery to Selma, stood among the throng of the march on Washington when Martin unveiled his "I Have a Dream." I sat in the auditorium in Memphis in 1968 when Brother King made his famous "I've Been to the Mountain Top" speech and was at the Loraine Hotel when his life was snuffed out by an assassin's bullet. I don't believe that any generation of our race has been blessed with participation in the making of history in such diverse ways as this generation of The Sphinx/Fall 1982

Alpha men. Few people even in this Alpha can give leadership to the generation have been so blessed as I legitimate hopes and aspirations of and I shall be eternally grateful. But Black America. my gratitude should not and will not Alpha can promote programs to encourage lethargy and apathy. Nor inspire Black youth to develop their should the progress, advantages, talents to their highest potential. advances and comforts which Alpha Alpha can fight for their right to men enjoy because of training and exist and develop and to use their station in life lull them into callous talents without the encumbering barindifference and passiveness. rier of racism. Let Alpha sound the alarm that "The Alpha can lead the charge in this Struggle Continues." Let me but cite a nation for justice, for freedom and for few reminders that "The Struggle human dignity. Continues." Alpha can give rise to a sense of If the 30,000,000 Blacks in America unity among Black Americans and constituted a separate nation, it would promote efforts of networking among be the second largest Black nation in their many dedicated organizations so the world. Only Nigeria has a larger as to establish a sense of purpose, population. There are 152 nations dedication and commitment to the whose population is smaller than Black common good. America. On the American Continent, To give the type leadership required only three nations are larger. They the Fraternity must: 1) Strengthen the include "White America" with 185 Brotherhood and puts its House in million, Brazil with 91 million and order; 2) Promote and implement a Mexico with 45 million. strong and effective outreach program However, with all that potential, we to serve the needs of Black America. only have 4,112 Black elected officials I see an Alpha that has oneness in out of a total of 490,265. There are purpose, oneness in direction and only 18 Black Congresspersons out of oneness in fraternal love. I see a Frater535; 205 Black mayors out of 134,017; nity from which oneness in brotherly no U.S. Senators or governors, all of love emanates and spreads out to "love this despite the fact that there are 480 for all mankind." cities whose Black population exceeds To strengthen the Brotherhood on 51 percent of the total. the national level three significant steps Black Americans receive less than have been taken: four percent of the doctorate degrees in 1. Reclamation: A Reclamation the United States despite the fact that Committee has been appointed to we are nearly 12 percent of the total design and implement a reclamation population. We comprise less than 1.5 program of reclaiming the Brothers percent of the lawyers and judges, and enlisting them in the fight for three percent of all the physicians, 2.2 justice. percent of the nation's dentists and on2. Financial Review: A Financial ly one percent of all the engineers. Overview Committee has been apIt is distressing, my Brothers, that if pointed to review the financial strucall of a sudden we were a separate ture with a view toward establishing nation it would have to be characterequity between life membership payized as undeveloped and backward. It ments and grand tax. The committee would not have enough engineers to will also do an actuarial study of the build its roads or bridges, nor enough life membership program related to our doctors to attend the sick, nor enough investments as well as long term funding. lawyers to support a system of justice. 3. New Alpha Headquarters: One of I could go on and on with dismal the most glaring needs of the Fraternity statistics and conditions. I think, is a decent headquarters for itself. I though, that I have said enough to think that I can make that statement remind you that "The Struggle Conamong Alpha men without one voice tinues" and that our achievements fall of dissent. far short of the tremendous needs of You will be asked during this conour people. vention to adopt a proposal to raise Now I know that Alpha, as great $1.5 million in three years for the conand as committed as it is, cannot treat struction of a headquarters. The plan or cure all of the ills or problems of will call for an assessment on each Black America. But in the words of a Alpha man to be solicited by each famous quotation, "We cannot do chapter. Quotas will be set by regions, everything, but we can do something. down to states, and down to chapters. And what we can do, by the grace of Brothers, I call for and urge an enthuGod, we shall do." Continued on Page 36 35


THE STRUGGLE CONTINUES Continued from Page 35 siastic acceptance of this proposal and for a commitment to build a headquarters. We need the type commitment of the children of Israel when they started to rebuild the Temple — for, according to the Holy Writ, "They were of a mind to work." "If I am not for myself," reads a famous quotation, "then who shall be for me? But if I am only for myself, then what am I?" The Seven Jewels not only pulled themselves together to survive in a hostile climate but they sought the survival of other students, especially the Black ones who suffered the same discrimination that they suffered. Since its founding Alpha has been reaching out. "Mourn not the dead but rather mourn that apathetic throng, the coward and the meek who see the world's great anguish and its pains and will not speak." The author of this quotation is unknown but it addresses adequately the Alpha philosophy. Alpha will continue to speak to the needs of the poor and deprived. It will cry out against discrimination and racism. It will be a trumpeter for justice. In a role of leadership the Fraternity has adopted and initiated implementation of "The New Alpha Thrust" Program to Continue the Struggle:

1. Leadership Development - Citizenship Education — Sponsor a Leadership Training - Citizenship Education Institute in each of its five regions. These institutes will instruct Black boys and girls in public speaking, parliamentary procedures, Black heritage, group dynamics, community organization, governmental structures, self-actualization, etc. 2. Promote programs of youth motivation, youth employment, business encouragement, education and support for Black colleges, etc. The Fraternity will develop and sponsor employment conferences in 25 select cities across the nation in an effort to impact on the high incidents of unemployment among Black Americans. SOCIAL ACTION Alpha will increase its efforts in social action so as to exert a strong influence on the nation's decisionmaking, especially as decisions impact on the Black community. As a member of the Executive Committee of the Leadership Conference on Civil Rights, I participated in directing and coordinating the Black struggle to extend the Voting Rights Act. Passage of that legislation was a sweet, sweet victory for the united efforts of Black Americans and all Americans who advocate political justice. Alpha alone generated thousands of letters, petitions and phone calls in support of the measure. We have due pride in our efforts for they clearly demonstrate the power we have when we mobilize. To further our social action efforts and render them more successful, I have —

1. Appointed a Social Action Committee to plan and direct our efforts for the maximum results. 2. Appointed a committee to study the impact of Reaganomics upon the Black community, so that the Fraternity can speak from an authoritative position in fighting cuts in the "people to people" programs of our Federal budget. I have listed but a few of the programs in our national efforts to give leadership to the legitimate hopes and aspirations of Black America as well as the poor, deprived and powerless Americans. We will do more. We must do more. "The Struggle Continues," my Brothers. The Struggle Continues . . . until the measure of a man will be his ability, not his race. The Struggle Continues . . . until there are no double standards in housing, in education and in the use of public facilities. The Struggle Continues . . . until the old and the infirm do not suffer pain due to the lack of good medical care nor experience hunger because of inadequate income. The Struggle Continues . . . until the scourge of poverty, illiteracy and pain are erased from the land. The Struggle Continues . . . until the ugly head of racism will no longer be raised to divide our people and deny Blacks equal justice and equity. The Struggle Continues. The Struggle Continues. The Struggle Continues!

GIVE. The Alpha Phi Alpha Million Dollar Fund Drive See Page 11 for ways you can give.

36

The Sphinx/Fall 1982


Brother WARREN HASIB ALI, a member of the Alpha Alpha Chapter, took office as President of the United Black Association (UBA) at the University of Cincinnati in May, 1982. Brother AH is a native of Toledo, Ohio and a graduate of Jesup W. Scott High School. While there he was a member of the National Honor Society, received two letters for Varsity Football, served as Homecoming King, and was elected Senior Class President and "Most Likely to Succeed" by his classmates. Also, Brother Ali participated in Junior Achievement and was recognized as an outstanding science student. He received the University of Michigan Honor Trophy Award and is listed in Who's Who Among American High School Students and the Society of Distinguished American High School Students.

Brother Warren Hasib Ali

Brother Ali is a senior majoring in Chemical Engineering. He is a member of the American Institute of Chemical Engineers and the National Society of Black Engineers (NSBE). He has served as High School Tours Chairperson and is presently the Chapter Executive Student Advisor and Region IV Co-Vice Chairperson for NSBE. He was recognized by NSBE for scholastic achievement (highest GPA for juniors) at their annual banquet in May, 1982. Brother Ali has been an extremely active member of Double A since his initiation on May 12, 1979. He has served as Sphinx Club President, VicePresident and Assistant Dean of Pledgees. He is presently concluding his second one-year term as President and will serve as Dean of Pledgees for

Double A's Fall '82 line. Also, he has participated in intramural football and basketball for the chapter. Brother Ali has not restricted his activities to the fraternity only. He will be entering his third year as a resident advisor in the U.C. Residence Halls this fall. He has served as Parliamentarian and Open Rush Chairperson for the Alliance of Black Greek Letter Organizations, Advisor for Minority Affairs of Sander Hall and executive council member for the Interfraternity Council (IFC). Brother Ali served as a Justice for the IFC Judicial Board which ruled on the Sigma Alpha Epsilon incident at U.C. during Winter '82. Brother Ali takes the lead of UBA after its best year aspiring to surpass last year's accomplishments by increasing membership to 1,000, motivating more membership input, securing quality speakers, increasing community involvement and, most importantly, becoming more politically active. If there is a man to lead UBA in surpassing last year's accomplishments, Brother Ali is that man - an Alpha Man!

Brother JAMES B. BLANTON, Executive Secretary of Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity, Inc., has been the recipient of several honors during the past few months: At the 101st Session of the United Supreme Council, Ancient and Accepted Scottish Rite of Freemasonry (Prince Hall Affiliation), Northern Jurisdiction, U.S.A., Inc., held in Freeport, Bahamas, the title of "Illustrious Inspector General" was conferred upon him upon his elevation to the 33rd and last degree of Masonry - the highest honor a Mason can obtain (and at the tender age of 33). At the 89th Annual Session of the Imperial Council, Ancient Egyptian Arabic Order of the Nobles of the Mystic Shrine, held in Denver, Colorado, he was nominated for ' the honorary "Past Potentate" Degree — one of the highest honors bestowed upon Shriners — and will receive it at the 90th Annual Session in St. Louis, Missouri, in 1983. At the Annual Meeting of the Chicago Society for Children & Families (one of Chicago's largest headstart day care services}, the Board of Directors unanimously voted to 37


Brother Samuel L. Eure sible for the research, development, acquisition, fielding and readiness of all smoke/obscurant munitions and material used by U.S. Army forces. Brother Eure is one of about fifty Senior Army Officers who are selected by Headquarters, Department of the Army, to manage key research, development and acquisition programs for the Secretary of the Army. Similar to other Army project managers, Brother Eure's mission and responsibilities are set forth in a Secretarial Charter which is personally signed by the Secretary of the Army. Brother Eure is directly responsible for managing and administering a fifty-one million dollar annual program as a part of the U.S. Army Armament Research and Development effort. Receiving this assignment in June 1979, upon graduation from the U.S. Army War College (the senior level institution for education and training of Army officers), he is currently the only Black Army officer in the key position of Project Manager. A native of Portsmouth Virginia, Brother Eure was educated in the Portsmouth public schools. He attended Virginia State University, Petersburg, Virginia and earned a B.S. degree in Chemistry in 1956. Brother Eure was initiated into Beta Gamma Chapter during his stay at Virginia State University. His military training began in college in the Reserve Officers Training Corps (ROTC) and in May 1956, Brother Eure was commissioned as a Second Lieutenant, U.S. Army Chemical Corps. His assignments have taken him to various parts of the 40

United States, West Germany and South Vietnam. In 1964, the U.S. Army selected Brother Eure to attend graduate school, full-time, for a two-year period at Army's expense. In June 1966, he earned a M.S. degree in Physics at the U.S. Naval Postgraduate School, Monterey, California and was also certified as a Nuclear Effects Engineer by the Defense Nuclear Agency. Additional graduate training led to the awarding of the Army Skill Identifier, as an Operations Research Analyst. During his twenty-six year military career, Brother Eure has earned many service medals and awards. He has served in a variety of positions ranging from Troop Commander, Research and Development Test Officer, Staff College faculty member to Headquarters, Department of the Army Staff Officer, Pentagon. During 1976-78, Brother Eure, then a Lieutenant Colonel, served as Commander, Holston Army Ammunition Depot and Plant, Kingsport, Tennessee. His performance as Commander and Senior Active Army Representative in the Upper East Tennessee area was deemed worthy of special recognition by Tennessee officials. On March 27, 1978, he was cited for outstanding performance as Holston's Commander by the State of Tennessee House of Representatives, House Joint Resolution No. 502. He was the first Black commander of Holston during its 40 year history and was the first to receive such acclaim from Tennessee state officials. During Brothe Eure's twenty-seven years in the "House of Alpha," he has lived by the principle of "maximum service to mankind." He has been and continues to be active in the civic, social and religious activities of the many communities in which he has lived. He has received numerous awards and recognitions for his service contributions. His most recent recognition was given in February 1982 at the Iota Alpha Lambda Chapter's Sixteenth Founder's Day celebration where he received the chapter's "Man of the Year Award" 1981-82. In addition to the demanding responsibilities of an Army Project Manager, Brother Eure is serving with distinction as the chapter's Dean of Pledges and Chairman of the Reclamation Committee. Over the past 15 months, the active membership in Iota Alpha Lambda has grown from fifteen to twenty-five. He states that the most satisfying event of his fraternal association with the chapter was the initiation

of seven new Brothers in October 1981. This line of seven outstanding men, who appropriately adopted the name "Golden Seven," was a unique and distinct achievement for the chapter. Brother Eure is of the Baptist faith. He is presently on the Usher Staff of the APG Protestant Chapel and serves as a volunteer for the APG Chapel Coffee House Ministry, an activity which provides an alternative weekend social and religious activity for soldiers stationed at APG. He is married to the former Vernell Joyce Brown of Norfolk, Virginia and they are the proud parents of two children. A son, First Lieutenant Samuel L. Eure, Jr., is stationed in West Germany, and a daughter, Karen L. Eure, is a junior at Hampton Institute, Hampton, Virginia, where she is a Dean's List Student (3.6 average) and an Alpha Sweetheart for Gamma Iota Chapter.

In what was truly an extraordinary session of Pine Bluff City Council, held June 25, 1982, at P. J.'s Disco Lounge, Highway 79-North, the city's community was renamed the Chester Hynes Community Center — in honor of Brother CHESTER HYNES. Bathed in soft glow of flashing disco lights, Mayor Wallis called the council into session before a crowd of more than 400 Pine Bluff residents who had gathered at an Appreciation Dinner to

Brother Chester Hynes The Sphinx / Fall 1982


honor Brother Hynes, a City Alderman from the Second Ward. In addition to Wallis and the council, State Representative Henry Wilkins III, Judge Earl Chadick, Sr., Chief Bobby Norman of the Pine Bluff Police Department, Assistant Chief Harvey Jacks of the Pine Bluff Fire Department and Sheriff W. D. "Dub" Brassell of Jefferson County also presented plaques and other tokens of appreciation. Other speakers included Brother Clifton Roaf, president of the Pine Bluff School Board; Brother H. O. Gray, president of the Pine Bluff chapter of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People; Howell Davis, president of Simmons First National Bank of Pine Bluff; and Calvin Matlock, president of Delta Sigma Lambda Chapter. Davis and other speakers praised Brother Hynes' many years of service — both during his tenure on the faculty of Arkansas AM&N College, now the University of Arkansas at Pine Bluff, and his almost 13 years on the City Council. At times during the dinner the tributes to Hynes assumed the tenor of a "roast," as speaker after speaker lampooned the Alderman's fishing exploits. Undaunted by the attacks upon his fishing skill, however, Brother Hynes rose at the conclusion of the dinner, thanked the crowd and said that the evening was but one of many indications of improving race relations in Pine Bluff. Quoting verses from a current Top 40 song, "Ebony and Ivory" by Paul McCartney and Stevie Wonder, Hynes asked the crowd, "Why can't we live in perfect harmony?" "We may not live in perfect harmony yet," he said, "but from my experience on the council, I can say we are making progress in the right direction." According to Gene Thomason, vice president of the Loan Division at Simmons Bank, about $4,000 was spent on the event. Masters of ceremonies for the event were Brother L. V. Coleman (UAPB) and Robert Dill, vice president of Simmons Marketing Division.

Brother GARVIN S. MAFFETT, [2nd Lt.] (right) speaks with Secretary of Defense Casper Weinberger at the Flag Officers Banquet, saluting the Black generals and admirals of all four services, held in Washington, D.C. Lieutenant Maffett is a Medical SerThe Sphinx / Fall 1982

Secretary of Defense, Casper Weiberger and 2nd St. Brother Garvin S. Maffett (right) at Flag Officer Banquet, Washington, D.C. vices Administrator with the 111th Pennsylvania Air National Guard unit at Willow Grove Naval Air Station and serves also as an Air Force Academy & AFROTC Admissions Officer in the Southeast Pennsylvania area.

m

Brother FREEMAN MONTAGUE, a student at Meharry Medical College, participated in the "Summer 1982 Professional and Student Exchange Program in Africa." The exchange program is under the auspices of Crossroads Africa, Inc., a non-profit organization focusing on international exchange and educational exchange. The group's projects are self-help in nature, focusing on such endeavors as rural health education, clinical medical work, building schools, hospitals and dams and compensatory education. Sonja Kelly, Director of the Crossroads Africa Program, said participants are a highly select group of professionals and students who, from a field of many hundreds of applicants nationwide, are judged to be most outstanding. Brother Montague, a native of West Memphis, Arkansas, was graduated from Wonder High School in 1975 and Arkansas State University, Jonesboro, in 1980. He was named Alpha Phi Alpha's College Brother of the Year in 1980. While at Meharry, he has served as

Freshman Class Vice President; Freshman Representative to the Curriculum Committee; Sophomore Class President; and Executive Vice President of the Pre-Alumni Council (equivalent to the SGA). In 1981 he was named a Meharry "Medical Scholar" — becoming one of five medical students, chosen on the basis of academic performance, to tutor entering freshmen during that year. An initiate of Theta Upsilon Chapter at ASU, Brother Montague has been extremely active with Chi Chapter at Meharry — serving as Dean of Probates and Vice President. He will serve this year as the President of Chi Chapter.

Brother CHARLES FREDERICK ROBINSON III, a news reporter from WPEC/TV, West Palm Beach, has recently joined the WCPO/TV-9 news team as a writer / reporter. WCPO is in Cincinnati, Ohio. He began his career in television news in July, 1980 as a news reporter trainee with WWBT/TV, Richmond, Virginia. Before that he was news anchor for one year with Richmond's WTVR AM-FM Radio and a news stringer for WLEE-AM Radio in Richmond. From June 1976 to November 1978, Robinson served as account executive with WENZ-AM Radio in Highland Springs, Virginia. A native Virginian, Robinson is a 1980 graduate of Virginia Common41


Brother Charles Frederick Robinson III

Brother Willie C. Robinson

wealth University where he earned a Bachelor of Science degree in Mass Communications. He was initiated into Theta Rho Chapter at VCU.

Fund; and is a member of the Board of Trustees for the University of Miami. He has been appointed to the Florida Election Commission by the Governor of Florida. Brother Robinson is married and is the father of two sons.

m *

Brother WILLIE C. ROBINSON, President of Florida Memorial College (Miami, Florida) was recently elected to the Board of Directors of Eastern Air Lines. Dr. Robinson, a native of Dunn, North Carolina, has been President of Florida Memorial College since 1977. In that time the college has undergone tremendous growth in both student enrollment and the physical plant additions. Brother Robinson came to Florida Memorial College from Yale University, where he had served in various positions, including Special Assistant to the President of the university. Brother Robinson is the author of several articles on Black Education including "Black Americans Struggle to Reach Higher Education" published last spring in Black Enterprise. In addition to serving on Eastern's Board of Directors, Brother Robinson also serves on the Boards of Directors of United Way of Greater Miami and the Miami-Dade Water and Sewer Authority; the Board of Governors and the Executive Committee of the Greater Miami Chamber of Commerce; the Southeast Bank Regional Consulting Board; the United Negro College 42

Brother MEZELL WILLIAMS, a former auditor for the City of Chicago, began work on March 1,1982 as Administrative Assistant to Mayor Bill Morris of Waukegan, Illinois. Morris ranked Williams' job as one of nine key appointive posts in Waukegan government. Brother Williams is the first Black to be hired in one of these positions under the Morris administration. Brother Williams holds a Bachelor's degree from Upper Iowa University

Brother Mezell Williams and a Master of Science degree in Public Service Management from DePaul University in Chicago. Along with his work as a program auditor for Chicago's Department of Human Services, he has also worked as a program monitor for the CETA (Comprehensive Employment and Training Act) Program; a mental health worker; and a drug abuse counselor. He is listed in Who's Who in the Midwest and is one of the U.S. Jaycee's Outstanding Young Men of America. Brother Williams, now a member of Kappa Chi Lambda Chapter in Waukegan / North Chicago, was initiated into Theta Chapter in 1969 and was an active member of Xi Lambda Chapter in Chicago, from 1971 until this year. In Xi Lambda, he served as Parliamentarian and Sergeant-at-Arms, was active on numerous committees, and was honored by the chapter for loyalty and dedication in September of 1981.

GIVE. The Alpha Phi Alpha Million Dollar Fund Drive. See Page 11 for ways you can give.

^SB?**The Sphinx / Fall 1982


achievement, and in keeping with that fine tradition established by our founders, the Seven Jewels, the Brothers of Theta Chapter would like to congratulate and give our best wishes to the following Brothers who graduated this school year: Daren Dandridge, University of IllinoisChicago; Anthony Irvin, University of Illinois-Chicago; George Jackson III, Loyola University, attending Graduate School at Illinois Institute of Technology; Allen Brown, Loyola University; Daren Sharpe, University of Chicago, attending Graduate School at Harvard University; and David Moody, Roosevelt University. Theta Chapter is continuing to live up to the fine tradition of Alpha and we urge all the Brothers to continue to live up to our lofty ideals. Look for the "Eighth Wonder of Alpha" in Los Angeles this summer. Until then, we bid you a warm fraternal goodbye.

u of Wisconsin GE "brings g o o d things

to light" Greetings and a warm welcome to all our Brothers in Alpha from the Brothers of Gamma Epsilon Chapter at the University of Wisconsin in Madison. We would like to extend a special greeting to our graduate chapter, Mu Eta Lambda, and to all of our Brothers in the State of Wisconsin. This fall the Brothers of "G.E." will be striving ever onward and upward toward the "Light of Alpha Phi Alpha." With almost an entirely new chapter, consisting of transfers and new inductees, Gamma Epsilon will be attempting, with revitalized enthusiasm, to uphold the strong tradition established by our mentor brethren of the past. We will be co-sponsoring a Minority Freshman Orientation in late August, and again mid-September. Also, in the fall, we are planning a Thanksgiving and Christmas Basket project, an Exam Collection Party project, a raffle for the Million Dollar Drive/Send-A-KidTo-Camp Fund, and a joint venture with the Madison Urban League. We would, at this time, like to give special recognition to our Brothers who have graduated and will be going on to hold the name of Alpha high elsewhere. "Good luck" and "best wishes" to Brothers: Henry Drake, off to a career in Engineering; Darrell The Sphinx /Fall 1982

Moore, who is actively pursuing a career in Marketing/Sales; Brian Spewer, bound for a career in Retailing/Manufacturing; and Kevin Cohee, who truly exemplifies Alpha Phi Alpha's commitment to high ideals, lofty accomplishments, and success in academics, by successfully completing his Masters in Business at UW/Madison, and presently being enrolled at the Harvard School of Law, May you all find peace, happiness and success in your future endeavors. Gamma Epsilon would also like to recognize its new members, who provide the necessary spark vital to any chapter's existence. We welcome transfer Brothers John L. Davis and Gregory Malvin, and neophyte Brothers Mark Edwards, John Musachia and Van Sapp. We look forward to a prosperous year working with you. Our officers for 1982-83 are.- John L. Davis, President; Gregory Malvin, Vice President; Van Benedict Sapp, Corresponding Secretary; Mark Edwards, Treasurer/Social Co-Ordinator; Kenny Samuels, Dean of Pledges/Historian; Tony Hampton, Sergeant-at-Arms /Parliamentarian; John Jenkins, Business Manager; and John Musachia, Recording Secretary. "G.E." welcomes any correspondence from our Brothers throughout Alpha. Come on and visit "G.E." — "we bring good things to light."

nebrosko Beta Xi Lambda holds Scholarship Luncheon In the tradition of Alpha Phi Alpha's aims of manly deeds, and scholarship, the Beta Xi Lambda Chapter of Omaha, Nebraska capped a successful year of activities with their annual M. A. "Gus" Dillon Scholarship Awards Luncheon. The recipients and their parents were the guests of the chapter. The young men were recognized for their outstanding academic and leadership achievements. The high school graduates received plaques for their achievements. Two graduates received $500 scholarships. Each recipient had a 3.5 or better grade point average. The chapter also recognized the young men graduating from junior high to high school, who maintained a 3.0 or better grade point average, with certificates of achievement. It is hoped that through this recognition, these young men will continue toward scholastic and leadership achievements throughout high school. The program included lunch, the awards and scholarship presentations, and an inspiring keynote address given by Brother Rev. William Johnson, Pastor of Calvin Memorial Presbyterian Church. Brother Carl Turner was the Chairman of the Scholarship and Awards Luncheon.

(Above and below) scenes from Beta Xi Lambda's M. A. "Gus" Dillon Scholarship Luncheon — in Omaha, Nebraska.

l?V. "" 51


indiana lota Lambda honors Brother Lightfoot Iota Lambda Chapter, of Indianapolis, recently honored Reverend Brother Theodore C. Lightfoot, Jr. by bestowing upon him the Alpha Award of Merit at a special recognition program. Brother Lightfoot was honored by the Indianapolis community for outstanding contributions in the area of theology and education. He is the immediate past president of the Indianapolis Board of School Commissioners, an instructor at Christian Theological Seminary, and pastor of Trinity Christian Methodist Episcopal Church. At the special awards program Brother Lightfoot also received a 'Twenty-five Year" certificate from the General Office; a proclamation from Congressman Brother Harold E. Ford (D-TN); a key to the city of Memphis, TN, his former place of residency; letters of congratulations from the Honorable Jane Byrne, Mayor of Chicago; NAACP Executive Director Ben Hooks; and NBN News Correspondent Brother Mai Goode, to name a few. He also received the Meritorious Service Award from Lane College President Brother Herman Stone, Jr. Tributes were numerous. They included remarks from representatives from various organizations such as the NAACP, the Indianapolis Urban League, Board of School Commissioners, Indianapolis Education Association and the Indianapolis Church Federation, as well as friends and family members. Iota Lambda is proud of the magnificent accomplishments which so become Alpha Brother Theodore C. Lightfoot, Jr. He joins in with other outstanding Indianapolis Alpha Men, who have made significant achievement in their respective fields. Included are Brother Dr. Frank P. Lloyd, President of Methodist Hospital (Indiana's largest); Brother Dr. Iverson C. Bell, President of Indiana Veterinary Medicine Association; Brother Dr. Rueben L. White, President of Metro Health Plan; Brother J. Clinton Hoggard, Presiding Bishop of the 4th Episcopal District - AME Zion Church; and Brother Kenneth T. Roberts, Esq., Treasurer of the Democratic Committee. The list goes on. 52

Reverend Brother Theodore C. Lightfoot, ]r. (right) is shown receiving the "Indianapolis Alpha Award of Merit" from Brother Thomas W. Gray. Standing in background are Alpha Brothers Fred Jones, who represented the Indianapolis Public Schools Administration, and Rozelle Boyd, Minority Leader of the City County Council.

ohio Cleveland Alphas endow scholarship fund The Cleveland alumnae chapter, Delta Alpha, presented a $5,000 check to Cleveland State University on June 8, 1982 to establish an annual endowed Alpha Phi Alpha Scholarship. Proceeds from university investments will be used to annually provide

partial financial support for deserving students, preferably Black males, above the freshman level with a grade point average of 3.0 or better. Delta Alpha Lambda Chapter has provided over $6,000 to promote scholarship since September, 1981. In addition to Cleveland State University, scholarship awards were made to Frank L. Kelker Scholarship Fund Cuyahoga Community College, the St. James AME Church Scholarship Fund, the United Negro College Fund and to two Fraternity members.

Delta Alpha Lambda establishes an endowed scholarship at Cleveland State University. Shown are (left to right) William Bennett, Chapter Vice President; Andrew Venable, Chapter President; and, Dr. Walter B. Waetjen, President of Cleveland State University. The Sphinx/Fall 1982


SOUTH university of olobomo Kappa Alpha is on top in Alpha South It was a special time for the Kappa Alpha Chapter during the weekend of April 9-11. For at the University of South Carolina, the Brothers of the Kappa Alpha Chapter (the University of Alabama) became Alpha South's Regional Chapter of the Year. Also, Kappa Alpha won the Regional Stepping competition. The chapter's display was chosen number one from among the other displays presented by the competing chapters in the region. The display recounted the chapter's events, activities, and honors for the past year. The display divided the chapter's year-long activities into the categories of leadership, scholarship, service and Brotherhood. Standing over six feet tall, the display included trophies, plaques, and certificates awarded to the chapter. Also, the Brothers' stepping show was selected as number one. Consisting of choreography and chants, the Brothers' show was selected to represent Alpha South at the National Convention in Los Angeles. The Kappa Alpha Chapter won the right to compete for regional honors by winning Alabama's State Chapter of the Year award. Journeying to Florence, Alabama from February 26 to the 28th, the Brothers of Kappa Alpha took State Chapter of the Year. They also won the right to compete for regional stepping honors by winning the state stepping competition. Kappa Alpha Chapter member David W. Long was named Alabama's Outstanding College Brother of the Year. Founded on December 6, 1974, the Kappa Alpha Chapter has continued to hold high the light and striving for the aims of Alpha Phi Alpha. Since its inception, the chapter has received numerous awards; the most cherished of which is being named the 1978 National College Chapter of the Year for Alpha Phi Alpha. Encouraging only the best of our members, Brothers in the chapter have proceeded to various heights at the University of Alabama. From officers of campus organizations to members of honor The Sphinx/Fall 1982

societies, senators in legislative bodies to chairman of committees, the Brothers of Kappa Alpha have participated in all walks of college life. The Brothers of Kappa Alpha were guided this past year under the auspices of its officers. The officers for 1981-82 were Rodney Harris, President; Marche' Jenkins, Vice President, Dean of Pledgees and Sergeant-at-Arms; David Young, Treasurer; Derrel Turner, Recording Secretary; Jeffery Willis, Corresponding Secretary and Chaplain; and, Edric Kirkman, Historian. The Kappa Alpha Chapter consists of Brothers: Tony Jones, David Long, Reginald McCall, David Hunter, Myron Smoot, Mike Young, Yoga Jones, Norbert Williams, Bill Minter, Chris Alexander, Aaron Dobynes and Jon Beans. Brother Johnny Kirk serves as our Advisor.

georgio Theta Nu Lambda has banner year The Brothers of Theta Nu Lambda Chapter in LaGrange, Georgia spent an outstanding year. The year was enhanced by the following activities: Founder's Day, Alpha Workshop, Education for Citizenship, participation in Youth Development, and a formal dance. The Founder's Day event was the scene of beauty, joy and memories reflecting upon the past events of the Fraternity. The Founder's Day presidential message was given by Brother Oliver N. Greene, while Brothers Frank Lewis and Alfred Randolph were chairmen. The Brothers lit a candle for the Seven Jewels of the Fraternity. After the very impressive program, the Brothers entertained their wives and sweethearts with a Disco Party. The outstanding event during the year was the Alpha Workshop given during the month of February 1982 at the West Georgia Regional Library in Carrollton, Georgia. The workshop was designed to inform juniors and seniors from the area high schools about entering college, discovering new occupations, entering tradeschools, and scholarships. Some 65 students participated in the workshops. The workshop was chaired by Brother Earl Stokes, while Brother Leroy Childs served as local coordinator. Seven colleges participated in the workshop and were given specific responsibilities during the workshop.

Certificates of Appreciation were presented to all workshop participants. The Education for Citizenship Program was presented on May 23, 1982 at the Warren Temple United Methodist Church in LaGrange, with Brother Leroy Childs presiding. Brother Oliver N. Greene, the Chapter President, served as speaker. He used as his theme "Bridge Builders for the Future." Mr. George W. Baker, Sr., a teacher in the Meriwether County Schools, was the recipient of the Citizen of the Year Award; and Mr. Lonnie B. Walls received the Alpha Phi Alpha Scholarship Award. All Brothers in Theta Nu Lambda Chapter were presented Certificates of Appreciation for their participation in the chapter's activities during the year. Two young men, Donald Weatherington, Jr. and Richard Bedgood, represented the chapter at Benedict College for the Annual Leadership Development Conference. These two young men are the sons of Brothers Donald Weatherington, Sr. and Cleveland Bedgood. The chapter's activities were ended with a formal dance held at the Sandpiper Supper Club in LaGrange. The following officers were elected for 1982-83: Willie Anderson, President; Charles Milligan, Vice President; Alfred McNair, Secretary; Billy Brown, Jr., Treasurer; Cleveland Bedgood, Financial Secretary; Don Weatherington, Dean of Pledges; Frank Lewis, Chaplain; Alfred Randolph, Parliamentarian; Leroy Childs, Director of Education; Solomon Ferguson, Editorto-the-Sphinx; and Oliver N. Greene, Sr., Historian.

morehouse college Alpha Rho still producing top quality in 58th year The 1981-82 school year at Morehouse saw Alpha Rho to a very successful year. The distinguished men of AP began the year with participation in the Sickle Cell Run and the Cancer Society Benefit to raise money for the respective organizations. Showing the true fraternal spirit, Alpha Rho helped Brother Andrew Young in his campaign against Sidney Marcus in the Atlanta mayoral race. Also in October, the Brothers of Alpha Rho assisted the teachers of a community elementary set up and prepare for a Halloween Party for the children of 53


the school. The chapter also assisted in the Reach Out Program and the festivities for that night. Not being content, the gentlemen of Alpha Rho hosted their Annual Haunted House Halloween Party for the Frederick Douglas Tutorial Program. November proved to be a most joyous one for the chapter for we inducted fifteen new Brothers into the House of Alpha. This legacy line consisting of Albert L. Vivian, Michael S. James, CarrT. Preston, Victor A. Tall, William Thomas Barnes III, Tedd M. Alexander III, Ernest Quarles, Jr., Stuart Rainer, Henry M. Goodgame II, Anthony L. Trufant, Wade H. McKinney IV, Noah E. Wills III, Cyril J. Turner, Brian K. Buchanan, and Craig B. Douglas called themselves the "Phenomenal Fifteen." Within the same period Brothers were named First, Second and Third for Mr. Junior Contest at Spelman. In remembrance of our founders, the gentlemen of Alpha Rho held their Annual Founder's Day Banquet in which we honored our founders and welcomed our new Brothers. The speaker for this occasion was Brother Nathanial Veale, Jr., one of the two chapter advisors, the other being Brother Wendell Whalum — both of whom we are most proud. Although the members of AP did various service projects that lasted for short periods, the chapter does have two long running projects that are performed weekly: The Harland Boys Club, Kidney Foundation Fund Drive, NAACP Fund Drive, Literacy Action Program, and the Frederick Douglas Tutorial Program. The Brothers of Alpha Rho received the Volunteer Service Award for Service Beyond the Call of Duty from the Boy's Club. Alpha Rho was instrumental in collecting and soliciting letters for extension of the Voting Rights Act. In a recent article by the United Way Volunteers, Alpha Rho was chosen from all other organizations in the state as the organization rendering the most service. Alpha Rho Chapter has pledged $3,000 to the National Fraternity Fund Drive for U.N.C.F. The gentlemen of Alpha Rho have shined throughout the community and school. February's activities with celebration of Black History Month. The Annual Spirit Night competition, which Alpha Rho has won for the past five years consecutively, began the 54

second semester of great endeavors. In March, Alpha Rho, along with two other organizations from Morehouse and Spelman sponsored a Blood Drive on Morehouse's campus. The American Red Cross credited AP for being responsible for the very successful Blood Drive. April saw our Brother, John Mims, complete a year of diligent service as Assistant Regional Vice President. Also during this period an Easter Egg Hunt and party were given for community children and nine new Brothers were shown the light. These men: Russell Buchanan, Rollie Farthing, Stanley Mosby, Daniel Daugherty, Brent Bailey, Harry Gillespie, Terry Geter, Darryl Harris and Christopher Richardson referred to themselves as the "Reviviscent Nine." With an induction of twenty-five Brothers for 1981-82 school year, we were named the second largest undergraduate chapter in the nation. The gentlemen of Alpha Rho have consistently shown excellence in any endeavor that they have undertaken. Members of Alpha Rho are members of

Phi Beta Kappa Honorary Fraternity, Dean's List, Honor Roll and five have just been named to Who's Who. This year culminated with Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity, Alpha Rho Chapter, winning Fraternity of the Year at Morehouse. Of this we are very proud. As the new school year 1982-83 comes forth, Alpha Rho is looking forward to another successful year under the leadership of Dewayne Tolbert, President (2nd term); Harun Knowles, Vice President; Edgar Smith, Corresponding Secretary; Maynard Scarborough, Recording Secretary; Theodore M. Alexander III, Treasurer; Charles Johnson, Dean of Pledges; Anthony L. Trufant, Chaplain; Ernest W. Quarles, Jr., Dean of Probates; Cyril Turner, Business Manager; Henry M. Goodgame II, Editor-to-theSphinx; Noah E. Wills III, Parliamentarian; Christopher Richardson, Director of Education; and Harry Gillespie, Historian. The gentlemen of Alpha Rho look forward to holding high the motto in their 59th year. "First of All, Servants of All, We shall transcend all!!"

Alpha Rho putting on a "step show.' The Sphinx/Fall 1982


knoxville college Gamma Omicron on the GO! Greetings, Men of Distinction, from Gamma Omicron Chapter, Knoxville College. Since our last correspondence, Gamma Omicron has experienced a renaissance, reconstruction, and revitalization with the "crossing of the burning sands" by the Jazzy 8 on November 8, 1980 and the Sensuous 6 on May 9, 1981. Since then, Gamma Omicron has regained and maintained its prominence in every aspect of college life and has been, as its acronym spells, on the GO! On the Knoxville College campus, leadership, service, and scholarship are all synonymous with Alpha Phi Alpha. During the 1981-82 academic year, Brothers demonstrated leadership abilities as follows: Brother Derek Miller, President of the Student Government Association and Vice President of the Phi Beta Lambda Business Fraternity; Brother Charles Rogers, President of Alpha Kappa Mu Honor Society and Phi Beta Lambda Business Fraternity; Brother Everett Newton, President of the Circle K Club; and Brother John Clayborne, President of Pan-Hellenic Council. In the area of service and activities, Gamma Omicron has also gained ground. Several of the activities and services performed last school year included donating food to needy families during the Thanksgiving and Christmas holidays, Christmas caroling along with the Gamma Eta Chapter of Alpha Kappa Alpha, donating to UNCF through the campus Pre-Alumni Council, visiting convalescent homes, and participating in intramural basketball. The new G O also put forth efforts toward a week of activities. Alpha Week 1982 took place January 10-16, 1982 and was a relative success despite bad weather conditions. Some of the activities included a Greek Cheese & Wine Sip, high blood pressure testing, and a program in tribute to Martin L. King, Jr. A scheduled World's Fair presentation concerning job opportunities and other information about the Fair was cancelled due to the weather. However, the highlight of the week was the chapter's attempt to hold its first Miss Black and Gold Pageant. In spite of minor problems, the program was a success and the winner, freshThe Sphinx / Fall 1982

man Johnnetta Taylor of Savannah, Georgia, went on to win at the state level of competition in Kingsport, Tennessee. Academic excellence is yet another forte for Gamma Omicron. The chapter maintained a cumulative grade point average of 3.0, the best of all fraternities on campus. Quarter after quarter more Brothers are present on the Honor Roll and are usually the only members of a fraternity on the Dean's List. Also during the Spring 1982 pledge period, five members of the line of six made the Honor Roll, the only group of pledgees to do so. Undoubtedly, Gamma Omicron is the epitome of versatility. Besides holding the number one position in leadership and scholarship, the Brothers have proven to be the best steppers on campus. For the second consecutive time, Gamma Omicron has walked away with first place in the Annual Spring Greek Show sponsored by the Pan-Hellenic Council. Congratulations are in order to the performers, Brothers who operated the special effects, and the entire chapter for its support. We would like to take this opportunity to recognize and congratulate members of the chapter for their individual accomplishments. Congratulations are extended to graduates Brother Darryl Hubbard, Political Science; Brother Jesse Anthony, Physical Education; and Brother Charles Rogers, Business, who was selected to Who's Who in American Universities and Colleges and was also one of three individuals to graduate cum laude. Best wishes and appreciation are extended to them all. Recognition is also in order for Brother Everett Newton who was nominated and selected as an Outstanding Young Man of America and Brother Derek Miller who was selected as College Brother of the Year by Knoxville's Graduate chapter, Alpha Mu Lambda, honored as the top student in the junior class, and also selected to Who's Who. Without question the 1981-82 school year will be a year for Gamma Omicron to remember, but 1982-83 is ahead. Brothers have taken steps to ensure G O's prominence on campus by again taking on leadership roles in the following manner: Brother David Stephens, President of the Student Government Association; Brother Everett Newton, Vice President of the SGA; and Brother Derek Miller, President of the Pan-Hellenic Council.

Gamma Omicron also plans to have a Fall Line, Alpha Week 1983, Miss Black and Gold, an Alpha Ball, and more service to the community and campus as well as maintaining our academic status. The officers for the 1982-83 school year are Derek Miller, President; Stanley Robinson, Vice President; Richard Berryman, Treasurer; Amos Lewis, Secretary, Curtis Rhett, Dean of Pledges; David Sellers, Assistant Dean of Pledges; and Everett Newton, Chaplain. Gamma Omicron is unmistakably on the move. We're looking forward to a productive and successful year. We have come a long way and have quite some distance yet to go; Yet we shall continue to hold Alpha high.

north corolino o & t New officers for Beta Epsilon The Beta Epsilon Chapter at North Carolina A&T State University extends its warmest greetings to the Brothers of Alpha Phi Alpha. An article appeared in the campus newspaper, The Register, on Friday, April 23, 1982. It was written by Brother Donald Smith, a neophyte Brother from the 1982 spring line, "Pieces of Eight," in defense of our Fraternity and other Greek letter organizations. Also included are some of the meritorious service projects our chapter has been involved in recently. Our newly elected officers for the school year 1982-83 are: Henry Midgett, President; Gregory Ward, Vice President; Maxfield Bowen, Corresponding Secretary; Donald Smith, Recording Secretary; Tony Allen, Treasurer; Victor Gavin, Sergeant-at- Arms/ Parliamentarian; William Pass, Historian; Ronald Patrick, Chaplain; and Charles deBose, Editor-to-the-Sphinx.

Give.

The Alpha Phi Alpha Million Dollar Fund Drive

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u of south corolino Theta Nu is South Carolina Chapter of the Year The Theta Nu Chapter was chartered at the University of South Carolina on March 30, 1973. Since its inception, the Brothers of Theta Nu have been actively involved in all Black organizations at USC as well as the rest of the Carolina community. Theta Nu has successfully held high the ideals of Alpha Phi Alpha scholarship and leadership. Theta Nu received several honors and was recognized by many organizations during the 1981-82 school year. Some of these awards include: South Carolina Chapter of the Year; champions of the Alpha South Regional Basketball Tournament; Panhellenic Council Academic Fraternity of the Year; first place winners of the Delta Sigma Theta Annual Step Show competition; and recognitions by Alpha Psi Lambda, Columbia, and Gamma Gamma Lambda, Greenville, for outstanding service to the communities and Alpha Phi Alpha. Some individual awards to Brothers of Theta Nu include: Brother of the Year for Alpha South, Ennis Fant, a Chemical Engineering major; the highest academic achievement award, Edwin Neal, an Accounting major; and Everett McAllister, a Pharmacy major, received awards from both the Association for Afro-American Students and the Pan-Hellenic Council for his outstanding academic achievements at Carolina. Theta Nu is the largest Black fraternity at USC and in the state of South Carolina. Each member works hard to obtain the goals of Alpha Phi Alpha. Theta Nu looks forward to another successful and productive year at USC. The Brothers of Theta Nu will continue to march upward and onward toward the light.

The 1981-82 school year proved to be a crowning one for Gamma Upsilon. The year began with the induction, on October 31, 1981, of ten talented young men known as the 'Ten Most Wanted — Men of Distinction." They were James Dawson, Orlando Featherstone, Charles Griffin, Perrymon Wright, Joseph Frazier, Abron Washington, Craig Roberts, Eric Lucas, Samuel Cole and Brian Dorsey. Working towards a better community and helping the less fortunate were important aspects of the past year's program. We entertained the mentally retarded through the REACH program and aided in a heart fund drive conducted by Tougaloo (for which we won a trophy). As a community project to foster leadership and promote sociocultural values, the Brothers of GU became involved in the Jackson Metropolitan Area's Big Brothers Program and also began organizing a local chapter Boy Scout Troop. During the Christmas holidays, we also donated a food basket to a needy family. In hopes of promoting a more positive atmosphere on the Tougaloo campus and strengthening the high regard in which Alpha Phi Alpha is held, we worked fervently to have a successful and enjoyable Alpha Weekend. We received many accolades for our Miss Black & Gold Pageant. Our Black and Gold Day was a huge success with what became the Greek Show of the century. It was even videotaped by a local television station. A good time was had by all at our Black and Gold

Ball where we presented our Sweetheart Court and crowned the 1982-83 Miss APA, Brenda Knott. The highlight of our Weekend came when Brother Frederick H. Miller, 3rd General President, appeared as our guest of honor. He was presented a plaque in appreciation for his untiring service to Alpha Phi Alpha since his induction some 73 years ago. Carolyn Williams received the Standford Love Memorial Scholarship of $200. Also our beautiful H. T. Drake trophy was inscribed with the names of two seniors who attained a 3.75 or better GPA for three consecutive semesters. Partial receipts of our Alpha Weekend is traditionally donated to the UNCF. In view of the fact that our Weekend was to be held during the same month that Brother Martin Luther King, Jr. was born, the chapter presented a commemorative plaque to Tougaloo College's library. Gamma Upsilon also served as ushers during a campus candlelight vigil in his honor. In order to feel worthy of the title Alphamen, we have engaged in various social and civic endeavors, among them: 1) Participation in the Black College Day March in Jackson, MS; 2) Helping in Tougaloo's annual bonfire; 3) Serving as ushers in the Miss UNCF and Ms. Tougaloo pageants and also local church services; 4) An ongoing voter-awareness drive; and 5) A Graduate-Undergraduate Brother program. The 1982 State Convention witnessed the naming of Gamma Upsilon as the "College Chapter of the Year." In addi-

tougaloo college Gamma Upsilon named state Chapter of the Year Warm fraternal greetings to all fellow "Knights of the Light" from the Brothers of Gamma Upsilon Chapter, Tougaloo College. Founded in 1948, Gamma Upsilon is the oldest undergraduate chapter of Alpha Phi Alpha in the state of Mississippi. 56

Brothers of Gamma Upsilon pose with chapter founder, H. T. Drake (left) and Tougaloo College President, Brother George A. Owens. The Sphinx/Fall 1982


tion to that prestigious title, we were honored to have our own lovely and talented Miss Sonya Thompson chosen Miss Black & Gold for the state of Mississippi. Also we took the first place trophy in the basketball tournament. Fortunate to have the chance to represent our state, we were very enthusiastic about attending the Southern Regional Convention in Columbia, South Carolina. At the regional, we received the second place trophy in basketball and enjoyed the opportunity of fraternizing with Brothers from all over the South. Upon our return to Tougaloo, we were greeted by the pleasant surprise of being given an award naming us "Most Supportive Greek" by our sisters, the ladies of Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority. With the coming of graduation came the loss of many of our number (most with honors). We were indeed sorry to see them go but we would like to wish the following Brothers good luck in their post-graduate commitments: Clifton Frazier, Meharry Medical College; Melvin Trotter, North Carolina Central; Vincent Harris, Brown U. Medical School; Joe Frazier, Georgia Tech; Charles Streeter, Iowa State University; Brian Worthy, Esn., U.S. Navy, and Clyde Bennett, 2nd Lt., U.S. Army. Although the graduates' departure left us with a neophyte administration, we feel that we are more than adequately prepared to meet the challenges of the 1982-83 school year. So until the next time, may the true spirit of fraternity keep the light burning brightly.

Chairman of the committee and was assisted by Brother Marvin Dunlap, David H. Wagner III, Melvin Mauney, and Harold Martin. Friday afternoon's and evening's activities included such relaxing novelties as a basketball tournament, "a stepping" contest for college Brothers and a disco that put everyone well into the swing of things in preparation for Saturday's events. Saturday morning bright and early Alphas and guests enjoyed a delicious breakfast during which Leroy Beatty III of Beta Zeta Chapter (Elizabeth City State University) did a very dramatic and meaningful oration and won the prize for the contest. The "red carpet" and the "welcome mat" were officially laid out for the men of Alpha and visitors as a welcoming party greeted convention goers. Greetings to the city were offered by the Honorable Mayor Wayne Corpening; Dr. James R. Scales, President of Wake Forest University; Brother H. Douglas Covington, Chancellor, Winston-Salem State University; Brother J. Ray Butler, D.D. and President of the Baptist Minister's Conference; and Alderman Virginia K. Newell, President of the Alphabettes of Alpha Pi Lambda Chapter. Greetings were also offered by Brother John Martin of Xi Eta Chapter and Brother Robert Phelps, President Beta Iota Chapter. At high noon, the Association of North Carolina Alphamen honored State Director A. M. "Gus" Witherspoon at the convention luncheon. The luncheon was most enjoyable; but the

formal banquet and dance was yet to come! After the luncheon the Alphabettes sponsored a bus tour of historical and well known sites in the WinstonSalem area. The evening brought the Alphas and their queens out to a formal banquet dinner and luncheon. David H. Wagner, Jr., President of Alpha Pi Lambda, was toastmaster and presented the head table. After the dinner a melodious number was rendered by four Brothers from Durham, NC followed by inspirational thought and the presentation of awards by State Director Gus Witherspoon and the awards chairman Raymond Perry. The following awards were presented: College Brother of the Year — Leroy Beatty III, Beta Zeta Chapter (Elizabeth State University); Alumni Brother of the Year — James Fulwood, Gamma Kappa Lambda (Wilmington, North Carolina); College Chapter of the Year — Beta Epsilon Chapter (A&T State University, Greensboro, North Carolina); Alumni Chapter of the Year — Gamma Kappa Lambda Chapter (Wilmington, North Carolina); State Director's Award — Raymond Perry and Derrick Sauls, Phi Lambda (Raleigh, North Carolina); Leadership Award — Jerome Lowe, Beta Epsilon (A&T State University); Service Award — Charles Lewis, Eta Omicron Chapter (North Carolina State University); Highest Overall Grade Point Average — Keith Hudson, Eta Omicron Chapter (North Carolina State University); Highest Semester Grade Point Average — Tim

north Carolina Alpha Pi Lambda hosts state convention Greetings from the best place to live, Winston-Salem, North Carolina, and Alpha Pi Lambda of Winston-Salem, Beta Iota of Winston-Salem State University, and Xi Eta of Wake Forest University, host chapters of the 19th Annual State Convention. "Saluting the past, Securing the future" ("The New Alpha Thrust") was the theme marking the agenda February 5, 1982 and February 6, 1982. The "headquarters" pyramid was the majestic Hyatt Regency Hotel of the "twin city" where registration was conducted on the Green Level Friday and Saturday. Brother Acie McGee was The Sphinx / Fall 1982

Winston-Salem city officials welcome North Carolina Alphas to the state convention in that city. Shown are, left to right, Rev. ]. Ray Butler, Dr. Douglas Covington, Rev. Royal Puryear, David Wagner, Alderwoman Virginia Newall, General President Ozell Sutton, Mayor Wayne Corpening, and Harold Brown. 57


Strachan, Eta Omicron Chapter (North Carolina State University); Alpha Man of Merit Award — Les Griffin, Epsilon Rho Lambda (Fayetteville, North Carolina); and Oratorical Contest — Leroy Beatty III, Beta Zeta (Elizabeth City State University). After remarks by the national and regional officers present, the convention was closed by Brother Witherspoon. Bedecked in formal black and gold attire, Alphas and their lovely ladies danced to the mesmerizing sounds of the Ebony Music Company of WinstonSalem under the direction of Dr. Frederick Tanner. During intermission, the Alpha Hymn was sung as the Ebony Music Company provided accompaniment in the background. A most meaningful state convention was held in Winston-Salem, North Carolina, the best city in America in which to live! Alpha men — You Were There!

mississippi Columbus Brother presents organ to church Members of Eta Phi Lambda Chapter, Columbus, Mississippi, joined chapter member W. L. Edwards and

his family at the dedication service for a new Hammond organ and Leslie speakers at St. James United Methodist Church in Columbus. The organ and speakers were presented to the church by Brother Edwards and his family, who are members of St. James, on Easter Sunday morning. The dedication ceremony was held at a later date.

florida "Changing of the Guard" at Mu Zeta Lambda Greetings from the Brothers of Mu Zeta Lambda (Polk County, Florida). Our chapter recently underwent a "Changing of the Guard" as Brother Robert Holland, of Bartow, was elected to a term as Chapter President and Brother James Ward, of Lakeland, was elected Vice President. They took office in September and under their leadership we all look forward to giving them our full support as we continue our trek "Onward and Upward Towards The Light." On Sunday, May 23 we sponsored our Annual High School Awards Program at the Lake Ridge Community Center in Lakeland. Under the directioin of Brother Jack Johnson, our chapter's Director of Educational Activities, we cited high school senior males from every high school through-

out Polk County and Plant City for outstanding service to their respective schools and communities. Included among this group of outstanding young men was Mr. Horace Broadnax, an exceptional student - athlete (basketball) from Plant City High School. His name bears remembering — for besides possessing a 3.2 academic grade point average, this young man led his team to the 1982 State of Florida Class 4-A High School Basketball Championship; made first team All-State; and, afterwards, signed a four-year basketball scholarship to Georgetown University in Washington, D.C., this year's runnerup to 1982 Division I Champion North Carolina. With the graduation from Georgetown of All-American guard Sleepy Floyd, we look for this young man to step right in and have an immediate impact on next year's team. During this award ceremony we demonstrated to those in attendance our chapter's versatility, as well as providing an exhibition of Alphamen "Leading by Example" - as we carried out the entire program from among the chapter membership. Brother Ken Glover presided; Brother Jack Johnson provided the music on the piano; Brother Phillip Walker gave the invocation; Brother Lynwood Bell sang two solos; Brother Marvin McCloud gave the Occasion; Brother Donzell Floyd gave an historical sketch of Alpha Phi Alpha; Brother Ken Riley provided Words of Encouragement and Motivation, followed by the awards presentations; and Brother Lorenzo Robinson, the then-Chapter President, gave closing remarks — after which refreshments were served. We pointed out several areas of leadership in which members of our chapter provide services at church and in the community. We also informed them of our individual career fields. This entire evening was summarized by pointing out to them that whatever areas they feel that their communities are deficient in, it is now their duty to go out, acquire the necessary training to delete those deficiencies, and return to their hometowns and likewise lead by example. And, naturally, we hope that a few Alphamen will emerge from that group also.

Brother W. I. Edwards, front right, is joined by fellow members of Eta Phi Lambda Chapter at the dedication of a new organ presented to St. James UMC by the Edwards family. 58

iffift The Sphinx / Fall 1982


SOUTHWEST louisiana Nu Theta Lambda awards McCoy Scholarships Nu Theta Lambda Chapter, St. Martinville, Louisiana, awarded John B. McCoy Memorial Scholarships to Jawan Marie Wiltz and Lynn Brew. Brother Alvin Wiltz, President of Nu Theta Lambda, made the presentations. The scholarships are given annually to academically deserving students. Jawan attends Xavier University in New Orleans and Lynn attends Southern University in Baton Rouge. Nu Theta Lambda has had since its inception a strong commitment to excellence in education and scholarship. The Fraternity sponsors many efforts to sustain this commitment via financial, moral and motivational activities.

Oklahoma state u EE seeks "Excellence in the Eighties" Greetings to those in Alphadom, from the Brothers of the electrifying Epsilon Epsilon Chapter at Oklahoma State University. 1982 was a continuation of EE's "Efforts Toward Excellence in the Eighties." The past year's activities began with a visit to the Children's Ward of the local hospital, soon followed by a Halloween Party for underprivileged youth. The community project was accomplished with the painting of the Stillwater Community Center (a preschool center for disadvantaged children). The Fall Semester concluded with addition of new Brothers, one of whom was the son of an EE alumnus, Brother Sam Pegues. The members of the ship "Parage" crossed the burning sands on April 3, 1981. The enthusiasm of these Brothers carried over into 1982 with the continuation of Alpha's Black High School Day. This program was implemented to increase the number of Black students at OSU. It was the brainchild of Brother Aaron J. Hill and has since been adopted as an integral part of The Sphinx / Fall 1982

Nu Theta Lambda President Alvin Wiltz, left, congratulates the chapter's scholarship winners — Jawan Wiltz, center, and Lynn Brew, right.

OSU's recruitment of Black high school students. This is yet another step AOA has made in promoting the importance of a college education in today's society. Our Civil Project included a rally for the late Brother Martin L. King's birthday's designation as a national holiday - which included gospel singing and a letter drive organized by the Alphas. Our socials included the 3rd Annual "Night on the Town," in which our House is transformed to include a Disco Room, a Game Room, a Live Entertainment Room featuring our very own band, and a Jazz Room. It was a great success I We have many projects planned for this year which include: 1) our participation in the Big Brother program; 2) our annual Blood Drive by the Sphinxmen; 3) a Jog-a-thon for the Cancer Society; 4) our continuation of efforts to nationalize the late Brother King's birthday; and, 5) a proposed statewide meeting of undergraduate chapters. The struggle to uphold the standards and ideals is a continual challenge, one which we have committed ourselves to meeting with increased ingenuity and tenacity. All chapters are encouraged to correspond with us and exchange with us your ideas and goals for a better Alpha Phi Alpha.

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Published continuously since 1914

Spring '83 — January 1st Summer '83 — March 1st


WEST California Vollejo chapter makes first scholarship award Brother Henry W. Elliott, President of Kappa Omicron Lambda Chapter of Vallejo, California presented $500 scholarships to graduating seniors Morgan E. Edwards of Hogan High School and Phillip A. Johnson of Vallejo High School. He was joined by Brothers Francis Tucker, Dr. Arthur Murray and Bill Thurston of the Education Committee. This marks the first year the chapter has presented scholarships to outstanding graduates. Morgan has been accepted in the Department of Chemistry at U.C. Berkeley and Johnson has been accepted at San Jose State University. The chapter has plans to offer annual scholarships to high school graduates of Solano County on a continuing basis.

60

Kappa Omicron Lambda President Henry Elliott (2nd from right) presents scholarships to Morgan Edwards (3rd from right) and Phillip Johnson (4th from right). They are joined by members of the chapter's Education Committee.

The Sphinx/Fall 1982


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Omega Chapter* Laurence T. Young, Sr., Editor

Brother THERNELL ROTHCHILD ANDERSON, age 64, entered Omega Chapter August 1, 1982 in his home, following an extended illness. Brother Anderson was born in Savannah, Georgia June 23, 1908 receiving his elementary education in Florence, South Carolina; and his professional education at Morehouse College, Atlanta, Georgia, where he became affiliated with Alpha Rho Chapter, later transferring to Xi Lambda Chapter in Chicago, Illinois. With the outbreak of World War II he entered military service and was assigned to the Air Force. At the close of the war, Brother Anderson returned to civilian life and became a member of the Chicago Chapter of the Tuskegee Airmen's Association. He was a long-time member of the Church of the Good Shepherd where he served in many official capacities. In addition to his many other activities Brother Anderson was a valued employee of the U.S. Postal Service for over 34 years until his retirement in 1975. Funeral rites were conducted by the Reverend Randell E. Evans, Jr. at the Church of the Good Shepherd August 7, 1982. The Fraternity's Omega services (Memorial) were conducted by officers of Xi Lambda Chapter Sunday, September 19, 1982. Survivors include a wife, Rhea; a son, Thernell III; three sisters, Eula, Daisy, and Margaret; a brother, Otis; a brother-in-law, Walter K. Black; and many collateral relatives and friends.

Brother W. HAROLD BETHEL, age 80, entered Omega Chapter August 28, 1982 at the Veteran's Hospital in Albany, New York following an extended illness. Brother Bethel was born in Buffalo, New York where he received his elementary and secondary education. He received his professional education at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology; thence coming to Albany, New York to assume a post as civil engineer for the Department of Public Works in Albany. Brother Bethel was a member of Beta Pi Lambda Chapter, which he helped organize and a member of many civil, social and professional organizations. Funeral rites were held September 2, 1982 at the Tebbutt Funeral Home, 633 Central Avenue in Albany, New York. There were no immediate

B r o t h e r G A S T O N TROY COOK, SR., age 82, a retired school principal, entered Omega Chapter June 13, 1982 at his home in Gainesville, Florida. He was born in Ocala, Florida and was a lifetime resident of Gainesville. Brother Cook's original chapter was Alpha Gamma Lambda â&#x20AC;&#x201D; later transferring to Nu Eta Lambda Chapter. Final rites were conducted at Chestnut Memorial Chapter in Gainesville, following which Omega Chapter rites were held simultaneously with words of tribute made by Brother J. C. Rawls, State Director. Brother Cook received his elementary education at Fessenden Academy â&#x20AC;&#x201D; receiving his Bachelor's degree from Fisk University in 1922, and a Master's degree from New York University - doing further graduate work at Florida A&M University. He is survived by his wife, Altamese; a son, Gaston, Jr.; a daughter, Joyce; many grandchildren and collateral relatives. 62

Brother DONALD S. FLETCHER recently entered Omega Chapter one of the youngest members of Eta Delta Chapter, Univesity of Miami, Miami, Florida. He was a devoted and dedicated officer of this chapter and his untimely passing is mourned by his Brothers and friends throughout the area. A tender tribute was offered by the Brothers of Eta Delta Chapter: "The tears we shed over this Brother shall not be in vain. He was and will always be our inspiration, and guide for becoming a strong and enduring leader. Our love for him will never die. We wish you peace and serenity."

Brother PLESANT WILLIAM GOODE, JR. entered Omega Chapter July 27, 1982 in his home at Mobile, Alabama following a brief illness. Brother Plesant was born September 1, 1897 in Mobile, Alabama where he received his elementary education. He received his Baccalaureate degree from Talladega College (Alabama), and earned his Doctor's degree from the University of Pittsburgh Dental School, where he was initiated into Omicron Chapter, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, following which he opened his dental practice in Mobile. Brother Plesant was a member of Hiram Lodge #3 - Free and Accepted Masons; past president of the Gulf Coast Dental Association and the Alabama State Dental Society; member of the Board of Directors of the Gulf Federal Savings and Loan Association of Mobile. Funeral rites were conducted at the Hope Chapel A.M.E. Zion Church in Mobile on July 30, 1982, with the Reverend James H. Taylor officiating. He is survived by his wife, Beatrice; one son, Bernard; two daughters, Beatrice and Annie; a brother, Dr. E. B. Goode; a sister, Thelma; many collateral relatives and a host of friends.

Brother THOMAS H. HAYES, JR. entered Omega Chapter Tuesday, July 20, 1982 at Eastwood Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee following a lengthy illness. Brother Hayes was born in Memphis, Tennessee where he attended elementary and secondary schools, followed by attendance at Atlanta University, Lincoln University and the University where he earned a Master of Business Administration degree. Brother Hayes was President and owner of the T. H. Hayes and Sons Funeral Home, which was founded by his father in 1902. The funeral home is the largest and oldest Black business in Memphis, Tennessee. Brother Hayes was co-founder of the Union Protective Life Insurance Company and served as its vice president until 1980, when it was purchased by the Universal Life Insurance Company. Brother Hayes was an active member of Alpha Delta Lambda Chapter and served with distinction as its president. Funeral rites were held July 24, 1982 at the Metropolitan Baptist Church in Memphis. He is survived by his wife, Helen; two daughters, Helen and Tommye; two grandchildren; many collateral relatives and a host of friends.

The Sphinx /Fall 1982


Brother ROBERT J. R. LARGEN entered Omega Chapter July 8, 1981 in his home in Albany, Georgia following an extended illness. Brother Largen was an active member of Gamma Omicron Lambda Chapter in Albany, Georgia for a period of more than forty years. He was educated at the University of Illinois and the University of Iowa in the area of Speech and Theatre; he was on the faculty of Albany State College, Albany, Georgia for over 27 years. He held positions in the Department of English; he was college theatre director with speech therapy as his major responsibility. Brother Largen was a professional Parliamentarian and was so certified; he was a faithful member of Bethel AME Church of Albany, Georgia; member of the Senior Choir; member of the Usher Board; a church steward and a Sunday School teacher for the past four decades. His faithfulness and fervor for all that he did, especially for Alpha Phi Alpha, was and long shall be an inspiration to all that knew him.

Brother ERNEST B. PEOPLE entered Omega Chapter July 4, 1982 in Waco, Texas. He was born in Marlin, Texas May 20, 1934 and moved to Waco, Texas at an early age. Brother People received his elementary and secondary education in the Waco Independent School District; his Baccalaureate degree at Paul Quinn College and his Master's degree from Prairie View A&M University. Brother People was an active member of Epsilon Epsilon Chapter for many years, having served that chapter in official capacities for the past several years. Brother People was on the faculty of Paul Quinn College, and for the last 12 years directed the Special Services Program, along with the Talent Search and Upward Bound program. Brother People was a member of many local and national organizations and was chairman of the Board of Deacons of the Carver Park Baptist Church, where last rites were performed. He is survived by his wife, Louise; a daughter, Cheryl; and his mother, Angelina.

Brother HOVEY DON MOORE entered Omega Chapter August 5, 1982 in Berkeley, California following an extended illness. He was born in Fort Worth, Texas, March 21, 1910. He received his elementary and secondary education in Fort Worth, Texas - later moving to California where he received his Baccalaureate degree at the University of California, Berkeley. Brother Moore was employed as a postal worker in Sacramento, California, and subsequently became an employee of the State of California as an Inheritance Tax Examiner in the State Comptroller's Office. For over 30 years Brother Moore was an active member of St. Andrews AME Church, serving on the Trustee Board. He also held membership in several civic, community and social organizations in Berkeley. He was an active member of Alpha Epsilon Chapter at the University of California and later became a charter member of Zeta Beta Lambda Chapter. Funeral rites were conducted by the Reverend George Baber at St. Andrew's Church on August 2, 1982. Alpha's Omega service was conducted at graveside with Brother Clifford Basfield officiating. Brother Moore is survived by his wife, Ila; a son, Charles; three daughters, Shirley, Barbara and Donna; a sister, Josie; and a brother, Julian; together with a host of collateral relatives and friends.

Brother MARTIN PREE, age 65, passed into Omega Chapter May 21, 1982 in his home, following a brief illness. Brother Pree received his elementary and secondary education in the public schools of Washington, D . C ; his graduate and professional education at Lincoln University, Oxford, Pennsylvania, where he was admitted into Phi Kappa Epsilon Honorary Scholastic Society. He was a member of Nu Chapter at Lincoln University and later transferred to Mu Lambda Chapter in Washington, D.C. He was known for his scholarship and athletic abilities. Following his educational activities, and his athletic prowess, Brother Pree spent the remaining 33 years of his career in the services of the U.S. Government. Brother Pree is survived by his wife, Audrey; his daughters, Rosalaind, Carolyn and Phyllis; a son, Marvin; and many collateral relatives.

Brother ROLAND N. PATTERSON entered Omega Chapter August 9, 1982 in Provident Hospital, Baltimore, Maryland following an extended illness. He was born September 22, 1928 in Washington, D . C , where he received his elementary education in the public schools. Brother Patterson was Superintendent of Schools in Baltimore, Maryland for several years and ranked as the nation's top educator. Brother Patterson was an active member of Delta Lambda Chapter, which chapter held Omega services prior to the final rites which were conducted by the Reverend Harold A. Carter, pastor of New Shiloh Baptist Church, Baltimore, Maryland. Brother Patterson held membership in many professional, national and local organizations, among which is the National Alliance of Black School Educators, which he sponsored. He is survived by his wife Marion of 27 years; a son, Roland, Jr.; a daughter, Doris; five brothers, all of Washington, D . C ; and three sisters. Burial was accomplished at Lincoln Cemetery in Washington, D.C.

The Sphinx/Fall 1982

Brother HERBERT QUICK, age 57, entered Omega Chapter July 13, 1982 in his home following a brief illness. Brother Quick was an active member of Gamma Iota Lambda Chapter for many years, serving in many chapter offices and activities. An overflow crowd of Brothers and others â&#x20AC;&#x201D; men, women, children, professionals â&#x20AC;&#x201D; people from all walks of life filled the Woodward Funeral Home in Brooklyn where the visitation was held; also the Alpha's Omega rites, conducted by the local chapter, on July 17, 1982. "He was one of the finest Brothers in a chapter noted for the professional accomplishments and impeccable standards of its members," said Brother Hobard Jarrett, former chapter President; other remarks were made by Brother Charles Greene - who spoke of Brother Quick's devotion to the Fraternity, as well as to his profession of Dentistry. The Brothers of the local chapter presented to his widow the Distinguished Service Award posthumously, in memory of Brother Quick. Brother Quick is survived by his wife, Sarah; a sister, Anne; a son; and a host of relatives and friends.

63


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THE SEVEN JEWELS

Henry A. Callis, M.D.

Charles H. Chapman

Eugene Kinckle Jones

George B. Kelley

Nathaniel A. Murray

Robert H. Ogle

Vertner W. Tandy

GENERAL OFFICERS GENERAL PRESIDENT - Ozell Sutton, 1640 Loch Lomond Trail, SW, Atlanta, G A 30331 EXECUTIVE SECRETARY - James B. Blanton, 4432 King Drive, Chicago, IL 60653 GENERAL TREASURER - James M. Trent, 3606 Edward Street, Landover, M D 20785 GENERAL COUNSEL - John W. Walker, 6520 Sherry Drive, Little Rock, AR 72204 HISTORIAN - Charles H. Wesley, 7632 17th Street, NW, Washington, D C 20012 COMPTROLLER - Charles C. Teamer, 2601 Gentilly Blvd., N e w Orleans, LA 70122 DIRECTOR-GENERAL C O N V E N T I O N S - Kermit J. HaU, 100 Fairview A v e . , Yeadon, PA 19050 VICE PRESIDENTS EASTERN - Thomas R. Hunt, 9 Rickover Court, Annapolis, M D 21401 MIDWESTERN - Jimmie L. Buford, 9807 Smalley Avenue, Kansas City, M O 64134 SOUTHERN - W. Mingo Clark, 2026 Winchester Road, Huntsville, AL 35810 SOUTHWESTERN - Raymond E. Carreathers, P.O. Drawer N, Prairie View, TX 77445 WESTERN - Clinton L. Minnis, 8786 S. LaSalle Avenue, Los Angeles, CA 90047 ASSISTANT VICE PRESIDENTS EASTERN - Kirk L. Bowen, 259 West 131st Street, N e w York, NY 10027 MIDWESTERN - James H. Cary, Jr., 1240 East 135th Street, East Cleveland, O H 44112 SOUTHERN - Anthony Hightower, 2210 Ross Avenue, College Park, G A 30337 SOUTHWESTERN - Sherwin L. Harvey, P.O. Box 2952, State University, AR 72467 WESTERN - Oscar L. Cosby, 909 W. Adams Boulevard, Apt. B-5, Los Angeles, C A 90007

Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity, Inc. GENERAL OFFICE: 4432 Martin Luther King Drive Chicago, IL 60653 Telephone: (312) 373-1819

Alpha Phi Alpha Education Foundation, Inc. Walter W. Sullivan, Chairman 1800 N e w Hope Road, SW Atlanta, G A 30331 James B. Blanton, Secretary James M. Trent, Treasurer John W. Walker, Counsel Ivan L. Cotman Ernest L. Hollo w a y Keith Miller Henry Ponder Jesse H. Sterling Paul C. Williams Ozell Sutton, Ex-Officio AWARDS To be appointed BUDGET AND FINANCE Charles C. Teamer 2601 Gentilly Boulevard New Orleans, LA 70122 BUSINESS ENCOURAGEMENT Virgil Chandler 4220 Pratt Street Omaha, NB 68111 COLLEGE BROTHERS AFFAIRS Norman E. Towels 10601 Diana Avenue, #456 Riverside, C A 92505 CONSTITUTION Milton C. Davis 1202 Montgomery Road Tuskegee Institute, AL 36088 Moses Melvin Morrison*

NATIONAL COMMITTEE/COMMISSION CHAIRMEN ELECTIONS John I. Hendricks, Jr. Box 42 Alcorn State University Lorman, MS 39096 EQUITABLE EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY Charles E. Lewis 3500 Fieldstone Drive Winston-Salem, NC 27105 GRIEVANCES AND DISCIPLINE Wilbur Hardy 329 Troy Street Aurora, CO 80011 LIFE MEMBERSHIP Elmer C. Collins 26151 Lake Shore Blvd. #1224 Euclid, OH 44132

ONE MILLION DOLLAR DRIVE Isadore J. Lamothe, Jr. 1407 University Avenue Marshall, TX 75670 PERSONNEL Thomas A. Phillips 9908 Taylor Drive Overland Park, KS 66212

SENIOR ALPHA AFFAIRS Laurence T. Young, Sr. 555 E. 33rd Place, »1208 Chicago, IL 60616

RECLAMATION AND MEMBERSHIP SPECIAL PROJECTS William Ross, Jr. Hanley J. Norment 5205 Overbrook Avenue 12500 Arbor View Terrace Philadelphia, PA 19131 Silver Spring, MD 20904 STANDARDS AND EXTENSION A. M. Witherspoon 2701 Rothgeb Drive Raleigh, NC 27609

PUBLICATIONS Joseph E. Heyward P.O. Box 384 Florence, SC 29503

RULES AND CREDENTIALS Emmett W. Bashful 5808 Lafaye Street New Orleans, LA 70122

TIME AND PLACE Frank Devine 6202 Washington Avenue Philadelphia, PA 19143

PAST GENERAL PRESIDENTS Howard H. Long*

B. Andrew Rose*

W. A. Pollard* Daniel D. Fowler* L. L. McCee'

Rayford W . Logan*

S. S. Booker*

Belford V. Lawson, Jr. 1813 Kalorama Sq. N.W. Washington, DC 20009

Raymond W . Cannon

2008 Virginia Road Los Angeles, CA 90016

A. Maceo Smith* Frank L. Stanley, Sr.*

The Sphinx / Fall 1982

PUCLICTY - PUBLIC RELATIONS Harvey L. Brinson 12818 Broadmore Road Silver Spring, MD 20904

RECOMMENDATIONS Solomon Stinson 6900 NW 5th Avenue Miami, FL 33150

Frederick Miller Drawer "M" Mound Bayou, MS 38762

Henry Arthur Callis*

James B. Blanton, Secretary James M. Trent, Treasurer John W. Walker, Counsel Mitchell Albert Larry L. Earvin Albert Holland Allen Killings Herbert Marshall Ozell Sutton, Ex-Officio

PUBLIC POLICY Hobart S. Jarrett 315 West 70th Street, (15 New York, NY 10023

Roscoe C. Giles*

Henry L. Dickason*

Wayne C. Harvey, Chairman 8775 W. Kingsbury University City, M O 63124

James B. Blanton, Executive Secretary Michael J. Price, Assistant Executive Secretary, Editor-in-Chief, The Sphinx Waldo E. Johnson, Assistant Executive Secretary - Programs

Charles H. Wesley 7632 17th Street, N.W. Washington, DC 20012

Charles H. Garvin*

Alpha Phi Alpha Building Foundation, Inc.

Myles A. Paige 4124 Kenway Avenue Los Angeles, CA 90008

Ernest N. Mortal 1101 Harrison Avenue New Orleans, LA 70122

William H. Hale*

Walter Washington Alcorn State University

T. Winston Cole 124 S.W. 23rd Gainesville, FL 32601 Lionel H. Newsom Central State University Wilberforce, OH 45384

Lorman, M S 39096

James R. Williams S84 Avalon Akron, OH 44320 •OMEGA CHAPTER

65


Directory of Chapters All chapters are required to submit a Chapter Directory to the General Office within ten (10) days after the election of chapter officers. This form should list the chapter's "Official Contact person" — to whom all chapter mail is sent. This listing contains — only — those addresses sent to the General Office for 1981-82.

I LEGEND I (A) (P) (CS) (S) (FS) (RS) EAST

Theta l o b Lambda (Springfield - #286) Arthur Shurn (S) 242 Middlesex Street Springfield, MA 01109 Nu l i Lambda (Sudbury - #540) Clifton E Reed (P) 14 Gedick Road Burlington, MA 01803 CONNECTICUT (Area III #439)COLLEGE CHAPTERS

INTERNATIONAL (DISTRICT I) Dirtctor Elmer Moore 2717 Tennyson S t NW Washington. DC 20015 AFRICA {Ann I) COLLEGE CHAPTERS Kappa Phi (U of Liberia - Cuttmgton Coll No Report ALUMNI CHAPTERS Eta Epsilon Lambda (Monrovia. Liberia - # 2 6 0 No Report EUROPE ( A m III Tbeta Theta Lambda (Frankfort. German) - #285 Lt Col Donald C Thomas, Jr (CS) Bra 9425 (Kaiserslautern. GE) APO NY 09012 CARIBBEAN (Ana III) Theta Epsilon Lambda (St Thomas. VI - #282) No Report iota Sigma Lambda (St Crou. VI - #518) No Report Epsilon Theta Lambda (Hamilton. Bermuda • #219) No Report lota Epsilon Lambda (Nassau, Bahamas - #506) No Report ASIA (Aria IV) M a Phi Lambda

(Seoul, South Korea - #565) Johnny Thomas (P) HHC, EUSA SJA TDS APO San Francisco. CA 96301

NEW ENGLAND (DISTRICT Director Thomas 0 Harris. IV 135 Canterbury Street Hartford. CI 06112 MASSACHUSETTS (Area II COLLEGE CHAPTERS Sigma (Metropolitan - #17) Cedric lones (P) 471 Memorial Drive Cambridge. MA 0 2 1 3 9 Alpha Kappa (Metropolitan - #32) No Report ALUMNI CHAPTERS Epsilon Gamma Lambda (Boston - #214) John H. McMullen. I t . (P) 8 Pine Street Sharon. MA 02067

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(Vale U - #6) No Report Kappa Delta (U of Connecticut - #423) Terry D. Sheppard (T) Sprague Hall. Room 249S U of Connecticut Storrs. CT 06268 Mu Phi (U of Bridgeport - #461) No Report Mu Psi (SCSC - #463) No Report ALUMNI CHAPTERS Beta Sigma Lambda (Hartford - #161) Royce A Rosmond (P) 2 Christine Circle Bloomfield. CT 06002 Zeta Phi Lambda (Stamford - #253) No Report Eta Alpha Lambda (New Haven - #256) Logan M. Hill (P) 42 Bungay Terrace Seymour. CT 06483 RHODE ISLAND (Area III) COLLEGE CHAPTERS Alpha Gamma (Brown U - #26) Mark Frentress (P) Bra 1167 - Brown University Providence, Rl 0 2 9 1 2 1 1 6 7 ALUMNI CHAPTERS Mu Theta Lambda (Providence - #553) No Report NEW HAMPSHIRE (Area IV) COLLEGE CHAPTERS Thela Zeta (Dartmouth College - #381) Alan B Bond (P) Hinman Bra 5024 - Dartmouth College Hanover, NH 03755

NEW YORK STATE (DISTRICT III) Director Clifford R Clemmons 221-25 Manor Road Queens Village. NY 11427 WESTERN NEW YORK STATE (Area I) COLLEGE CHAPTERS Delta Epsilon (U of Buffalo - #93) Darrel L Hawkins (P) Union 400 - SUC at Buffalo 1300 Elmwood Buffalo, NY 14222 Mu Sigma (U of Rochester - #458) Kevin Huff (P)

Box 659 25 Andrews Memorial Drive Rochester. NY 14623

66

(T) (ES) (VP) (DOP) (DP) (AS)

Advisor President Corresponding Secretary Secretary Financial Secretary Recording Secretary ALUMNI CHAPTERS Rho Lambda ( B u f f a l o - #116) Robin D Thompson (CS) 59 Woodlawn Avenue Buffalo, NY 14209 Eta Theta Lambda (Wyandoance - #263) George Mims (P) 885 Seneca Road W Hempstead. NY 11552 Eta Rho Lambda (Rochester - #271) Rufus W. McGee (RC) 201 Warner Street Rochester. NY 14606 CENTRAL NEW YORK STATE (Area II) COLLEGE CHAPTERS

Alpha (Cornell U - #1) Erskine R Tucker, Ir. (P) 409 Elmwood Avenue

ALUMNI CHAPTERS Alpha Gamma Lambda (New York - #125) No Report Kappa Xi Lambda (New York - #536) No Report BROOKLYN and LONG ISLAND (Are. VI, COLLEGE CHAPTERS Delta Chi (City of Brooklyn - #308) No Report Theta Epsilon (Adelphi U - #380) David C. Tanner (VP) Adeiphi-U Center, Room 109 Garden City, NY 11530

NEW JERSEY (DISTRICT IV)

ALUMNI CHAPTERS Beta Pi Lambda (Albany - #159) Irving Smith. Ir, (S) 35 Bnarwood Road Loudonville. NY 12211 Thela Chi Lambda (Schenectady - #298) No Report Iota lota Lambda

(Rome - #510) No Report HUDSON VALLEY (Area IV) ALUMNI CHAPTERS Eta Zeta Lambda (New Rochelle - #261) No Report Eta Chi Lambda (Nyack - #276) Walter C Blount. )r. (S) P 0 Box 165 Orangeburg. NY 10962 Kappa Upsilon Lambda (Mid-Hudson Valley - #542) lames E. Royal, Jr. (P) 38 North Street Newburgh, NY 12550 METRO NEW YORK CITY (Area V| COLLEGE CHAPTERS Eta (Metropolitan - #7) No Report ZltaEta (Columbia U - #338) No Report

Plamfield, NJ 07062 Omicron ZeU (Fairleigh Dickinson University Richard L. Matthews (P) 250 17th Street Paterson. Nl 07054 ALUMNI CHAPTERS Alpha Alpha Lambda (Newark - #123) Warren E. Sherwood (S) 15 Columbus Avenue Montclair, NJ 07042 Beta Alpha Lambda (Jersey City - #145) No Report Delta Mu Lambda (Paterson - #199) Joseph Fulmore (P) 496 East 29th Street Paterson, NJ 07514 Kappa Theta Lambda (Teaneck - #531) Arnold E Brown (P) P. 0- Box 776 106 West Palisade Ave Englewood. NJ 07631 (AREA II - CENTRAL) COLLEGE CHAPTER Delta Iota (Rutgers U - #97) No Report ALUMNI CHAPTERS Zlta Epsilon Lambda (Red Bank - #238) No Report

Zeta Nu Lambda (Plamfield - #245) Malcolm L Champion (P) 1030 Prospect Ave. Plamfield, NJ 07060 Theta Psi Lambda (Somerset - #299) ~

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COLLEGE CHAPTERS lota lota (Trenton State College #406) Algernon Ward (P) 851 Carteret Avenue Trenton. NJ 08618 Nu lota (Glassboro State - #472) Phillip L. Jackson (P) 227L Parkcrest Village Glassboro, NJ 08028 ALUMNI CHAPTERS Alpha Theta Lambda (Atlantic City - #130) 0 . C. Edwards (P) 310 North Illinois Ave Atlantic City, NJ 08401 Zeta lota Lambda (Trenton - #242) No Report Kappa lota Lambda (Burlington County - #532) No Report Nu Gamma Lambda (Glassboro - #570) No Report

Kappa Rho (C. W. Post College - #435) No Report Xi Psi (Hofslra University +707) Raymond Remirez (ED) Box 42 - Hofstra University Hempstead. NY 11550

Ithaca, NY 14850 Delta Zeta (Syracuse U - #94) ALUMNI CHAPTERS Gerald G Erasme (P) Gamma Iota Lambda P. 0. Box 185 - S.U Station (Brooklyn-Long Island - #175) Syracuse. NY 13210 No Report ALUMNI CHAPTERS Zeta Zeta Lambda lota Theta Lambda (St. Albans - #239) (Endicott - #509) Roy Foust (CS) Robert E. Hunter (S) 112 01 175th Street 600 Princeton Drive Jatnaica, NY 11433 Vestal, NY 13850 l o l l Kappa Lambda (Syracuse - #511) Director Melvin Beard (P) Elbert C Wisner P. 0 Box 6565 300 Lincoln Dr., Colonial Terr. Teall Avenue Station Ocean. Nl 07712 Syracuse. NY 13210 .... (AREA I - NORTHERN) 1 NORTHEAST NEW YORK STATE (Area COLLEGE CHAPTERS COLLEGE CHAPTERS lota Rho Kappa Zeta .(Newark College of Engineering (IJdca College - #425) Kevin Turner (P) No Report 1129 E. 3rd Street

Treasurer Editor-to-the-Sphinx Vice President Dean of Pledges Dean of Pledges Assistant Secretary

-

PENNSYLVANIA (DISTRICT V) Director Frank Devine 6202 Washington Avenue Philadelphia. PA 19143 WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA (Area I) COLLEGE CHAPTERS <413) Omicron

#713)

ALUMNI CHAPTERS Zeta Theta Lambda (Harrisburg - #241) Joseph Robinson, Jr, (CS) P 0 . Box 10436 Harrisburg, PA 17105 EASTERN PENNSYLVANIA (Area III) COLLEGE CHAPTERS Nu

lota Alpha Lambda (Aberdeen - #502) Leroy Stansbury (S) 644 Elm Street Aberdeen. MD 21001 Kappa Kappa Lambda

(Lincoln U - #12) No Report Psi (U of Pennsylvania - #22) James King, Jr. (P) c/o Office of Fraternity Affairs 3734 Locust Walk Philadelphia, PA 19104 Delta Pi (Cheney - 302) No Report Zeta Psi (West Chester State Coll, #353) No Report ALUMNI CHAPTERS Rho (Philadelphia - #16) Harold 0. Trawick (P) 6632 Boyei Street Philadelphia. PA 19119 Zeta Omicron Lambda (Philadelphia - #247) Waverly L. Easley (P) 2332 Bryn Mawr Avenue Philadelphia, PA 19143

COLLEGE CHAPTERS lota Zeta (U of Maryland - #403) No Report Mu Upsilon (Frostburg State Coll. - #460) Loremo E. Waters, Jr. (S) Frostburg Stte University Box 64 Frostburg. MD 21532

DELAWARE, MARYLAND „ c (D1STR|CT „,,

&

Director Hanley J. Norment 12500 Arbor View Terrace Silver Spring. MD 20902 DELAWARE (Area I)

COLLEGE CHAPTERS Gamma Sigma (U of Pittsburgh - #14) (Delaware State College Charles R. Davis, Ir. (P) No Report P. 0. Box 7184 - Oakland Station Xi Omicron Pittsburgh, PA 15213 M of Delaware - #499) Iota Sigma No Report iMillersviile State Coll. - #414) ALUMNI CHAPTERS No Report Gamma Theta Lambda XiMu (Wilmington - #174) (Slippery Rock State College - #496) i V ' T " ! , ph.l.n 'hihp While White »P1 (VP) Zeta Rho Lambda P. 0 Box 242 (Dover - #249) Slippery Rock. PA 16057 John H. Quarles (P) Xi Sigma (Indi'aTa'u of Pennsylvania Harold K Lloyd (P) Box 1700 Folger Indiana Umv of PA Indiana, PA 15705 ALUMNI CHAPTERS Alpha Omicron Lambda (Pittsburgh - #136) Alfred E Richardson (P) 218 Manor Ct. Pittsburgh. PA 15241 Kappa Beta Lambda (Erie - #525) No Report Nu Upsilon Lambda (Pittsburgh - #586) Walter H. Green (S) 420 Graham

#702)

a* Pittsburgh, PA 15232 CENTRAL PENNSYLVANIA lArea II) COLLEGE CHAPTERS Gamma Nu (Pennsylvania State U - #78) No Report

3

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MARYLAND NORTH (Arts III COLLEGE CHAPTERS l a t a Alpha (Morgan State U - #45) William A. Sheiman (P) 5964 Daywalt Avenue Apartment B Baltimore. MD 21206 Mu Rho (Towson State - #457) Kenneth Green (CS) Mu Rho Chapter Box 906 - Towson State U Towson. MD 21204 Nu Kappa #473) (UM-Baltimore County No Report ALUMNI CHAPTERS Delta Lambda (Baltimore - #104) Robsol G. Pinkett (S) 3201 Clifton Avenue Baltimore. MD 21216

(Baltimore - #533) No Report MARYLAND SOUTHWEST (Area III)

ALUMNI CHAPTERS lota Upsilon Lambda (Silver Spring - #520) E. Averal Austin (CS) 6 2 0 0 Westchester Park Drive College Park, MD 20740 Kappa Epsilon Lambda (Landover - #528) Sheldon C Powell (RC) P 0 , Box 2188 Capital Plaza Drive Hvattsville, MD 20784 Kappa Phi Lambda (Columbia - #543) Kenneth M. Jennings. Jr. (P) P. 0. Box 321 Columbia. MD 21045 MARYLAND EASTERN (Area IV) COLLEGE CHAPTERS Delta Nu (U of Maryland, E S . - #100) Anthony E. Miller (P) P. 0. Box 1456 - UMES Princess Anne. MD 21853 E la Zeta (Bowie State College - #359) No Report ALUMNI CHAPTERS Delta Omicron Lambda (Princess Anne - #203) No Report Eta Eta Lambda (Annapolis - #262) Randolph Robins (RC) P 0. Box 45 Gambnlls. MD 21054 WASHINGTON, D C . (Area V) COLLEGE CHAPTERS Beta (Howard U - #2) Herb V. McMillan, III (P) P. 0. Box 506 Howard University Washington. DC 20009 Nu Beta (American U - #465) Nu Beta Chapter Phillip A. Lattimore, III American University Eagle Station - Box 124 Washington, DC 20016 Omicron Omicron (UDC - #721) Edmund J. Jones (RC) 8105 Eastern Avenue C-412 Silver Springs. MD 20910 ALUMNI CHAPTERS Mu Lambda

(Washington - #111) lessee B Brown (CS) 804 Tantollon Drive Oxon Hill. MD 20744


Omicrofl Lambda Alpha Robert M. More (P) 1495 Newton Street N.W. Washington, DC 20010

VIRGINIA (DISTRICT VII) Director C. A. Pennington 3212 Griffin Avenue Richmond. VA 23222 BLUE RIDGE NORTH (Area I) COLLEGE CHAPTERS lota Alpha (Washington * Lee U - #398) No Report Mi M i (U of Virginia - #399) Kirk T. Brown (S) Newcomb Hall, Box 430 Charlottesville, VA 22904 XiDalta (James Madison U - #489) Steven D. Fields (P) Box 4172 James Madison University Harrisonburg, VA 22807 ALUMNI CHAPTERS Gamma Alpha Lambda (Charlottesville - #167) No Report BLUE RIDGE SOUTH {Ana II) COLLEGE CHAPTERS Theta Iota (Virginia Polytechnic U - #384) No Report ALUMNI CHAPTERS Alpha Kappa Lambda (Roanoke - #132) No Report Gamma Nu Lambda (Lynchburg - #178) No Report SOUTHERN VIRGINIA (Area III) COLLEGE CHAPTERS Delta Tau (St. Paul's Polytechnic - #305) George T. Hankerson (CS) Delta Tau Chapter St. Paul's College Lawrenceville. VA 23868

Kappa Pi (William S Mary - #434) No Report ALUMNI CHAPTERS Ztta Lambda (Newport News - #106) Claude Carter (CS) 12 Suburban Pkwy. Hampton, VA 23661 Delta Beta Lambda (Hampton - #190) James E. Blacken (S) P. 0. Box 483 Hampton. VA 23669 Nu DelU Lambda (Surry County - #571) No Report TIDEWATER SOUTH (Ann VIII COLLEGE CHAPTERS Epsilon Pi (Norfolk State U - #324) No Report Nu Theta (Old Dominion U - #471) Calvin E. Greene (S) 1506 West 40th Street Apartment 1 Norfolk, VA 23508 ALUMNI CHAPTERS Alpha Phi Lambda (Norfolk - #142) No Report Epsilon lota Lambda (Suffolk - #220) No Report Epsilon Nu Lambda (Portsmouth - #223) No Report Xi Alpha Lambda (Prince Williams County - #990) Chester F. Johnson (CS) 5610 Broadmoore Street Alexandria. VA 22310

nit*

(Hampden-Sydney - #491) Christopher Yim (P) Box 381 Hampden Sydney College Hampden Sydney, VA 23943 ALUMNI CHAPTERS Delta Nu Lambda (Danville - #200) No Report Epsilon Omicron Lambda (Lawrenceville - #225) Ernest L. Morse (CS) P. 0. Box 595 South Hill. VA 23970 lota Tau Lambda (Charlotte Court House - #519) Robert L. Early (S) Rt 3, Box 274 Farmville, VA 23901 NORTHERN VIRGINIA (Ana IV) ALUMNI CHAPTERS Zeta Upsilon Lambda (Reston - #252) No Report Theta Rho Lambda (Arlington - #293) Arthur B. Word (P) 404 E Bellefonte Avenue Alexandria, VA 22301 CENTRAL VIRGINIA (Area V) COLLEGE CHAPTERS Gamma (Virginia Union U - #3) Vance L. Page (P) 2215 Alton Avenue Apartment B Richmond, VA 23224 Beta Gamma (Virginia State College - #47) loseph J. Suber, Jr. (S) 1513 Oakdale Avenue Petersburg, VA 23803 Theta Rho #391) (Virginia Commonwealth U No Report ALUMNI CHAPTERS Nu Lambda (Virginia State College - #112) R. J. Hayes (CS) 21329 Sparta Drive Ettrick, VA 23803 Beta Gamma Lambda (Richmond - #147) No Report Nu Omicron Lambda (Fort Lee - #581) Michael C. Walker (CS) 849 West Wythe Street Petersburg, VA 23803 Xi Delta Lambda (Henrico County - -r-593) Leo H. Ross (P) 5210 Bonington Road Richmond. VA 23234 TIDEWATER NORTH (Ana VI) COLLEGE CHAPTERS Gamma lota (Hampton Institute - #75) Larry Townsend (P) Box 6262 Alexander Street Hampton, VA 23513

MIDWEST I L L I N O I S (Central) Director Arthur B. Cooper P. 0. Box 2085 - Station "A" Champaign. IL 61820 COLLEGE CHAPTERS Tan (U of Illinois - #18) Eric Floyd (P) 904 N. Broadway Street Urbana. IL 61820 ZitaNu (Eastern Illinois - #343) No Report Eta Tau (Illinois State U - # 3 7 1 ) Marcus Tyler (P) P. 0. Box 604 Normal, IL 61761 Theta Omicron (Miilikin ti - #389) No Report ALUMNI CHAPTERS Omicron Lambda Beta (Champaign - #501) No Report Nu Psi Lambda (Bloomington - #589) No Report

ILLINOIS (NORTHERN) Director Robert L Thirston 1734 Grove Avenue North Chicago. IL 60064 COLLEGE CHAPTERS Epsilon Phi (Northern Illinois U - #329) Reginald Greenwood (S) Northern Illinois U Epsilon Phi Chapter, Box 660 DeKalb, IL 60115 Mu Mu (Elmhurst College - #452) David A. Lewis (S) 190 Prospect, Box 324 Elmhurst. IL 60126 ALUMNI CHAPTERS Kappa Chi Lambda (Waukegan - #544) Kenneth Robinson (P) P. O. Box 512 North Chiciao, IL 60064 Mu Alpha Lambda (DeKalb - #546) No Report Mu Mu Lambda (Glen Ellyn - #556) Clarence R. Lewis (P) 10 W. 101 18th Street Lombard, IL 60146

ILLINOIS (NORTH CENTRAL Director Allen Knox 5020 S. Lake Shore Drive #2704 Chicago. IL 60616 COLLEGE CHAPTERS Theta (U ol.lllinois - Chicago #8) Antfony Irvin (P) 951 W. 104th Street Chicago, IL 60643

Alpha Mu (Northwestern U - #33) Joseph J. Fleming (P) Norris CA0 1999 Sheridan Road Evanston, IL 60615 ALUMNI CHAPTERS Xi lambda (Chicago-#113) Edgar Hamilton (P) 5020 S. Lake Shore Drive #1402 Chicago. IL 60615 Zeta Xi lambda (Evanston - #246) No Report Theta Mu Lambda Joint - #288) No Report

ILLINOIS (NORTH CENTRAL Director Arndel Ricks, Jr. 8841 S. Prairie Chicago, IL 60619 COLLEGE CHAPTERS Nu Delta (Chicago State U - #467) No Report Nu Epsilon (Lewis U - #468) Adrian Willis (P) lewis U Route 53 Romeoville. IL 60441 NuRho (NT - #479) Lester McCarroll, Jr. (P) Box 15 - IIT 3200 S. Wabash Chicago, IL 60616 Omicron Iota (DePaul U - #716) No Report Omicron Xi (Roosevelt U - #720) Durt'l Walton (P) 4901 W. Van Buren Street Chicago, IL 60644

ILLINOIS (SOUTHERN) Director John Reeves 3519 Converse Avenue East St. Louis, IL 62207 COLLEGE CHAPTERS Beta Eta (Southern Illinois U - #51) Mark E. Davis (P) 419 S. Washington Carbondale. IL 62901 Iota Pi (SIU Edwardsville - #412) Theartry Green (P) 514 N. 24th Street E St Louis, IL 62206 ALUMNI CHAPTERS Delta Epsilon lambda (East St. Louis - #193) No Report Mu Kappa Lambda (Carbondale - #555) No Report

ILLINOIS (WESTERN) Director Curley R. Bradford 3109 9)4 Street Rock Island, IL 61201 COLLEGE CHAPTERS Epsilon Kappa (Bradley U - #319) Aaron Johnson (P) 1527 W. Fredonia Peoria. IL 61606 (Western Illinois - #360) No Report ALUMNI CHAPTERS Kappa Pi Lambda (Peoria - #538) Mu Delta Lambda (Springfield - #549) Dennis C. Miner (P) 2832 Stanton Apartment 4 Springfield, IL 62703 Mu Chi Lambda (Rock Island - #566) Phillip Alexander (AE) P 0. Box 1644 Rock Island, IL 61201

INDIANA (NORTHERN) Director Theo Hamiter 7158 Anion Trail Court Indianapolis, IN 46250 COLLEGE CHAPTERS Gamma Eta (Indiana U - #73) I) Wayman Nunn (P) 501 N. Park Ave. Bloomington, IN 47402 Zeta Rho (Indiana State U - #347) No Report Nu Pi (U of Evansville - #478) No Report

ALUMNI CHAPTERS Iota lambda (Indianapolis- #109) Leslie House (CS) P. O. Box 88131 Indianapolis, IN 46208 Kappa Rho Lambda (Evansville - #539) No Report Nu Nu lambda (Bloomington - #579) Frank Motley (P) 3643 Longvrew Drive Bloomington, IN 47401

COLLEGE CHAPTERS Alpha Pi (U of Louisville - #37) Ron Nichols (P) Student Center Room 12 Louisville. KY 40208 Beta Me (Kentucky State U - #55) Allen B. Croskey (P) Combs Hall Frankfort KY 40601 Epsilon Chi (U of Kentucky - #330) No Report Xi Alpha (Morehead State U - #486) No Report ALUMNI CHAPTERS Alpha Lambda (Louisville - #101) No Report Alpha Beta Lambda (Lexington - #124) No Report Gamma Beta Lambda (Frankfort - #168) No Report

ALUMNI CHAPTERS Epsilon Upsilon Lambda (Flint â&#x20AC;˘ #230) Billye G. Thomson P. 0. Box 1247 Flint Ml 48503 Eta Nu Lambda (Grand Rapids - #267) No Report lota Chi lambda (Saginaw - #522) No Report Kappa Delta Lambda (Lansing - #527) No Report

NEBRASKA Director To Be Appointed COLLEGE CHAPTER Beta Beta (U of Nebraska - #46) No Report AUJMNI CHAPTER Beta Xi Lambda (Omaha - #157) Renard Terrell (S) 4024 N. 116th Omaha. NE 68164

OHIO (NORTHERN)

Director Joe Sansbury Director 1430 Abbington Nathaniel Allen Toledo, OH 43607 3321 MaHett Street COLLEGE CHAPTERS Muskegon Heights, Ml 49444 Epsilon Alpha COLLEGE CHAPTERS (U of Toledo - #310) Epsilon Xi Timothy C. Ivey (P) (Western Michigan U #322) 1517 Secor Rd. John Wright (P) Apt 133 1323 Greenwood Toledo. OH 43602 Apt 105 Epsilon Theta Kalamazoo, Ml 49007 (Bowling Green U - #317) KENTUCKY (WESTERN) Iowa Epsilon No Report (Grand Valley - #402) Director ALUMNI CHAPTER No Report Jimrme Stewart Alpha Xi lambda 514 E. Cedar Street - Apt 5 AUJMNI CHAPTERS (Toledo - #135) lota Phi lambda Franklin. KY 42134 No Report (Muskegon Heights - #521) COLLEGE CHAPTERS OHIO (NORTHEAST) John Lester (P) Zeta Omicron Director P. 0. Box 3972 (Murray State U - #345) Hilton O. Smith Muskegon Heights, Ml 49444 Lantz M. Biles, (S) 3038 Monrcello Blvd. Kappa Psi Lambda 2309 Univ. Station Cleveland, OH 44118 (Kalamazoo - #545) Murray. KY 42071 COLLEGE CHAPTERS No Report Eta Rho Pi (Western Kentucky U - #369) Nu Rho Lambda (Benton Harbor - #583) (Cleveland State/ No Report No Report Western Reserve - #15) ALUMNI CHAPTERS Harry Brownlee (P) Gamma Epsilon Lambda MINNESOTA (Hopkmsville - #171) 11715 Parkview Director Cleveland. OH 44120 No Report James Beard Alpha Tau IOWA MICHIGAN (EASTERN) 4109 Portland Ave.. South (U of Akron - #40) Director Minneapolis. MN 55407 Director No Report Everett A. Mays Anthony Crutchfiek) COLLEGE CHAPTER Epsilon Delta P 0. Box 533 447 Palmerston Ml (Kent State U - #313) Des Moines, IA 50302 Detroit. Ml 48218 (U of Minnesota - #11) No Report COLLEGE CHAPTERS COLLEGE CHAPTERS No Report lota Phi Alpha Theta Epsilon ALUMNI CHAPTER (Mount Union College - #417) (U of Iowa - #30) (U of Michigan - #5) Gamma Xi Lambda No Report Michael Marsh (P) No Report (Minneapolis- #179) Xi Chi p 0. Box 506 Alpha Upsilon No Report (Baldwin-Wallace College - #706) Iowa City, IA 52240 (Wayne State U - #41) Gregory Williams (P) Alpha Nu MISSOURI (EASTERN) Eric J. Christian (P) 3625 E. 143 (Drake U - #31) 18041 Schaefer Cleveland, OH 44120 Todd Easley James Williams Detroit Ml 48235 Omicron Epsilon 1319 39th Street 1620 El Tigre Epsilon Eta (Youngstown State University - #712) Des Moines, IA 50311 St Louis. MO 63138 (Eastern Michigan U - #316) No Report AUJMNI CHAPTERS COLLEGE CHAPTERS Robert LaGrand (P) ALUMNI CHAPTERS Zeta Kappa Lambda Alpha Eta Campus Life (Des Moines - #243) Beta Rho Lambda (SI Louis - #29) 117 Goodison Hall Eddie V. Easley (P) (Youngstown - #160) No Report ESU 1431 41st Place No Report Epsilon Psi Ypsilanti. Ml 48197 Des Moines, IA 50311 Delta Alpha lambda (U of Missouri - #441) Eta Xi Mu Tan Lambda (Cleveland - #189) No Report (U. of Detroit - #366) (Cedar Rapids - #563) Andrew A. Venable (P) Xi Gamma Noel Celestin (P) No Report (Southeast Missouri State #488) P. 0. Box 99551 20163 Manor Nu Chi Lambda Cleveland. OH 44199 No Report (Iowa City - #588) Detroit Ml 48221 Eta Tau Lambda ALUMNI CHAPTERS James E. Tolbert (P) Omicron Mu (Akron - #273) Epsilon Lambda 2427 Bartlet Road (Oakland University - #718) No Report (St Louis - #105) Apartment 1C No Report Kappa Mu Lambda Linnie Thigpen. Jr. (CS) Iowa City. IA 52240 ALUMNI CHAPTERS (lorrain - #534) 4611 Fletcher Gamma lambda No Report St Louis. MO 63121 (Detroit - #103) KANSAS (EASTERN) Epsilon Eta Lambda OHIO (CENTRAL) Oscar B. Session (P) Director (Charleston - #218) Director 1947 S. Stratford Richard Marshall Edward W. Barrett (P) William Nelson, Ph.D. Detroit Ml 48221 626 Oakland 201 W. Tom Brown Street 2572 Burnaby Drive Epsilon Upsilon Lambda Kansas City, KS 66101 P.O. Box 171 Columbus. OH 43209 (Flint #230) COLLEGE CHAPTERS Charleston. MO 63834 COLLEGE CHAPTERS Billye G. Thompson Upsilon Kappa P. O. Box 1247 MISSOURI (CENTRAL) (U of Kansas - # 1 9 ) (Ohio State U - # 1 0 ) Flint Ml 48503 Director No Report No Report Theta Zeta lambda Kenner Tippin Gamma Chi Phi (Ann Arbor - #283) 3621 E"ergreen (Kansas State - #87) (Ohio U - #20) William L. Harris (S) Columbia, MO 65201 No Report No Report 2861 Eisenhower COLLEGE CHAPTERS Kappa Taa AUJMNI CHAPTER Ann Arbor. Ml 48104 Alpha Psi (Kansas State U - #437) Alpha Rho Lambda lota Rho Lambda (Lincoln University - #44) No Report (Columbus - #138) (Pontiac - #517) No Report James Upton (CS) KANSAS (WESTERN) No Report Zeta Alpha F. 0. Box 3039 Director (U of Missouri - #332) MICHIGAN (NORTHERN) Columbus. OH 43204 P. J. Williams No Report Director 3601 Randolph lot* Xi OHIO (WEST CENTRAL) lames H. Gaddis lopeka, KS 66611 (Northeast Missouri - #410) Director 4028 Wisner COLLEGE CHAPTERS No Report Edward White Saginaw. Ml 48601 Delta Mu ALUMNI CHAPTER 5211 Big Bend Drive COLLEGE CHAPTERS (Wichita State U - #99) Beta Zeta Lambda Dayton. OH 45427 Gamma Tau No Report (Jefferson City - #150) COLLEGE CHAPTERS (Michigan State U - #84) Epsilon Omicron No Report Xi Glen D. Oliver (P) (Washburn U - #323) (Wilbertorce U - #13) MISSOURI (WESTERN) 4)8 North Case Hall No Report No Report Michigan State U James Fleming IiNu Gamma Theta 2309 N. 10th (Emporia State College - #497) East Lansing, Ml 48823 (U ot Dayton - #74) Zeta Beta Blue Springs. M0 64015 No Report No Report (Ferris State - #333) COLLEGE CHAPTERS ALUMNI CHAPTERS COLLEGE CHAPTER William Lykes (P) Delta Rho Delta Eta Lambda Delta Xi Box 4 - Rankin Center (U of Missouri - #303) (Topeka - #195) (Central State U - #300) Ferris State College No Report P. J. Williams (P) Marshan Brown (P) Big Rapids, Ml 49307 Zeta Gamma 3601 Randolph P. 0. Box 441 Zeta Delta (Central Missouri #334) Topeka. KS 66611 Wilbertorce, OH 45384 (Northern Michigan - #335) No Report Eta Beta Lambda ALUMNI CHAPTERS No Report ALUMNI CHAPTER (Wichita - #257) Theta Lambda Theta Tau Beta Lambda No Report (Dayton - #108) (GMI - #393) (Kansas City - #102) George C. Findley (P) KENTUCKY (EASTERN) No Report No Report 1820 Ruskin Road Director Dayton, OH 45406 Shirley Cunningham, Jr. First National Building - Suite 906 Lexington, KY 40507

INDIANA (SOUTHERN)

Director Ira demons, Jr. 4004 Eastern Drive II) Anderson, IN 46012 COLLEGE CHAPTERS Gamma Rho (Purdue - #82) No Report Theta Xi (Ball State U - #388) Tyrone J. Johnson (P) Box 355 Student Ctr. Muncre. IN 47305 Iota Theta (Calumet College - #405) No Report ALUMNI CHAPTERS Gamma Rho Lambda (Gary - #182) Everett S. Palmer (P) 6529 Birch Avenue Gary. IN 46403 Theta Xi lambda (South Bend - #290) Inactive Theta Upsilon Lambda (Fort Wayne - #296) No Report

MICHIGAN (WESTERN)

67


COLLEGE CHAPTERS Alpha Beta

Chi Lambda (Wilberforce - # 1 2 1 ) Lee L. 1. Ingham (S) Philosophy Depaitment Central State University Wilberforce, OH 45384 Zeta Delta Lambda (Springfield - # 2 3 7 ) lake Biewei (P) 7162 Mandrake Drive Dayton. OH 45424

(Talladega College Franklin W. Thomas, Room 306. Crawford Talladega College Talladega. AL 3 5 1 6 0 Beta Upsilon (Alabama State U -

Gamma Kappa (Miles College -

Clarence Frazier 1145 Wionna Avenue Cincinnati. OH 45224 COLLEGE CHAPTERS Alpha Alpha

NEST VIRGINIA Director Adolphus A. Young. It. P 0. Box 13 Keystone, WV 24852 COLLEGE CHAPTERS #28)

P. 0 . Bon 511 Institute. WV 25112 •eta Thau (Bluefiekf State - # 5 2 ) No Report Nu Nu #475)

BM

(Concord College - # 4 9 3 ) No Report ALUMNI CHAPTEHS Alpha Zata Lambda (Bluefiekf - # 1 2 8 ) Adolphus Young. Jr. (S) 7162 Mandrake Drive Dayton. OH 45424 Alpha Iota Lambda (Charleston - # 1 3 1 ) John Scott (S) P. 0 . Bo> 303 Institute, WV 25112 Gamma Delta Lambda (Beckley - # 1 7 0 ) Inactive

WISCONSIN Director Coleman 0 Wells 922 W Zedler Lane Milwaukee. Wl 53092 COLLEGE CHAPTERS Gamma Epsilon (UW Madison -

#63)

#71)

John L Davis (P) 837 W Badgetl # 1 Madison. Wl 53713 Epsilon T H (UW Milwaukee - # 3 2 7 ) No Report

MM (UW Whitewater - # 3 4 0 ) Darryl Johnson (P) 1125 W Capital Drive Milwaukee, Wl 53206 Eta Beta (WSU Platteville - # 3 5 5 ) No Report Eta P. (WSU Oshkosh - # 3 6 8 ) No Report Mu Epsilon (Carthage College - # 4 4 6 ) No Report Null (Marquette U - # 4 7 6 ) Levester Johnson (P) 2600 W Highland - Apt. 104 Milwaukee. Wl 53233 Nu Omicron (Carroll College - # 4 7 7 ) No Report ALUMNI CHAPTERS Delta Chi Lambda (Milwaukee - # 2 1 0 ) Coleman 0 Wells (SD) 922 W Zedler Lane

Meqnon. Wl 53092 Mu Eta U m b d a (Madison - # 5 5 2 ) Ouane McCrary (P) 1730 Baiidstreet Madison. Wl 53713

SOUTH ALABAMA Leotis Peterman 4 3 4 0 Yorkshire Drive Montgomery. A l 36108

FLORIDA

#76)

No Report Gamma Phi (Tuskegee Institute Robert White (CS)

(U of Cincinnati - # 2 3 ) No Report Dtlta Ucsaloti (Miami U - # 3 0 6 ) No Report ALUMNI CHAPTER Delta Gamma Lambda (Cincinnati - # 1 9 1 ) Ivan Reynolds (P) 650 Springer Avenue Cincinnati. OH 45215

(Marshall U No Report

#24) Jr. (CS) Hall

Rufus J. Mitchell (P) P. 0. Box 28 Alabama State University Montgomery. AL 36195

OHIO [SOUTHWEST)

Alpha Zeta (West Virginia State Duncan Robinson (S)

Kappa Nu Lambda (Leighton - # 5 3 5 ) Jerry W. Smith (P) P. 0 . Box 622 Sheffield. AL 3 5 6 6 0 Mu Iota U m b d a (Mobile - # 5 5 4 ) No Report Mu Psi U m b d a (Homewood - # 5 6 7 ) Larry Buie (P) P. 0 . Box 2281 Birmingham, AL 35201

Director John C. Rawls R t 4 - Box 183P Gainesville. FL 32601

#86)

P. 0. Box 36 Tuskegee Institute. AL 36088 Delta Gamma (Alabama A S M - # 9 1 ) Lavon LaCounte P. 0. Box 220 Alabama A S M

University

Normal. AL 35762 Epsilon Nu (Stillman College No Report

BetaNu (Florida A S M - # 5 6 ) Jeffrey Lamar (P) 417 Walkei Ave. # 1 1 Tallahassee. FL 32304 Delta Beta (Bethune Cookman - # 9 0 ) Bernard L. Washington (P)

#321)

Theta Delta (U of South Alabama Michael A. Carlton (P) P 0. Box U701 Mobile. AL 36688 lota Na (UAB - # 4 0 9 ) Belgee Falkner (S) Volker Hall - U A B

565 Second Ave. # 3 Daytona Beach, FL 32014

#379)

#420)

#422)

Box 5554 Florence. AL 35630 Nu Tau

Apt 228 Jacksonville, FL 32209 Mu Theta (U of West Florida - # 4 4 9 ) No Report Xi Iota (U of Central Florida - # 4 9 4 ) Karl Harmon (P) 7212 Mandarin Orlando. FL 32809 Xi Kappa (Florida Tech. - # 4 9 5 )

Darrell R. Heyes (S)

P. 0 Box 154 Troy. AL 36082

Xili (Jacksonville - # 4 9 8 ) Ramon Rogers (P) P. 0 . Box 81 Jacksonville State U. Jacksonville. FL 36265 Omicron Alpha (Auburn U at Montgomery

-

#708) Kenneth Avery (P) 2027 Beach Street Montgomery. AL 36108 Omicron Kappa (Auburn U. at Auburn - # 7 1 7 ) Ferdinand 6. Williams, Jr. (P) P. 0. Box 1865 Montgomery. AL 36108 ALUMNI CHAPTERS Omicron Lambda (Birmingham - # 1 1 4 ) L. A. Simmons. Jr. (S) P 0. Box 3910 Birmingham. AL 35208 Alpha Nu Lambda (Tuskegee Institute - # 1 3 4 ) No Report Alpha Upsilon Lambda (Montgomery- #141)

(Huntsville - # 1 % ) A. J. Garth (CS) P O Box 33 Alabama ASM University Normal. AL 35762 Delta Pi Lambda (Selma - # 2 0 4 ) William P Cook (P) 505 Woodrow Ave. Selma. AL 36701 Delta Phi Lambda (Tuscaloosa - # 2 0 9 ) No Report Epsilon Delta Lambda (Talladega - # 2 1 5 ) No Report Theta Alpha Lambda (Gadsden - # 2 7 8 ) No Report Theta Gamma Lambda (Dothan - # 2 8 0 ) Doc Anderson (CS)

Gainesville, FL 32601 lota Delta (Florida State U - # 4 0 1 ) No Report Kappa Upsilon (Metropolitan - # 4 3 8 ) James E. Bryant Jr. (S) 5 0 2 0 Cleveland Rd.

(U of Montevallo - # 4 8 1 ) No Report Xi Beta (Troy State U - # 4 8 7 )

Samuel L. Jackson (S) P 0 Box 6058 Montgomery. AL 36106 Beta Omicron Lambda (Mobile - # 1 5 8 ) Atvin J. Allen (RS) 1205 St. Madar Street Mobile. AL 36603 Delta Theta Lambda

#309)

Theta Sigma (U of Florida - # 3 9 2 ) John C. Pittman (T) 1252 N W . Avenue 10th Street

P. 0. Box 7368 University. AL 35486 Kappa Gamma (U of North Alabama Derrick T Morgan (P) U. of North Alabama

Delta Psi (Florida Memorial Coll. Renard Dowdell (P) 15800 NW 42nd Avenue Miami, FL 33054 Eta Delta (U of Miami - # 3 5 7 ) No Report

GEORGIA Director Lorenzo Manns 4554 Moline Avenue Columbus, GA 31907 COLLEGE CHAPTERS

Theta Gamma (U of South Florida - # 3 7 8 ) Harold K. Washington (P) U of South Florida Tampa, FL 33620

P 0 . Box 329 Birmingham, AL 35294 Kappa Alpha (U of Alabama Jon Beans (CS)

COLLEGE CHAPTERS

Theta Eta U m b d a ( S t Petersburg - # 2 8 4 ) Frank E. Smith (RS) 4173 Beach Drive. S.E. S t Petersburg, FL 33705 lota Beta U m b d a (Cocoa - # 5 0 3 ) William Gary (P) P. 0 . Box 1275 Cocoa, FL 32922 lota Pi U m b d a (Miami - # 5 1 6 ) Wendell H. Carr (P) P. 0 . Box 570723 Miami, FL 33157 Mu Zeta U m b d a (Ukeland - # 5 5 1 ) Donzell Floyd (CS) 445 Avenue B, NE Winter Haven, FL 33880 Nu Eta U m b d a (Gainesville - # 5 7 4 ) No Report

Michael Trott (P) Florida Tech.

P. 0. Box 5001 Melbourne, FL 32901 ALUMNI CHAPTERS Upsilon U m b d a (Jacksonville - # 1 1 9 ) No Report Beta Beta U m b d a (Miami - # 1 4 6 ) Aubyn L. lones (P) P. 0 . Box 510027 Miami. FL 33151 Beta Delta U m b d a (Daytona Beach - # 1 4 8 ) David H. Staples (P) 803 S. Thompson Avenue Deland. FL 3 2 7 2 0 Gamma Zeta U m b d a (Tampa - # 1 7 2 ) No Report Gamma Mu U m b d a (Tallahassee- # 1 7 7 ) Charles R. Russell (S) 433 Mercury Drive

lota (Morris Brown College - # 9 ) Frederick C. Walton (S) P. 0. Box 92055 Atlanta, GA 30331 Alpha Rho (Morehouse College - # 3 8 ) No Report Alpha Phi (Clark College - # 4 2 ) Albert L. Amey (P) Clark College, Box 137 Atlanta. GA 30314 Gamma Zeta (Ft. Valley State - # 7 2 ) No Report Delta Delta (Albany State - # 9 2 ) Edwin Green (A) P. 0 . Box 36 - ASC Albany, GA 31705 Delta Eta (Savannah State Coll. - # 9 5 ) Ransom J. Ricks (CS) Savannah State College P. 0. Box 20742 Savannah. GA 31404 ZetaMu (Georgia State U - # 3 4 2 ) No Report

ten

(U ol Georgia - # 3 4 6 ) Phillip Franklin (P) 2151 University Station Athens, GA 30602 Eta Alpha (Paine College - # 3 5 4 ) No Report Theta Beta (Columbus College - # 3 7 7 ) No Report lota Eta (Mercer U - # 4 0 4 ) Andy L. Davis (P) P. 0. Box 61 - Mercer U Macon. GA 31207 Mu Alpha (Emory U - # 4 4 2 ) Eric Morrow (S)

Mu Gamma (Georgia College - # 4 4 4 ) Michael A. Buike (P) Box 1953 - Georgia College Milledgeville. GA 31061 Mu Delta (Georgia Southwestern - # 4 4 5 ) Anthony Tonye (S) Georgia Southwestern College

Box 1196

LB 10131 Georgia Southern College Statesboro. GA 3 0 4 6 0 ALUMNI CHAPTERS Eta U m b d a (Atlanta - # 1 0 7 ) Larry Epps (CS)

2601 Avenue I Ft. Pierce. FL 33454

P 0 Box 6893

P 0 Box 92576

Dothan.

Atlanta. GA 30314

.1 36302

COLLEGE CHAPTERS Gamma Upsilon (Taugallo College - # 8 5 ) Abron Washington (P) 3340 Harley, Apt 70 lackson, MS 3 9 2 0 9 Delta Kappa (Alcorn State U - # 9 8 ) Birchel Washington (P) P. 0. Box 267 Lorman, MS 39096 Delta Phi (Jackson State U - # 3 0 7 ) No Report Zeta Phi (MS Valley State U - # 3 5 1 ) Rothley Howard (CS) P. 0 . Box 899 I t t a B e n a , MS 38941 Iota Gamma (Rust College - # 4 0 0 ) No Report Kappa Beta (MS State U - # 4 2 1 ) Dwayne F. Bynum (P) Mississippi State University Mississippi State, MS 29762 MuXi (Metropolitan - # 4 5 4 ) No Report Nu Upsilon (U of Mississippi - »'482) Jimmy L. Williams (CS)

Fort Lauderdale, FL 3 3 3 1 0 Eta Kappa Lan.jfla ( F t Pierce - # 2 6 5 ) Havert L. Fenn (S)

MISSISSIPPI Director Wiley Jones Alcorn State University P. 0. Box 285 Lorman, MS 39096

P. 0. Box 1472

P 0 Box 6072

(Ocala - # 2 2 6 ) William E. Jackson (S) 1822 SW 4th S t

Epsilon Beta U m b d a (Macon - # 2 1 3 ) Albert J. Abrams (S) P. 0. Box 5329 Macon, GA 31208 Eta Iota U m b d a (Athens - # 2 6 4 ) No Report Theta Nu U m b d a (LaGrange - # 2 8 9 ) Alfred McNair (S) P. 0. Box 1818 LaGrange, GA 30241 Iota Gamma U m b d a (Brunswick - # 5 0 4 ) Richard Wilson (S) P. 0 . Box 98 White Oak, GA 31668 Kappa Tau U m b d a (Valdosta - # 5 4 1 ) Calvin Willis (P) 4021 Lantern Lane Valdosta, GA 31601 Nu Mu U m b d a (Decatur - # 5 7 8 ) No Report

Emory U Atlanta. GA 30332

Ocala. FL 3 2 6 7 0 Zata Alpha U m b d a (Ft Lauderdale - # 2 3 4 ) Nathaniel L Hankerson (P)

No Report Epsilon Mu U m b d a (Pensacola - # 2 2 2 ) No Report Epsilon Pi U m b d a

Gamma Sigma U m b d a (Ft. Valley - # 1 8 3 ) Ralph Malone (S) 1211 Beverly Street Fort. Valley, GA 3 1 0 3 0 Delta Iota U m b d a (Columbus-#197) No Repory

Box 21185

Amencus, GA 3 1 7 0 9 Mu Omicron (Valdosta State - # 4 5 5 ) Michael Dixon (S) 214 Georgia Avenue Valdosta. GA 31601 Nu Gamma (West Georgia Coll - # 4 6 6 ) James Taggert, Jr. (S) 1791 S. Gordon Street SW Carrollton. GA 30318 NuMu (Southern Tech. Inst - # 4 7 4 ) Brett M. Gaines (P) Room 108. Dean of Students Bkfg. Georgia Technical Atlanta. GA 30332 U n a (Georgia Southern College - # 7 0 3 ) Crandall Jones (CS)

Tallahassee. FL 32304 Delia Delta U m b d a (Wesr Palm Beach - # 1 9 2 ) Robert L. Smith, Jr. (P) 1817 37th Street West Palm Beach. FL 33407 Delta Xi U m b d a (Orlando - # 2 0 2 )

Alpha Chi U m b d a (Augusta - # 1 4 3 ) Willie G. Marshall (FS) 829 Strother Drive Augusta, GA 30901 Beta Phi U m b d a (Savannah - # 1 6 4 ) Edward G. Miller, Sr. (P) 1522 Cloverdale Drive Savannah. GA 31401 Gamma Omicron U m b d a (Albany - # 1 8 0 ) No Report

P. 0. Box 3251 University. MS 38677 Omicron Gamma (Millsaps College - # 7 1 0 ) No Report ALUMNI CHAPTERS Alpha Epsilon U m b d a (Jackson - # ! 2 7 ) No Report Epsilon Xi U m b d a (Mound Bayou - # 2 2 4 ) George J. Bacon (RS) 1501 Kennedy Cove Greenville. MS 38701 Zeta Mu U m b d a (Biloxi - # 2 4 4 ) No Report Eta Phi U m b d a (Columbus - # 2 7 5 ) johnny Johnson (P) P. 0 Box 464 Columbus. MS 39701 Theta Sigma U m b d a (Natchez - # 2 9 4 ) No Report Mu Gamma U m b d a (Hattiesburg-Laurel - # 5 4 8 ) No Report M a Pi U m b d a (Biookhaven - # 5 6 0 ) No Report

Epsilon Sigma U m b d a (Rocky Mount - # 2 2 8 ) No Report Epsilon Chi U m b d a (Elizabeth City - # 2 3 2 ) Roger A Mclean (P) Box 21

NORTH CAROLINA Director Rudolph Hendricks

P. 0. Box 16153 Charlotte, NC 28212 COLLEGE CHAPTERS Alpha Omicron (Johnson C. Smith U Rodney K. Hood (P)

#36)

1327 Orvis Street Charlotte, NC 28216 Beta Epsilon (A4T State U - # 4 9 ) Maxfield Bowen (CS) Box A-14, NC AST SU Greensboro, NC 2 7 4 1 1 Beta Zeta (Elizabeth City State U - # 5 0 ) No Report Beta lota (Winston-Salem State U - # 5 3 ) Dennis Turnage (P) P 0 . 6ox 14793 Winston-Salem, NC 27102 Beta Rho (Shaw U - # 6 0 ) No Report Gamma Beta (North Carolina Central U No Report

P. 0. Box 26611 Raleigh. NC 27611 Epsilon Zeta (Fayetteville State U - # 3 1 5 ) No Report Zeta Epsilon (Barber-Scotia College - # 3 3 6 ) No Report EUNu (East Carolina U - # 3 6 5 ) No Report Eta Omicron (North Carolina State U - # 3 6 7 i Everett C. Dudley (CS)

P. 0. Box 5631 Raleigh, NC 27650 Kappa Omicron (Duke U - # 4 3 3 ) Robert Harrington (CS) Box 4783 - Duke Station Durham, NC 27706

•ate

#447)

P. 0 . Box 551 Chapel Hill. NC 27514 MuTau (UNC - Charlotte - # 4 5 9 ) Gerald Dawson (P) 1800 Irma Charlotte. NC 28216 NuZeta (Western Carolina U Johnny P. Guthrie (P)

#469)

P. 0 . Box 543 Cullowhee. NC 28723 Xi Eta (Wake Forest U - # 4 9 2 ) Frederick D. Jones (P) P. 0. Box 6476 Reynolds Stat Winston-Salem. NC 2 7 1 0 9 Omicron Beta (Atlantic Christian - # 7 0 9 ) No Report ALUMNI CHAPTERS Kappa U m b d a (Greensboro- # 1 1 0 ) William Finger (CS) P. 0. Box 21052 Greensboro, NC 2 7 4 2 0 Phi U m b d a (Raleigh - # 1 2 0 ) P. P. Thompson (RC) 1305 Foxrun Drive Raleigh. NC 2 7 6 1 0 Alpha Pi U m b d a (Winston-Salem - # 1 3 7 ) No Report Beta Theta U m b d a (Durham - # 1 5 2 ) A. M. Cowards. Sr. (S) 2307 South Roxboro Durham. NC 27707 Beta Mu U m b d a (Salisbury- #155) No Report Beta Nu U m b d a (Charlotte - # 1 5 6 ) lames G. Health (P)

P. 0. Box 16153 Charlotte. NC 28212 Gamma Kappa U m b d a (Wilmington - # 1 7 6 ) No Report Gamma Psi U m b d a (Asheville - # 1 8 8 ) Lawrence Gilliam (P) 10 Gilliam Place Asheville, NC 28801 Epsilon Rho U m b d a (Fayetteville - # 2 2 7 ) Bill) R. King (P) 5 7 0 2 Shenandoah Drive fayetteville, NC 28304

Theta Omicron U m b d a (Goldsboro - # 2 9 1 ) No Report Nu Iota U m b d a (Kinston - # 5 7 6 ) No Report Nu Kappa U m b d a (Lumberton - # 5 7 7 ) No Report

SOUTH CAROLINA #68)

Gamma Mu (Livingstone College - # 7 7 ) No Report Gamma Psi (SL Augustine's College - # 8 8 ) Austin R. Cooper, II (P)

(U of North Carolina William M. Daniels (S)

Elizabeth City State U Elizabeth City. NC 2 7 9 0 9 Zeta Eta U m b d a (Kinston - # 2 4 0 ) Walter B. Council (S) P, 0 . Box 1187 Greenville. NC 27834 Eta Mu U m b d a (Gastonia - # 2 6 6 ) No Report

Director Peter Felder P. 0 . Box 41 Claflin College Orangeburg. SC 29115 COLLEGE CHAPTERS Beta Delta (South Carolina State - # 4 8 ) No Report Gamma Gamma (Allen U - # 6 9 ) No Report Gamma Pi (Benedict College - # 8 1 ) Douglas Showell (S) Bacoats Hall Benedict College Columbia, SC 29204 Delta Alpha (Claflin College - # 8 9 ) No Report Eta lota (Voorhees College No Report

#362)

TheU Nu (U ot South Carolina - # 3 8 7 ) Eric L. Jefferson (CS) Univ. of South Carolina Columbia. SC 29208 Kappa Chi (Francis Marion College No Report Mu Pi (Baptist College No Report Nu Phi

#440)

#456)

(USC - Conway # 4 8 3 ) No Report Xi Epsilon (Morris College - # 4 9 0 ) Mayhue Bostic. Ill (P) Morns College Box 123 Sumter, SC 2 9 1 5 0 Xa Phi (Wmthiop College - # 7 0 5 ) Leroy Stansbury, Jr. (T) 644 Elm Street Aberdeen. MO 21001 ALUMNI CHAPTERS Alpha Psi U m b d a (Columbia - # 1 4 4 ) No Report Beta Kappa U m b d a (Charleston - # 1 5 4 ) James T. McKim (CS) P.i0. Box 2714 Charleston, SC 29403 Gamma Gamma U m b d a (Greenville - # 1 6 9 ) No Report Delta Zeta U m b d a (Orangeburg - # 1 9 4 ) Hayward E. Bovian (P)

P. 0. Box 152 Orangeburg, SC 29115 Delta Kappa U m b d a (Florence - # 1 9 8 ) Joseph Heyward (S) P. 0. Box 384 Florence. SC 29503 Eta Omicron U m b d a (Rock Hill - # 2 6 9 ) No Report Theta Phi U m b d a (Bennettsville - # 2 9 7 ) No Report lota Eta U m b d a (Denmark - # 5 0 8 ) No Report Mu Epsilon U m b d a (Conway - # 5 5 0 ) No Report Xi Gamma U m b d a (Beaufort ^592) Cleadus W. Ferguson (S) 1403 Greenlawn Drive Beaufort. SC 29902

TENNESSEE Director Micheal Nettles C535 Premier Drive Nashville. TN 37209

#H5


COLLEGE CHAPTERS Chi

Kappa lota (Southern Arkansas U -

(Meharry Medical College No Report Alpha Chi (Fisk U - # 4 3 )

#21)

No Report BetaXi (LeMoyne-Owen College No Report Beta Omicron (Tennessee State U No Report Beta Pi

#57)

#58)

(Lane College - # 5 9 ) Paul S. Adams (P) Lane College Jubilee Residence Hall Jackson. I N 38301 Gamma Omicron (Knoxville College Derek Miler (P)

#80)

Knoxville. TN 37921 Eta Phi #373)

P. O. Box 6041

(Austin-Peay State U -

#390)

Reginald J- Bridges (P) Austin Peay State U Clarksville, TN 37040 Kappa Eta (Memphis State U - # 4 2 6 ) Lucius Austin (P) 1183 Dorthy Place Memphis, TN 38104 Kappa Theta (Vanderbilt U - # 4 2 7 ) No Report Kappa Xi (Middle Tennessee State No Report Mu Beta

#432)

LI of Tennessee at Martin Martin, TN 38238 Mu Iota

Beta Tau

(University ot Tennessee »t Knoxville - # 4 5 0 ) Randolph Wilkerson (CS) 1810 Lake Avenue Knoxville, TN 37916 Nu Eta (Christian Brothers Coll. D »ayne K. Pigues (P) 3446 Carnes Number 4

#470)

Memphis, TN 38111 JLUMNI CHAPTERS Tau Lambda (Nashville - # 1 1 8 ) No Report (Chattanooga - # 1 2 2 ) Virgil V. McGee (P) " 9 M. L. King Blvd. Chattanooga, TN 37403 •Ipha Delta Lambda #126)

Jettiro J. Alexander, Ji (P) 5016 Ravensworth Drive Memphis, TN 38109 Alpha Mu Lambda'

Knoxville - #133) Leonard A. Jackson (CS) R 0. Box 2091 Knoxville, TN 37901 « t a Upsilon Lambda (Jackson - # 1 6 3 ) No Report Kappa Zeta Lambda (Clarksville - # 5 2 9 ) No Report Mu Nu Lambda #557)

SOUTHWEST ARKANSAS Director Robert Jones 1413 Lee Circle South Blytheville. AR 72315

I 0 Box 155 - UAPB n n e Blull.AR 71601 Theta Kappa (Henderson State Coll -

#385)

No Report Theta Upsilon Arkansas State U - #394) * f 0. Renfroe (P) l , ° Box 1366 m

( D o t Central Arkansas S,am|K S Bn,Vc Box 646 - Ij C <A > Un

* " y . AR 72032

Epsilon lota (U ot Texas - #318) No Report Epsilon Rho (Lamar Tech - #325) Kelvin L. Johnson (P) P 0. Box 10729 Lamar University Beaumont TX 77710 Epsilon Sigma (St Mary's U - #326) Clarence E. Cook, Jr. (P) P. 0. Box 8009 San Antonio, TX 78208 Zeta Kappa (UT-EI Paso - #341) Sidney Williams (P) 124 Vaquero El Paso, TX 79968 Zeta Tau (East Texas State - #349) Glen Harmon (P) P 0. Box S - E.T. Station Commerce, TX 75428 Zeta Chi (UT-Atlington - #352) No Report Eta Gamma (Prairie View - #356) Robert Price (CS) P. O Box 2255 prairie View, TX 77445 Eta Epsilon (North Texas State - #358) Dodd C. Stacker P O. Box 5493 - N T Station Denton, TX 76201

OKLAHOMA

(U of Houston - #364) No Repoit Eta Upsilon (Texas Tech U - #372) Tarhan Burnett (S) Box 1 - Student Life Office Texas Tech University Lubbock, TX 79409 Eta Psi (Texas Christian U - #375) Keith Moirow (P) Eta Psi Chaptei - Box 30911 Texas Christian University fort Worth. TX 76129

EtaMu Director William G. Henderson 1214 N E . 67th Oklahoma City, OK 73111 COLLEGE CHAPTERS Beta Kappa (Langston U - #54) Italian Ballard (P) P. 0 Box 386 Langston, OK 73050 Epsilon Epsilon (Oklahoma State U - #314) Dariyl Walker (S) 408 N Washington Stillwater, OK 74074

Theta Alpha (Jams Christian College No Report

Zeta Zeta (U of Oklahoma - #337) No Report Zeta Sigma (Central State U - #348) No Report Zeta Upsilon (Northeastern State Coll. - #350) No Report Eta Theta (East Central State - #361) No Report Kappa Epsilon (Cameron U - #424) Michael A. Wilson (P)

P 0 Box 6397 Lawton. OK 73505 Omicron Nu (University of Tulsa -

i

l

#397)

ALUMNI CHAPTERS Sigma Lambda (New Orleans - #117) Desmond M Abies (CS) 4634 Francis Drive New Orleans. LA 70126 Beta lota Lambda (Baton Rouge - #153) Henry A Young (P) 1187 Bayberry Avenue Baton Rouge. LA 70807 Delta Upsilon Lambda (Shreveport - #208) James C Leary (T) 2961 Looney Street Shreveport, LA 71103 Epsilon Kappa Lambda (Grambling - #221) No Repoit

#376)

Theta Mu (Sam Houston State U - #386) Theodore R. Williams (P) p 0 Box 2840 Huntsville. TX 77340 lota Kappa (Paul Quinn College - #407) No Report Iota Mu (SF Austin State U - #408) Alton L Frailey (P) Route 10 - Box 6120 Nacogdoches, TX 75961 lota Omicron (Southern Methodist U - #411) Palmer Jason (P)

P. 0. Box 251 +719)

No Report ALUMNI CHAPTERS Alpha Tau Lambda (Tulsa - #140) Emanuel Palmer (S)

P 0 Box 6152 Tulsa. OK 74106 Beta Epsilon Lambda

(Boley - #149) No Report Beta Eta Lambda (Oklahoma City - #151) No Report Beta Chi Lambda (Muskogee - #165) Jimmie L White, Jr (S) Box 26 Warner, OK 74469 Zeta Gamma Lambda (Langston - #236) Raymond Johnson. Sr (P)

Box 836 Tulsa. OK 74123 Eta Xi Lambda (Lawton-Ft Sill - #268) Charles King. Ji (P) P 0 Box 5752 Lawton. OK 73504

TEXAS Director A L Mackey 6801 Williamette Austin. IX 78723 COLLEGE CHAPTERS Delta (Huston Tillotson College No Report Alpha Sigma (Wiley College - #39) No Report Gamma Alpha (Texas College - #67) Dennis Rice (P) 2404 N Giand Avenue Tyler. TX 75702 Delta Theta (Texas Southern U - #96) No Report Epsilon Gamma (Bishop College - #312) No Report

Southern Methodist University Dallas. TX 75275 Kappa Sigma (West Texas Slate - #436) No Report

'"»"u

Baton Rouge, LA 70893

(Philander Smith College - #65) No Report Gamma Delta (U ot Ark. at Pine Bluff - #70) Kenneth W Johnson (P)

Theta p ™ ' " > -

(USL - #344) No Report Eta Kappa (Louisiana Tech U - #363) Byion J Baioie (P) P. O. Box 3129 T.S. Ruston LA 71272 Eta Chi (Northeast Louisiana - #374) No Report Theta Theta (McNeese State U - #383) Nathaniel Guidry (P) Theta Theta Chapter McNeese State Univ Lake Charles, LA 70609 Theta Phi (U of New Orleans - #395) No Report Theta Chi (Northwestern State U - #396) Ronald Page (P) NSU P. 0. Box 5232 Natchitoches, LA 71457 Kappa Mu (Nicholls State U - #430) Tyrone Melaneon (CS) P. 0 2209 NSU Thibodaux. LA 70310 Kappa Nu (Southeastern Louisiana - #431) No Report Nu Psi (Louisiana Slate U - #485) Greg Hams (CS)

Epsilon Psi Lambda (Alexandria - #233) Arthur Lee (P) 2929 Wise Street Alexandria. VA 71301 Zeta Chi Lambda (Bogalusa - #254) No Report Zeta Psi Lambda (Lake Charles - #255) Adrian L. Wallace (P) P. 0. Box 1102 Lake Charles. LA 70601 Eta Gamma Lambda (Lafayette - #258) Richard Traverse (S) P. O. Box 5224 Lafayette, LA 70502 Eta Delta Lambda (Monroe - #259) Milton A. Jackson, Si (CS) P. O. Box 815 Monioe. LA 71201 lota Xi Lambda (Opelousas - #514) No Report Nu Alpha Lambda (Marrero - #568) No Report Nu Theta Lambda (St. Martinville - #575) Prosper Chretien (P) P 0 . Box 364 St. Martinville, LA 70582 Nu Sigma Lambda (Natchitoches - #584) No Report

P 0 Box 21902

COLLEGE CHAPTERS Beta Chi

AR

(Xaviei U - #62) No Report Beta Phi (Dillard U - #64) Keith A Miller (P) P. 0. Box 1108 - Dillard U New Orleans. LA 70122 Delta Sigma (Grambling U - #304) Dwaine T Price (S) P. O. Box 200 Grambling, LA 71245 Epsilon Upsilon (SUN0 - #328) No Report

ZetaXi

Psi Lambda

s

Director Edwin Holt 208 Piano Shreveport, LA 71103 COLLEGE CHAPTERS Beta Sigma (Southern U - #61) No Report

f- O. Box 121

(Kingspoit No Report

Pine Bluft. AR 71611 Theta Tau Lambda (Helena - #295) Willis Williams (FS) 51 Lambert Drive Helena, AR 72342 Mu Omicron Lambda (Blytheville - #559) Joe A. Gay (S) 107 Parkway Osceola. AR 72370

LOUISIANA

(OT - Martin - # 4 4 3 ) Reginald Williams (CS)

(Memphis -

Mike Dedner(P) P 0 Box 777 - SAU Magnolia, AR 71753 Kappa Kappa (U ot Arkansas - #429) Samuel Turner (P) 836 Fairview Fayetteville, AR 72701 Kappa Psi (UA Little R o c k - #441) No Report Nu Alpha (Arkansas Tech. U - #464) James W. Taylor (S) 1401 Parker Place, Apt. #18 Russellville. AR 72801 ALUMNI CHAPTERS Pi Lambda (Little R o c k - #115) James E. Wilson (P) 4216 Tatum Little Rock. AR 72204 Delta Sigma Lambda (Pine Bluft - #206) Calvin Matlock (P)

901 College

(UTChattanooga No Report Theta Pi

#428)

#4)

(Southwest Texas State - #453) Michael Tapscott (P) Mu Nu Chaptei LBI Student Center - SW Texas San Marcos. TX 78666 ALUMNI CHAPTERS Alpha Eta Lambda (Houston - #129) Adlee Anderson, Jr, (P) 4827 Benning Houston, TX 77035 Alpha Sigma Lambda (Dallas - #139) William Mitchell. Ill (S) P 0 Box 26324 Dallas, TX 75226 Beta Tau Lambda ( f t Worth - #162) Samuel Watson (CS) 5637 Wainwright Drive Fort Worth, TX 76112 Gamma Eta Lambda (Austin - #173) Allen M Johnson (S) 9901 Mandeville Ctr Austin, TX 78750 Gamma Pi Lambda (Galveston - #181) No Report Gamma Tau Lambda (Beaumont - #184) No Report Gamma Upsilon Lambda (Marshall - #186) No Report Delta Rho Lambda (San Antonio - #205) James L Pickett (P)

P 0 Box 10071 San Antonio. TX 78210 Epsilon Alpha Lambda

(Tylei - #212) No Report Epsilon Epsilon Lambda (Waco - #216) Alvin Pollard (P)

P 0. Box 1405 Waco. TX 76703

Epsilon Tau Lambda (Prairie View - #229) Neal Barnes (P) P. O. Box 2241 Prairie View. TX 77445 Epsilon Phi Lambda (Poit Arthur - #231) No Report Zeta Tau Lambda (Amanllo - #251) No Report Eta Upsilon Lambda (Odessa - #274) British C. Daniels (P) 704 Ohio Big Spring. TX 79720 Theta Delta Lambda (El Paso - #281) Michael A. Jacques (P) 3404 Slocum Street El Paso, TX 79936 Theta Kappa Lambda (Lubbock - #287) No Report Kappa Gamma Lambda (Texarkana - #526) Henry Mcfadden (P) 512 State Line Plaza Box 8025 Texarkana, AR 75502 Kappa Sigma Lambda (Killen - #540) No Report Mu Rho Lambda (Longview - #561) No Repoit Nu Pi Lambda (Arlington - #582) No Report Xi Beta Lambda (Temple - #591) Ernest Davis (P) P O. Box 1249 Temple. TX 76501

WEST ARIZONA/UTAH/NEVADA Diiector Felix Goodwin 7065 N. Stardust Tucson, A2 85718 COUEGE CHAPTERS

Zeta Theta (U of Arizona - #339) Jerord D. Patterson (VP) 4917 E 26th Street Tucson, AR 85711 lota Upsilon (Utah State U - #416) No Report Mu Eta (Arizona State U - #448) Mark Chambers (P) 5622 S. Hurricane Tempe, AZ 95281 ALUMNI CHAPTERS Delta Tau Lambda (Phoenix - #207) No Report Eta Psi Lambda (Tucson - #277) Richard Davis (CS) 5620 E S. Wilshire Drive Tucson. AZ 85711 Theta Pi Lambda (Las Vegas - #292) No Report

CALIFORNIA (CENTRAL) Director Earwrn (Earl) McCullar 3762 N Cedar S t r e e t - #113 Fresno. CA 93726 COLLEGE CHAPTER Epsilon Beta (Fresno State - #311) Lin C. Jackson (P) 1136 E Terrace Fresno. CA 93704 ALUMNI CHAPTERS lota Nu Lambda (Fiesno - #513) No Report Kappa Eta Lambda (Bakeisfield - #530) LeCostel Hailey (P) Kappa Eta Lambda

P. O Box 2114 Bakeisfield

CA 93303

CALIFORNIA (NORTHERN! Director Joe C Thomas 208 Chadwick Way Benicia. CA 94510 COLLEGE CHAPTERS Alpha Epsilon (UC Berkeley - #27) Kerry Lewis (S) 944 Willow Stieel Oakland. CA 94606 Delta Omicron (Stanlord - #301) Kirk B Washington (P) 110 Roundtable Drive #13-1 San Jose, CA 95111 Epsilon Mu (San Jose State U - #320) Kirk B. Washington (P) 110 Roundtable Drive Number 1 3 4 San Jose. CA 95111 Nu Sigma (Stanlord - #480) No Report

Xi Pi (Hayward - #700) Randy Ford (PR) 2511 E. 15th Street Oakland. CA 94601 Xi Rho (San Francisco - #701) Timothy L. Giay (S) 994 Ingerson Ave. San Francisco. CA 94124 Xi Upsilon (California Polytechnic - #704) Christopher Santee (T) 1170 Santa Yne; Number B Los Osos, CA 73402 ALUMNI CHAPTERS Gamma Phi Lambda (Berkeley - #186) Capers G Bradham (P) P. 0. Box 3238 Berkeley. CA 94703 Gamma Chi Lambda (San Francisco - #187) Joe C. Thomas (P) 208 Chadwick Way Benicia, CA 9 4 5 1 0 Eta Sigma Lambda (San Jose - #272) No Report Theta Beta Lambda (Oakland - #279) Inactive Kappa Alpha Lambda (Monterey - #524) No Report Kappa Omicron Lambda (Valleio - #537) No Report

CALIFORNIA (SACRAMENTO) Director Herman A. Sanders 1128 Weber Way Sacramento. CA 9 5 8 2 2 COLLEGE CHAPTERS Theta Eta (UC Davis - #382) Rodney Cook (P) 2640 Portage Bay Ave. Davis. CA 95616 NuChi (U ol the Pacific - #484) No Report ALUMNI CHAPTERS Zeta Beta Lambda (Sacramento - #235) No Repoit Nu Beta Lambda (Stockton - #569) Kenneth D. Peters, Si. (S) 2663 Fallenleaf Drive Stockton. CA 95209

CALIFORNIA (SAN DIEGO) Director Rulus Dewitt 4937 Dafter Drive San Diego, CA 92041 COUEGE CHAPTER Eta Sigma (Metro San Diego - #370) No Repoit ALUMNI CHAPTER Zeta Sigma Lambda (San Diego - #250) Sam Thomas (P) 7594 Careybiook Lane San Diego, CA 92114

CALIFORNIA (SOUTHERN) Director G. Bernard Brown 3946 S Burnside Los Angeles. CA 90008 COUEGE CHAPTERS Alpha Delta (USC - #26) No Report Gamma Xi (UCLA - #79) Bennie M Brown (P) 3670 Keystone Avenue No. 6 Los Angeles. CA 90034 lota Chi (U ot Redlands - #418) No Report lota Psi (California Polytechnic U - #419) John N Brown (P) 2846 E Valley Blvd Apartment 5 W. Covrna. CA 9 1 7 9 2 Mu Kappa (UC Santa Barbara - #451) No Report M a CM (Cal State Long Beach - #462) Thomas C Robinson. Ji. (P) 466 W. Caldwell Compton. CA 90220 Omicron Eta (University of California -

Irvine - #714) No Report ALUMNI CHAPTERS Beta Psi Lambda (Los Angeles - #166) Henry H Melton (S) 5303 Marburn Ave. Los Angeles, CA 90043

Eta Pi Lambda (Pasadena - #270) No Report lota Zeta Lambda (Compton - #507) Michael J. White (CS) 232 N. Locust Number 6 Inglewood. CA 90301 Mu Xi Lambda (Rialto - #558) No Report Mu Sigma Lambda (Culver City - #562) Petei Bostic IP) P 0 Box 36764 Los Angeles. CA 90036 Nu Tau Lambda (Orange County - #585) Lloyd Chandler (RS) 2814 Burly Ave. E Orange. CA 92669

COLORADO Director Phillip Cochran 1165 Drexel Street Boulder. CO 80303 COUEGE CHAPTER (Alpha lota - #31) No Report ALUMNI CHAPTERS Delta Psi Lambda (Denver - #211) Percy Lyle (CS) P O. Box 2975 Denver. CO 80202 lota Omicron Lambda (Colorado Springs - #515) lota Omicron Lambda Chapter P. 0 . Box 15083 Colorado Springs. CO 80910 Mu Upsilon Lambda (Boulder - #564) Ronald Reese (S) Mu Upsilon Lambda P. 0 Box 2158 Boulder. CO 80306

HAWAII Diiector C Edward Singer 410 Magellan S t r e e t - Apt Honolulu. HI 96813

908

ALUMNI CHAPTER Mu Beta Lambda (Honolulu - #547) Toy d i c e (P) 98 1114 Kaphapili Street Aeia. HI 96701

NEW MEXICO Director Boyd Jackson 1305 Evelyn Court, NE Albuquerque. NM 87112 COUEGE CHAPTER Omicron Delta (University of New Mexico No Report

#711)

ALUMNI CHAPTER lota Psi Lambda (Albuquerque - #523) No Report

WASHINGTON/OREGON Director Herbert Starke 15013 SE 171st Street Renton. WA 98055 COUEGE CHAPTERS Alpha Xi (U ol Washington - #35) Vincent R Newsome (P) 4135 Brooklyn NE Number 213 Seattle. WA 98105 Beta Psi (U ol Oregon - #66) Inactive lota Tau (Eastern Washington U - #415) Joseph I Taylor (P) c / o Alpha Pin Alpha P O Box 2213 CS Pullman. WA 99163 ALUMNI CHAPTERS Epsilon Zeta Lambda (Portland - #217) No Report Zeta Pi Lambda (Seattle - #248) Tommy L Bogan (P) 3543 S Dawson Street Seattle. WA 98118 lota Mu Lambda (Tacoma - #512) James Randall (P) Iota Mu Lambda P O. Box 171 - Femhill Stn Tacoma. WA 98412 Nu Epsilon Lambda (Richland - #572) No Repoit Nu Phi Lambda (Spokane - #587) No Repoit

ALASKA Diiector To be Announced Nu Zeta Lambda (Anchorage - #573) No Report


The Sphinx

Second Class Postage Paid Chicago, Illinois

USPS 510-440 4432 Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., Drive Chicago, Illinois 60653 POSTMASTER: If this magazine is undelivered please send Form 3579 to The Sphinx, Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity, Inc., 4432 Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Drive, Chicago, IL 60653.

MONUMENTS For All Time

. Like the master builders of ancient Egypt, the founders of Alpha Phi Alpha crafted an institution designed to last — providing leadership and service to our community. Carrying out their theme, Alpha Men today are embarked on a campaign to raise One Million Dollars for the benefit of the Blac£ community's basic institutions — the NAACP; National Urban League; and United Negro College Fund. This, too, will be a lasting contribution — indicating that Blacks should and can support their own institutions. Thus far, Alpha has contributed $600,000 to these groups. With your help, we can reach the "million" mark by year's end

This Founder's Day '82 — remember the Seven Jewels. Give To .

The Alpha Million Dollar Fund Drive

FOUNDER'S DAY '82 Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity, Inc.

December 4, 1906 - December 4, 1982


The SPHINX | Summer 1982 | Volume 86 | Number 3 198206803