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OFFICIAL PUBLICATION OF

ALPHA PHI ALPHA

MRS. ANNIE C. SINGLETON To Alphadom, Valentine Greetings

1940

5efauwi# JSfjum&vt 194C

Dedicated to Twentieth Anniversary of Psi Chapter


ALPHA PHI ALPHA FRATERNITY, Inc OFFICIAL DIRECTORY General Officers PRESIDENT—Charles H. Wesley, Howard University, Washington, D. C. FIRST VICE-PRESIDENT—Bert A. McDonald, 319 East 48th St., Los Angeles, Calif. SECOND VICE-PRESIDENT—H. Council Trenholm, Ala. State College, Montgomery, Ala. THIRD VICE-PRESIDENT—Roger F. Gordon, 1530 French St., Philadelphia, Pa. FOURTH VICE-PRESIDENT—Lucien C. Wright, 1304 E. Long St., Columbus, Ohio. SECRETARY—Joseph H. B. Evans, 101 S. Street, N. W., Washington, D. C. TREASURER—Farrow R. Allen, 337 West 138th St., No •/ Ycrk City, New York. EDITOR OF THE SPHINX—Lewis O. Swingler, 390 V<z Bjale Street, Memphis, Tenn. DIRECTOR OF EDUCATION—Rayfcrd W. Logan, Howard University, Washington, D. C. GENERAL COUNSEL—Belford V. Lawson, Jr., 2001 11th, N. W., Washington, D. C. LAY MEMBERS EXECUTIVE COUNCIL—Ferdinand L. Rousseve, 4636 Willow Street, New Orleans, La. Walter S. Scott, Jr., 69 North 21st Street Columbus, Ohio. Edward W. Brooke, 1730 First St., N. W.—Washington, D.C. JEWELS—Dr. Henry A. Callis, 2306 E St., N. E., Washington, D. C , Nathaniel A. Murray, 150 You Street, N. W. Washington, D. C ; Vertner W. Tandy, 221 West 139th Street, New York City, N. Y.; George B. Kelly, 1-113th Street, Troy, New York. 'Charles H. Chapman — *Robert H. Ogle — "James H. Morton — 'Deceased. REGIONAL DIRECTORS—Southern Jurisdiction; H. C. Trenholm, Vice-President; H. I. F. Nanton, The Carolina Tribune, Raleigh, N. C ; Felton G. Clark, Southern University, Scottlandville, La.; M. G. Ferguson, Citizens Savings and Trust Co., Nashville, Tenn.; Rufus G. Atwood, Ky. State College, Frankfort, Ky.; Eastern Jurisdiction, R. F. Gordon, Vice-President; John M. Moore, 1220 Howard Road, Richmond, Virginia; John L. S. Holloman, Virginia Union University, Richmond, Va.; Mid-Western Jurisdiction; L. C. Wright, Vice-President; lahoma! C. Paul Johnson, 2700 Flora St., Dallas, Texas. Va.; Charles F. Lane 4722 Langley, Chicago, 111.; WestKermit J. Hall, 1322 Washington Street, Charleston, W. Va.; Charles F. Lane 4722 Langley, Chicago, 111.; Western-Jurisdiction; B. A. McDonald, Vice-President; Kenne.h L. Jones, Langston University, University, Langston, Oklahoma; C. Paul Johnson, 2700 Flora St., Dallas, Texas; Bernard E. Squires, 326 Railway Exchange Bldg., Seattle, Wash. CHAIRMAN CHAPTER HOUSING COMMISSION—Belford V. Lawson, Jr., 2001 11th St., N. W., Washington, D. C CHAIRMAN. COMMITTEE ON PUBLIC OPINION—Howard H. Long, 1112 Girard St., N. W., Wash., D. C. CHAIRMAN, COMMITTEE ON STANDARDS—Henry L. Dickason, Bluefield State Teachers College, Bluefield, W. Va.

CHAPTER 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7.

8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16.

17. 18. 19.

ALPHA—Cornell University, Ithaca, New York: President, Dr. G. A. Galvin, 216 W. State Street; Secretary, Dr. Albert P. Johnson, 216 W. State Street. BETA—Howard University. Washington. D. C.J President, Edward W . Brook. 1760 1st St., N. W.; Secretary, N. Alan Harris, 1917 3rd St. N. W. GAMMA—Virginia Union University: Richmond, Va.; President, E. D. McCreary, Jr., Secretary, Percy Patricks, Virginia Union. DELTA—T'illotson College, Austin, Texas; President, Baldwin W. Burroughs. Secretary, Joseph P, Bracy, Tillotson College, EPSILON—University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Mich.; President, Pet-r J. Carter, Secretary, James Seldon, Jr., 311 Glen. ZETA—Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut; Pres. Sec. Dr. R. S. Fleming, 216 Dwight St. ETA—Columbia University. St. Lawrence, Brooklyn, C. C , St. John University. Brooklyn, New York City; President. Mac C. Davis, 79 St. Nicholas PI., N. Y. C . Secretary, Lucius C. Watson, 3 5 West 110th Street. N. Y. C. THETA—University of Chicago, Chicago, 111.; President, George A. Denison, 4432 S. Parkway; Secretary, Clarence Robinson, 4934 Washington Pk. Ct. IOTA—Syracuse University, Syracuse, New York; INACTIVE. KAPPA—Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio, President, Henry Parks, Jr., 75 E. 11th Ave.. Secretary Robert R. Watson, Jr., 154 Monroe Ave. MU—University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota; President, John R. Lawrence, 947 Igle'iart Ave., St. Paul, Minn., Secretary, John M. Patton, 954 St. Anthony Ave., St. Paul, Minn. NU—Lincoln University. Pa. President, Roy Nichols; Secretary William Land, Lincoln University, XI—Wilberforce University, Ohio; Preider.t, George Walker, Secretary, Warren Walker. Wilberforce University. OMICRON—Pittsburgh. Pa., President. Paul L. Jones, 228 West 14th, Homestead, Pa.; Secretary McDonald Williams, 201 Michigan Avenue, Bet-hoover, Pitts.. Pa. PI—Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio, President, Clarence L. Sharpe, 4609 Central Ave., S. E., Secretary, Aaron A. Bromley, 2292 E. 95th St. RHO—Graduate Group, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; Pres. Dr. W. P. Jerrick, 184 3 Christian St.; C. Sec. Dr. O. Wilson Winters, 2 8 Curren Arcade; F. Sec. Norristown, Pa.; F. Sec. Dr. Percy I. Bowser, 5344 Race St. SIGMA—Harvard University. Boston, Mass., President, Thomas A. Center. 54 Mt. Pleasant St., N. Cambridge, Mass., Secretary, Julian C. Branker. 1 1 Waumbeck St., Roxbury, Mass. TAU—University of Illinois, Champaign. 111., President, Richard M. Haskins, Secretary, Willie B. Martin, 1305 W. Stoughton St., Urbana, III. UPSILON—University of Kansas, Kan., State Teachers College, Emporia, Kans., Kan- as State College of Agriculture Si Applied Sciences, Manhattan. Karsas. Lawrence, Kansas; President, Harry Rawlins, Jr., Secretary, Richard Walker, 1101 Mississippi St.

ROSTER 20.

PHI—Ohio University. Athens. Ohio: Pres. John W. Casaway; Sec. Walter B. Allen, 155 W. Washington St. 2 1 . CHI—Meharry Medical College. Nashvil'e. Te-in., President, Max Johnson, Secretary, Donald M. Cary, 1017 16th Ave. 22. PSI—University of Pennsylvania, Temple U.i vers'ty. Ph'adelphia, Pennsylvania; President. Alton C. Berry, 5314 Race St., S^cr^tar/, Ernest Smith, 208 N. 53rd St. 23. ALPHA ALPHA—University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati Co kge cf Pha m. acy, Miami University. Cincinnati, Ohio; President, John W. Fleming, 1532 Linn St., Secretary. Saul S. Sanford, 747 Clark Street. 24. ALPHA BETA—Talladega College. Talladega, Ala.; Pr.sident, George E. Lee; Secretary, Andrew B. Randall, Corresponding Secretary, Erman W. Edgecombe, Talladega. 25. ALPHA GAMMA—Brown University, Providence, Rhcde Island; INACTIVE—Address Joseph G. LeCount, 42 Westminister St. 26. ALPHA DELTA—University of Southern California, Los Angeles, Calif., President, Edward C. Strong, 1145 Sunset Ave., Pasadena, Calif., Secretary, Henry Feltenberg, 1126 S. Serrano Ave. 27. ALPHA EPSILON—University of California, Berkeley, California; Pres. Edward E. Aubert, 1601 Tyler St.; Sec. Theodore Smith, 2928 Grove St.; C. Sec. Henry L. Richardson, 1557 Seventh St., Oakland, Cahf. 28. ALPHA ZETA—West Virginia State, West Virginia State College, Institute, W. Va.. President, Lloyd G. Lewis, Secretary, Thomas H. Shaw. lr., W. V. State College. 29 ALPHA ETA—Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts; INACTIVE. 30. ALPHA THETA—University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa; President, Julian Mason; Secretary, Clifton R. Jones, 815 Dubuque Street. 3 1 ALPHA IOTA-—University of Colorado. Denver, Colo., President, Howard Jenkins, Jr., 3131 Gilpin St., Secretary, John Wallar, 2606 Gilpin St. 3 2. ALPHA KAPPA—Springfield College, Amherst College. Amhers:, Mass., Springfield, Massachusetts; Sec. Eric Headley, Springfield College. 3 3. ALPHA MU—Northwestern University, Evanston, Illinois; Pres. William C. Pyant, 1930 Brown Ave.; Sec. Colbert S. Davis. 34. ALPHA NU—Iowa State College, Drake University, Des Moines, Iowa, Ames, Iowa; Pres. S. M. Riley, Jr.; Sec. Charles P. Howard, 515 Mulberry St., Des Moines, Iowa. 35. ALPHA XI—University of Washington, Seattle. Washington; President, James P. Johnston, 928 3 1st St.. Seattle, Washington; Secretary, Robert B. Pitt;, 1319 E. 56th St., Seattle, Washington. 36. ALPHA OMICRON—Johnson C. Smith University, Charlotte, N. C„ President, Earnest N. Mattison, C. Secretary, Willie C. Parks, Johnson C. Smith University. 37. ALPHA PI—Louisville Municipal College, Louisville. Kentucky; Pres. Perry A. Lively, 3431 W. Hale Ave.; Sec. Vernon E. Miller, 1740 Dumesnile St.


THE SPHINX

Official Organ of Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity, Inc PUBLISHED FEBRUARY, MAY, OCTOBER, and DECEMBER VOLUME 26

NUMBER 1

FEBRUARY, 1940

KNOW OF A JOB? EDITOR'S NOTE — This column, bearing the above caption, will be published regularly in the Sphinx Magazine with the hopes that it will serve the purpose of calling attention to specialized talent and training within the rank of this Fraternity. If you are qualified by training, experience, or both, and in need of employment, don't hesitate to write this column in care of the Editor. List your name and address, give a brief sketch of educational background and experience, if any, and the type of employment you believe you are most adequately suited. This column will also be devoted to individuals or institutions in search for men who have been prepared in certain fields of endeavor, and urges its use by those who are influential in selecting such men for new jobs, or filling vacancies. SOCIAL WORKS Brother H. S. B.—St. Augustine's College, B.S., 1936. Studied at New Jersey State Teacher's College, 1938-1939. Two and one-half years' work in adult education. High rating on City, County, and State Civil Service lists for social investigator. Address:—41 Ninth Avenue, East Orange, N. J. In Education Brother Isaiah Israel—West Va. State College, B.S., in Education, with a major in Physical Education, 1937. Attended Michigan University, 1937-8 toward Master's Degree. Two years of exeprience in High School and Y. M. C. A. Physical Education Program, planning and execution. Not as concerned with financial remuneia.ion a t this time as the opportunity to get a start in type of work for which he has qualified himself. Permanent Address 350 Hamilton Street, Fairmont, West Va. Toledo, Ohio address, 669 Indiana Avenue.

FRONT COVER Valentine greetings from and to Mrs. Annie C. Singleton, "Mother of Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity", at whose home this organization was founded nearly 24 years ago.

TABLE OF CONTENTS Page Founder's Address 2 Psi's Anniversary 3-4 Tau's Chapter House 5 Economic Life of the Negro 7 Significant Alpha News 9-10 Fraternity Fun 11 Hits & Misses 12 Educational Movement 13 Book Reviews 14 Alpha in Realm of Sports 15 Voice of the Sphinx 17 Tribute to Kelly Miller 42 Tribute to James Booker 42 Audit's Report 43 Omega Chapter 42

Entered as second class matter at the Post Office in Memphis, Tenn. as issued four times a year in February, May, October and December, under the Act of March 3, 1879 and accepted for mailing at the second class rates of postage.

THE STAFF EDITOR-IN-CHIEF LEWIS O. SWINGLER Memphis, Tennessee ASSISTANT EDITOR HUGH M. GLOSTER LeMoyne College Memphis, Tennessee WHO'S WHO EDITOR GEORGE B. KELLEY Troy, New York HISTORY EDITOR JAMES B. BROWNING Miners Teachers College Ga. Ave. at Euclid and Fairmont, N. W. Washington, D. C. FRAT FUN EDITOR DR. O. WILSON WINTERS 28 Curren Arcode Norristown, Pa. ART EDITORS JAMES D. PARKS Lincoln University Jefferson City, Mo. FERDINAND ROUSSEVE Art Department Xavier University New Orleans, La. HERSHAL C. LATHAM Memphis, Tennessee CONTRIBUTING EDITORS MILTON S. J. WRIGHT Wilberforce University Wilberforce, Ohio WILLIAM H. GRAY 1844 N. 11th St. Philadelphia, Pa. JOSEPH E. COTTON Memphis, Tennessee KERMIT J. HALL 1332 Washington Charleston, W. Va. CLYDE L. COLE Carver Junior High School Tulsa, Oklahoma GRANT W. HAWKINS 2627 Shriver Indianapolis, Ind. 1940 CONVENTION EDITOR J. R. LILLARD Kansas City, Mo. CIRCULATION SPENCER SMITH Memphis, Tennessee

Subscription Price—One Dollar and Fifty Cents Per Year


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THE S P H I N X

February, 1940

Fraternities In The New Order FOUNDER'S ADDRESS By HENRY A. CALLIS> Founder New York Convention, 1939 T ITTLE more than a college generation has passed since I similarly addressed our fraternity at the site of the 1933 World's Fair in Chicago. The changes that have occurred about us have been kaleidoscopic. Many of them have lacked beauty. Often our spirits have been shocked. Democratic principles, consideration for minorities, freedom of speech, the search for truth, the opportunity to earn an equitable living in peace,â&#x20AC;&#x201D;all have been jeopardized and in many places destroyed. Today we look out upon a New Order.

the light of day a century ago in the Industrial Revolution in England, the student up-risings in Germany, and for America, in the Abolition Movement, in public support for education and in the Labor Movement. Today our conception of society embraces individual health, housing, sanitation, roads, recreation, science, art, vocational direction, gainful occupation and leisure. Gradually and peacefully we approach an era in which the responsibilities, benefits and protection of society shall extend down to every member of the social group. i

In the Chicago Convention we were aware of the passing of the Old Order. We faced squarely and, I believe, with much wisdom the new problems of relief, unemployment, industrial stratification and political ineptitude. Never-the-less college fraternities a r e an inheritance of the Old Order. Their traditions spring from the social limitations of the Nineteenth Century. It is reasonable to inquire whether they have a place now in this world of rapidly changing values. We have discussed frequently the growth olf the Greek letter college fraternities in America and our evolution from and contribution to that movement. On that account an historical definition of our inquiry is not essential.

Many of the difficulties and much of the lag in this social development arise from selfishness, ignorance and lack of appreciative understanding. Trainled men of character are able t o bring the past and the future into a workable present. Herein lies the present opportunity of the college fraternity, to give leadership to a practical humanitarianism.

What is the new order? I admit ignoi-ance. Yet we can interpret trends. Closely related events may have significance. As trained minds, it is our obligation to search out the relationships and piece them together in some small comprehensible pattern. It is our responsibility in our email way to give conscious direction to those forces which generate within the scheme. As we view the world we see fear and vacillation, intrigue and treachery in Europe; war and inhumanity in Asia; greed and feverish exploitation in Africa. All are related to the passing of an economic order in which Might was Right; in which selfish greed for wealth and power gave the victim no quarter. The torch of civilization and the cross of religions burned the feet and bent the back of the victim that the shrewdest, the most heartless might gain luxury and leisure. The unsuspected byproduct of this economics was enlightenment and challenge. Political changes came swiftly, but their purposes have been perverted by the guardians and beneficiaries of the old stealth and exploitation in their effort to stem the inevitable advance of social justice. The same struggle gotes on in our own country. We acknowledge wealth that is almost inexhaustible, scientific knowledge and technical advance that leaves few practical problems unsolved. Yet 100 million people belong to families whose total money income does not allow the level of a reasonably comfortable subsistence. Upon this background is growing a dynamic conception of government and society. This conception first saw

The Old Order abrogated to itself permanence. Therefore the individual was not prepared to think about problems revealed with the realization that the old pre-war prosperity of individualism cannot come back. The leader today must cultivate in all the people new social virtues; a keener ability to appraise these problems in terms of workable social values; the interest to ferret out and checkmate the enemies of social progress; the wisdom to achieve, as Judson Herrick says, "the proper balance between personal profit and the public good." Such leadership is education in the broadest sense. It presages a moral relationship and responsibility in the commonplace affairs of life, of which our fathers scarcely dreamed. The forces for this achievement live in human nature. An intelligent leadership can develop and guide them. To bring understanding to a world in chaos is the opportunity of leadership and direction which college fraternities may essay. Our training and background prepare us to lead in the restraint of aggression upon the extensions of the social frontier. This responsibility necessitates the habit of clear and unprejudiced thinking on our part and the transference of that thought into sane and effective action. If college fraternities seize this opportunity for community leadership, we may be proud of their role in the advancement of the public good and in the extension of the welfare of the individual. For Alpha Phi Alpha this awareness of our opportunity should mean a vigorous criticism of our conceptions and an examination of our procedures. We need wisely to appraise our times, to be responsive to contemporary thought; to bear the burden of a disadvantaged people; to stand firmly upon character and principle making no sacrifice for some temporary good. In Alpha Phi Alpha there is the background for the ideas, visions and plans of the New Order.


THE

February, 1940

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SPHINX

Members Of Psi Chapter, Philadelphia,

20 Years Ago

E A R L I E S T known picture of Psi Chapter, probably the spring of 1920. Standing left to right:—E. C. Wright, Howard McNeil, Augustus Granger, Hilliard Robinson, Clarence Scarborough, Frank Harris, Harold Waters, J. D. Hurt ( ? ) , Sitting left'to right:—Wallace W. Carney, Preston C. Johnson, Russell Nelson, Name Unrecorded, Raymond Pace Alexander, Lawerence D. Christmas, W. LeRoy Berry, Harry S. Blackiston, C. Dewey Rodgers.

Dr. Wesley Anniversary Speaker For Psi By WILLIAM H. GRAY, JR. Contributing Editor r p w o decades in Alpha Phi Alpha furnished an inspiring theme for Psi Chapter's twentieth anniversary celebration in Philadelphia during the Christmas holidays at historic University of Pennsylvania. The memorable anniversary came on the eve of the inauguration of the University's Bi-Centennial celebration and recapitulated the contributions of a great institution and a great fraternity to a nation and a race. Dr. Charles Wesley, general president of Alpha Phi Alpha keynoted the historical significance of the occasion in a masterly address delivered before a huge gathering of frien.'.s of Alpha Phi Alpha who assembled in a University au'itorium to pay tribute to the Chapter's achievement sin:e entering upon the rolls of Alpha twenty years ago. Dr. Wesley's sermon was acclaimed by an appreciative audknee as one of the most inspiring messages rendered from a local platform. The general president was obviously inspired and responded with an oration that merited him an indelible place in the hearts of his listeners. The general c:!cbration was featured by the contri-

butions of outstanding local and national figures. Southern Vice-President, H. Council Trenholm, scholarly president of Alabama State Teachers College; General Secretary, Joseph H. B. Evans; General Counselor, B. V. Lawson; Eastern Vice-President, Roger F. Gordon, former president of Psi; Brother Bishop Bray, of Chicago; Brother Dr. Edward F. Jones, of New York, one of the first members of Psi; Brother Raymond Pace Alexander, foremost Negro lawyer of Philadelphia; Brothers Jerrick and Winters, only life members of Alpha; Dr. Charles A. Lewis, known as "Daddy" of Psi; Brother William L. Berry of Baltimore; Brother Everett Johnson, and Dr. Arnold K. Henry, Dean, University of Pennsylvania were only a few who appeared on the three day program highlighting the celebration. Brother J. Gordon Baugh, youthful business executive and an outstanding member of the chapter, directed the varied activities of the anniversary. Undoubtedly his work, enhanced by the capable assistance of Brothers Woodley wells and Ernest Smith, accounted for the outstanding success of the affair. These men were the "wheel in a wheel" of a splendid committee. ••:


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CELEBRATION UNPRECEDENTED Many unique social affairs, unusual souvenirs, and placid constructive educational and fraternal meetings, "sans" politics rendered this a "spiritual" convention unprecedented in the annals of Alpha Phi Alpha. Appearing on the three closed sessions, which began on Friday afternoon, December 29 and had as their respective themes—"Here We Are", "What We Are" and "What We Shall Be", were outstanding brothers from all walks of life. Those who contributed on these programs aside from the brothers already listed were: Brothers Alton C. Berry, president of Psi Chapter; Leonard Logan, Attorney David B. Asbury, John W. Jones, Milton Washington, manager of the Alpha Phi Alpha basketballers; Franklyn W. Morris, Jr.; Dr. Wilbur Strickland, Dr. W. Harry Barnes, noted ear, nose and throat specialists; Dr. W. Reid Wells, William B. Harris, Fred Alsup, and William H. Gray, Jr. The final closed session was climaxed by the appearance of Brother Joseph H. B. Evans, Brother Walter Jerrick and Brother B. V. Lawson. "What Alpha Can Do For The; Youth" by Brother Arthur Huff Fauset, Principal of the Frederick Douglass Public School; "What It Can Do for Education" by Brother Tanner G. Duckery, principal, Paul Lawrence Dunbar Public School and "Alpha's Contribution to the Community" by Brother Henry C. Sparks, Activities Secretary, Y. M. C. A., were all representative addresses that merited high commendation from the brothers.

S P H I N X

February, 1940

A souvenir program including historical data on the Chapters and members, with a beautiful cover designed by Brother Franklin Morris; and a souvenir key were presented to each brother in attendance. The closed formal, given on the University campus; a mid-night smoker; an open Sunday afternoon tea at the home of Attorney and Mrs. Raymond Pace Alexander honoring President Wesley and other visiting brothers; and a basketball game high-lighted the social phases of the meeting. The Brothers literally "let their hair down" at the smoker. Moving pictures of the University of Pennsylvania's 1938 and 1939 football games and motion pictures of Bermuda were shown by Brother Baugh while the brothers smoked, ate,—and jested. (Note anything that rhymes with blank.) PRESIDENT WESLEY SPEAKS The open program Sunday morning which marked the occasion of Dr. Wesley's soul-stirring message was well attended. Others appearing on this program, besides Brothers Trenholm, Evans and Gordon, were Brothers Raymond Logan, Raymond Pace Alexander, C. A. Scott and Mr. Clifford C. Washington of the Inter-fraternal Council and City Councilman, James Irving. Dr. Wesley spoke on the "Dynamics of Education". Taking the Bible Story of the dead man whose bones became revitalized upon touching the bones of Elisha who lay dead in an open grave, and the dynamo whereby mechanical energy is Continued On Page 16

Psi's Dynamic Anniversary

Committee

CTANDING, left to right:—Jerry Certaine, Chaplain; Robert Poindexter, Associate Sphinx Editor; Ralph Baxter, Sergeant-at-Arms. Sitting, left to right:—John W. Jones, Assistant Secretary; Ernest Smith, Secretary; Alton C. Berry, President; Dr. W. Reid Wells, Treasurer; and Franklyn W Morris, Jr., Vice-President.


February, 1940

THE

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Newl Fraternity House For Tau By Brother Charles F. Lane, Regional Director, Mid-Western Jurisdiction, originally initiated in Tau Chapter, now a member of Theta Chapter and a leading attorney in Chicago.

ATTORNEY CHARLES F. LANE D E F O R E considering the house recently purchased for Tau Chapter, located at the University of Illinois, Uribana, some mention should be made of the house used by the Chapter a few years ago. During the regime of Raymond W. Cannon, Tau Chapter was on numerous occasions referred to, as "Turbulent Tau." That term, in reality, carried a greater significance than one might realize. At that time, the members of Tau were so Fraternity minded, that they tried conscientiously to live up to the letter of the Law. A brother would be suspended or recommended for expulsion upon the slightest provocation. The Chapter at that time had sufficient equity in a Fraternity house for the brothers to feel secure in referring to it as "our" Fraternity House. A dining room was maintained, speeches were made and current problems solved, at the dinner table. The Alpha spirit was most intense, as evidenced by the feeling put into the Fraternity and college songs. Because of the house accommodation, "Home Coming" was always considered a great occasion, for visitors were numerous. It was this course of events which led the brothers to consider their Fraternity with such high regard, that they were eager to punish anyone who strayed, to any degree, from the fold. As time passed on, and old brothers left the Chapter, the younger brothers, with their limited knowledge of the legal status of the property in which they lived, and with very little finance, allowed the old Fraternity house to slip from under them. From that time until the present the members of Tau have lived from "pillow to post." Their living conditions have been most unfavorable, which made it difficult for the men to keep the Chapter together. As a Fraternity, their prestige in the community was lessened; certain complications arose, as a result of their instability, which caused the Dean of Men to threaten to withdraw their Chapter. Strange as it may seem, however, those men pledged to stick together, and in spite of their handicaps, held their Chapter in tact. They proved themselves to be the type of material of which Alpha Phi Alpha boasts. CONDITIONS AT THE UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOISâ&#x20AC;&#x201D; Realizing the plight of Tau Chapter, Brother Sidney A. Jones, Jr., who was Vice President of the Mid-Western

districts until the last convention, came to the rescue of the Illinois Chapter. Being in close contact with the City of Champaign and the University of Illinois, he could observe the living conditions of the students. For the benefit of

Tau's Old, New Chapter

House

Tau Brothers, Illinois University, moved out of the old home, lower, photo, to new chapter house, top picture.


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THE

those who are not familiar with University life in Champaign and Urbana, a few words should be devoted to that topic. Champaign and Urbana, often referred to as twin cities even though they are North of the Mason and Dixon Line, and only 140 miles from Chicago, are a "hot bed" of prejudice. Colored students are not allowed to eat in any of the restaurants on and about the campus; they must sit in certain seats in the theatres, and there are some theatres which will not allow them to enter. Thei-e are but few homes of Negro citizens which are adequate to house Negro students. The University maintains no dormitories for men. In spite of the fact that there has been much agitation on the part of Negro students and other mixed groups, to destroy the barrier of prejudice, little, if anything, has been accomplished to that end. A large number of Negro students attend the University of Illinois, because it is a State school, and the tuition is low. Too, scholastic requirements for entrance are not as rigid as they, are in some privately endowed institutions. Being only a few miles from Chicago and St. Louis, many students attend the University in order to be near home. This indicates that the University of Illinois is a fertile field for the development of good Alpha men. That is why it was considered essential to preserve the Tau Chapter Charter. Brother Sidney Jones concluded that we could not immediately change the conditions which exist at the University of Illinois, but we could improve the status of our brothers there by helping them to obtain a house in which to live. With this idea in mind, he fought for Chapter house financing by the general organization. Primarily through his efforts, along with those of members of Tau Chapter, the general organization realized the necessity ing a Housing Commission to consider Chapter HouÂť-financing. The conditions at the University of Illinois were such that when brought to the attention of the Housing Commission, it was recommended to the GeneteS Convention that $2,000.00 be set aside to be used by Tau Chapter as a down payment on a Fraternity House.

PURCHASE OF FRATERNITY HOUSEâ&#x20AC;&#x201D; Upon returning from the Convention held in New York, this summer, Brother Jones, although no longer VicePresident, set about to complete the task of obtaining a Fraternity House for Tau. The men were greatly in need of a house for the ensuing school year. In September, Brothers Jones, Oscar C. Brown, and Charles F. Lane, made a trip to Champaign to select and negotiate for a house. The deal had to be handled in a unique fashion, i.:asmucii as the seller of the house selected would not sell to a colored Fraternity; and if the people in the community knew that colored students were buying the house, they .spHld block the deaf. Fortunately for us, Brother Jones'* complexion and" hair were of such texture that the average suspecting Caucasian might consider him one of them. In order to close the deal, Jones had to make three successive trips to Champaign. On the 7th day of October, 1939, the boys moved into their new abode. At the present time there are twentyone students living in the house, eleven of which are pledges. The men at Tau are due much credit for the manner in which they held their pledges in tact until the new house was ready to be occupied. There are twenty pledges at the Chapter at the present time. The house is

S P H I N X

February, 1940

located at 1301 W. Clark Street, Urbana, and is in a nice residential neighborhood. It is a three story, fourteen room house, completely furnished. A corporation is being organized to be known as The Tau Foundation. This organization will take title to the property, and its board of directors will actively manage all operations of the Fraternity house. This corporation will consist of men who are in residence at the seat of Tau, and also men who are well established in Chicago. This type of set-up has been deemed advisable in order to assure a business-like operation. In Chapters where almost all of the members are college students, men come and go, within such short time, that there is very little fixed responsibility on any particular member or group. Often men who succeed others are the victims of unwise dealings of their predecessors. They inherit problems and burdens which are too great for them to bear. This type of situation, in time, usually leads to destruction. For that reason, it is necessary to develop some system of continuity, whereby there will always be some brothers in control who are familiar with past negotiations. In the annual report of the Housing Commission, much emphasis was placed on the fact that Chapter house financing created many new problems which must be carefully studied and weighed. It was also brought out that different sections of the country presented problems peculiar to their own location. For example, it was shown the difficulty a Chapter located at a boarding school experiences in trying to maintain a Fraternity house in competition with the dormitory at the particular school. To me, it appears that that type of situation would simplify our housing problems. Where a chapter is located in a boarding school, there is no need for a Fraternity house. The students have close association in the dormitories, and all that is needed is a place to meet which can be obtained for a small rental. Chapter houses at boarding schools could easily be eliminated without prejudice to any one, especially where such house must exist with the aid of the General Organization. Other queries as to success of Chapter house financing could be eliminated, if we would consider them for what they actually are, rather than for what they mean personally to any particular individual or group of persons. If Tau Chapter is used as an experiment for Chapter House Financing, even though successful, it may not prove that other chapters can do likewise. So much depends upon the persons who effect the House management program, that one project may fail where another may stand up, the difference being due primraily to difference in personel. There is no doubt in my mind that Alpha Phi Alpha will be proud of the manner in which the Tau house will be managed, and the $2,000.00 loan will be protected. The older men in Chicago, have pledged themselves to effectively assist the younger fellows at Tau. We realize there will always be students who need help, and one of the best ways to be of service in helping students, is to see that their living conditions are conductive to good scholarship. The general organization could make no better use of its money than to assist in the purchase of Fraternity Houses where they are needed. In a few years we would have valuable properties all over the country, and we would have something material to show for our money.


February, 1940

THE

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Economic Life Of T h e Nergfo AN HISTORICAL SURVEY By DR. MILTON S. J. WRIGHT EDITOR'S NOTES:â&#x20AC;&#x201D;The second and final installment of a comprehensive and aut'iorative treatise by Brother Dr. M'lton S. J. Wright, Professor of Economics and Political Science at Wilberforce University. First section of this article appeared in the Educational Number of the Sphinx, 1939.

OCCUPATIONS 1. See "The Black Worker," Spsro and Harris. Negroes have engaged in many and varied kinds and types of occupations in this country, from highly skilled technicians and the professions to share-croppers and garbage men; from water-boy to college president. Although he has frequently been characterized as lazy, shiftless and decile, usually, when given a chance, the Negro has shown himself to be a good worker'. Studies of Mexican and Negro workers in Texas show the latter to be more stable workers than the former. Negroes have traditionally been considered one of the principal sources of cheap labor. It has been definitely proven that they lend themselves more easily to a much wider range of occupations than does any other minority group in the country. While Negroes hav e been labelled as agricultural and domestic workers primarily, investigations show that, if given equal opportunity with other workers, they are equally adept at various technical, mechanical, industrial, commercial and professional tasks. Negro laborers have always had a hectic road to travel. For years they were used as scabs or strike-breakers, pushed around like pawns in the bitter battles between white capital and labor. Within more recent years Negro labor has found itself in somewhat of a daze, torn between the two principal opposing American labor camps, the A. F. of L. and the C. I. O. The Negro has been told by such Negro industrial and labor leaders and advisers as A. Philip Randolph, Lester Granger, T. Arnold Hill and others that it is to his best interest to cast his lot with that of American labor in general and join the unions. BUSINESS American Negro business sprang out of, and has been perpetuated for the most part by racial and economic prejudice and discrimination. Until about 1910 Negro business enterprise was confined almost entirely to the South. As the Southern Negro migrated North and West he brought along his business projects and sat them up. Tho West Indian Negro has contributed qui'te a bit to Negro business enterprise, particularly in the Northeast. From the report of the Conference on the Economic Status of the Negro, held in Washington, D. C, May, 1933, we take the following: "There is yet considerable confusion as to the direct objective and possibility of development of Negro business as a distinct economyâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;Having the greatest cause for cooperative economic techniques, and perhaps greatest grounds for protest against unrestrained individualism, these Negro enterprises have not only shown least capacity for cooperative ventures, but seem to have been guided in their business aspirations by the general type of business success against which they have deepest complaint on behalf of Negro workers. Some 25,000 of these small Negro enterprises during 1929 averaged net sales of $3,935, and gave employment to 12,561 persons, mostly Negroes. The effect upon employment, thus,

is negligible." "Although Chicago has 100,000 fewer Negroes than New York, it is the centre of U. S. Negro business; last census figures showed Chicago's Negro establishments had annual net sales of $4,826,897, New York's were only $3,322,274'." There is little doubt that the greatest, if not the only hope for Negro business and Negro economic li'fe in America for stability and survival in our great competitive economic society lies in the co-operative idea. The two billion dollars purchasing power of the Negro; his estimated four billion dollars potential capital, etc., look good on paper and compare rather favorably with similar items for other minority groups in the country. When compared with those of the aggregate for the entire country, they are not a drop in the proverbial "bucket." If, however, this scattered potential capital were brought together and concentrated in fewer endeavors, it would not only contribute to greater efficiency and worthy but also to sounder, mor e stable and tangible profits, dividends and greater general economic security. 1. Business in Bronzeville, Time Weekly Magazine, April 18, 1938, p;ge 70. It is true that, under the circumstances, the American Negro has done a great deal with his churches, schools, business enterprises and the like, but with his greater opportunities for education, knowledge and intelligence, he should have acquired wisdom enough to see that there is pressing need for more merging and combining of his efforts in h's various institutions and enterprises. Instead of straining at a thousand and one small, precarious and frequently wasteful efforts, why not combine and concentrate on fewer but stronger and more stable ones? In the p:,st, and even now to too great an extent, there have been too few high paying positions for Negroes, and so an amazingly large number of them are fighting and scheming to secure and hold the few that there are. Everybody wants to be the Grand Exalted Ruler, the President, the Manager, the Chairman, the Leader; and why? Simply because the big job pays more and has more honor and prestige attached to it. There are those who would break even the Ten Commandments plus a score of individuals to secure high positions and, who would break up the enterprise or the institutions itself rather than give them up, or have certain powers taken away. Meanwhile the project itself goes wanting and deteriorates. The general marging and co-operative idea seems to be growing more and more among Negro enterprises, as is evidenced by certain insurance companies, credit unions, banks, churches, etc. As yet, however, the surface has scarcely been scratched. We note, for instance, that in 1936 there were 139 institutions for higher learning among Negroes in the U. S. (excluding professional schools) serving 76,681 students, employing 3,624 teachers, having a total annual income of $8,991,524.86 and a total property valuation of 65,000,000 dollars. In the same year there were 45,000 Negro churches of 25 nationally recognized denominations, serving 5,300,000 communicants and having a total property valuation of $210,000,000. In 1932 there were 25,701 stores operated by Negroes, em-


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THE

ploying 12,561 persons and having net sales amounting to $101,146,043. In the same year ther e were 23 Negro banks with a total capital of $2,000,000; resources of approximately $15,000,000, and an annual volume of business amounting to 50,000. Of the 44 Negro insurance companies now in business, 28 of them form what is known as the National Negro Insurance Association. Quoting from an article by Dr. P. M. H. Savory, Chairman of the Board of Directors of the Victory Life Insurance Company, in th e May, 1938 issue of Opportunity. "In 1936, 28 colored insurance companies collected $18,475,389 from Negroes. In return they employed directly 15,000 colored persons. They paid over $100,000 to colored printers and publishers for printing and advertising and $100,000 to Negro physicians for medical examinations. Beneficiaries and policy holders received $6,500,000 in 1938 and an additional $5,000,000 was paid colored agents in salaries and commissions. Compare this with an annual premium income of $68,000,000 collected from Negroes toy nine white companies (who employ few if any Negroes). The growth of Negro Insurance Companies can be seen in a comparison for three years: In 1934, their combined income was $14,633,709.35; in 1935, it was $15,061,342.72; by 1936 it had increased to $18,475,389.36. The amount of business in force during 1934 amounted to $223,319,600.35; in 1935, $288,963,070; and in 1936, $325,000,000.': The figures and data just quoted show what can be done through cooperation and they also show the great need for more merging and greater coopsration efforts. It is an old, old adage, but a true one—"In co-operation there is strength", stability—and even greater probability of economic security. Let us view some of the factors that go to keep Negroes in the lowest economic sphere: From a study of the earned incomes of unskilled Negro labor groups in about twelve different, so-called, "typical regions of the U. S.'' a group of graduate students of Columbia University during the past summer found that the Mean Income for that designated group was $8.20 and $12.40 a week; for the skilled labor group, approximately $20 a week; for Negro teachers, social workers, etc., approximately $90 a month. From an editorial in the January, 1938 issue of Opportunity the following statements are taken: "In a report issued by the Bureau of Labor Statistics the unfortunate condition of the Negro family in the city of New York is disclosed — during 1935-36 50 per cent of the Negro families received incomes below $837. Nearly onefourth of the Negro population had incomes of less than $1,000 or received relief some time during the year. The report showed that the average Negro householder was compelled to pay thirty per cent of his family income for rent." "Even in Harlem, the largest Negro city in the world, the best paid labor is white, hired by white employers who exploit th e colored community'. Comparatively few Negro families keep expense accounts or budgets. The fact that the majority of Negroes receive low wages, and like many other low income groups, a very small percentage of them are intelligent spenders— frequently placing desires and wants above necessities in their zealous attempts to keep up with the proverbial "Jones"; plus their proness to buy on what the late Dr. II. A. Hunt amusingly called "the extortion plan" (the in-

SPHINX

February, 1940

stallment plan); the fact that they are easy and willing preys of the loan sharks, all of these and more, are reasons for their poverty or pauperism. Thes e facts are not only true of ignorant Negroes, but many so-called highly trained individuals ar e often the worst victims, school teachers in particular. Another pertinent fact is, that usually Negroes who work for Negro bosses are the most poorly paid. The average Negro executive seems to have an absolute aversion to paying his Negro employees anything like what a white employee would demand and get, for th e same work, even though sufficient funds may be available. Many Negroes feel that if a white plumber will do a job for $10, then a colored plumber should by no means ask for more than $8 for the same job. Another important factor is that the Negro in America has been so much the object of charity and philanthropy that it has served to make him slothful about helping himself. There is no doubt that in those early years after emancipation he sorely needed help, and in some cases subsidy, in order that he might get a start. It was truly gracious of white charitable and philanthropic individuals, foundations, etc., to come to the aid of a down-trodden, unfortunate people. Th e members of the race should be grateful. However, it is high time that the Negro people in America become of age and stand on their own feet. Throughout the years white people have given Negroes schools, Y. M. C. A.'s and in many cases, paid for the education of leaders of the group. The Negro should cease to be a beggar and an object of charity and philanthropy. He should begin to pay his own way. May I simply mention one of the chief sources of income among Negroes in many centers today? Although considered illegal, the policy or numbers racket and other gambling games have contributed very substantially to the economic well-being of Negroes in various urban and rural centers. To be sure, they have caused much economic woe to thousands, but to other thousands they have been like economic saviors, like a shelter in the time of storm. The writer, however, does not recommend such as a panacea for economic ills of the race. Negro leaders must themselves learn and practice thrift and then teach thrift to their people particularly to their young people. They must learn that it is safer and sounder to learn to crawl before they try to run a foot race. In conclusion, I quote again from the report of the Conference on the Economic Status of the Negro, "There would be no reason to regard the economic status of the American Negro as any different from that of the rest of the population, or even from that of the general wage earning population, if this status were not intricately bound up with other special social and cultural factors. These other factors are the unique historical relationship of Negroes to the "development of American industry and life; the inescapable limitation of their cultural and economic expansion by the very institutions which they helped, helplessly, to create; their high visibility as a group; and the stern necessity now, in this period of economic distress, to make swift adjustment, as a conspicuous minority, to a bewilderingly complicated economic structure, if they are to survive it 1 ." 1. "Labor Steps Out In Harlem"—Claude McKay, The Nation, October 16, 1937, page 399.


THE

February, 1940

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Significant Alpna N e w s Endorsed For The Bishopric D R O . Rev. A. Wayman Ward, D.D., distinguished in the ministry of the African Methodist Episcopal Church, and a notable son of Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity, has been endorsed for the B i s h o p r i c of his Church by & number of leading organizations of the country. The Quadriennial Conference of the A. M. E. Church will be held in the City of Detroit, Michigan, beginning in May, 1940. Brother Ward has pastored Greater REV. A. WAYMAN WARD Bethel A. M. E. Church, Chicago, Illinois, during the past 12 years. He is one of the leading figures in the civic as well as religious life of the city. Brother Ward serves as vice-president of the Chicago Federation; Chairman of the InterRacial Commission, representative in the Federal Council of Churches in America, member of the World Fellowship of Faith, the Masonic Lodge, as a 32nd degree Mason and Shriner; the Chicago Branch of the National Urban League; Chicago Branch of the National Y. M. C. A. He claimed Alphadom in 1912 and has been a "bright and morning star" in the firmament of this organization for many years. While in attendance at the 24th General Convention cf Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity at St. Louis, 1933, Brother Ward wrote the official prayer which is now used whenever brothers gather in the name and spirit of Alpha Phi Alpha. The well known leader is builder of $150,000â&#x20AC;&#x201D;Shorter Chapel, Denver, Colorado, returning in 1938 to burn the mortgage of this church. He "reigned" as "Dollar Money King" of the A. M. E. Church from 1928 to 1938, a period of ten years. Brother Ward is a graduate of Wilberforce, Denver, and Yale Univjrsities. He is married, and father of five children. His father, the Rev. A. Milton Ward, an A. M. E. minister with 55 years of service, is pastoring in Oakland, California. For the Bishopric, Brother Ward is backed by Alpha Phi Alpha brothers of Chicago, as well as other organizations of that city.

Cupid's Corner RUCKER-ANDERSON MARRIAGE Of widespread interest was the announcement by Mr. and Mrs. Walter Henry Aiken of Atlanta of the marriage of their sister, Ann Rucker, to Brother Charles

A Circulation Man Speaks ??TN the Sphinx, our organization has a publication of which to be proud. Realizing this fact it is the desire of the editor and the circulation department that every active member receive a copy of each edition. We are striving to make each issue better than the previous one. In 'order to bring the circulation department up to a higher efficiency standard, t h e Fraternity has added an Addressograph m a_ chine. T h i s machine BROTHER SPENCE M. SMITH w m f a c i H t a t e a d d r e 3 g . ing magazines, hitherto an arduous task, as well as speed up postal distribution. Chapter secretaries are called upon to aid the circulation department by sending to the General Secretary's office complete lists of names of financial members with especial attention given to CORRECT ADDRESSES. They are asked to revise their lists when and if members of their chapters move from one street address to another within the same city or move to a new locality. It has been observed that there are a number of transfers during the interim that elapses between publications. Every book that is lost in postal transit is an added expense to the organization, not to mention the fact that some brother perhaps misses his Sphinx. My fraternal greetings to all brothers. I look forward to seeing many of you again at the Kansas City Convention."

W. Anderson, Jr., of Louisville. The ceremony was performed in Montreal in August by the Reverend Roy P. Stafford of the St. James United Church. The bride is an alumna of Atlanta University and the Hampton Institute Library School. Prior to her present position as Librarian at Kentucky State College, she was employed at Fisk University and the Carnegie Library in Atlanta. Her family many years ago was quite active in Republican circles in the South, her father having served as Georgia's only Negro Collector of Internal Revenue, and her grandfather, the late Jefferson Long, as the first United States Negro Congressman. Brother Anderson is one of Louisville's most prominent attorneys. He is a graduate of Wilberforce University and the Howard University Law School. He has the outstanding distinction of being the first Negro to be elected in the Kentucky Legislature.


THE

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Alpha

Xi Lambda

President

DROTHER Victor who English made a splendid re>ort to his chapter as ielegate to the World's â&#x20AC;˘\;ir Convention in \Tew York last year. was re-elected president of Alpha Xi Lambda, Toledo, Ohio.

BROTHER VICTOR ENGLISH

Makes Kappa Pi Medical

Society

' D R O T H E R Maurice F. Gleason, president of Chi Chapter, Meharry Medical College, Nashville, Tenn. has been appointed as interne at the Cleveland City Hospital, a mixed institution in the City of Cleveland, Ohio, his home. He will begin serving his interneship following graduation from Msharry in June. Cleveland City Hospital has 1500 beds and limits its yearly quota, of Negro internes to twfl. Patients are not segreBRO MAURICE F GLEASON gated. Negro internes are assigned patients in order of their admittance to service regardless of color. At Meharry Brother Gleason made Kappa Pi Honorary Medical Society in his Junior Year. Last April when the Sphinx editor personally interviewed him relative to his election to the Society, Brother Gleason was too mod est to comment, but preferred instead recognition in the Sphinx for Brothers Robyn J. Arlington and James R. Gladden (See Sphinx, Educational Number, 1933) who were elected to Kappa Pi during their senior year. Brother Gleason did his undergraduate work at John Carroll University, Cleveland. He was the first Negro to finish from Carroll, a white Jesuit University. Following his interne work in Cleveland, he expects to do special study in Obstetrics and Gynecology.

February, 1940

S P HI N X

Langston's New

President

D R O T H E R Dr. G. Lamar Harrison, for eight years head of the Dapartment of Education at Prairie View College, was recently appointed to the presidency of Langston University, Langston, Oklahoma. He assumed his new duties shortly after the beginning of the 1939 - 40 academic terms. Brother Harrison received his undergraduate training at H o w a id University, followed by graduate w o r k at Cincinnati . University where he BRO. DR. G. LAMAR HARRISON ^ ^ ^ Master-S Degree, a n d O h i o State University where he became the recipient of the Degree of Doctor of Philosophy. He carried to Langston University a brilliant record in the field of education and well wishes of his brothers of Alpha Eta Lambda Chapter who tendered him with a Farewell Party. Brother Harrison is still in his thirties.

An Alpha At 16 DROTIIER J a m e s Maurice Landers member of Beta Mu at Kentucky State College is believed to be the youngest man in entire Greekdom. He is 16 years old. During his entire school career he has been heralded as an exceptionally good scholar and profound thinker. If Ithere is ever to be added a better scholarship average to the present good average that Alpha maintains thruout its realm, it would necessitate a few men with the consistency Brother James Maurice Landers of Brother Landers. Majoring in History and Government, a sophomore and a true Alpha man, Brother Landers sends greetings to all chapters.


February, 1940

THE

Page 11

SPHINX

* *ATE*NITY rUV DR.O.WILSON FRAT

FUN

A jug of wine, a book of verses and thou Beside me sitting in the wilderness Ah! That would be paradise, enow! —Omar Khayyam A bowl of nuts, a set of sonnets and all The Alpha tribe ^knitting by the radiator Ah! That would be Frat Fun, and how! —OLIVER WINTERS. MID-WINTER NUTS The teacher was testing the knowledge of a kindergarten class. Tossing a half dollar on the desk, she said sharply: "What is that?" Instantly a voice from, the extreme rear of the room replied: "Tails"! Matilda returned from the World's Fair where she had seen one of those lie detector machines. At the bridge party she said to her partner, "Have you seen one of those instruments which can teil when a man is lying?" "Seen one?", said her partner, "I married one!" Flattery is 90% soap; soap is 90% lye. Southern suitor—Honey Chile, would you mind if Ah kissed you all? Honey Chile—Oh Sugar, ain't my lips enough? The Way Down East tourist visiting at Los Angeles said to his son, "Put your raincoat away, it doesn't rain in California." "All right, pop," said the son, "look out there and see all that orange ju'co falling down from the sky." A wise girl is judged by the company she keeps from making love to her. Mother: "Isn't is wonderful how little chicks get out of their shells?" Jitterbug daughter: "What intrigues me is how they get in." It isn't the size of the dog in the fight— It's the size of the fight in the dog. Judge: "Are you positive the prisoner was drunk?" Officer: 'Well your honor, I saw him put a penny in a patrol box and look up at the City Hall clock and roar, "Gosh, I've lost 14 pounds!" Bill: "My wife can be an angel when she wants to be." George: "Mine, too—anytime from now on." A man walked into the stands at the Hampton tennis tournament just as McDaniels and Wier had staged a long rally and one of them had made

WINTERS EDITOR

a spectacular shot which won the game. "Looking around him, he asked aloud, "Whose game?" A shy young co-ed sitting near by looked up hopefully and replied, "I am."

VALENTINE SONNETS O woman, lovely woman! nature made thee To temper man; we had been brutes without you; Angels are painted fair, to look like you; There's in you all we believe in heaven: Amazing brightness, purity and truth, Eternal joy and everlasting love. —Otway. FROM JOE TO HILDA Thou art sweet and thou art fair None, none on earth above thee As sweet and fair as angels are To know thee is to love thee. —Byron. FROM FARROW TO MRS. ALLEN Without you There would be no song No sweet refrain Each day would be a day too long To love in vain. —Yeiser. FROM RAYFORD TO MRS. LOGAN So dear to heaven is saintly chastity That, when a soul is found sincerely so, A thousand liveried angels lackey her, Driving far off each thing of sin and guilt! —Milton. FROM LEWIS TO MRS. SWINGLER Kind hearts are more than coronets And simple faith than Norman blood. —Tennyson. TO THE VICE PRESIDENTS It's rather late for wishes now Though once you'd plenty It seems that you've forgotten how You wished at twenty. What are your wishes now? You keep But six or seven; The dearest deal with Food and Sleep; The wildest, Heaven. TO THE SPHINX PLEDGEES 'Twas in a restaurant they met, Romeo and Juliet He had no cash to pay the debt, So Romeo'd while Juli'et Continued On Page 16


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f"\UT of the night that covers me, black as a pit from pole to pole, I thank whatever God that made me for another year to mold. And to mold it with the best there is in me so that when St. Peter opens his scroll, the answer will be ready. So as this humble individual goes, so he hopes that the rest of Alpha's several thousand brothers will go and in going Alpha Phi Alpha will mold herself deeper in the hearts of men when another year rolls around. And in the words of our general president, and a great man and brother he is: "that every Alpha man is expected to do his duty." With his varied and many achievements over some terrible handicaps naturally mark him as great. Our hats are off to you, Brother President—a real brother, gentlemen and a scholar. And s"eaking of achievements among some of our other good brothers, let's pay tribute to those whom the famous magazines of the nation were loud in their praise for the work done in 1939. I refer to Brother Attorney Thurgood Marshall and Attorney Chas. Houston who were cited for their work in the Maryland teachers pay and the anti-Lynching cases. Such recognition is deserving to mention everywhere. Brothers who are making footprints on the sands of time, we note with interest that Brother Attorney Chas. W. Anderson of Louisville, Kentucky has finally been taken in that "great fraternity", the mystic realm of mat i iniony. Here's the felicitation of the entire staff and my personal congratulations, although you did not allow me to serve as best man. See you and the "missus" sometime soon. Well brothers, now seems to be the time for those of you who are politically inclined to be up and about. With the recent passage of the Anti-Lynching bill in the House of Representatives, we seem to have as a race more possibility of its passing the Senate than before. A rather tedious situation has come of the Missouri Law School case and it certainly bears watching. The events of the case are certainly happening thick and fast. We of Alpha Phi Alpha are naturally interested because of the part we played in its early stages. And too, there's Brother Sherman Scruggs who is at the head of Lincoln University of which the Law School is a part.

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February, 1940

Here's hoping for a bigger and better Lincoln University running smoothly very soon under its very capable president. And speaking of schools and education, there has at no time in history been so many and varied discussions on education. At the turn of the century when the era of the age of learning was sweeping the then known world, no great enthusiasm Was placed upon a search for knowledge than is at the present time. Among the various set-ups and proposals that I like best is the experiment started by the President of Oglethorpe University somewhere down in Georgia—too bad it had to start down South—when he selected twelve regular good high school graduates from all sections of the country and enrolled them in the University for a period of four years and will in that time they will have passed through every college in the University, getting a taste of all phases of learning from a prescribed course of study and rearrangement of the curricula to the extent that they will be fitted for more all-around task when thrown out into the world to make a place for themselves. He intends to watch his products after graduation for a given period and note the results. It has some good points that are workable. Some of you educational experts look into it and elaborate upon it. Remember sometime ago Brother L. C. Ridley formerly of Wilberforce, had an idea that was presented in this column. Mentioning the name of Wilberforce reminds me that I find my old school chum, Brother Doctor Milton S. J. Wright of Wilberforce, is the editor of the new Wilberforce Journal with a very able staff. And to him I think it will go a long way to rejuvenate the spirit ,of the Forces' grads. With the spirit of brotherly love and a hope for Alpha Phi Alpha to make strides "forward" is the aim of your humble servant. I appreciate your criticism and will devote as much of my space as possible for any further enlightenment to the New York Convention. A bit of personal mention of Brother Dr. C. Thurston Perebee and the record he is making in his fields and congratulations to Mrs. Ferebee upon the election as head of Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority. Much success to you both in your chosen fields. Continued On Page 13


February, 1940

THE

Scholarship—Fellowship Washington, D. C. To all Brothers: 1. Your Fraternity offers you for the school year, 1940-1941, two (2) ONE-HUNDRED DOLLAR SCHOLARSHIPS in each of the four (4) vice-presidential jurisdictions. Please note that, as in the past, only undergraduates may apply for scholarships. BUT NOTE THIS NEW RULING: As a result of the vote of the Executive Council which declared that "for the purposes of Grand Tax remittances, any brother pursuing a full-time residence program of study, in an accredited institution of learning, shall be regarded as maintaining an undergraduate status and shall be entitled to the privilege of paying the undergraduate Grand Tax," our General President has advised me that this ruling will also apply as far as application's for scholarships are concerned. SCHOLARSHIPS must be applied for on forms that may be secured from my office. To facilitate matters I am sending three (3) scholarship application blanks to all chapters where there are likely to be undergraduates. IF YOU FAIL TO SECURE ONE, WRITE ME. All applications must be mailed not later than May 15, 1940 and applicants must carefully follow the simple requirements set forth in the blanks. 2. There are no application blanks for fellowships which are awarded for creative work, research, or as a grant-in-aid of publication, but not for residence work. If, however, a brother is in residence at a university, he may qualify under any one of the three above-mentioned categories. Applicants should give a comprehensive statement of their project and should have three (3) authorities competent to evaluate their project submit to me their opinion as to the value and feasibility of the project and of the applicant's capacity to carry it out. There is available the sum of $750 for fellowships, which may be

"Hits and

Misses"

Continued From Page 12 Our general President and his winning smile vie with that of the President of the United States. Some recent snaps during the holiday season really bear me out in this contention. I suppose I have a rather black-out-look for 1940 where Olga is concerned, but this is leap year, you know, boys, and if I don't this year, well, I am just about lost. Next leap year I'll be too old to be in the running. Looking toward Kansas City with a lustful eye, here's hoping we will all be there. So long.

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awarded as a whole or in parts. Applicants should state how much they may need for their project and explain how they would spend the sum if awarded. Applications for fellowships must also be mailed to me not later than May 15, 1940. 3. I am gathering information in order to submit to the Kansas City Convention, as directed by the New York City Convention, a comprehensive plan for a loan fund In the meanwhile, please note that my office does not have available funds for any loans. Fraternally yours, RAYFORD W. LOGAN, Director of Educational Activities.

Educational

Week, April 29—May 5 Washington, D. C.

To all Brothers: 1. I am hereby designating the week of APRIL 29MAY 5 as EDUCATIONAL WEEK. It sometimes hap. pens, however, that some chapters do not find this we°k the most convenient. In that event, it is desirable to select a week as close as possible to the one designated. Chapters are free to determine whether they will conduct a campaign of Education for Citizenship or the Go-to-High school Campaign. 2. I shall send to all chapters that make the request pnor to April 1st five (5) of the large placards carrying the slogan, "We Want YOU to Vote.'' Additional Placards may be obtained at pro-rata cost. I am urging all chapters to distribute among the members and in the commun.ty tags with the slogan, "A Voteless People is a Hopeless People." We ar e hoping to have published by April 15 the Survey of the Attitude of the Southern Press toward the Negro. This is a most important contribution and will surpass even our Surveys of the New Deal and the Negro. 3. Since this is a national election year, and since there is so much discussion about the value of "Democracy", we should be able to focus attention very definitely upon the role of the Negro in the political life of the United States. Please remember, however, that chapters must not support any particular candidate or party No one, except the General President or the General Convention, is authorized to use the name of the Fraternity in support of any individual, organization or movement. Thanking you for your usual wholehearted cooperation, I am, Fraternally yours, RAYFORD W. LOGAN, Director of Educational Activities.


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THE SPHINX

February, 1940

By James B. Browning History Editor

The Negro in Sports, by E. B. Henderson, Washington: The Associated Publishers, 1939 PP 200, Price $2.00. Here the long story of Negro participation in sports passes in clear review. Many children will be inspired to emulate these athletes. Sports fans will enjoy seeing in print events which they saw or wished they had seen and librarians will find it a valuable book for the general public. There are of course shortcomings which anyone familiar with the subject will note but judged as a whole it is a valuable contribution to a hither-to neglected subject. The First Negro Medical Society, A History of th^ Chirurgical Society of the District of Columbia, 1844-1939 by W. Montague Cobb, Washington, The Associated Publishers, 1939 P P 160, Price $2.00. This is a story of the heroic struggle of Negro and White physicians to win admission in the American Medical Association for Negroes, the failure of this attempt and the subsequent adjustments made in segregated groups of Negro physicians. Professional men will be interested in seeing how bravely the pioneer physicians fought to prevent the present spectacle of black and white National Medical Associations in democratic America. Echoes From the Hills, A Book of Poems, by Bessie Yancey Woodson, Washington: The Associated Publishers, 1939, P P 75, Price $1.00. This is a first book by an author who writes beautifully of experiences drawn from her work as a West Virginia school teacher and of the Negro people as a whole. Men and women who like to read poetry from the heart of a woman who not only writes interestingly but with a deep inspirational tone should be sure to read this attractive volume. The History of Alpha Phi Alpha a Development in Neg.o College Life, by Charles H. Wesley, Washington, The Foundation Publishers, 1939. The General President has done a remarkable job m bringing up to date the story of the fraternity. That this is the third edition is almost unique among Negro authors, but even more notable is that here is presented in a smooth objective style an interpretative narrative of Alpha Phi Alpha which becomes more brilliant with each handling. The Teacher in the Negro College, By Alphonse Heninburg, New York. The School of Education of New York University (A doctoral dissertation).

According to this account: Cheyney Teachers College is the oldest Negro college; only eleven Negro colleges enroll 500 or more students; mothers and fathers of Negro teachers generally stopped school before high school graduation; during the year 1933-34, only one teacher, a man, earned as much as $5,000 per year; the male college teacher earns less than physicians, lawyers, dentists, and social workers among Negroes and only about 15'/< of all Negro teachers are employed for a longer period than one year. 11. Periodical Accounts Rayford W. Logan, "Magloire Pelage," Opportunity Journal of Negro life, Volume XVIII, January 1940. The Hero of this sketch fought with courage under Rochambeau. He prevented an insurrection of the colored people in his native Guadeloupe. He was a colonel in the French Army"â&#x20AC;&#x201D;and took part in the Peninsular Campaign against Wellington". Brother Logan hopes that there will be sufficient interest in his life to justify the publication of a full length biography. James B. Browning, "James D. Sampson", The Negro History Bulletin Volume III. January 1940. This is the brief story of a North Carolina free Negro who became a contractor of distinction and minister of rare courage. His children were given a higher education even before the days of the Civil War. Some of the wealth he acquired was used to prolong that war, but most of his children survived to become leaders in post war Negro life.

DEADLINE FOR EDUCATIONAL NUMBER OF THE SPHINX The EDUCATIONAL NUMBER of the Sphinx is set for April 10. All copies, pictures, etc., for the edition must reach the Sphinx Office not later than the above date.

DON'T MISS YOUR SPHINX Every .active brother is entitled to a copy of the SPHINX. Please help us get it to you without delay by reporting changes of addresses when you move from one locality to another. Report Changes At Once!


February, 1940

Alpha

THE

Psi Stars

SPHINX

On All Midwest

Page 15

Conference

Team

TTWO outstanding gridiron guards at Lincoln University, Jefferson City, Mo. Both are members of Alpha Psi Chapter, and highly respected by their football foes in lha Midwest Conference.

To Captain Morehouse

In 1940

Co-Captains of Morehouse Maroons B R O T H E R S Albert Whatley, left, and Cassiu:-; Ward, were elected Co-Oaptains of Morehouse College's football team for 1940. Both are members of Alpha Rho Chapter. Brother Ward, powerful 165-pound guard, who hails from Boston, Mass., is rated by Southern sports writers as one of the best' linesmen in the South today. The Atlanta Daily World selected him on its 1939 All-America check list. No less a great grid player is Brother Albert Whatley, Milner, Ga. Quick-eyed, strong, experienced, and wise, Brother Whatley was a tough, aggressive, and determined battler last season. The destiny of the 1940 grid season for Morehouse rests in the hands of these capable players. BROTHER ALBERT WHATLEY

BROTHER CASSIUS WARD


Page 16

THESPHINX

Outstanding

At Lincoln U., Pa. TWO outstanding brothers of Nu Chapter, Lincoln University, Pa. Brother James Baker, left, was the mainstay in the lion's ,ibackfield last season. He was a passer a la Davey O'Brien and gained over 1,000 yards thru the air. His trusty arm aided Lincoln immensely in its successful season. Brother Baker hails from Ardmore, Pa., and is an honor student.

Brother Paul JackI son, Philadelphia, has „ . . „ _ _ „,rr„„ , ,A ,made a remarkable BROS JAMES BAKER, left, and . _.,,. .,„„„„,, record at Lincoln in PAUL JACKSON , . ,. „ . scholarship. He is an "A" student, majoring in mathematics and romance languages. He is a student instructor, member of the "Y" cabinet, and active in school activities.

Frat Fun Continued From Page 11

TO THE ALPHA CONVENTION HABITUES We're thru with all sorors, they're fickle, untrue They make you then break you and laugh when they're thru They tease us, torment us and drive us to sin— Say, who is that blonde that just now came in. TO J. EDDIE COTTON Your love is dead as withered roses, An unromantic halitosis Since love decided then to die There's nothing now to do but sigh; Go drink that love right off the slate What! Poison? No, bicarbonate!

TO THE BASILEUSES OF ALL THE SORORITIES FROM ALL OF US Shall I wasting in despair D_e because a woman's fair? Or make pale my cheeks with care 'Cause another's rosy are? Be she fairer than the day Or the flowery meads in May, If she be not so to me, What care I how fair she be? —Wither. A jug of wine, a book of verses—or A bowl of nuts, a set of sonnets—then Springtime! 0. WILSON WINTERS Frat Fun Editor.

February, 1940

President

Wesley

Speaks

Continued From Page 4 translated into electrical energy, Brother Wesley pointed out the inspiration to be gained through the organization and utilization of past experiences. He outlined the material as well as social and political changes that had taken place in the past twenty years during Psi's existence and left a challenge to the youth of today and to Psi Chapter in particular to use their minds as a dynamic force to translate their formal education into vital forces in the growth of the race. Brother C. Council Trenholm, President of Alabama State College and Vice-President in charge of the Southern Jurisdiction brought his greetings and felicitations. He expressed a very personal interest in Psi's Celebration inasmuch as within a few months he would celebrate his own Twentieth Anniversary in Alpha Phi Alpha. HISTORICAL FACTS The Twentieth Anniversary of Psi Chapter should be of significance to all Alpha since its establishment broke an age old precedent in the fraternity. Until the Chicago Convention in 1919 at which the Charter of Psi Chapter was given there was a ruling of the General Organization that there could be only one chapter in any one city. The situation had become acute in Philadelphia. Problems arose between men in the Rho Chapter which made the formation of a second chapter advisable for the continued growth of Alpha Phi Alpha in the City of Brotherly Love. Fortunately the General Convention could appreciate the situation as set forth by Dr. Charles A. Lewis, now known as the Daddy of Psi Chapter and voted that Psi Chapter should be established at the University of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia. And so with this opening wedge it was possible for additional chapters to be set up in other metropolitan areas where for one reason or another a single Chapter should not be adequate. Conditions have changed greatly during the twenty years that Psi has been in existence. Its Charter members, then mostly undergraduates, are now substantial business and professional men well known throughout the country. The increased cost of tuition has decreased the number of Negro Undergraduate students at the University of Pennsylvania. The development of other schools in and about Philadelphia has increased the number of Negro students in the other institutions so that now many of the younger men in the Chapter are students in other institutions.

Brother Bill

Watson

Gone but not forgotten, Brother William Watson, Captain of the University of Michigan track team, ended his collegiate career in 1939 by winnig three first places in the Western Conference outdoor meet to bring to nine the total of the greatest number accumulated by a Western Conference athlete. Brother Watson broke a 33-year old record in the discus throw with a heave of 160 feet, 10'/8 inches. He also won the shotput and broad-jump to bring to nine, to the number of first places, he has won in three outdoor conference meets. The noted athlete took a third in one of the three meets. No other track and field man in the 30-year history of track in the Big Ten ever won more than eight individual titles. He also won three successive indoor titles in the shot-put and placed in the high jump.


THE

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BROTHER MYLES A. PAIGE by Bros. Farrow Allen, M; I

Martin, J. Edward Lowry and othes who gave us a very interesting and concise picture of the convention. Bro. Frank WsP.xr, chairman of the Social Committee as usual entertained the brothers in his royal manner. At the December Meeting the following brothers were insteled as the officers for the year of 1940: Dr. Louis R. MiJdleton, president; Frank A. Walker, vicepresident; C. Arthur Jackson, secretary; Robert T. Curtis, assistant secretary; Dr. Caesar P. McClendon, treasurer; Vester G. Fowlkes, financial secretary; G. Dewey Curtis associate editor of the Sphinx; D. Henry P. Weekes, sergeant-at-arms; Dr. Willis Cummins, Dr. Lucien Brown, James Fladger, members of the Executive Committee. Another outstanding honor came to Alpha Gamma Lambda, when Mayor Fiorella LaGuardia announced at the Omega Psi Phi Conclave, his enjoyable privilege to promote Bro. Mylas A. Paige to be a Justice of the Court of Special Sesiicns which is the highest appointive post of judiciary in the City of New York. Bro. Paige, as we all know was t h : first Negro to be appointed a Magistrate in the great Metropolis. On New Year's afternoon, our basketball team brought a disappointing ending for the Omega Conclave by defeating them by a score of 27-19. Bros. Vester Fowlkes and Edward Jones, our delegates to Psi Chapter's Twentieth Anniversary reported that it was a tremendous success and entertained the brothers in a gala manner. Fraternally yours, GEO. DEWEY CURTIS, Associate Editor.

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Beta Zeta Lambda

NEW YORK, N. Y. Brother in Alpha Phi Alpha— Greetings: Recovering from the very enjoyable task of i n g host to the Thirty-third Annual Convention, A l p h a Gamma Lambda chose •a joint smoker for the Metropolitan Chapters as their October meeting. A very large and e n t h u siastic group turned out to hear the report of the convention w h i c h honored New York by selecting our very capable retiring President to be the General Treasurer. Many inspiring speeches were made e, Carson Baker, Fred

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Chapter

JEFFERSON CITY, MISSOURI Greetings: Beta Zeta Lambda held its first meeting at the home of Brother H. Hadlcy Hartshorn October 18th. Fifteen brothers were present at this meeting. This is an increase of five over our last meeting in April. We are glad to welcome back to the campus and to the chapter Brother Booker T. McGraw who received his Ph. D. Degree from Harvard University last June. Brother McGraw is registrar of Lincoln University, Professor and Head of the department of Economics. Brother McGraw is also a charter of Beta Zeta Lambda. Among the newcomers to this campus are Brother James Freeman who is heading the Department of Agriculture at Lincoln University. Brother Freeman comes to us from Prairie View College where he was an active member of Alpha Eta Lambda. Brother Freeman holds the M. A. Degree from Iowa State. Brother Arthur Pullam, Jr., a graduate of Kansas University, holding both the Bachelor and Masters Degree from that school, is serving as a teacher in the Biology Department of Lincoln University in the place of Mr. W. W. Dowdy who is away this year on a leave of absence. Brother Albert Marshall of Alpha Psi Chapter, Lincoln University and a member of the 1938 graduating class, recently received his B. S. Degree in Library Science from Illinois University, and has been added to the Library Staff of Lincoln University and a 1937 graduate of Lincoln University has formally cast his lot with Beta Zeta Lambda. Brother President Walter Talbot has been appointed acting Dean of Men at Lincoln University. The office of Superintendent of Buildings and grounds, left vacant by the recent death of our beloved Brother Cecil Heariold, has been filled by the appointment of Brother G. Robert Cotton to that position. Brother Joseph Johnson, formerly in the business office of Lincoln University, has been added to the instructional staff of the University as an Instructor in the department of Economics. The second meeting of the year was held in November with Brother James Freeman as the host. The following officers for the year, 1940 were elected: President, Brother N. P. Barksdale; Vice President, Brother H. H. Hartshorn; Executive Secretary, Brother A. S. Pride; Corresponding Secretary, Brother J. T. Johnson; Treasurer, Brother G. Robert Cotton; Chaplain, Brother C. C. Hubbard; Sergeant- At-Arms, Brother James Freeman; Associate Editor to the Sphinx, Brother U. S. Maxwell. Brothers Pride and McGraw gave interesting and informative reports of the convention which were followed by a lively discussion. Plans were made for many worthwhile projects which will no doubt be mentioned from time to time by our scribe of this column Brother U. S. Maxwell. Until then, Au Revoir.


Page 18

T H E S P H I N X

February, 1940

Beta Rho Lambda Makes Advent At Youngstown An elaborate dinner setting with a chicken menu marked the formal advent of Beta Rho Lambda Chapter, Youngstown, Ohio, into the realm of Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity. Brother S. S. Booker, former national president, acted as chairman of the meeting, and Brother Lucien C. Wright, MidWestern Vice-President, Columbus Ohio, served as guest speaker, and administrator of the ceremonies incident to the setting up of the new chapter.

OEGINNING with a Chicken Dinner, Beta Rho Lambda held its first official meeting in the club rooms of the West Federal Y. M. C. A. on November 3, 1939. Brother S. S. Booker, former national president, acted as chairman of the meeting. The following charter members were present: Brothers S. S. Booker, Graham Lynch, A. L. Johnson, James Booker, Joseph Hall, Samuel Stiggers, T. A. Lander. Brother Lucien C. Wright, Mid-Western VicePresident was introduced by Brother Booker. Following the introduction Brother Wright gave an inspiring speech and then proceeded with the ceremonies of formally setting up the chapter. He was assisted by Brothers W. S. Scott, Jr., and Robert Watson of Alpha Rho L:mbda Chapter. The fraternity oath was taken by the brothers of the new chapter. The preamble to the constitution was recited. Brother Scott very ably explained the ritual giving the recent changes that had been made at the national convention. The charter was then presented to the chapter by Brother Watson which was then signed by the charter

Chi

Chanter

MEHARRY MEDICAL COLLEGE Dear Brothers in Alpha: Now that the school term has reached the point when semester exams reign, members of Chi have turned their attention to activities appropriate to the season. Alpha has been well represented in the scholastic world. The doors of the honorary medical fraternity, Kappa Pi, were extended to Brothers J. D. Phillips, Auther Mitchell, and J. N. Jenkins, as merit for their scholastic achievement. Thanksgiving night found Chi giving one of the most gallant affairs of the year, the annual Thanksgiving Cabaret Dance. This affair was gay and packed full of enjoyable moments for the brothers and their friends. Members of the Sphinx Club provided a very pleasant and entertaining evening for Chi Chapter on Jan. 9th. This affair was elaborately carried out and well attended by the brothers.

members. The election of officers was then held with Brother Wright presiding. The officers elected were Brothers S. S. Booker, president; Joseph Hall, vice-president; A. L. Johnson, Secretary; Samuel Stiggers, assistant secretary; Graham Lynch, treasurer; James Booker, (deceased) associate editor to Sphinx; T. A. Lander, sergeant-at-arms. The meeting was then turned over to Brother Booker, the newly elected president. All the brothers present gave interesting testimonials of their fidelity to Beta Rho Lambda. Thus was born what is perhaps the youngest chapter in Alpha Phi Alpha. However, we have been advised to inform all the other chapters that Beta Rho Lambda may be young, but we feel that we have the magic elixir (Good Old Alpha Spirit) which will speed our maturity to astonishing proportions. Just watch us! Fraternally HARRY J. MOODY, Acting Associate Editor to Sphinx.

This year promises to be a great one for Chi, the belief being obvious from the selection of officers. The Chapter is honored to have and present its executive staff which was inaugurated at the first meeting, Jan. 1940. It was as follows: Brother Max Johnson, president; Brother Waldense Nixon, vice-president; Brother Donald Cary, recording secretary; Brother Julian Walker, corresponding secretary; Brother J. H. Boyd, treasurer; Brother J. D. Phillips, house manager; Brother Roscoe Williams, chaplain; Brother Daniel A. Collins, editor to the Sphinx. The chapter's basketball team is rapidly shaping itself into form and color to defend Alpha in the interfraternal tournament here at Meharry. The team is under the management of Brother Carl Jenkins. Chi bids success to all in their endeavors, providing their endeavors add to the glory of Alpha Phi Alpha. Fraternally, DANIEL S. COLLINS Associate Editor to the Sphinx.


THE

February, 1940

Psi

Chapter

PENNSYLVANIA-TEMPLE UNIVERSITIES Greetings Brothers in Alpha Phi Alpha: Psi chapter extends heartiest greetings for a happy and prosperous New Year. May all the chapters enjoy as eventful year as Psi has enjoyed. We are glad to welcome into the fold two new brothers: Brother Raymond Logan of St. Augustine College, and Brother Elias Scruggs of Pennsylvania State College. The principal event on the agenda during December was the Twentieth Anniversary Celebration of Psi. Many distinguished brothers were present to help the members observe the great occasion. Among those present were Brothers Charles H. Wesley; H. Council Trenholm, Southern Vice-President; Belford Lawson; William Leroy Berry, charter member and first president of Psi; Joseph H. B. Evans, Edward F. Jones, charter member of Psi, and other visitors and delegates. We gratefully acknowledge the presence of these brothers and the sincere fraternal greetings from the respective chapter. Every phase of worthwhile activity in Psi Chapter was recognized and interpreted by some competent speaker. Dur'ng December, Psi held its annual election of officers and in selecting men to lead the chapter during 1940, paid tribute to the fine leadership of Brother Alton C. "Chippy" Berry, former president of Psi Chapter, by returning him to the presidency during 1940. Assisting Brother Berry are Brothers Franklyn W. Morris Jr., vicepresident; Ernest Smith, secretary; John W. Jones, assistant secretary; W. Reid Wells, treasurer; Ralph Baxter, sergeant-at-arms; Jerry Certaine, chaplain; Robert L. Poindexter, Chapter editor of Sphinx. Basketball occupies the spotlight also. Under the very capable leadership of Brother Milton Washington, Psi has a team of potential championship calibre. Although Psi lost a heart breaking game to the local Omegas by a score of 23-21, the team has been victorious in the other battles. The latest victory was a. rousing, thrill-packed win over the Washington Omegas by a score of 45-40 on January 14th. Psi's ball hawks—Chick Taylor, Frank Morris, Pat Redd, Lindsay Strothers, Johnny Orr, Howard Jones and Jim Peacock were too much for the highly rated stars Sidat-Singh, Willie Wynne, Woody Gwaltney and company. Sweet revenge, eh? The impending games however will still further test Psi's strength. We hope to finish on top of the heap and dethrone Kappa. Next time you hear from us, we hope to report that our Relay Prom was its usual success, and that Psi is master of the basketball court. Until then, cheerio and the best of luck to all the chapters in their endeavors this coming year. ROBERT L. POINDEXTER, Chapter Editor.

Beta Omicron

Chapter

TENNESSEE A. & I. STATE COLLEGE Greetings Brothers, Beta Omicron greets you at this time seven brothers stronger that it was at the time of our last writing.

Pag© 19

SPHINX

Brothers who crossed the burning sands in the fall are as follows: Brothers William Dickerson, Julius Higgins, Harold Jenkins, Edward Hambrick, William Rhoden, Alvin Rountree, and Marvin Tyus. Beta Omicron celebrated Founder's Week in a big way culminating the week's activities with an impressive Vesper program, Sunday, December 10th well representative of Alpha. The posting of the fall quarter grades showed Alpha leading in scholarship as usual. Brother Edgar Green of E. St. Louis, 111., last year's president and Brother Henry Radcliffe of Little Rock, Ark. (both '39 graduates) visited us during Homecoming Thanksgiving week. At the time of this writing plans are under way for the annual dance and banquet given by the combined Nashville chapters, Chi, Meharry, Alpha Chi, Fisk, Tau Lambda, City, and Beta Omicron, Tenn. State (with the latter serving as host). The affair this year bids fair to be the greatest yet. The chapter officers for the year are as follows: President, Billy Jones; Vice-President, James Crosse; Secretary, Ira Evans; Corresponding Secretary Phillip Pyron; Treasurer, Leon Carter, Sergeant-At-Arms, Harold Hodges, and Chaplain, Julius Higgins. Beta Omicron is planning interesting programs to be given at various intervals during the remaining school year. Wishing all chapters and brothers no little amount of success, we remain Fraternally yours, BILLY JONES, Associate Editor. o

Upsilon

1—

Chapter

KANSAS UNIVERSITY Greetings Brothers: The fall of 1939 was one of the most constructive in the history of Upsilon Chapter. Under the able stewardship of Brother Earl West, the Chapter house was decorated and completely remodeled from top to bottom thru the loyalty and cooperation of the brothers, Sphinxmen and the Alpha Mothers' Club. I t it again one of the outstanding fraternity houses on the Campus. This spiritual renaissance extends also to the chapter members. The grades of both chapter members and sphinxmen rank in the upper strata of the scholastic achievement. The social season has been marked by several brilliant affairs including one of the best and most enjoyable Founder's Day Banquets in several years. The guest speaker of this gala affair which occurred on December 11, 1939 was the prominent doctor, brother E. B. Perry of Wheatley Hospital in Kansas City, Mo. Graduate Chapter Beta Lambda was entertained with a smoker afterwards. No small portion of this success was due to the activity of an Alpha Mothers Club which hsts been instrumental in sponsoring Alpha affairs. The new year brought the insight and enthusiasm of a new brother—Raymond Timmons—into the fold. He came into the chapter under the guidance of the newly elected officers consisting of Harry Rollins Jr., as president; Wm. P. Foster, vice-president; Richard Walker, recording secretary; Floyd Crouch, king of freshmen; Lorenzo Fuller, corresponding secretary; and Yours Fraternally, CECIL FLORENCE, Editor to the Sphinx.


THE

Page 20

Beta

Delta

February, 1940

SPHINX

Chapter,

State

College

BETA DELTA AND ITS GUESTS AT STATE COLLEGE, ORANGEBURG, S. C.

Beta Delta

Chapter

STATE COLLEGE Greeting's and Salutations Brothers: Beta Delta begins by wishing everyone of you a most ' prosperous and happy New Year. We hope that this year â&#x20AC;˘ will be your most successful year in Alpha as we are expecting the same ourselves. We have had great indications of this, for on Sunday morning December 3, 1939, Beta Delta welcomed twelve new brothers into the fold of Alpha, including your correspondent. Going further, we presented Brother Samuel Lucius Gandy of Fisk University (A.B., B.D.) as guest speaker on a Sunday Vesper program which captivatod the large audience in the "Beautiful White Hall". Brother Gandy, a son of Beta Delta and an alumnus of State College held the audience spell bound for a half hour in his delivery of a speech which showed every reason for Brother Candy's rapid rise since leaving South Carolina State in 1935. Brother Gandy's subject was "Imperative Beyonds in a Modern World." Brothers Ferdinand Abrahams, B.M. Allen University for his fine interpretations on the organ, received hearty praises and congratulations. An Alpha quartet composed of Brothers J. Powell, A. Humbert, M. Day, and W. Bennett dedicated to Miss Annie Singleton, "Mother of Alpha Phi Alpha," the beautiful ballad "Silver Threads Among the Gold". This was

truly a highlight on a program which consisted only of highlights. After the program all of the good brothers went down to the home of Brother Paul R. Webber where we feted Brother Gandy at a fine smoker. Present at the program and smoker were Brothers Doctor Smiley, Dave Albritton, (of Olympic fame) and Brother C. Thomas of Claflin College. Brother Smiley is a physician in Greenville, South Carolina. The twelve neophytes in Beta Delta Chapter are Brothers Robert Butler, McRussell Flynt, Alfred Humbert, Harold Green, Berry Johnson, David Scott, John Snypse, Charles Snypse, Windsor Williams, Peter Whittaker, Richard Pride and James Simmons. This boosts our number to twenty-six active brothers on our campus and Beta Delta expects its best year in Alpha in 1940. Brother Loler Decosta is the Beech Nut Gum representative at our school. With greater promises in future. Fraternally yours, JAMES (JIMMY) SIMMONS, Associate Editor.

Alpha Xi Chanter UNIVERSITY OF WASHINGTON Seattle, Washington Greetings Brothers in Alpha Phi Alpha: From the great Northwest, heretofore unexplored by Negro Intercollegiate Fraternities, from a section which Dame Rumor says is closer to China than to New


February, 1940

THE

York and where a trip to Alaska is just a week-end cruise, Alpha Xi sends her greetings. Once more Alpha Phi Alpha has done it. By decree of the convention in New York City and under the leadership of Brotbar B. E. Squires, Alphai Phi Alpha is entrenched in these wide open spaces. During the Thanksgiving holidays a group of University men and their guests assembled at the Seattle Y. W. C. A. At the break of dawn, Alpha Xi had been established with its seat located at the University of Washington in Seattle and the University of Oregon at Eugene. 'Twas a grand affair, Brothers. A formal banquet, lovely ladies, speeches and afterwards dancing at the home of Brother land Mrs. Squires until the wee hours of the morning. A typical Alpha affair in every respect. Those who shared the event with the Brothers pronounced it inspiring, unforgetable, grand. On the last day of the year thai Brothers were assembled in Portland, Oregon. Here again the "Alpha Spirit" was really in evidence. A successful meeting, banquets, songs end "Bull-Sessions" all added to the determination of the Brothers to carry to the Northwest the aims and ideals of Alpha Phi Alpha. It was a reluctant group of Seattle Brothers who left the homes of Brothers Rutherford, Unthank and Smith with the echo of, "That Old Alpha Spirit" ringing in their ears. It is with pride that Alpha Xi presents her membership roll to all Alphadom; Brother Dr. Felix B. Cooper, Seattle dentist and civic leader, formerly of Epsilon Chapter; Brother O. Avis Dennis, Graduate Civil Engineer from the University of Washington, now studying on a Denny Fellowship at his Alma Mater; Brother Shelby Golden Jr., University of Oregon, Junior in Business Administration. Brother Golden is one of the few Negro players to make a major collage golf team, being numberone man on Oregon's team. Broter James P. Johnston, University of Washington Sophomore, School of Forestry. Brother Johnston is making a brilliant record in Forestry where he is the first Negro student to ever enroll at Washington in this field and one of the very few in the country. Brother T. McDonald Rutherford, University of Oregon Senior in Business Administration. Brother Rutherford is a student leader at Oregon and well known throughout the Northwest. He was pledged to Alpha Phi Alpha while a student at the University of California. Brother B. E. Squires, Executive Secretary, Seattle Urban League. Brother Squires is a former member of Kappa and Beta Beta Chapters and needs no introduction to Alphadcm. He now serves as Northwest Regional Director of Alpha Phi Alpha. Brother Kenneth F. Smith, State employee of Oregon, former member of Upsilon Chapter who finds tilnra to supplement his recently (acquired matrimonial bliss with the study of Law at a Portland School. Brother Dr. DeNorval Unthank, Oregon's only Negro Physician. Formerly of Upsilon and Mu Lambda Chapters. Brother Unthank is one of Portland's most active civic leaders. Brother Robert B. Pitts, Howard University graduate, now doing graduate work a t the University of Washington in Economics. Brother Pitts was formerly a member of Omicron and Beta Chapters. These Brothers will be found in all of the progressive movements affecting the Negro in the Northwest. Brother

Page 21

SPHINX

Dr. Unthank is serving on the Executive Council of the Portland Branch of the N. A. A. C. P. Brother Dr. Cooper has long been considered the leader in constructive movements in Seattle. Brother Squires is fast becoming the champion of Negro Rights throughout the Northwest and with Brother Pitts represents Alpha Phi Alpha in the Executive Council of the Seattle Branch of the N. A. A. C. P. At the Chapter meeting held in Portland on the last day of the year '39, the following officers were elected for this year: Brother James P. Johnson, President; Brother T. McDonald Rutherford, Vice President; Brother Dr. DeNorval Unthank, Treasurer; Brother Robert B. Pitts, Secretary. With the election of these Brothers, Alpha Xi looks forward this year with its opportunitiy for Alpha paiticipation in constructive activities in the Northwest. To Brothers all over Alphadom we extend our hand. Gome up and see us some time. Fraternally, "BOB" PITTS

Zeta

Lambda

Chapter

NEWPORT NEWS, VIRGINIA In the most enthusiastic and spirited meeting held in Zeta Lambda Chapter's meeting- halls in recent years, Brother G. Wesley Raney, Jr., A.B. Lincoln University (Pennsylvania) was duly installed as chapter leader for 1940. Brother Raney is a teacher. He formerly taught school in Eastern Shore, Virginia. At present he is on the faculty of the Huntington High School, Newport News, Virginia. Brother Raney, who is quite prominent in local community life was a leader in his college days. He won his "L" as a member of the Lincoln University Football team, and was also prominent in vtarious other campus activities. A departing word about those of the staff of officers of last year who performed splendidly their duties: Brother Raney, who was 1939 vice president was called on often to lend his advice and other abilities that the chapter might live; Brother Charles Jones, secretary for some years was a mighty force in keeping Zeta Lambda intact; Brother William Miller, chapter's wealthiest member, has kept the money of the group for so many years, that it wouldn't seem like Zeta Lambda, if he wasn't on hand crying "Pay your dues, Pay Your Dues." Brother Miller is most efficient; Brother T. Roger Thompson was a real chaplain. The clarity, sincerity and appeal of his prayers are beautiful to hearken to. In addition to Brother Raney, the officers elected for 1940 include: Brother W. D. Young, Vice President; Brother Fernando Brown, Secretary; Brother William Miller, Treasurer; Brother T. Roger Thompson, Chaplain. Brother Young is a physician, and is one of the "Old Gamma Chapter" men. Brothers Brown and Miller are teachers. Brother Thompson is a School principal. The brothers welcomed several new faces at the installation meeting; Brother Hill of Talladega College, recent graduate; Brother Robinson, recent graduate of Virginia State College For Negroes; Brother Woody, local insurance executive; and others. Brother O. H. Smith, owner and operator of the O. H. Smith Funeral Home, stole a march on the other local morticians. As Christmas gifts to his friends and


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THE

"prospective clients," he has just distributed a handsome leather bound "Daily Record" with the recipient's name engraved on the gift. The 1940 memorandum is a desk calendar, personal diary, appointment record, all in one. It is just the item that a busy executive needs. Brother L. F. Palmer, Principal of Huntington High School, acknowledged Negro Leader of Newport News, receives so many national, state, and local honors, that it is almost difficult to keep up with them. Brother Palmer was recently named chairman of th-s Colored Auxiliary, Newport News Chapter, American Red Cross. Under his leadership as General Chairman and Brother John B. Henderson, as Roll Call Chairman, the Auxiliary this year broke all previous records in the number of memberships secured and the amount of money raised. Brother Palmer was recently elected president of the Colored Auxiliary, Newport News Chapter, Virginia Tuberculosis Association. Brother Palmer was just elected president of the Association of Secondary Schools and Colleges for Negroes. This organization is the most powerful in Negro education in the Southland. Brother Palmer was also appointed chairman of the Control Committee of the above mentioned association. This committee is making a Ten-Year Study of Negro Secondary Education. Its findings and recommendations will no doubt be epochal and far-reaching. Well, I might go on about Brother Palmer, for a little more than a year ago, he was named one of the twelve outstanding citizens in all Virginia. I am sure you can easily understand why we are proud of Brother Palmer's connections with Zeta Lambda. Brother L. A. "Bill" Fowlkes, and Brother T. Roger Thompson, prominent Elks, helped to make pleasant the stay of Judge W. C. Heuston in our city. Brother Heuston, National Director of the Elks' Education Department has his headquarters in Washington, D. C. Very sincerely yours, J. RUPERT PICOTT.

Beta Mu

Chapter

KENTUCKY STATE COLLEGE Dear Alphadom: In the fall initiation, Beta Mu enlarged its chapter to fifteen members. Fifteen members who will strive their utmost to mean as much to Alpha Phi Alpha as Alpha Phi Alpha means to them. Among the neophytes, we have Brother Rodford Rodgers who was co-claptain and spark-plug of the powerful Kentucky "Thorobreds", also a potential All-American who piloted the "Thorobreds" to a very successful season. We have planned a series of programs that we feel will give impetus to cultural development on Kentucky State Campus and are looking forward to a very successful year. To Beta Lambda, we would like to extend our heartiest congratulations for "out-maneuvering" Alpha Lambda for the role of host for the 1940 Convention. We were pulling for Alpha Lambda because we wanted to show what "that good old Alpha Spirit" plus that good "Kentucky Hospitality" will give. Little Brother George R. Brown was elected captain

SPHINX

February, 1940

of Kentucky State Thorobreds for 1940. Little Brother Brown hails from Portsmouth, Ohio, is a sophomore and a valuable player. Fraternally Yours, NATHANIEL SHIELDS.

Beta

Psi

Chapter

LONDON, ENGLAND Brothers in Alpha Phi Alpha: It gives us great pleasure to send this greeting from the other side cf the Atlantic. This is our first letter to convey our fraternal greetings to you all, dear brothers. We are the youngest chapter; we still are in the crawling stage but soon we shall be on our feet. Already Alpha Phi Alpha has entered the precincts of Oxford, Cambridge, and London, and has even invaded the Temples. (Law Schools). We have already in our midst men from East Africa, West Africa, South Africa and North Africa, men from West Indies and South American Continent. They are essentially men of Alpha type. On August seventh the Brothers crossed the Burning Sands and held their flaming torches high. The Brothers who guided the Neophtyes through the jobs of their induction ceremony were Brother Leo Hansberry, Brother Dr. Xuma, and the Brother to whom the General Convention gave the duty of inaugurating the chapter. We were very sorry that Brother Paul Roberson and Brother Max Yergan were unable to be present with us. We were sorry that the Neophytes could not get proper instruction in the Alpha Song, for Brother Hansberry sings a little, Brother Xuma hasn't practised for a long while, and Brother Nyabongo doesn't sing at all; so you may guess how we all missed Brother Roberson. In this "Silver Isle" the Alpha spirit has sprung up, and who can say how rich a harvest will be garnered? The Neophytes are Brothers Dr. C. B. Clarke, Prince C. Kessie, H. W. Springer, Dr. Nlanka-Bruce, M. Koinage, W. R. Pakeman, N. Naubuga, F . S. Furbert, and N. A. Fadipe, Dr. M. Gregory. Brothers, we wish you all success, good health and happiness. Fraternally yours, WILLIAM R. PAKEMAN

Alpha Psi Chapter LINCOLN UNIVERSITY, (MO.) Greetings Brothers: Across the burning sands and into the realm of Alpha Phi Alpha have come eight neophyte brothers, who are ever enthusiastic in doing all they can in the uplift of Alpha Phi Alpha and its high ideals and in carrying out the objectives of Alpha Psi. We are more than proud in having neophyte brothers: Ernest Bennett, Adam Busch, James Busch, Curtis Branch, Jiames Butler, Earl Crosswright, Raymond Nero and Victor E. Travis within that glorified bond of Alpha Phi Alpha men. We gladly welcomed back to the bond, during our


THE

February, 1940

homecoming festivities, brothers Ferdinand B. Clarke, John Harvey, Blanchard Tomlin, Houston Chandler, and Frank Weathers. These brothers were not half as proud, in visiting the old alma mater and Alpha Psi, as wa were in receiving them. Also during the pre-Christmas holidays, brothers Morris Fountain and Lionel Newsome visited with us. We, as well as our pledges, received some very wise1 counsel from Brother Newsome. Our chests are expanded with pride when we see so many of the good brothers of Alpha Psi out in the world doing good. Alpha Psi is aiding "dear old Lincoln" in the honoring of its athletes; in doing so, we are presenting to the school, at the annual athletic banquet a letter ("L") plaque which will bear the names of the honored athletes. Thi ough the years "Lincoln" will be spelled out, each letter bearing the names of a group of honored athletes. We believe that this will add to the tradition as well as help to develop the spirit of Lincoln University. In the line of spirit development at Lincoln University, Alpha Psi is sponsoring an essay contest, whose general topic is "School Spirit"; the essays will be submitted to the personnel office. The winning essays will revive twenty-five dollars in scholarship awards. In the line of social activities, Alpha Psi, with Alpha Iota Chapter of Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, enjoyed a delightful waffle supper; the affair was enjoyed immensely by all concerned. Alpha Psi, along with other Greeks of the campus, was entertained with regal dignity Bt the annual Sphinx Christmas Dance Party. We look with pride on our Sphinx Club and its activities and are doing our bit in instilling the high ideals of Alpha Phi Alpha within them. We are sure that everyone of them are good Alpha men in the making. Alpha Psi was honored this year in the athletic world with the placement of two of our brothers on Midwestern Conference teams. They were: Brother James (Pee-Wee) Hunt, who is president of our chapter, presiof the senior class, co-captain of the varsity squad, president of the " L " Club and an outstanding leader in campus activities; Brother John Hughes, another stellar defender of Lincoln University's cause on the gridiron, and our vice president and dean of pledges. Brother Hunt was elected as first string guard on the All Midwest Conference team. Brother Hughes received a guard position on the second team; he was twice holder of a guard position on the second team for the past two seasons. Alpha Psi is over enthusiastic in carrying out the program of the 1939 national convention, which was so ably brought back to us by our representative and delegate, Brother Benj. Williams, who reported that the 1939 National Convention was a very interesting one, which was well seasoned and spiced with the living Jewels of Alpha Phi Alpha and the mother of Alpha Phi Alpha. Look out Kansas City, here comes old Alpha Psi. Fraternally yours, BROTHER WILLIAM WHITE. -

o

THE CHAPTER OFFICE ROSTER James Lee Hunt, president; William White, Vice-president; James Jones, secretary and Joseph McDuffie, treasurer.

SPHINX

Poge 23

Beta Eta Lambda

Chapter

OKLAHOMA CITY, OKLAHOMA Beta Eta Lambda is happy to extend greetings to all brothers everywhere. We have elected and installed the officers for this year. Each one is a man of ability, integrity, and vision; and because of these facts it is believed that the type of program which we will put over this 'year will be heralded throughout "Alphadom", as unique and becoming to Alpha men. Last year, our program was one which elicited the favorable comments of both press and pulpit in connection with our "Better Citizenship Week", in which we (in cooperation with other graduate chapters) brought to the state Brother B. C. Cyrus, emiri.nt barrister of Chicago. What he said was teemed with wisdom, sparkling with wit, and flaming with sincerity. As one travels through the state today, it is not an uncommon thing to hear Brother Cyrus being quoted evincing the profound impression which he made upon the people. When they think of Cyrus, they think of Alpha. Each of the new officers has pledged himself that the program this year will be as effective for good as the one last year. These â&#x20AC;˘ officers are: Brothers R. A. Wilson, President; Lee Edward Lewis, vice president; John E. Jackson, seci-etaiy; Jack H. Jefferson, assistant secretary; J. Morton Littlepage, treasurer; Euglane J. Brown, chaplain; Sercy J. Bailey, sergeant-at-arms; and Elbert Lee Tatum, associate editor Sphinx and parliamentarian. We have not fully settled on objectives for the year, but because of the spirit of oneness which is pronounced in Beta Eta Lambda, whatever the objective is, it will be accomplished in such a manner that it will reflect credit to Alpha everywhere. We are wishing for you, success too, in everything that you undertake to do. Fraternally yours, ELBERT LEE TATUM, Associate Editor Sphinx.

Gamma

Chapter

VIRGINIA UNION Greetings Brothers: Gamma men are very happy to be the first chapter to receive pins from our new company, the L'Overture Company. Last summer, being secretary of my chapter, I ordered pins for three old brothers. It was at the time of the Convention and the pins were held up. As soon as the business of settling the contract was over, Brother Evans wrote me I would receive our pins. The pins were sent, but we noticed several flaws. The pins were returned at once stating the flaws. L'Overture Company wrote me and the pins were sent within a week after having been returned to the company. We found them the most beautiful of all pins. When a pin can pass the critical eyes of the men of Gamma, it can pass any critical eye. We feel Alpha has done a great thing in changing to the L'Overture Company. Fraternally yours, WALTER RANDOLPH,


THE

Page 24

SPHINX

Historic McGee Cup Resides with Gamma

February, 1940

Chapter

CHOULD any brother want to know the whereabouts of the historic McGee Cup the Sphinx is glad to announce that it resides with Gamma Chapter, Virginia Union, Richmond, Va. Should there be any doubt of its present address, the above picture is unqusstionable proof. Reading left to right, front row:—S. Jackson, J. Lee, W. Randolph, J. L. Holloman, R. Sampson, C. Williams, M. Beverly. Second row:—M. Toney, P. Patrick, T. Freeman, A. Bassette, C. McCreary, B. Martin. Third row:—T. Bazemore, B. Bowser, V. Smith, E McCreary. Top row:—L. Browne, Jr., C. Harper, J. Savage,

Alpha

Eta Lambda

Chapter

PRAIRIE VIEW—HOUSTON, TEXAS Dear Brothers in Alpha: A hearty good wish for a happy New Year to all brothers and chapters everywhere and sincerest hopes that the year has already gotten off to an auspicious start for everyone. The spirit of fraternity is greatly needed in the world now; and we who follow and subscribe to such a spirit should exhibit it at its highest and best in 1940, and thus by our individual and concerted effort, we may help greatly to make this the kind of year it ought to be for everybody. The recent holiday season was a little on the quiet side down Alpha Eta Lambda way. A number of the brothers left for distant parts to sp=nd the Christmas season while others burned the Yule log at home. But it was for all of us a jolly good Christmas. The season was high-lighted by a Farewell Party given by the Chapter to Brother Dr. G. Lamar Harrison in the Guest Housft at Prairie View College. Alpha brothers everywhere will be happy to know that Brother Harrison has been honored with appointment to the presi-

dency of Langston University, Langston, Oklahoma, where he officially assumed his administrative duties early in January. Brother Harris was in his eighth year as professor and head of the Department of Education at Prairie View. In this position and in the educational life of the state of Texas he made his presence and his influence definitely felt, for he is an educator of splendid training, having received his undergnaduate instruction a t Howard University, the Master's dsgree at the University of Cincinnati, and the degree of doctor of philosophy from Ohio State University. Before coming to Prairie View, he was on the faculty of West Virginia State College. So he goes to Langston with a wealth cf experience and training which, though still in his thirties and hence one of the youngest of presidents of a major Negro college, bespeak for him a successful and fruitful administration at Langston. A representative group of brothers and their ladies from Houston and Prairie View were on hand to attest the high esteem in which Brother Harrison is held in Alpha Eta Lambda chapter where he has been such an active member for the last seven years. Brother George W. Reeves has assumed the duties of Acting Head of the Department of Education at Prairie View since Dr.


THE

February, 1940

Harrison's departure. By an oversight we failed to mention in the last publication among the new-comers to Prairie View Broth. er Dr. T. R. Solomon, a doctor of philosophy from the University of Michigan, is professor of Political Science at Prairie View, and his friends in general and brothers in particular will be interested to know that he has joined this faculty where already a considerable number of Alpha men are contributing effectively to the advancement of the world's largest Negro land grant college. Fraternally yours, GEORGE W. MORTON, Chapter Editor. o

Alpha Chi Lambda

Chapter

AUGUSTA, GEORGIA To Alpha Phi Alpha men everywhere, Alpha Chi Lambda chapter in Augusta, Ga., extends greetings and best wishes for tha year 1943. Into the final days of near-spent '39, hastening to make its departure, Alpha Chi Lambda crammed a full and varied program of activities to usher out the old year in a blaze of glory. As warriors, who nota sinking of the evening sun, fight with renewed vigor in order that the victory may be won ere nightfall, so Augusta's stalwart son? of Alpha redoubled their efforts to maik another banner year for that which is "first of all." Brothers in Alpha Phi Alpha, their wives, sweethearts, and guests were truly "In the Mood" Friday night, December 29, when Alpha Chi Lambda staged its annual formal at the Del Mar casino. In a brilliant setting of decorations in Gold and Black beneath the lighted Alpha Phi Alpha's lovely ladies, beautifully gowned, and genial members of the male contingent, resplendent in formal attire, danced to the song hits of the day, sweet and swing, played in the inimitable style of Augusta's leading orchestra. Brothers from far and near joined with fraters of the local chapter to make merry on this gala occasion. From Louisville, Ky., cameBrother Charles W. Anderson, distinguished member of the Kentucky legislature; from Atlantic City, Brother Richard Lockett, Y. Work Secretary; from Meharry, Brothers Clarence Morgan and Julian Walker. Chapters a t Fisk and South Carolina State were represented by visiting brothers. Alpha Chi Lambda's students of human anatomy having located a region "South of the Border", ushered into the ennobling mysteries of Alpha Phi Alpha Friday, December 22, two candidates adjudged worthy. Neophyte Brothers Thomas A. Ross and Horatio Lamar having "seen the light" were sumptiously dined at the Taystee Shoppe on the same evening, as Brothers gave them a royal welcome into the fraternity. Brother Ross is professor of Education at Paine College, a graduate of Kentucky State College, and holds the M.A. degree from Indiana University. Brother Lamar is a graduate of Morehouse College and during the past year has been teaching at Walker Institute here. As it comes the time of brothers of this chapter to entertain the body at its bi-monthly meetings, each seeks to provide for the fullest enjoyment of the group. During the past months brothers have enjoyed delectable repasts and fraternal hospitality at their several meetings

SPHINX

Page 25

as guests of Brothers Dr. La Verte Jones, Dr. R. L. Lockett, J. M. Tutt, and Dr. R. W. White at the Taystee Shoppa and of Brother L. D. Perry and yours truly at their homes. Brother L. D. Perry, energetic and eapaKe leader of Alpha Chi Lambda chapter for the past two years exploded the "third term" thcoiy when by unanimous vote of the group he was drafted into service as chapter p e s i d e n t for another year at a recent meeting. Other officers elected include, Brothers Hinton James, vice president; J. M. Tutt, secretary; Dr. R. W. White, treasurer; Dr. C. C. Jchnson, assistant secretary; Dr. R. L. Lcckett, parliamentarian; Dr. La Verte Jones, cergear.t-at-aims; Dr. A. C. Griggs, Chaplain; and J. W. Waltece, Editor to the Sphinx. Brother Ciainnont A. Williams spent the Christmas holidays at home in Greenville, S. C. Brother Dr. A. C. Griggs journeyed to Farmville, Va., for the holidays to visit his mother and other rel itiv s. While old St. Nick must have had a deu.e of a time getting them down the chimneyâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;tires and all he visited two of Alpha: Chi Lambda's eligible bachelors with lon-r, low, 19-13 models. Brothers and others, beware of Brothers S. M. Jenkins and Da. La Verte Jonas. Fraternally yours, JOEL W. WALLACE. o

Alpha Psi Lambda

Chapter

COLUMBIA, SOUTH CAROLINA Greetings Brothers: The New Year finds the good ship Alpha Psi Lambda under the control of a new crew cf officers and with sails set for greater achievement. The roster is as follows: President Bro. Raymond L. Bailey; Vice-President, Bro. F. P. Abraham; Secretary, Bro. H. B. Rutherford; Assistant Secretary, Bro. Albert Kennedy; Treasurer, Bro. Alvin Thompson; Chaplain, Bro. Joseph King. At tha last n-ueting, at which the officers were installed, the president appointed several committees to get the work of the year under way. The chapter continues to command recognition with outstanding activities. The Alpha Psi Lambda Formal held in the spring of last year still ranks as tha number one social event of the city and sets a high mark for other organizations to aim at. Under the chapter sponsorship the Freshmen of Allen University were guests at a reception during the latter part of th'a fall. Wa are gratified in having the association of the following new brothers: Randall C. Morgan, instructor in Physical Education and Health at Booker T. Washington High School; Dr. W. P. Harris, interne a t the Good Samaritan-Waverley Hospital; Elbert E. Rogers, instructor in General Science at Carver Junior High School; Sinclair Robinson of tha local branch of the North Carolina Mutual Life Insurance Co.; William Harris, member of the NYA staff at Camp Moore, West Columbia. Our former president, Bio. Joseph D. McGhee, is now Registrar a t South Carolina State College. Bro. Rutherford is receiving congratulations on the advent of H. B., Junior, Fraternally, F. C. HIPP, Associate Editor.


THE

26

February, 1940

SPHINX

A Queen Receives Her Crown At Beta's

Ball

flSS DORIS WEST, pretty and popular Delta coed, who was elected Queen of Alpha Phi Alpha and crowned at the Ball December 22 in'Washington, D. C. Edward Brooks, President of the undergraduate chapter, presented the crown while the ladies of the court looked on. They are Inez White, Gloria Osborne, Charlotte Wesley and Bernice Norwood.

M1

Beta

Chapter

HOWARD UNIVERSITY Greetings Alpha Brothers: Since last you heard from us here at Beta, quite a number of eventful things have happened. With the turning of events, we have really had the pleasure of seeing real Alpha spirit prevailing. Along with the spirit being exemplified in many ways by all the brothers, I refer specifically to two brothers namely, Brothers Nicholas Thomas, present chaplain, and Stanley Hughes, vice-president, who on two occasions asked permission to personally assume a debt of the chapter; one occasion being the paying for a chapter picture. Such action prompted by a real spirit is really worthy of mention. During the first week of December, we were happy to announce the addition of nine new brothers; brothers who have shown ever since first being pledged that they are typical of the timber that we of Alpha strive for. These recent additions are: Brothers Thomas Allen, Esmond Bond, Harry Boston, Marshall Hill, Andrew Howard III, August Garner, William Parks, Edward Romos, and

Robert Thompson. Already these brothers are very actively and enthusiastically engaged in helping to carry out the chapter program. Early in December, the two chapters, Beta and Mil Lambda felt we needed another body to work in conjunction with our chapters on various matters, this body to be composed of women. Maybe the brothers felt that the guiding genius of a woman in many instances was just what we needed. Thus was formed the Women's Auxiliary to the chapters here, composed of the wives of the brothers. Their first effort (which we hopa will be typical of all succeeding ones) was a tremendous success. It was the staging of a cocktail party, at which all that attended, as Paul Lawrence Dunbar said, "had one scrumptious time." By conducting a popularity contest on the cr.mpus for the first time, Beta thus chose a young lady to s;rÂť'e as queen for one year. The victor in the contest was a lovely soror from Delta Sigma Theta Sorority, Miss Doris West of Washington. At a formal dance given December 22nd by Beta with music being furnished by the famous Benny Carter, Brother Edward Brooks, president with


February, 1940

THE

Two Losing Queens Already

SPHINX

Crowned With Diadems Of

Page 27

Beauty "",1

T W O losing queensâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;left, Miss Christine Hawkins of Sigma Gamma Rho and Miss Beryle Lcckhart of Alpha Kappa Alpha. The lamps they hold are consolation prizes.

typical finesse, crowned Miss West as Alpha Queen for one year, her reign to end December 22nd, 1940. Quite a few brothers of Beta are holding positions which we would like to make cognizance of. Among these are Brother Walter Primas, who has received an appointment as Postmaster a t the Station located on the Campus; Brother Jameston McCall who was elected president of the Student body of the school of Pharmacy and Brother Edgar Davis who is serving as treasurer for the student council. Wishing continued success to all chapters, I remain Fraternally yours, ROBERT LEWIS, JR., Editor of Sphinx.

Beta Gamma Lambda

Chapter

RICHMOND, VIRGINIA Greetings Brothers: Alpha spirit still runs high here in Richmond. Having tendered to the city's fun loving public with our gala holiday ball, we are now determined to buckle down toward carrying out the more serious part of our pro-

g u m . This year will find us more truly "servants of all" and with a definite bid for "transcending all"! The chapter is planning several new projects to add to our usual program. We are working out details for extended financial assistance to the community hospital and the nursery school for children of low income parents. Because of a coming hot mayoralty campaign our citizenship program will be most timely. Brothers are enthusiastic and our influence will be greatly felt. Brother Samuel C. Howell is chairman of this wide awaka committee. We are happy to have Richmond represented in our national official family once more. Brother John M. Moore, Regional Director, is a man of action and keen intellect. One of the most popular faculty members at Virginia Union University, Brother Moore is doing an admirable job with his extra curricular work. Brother Moore has been president of the N. I. D. A. and is known by students of all the colleges in this district. He himself has presented some of his original Plays. He possesses the rare ability of being able to mingle with students without losing dignity or respect. One of the most important items on Brother Moore's virile program is a


Page 28

THE

SPHINX

Beta Chapter, Howard

February, 1940

University

- a ° , t *§fe.^ BETA CHAPTER, HOWARD UNIVERSITY, WASHINGTON, D C.

state wide meeting of all Alphas to convene in Richmond this spring for a conference concerning the local >and national pioblems. You will ba hearing more about the details later. Brother Moore is being supported by an active, alive committee from our chapter. Brother Archie G. Richardson, Assistant Supervisor of Negro Education is chairman of that committee. Brother Richardson has collaborated on an important publication which the state board will soon publish. This report will reveal startling information about Negroes in our state, touching upon educational, social, and economic problems. Brother Wslton Henderson is doing a good job as field secretary of The Negro Organization Society. He is also state supervisor of N. Y. A. Brother Dr. J. M. G. Ramsey has been named a member of the board of directors of the Southern Aid Society of Va., one of our oldest insurance companies. Incidentally Bro. Ramsey is the only treasurer that Beta Gamma Lambda has ever had. Bro. John Nixon, principal of one of the local public schools is president of the Richmond Teacher's Association. Another Broth;r, Thomas H. Henderson, is president of the State Teacher's Association. He is probably the youngest president the association has had. Brother Henderson is working toward his Ph.D., at the University

of Chicago. Recently, Bro. Benjamin Thompson was namad supervisor of all playgrounds in the city. Bro. Thompson is already superintendent of the Negro Recreational Area which is wonderfully equipped playground and park area with a very modern swimming pool. This pool was the result of years of agitation and work on the part of Richmond's Negroes. Much of the credit fcr the success of their efforts is due to the untiring work of the local citizenship committee which included many Alpha men. Bro. Paul Dill Morton, who has been connected with the sales department of the Rumford Baking- Powder Co., has secured a position with the advertising department of the Afro-American. Our romantic interest for the month tells of the maniage and reception of Bro. Harry Savage and the lovely Miss Lemoyne Williams. Both are accomplished musicians and teachers in one of the local high schools. Bro. Savage being director of the Armstrong Choral Club. Our president for the year is Bro. Joseph R. Ransome. He is a real Alpha man, combining dignity of charm, scholarship, and t a k n t . Joe is a teacher at Armstrong High School is pursuing his work toward his doctorate, and is a tenor of no mean ability. Besides brothers, in his own smooth way, he is a grand host.


THE

February, 1940

Bro. Richardson, of whom I spoke before is vice-president. Bro. David Graves served as secretary so efficiently that he was re-elected for that office. Bro. Graves is a tsacher also and is actively engaged in church and scout work. Bro. Dr. Roosevelt H. Hairington, with all the enthusiasm of a new Alpha man becomes financial secretary. One of the most popular men in the chapter and community, Bro. Harrington though busy, finds time to engage actively in fraternity work, and his spark generates much vigor to the committee he serves upon. Dr. J. M. G. Ramsey, our treasurer, is one of the oldest and most rei! men in the chapter. His words of wisdom are a real beacon for us. Bro. Milton F. Hill, Sergeant-AtArms, is actively 'engaged in the government farm program. Bro. Hill is county agent of Gooch'and County. Bro. Welton Henderson is such a good Alpha man that Beta Gamma Lambda wanted him to watch over the personal progress of its members so we elected him chaplain. Yours truly was re-elected associate editor. Fraternally, JAMES H. PAYNE.

Beta Omicron

Lambda

MOBILE, ALABAMA On July 29 last Beta Omicron Lambda chapter was established here in the City of Mobile, Alabama. This was tb2 realization of a long cherished dream of the s Alpha man in this city who had formerly been unable to have a chapter because of insufficient numbers. But wich the return of men of last year's graduating classes this handicap was removed, and our number so increased as to warrant chapter life. Brother Charles W. Greene, Southern Vice-President at the time, came down from Atlanta and set up the chaprar. He did so in a very ef effective, and inspiring way, and every brother present was able to regain the same old spirit which has for many years made Alpha a dominant force in Negro life. Chapter members of the chapter are: Brothers M. Edmonds, President; P. W. Goode, Vice-President; J. A. Franklin, Treasurer; 0. H. Johnson, Secretary; S. A. Herman, Assistant Secretary; J. P. Dixon, Associate Editor of Sphinx; H. A. Anderson; and C. T. Batt There w>ere several visiting brother present a t the ceremony. They are Brothers Grover C. Dixon, Alpha Beta, who proxied for Brother Battle; Walker J. Carroll, Alpha Upsilon Lambda; Wiley Bolden, Beta Upsilon; and Milton Richardson, Beta Upsilon. Each expressed genuine happiness over having a graduate chapter in this city. After the ritualistic ceremonies were completed the men met their ladies and drove to the grounds of the Utopia Club House on Mon Louis Island where they enjoyed a fish-fry party. Since the chapter has been established here the brothers have been meeting regularly and in full attendance have been laying plans for the future. One of the first •steps to be taken was the selection and initiation of new members so that the chapter might have more instruments with which to do its work and further spread the ideals of Alphadom. In this light four men were brought across the burning sands on January 13, 1940'. They are Brothers John A. Rivers, Morehouse '29; John Krouse, Tuskegee '38; Leslie C. Taylor, Alabama State '37; and Alphonse Russell, Alabama State, '37.

SPHINX

Page 29

The Chapter was very happy to have Southern VicePresident H. Councill Trenholm present to conduct the initiation procedures. Brother Trenholm brought felicitations from Alpha Upsilon Lambda as well as several other chapters in the region. He included in his remarks reference to a proposed regional conference, which proposal was met with enthusiam by all brctheis. With the coming of these new personalities, who represent the highest type of young-manhood in this city, Beta Omicron Lambda, feels even more prepared to carry on the good work and make the influence of Alpha felt in this area which has long been neglected. Fraternally, J. P. DIXON, Associate Editor of the Sphinx. o

Beta Gamma

Chanter

VIRGINIA STATE COLLEGE 1940 found Beta Gamma well represented at that school "far above the Appomattox"—Virginia State ColBrother George Diggs, unanimously elected, heads the Student Council; Brother Diggs is elso President of the Inter-Fraternal Council. Brother Edward Shelton is very capably filling the presidency of the Men's Senate. Brother Edward W. Robinson was very instrumental in ishing a chapter of the Youth Council en the campus. Brother Elbert Pcgue, farmer president of Beta Gamma, is the student representative on the Athletic Committee of the College and President of the Men's Glee Club. Sphinxman James Gault, succeeding your correspondent, is editor of the Virginia Statesman, official publication of the College. Brothers Wilbur Wyatt, James Cooley, Clarence Wiggins, and James Wright are quite active in the Players Guild—Virginia State's dramatic club. In addition, Brothers of Beta Gamma hold a number of offices in the various clubs on the campus. Officers for the current year are: Brother Jefferson Bryant, president; Brother Wilbur Wyatt, vice-president; Brother Robert Whiting, recording secretary; Brother Sinclair Jeter, corresponding secretary; Brother Robert Manuel sergeant-at-arms; Brother James Cooley, chaplain; Brother William Coleman, Dean of the Sphinx Club; and Brother Julius H. Hughes, editor to the Sphinx. Graduation takes away one of the brothers, James W. Younge, Jr. Brother Younge graduates with a B.S. in physical education in February. As we go to press Brother Belford V. Lawson has consented to speak on Beta Gamma's annual chapel program January 28. Brother Lawson plans to speak on "Scholarship in Democracy" or "Working Scholars." Best wishes to all the chapters for continued success. Yours fraternally, JULIUS H. HUGHES, Associate Editor to Sphinx. o -—

Aloha

Lambda

LOUISVILLE, KENTUCKY Greetings Brothers, Alpha Lambda, after a valiant fight for the convention in New York this summer, has added new hope to its chances for 1941 (or whenever the next general convention is held after 1940.) Carrying on in true Kentucky style, Brothers Walker and Stanley flooded New York with good old Calvert's— but the brothers in session let all of the effects


THE

Page 30

After

Kansas

SPHINX

City, It's Louisville,

Say

February, 1940

Kentucky

Brothers

K/IEMBERS of Alpha Lambda, Louisville, Ky., first graduate chapter of Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity, and Alpha Pi, Louisville Municipal College, shown with Bro. Joseph H. B- Bvans, General Secretary, during a recent visit. First row; left to right:—Dr. John Walls, Lyman Johnson, Secretary Evans, Dr. P. 0. Sweeney, Dr. John Williams. Second row:— Brothers George Robinscn, Douglas Reid, Dalton Childress, Dr. J. F. Laine, Dr. Beard Woolfolk. Third row:—Brother William H. Walker. A large delegation from these two chapters expects to be on hand in Kansas City next December to make a bid for 1941 convention die out before they voted on the '40 convention site. In fact so many visitors were in attendance (we mean nondelegates) at the Banquet, that it was impossible for a poll of the House; hence Kansas City, who brought along ten cars of repeaters went to town. In all sincerity however, Alpha Lambda doffs its hat to Kansas City. Their one redeeming feature in winning the '40 convention was their pledge to support Louisville for the next general convention. Look out Mayberry and Lillard, we're depending on you! Besides, Alpha Lambda wishes to let every chapter know now that it will be in Kansas City stronger than ever, inviting the next convention. We plan to win too, even if the one great Bindly Cyrus (Convention orator) does campaign for some other chapter. So prepare now, brothers, to vote for Alpha Lambda —incidentally, don't let your chapter get any convention notions for we are going to railroad you worse than Kansas City did us! Alpha Lambda had the pleasure of entertaining Brother General Secretary Joseph H. B. Evans recently. STEWART PICKETTE.

Alpha Xi Lambda

Chapter

TOLEDO, OHIO Greetings, Brothers in Alpha: With three neophyte brothers in our chapter, we of Alpha Xi Lambda continue to forge ahead looking forward to 1940 and all the 40' with eager anticipation of greater doings. On December 9, 1939, those everburning sands were crossed by Jake Chandler, Charles Peoples, and Charles Ward—whom we now gladly call brothers. Several men were inducted into the Sphinx Club at our annual Alpha-Sphinx breakfast held on January 1, 1940. The year 1939 found Brother Charles E. Doneghy added to the roll of "Who's Who in American College", Brothers Chandler, English and Peoples distinguishing themselves in track, Brother James M. Burgette promoted to the position of Acting Executive Secretary of the Indiana Avenue Branch Y. M. C. A., and Brothers John James and Iseah Isreal promoted in Y. M. C. A. work. For the year 1940, cooperation, spirit, and tradition


February, 1940

THE

become our passwords as our new officers were all elected unanimouslyâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;three of them reelected. Reelected were Bother Victor English, president; Brother George E. Bush, vice-president; and Brother Joseph Doneghy, treasurer. New officers are Brother Charles Peoples, secretary; Brother Jake Chandler, assistant secretary and associate editor to the Sphinx; and Brother James L. Thomas, sergeant-at-arms. With this choice of leadership, we of Alpha Xi Lambda feel that there is nothing ahead but progress. Brother John James was appointed manager and coach of our newly formed basketball team. Comprising the team are Brothers Billy Jones, Joseph Doneghy, Iseah Isreal, John James, Victor English, James L. Thomas, Jake Chandler, Charles Ward and Charles Doneghy. A number of games have been scheduled and we hope to take "charge" of them in true Alpha manner. On Fraternal Night featuring the Dedication Week of the new Frederick Douglass Community Center, Alpha Xi Lambda Chapter rendered the Alpha Hymn in great style led by Brother Herbert S. Goodloe. Other fraternity and sorority songs were very beautifully sung on tha same occasion. We wish every other chapter and every single brother the best of luck and success, and realize that none of us can do anything too great for Alpha Phi Alpha. Fraternally yours, CHARLES PEOPLES, Secretary.

Mu

Chapter

S P H I N X

Page 31

can really say that 1940 is the beginning of a richer and happier life for himself and family. The passing of 1939 also saw Brother "Fuzzy" Evans embarking upon the good ship of matrimony. Mrs. A. J. Lewis was hostess to the Alpha Matrons at a birthday dinner given for Brother Lewis, December 12th. Gifts were distributed and a fine time was had by all. This year Mu Chapter is awarding a scholarship to some deserving high school graduate of the twin cities. The recipient of the award will be selected from a list of applicants by the Educational Committee and two local ministers. I would like to hear from any of my good Alpha brothers in other parts of the country who are participating in the Government's C. A. A. Flight Training program. I am the only Negro in the class of fifty being trained at the University of Minnesota and I would like to compare notes with any of the other trainees. ( My address is 947 Iglehart Ave. St. Paul, Minn.) His Sartorial Elegance, Brother Leon Smith, may still be seen in the gayer spots of the city accompanied by his charming wife. Brother Raymond Cannon has been ill for a time but is up and active now and sends his greetings to his friends. I will add the chapter's best wishes for a bigger and better Alpha year in 1940. Respectfully and regretfully, WALTER L. ROBINSON. o .

Eta Lambda

Chapter

MINNEAPOLIS, MINN.â&#x20AC;&#x201D;ST. PAUL, MINN.

ATLANTA, GEORGIA

Brothers in Alpha: It is with deep regret that I pen this my last and final communication to the Sphinx. In the recent election of chapter officers, my name was struck from the roll of officers in the capacity of Associate Editor to the Sphinx and placed opposite the office of vice-president. My place has been taken by that illustrious penman and lover, Brother Norman Lyght, who, I am sure will carry on with the same efficiency as he does in other affairs. Brother A. J. Lewis was elected to the office of Assistant Secretary and to the amazement of everyone present Brother Lewis volunteered to act as chapter Historian. This is the first time I have ever seen anyone ask for a headache, but I am proud of my brother. Brother Louis P. Moore was reelected to the office of Corresponding Secretary over his vehement protestations that his time was taken up with his schoolwork. (I think he should also have mentioned his charming fiancee who, I am sure receives much more of his valuable time than any schoolwork). Brother Walter Coins was elected to the office of controlling the Social affairs of the chapter, and he is anxious to put into practice some of the ideas he collected at the convention in New York. Brother T. J. Posten is our new Sergeant-At-Arms. Of course, we of Mu Chapter would feel absolutely lost without Brother John Robert Lawrence Jr., Brother John M. Patton and Brother William Cassius in the respective office of president, secretary and treasurer.

Greetings, Brothers in Alpha Phi Alpha: As Eta Lambda enters its twentieth year of activity, never before in its history have its members been called upon in such large numbers to lead the social, civic and uplift organizations of the city. Truly, Eta Lambda is a rich storehouse of leadership for Atlanta's 105,000 black folk. When a chairman for the annual community chest drive was needed, our chapter filled the vacancy with Brother Alonzo Moron, manager of the University Homes project, who put the program over 100 per cent. The Atlanta branch, NAACP found itself leaderless and into the breech stepped youthful, dynamic Brother T. M. Alexander whom Eta Lambda regretfully relinguished as its president for this purpose. Brother Forrester B. Washington for the third successive year has directed the annual Christmas Seal Campaign for the Atlanta Tuberculosis campaign, reaching his goal of $2,000. In the meantime as director of the Atlanta University of Social Work he obtained a $10,000 grant for his institution from the Julius Rosenwald fund. Brother Dr. C. Waymond Reeves was called upon during the month to head up the Atlanta-Fulton County Medical Society, while Brother W. A. Robinson was named by the General Education Board to direct its study of secondary schools for Negroes in the Southern Region. Brother M. S. Davage, president of Clark University, is taking a leading role in affecting the Methodist church unification setup and Brother Andrew Lewis, as commissioner of Boy Scouts for this district, is looked upon by thousands of young boys as their leader.

Brother Claybourne C. Hill received his license to practice in this state from the Dental Board of Examiners in December. On Friday December 29th, he was informed of the birth of an eight pound son. Brother Hill

Brother W. E. B. DuBois, chairman of the department of sociology of Atlanta University, has been named editor


THE

Page 32

Eta Lambda

February, 1940

SPHINX

Chapter, Atlanta,

Georgia

LOOKS FORWARD TO 20TH ANNIVERSARY

Photo By Madcay.

T EFT to right:â&#x20AC;&#x201D;Jacob Henderson, treasurer; T. M. Alexander, retiring president; C. W. Greene, newly elected president; Nelson C. Jackson, secretary. Back row:â&#x20AC;&#x201D;Mike Turrentine, John Newman, Dr. C. W. Reeves, Dr. C. L. Johnson, Andrew Lewis, chaplain; W. D. Thomas, Braynard Burch, R. G. Martin. Officers not in picture, G. T. Delorme, vice-president; Cliff Mackay, associate editor to Sphinx

in chief of the new publication, "Phylon, the Atlanta University Review of Race and Culture" by Brother Rufus E. Clement, president of Atlanta University. Two other brothers, Mess Kendrix, of the Georgia NYA and Cliff Mackay, managing editor of the Atlanta Daily WORLD, during the month inaugurated a Journalism Seminar at Morehouse College, as a first step toward establishing a department for this profession. These are but a few of the many instances where Eta Lambda has been called upon for aid in putting over various community programs, and has as always responded in the true Alpha spirit of service. Brother Charles W. Greene has been elected president of our chapter. Other officers elected were G. T. DeLorme, vice president; Nelson C. Jackson, secretary; Jacob Hend-

erson, treasurer; Andrew Lewis, chaplain and Cliff Mackay, associate editor to Sphinx. The officers were installed by Brother Dr. C. W. Reeves. Elaborate plans are being made by Eta Lambda under the progressive leadership of Brother Greene to observe beginning in March, the twentieth anniversary of the chapter's founding on March 20, 1920. A pall of gloom fell ever the chapter in November with the death on Nov. 26 of Brother Dr. N. Lamar, a pioneer and one of its most beloved and loyal members. His memory will ever remain burning in the hearts of Eta Lambda members. So to Alpha brothers everywhere come best wishes for success from Atlanta's Eta Lambda. Fraternally, CLIFF MACKAY, Associte Editor.


February, 1940

Beta

THE

Lambda

Chapter

KANSAS CITY, MISSOURI Greetings Brothers: Beta Lambda is planning for the warm and cordial reception it intends to give the Greeks in 1940. They have made plans for the accomodation of the Convention in the beautiful and spacious Municipal Auditorium where the banquet, public meeting, business sessions, the formal party, registration and everything but living quarters can ibe secured. Among the new brothers who have been seen regularly at the Pall meetings have been Brother Paul Moberly, instructor of Chemistry and Physics at Sumner High School; Brother Lloyd Hughes, Phi Beta Kappa from California and Principal of the High School Department and teacher of Sociology at Western University; Brother Lamar Smith, who teaches Physical Education at Northeast and who was formerly at Paul Quinn College in Waco, Texas. Brother T. Arnold Hill was in the city and managed to spend a few minutes talking informally with the brothers. Brother Dowdal Davis, who is with the Advertising Department of the Kansas City Call is working overtime as Secretary of the Chapter. He is also a graduate of the Art School of Kansas University and is a budding photographer. At the last business meeting of Beta Lambda, members from Upsilon which is under the graduate chapters wing, attended the meeting and reported the house finances in good shape, as well as to thank the Alpha wives for the splendid furnishings which they recently donated to Upsilon Chapter House. Beta Lambda treked en masse to the Founders Day Banquet at Upsilon, at the University of Kansas at Lawrence before Christmas. The brothers planned an automobile caravan which assembled at Brother Roosevelt Butler's after an inspirational meeting in his hospital Rathskellar. Beta Lambda is joining hands in the Pan-Hellenic's annual Salon Musical which is to be held in the beautiful Little Theatre of the Municipal Auditorium. Brother President Howell is making plans for the second annual celebration of the chapter's anniversary. Beta Lambda's 21st birthday was observed with an Alpha service with a special sermon to the brothers at Mason Memorial Church in Kansas City, Kansas. The Missouri brothers went across the river and joined the Kansas men in a complete Alpha worship service. Brother Hamilton Perkins who is a member of Phi Sigma, an honorary National Biological Society is connected with the Pharmaceutical Department of the University of Kansas and is now a Beta Lambdite. The local chapter of Alpha Phi Alpha, Alpha Kappa Alpha and Kappa Alpha Psi have formed a coordinating committee to plan for the coming of the conventions of the three Greek letter societies to Kansas City in December 1940. At the January meeting of Beta Lambda in the beautiful home of Brother Dowdal Davis with the other Davis member (Guy V.) serving as co-host the following brothers were installed as the new officers of the chapter for 1940:

SPHINX

Page 33

John L. Howell, president; J. R. Lillard, first vice-president; J. H. Bluford, treasurer; Guy V. Davis, financial secretary; Dowdal Davis, recording secretary; James A. Jeffress, corresponding secretary; Burt A. Mayberry, Sphinx editor; Lloyd Hughes, chaplain; Mathew E. Carroll, educational director. Sincerely yours, THOMAS A. WEBSTER. o â&#x20AC;&#x201D;â&#x20AC;&#x201D;

Aloha

Theta

Chapter

IOWA UNIVERSITY Greetings Brothers: Alpha Theta is glad of this opportunity to wish all brothers in Alpha Phi Alpha a Happy and Most Prosperous New Year. I'm sure that Christmas was a time of great cheer for all good brothers of A. Phi A. The brothers of Alpha Theta Chapter took the opportunity afforded by the Christmas recess to travel and see old friends and to renew acquaintances. Bro. Walker and Bro. Cox spent the holidays in Oklahoma and Arkansas; Bro. Higgins and Bro. Perkins went to St. Louis; Bro. Augustus Low spent the vacation in Omaha, Nebr., and Bro. "One-y" Jones spent the holidays in a most delightful manner in South Boston and Richmond, Virginia. Only Bros. Cavell, Cunningham, and Simpson were left here in Iowa City to keep the lights of A Phi A house burning while the others were away having their fun. And if shadows under the eyes and loss of weight are any indication of the fun they had, they had a lot of it. Bro. Joe Tandy, who went to Detroit, is still trying to catch up on his sleep. A bouquet to the brothers of Beta Gamma Lambda for that swell Christmas dance. If we can believe Bro. Jones' account of it, it was good. And how! True to the traditions of Alpha Phi Alpha the brothers of Alpha Theta Chapter stand high in scholastic achievement among the student body of the State University of Iowa. Recent records show that Brother Abishi Cunningham a junior law student, has made the Iowa Law Review; Brother Winston Cavell is Co-analyst in the department of Chemical Engineering; and Brother Jones was elected to the local chapter of the honorary sociological fraternity, elected a member of the membership committee, and, by unanimous vote, was elected Chairman of the Executive Committee of the Sociology Club. Plans for the Annual Founders' Day formal dinner dance are progressing very rapidly. Friday, February 9, is the date of the party and we expect to make it a gala affair. Practically everyone now is working feverishly preparing for semester exams. To all brothers everywhere who are going through the same ordeal we extend to you our sympathy and best wishes. The one sad note that creeps in at this point is the passing of Brother James Booker, formerly of Gamma Chapter now a member of Omega. Alpha Theta joins Gamma and the entire fraternity over the loss of Brother Booker. Until the next time, I remain, Your correspondent, CLIFTON R. "ONEY" JONES.


THE

Page 34

February, 1940

SPHINX

At Beta Tau's Fifth Initiatory

Banquet

C E A T E D from left to right are Brothers Harold Verdun, Terry Francois, Marcus Neustander (Beta Phi), Reynolds (Sigma Lambda), C. C. Haydel (Sigma Lambda), Henry Stephens, Giles Wright, Walter M^rial, Warren MeKenna. Charles deLay, Asa Atkins, William Hill, Ralph Metcalfe, (Sigma Lambda), Mason Cloyd, and Ocar Bouise. Standing, Brothers Robert Harrison, Felix Alexis, Eldridge Williams, Peter Clark, Waldo Bernard, Benjamin Mourning, Edward Dorsey, Murray Martin, Edward Johnson, Leonard LeMelle, Flournoy Coles, Vernon Frilot, Joseph Mason, Francis Wheeler, Wilfred Lion, Hammond, Joshua Williamson, Joseph Chretien, Daniel Wagner, Benson Boutte, Lucious Thomas, Herman Washington (Sigma Lambda), Daniel Turner, Walter Wheat, Numa Rousseve (Sigma Lambda), and Harold Bouise.

Beta Tau Chapter XAVIER UNIVERSITY Brothers in Alpha Phi Alpha: Beta Tau wishes each of you a happy and prosperous New Year, and with the New Year we would like to present fifteen new members: Terry Francois, Robert Harrison, Eldridgs Williams, Benjamin Mourning, Edward Johnson, Leonard LeMelle, Flournoy Coles, Vernon Frilot, Joseph Mason, Francis Wheeler, Wilfred Lion, Joseph Chretien, Daniel Wagner, Lucious Thomas, and Walter Wheat. Their successful trip across the burning sands of Alphadom was celebrated by a banquet and smokerâ&#x20AC;&#x201D; the whole of which was> conducted by Warren MeKenna. After the graduation of many of our brothers in June, Charles deLay was elected as acting president and in that capacity attended the National Conference in

New York, along with Brothers Benson Boutte and Melvin Bolden. Their most satisfactory report was followed by preparations'for our fifth initiation and the election of new officers at later meetings. With the exception of office the acting officials succeeded themselves. The officers are as follows: Charles de Lay, .president; Warren MeKenna, vice-president; Walter Morial, secretary; Henry Stephens, assistant secretary; R. T. Pearson, treasurer; Giles Wright, parliamentarian; William Hill, chaplain; and Mason Cloyd, associate editor of the Sphinx. We have adopted as one of our policies for t3vs hew year a fostering of better Interfraternal spirit o.i our campus. We have organized a basketball team and would like to extend our challenge to all. Fraternally yours, M. D. CLOYD, Associate Editor.


February, 1940

THE

Alpha

Beta

TALLADEGA COLLEGE Greetings Brothers: Alpha Beta Chapter takes this opportunity to extend to each and every brother of Alpha Phi Alpha a most successful and prosperous year. It is sincerely hoped by each brother of Alpha Beta that 1940 will bring unlimited success and happiness to each individual brother of Alpha Phi Alpha. The beginning of this school year found Alpha Beta eight strong. The graduating class of '39 had taken its toll as usual. On November the ninth, seven new men crossed the burning sands into Alphadom. They were Neophyte Brothers, Griffin Allen, Herbert Butler, Andrew Cyrus, Charles Forde, Spencer Jones, George Lee and Andrew Randall. Alpha Beta now has fifteen loyal brothers, each one having pledged within himself to work 'is hard as it is humanly possible, so as to make Alpha Beta a chapter of continued and inspired progress and a brilliant example of what Alpha Phi Alpha actually stands for. The new year has brought with it not only much inspiration and hope but it has brought an entirely new set of officers to guide Alpha Beta throughout the coming year. They are: President, Brother George E. Lee; VicePresident, Brother Griffin M. Allen; Secretary, Brother Andrew B. Randall; Corresponding Secretary, Brother Spencer S. Jones; Treasurer, Brother Richard A. Wilson; Advisor to Sphinx Club, Brother Albert M. Brown; Chaplain, Brother Herbert C. Butler; Sergeant-at-Arms, Brother Andrew E. Cyrus. It is fully realized that the guidance of the above officers along with the advice of the older brothers will make Alpha Beta a truly outstanding chapter. Alpha Beta takes this opportunity to welcome back to the Chapter Brother Joseph T. Singleton who recently returned from New York City and to express its sincere fraternal feeling and best wishes for a speedy recovery to Brother William J. Roberson who due to illness is absent from the chapter. Having expressed the true feeling, obligations and sentiments of Alpha Beta Chapter, I remain. Fraternally yours, SPENCER E. JONES, Corr. Sec. o

Phi Lambda

Chapter

RALEIGH, N. C. Brothers in Alpha Phi Alpha: Phi Lambda Chapter is particularly happy to greet the brothers in Alpha Phi Alpha through the excellent medium of The Sphinx. We wish to extend to you the fellowship that is thoroughly imbedded in the fraternal bond of progress and enthusiasm that typifies our brotherhood. A fitting conclusion to a year of innumerable successes and varied activities under the most excellent leadership of retiring President, Brother Robert P. Daniel, climaxed by the winning of the Balfour Cup, was realized when Phi Lambda was privileged to entertain several particularly outstanding brothers, including our General President and our Regional Vice-President.

SPHINX

Page 35

Our meeting, at which these brothers were our g'uests, was in itself a ritual that typified the highest ideals of Alpha. The retiring President first presented visiting Brothers V. E. Daniel, Dean of Wiley College, Texas, and Frank A. DeCosta, Supervising Principal of Avery Institute, Charleston, S. C. Both brothers brought greetings and recounted vivid experiences and developments of the fraternity. Then followed the presentation of cur own Regional Vice-President, Brother H. Council Trenholm. Brother Trenholm outlined an Alpha of tomorrow that could and should be realized through a re-establishment of the allegiance, cooperation and foresight for which the fraternity was founded. At this point our new chapter officers were duly installed by visiting Brother Frederick D. Patterson, of Tuekegee. These new officers then joined the visiting brothers and the regular Phi Lambda members in hearing General President, Brother Charles H. Wesley rivet together the unity of ideals, ritual and bonds into a watchword that will insure greater opportunities for Alpha Phi Alpha. The new officers who accepted tha torch of responsibility and the challenge to serve Phi Lambda Chapter and Alpha Phi Alpha in general were selected from the now twenty-seven, yet ever-increasing, financial brothers. They are as follows: John C. Harlan, president; H. I. F. Nanton, vice-president; Louis W. Roberts, secretary; H. C. Perrin, financial secretary; Reginald L. Lynch, treasurer; J. Percy Bond Jr., editor-to-the-Sphinx; Samuel Moss Carter, chaplain; Hairy E. Payne, sergeant-at-arms. The representatives to the Inter-fraternal Alliance Council included: H. C. Perrin, H. I. F . Nanton, Robert P. Daniel. These brothers who helped Phi Lambda win the last one of the Balfour Cups, and who have seen it exhibited at strategic points and gatherings throughout North Carolina, are now directing all efforts toward plans for winning the first one of the L'Overture Cups. These plans were cemented together by the firm platform of our new chapter President, Brother John C. Harlan. Phi Lambda joins with him one hundred per cent in concerted efforts to realize honesty, efficiency, and continued reclamation and greater service to brothers of Alpha Phi Alpha to our fellow men. Immediately following Easter, Phi Lambda Chapter will serve as host to its innumerable friends and financial brothers throughout North Carolina and the entire Piedmont Region, at a formal dance to be held on Friday, March twenty-ninth, at the City Auditorium in Raleigh, N. C. Fraternally yours, J. PERCY BOND, JR. Associate Editor to the Sphinx. o

Eta

Chanter

NEW YORK, N. Y. My Dear Brothers, I deem the time appropriate to bring you news of what goes on in Eta, now that the bustle and excitement of our successful convention in this city has subsided, and everyone has closeted the memories made on that occasion for pleasant reminiscing when he will have joined the ranks of the hoary.


Page 36

THE

Emerging from our convention with no little glory as the co-host of that event, Eta has lost no time in girding her loins for a militant campaign for the future. The chapter met on Thursday evening, November ninth, and established a New Deal for this year. Bro. Mac. C. Davies will be the new skipper a t the helm of Eta's Ship of State, and an able first mate was chosen in the person of Bro. Fred Day. Bro. Lucius Watson will be our New Recording Secretary, and Bro. David Carrington will occupy the position of Financial Secretary. Bro. Andrew Tyler, our prexy last year, has been elected Treasurer, and Brother Joe Carey will be our Athletic Director. Bro. Eddie Byas, our Recording Secretary for the past few years, will give our meetings that spiritual touch in his capacity as Chaplain. One change of startling proportions was noted. Bro. Fred D. "Shorty" Atwater, Eta's renowned man of small statue, who has a manner all his own of beguiling the more garrulous brothers into silsnce, and perennial incumbent of the position, was superseded as Sergeant-at-Arms by Bro. Edwin Stanislans Johnson. Your humble scribe is the only holdover from last year's slate. Upon examining this list, one finds no less than four brothers who crossed the burning sands on that eventful May night in 1937, after being nurtured in the good old Alpha precepts under the capable supervision of Brother Theodore Rutledge: Bros. Davies, Tyler, Watson, and yours truly. I believe one might observe, with pardonable pride, that the members of that "wonder" group are contributing, in no small measure, to the leadership of the chapter. Eta's basketball team, captained by the redoubtable Bro. Walter "Brick-top" Wright, is busily preparing to defend the laurels so brilliantly won last year. If what I hear is correct, the boys are determined to win again, or be brought back on thsir shields. Fraternally yours, ARCHIE FLANAGAN.

Beta Alpha

Chapter

MORGAN COLLEGE Greetings to Brothers in Alphadom: It is usually customary to eulogize individuals for their noble accomplishments after they have passed along. But it is my distinct desire to present to all the brothers in Alpha a picture of the participation of Beta Alpha brothers in the life of the College at Morgan. Brother Bruce Edemy, president of Beta Alpha, is recognized as one of the most brilliant students a t Morgan. He has the distinction of being one of the two undergradute members of Phi Lambda Psi, Morgan's honor society. Likewise he is distinguished as president of the Commerce Club and as a member of the College Quartet. Our vice president, Bernard Nash, is recognized as the dynamic president of the History Club and Student Councilman, as well as an honor man. Earl Jackson's time-consuming job is not enough to prevent him from being an honor roll man and senior class president. Brothers Charles Page and William Magee have the distinction of being two of the three undergraduates in Beta Kappa Chi, Morgan's honorary scientific society. Beta Alpha also has another honor man in Howard Little who also features in the College Quartet. Brother Frank Richardson is also a pillar to this

SPHINX

February, 1940

Quartet. Beta Alpha is represented in the field of sports by Randolph Keah, Maurice "Moe" Tucker, and William "Sug" Cain, the latter of whom is an all 'round athlete, scholar, student councilman, and "Y" prexy. Brother Paul Chester, who transferred from Washington, has fully adjusted himself to Morgan, and recognition of his intelligence and practicability has brought him the sobriquet of "The Mighty Atom." Yours truly is striving to fulfill his obligation as prexy of the Hellenic Council and the Debate Society. Thus, I present this roster of Beta Alpha. But with it goes nearly every important position at Morgan. And I'm distinctly pleased to say that these positions have been gotten not by politics (which is virtually non-existent at Morgan) but by the sheer ability of these brothers. I am proud to be able to eulogize these brothers for their noble accomplishments. I am even prouder to say that these are representative Alpha men. May every brother and chapter be equally proud. Fraternally, SAMUEL MYERS.

Alpha Delta Lambda

Chapter

MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE Greetings Brothers: We of Alpha Delta Lambda are hitting it full stride with the beginning of the new year. We got off with a "get-together" during the cold days and really warmed things up. It put the spirit in all of us. Basketball season is under way and our colors are flying high in this section. It promises to be a grand season. We have been visited by several out-of-town brothers and we have added to our ranks Brother John Bluford, Jr., Kansas City, Mo., who is manager of the Memphis District of the Supreme Liberty Life Insurance Company. He is doing a fine job. Brother W. P. Adkins' football season was very successful although we didn't emerge a champion. Brother Hugh Gloster is back with us after a year's absence in New York. Brother Marvin Tarpley is the proud father of a bouncing young boy baby. Our entertainment chairman Brother H. C. Latham, underwent an operation recently but came out of it in fine shape. At this writing he is canvalescing rapidly. Brother "Rev." H. B. Gibson's Golden Hour every Sunday evening is gaining popularity by leaps and bounds. Our latch string always hangs on the outside. Until next time. Fraternally yours, J. EDWARD COTTON.

Rho

Lambda

Chapter

BUFFALO, NEW YORK Greetings Brothers: Since the last issue of the Sphinx, we have passed, from the old year into the new one. Rho Lambda Chapter can review 1939 with much pride and thanksgiving. On every hand the Chapter is gaining ground in carrying out the program that has been so nobly planned by our President, Brother Dr. Walter B. Holland, and the officers.


THE

February, 1940

We have already made plans for a very extensive educational scholarship fund. Brother Dr. Lloyd Burrell is acting chairman of this committee assisted by Brother William L. Evans and Brother Bud Council. Rho Lambda Chapter has been credited with the bringing into the folds of Alpha Phi Alpha in the year of 1939 Brother Hilton Daniel Lang. Brother Lang passes the qualities of real Alpha Phi Alpha material. He received his B. S. degree in education from the University of Buffalo last June. He is now employed as an instructor at the Urban League of which Brother William L. Evans is the Executive Secretary. The annual formal dance which was given on the 27th day of December, was agreed upon by the 400 guests present that it was a great success. The guests are now looking forward for the time to come when they may receive another invitation. When we think of the progress Rho Lambda Chapter has made in the last few years, much of the credit is due to Brothers Charles B. Hayes, Holliman, John Pollard. These brothers live in Niagara Falls, New York, and they are doing much to make Rho Lambda Chapter what it should be. Brother John Pollard, who is Executive Secretary of the Urban League of Niagara Falls, New York, is now recovering from a very severe illness. We all wish for him an early and complete recovery. Brother Dr. A. P. Johnson, who lives in Syracuse, New York, is doing a great job for Alpha Phi Alpha in westei-n New York. The officers of Rho Lambda Chapter for 1940 are as follows: Brother Walter B. Holland, President; Brother Dr. Charles Hayes, Vice President; Brother Dr. Daniel Bobbs, Secretary; Brother Lloyd Burrell, Treasurer; and Brother Dr. Russell W. Holland, Editor to the Sphinx. Fraternally yours, DR. RUSSELL W. HOLLAND. o

Beta

Upsilon

â&#x20AC;˘

Chapter

ALABAMA STATE TEACHERS COLLEGE Greetings Brothers: ,,It has been sometime since this chapter has made the .columns of the Sphinx. The members of this chapter wish to inform the brothers of Alpha wherever they may be, that we are very much alive and have been doing our part in trying to demonstrate the true spirit of Alpha Phi Alpha under the leadership of Brother Robert D. Smiley, our president, who is also President of the PanHellenic Council on our campus. Our chapter consists of fifteen active brothers. Namely: Robert D. Smiley, Eddie Callahan, Clyde Montgomery, Thornton Green, Theodore A. Smith, Maxwell Graham, Willie Smith, Leroy Jackson, Milton Richardson, Alphonsia Jones, Ralph Davis, Clement Merritt, Isaac Points, Andrew Campbell and Theodore J. Jemison. The officers who were installed at the beginning of the year 1940 are: Brothers Alphonsia Jones, president; Clyde Montgomery, vice-president; Isaac Points, secretary; Ralph Davis, assistant secretary; Andrew Campbell, treasurer; Theodore Smith, chaplain and Clyde Montgomery, Dean of Pledges. With the installation of these officers all Beta Upsilon is looking forward for the most progressive year ever. Beta Upsilon and Alpha Upsilon Lambda, the graduate chapter in Montgomery on Sunday night, January 14,

SPHINX

Page 37

were the guests of President H. Council Trenholm, who was elected in the last general convention second vicepresident of Alpha Phi Alpha. Here's wishing Alpha Chapters and Alpha men everywhere a most prosperous and successful year. Yours fraternally, THEODORE J. JEMISON. o

Epsilon

â&#x20AC;˘

Chapter

UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN Brothers in Alpha Phi Alpha, we greet thee: We approach the New Year with a great determination to carry out our program in a progressing peaceful and harmonious manner, in spite of the absence of these brothers: Brother Nelson Palmer, a recent recipient of a Rosenwald Fellowship to complete work toward the Ph.D. Degree in Sociology and is now doing research work in the east. Brother Waldo Blanchett who is now Dean of the College at Fort Valley, Fort Valley, Ga.; Brother Armstead Pierro, who received his Masters Degree in Physical Education, Brother Barton Beatty, who received his Masters degree and is now Boys Work Secretary at Detroit Y. M. C. A., and Brother William "Big Bill" Watson, Captain of Michigan's Big Ten Champs, track team. Officers who have taken over the reins for the coming year are Brothers Robert Baker, president; Allen Pearman, vice-president; Lionell H. Newsom, secretary and corresponding secretary; Charles E. Simmons, treasurer; Wesley Allen, sergeant-at-arms; William "Bill" Womack, associate editor to Sphinx; Woodruff C. Adams, Chaplain. The brothers of Epsilon have been carrying on nobly this past year with special honors we pay tribute to Brother Wesley Allen who is back with us and is set on winning "Big Ten" honors this coming Spring. Brother Baker who was graduated last June is now doing graduate work in Education. Sorry to say but happy to admit that what one loses is another's gain, Alpha Beta is somewhat weaker but Epsilon is much stronger due to the presence and hearty cooperation of Brothers Ish, Crocker and, last but not least is Brother Seldon whom we boast as being the smallest man in Alphadom. We are also fortunate in having Brother Abraham, coach at Tugaloo College and a most ardent lover of Alpha, Brother Brown from Philadelphia, now in the Law School. Epsilon boasts her own sons, Brothers Pearman, Carter, and A. B. Nutt (who by the way, brothers, is the youngest student ever admitted) to the school of engineering. Brother Ed. Allen from Morehouse and Brother C. Simmons from Lincoln, Pa. Brother Myron Townes, a recipient of a Rosenwald Fellowship and a Member of Phi Beta Kappa and other honorary fraternities, is now near the completion of his work for the Ph.D. in chemistry. We have brothers W. Young, F. Raiford, Suttler, Eaton, Yancy and Bryant in the Medical School. Lionell Newsom in the field of Sociology, and Woodruff Adams in the field of Public Health and William Womack in Health and Physical Education. We are anxiously awaiting the arrival of the Chairman of the Housing Committee with whom we shall discuss plans for a Chapter House. I remain yours in Alpha, WILLIAM "BILL" WOMACK.


Page 38

THE

Alpha

Tau Lambda

Chapter

TULSA, OKLAHOMA Greetings: The activities of Alpha Tau Lambda chapter of Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity have been few but interesting. We are happy to report the old wheel is moving! and life has been very good to many of us. November 15th, the chapter met and elected the following brothers to guide the destinies of the chapter. The elected roster include—Brothers E. W. Clark, president; W. D. Combs, vice president; J. Tyler Smith, secretary; F. L. Parker, treasurer; Dr. E. W. South, chaplain; Dr. R. S. Bryant, sergeant at arms; Clifford Johnson, editor of the Alphagram and Robert L. Fairchild, associate editor of Sphinx. These brothers have taken office and are doing a splendid work for the fraternity. Two meetings have been held since the election of the officers. These meetings different from the old traditional meeting have been held at the homes of different brothers. The policy of the chapter has been changed, in that instead of having the old-fashioned meeting with no interest there efforts have been made to add taste. This has been done successfully. The first meeting was held at the home of Brother E. W. Woods. Brothers Julius Moran, Robert L. Fairchild and E. W. Woods were the hosts to the chapter. A twenty pound turkey and all the trimmings comprised the joyous feast. We really had fun. The second meeting was held at the home of Brother E. W. Clark. Brothers Jessie Lee Greadington, Horace S. Hughes, and E. W. Clark were the hosts. A tenderized, sugar cured ham and all the necessary trimmings comprised the menu for the evening. It was an evening full of fun and fraternizing. Each of these meetings was held the second Saturday of December and January respectively. Brother Joe Robert Burns of Xavier has joined with Alpha Tau Lambda. Brother South and the wife of Brother Combs comprise the sick lists among us Alphas. Brother Clyde Cole is on the sick list. Kansas City, Mo., is the next jumping off place. Will you be there ? Well we will be there, we" hope, and we will be seeing you. Yours truly, ROBERT L. FAIRCHILD, Associate Editor of Sphinx. o

Beta Kappa

Chapter

LANGSTON UNIVERSITY As we enter a New Year torn with hatreds, prejudices, and misunderstandings, with wars and destruction in certain countries and with propaganda, secret connivings, and sabotage in others, it gives a measure of well feeling to know that we hold kindred with a group spread throughout the length and breadth of the earth that retains some of that now almost extinct brotherly love. A group working not for the abolition, but for the preservation of all mankind. We here at Beta Kappa again proudly reaffirm our loyalty to our purpose and our zeal toward the perpetuation of our program. We are happy to welcome as President of the University, Brother G. L. Harrison, formerly of Prairie View College. Brother Harrison comes to us with a well rounded progressive program that bids fair to keep Langston

S P H I N X

February, 1940

in its traditional place in the solar system. In this connection also, mention must be made of the great work done by Brother Jimmie Taylor in his position as Special Adjustor working with Acting President B. F. Lee during the hectic days of our school's transition. It is a fitting reward for his services that Brother Taylor has been appointed Business Manager and will be able to help bring to pass some of the many fine things he desires for his Alma Mater. In the realm of student activities, it should be stated that by the time this publication is released from the press the much publicized and expected play "Lena Rivers" will be given by the Langston Varsity players. Starring in this production and assistant director will be brother Wendell Gray, ably assisted by the old show stealer, par excellence Brother Richard Jones and the apple of the theatrical eye, matinee idol, Brother Faythe McGinnis. Out of six students selected from Langston to be in "Who's Who Among Students in American Colleges and Universities," two were from the ranks of Alpha—Brother Coy W. Franklin who in addition to being retiring President of Beta Kappa, is President of our Student Council and one of the most outstanding authorities on Student Government throughout the entire southwest. And yours truly, Bill Hale, for small services rendered in the field of religious activities having been a member of the 1940 N. I. C. C. which convened in New York and was elected Vice Chairman of the National Council of Student Christian Associations of the Y. M. C. A. Suffice it to say that Brothers O. H. Ellis and Leo Woody are still carrying on in a masterful fashion in the Biology laboratory as special assistants to Brother G. C. Hamilton, who has been extremely instrumental in developing in them qualities which are rare and enviable. 'Tis said that these men are the best assistants the department has ever seen. Perhaps there are some among you brothers out there in the invisible empire who have heard that Langston had a fair team again this year. Not as good as it might have been, we grant, but nonetheless good enough to be the National Champions. Well, one of the men especially responsible and a man who has played his last for the old school is none other than All American Brother Frank Swain. A toast. My only regret is that each of you don't know Brother Swain personally, because take it from one who has known him since we were both in the safety pin era, he is everything that an Alpha man should be: a scholar, suave, considerate, self-reliant and every inch a gentleman. Other Bothers who were members of our Championship team and acquitted themselves nobly are Grant Franklin, Faythe McGinnis, Jewel Maxie and that greatest of all quarter-backs, the scourge of the Southwest, Roland Kerry who, through his splendid leadership while marshalling his forces, his unerring kick, and his bullet-like pass, did much to give Langston that edge necessary to snatch victory from potential defeat. It but remains now to tell you that with the installation of our new officers by Regional Director, Brother K. L. Jones, Beta Kappa, proud of her sons, proud of her heritage and proud of her future, looks on to the dawn of even greater exploits because of the indomitable spirit of Alpha. Our new officers are: President—Wenell Gray. Vice President — Mazola Crossley, Secretary—Marhhall Love. Treasurer — Grant Franklin. Historian — Jewell Maxie. Sincerely, BILL HALE.


THE

February,, 1940

Alpha Rho Lambda

Chapter

COLUMBUS, OHIO Greeting's Brothers in Alpha Phi Alpha: Yes brothers, believe it or not, the Alphas in Columbus have a house. This is the beginning of the realization of a 20-year dream, a dream held by many who have come and gone. I remember very distinctly the evening that Brother Walter Cardozo cams down to chapter meeting with an excellent report on Housing. He outlined just the steps necessary to obtain, a house. At one time the undergraduate chapter had a House Fund bank account into which lO'v of all receipts were to be deposited. ' I say the beginning of the realization of a 20-year dream because the house, located at Hamilton & Spring Sts., has only been taken for a short time lease. If this proved successful, steps are to be taken for permanent quarters. While the credit for obtaining the house cannot go to any one person, I cannot pass without mentioning Dr. J. J. Carter and Attorney Edward Cox along with the twenty years of 'talking. I don't recall one meeting when Dr. Carter has not said something about a house for Alpha Phi Alpha. However the credit for making the first steps toward obtaining the present house goes to Ed. Cox. It would be impossible to close without mentioning the inauguration banquet held Saturday, January 33th at the Belmont Club. Twenty-nine brothers were present to hear president Brother Dr. J. J. Carter outline his plans for Alpha Rho Lambda, after he and the remainder of the officers had been installed by Brother Chas. Warfield, who, in doing so, praised Brother Lucien Wright, the retiring president. Brother Carter closed his address by naming the following committee chairmen: Social, Attorney Lawrence Curtis; Activities, Oscar Woolfolk; Housing, Ed Cox; Budget, Harry Leubers; Forum, Louis Scbuster; Reclamation, Maceo Hill. And now for the Columbus Community Forum. It is going great under the leadership of General Chairman Louis Schuster and Master of ceremonies F. Collins Shearer. (Some of you might have known the latter by Frank C. Shearer). Despite the fact that the December meeting was the day before Xmas, a large crowd came out to hear Mrs. Levi J. Levenger discuss "Jews and Negroes, Two Minorities." Notice to all chapters accustomed to winning trophies. We are going to need some trophies for our house. Fraternally yours, BARBEE WM. DURHAM. o

â&#x20AC;˘

Nu Chapter LINCOLN UNIVERSITY, PENNSYLVANIA Salutations Brothers: Since greeting of fellowship and brotherhood last wafted down from Nu, ten loyal souls have encased themselves into the sacred arms of Alpha Phi Alpha. The neophytes who treaded the scorching sands were Carl Alford, Alvin Barefield, George Blackwell, Norris Dodson, Frank Doggett, John Doggett, Glen Fowlkes, Grant Schockley, Thomas Taylor, and Harold Wood. The election of chapter officers for the forthcoming year were as follows: Roy Nichols, president; Grant Schockley, vice-president; William Land, recording secretary; Jesse Gloster, corresponding secretary; Peter J. Smith, treasurer; James Baker, assistant treasurer;

PagŠ 39

SPHINX

John Doggett, parliamentarian; Conrad Smith, chaplain; George Blackwell, sergeant-at-arms, and Glen Fowlkes, associate editor to the Sphinx. Chapter plans include cooperation in the formation of a Pan-Hellenic Council at Lincoln. The sponsoring of an inter-fraternal banquet is also one of the many projects contemplated. In the field of sports, Brothers Baker, Brown, and Lee were strong factors in the Lincoln Football team. Brother Baker was hailed as the greatest passer in Negro colleges and Brother Lee made the second team of the Negro All-America. We again send greetings from Nu and remain Fraternally yours, GLE;N FOWLKES. o

Beta Sigma Chapter SOUTHERN UNIVERSITY Greetings Brothers: After a stormy and turbulent year, though successful and enjoyable, Beta Sigma embarks upon this period of the new year with an effective strength of power both physical and mental. Althoug-h confronted with a semi-mass exodus of brothers from school during thirty-nine, Beta Sigma emerges from this catastrophe with new attitudes toward life and a new technique of dealing with it. Among the brothers who continue to work distinctly in the tradition of the past are Brother Emmett Bashful, President of Beta Sigma, Vice-President of the Senior Class, and honor Southern's Basketball team, whose outstanding court performance recently enabled Southern University to defeat La. Normal in two games 43-38 and 47-27. E. J. Harris, honor student and assistant student librarian, and Charles Harrington, Business Administration major who anticipates the day when he becomes a Certified Public Accountant. At present the Brothers are looking forward to a visit by General Secretary Joseph H. B. Evans in February. The present officers of Beta Sigma Chapter are as follows: Emmett Bashful, president; Charles Harrington, secretary; Ulysses Jones, Dean of Pledges and vice-president; E. J. Harris, treasurer; Ulis Shelton, business manager; Garland B. Hailey, reporter and corresponding secretary. o

Alpha Sigma Lambda Chapter DALLAS, TEXAS The new officers for Alpha Sigma Lambda are as follows: H. I. Holland, president; D. N. Howell, secretary; S. W. Hudson, assistant secretary and editor to the Sphinx; R A. Lay, treasurer; Rev. Charles Warren, chaplain; J. L. Patton, Jr., vice-president and M. B. Slaughter, sergeant-at-arms. Under this group of new officers the chapter has progressed in the same fine way of the past. The chapter and the Fraternity were honored by the appointment of Brother A. Maceo Smith as a coordinator between the Federal Housing Authority and the Negro Race. He will cover the southwest area consisting of New Mexico, Oklahoma, Texas and Louisiana. As an


THE

Pcrge 40

ovation for his accomplishment he was featured at a testimonial dinner in which the chapter participated along with various civic organizations. Alpha Sigma Lambda is also pioneering in the development of inter-fraternal Basketball. Yours truly, S. W. HUDSON, JR. Editor to the Sphinx. o

Nu Lambda

Chapter

VIRGINIA STATE COLLEGE ETTRICK, VIRGINIA To the Brothers here and overseas, Greetings: At the last two General Conventions where formulation of policies on issues of the day have been crystallizing, one of the greatest functions of the Fraternity in and to the lives of its members was strongly emphasized. That function was this, that while it would be impolitic for the Fraternity as an organization to become the special pleader of any cause or identify its great name with any particular existing organization or movement, its service to the brothers and to society at large would be to provide a fellowship of men with common ideals (servants of all) that would serve to inspire brothers to leadership in their local communities. That function and that purpose seems to account, at least, in part for the activities of the brothers since our last report. In November Brother John M. Gandy, president of the college, and J. L. Lockett, Director of the Division of Agriculture, attended the Association of Presidents of Negro Land Grant Colleges at Howard University. Brother Gandy was elected treasurer and Brother Lockett served as a member of the research committee. At the conference on Virginia Population Trends held in Roanoke, Virginia last fall Brother Gandy, as chairman of the committee on special Negro Problems, made a very fine report, and Brother H. W. Roberts, head of the Department of Sociology, worked with the committee on Tenancy and Farm Labor. On December 7, Brother Gandy delivered an address in Memphis, Tennessee at the meeting of the competitors from Arkansas, Mississippi, and Tennessee in a contest on various forms of farm life. He also attended the meeting of the National Council of the Y. M. C. A. in Detroit, Michigan. And on January 12, he attended a Seminar on the Negro Work of the American Missionary Association in New York. Brothers J. H. Johnston, dean of the College and P. C. Johnson, Head of the Department of Education, attended the meeting of the Southern Association of Negro Colleges and Secondary Schools which met in Durham, North Carolina, December 7-8. Brother Johnston is a member of the executive committee. During1 the Christmas holidayfe, Brother Roberts, attended the thirty-fourth annual meeting of the American Sociological Society in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. At the conference of Financial Officers of Colleges for Negroes October 23-28, held at Atlanta University, under the auspices of the General Education Board, Bro. L. H. Foster, treasurer-business manager of the college and J. B. Cephas, Bookkeeper, were present. Brother Foster, the prince of the business manager clan, was

SPHINX

February, 1940

secretary of the conference directed by Mr. Trevor Arnett, a former president of the General Education Board, and prepared the excellent summary of the conference which centered around the objective of making the business office a more efficient and effective agency in the promotion of the educational purpose and function of the College. Oh, yes! our poet—you know him, Brother J. F . Ragland, the analytical chemist, at Lawrenceville. You know by now that he contributes his poems regularly to the local paper (white). Well, on November 3, he really crashed the color line and made history; for the Chamber of Commerce requested him to issue a call in poetry for the celebration of "Tobacco Day" in Lawrenceville, November 8. His masterpiece of twelve verses was printed in the center of the first page of the Brunswick Times-Gazette, along with the mayor's proclamation designating this day for the gala affair. There is not an event of significance in Lawrenceville—from "Peanut Week" to a Congressman's visit—that passes without being beautifully versified by our poet. And so we march on in the Spirit of Alpha. Fraternally, HARRY W. ROBERTS. o

Beta

Xi

Chapter

LEMOYNE COLLEGE Brothers in Alpha Phi Alpha: Beta Xi Chapter again sends greetings from the depth of our hearts to brothers everywhere and wish all chapters continued success in their undertakings during the coming season. Although our chapter roster is unusually small this year, we have ibeen able to carry on the aims and] ideals of our beloved fraternity and through conscientious effort and cooperation of this small group, we have been successful in achieving some noteworthy results which all the more tend to prove that it is not in numbers, but the quality that counts. The rank of our chapter roster has been further depleted due to the illness of our president, Brother Fred Lyle, who was forced out of school and who at this writing is confined to a hospital bed. Recently our pledge club has been enlarged with the addition of seven new members. They are Sphinxmen James Brandon, William Hall, Nolon Brown, Walter Meachum, James Boone, Willie Smith, Chas. Bodye, all of whom are outstanding athletes and good scholars and who possess characteristics symbolic of true Sphinx men and future Alpha men. At present the chapter is making plans for an extensive educational campaign in the form of our annual "Go To High School, Go To College Campaign." Plans are to contact a larger number of schools in this area than ever before. And so with our faithful few we are looking forward to the future with optimism and feel that our achievements during the season will make this a banner year for our chapter. With this bit of news and a most hearty wish for continued success of all Brothers in Alphadom, we sign off until another opportunity is granted to tell of the progressive activities of Beta Xi. Fraternally yours, MILTON BARBOUR, Associate Editor.


February, 1940

Omicron

THE

Lambda

BIRMINGHAM, ALABAMA Greetings, Brothers and Friends of Alphadom: The new year finds brothers of Omicron Lambda still carrying on the program of Alpha Phi Alpha. The chapter made tremendous strides of success under the incumbent administration of 1939 headed by our own Brother Attorney A. D. Shores. On Sunday, January 7, the brothers met at the home of Brother W. J. Dowdell in Bessemer for the first meeting of the year. After a brief summation of the business of the old year, the new officers were installed for the ensuing year, Brother Day, formerly of Eta Chapter officiating. The new officers are as follows: Brothers Peter A. Hall, president; Saunders, vice president; Chas. 0. Webb, secretary; Herbert Pegues, corresponding secretary; Chas. J. Greene, treasurer; Lincoln Jackson, sergeant-at-arms; Rev. A. L. Cash, chaplain. On returning as president, Brother Attorney Shores spoke confidently of the chapter's continued progress and success under the new administration, and as a true Alpha brother, promised his fullest cooperation and support to the chapter in realizing its program. Brother Hall, on assuming the gavel as the new president spoke a word of commendation for the wonderful leadership which Brother Attorney Shores had given Omicron Lambda and to the community at large. Brother President Hall stated that the reclamation program for defunct brothers would continue until all these brothers had returned to the fold. At this point the scene of the meeting shifted to the cozy dining room of Brother Dowdell's lovely home—and was he a real host! Brothers, you should have been there! All the brothers present had a grand time. The first meeting under the new administration was held Saturday night January 20, at the Owl's Club with a good old time smoker. Financial or non-financial, all Alpha men in and around Birmingham were invited. Many of the old and new brothers attended. Much was said about returning to the folds of Alphadom. Every brother was happy and gay, old songs were sung—remember those old sweetheart songs that are still sung on many college campuses? Brothers, the true Alpha spirit (or should I say S P I R I T S) was prevalent. In the realm of sports Omicron Lambda plans big things this year in basketball. Coach Herbert "Dizzy" Pigrom and his assistant "Yak" Collins are busy whipping the team in shape. Brothers if you want to see some nifty basketball playing, drop down or come over to the "Ham" town. The team may miss brother "Dizzy" Pigrom in that he has gone into the bakery and pastry business in Bessemer. Success to him in realizing one of his desires. The chapter has accepted an invitation from the local chapter of the Delta Sigma Theta Sorority to appear on its annual Jabberwock program in March. Plans are now underway to capture the first prize. Do you recall our motto, brothers? In so far as lending a hand to other vital forces in making our city a. better place in which to live, Omicron Lambda is an ardent supporter of the Pan-Hellenic Council. The Council held its last meeting Sunday January 21

SPHINX

Page 41

at the Smith & Gaston Chapel. Omicron Lambda was in charge of the program. The theme was "Black Economy." Four leading figures from the community at large were invited to lead the discussion which ended in an open forum. The program was designed to stimulate our people to thinking of the possibilities for bettering our economic standards that could become realities should we as a racial minority learn and develop the a r t of cooperation! Here is wishing ye all a year of success. Fraternally yours, HERBERT PEGUES, Corresponding secretary, 704—3rd Ave. N., Birmingham, o

Xi

Chapter

WILBERFORCE UNIVERSITY Brothers in Alpha: Xi Chapter has opened 1940 with a bang and is all set to do greater things than ever done last year. We feel wonderfully proud of ourselves because of the achievement we have made thus far in the new year and the welcoming of eleven new brothers into our chapter here. They are namely: Brothers Benson, Lett, Robinson, De Costa, Kelley, Harris, Alexander, Carr, Bradley, Corbin, and Nuddleton. Two of the neophyte brothers are advanced officers in the R. O. T. C. here at Wilberi'orce, namely Brothers Benson and Lett. Xi is quite a remarkable chapter for we have Brothers who are cooks, electricians, musicians, and many other tradesmen and everyone excels in something. We are happy to report that of the eight (8) possible assistantships offered to students here, that there are four (4) post held by Xi men namely: Brother McKee Chemistry; Brother Harris, Chemistry; Brother Lsace, Biology and Brother Nelson, Biology. Our retiring president, Brother John Letts has been selected as Major of the R. O. T. C. Unit, and we must say that he has done a wonderful job at the helm of dear Xi during the last year and know that he will establish a record for himself upon the scrolls in the hall of Military fame. Last month we held our annual Sweethearts Banquet which was attended by all good brothers and their guests and the Sphinx club with their guests. The banquet was a very beautiful event with soft music, candle light, smoothly gowned women and a menu that still recalls a very savory memory in our minds. Brother McKee was Master of Ceremonies and because of his frankness and naiveness, kept the guests in dignified stitches all evening. Our election of officers was carried out in regular Alpha style and we are announcing Brother George Walker as president; Brother William Goings, as president, ex-officio of the Sphinx Club; Brother Warren Walker as secretary; Brother Brown as treasurer; Brother G Ross as Sergeant-at-arms; Brother C. Hendon as chaplain; Brother G. Johnson as Historian; and Brother M. Nelson as Editor to the Sphinx. In conclusion, we the brothers of Xi send best wishes to all of Alphadom. Yours Fraternally, MELVIN M. NELSON, Editor to Sphinx.


THE

Page 42

TRIBUTE

TO

BROTHER DR. KELLY MILLER

Kelly Miller is dead. A romatic figure is still. A powerful pen is dry. Coming into young manhood at the closing days of the Reconstruction, Kelly Miller's life spans the Negro's struggle for integration into the American ideal. An uncompromising warrior against the barrier of race he was the astute social philosopher who found the good in every disadvantage. Countless men and women gained their inspiration from Kelly Miller. When the first convention of Alpha Phi Alpha assembled at Howard University in December, 1908, Kelly Miller was a national figure. He was a member of Beta Chapter. His was the only address of an older man to the young delegates. Throughout the convention Kelly Miller came repeatedly to its meetings from his office in the old Main Building. His wit smoothed out many of the

Brilliant

idealistic entanglements His wisdom was sealed General Organization Fraternity. HENRY ARTHUR

So wrote John Milton on the death of his friend. Likewise Beta Rho Lambda mourns the passing of one of its brothers and founders. Death came (as it must to all men) to brother James Waring Booker on the first day of January 1940, after a brief illness of two days. Brother Booker, son of Mrs. and Brother S. S. Booker, former National President, was twenty-two years old. He graduated with an excellent scholastic record from Virginia Union with the class of 1939. While a student there he took an important part in the extra-curricular activities, being president of his class, president of Gam-

of the youthful architects. in the cornerstane of the of Alpha Phi Alpha CALLIS, Founder.

Message Of

Sympathy

TO MRS. KELLY MILLER

Mrs. Kelly Miller and Family, 2225 Fourth Street, N. W., Washington, D. C. The Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity mourns with you in the loss of Kelly Miller. His life is historically interwoven with the struggle of the Negro for justice and freedom in America. Kelly Miller's wit and counsel aided in founding Alpha Phi Alpha as a national fraternity at its first convention at Howard University in 1908. CHARLES H. WESLEY, General President HENRY ARTHUR CALLIS, Founder.

Alpha Career Of Brother

"Yet cnce more, O ye laurels, and once more ye myrtles Brown, with ivy never sere, I come to pluck your berries Harsh and crude; And with forced finders rude, Shatter your leaves before the mellowing year. Bitter constraint, and sad occasion dear, Compels me to disturb your season due: For Lycidas is dead, dead ere his prime, young Lycidas, and both not left his peer: Who would not sing for Lycidas? He knew himself To ring, and build the lofty rhyme."

February, 1940

SPHINX

James Booker Cut

Short

ma Chapter, member of the University's debating team, student manager of the Choral Club, member of the Student's Governing Board, and various other activities which endeared him to the student body as well as the faculty of this institution. Brother L. W. Davis of the faculty came to pay the respects of Gamma, Virginia Union and his personal sympathy. Although the founding of a chapter in Youngstown had been discussed for years it was through the persistence, perseverance, enthusiasm and genuine Alpha spirit of Brother Booker that Beta Rho Lambda exists. As we said in the memorial tribute given by Brother Andrew Johnson; To his fraternity he rendered a full measure of support, no task was too burdensome, no assignment too trivial, no distance too great for him to travel, if the, doing and going might prove beneficial to the organization and its members. Truly this was the attitude taken by Brother Jas. Booker toward his beloved Alpha. With the passing of Brother Booksr we brothers of Beta Rho Lambda feel that one of hi? greatest ambitions was to make this chapter one of the most outstanding chapters in Alpha Phi Alpha. As 3 living memorial to him we brothers of Beta Rho Lambda pledge ourselves to carry out his ambition.


February, 1940

THE

AUDIT The President's

SPHINX

OF TREASURERS Alpha Phi Alpha

Letter

To the Chapters and Brothers in Alpha Phi Alpha. I am submitting herewith for your information an audit of the books of the former Treasurer, Brother Percival R. Piper, who served as treasurer during the interim from August 8, 1939, when his books were closed, to October 24, 1939, when he turned over his records to the present Treasurer, Brother Farrow R. Allen. These records were audited by Brother Gustav Auzenne, Assistant Treasurer at Howard University. Your serious attention and reflection are requested upon this audit. Since the records of the General Secretary are mentioned in this audit, he will make comment upon the same and his comments are included with this report. Fraternally yours, CHARLES H. WESLEY, General President. â&#x20AC;&#x201D; o January 15, 1940. Dr. Chas. H. Wesley, General President, Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity. My dear Brother Wesley: I have gone over the audit report of the "examination of the records of the General Treasurer" for the period August 8, 1939 to October 24, 1939, as submitted to you by Brother Gustav Auzenne, Jr. I have noted that the balance of $2.22 as turned over to the new Treasurer by Brother Piper is in agreement with the schedules of receipts and disbursements for that period and have read the statement by the Auditor "that all transactions were in regular order with a few minor exceptions." I should have no further comment to make on this report even though its cost on the basis of months covered is four times that of the last audit as made by Certified Public Accountants, were it not for the fact that much of the report is devoted to the General Secretary and his records, and this is true despite the inclusion of a statement that "the records of the General Secretary were not available for this audit." Brother Auzenne's choice of words here is both unfortunate and unfair. The inference is that he could not obtain these records, when as a matter of fact, he at no time asked for them. He had in his possession duplicates of all remittance reports and the original warrants for all expenditures. The records of the General Secretary were available if he had wanted them. All unpaid warrants listed have been paid with the exception of the fellowship for Brother Fadipe on which payment has been purposely withheld. Every warrant issued by this office contains a memorandum showing the purpose of the expenditure which statement is in accord with expenditures allowed as per the report of the Budget Committee and passed upon by the General Convention. Every warrant issued bears the signature of the General Secretary and is transmitted to the General President who signs and sends it on to the General Treasurer for payment. The fact that the signature is mimeographed with the form does not detract from its validity any more than does the printed signatures of the Registrar of the Treasury or the Treasurer of the United States on our currency. No question on this score has ever arisen in the history of the Fraternity and the General Secretary has never attempted to evade responsibility for that

Page 43

RECORDS

signature. The statement that the securities were placed in a safe deposit box "under the direct control of the General Treasurer" is untrue. The General President at all times had a key which must be used in conjunction with the key held by the General Treasurer, to obtain access to the safe deposit box. The action of the Convention designating U. S. Government Bonds as a form of investment was definite and there was no indication that switching of securities was desired. One must take into consideration the cost of fees and commissions of a Trust Company if any monetary gain is expected. Based upon his incorrect premise that the functions of the Treasurer should not be "secondary", Brother Auzenne would have the chapters send money direct to the Treasurer and wait for pass cards, etc., until the Treasurer had certified the list to the General Secretary. This would have to be done almost daily and the work devolving upon both Secretary and Treasurer would be greatly increased. We have not been successful in getting chapters to send one copy of the remittance report direct to the Treasurer and even here he must wait for the report from the Secretary before he can know that the distribution has been made properly. How can he check and approve the original report sheet if he doesn't have the individual records of brothers? A reading of Art. VII, Sec. 9, C & D, of the Constitution will indicate the procedure as laid down by our basic law. Here it states that the General Secretary "shall receive and transmit immediately upon receipt all moneys and funds to the General Treasurer" Brother Auzenne is well acquainted with the remittance sheet forms as he has handled them many times before. He should know that the General Secretary signs the second sheet which is returned to the chapter that sent the money in. The General Treasurer signs the third copy to certify that he has received the money from the General Secretary and retains a fourth copy for his records. I cannot see where the signature of the General Secretary, except as a receipt to the chapter would avail anything. You probably know that in addition to this receipting procedure, we now send from this office a separate blanket receipt, serially numbered, and tak-n from a, bound receipt book made up especially for this purpose. After the General Treasurer and I had closed our books prior to the August Convention, I kept all remittance reports, with checks, money orders, etc., attached, and carried them to the Convention to be used in a supplementary report by the Auditors if asked for. They were not used and I brought them back to be transmitted to the new Treasurer. Here ensued a delay caused by the fact that the new treasurer had to go away for a much needed rest and upon his return had to go through the routine procedure of qualifying for his bond. I brought this matter to your attention and you ruled that Bro. Piper would continue to act as Treasurer until his successor had duly qualified. This accounts for the delay in transmittal and I trust will clear up any implication that the delay was purposeful. Will you be good enough to authorize the publication of this letter along with the report? Fraternally yours, JOS. H. B. EVANS, General Secretary.


Page 44

THE

December 1, 1939. Dr. Charles H. Wesley, President, Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity, Inc., Washington, D. C. Dear Dr. Wesley: In accordance with your instructions I have made an examination of the records of the General Treasurer of the Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity Incorporated as at October 24, 1939 and the transactions involving receipts and disbursements, deposits and cancelled checks for the period August 8, 1939 to October 24, 1939. In connection therewith I examined or tested bookkeeping records of the General Treasurer and other supporting evidence and also made a general review of the accounting methods and practices. No attempt was made to secure confirmation from any of the depositories or verify the securities held by the fraternity. Also in connection with the cash receipts for the period under review no attempt was made to compare the cash receipts as shown by the records of the General Treasurer with the cash receipts as recorded by the General Secretary in as much as the records of the General Secretary were not available for this audit. I submit herewith the following exhibits and schedules setting forth the results of my examination: Exhibit A—Statement of Cash Account. Exhibit B—Statement of Cash Receipts. Exhibit C—Statement of Cash Disbursements. Exhibit D—Statement of Unpaid Warrants. Schedule B—1 Analysis of Cash Receipts. Schedule C—1 Analysis of Cash Disbursements. The following detailed comments with respect to my examination are submitted for your consideration: CASH RECEIPTS: The cash receipts were analyzed as per Schedule B—1 and reconciled with the books and bank balances. Exhibit B—Statement of Cash Receipts and Exhibit A—Statement of Cash Account present a summary of the cash transactions for the period August 8, 1939 to October 24, 1939 resulting in a net cash balance of $2.22. CASH DISBURSEMENTS: An analysis of cash disbursements, Schedule C—1, revealed that all transactions were in regular order with a few minor exceptions. There is no warrant to support the issuance of check Number 808 dated August 12, 1939 for $40.00 payable to George B. Kelly. Subsequently this sum was refunded to the fraternity and deposited September 19, 1939. The missing checks include numbers 812, 817 and 843 for the period of this examination. These checks should be secured and turned over to the present Treasurer of the fraternity and made available for the next audit. UNPAID WARRANTS: This amount represents the unpaid warrants as of October 24, 1939. It is recommended that these obligations be liquidated as soon as funds are available. It could not be ascertained whether there are additional obligations of the fraternity for which warrants have not been issued. In this connection it is suggested that more detail information be indicated on the warrant before issued in order that the purposes may be fully understood. SIGNATURES ON WARRANTS: Under the present practice warrants are prepared for the signatures of the General President and the General Secretary as authority for the issuance of checks. It is to be noted that warrant numbers 39—57 bear ink signature of the General President but only mimeograph signature in the case of the General Secretary. If the signatures are authoritative in

S P H IN X

February, 1940"

connection with the issuance of warrants on which checks are to be drawn, both signatures should be written in ink. BUDGET STATEMENT: The present practice is to approve and set-up the budget for a period of two, years, but there have been varying .dates with' respect to the close of the fiscal year. It has not been possible to present a statement in connection with this audit, because of the changing policies of fiscal year ending. It would be highly desirable to set the fiscal year December 1 to November 30.

: RECOMMENDATIONS SECURITIES: As shown by the audit report* for the period ending August 7, 1939 the value of securities, held by the fraternity amounted to $10,125.00;: No attempt- was made to verify security holdings as at Oct6ber 24, 1939. The General President informed me :that it has been. the practice for the General Treasurer of'.the fraternity to be custodian of the securities. Further.Jbhepractice has been to place the securities in a safe deposit "b'tfx under the direct control of the General Treasurer. It is recommended that this practice be discontinued, and that the securities be deposited with -'a responsible Trust Company preferably in New York City us trustees for the fraternity, and to avail itself of the -services. that the trustees are able to offer in the field of investment. The Trust Company undertakes to maintain the principal of the fund in tact, and to secure the highest possible yield for the investor. The trustees submit periodic, reports on the conditions of the security market, offering suggestions fcr sales or purchases depending on the'trend of the security market. It is profitable on frequent occasions to sell a particular holding before maturity and to purchase in other issues yielding a larger income. The • changing of general officers in the fraternity will not alter the relationship cf the trustees and the fraternity as it is under the present practice of transferring securities from one officer to another. RECORD FOR THE TREASURER: It is suggested that proper and adequate records be set up for the General Treasurer of the fraternity, principally a bound columnar cash book sufficient in size to give proper description and classification of the funds received and disbursed1 by the ; fraternity. • REMITTANCE OF FUNDS: Fcr a considerable-number'' of years the chapters have been remitting -funds - to the General Secretary in payment for grand tax, initiation fees, emblems and for other purpose?, and then tn'e'funds are remitted from the General Secretary to the General Treasurer. It is to be observed that the -Treasurer is the duly elected custodian of the funds of the fraternity and is held strictly responsible for all moneys'of theSfraternity. Under the present practice the Treasurer is not performing the duties assigned to him, in reality his functions ar« secondary. As is indicated on Schedule B—1 fu-nds'Were mailed by the chapters to the General Secretary from August 2, 1939 to September 27, 1939 and all of the funds were deposited by the Treasurer on October 12, 1939. Actually some of the funds were in transit for a period of over two months. In this connection none of the "Remittance Funds Sheet" accompanying the funds were sijc^ed by the General Secretary. It is recommended that this practice be discontinued and that the individual chapters mail the funds direct to the Treasurer of the fraternity with the necessary detailed information. The General Treasurer would then be the responsible officer to certify to the General Secretary


February, 1940

TH E

members entitled to the official pass card. The plan suggested would make possible two important safeguards; first, the funds would reach the depository within the shortest possible time and second, the original report sheet would be checked and approved by the officer directly responsible for the funds of the fraternity. „ Faithfully yours, GUSTAV AUZENNE, JR.

SPHINX

Page 45 Exhibit—C

ALPHA PHI ALPHA FRATERNITY STATEMENT OF CASH DISBURSEMENTS For the Period August 8, 1939 to October 24, 1939 General Officers' Budgets: First Vice President $ 125.00 General Secretary 548.70 General Treasurer 75.00 $ 748.70 Convention Expense: Travel General

EXHIBIT—A ALPHA PHI ALPHA FRATERNITY STATEMENT OF CASH ACCOUNT For the Period August 8, 1939 to October 24, 1939 Balance on hand, August 8, 1939, per report of Lucas and Tucker, Auditors $6,069.81 Less: Adjustment on voucher of August 8, 1939 .05 $6,069.76 Add: Receipts for the period August 8, 1939 to October 24, 1939, per remittance reports No. 1-59 (Exhibit B)

772.09 $6,841.85

Deduct: Disbursements for the period August 8, 1939 to October 24, 1939, per warrants No. 39-54 (Exhibit C)

Editor of Sphinx Executive Council Alpha Foundation: General Expense Fellowships Scholarships

$1,455.35 395.95 1,851.30 560.00 60.00 $

96.25 850.00 275.00

1,221.25

Contributions and Donations: National Negro Congress Pan Hellenic Conference (expenses of delegate) Committee on Public Policy Payments on pins—L. G. Balfour Co Payment on purchase of addressograph machine Auditing Expense Bank service charges Loan to Tau Chapter for use in purchase of house Advance to George Kelly

50.00 50.00 50.00 100.00 30.00 75.00 3.33 2,000.00 40.OO

6,839.63 $6,839.63 $

.i . Cash Balance, October 24, 1939

2.22

Exhibit—D ALPHA PHI ALPHA FRATERNITY STATEMENT OF UNPAID WARRANTS

For the Period August 8, 1939 to October 24, 1939 Grand Tax $500.15 Initiation Fees 17.50 Deposits on Pins 89.60 Reinstatement Fees 65.45 Special Fees 30.15 Histories 1 10.75 Miscellaneous: Refund of advance to George Kelly $40.00 Refund of overpayment of budget of First Vice President 99 Excess payment by Alpha Iota Chapter 7.50 Advance payment by Upsilon Lambda Chapter 10.00 58.49

At October 24, 1939 Warrant Number Payable to Explanation Amount 39 N. A. Fadipe—Fellowship payment not made because of European war, per request of R. W. Logan $400.00 53 Lewis O. Swingler—Balance due on first installment for purchase of addressograph machine 6.00 54 L. G. Balfour Co.—Balance due on bill for pins, to September 13, 1939 67.82 55 Lawrence T. Young—Balance due on account of services as convention secretary 66.35 56 Coins Printing Co.—Payment on account, for General Organization stationery 50.00 57 B. V. Lawson, Jr.—Budget, office of General Counsel 25.00

$772.09

$615.17

Exhibit—B

ALPHA PHI ALPHA FRATERNITY STATEMENT OF CASH RECEIPTS


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February, 1940

THE

SPHINX

Page 47

ALPHA PHI ALPHA FRATERNITY ANALYSIS OF CASH DISBURSEMENTS For the Period August 8, 1939 to October 24, 1939

Paid to Rayford W. Logan William C. Pyant Charles H. Wesley Joseph H. B. Evans Rayford W. Logan Charles W. Greene Sidney A. Jones, Jr. Farrow R. Allen Bert A. McDonald (See check No. 827) Percival R. Piper Lewis O. Swingler (See check No. 826) Ferdinand L. Rousseve Christopher M. Roulhac (See check No. 825) Walter S. Scott, Jr. (See check No. 824) George B. Kelly Theodore M. Berry Henry N. Dickason (See check No. 823) Alpha Gamma Lambda and Eta Chapters NOT ISSUED Howard H. Long Joseph H. B. Evans P. R. Piper (See No. 839) Henry A. Callis NOT ISSUED T. M. Perry Robert F. Bundy, Jr. (See No. 832) Bert A. McDonald Sidney R. Redmond Belford V. Lawson Henry L. Dickason (See check No. 810) Walter S. Scott (See check No. 807) C. M. Roulhac, Jr. (See check No. 806) Lewis O. Swingler (See check No. 804) Bert A. McDonald (See check No. 802) M. S. Davage Cathryne W. Ross Lucas and Tucker Alpha Gamma Lambda and Eta Chapters Robert F. Bundy (See check No. 819) Marshall Sheppard C. C. Jackson Lawrence T. Young Joseph H. B. Evans

Warrant Number 39 47 47 47 47 47 47 47

Schedule Câ&#x20AC;&#x201D;1 Fellowships and Convention Expense Scholarships Travel Other Miscellaneous $500.00 $ $ $ (Delegate to 50.00 (Pan Hellenic 45.80 (Conference 45.80 45.80 93.75 97.65 30.00

Date 8-12-39 8-12-39 8-12-39 8-12-39 8-1239 8-12-39 8-12-39 8-12-39

Check Number 794 795 796 797 798 799 800 801

8-12-39 8-12-39

802 803

47 47

180.90 84.75

180.90 84.75

8-12-39 8-12-39

804 805

47 47

85.00 121.30

85.00 121.30

8-12-39

806

47

85.00

85.00

8-12 39 8-12-39 8-12-39

807 808 ' 809

47

75.00

47

75.00 40.00 54.85

8-12 39

810

47

45.00

45.00

8-16-39

40

100.00

42 43 47 47

50.00 200.00 25.00 45.80

45.80

8-30-39

811 812 813 814 815 816 817 818

47

30.00

30.00

8-29-39 8-18-39 8-30-39 8-30-39

819 820 821 822

44 47 47 48

20.00 125.00 83.50 45.35

8-30-39

823

47

31.10

31.10

8-30-39

824

47

16.65

16.65

8-30-39

825

47

27.80

27.80

8-30-39

826

47

27.80

27.80

8-30-39 8-30-39 8-31-39 8-31-39

827 828 829 830

47 47 47 47

53.80 60.60 10.00 75.00

53.80

8-31-39

831

47

135.00

8-31-39 8-31-39 8-31-39 8-31-39 8-31-39

832 833 834 835 836

45 47 47 47 47

330.00 10.00 10.00 25.00 58.70

8-16-39 8-16-39 8-17-39 8-24-39

Amount $500.00 50.00 45.80 45.80 45.80 93.75 97.65 30.00

40.00 Advance 54.85

100.00

Printing

50.00 Public Policy 200.00 Gen. Sec'ty. 25.00 Gen. Treas.

20.00

125.00 1st Vice Pres. 83.50 45.35

Housing Com.

60.60 Speaker 10.00 Stenographer 75.00 Audit 135.00

Rent

330.00 10.00 10.00 25.00

Speaker Asst. Sect'y Conv. Sect'y 58.70 Gen. Sect'y


Page 48 Lewis 0. Swingler 8-31-39 Archibald Carey, et. al., trustees 8-31-39 Percival R. Piper (See check No. 815) 9-6-39 Charles H. Wesley 9-6-39 M. G. Ferguson 9-6-39 Joseph H. B. Evans 9-20-30 NOT ISSUED Robert Riley 10-12-39 10-12-39 Robert Harris William Leace 10-12-39 10-12-39 Percy C. Ifill Wiley W. Martin 10-12-39 10-12-39 Carroll M. Leevy National Negro Congress 10-12-39 Rayford W. Logan 10-12-39 Joseph H. B. Evans 10-12-39 Lewis 0. Swingler 10-24-39 L. G. Balfour Co. 10-24-39 Commonwealth Bank— September Commonwealth Bank— October Second National Bank-—September Total (Exhibit C)

T HE

S P H I N X

837

48

100.00

838

41

2,000.00

839 '840 841 842 843 844 845 846 847 848 849 850 851 852 853 854

47 46 47 49

50.00 60.00 48.30 150.00

50 50 50 50 50 50 51 52 52 53 54

F e b r u a r y , 1940 100.00 Sphinx 2,000.00 Loan 50.00 Gen. Treas. 60.00 Exec. Com. 48.30

150.00 Gen. Sect'y Check

50.00 50.00 25.00 25.00 50.00 50.00 50.00 50.00 50.00 50.00 50.00 50.00 50.00 50.00 96.25 96.25 140.00 140.00 490.00 490.00 100.00 100.00 .57) .81) 2.00) 3.38 $6,839.63 $1,125.00 $1,455.35 $395.95 $3,863.33

Grant Ed. Activity Gen. Sect'y Sphinx Pins

Bank service


CHAPTER

ROSTE R - C o n t i n u e d

38.

A L P H A R H O — M o r e h o u s e C o l l e g e , A t l a n t a , G a . ; President, G e o r g e l a y l o r , Secretary, M i l u s J . G r a h a m . M o r e h o u s e C o l l e g e .

39.

A L P H A S I G M A — W i l e y College, Bishop College, Marshall, Texas, P r e s i d e n t , Robert Riley, S e c r e : a r / , J a m e s C. W a l l a c e , J r . . W i l e y C o l l e g e . ALPHA TAU U n i v e r s i t y of A k r o n , A k r o n , O h i o ; P r e s i d e n t . R a - m o d R. B r o w n ; Secretary, H e r b e r t T . B r a c k e n , 3 8 5 W " e i 1 <Ttcn. A L P H A U P S I L O N — C i t y C o l l e gge e D Dct.-o:t. r ecttrroo!, :: ,, M M ecnh l --aatni ;; 1: ' - r . o . ' .. ctro.t. L Norman Tabo 2 0 0 1 C h e - a u - t Street, Secretary. Carlyle J o ' i r . s , n . -.922 Montc'air. A L P H A P H I — C l a k U n v e r s l t y , At'anta, Ca.; President. C'arence J. ^ ; " " ' ' e " . Sec-e:ary, H e n r y H . Caldwell, C ark U n i v e r s i t y . A L P H A C H I — F i s k University, N a s h v i l l e . T e n n . ; P r e s i d e n t , W a l t e r N . B o a g s ; Secretary. Roderick M . P u g h , Fisk University. A L P H A P S I — L i n c o l n U n i v e r s i t y . Jefferson C'ty, M s . o u r i ; P r e s i d e n t , Jamen Lee H u n t ; S2cretary. J a m e s J o n e s , Lincoln U n i v e r s i t y . B E T A A L P H A — M o r g a n C o l l e g e . Baltimore, M d . ; P r e s i d e n t . B r u c e E d e m y ; Secretary. B r o a d u s K. W h i m s . B E T A B E T A — U n i v e r s i t y of N e b r a s k a . C r e i g h t o n University. „ Municipal University. Lincoln, N e b r a s k a . President, M e r l e H e r r i f o r d , 103 5 Ross St., Secretary, Robert A . Rucker, 2 5 1 0 C o r b y St., O m a h a . B E T A G A M M A — V i r g i n i a State College, Ettrick. V a . ; P r e s i d e n t , E l b e r t P o g u e ; Secretary, Sinclair J e t t e r , Va. State C o l l e g e .

40. 41.

42. 43. 44. 45. 46.

47. 48. 49.

N.

B E T A D E L T A — S t a t e College, O r a n g e b u r g . S. C . ; P r e s i d e n t , Laler D e C o s t a ; Secretary. F r a n k H a l l , State C o l l e g e . B E T A E P S I L O N — A g r i c u l t u r a l and Technical College, G-eensbo.o. North C a r o l i n a ; P r e s i d e n t . M e r c e r Z . Ray, S e c r - t a . y , Earl H o l l a n d . A Sc T . College. B E T A Z E T A — S a m u e l H u s t o n College, Austin, Texas; Pres. Jackson D . S m i t h , J r . , S a m u e l H u s t o n C o l l e g e ; Sec. L a V o n E. S m i t h , 1314 B o b H a r r i s o n St. BETA ETA—Southern I l l i n o i s T e a c h e r s C o l l e g e , C i r b o . n d a l e . 111.; P r e s i d e n t . S a m u e l W . D a v i s , 4 0 2 E . O a k Street. Secretary, G a f f n e / T i _ _ < ~ _ i — T i l : :_ T a y l o r , C o l p , Illinois.

CHAPTER

B E T A T H E T A — B l u e f i e l d State T e a c h e r s C o l l e g e , Bluefield, W . Virginia; P r e s i d e n t , T a f t J o h n s o n , Secretary, H a y w a r d A . S i m p s o n , .'.'tite Teachers College. B E T A I O T A — W e s t e r n r t te T e a c h e r s C o l l e g e , Kalamazoo, M i c h i g a n ; Pres. H a c k l e y E W o o d f o r d , 114 N . P a r k S t . ; Sec. J o h n T . T a p l e y , 133 1 W . M i c h . g a n . 54. 55. 56. 57. 58. 59. 60. 61. 62. 63. 64. 65. 66.

B E T A K A P P A — L a n g s t o n University, L a n g s t o n , O k l a h o m a ; P r e s i d e n t , Coy F r a n k l i n ; Secretary, Leo W o o d y , L a n g s t o n , U n i v e r s i t y . B E T A M U — K e n t u c k y Stste Coll g j , F r a n k f o r d , K y . ; P r e s i d e n t , Sheley L v n e m , Secretary N a t h a n i e l L. S h i e l d s . K y . State C o l l e g e . B E T A N U — F l o r i d a A. & M . C o l l e g e , T a l l a h a s s e e , F l o r i d a ; P r e s i d e n t , Reginald H . H u g h e s ; Secretary, J o s e p h N . P a t t e r s o n , Florida T . & M . B E T A X I — L e M o y n e C o l l e g e . M e m p h i s , T e n n . ; P r e s i d e n t , Fred L y l e ; Secretary, Ben J o n e s , L e M o y n e C o l l e g e . B E T A O M I C R O N — T e n n c s ee S:ate C o l l e g e , N a hville T e n n . ; P r e s i d e n t , Bi ly J o n e s ; S e c r e n r y , Ira Evans, T e n n e s s e e State C o l l e g e . B E T A P I — L a n e College, Jackson, T e n n . ; President. Samuel W . Beas. ley, Secretary, H e r m a n Stone, C o r r e s p o n d i n g Secretary, Cecil T . D r a p e r , Lane C o . l e g e . B E T A R H O — S h a w University, Raleigh, N . C ; P r e s i d e n t , C l a u d e R. T r o t t e r ; Secretary, W . C o l e m a n S h a n k s , Shaw U n i v e r s i t y . C E T A S I G M A — S o u t h e r n University. Scotlandville. La.. P r e s i d e n t , E m . m e : : B a s h f u l ; Secretary, C h a r l e s H a r r i n g t o n , S o u t h e r n U n i v e r s i f . B E T A T A U — X a v l e r University, New O r b a n s , La., P r e s i d e . ! , C h a r l e s dc Lay. 1912 Do.-genols St., Secretary, H e n r y S t e p h e n . Xavier University. B E T A U P S I L O N — S t a t e T e a c h ' r s C o l l e g e , M o n t g o m e r y . Ala., P r e s i d e n t Alonzia J o n e s . Secretary. Isaac Points, State T e a c h e r s C o l l e g e . ? , E I A P m — D i l l a r d University, N e w O r l e a n s , La.; P r e s i d e n t , J a m e s L . H a l l ; Secretary. M . C. Rhaney. B E T A C H I — P h i l a n d e r Smith C o l l e g e . Little Rock. A r k a n s a s ; P r e s i d e n t , H i r a m L. l a r . n e r . Secretary. G e o r g e Russell, P h i l a n d e r Smith C o l l e g e . B E T A P S I C H A P T E R — O x f o r d , C a m b r i d g e , L o n d o n Universities, Lond o n E n g l a n d ; P r e s i d e n t , D r C . B . C l a r k e , Belfield H o u s e , New B a r n e t , E n g l a n d ; Secretary, N . A. F a d i p e , 4 3 C a l t h o r p e Street, L o n d o n , E n g l a n d .

ROSTER-Graduate

1 0 1 . A L P H A L A M B D A — L o u i s v i l l e , Kentucky; President, D r . J. H . Walls, 9 3 2 W . W a l n u t St., Secretary, L y m a n T . J o h n s o n . 2 6 2 7 W . M a d i s o n St. 1 0 2 . B E T A L A M B D A — K a n s a s City, M o . , P r e s . , D r . A . C. W i l s o n , 2 2 1 9 T r a c y ; C . S e c , J a m e s A . Jeffress, 2 7 3 2 H i g h l a n d . 1 0 3 . G A M M A L A M B D A — D e t r o i t , Mich., P r e s i d e n t . H e n r y S. D u n b a r , 5 T T C h a n d l e r ; Secretary, G r o v e r D . L a n g e , 6 0 7 A d a m s A v e . , E . 1 0 4 . D E L T A L A M B D A — B a l t i m o r e , M d . . P r e s i d e n t . C l a r e n c e C. J a c k s o n , J r . , 2 3 2 5 M a d i s o n A v e . , Secretary, D a v i d J . W h i t f i e l d , 7 0 4 N . Gay St. 1 0 5 . E P S I L O N L A M B D A — S t . Louis, M o . ; P r e s i d e n t . A a r o n E. M a l o n e , 1 5 1 6 P e n d l e t o n A v e . , C o r r e s p o n d i n g Secretary, J o h n A . D a v i s , 4 2 0 0 W . C o t e Brilliante. 1 0 6 . Z E T A L A M B D A — N e w p o r t N e w : , V a . ; P r e s i d e n t . G. W e s l e y Raney, J r . , 641 H a m p t o n A v e . ; Secretary, F e r n a n d o . B r o w n . 2 4 1 1 J e i f e r s o n A v e . 1 0 7 . T H E T A L A M B D A — D a y t o n , O h i o , P r e s i d e n t , Lloyd G. P h i l l i p s , 6 1 7 R a n d o l p h St.. Secretary, F r e d J. Grigsby, 2 2 1 H o r a c e St. 108. E T A L A M B D A — A t l a n t a . Ga.; President Charles W . Greene. 304 Gsifnn St., N . W . , Secretary. N e l s o n C. J a c k s o n , 2 4 7 H e n r y St., S. W . 109. I O T A L A M B D A — I n d i a n a p o l i s , Ind., President, Alfred D . Grayson, 5 2 7 W . 4 2 n d St.; Secretary, J o n a t h a n W . Giles 2 6 2 9 Shriver, A v e . 1 1 0 . K A P P A L A M B D A — ( j r e e n s b o r o , N . C , Pres., William t . b e a v e r ; S e c , Benjamin H . C r u t c h e r , A BC T . C o l l e g e . , „ _ 1 1 1 . M U L A M B D A — W a s h i n g t o n , D . C ; P r e s i d e n t . C. C. H o u s e , 149 W St.. N W . Secretary. G e o r g e W . Peter o n . 6 0 4 D S t . . N . W . 1 1 2 . N U L A M B D A — E t t r i c k , Va., P r e s i d e n t , R e u b e n R. M c D a n i e l ; Secretary, C h a r l e s H . T o w n e s , Va. State C o l l e g e . 1 1 3 . X I L A M B D A — C h i c a g o . 111.. P r e s i d e n t . W i l l i a m R. T h o m p s o n , Secretary, L a u r e n c e T . Y o u n g . 4 4 3 2 S. P a r k w a y . 1 1 4 . O M I C R O N L A M B D A — B i r m i n g h a m . A l a b a m a ; P r e s i d e n t , Peter A . H a l l , 6 2 0 10th A v e . , N . ; Secretary, C h a r l e s O . W e b b , 9 1 0 1st St. N . 1 1 5 . P I L A M B D A — L i t t l e Rock, A r k . , Pres., D r . J . B. J o r d a n , 6 1 0 ' / 2 W . 9th S t . ; S e c . C. b r a n k l i n B r o w n . 1 0 1 9 C r o s s St. 116. R H O L A M B D A — B u f f a l o , N . Y., Pre idem. D r . W . B. Hol.ond 357 W i l l i a m St.. Secretary. D r . J . M c D o n a l d B o b b , 2 1 5 William St.. Buffalo 1 1 7 . S I G M A L A M B D A — N e w O r l e a n s , La., P r e s i d e n t , W h i t n e y H a y d e l , 2 2 2 8 St. B e r n a r d A v e . ; Secretary, Rene J . Rousseve, 5 0 1 4 LaSalle St. 1 1 8 . T A U L A M B D A — N a s h v i l l e , T e n n . , P r e s i d e n t , D r . St. E l m o B r a d y , Fisk U n i v e r s i t y ; Secretary, J a m e s R. A n d e r s o n , 1 0 2 7 18th A v e . , N . 1 1 9 . U P S I L O N L A M B D A — J a c k s o n v i l l e , Fla., P r e s . , C h a r l e s S. Long Jr., Edward Waters College; S e c . H . James Greene, Edward Waters College. 1 2 0 . P H I L A M B D A — R a l e i g h . N . C , P r e s i d e n t , J o h n C. H a r l a n , bhaw LJniversity, Secretary. Louis W . Roberts, St. A u g u s t i n e C o l l e g e . 1 2 1 . C H I L A M B D A — W i l b e r f o r c e , O h i o ; P r e s i d e n t . J a m e s T . H e n r y , Secretary. G r a n v i l l l e C. S m i t h . W i l b e r f o r c e University. 122. P S I L A M B D A — C h a t t a n o o g a , T e n n . , President, Booker T . Scruggs, 1909 Blackford St.; Secretary, D r . W . B . D a v i s , 1 2 4 ' / 2 E . 9th St. 123. A L P H A A L P H A L A M B D A — N e w a r k , N . Jersey, Pres. Dr. Ferdinand D . W i l l i a m s , 191 Bloomfield A v e . , Montclair, N . J . ; S e c , A r t h u r •-. W i l l i a m s , 136 Lincoln St., Montclair. . 1 2 4 . A L P H A B E T A L A M B D A — L e x i n g t o n , Ky.. Pres., E d w a r d M . C h e n a u l t . 2 2 6 W . 6th St.; S e c . D r . H e n r y A . M e r c h a n t , 126 D c W e e s e St. A L P H A G A M M A L A M B D A — N e w Y o r k City; President, D r . Louis K. 125. M i d d l e t o n , 6 0 1 W e s t 1 3 6 t h Street; Secretary, C. A r t h u r J a c k s o n , 40U Convent Ave. , . ,. A LPHA DELTA LAMBDA M e m p h i s . T e n n . . P r e s : d e n t Edwin t-. 126. J o n e s , Route 1. Box 2 52 ( M a l l o r y A v e . ) ; Secretary. A b n e r B . O w e n , J r . , 598 Williams Ave. ,, . 1 2 7 . A L P H A E P S I L O N L A M B D A — J a c k s o n , Miss., P r e s . , Everett K. Lawrence, T o u g a l o o C o l l e g e , T o u g a l o o , Miss.; S e c , Alan T . B u s b y , Box 1 7 6 . A l c o r n , Miss __ , _ 1 2 8 . A L P H A Z E T A L A M B D A — B l u e f i e l d . W . V a . ; P r e s i d e n t . D r . J . Ernest M a r t i n , 124 P a r k St.. Bluefield, W . V a . ; Secretary. E . W . B r o w n e , Box 576, Kimball, W . Va. ... 1 2 9 . A L P H A E T A L A M B D A — H o u s t o n , T e x a s ; P r e s i d e n t . J o h n Law. 5 2 4 7 T r u x i l l o A v e . , Secretary, H a r v e y R. T u r n e r , Prairie View C o l l e g e , Prairie View. T e x a s . _ .. . 1 3 0 . A L P H A T H E T A L A M B D A — A t l a n t i c City, N . J . , P r e s i d e n t . F e r d i n a n d C. N e w t o n , 2 1 7 N . J e r s e y A v e . ; Secretary, A u s t i n M a r t i n , 1711 Arctic Ave.

Chapters

1 3 1 . A L P H A I O T A L A M B D A — C h a r l e s t o n , W . Va., P r e s . , Earl J . Reason, V / V ? . 1 . 1 S h r e w s b u r y St.; S e c , J . Kermit H a l l , 1332 W a s h i n g t o n St. E. 132. A L P H A K A P P A L A M B D A — R o a n o k e , Va., P r e s . . D r . Elwood D D o w n . ing, 2 3 6 P a t t e r s o n Ave., N W ; S e c , D r . G e o r g e A. M o o r e , 160 E. Vine St. 1 3 3 . A L P H A N U L A M B D A — K n o x v i l l e . T e n n . ; P r e s i d e n t . N . A. H e n d e r s o n 123 E. V i n e Ave., Secretary, M . D . S e m e r , 2 1 3 4 E. V i n e A v j 134. A L P H A N U L A M B D A — 1 uskegee, Ala., P r e s . , W . H e n r i P a y n e ; S e c , H o l l i s F. Price, T u s k a g e e I n s t i t u t e . 1 3 5 . A L P H A X I L A M B D A — T o l e d o . O h o , P r e s i d e n t , Leo V . E n g l s h , 6 1 4 T e c u m eh St., Secretary, C h a r l e s P e o p l e s , 522 W a b a h Ave 136. A L P H A O M I C R O N L A M B D A P i t t s b u r g h , Pa., P r e s i d e n t R M a u r i c e M o s s , 1 3 0 0 5th A v e . ; Secretary, W i l b u r C. D o u g l a s s , 5 1 8 4 t h A v e . 13 7. A L P H A P I L A M B D A — W i n s t o n - S a l e m , N . C , Pres., W a l k e r E Pitts, 1 1 1 7 E. 1 1 t h ; C. S e c , W i l l i a m R. C r a w f o r d ; F . S e c , D r . E . S h e p a r d W r i g h t . Bruce Bldg. 1 3 8 . A L P H A R H O L A M B D A — C o l u m b u s , O h i o , P r e s i d e n t , D r . J. J . C a r t e r , 86 M o n r o e A v e . . Secretary, A. D e V C t o s b y , 2 6 5 N . 2 2 n d St 1 3 9 . A L P H A S I G M A L A M B D A — D a l l as, T e x a s , P r e s i d e n t , H . I . H o l l a n d , 2 9 1 3 T h o m a : A v e . , Secretary, D . N . H o w e l l , 2 7 0 0 Flora S~. 140. A L P H A T A U L A M B D A — T u l s a . Okla.; President. E. W. C'arke, 617 E. Archei- St., Secretary. J. T y l e r Smi h. 124 N . G r e e n w o o d St. 1 4 1 . A L P H A U P S I L O N L A M B D A — M o n •gomery, A l a . ; P r e s i d e n t . C o h e n J' S i m p s o n . Secretary. W i l l i a m H . Fletcher. State T e a c h e r s C o l l e g e . 1 4 2 . A L P H A P H I L A M B D A — N o r f o l k , Va., P r e s i d e n t , P . B e r n a r d Y o u n g , J r . ; Secretary. T h o m a s W . Y o u n g , 7 2 1 C h a p e l St. 1 4 3 . A L P H A C H I L A M B D A — A u g u s t a , Ga., P r e s i d e n t , Lawrence D . P e r r y , Box 9 0 4 Pilgrim I n s . C o . ; Secretary, J o h n M . T u t t , 1 1 0 8 P h i l l i p St. 144. A L P H A P S I L A M B D A — C o l u m b i a , S. C ; P r e s i d e n t , R a y m o n d L. Bailey, University T e r r a c e A p r s . 145. B H T A A L P H A L A M B D A — J e r s e y City, N . J.. P r e s i d e n t . D r . W . H a r . old B r a n c h . 190 D u n c a n Ave., Jersey City, N . J . ; D o r l a n d H e n d e r s o n , 2 6 9 N . C l i n t o n St. East O r a n g e . N . J. 146. B E T A B E T A L A M B D A — M i a m i , Fla., Pres., D r . Felix E. Butler, 3 6 6 N W . 14th S t ; S e c . Frederick L. J o h n s o n , 159 N . W . 10th St 1 4 7 . B E T A G A M M A L A M B D A — R i c h m o n d , V a . . P r e s i d e n t . E. M . B u r k e , 8 0 6 N . 6th St., Secretary, Lester V . H i l l , 1 7 1 9 Blair St.. A p t . 3 . 148. B E T A D E L T A L A M B D A D a y t o n a Beach. Fla., P r e s i d e n t , C h a r l e s J . G r e e n e , P . O . Box 1 7 8 9 ; Secretary, D r . H . E r n e s t H a r t l e y , 6 2 4 2 n d Ave. 149. B E T A E P S I L O N L A M B D A — W e w o k a , O k l a . , Pres., D r . D . A. F r e n c h , 201 S. S e m i n o l e ; Sec., W i l l i a m A . D o b s o n , Box 2 1 6 . Lima. O k l a . 1 5 0 . B E T A Z E T A L A M B D A — J e f f e r s o n City, M o . ; Pres d e n t , N . P . B a r k s . d a l e . Secretary. A . S. P r i d e . Lincoln U n i v e r ity, Jefferson City. M o 1 5 1 . B E T A E T A L A M B D A — O k l a . City. O k l a . , President, Raleigh A. W i l s o n , Box 2 5 3 . L a n g s t o n , O k ' a h o m a ; Secretary, J o h n E . J a c k s o n , 5 2 7 N o r t h Phillips S t . . O k l a h o m a City, O k l a h o m a 152. B E T A T H E T A L A M B D A — D u r h a m . N . C , Pres. J a m e s T . Taylor, 2 1 0 6 Fayetteville St.. Sec. J o h n E. P a y n e , 1 6 0 9 Lincoln St. 1 5 3 . B E T A I O T A L A M B D A — B a t o n R o u g e , La.; P r e s i d e n t . D r . B V . Bar o n c o . J r . , P . O . Box 2 0 0 5 , Secretary, J a m e s H . Boswell, 9 3 3 N a p o l e o n St-eet. 1 5 4 . B E T A K A P P A L A M B D A — C h a r l e s t o n , S. C ; P r e s i d e n t , A r l h u r D . G r e e n e , 55 " G " J o h n s o n St.. Secretary. F r a - k A . D e C o s t l . Avery Ins""tuf> 1 5 5 . B E T A M U L A M B D A — S t a t e s v i l l e . N . C.j P r e s i d e n t , Secretary, T . E . Allison. J r . , 5 36 S. G r e e n Street. 156. B E T A N U L A M B D A — C h a r l o t t e , N . C ; President, Secretary,t C l i n t o n L . B l a k e , 4 2 3 E . 1st St.. Financial Secretary, G. F . W o o d s o n . J r . . 2 1 1 2 W . T r a d e Street. 1 5 7 . B E T A X I L A M B D A — < ) m a h a N e b r a s k a ; P r e s i d e n t ; Secretary, G e o r g e A . S t a m s . 1119 N . 21st St.. O m a h a N e b r . 1 5 8 . B E T A O M I C R O N L A M B D A — M o b i l e , A l a . , P r e ident. Milton G. E d . mop.ds. Secretary. O r l a n d o H . J o h n s o n , 2 0 1 N Lawrence St. 1 5 9 . B E T A P I L A M B D A — A l b a n y , N . Y . ; P r e s i d e n t , G e o r g e B Kelley, 1 1 1 3 t h Street. T r o y . N . Y . 160. B E T A R H O L A M B D A — Y o u n g s t o w n , O h i o , P r e s i d e n t . S. S. B r o k e r , 9 6 3 W . Federal St., Secretary, A n d r e w L . J o h n s o n , 4 0 4 W . Earl A v e . 1 6 1 . B E T A S I G M A L A M B D A — H a r t f o r d , C o n n . ; T o Be Set U p . 1 6 2 . B E T A T A U L A M B D A — F t . W o r t h , T e x a s ; T o Be Set U p . 1 6 3 . B E T A U P S I L O N L A M B D A — J a c k on, T e n n . ; T o Be Set U p .

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Ci SSouquet ta - On "W Stated A L P H A (Zoncem The Bigger and Better

WILL-BRO anent their PEDIGREED PRINTING Business and Professional men say of WILL-BRO that it has tha prospects of a long life, and yet it is amazingly economical.

The interesting character of the Creative Art of WILL-BRO earns this bouquet窶認or it is the soundest little business enterprise ever conducted by young Negroes in Harlem. WILL-BRO'S creations are warm and lively, adding brilliance to illustration and text, whether your job calls for offset or letterpress printing. Be sure to see WILL-BRO'S samples. Write to:

WILL-BRO ADVERTISING SERVICE 2309 SEVENTH AVENUE

NEW YORK CITY

i^ebtsreeti i^ttnttng Specialists in the modern methods of Building Business through the media of Advertising, Printing, Offset Lithography, Direct Mail and Sales Promotion.

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The SPHINX | Winter February 1940 | Volume 26 | Number 1 194002601  

Tribute to Kelly Miller. Educational Movement. Tribute to James Booker. Educational Movement.

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