Issuu on Google+

Association of Ontario Health Centres Association des centres de santĂŠ de l'Ontario

410-5233 Dundas Street W., Toronto, Ontario M9B 1A6 Tel: 416 236-2539 Fax: 416 236-0431 Email: mail@aohc.org Web: www.aohc.org


mission To represent member centres in the promotion of healthy public policy, healthy individuals and communities through the creation and continuing development of health centres which embody principles of accessible quality primary care, health promotion and active community ownership and participation.


vision That Ontarians:

1.

Live in healthy, vibrant communities.

2.

View health centres as the preferred model of primary health care.

board of directors

Have access to a health centre in their community which provides health and social service programs that address the determinants of health.

1999-2000

3.

That the membership:

Chair: Patricia McLean, Elmira 1.

2.

Look to the Association of Ontario Health Centres for leadership both within the broad community health sector, and internally, advancing creative solutions to issues brought forward by members. Have a sense of ownership of AOHC and actively participate and contribute on province-wide initiatives.

That the Association:

1.

Has effectively positioned health centres in the overall health framework in Ontario.

2.

Is recognized and sought by health care providers as experts in primary health care through cutting edge policy development.

3.

Has fostered effective open two-way communication among member centres.

APPROVED BY AOHC BOARD OF DIRECTORS, OCTOBER 1999

Executive Committee

Vice President: Robert Groves, Lanark Secretary: Norm Tulsiani, Toronto Treasurer: Walter Weary, Toronto Liana Frenette, Thunder Bay Directors

Richard Bissonnette, Cornwall Denise Brooks, Hamilton Betty Kennedy, Thunder Bay Marina Lundrigan, Dorchester Susan Milankov, Toronto Jack McCarthy, Ottawa Altaf Stationwala, Toronto

staff list Gary O’Connor, Executive Director Susan Arai, Researcher, Information Specialist Rishia Burke, Co-ordinator, Centre Enrichment Carole Elliott, Co-ordinator, Communications & Development Charmaine Haddock, Receptionist, Secretary Arlene Herman, Co-ordinator, Centre Enrichment Momodou Jeng, Co-ordinator, Program Evaluation Systems Marion Jones, Information Systems Assistant Cory LeBlanc, Executive Assistant Joe Leonard, Executive Support Consultant Christine Miller, Administrative Assistant Linda Stewart, Manager, Information Technology

1


committees Conference Planning

Co-chairs: Marina Lundrigan, AOHC Board of Directors Beth Beader, North Hamilton CHC Committee: Patrick Lapointe, CACHCA Representative Dianne Musgrove, Noojmowin Teg Health Centre Teo Owang, Central Toronto CHC AOHC: Carole Elliott, Cory LeBlanc, Gary O’Connor Information Systems Co-ordinating

Co-chairs: Barbara MacKinnon, Pinecrest-Queensway Health & Community Services Altaf Stationwala, AOHC Board Members: France Gelinas, Northern Region Jeanne Goodhand, Eastern Region Cathy Paul, Toronto Region Jean-Gilles Pelletier, Toronto Region Clint Rohr, Southwest Region Walter Weary, AOHC Board Members at large: Jan Barnsley, University of Toronto Jack Williams, ICES Ministry of Health Representatives; David Thornley, Wayne Oake AOHC: Marion Jones, Linda Stewart Gary O’Connor, ex officio Information Systems, User Support Sub-Committee

Chair: Jean-Gilles Pelletier Pam Ferguson, Eastern Region Suzanne Giroux Sheldrick, Francophone Simon Hagens, Southwestern Region John Hawkins, Eastern Region Michelle Hurtubise, Central Region Ella Litwin, Kay Marsh, Central Region Christine Randle, Central Region Jennifer Rayner, Southwest Region Lori Trelinski, Northern Region Sue Vieira, Southwest Region Karen Yik, Central Region Ministry of Health Representative: Jeff Kwok AOHC: Marion Jones Linda Stewart, ISCC Representative 2

Research Advisory Sub-Committee

Chair: Rosana Pellizzari, Davenport Perth CHC Michael Birmingham, Carlington CHC Jan Campbell, Davenport Perth CHC Dale Guenter, North Hamilton CHC Carla Palmer, Barrie CHC Pamela Smit, Centretown CHC Altaf Stationwala, AOHC Board David Thornley, Ministry of Health Karen Tu, ICES Walter Weary, Central Toronto CHC Jack Williams, ICES Lynn Wilson, Four Villages CHC AOHC: Momodou Jeng, Gary O’Connor, Linda Stewart Membership Secretariat

Co-Chairs: Robert Groves, AOHC Board Susan Milankov, AOHC Board Members: Robert Bisson, CSC, Hamilton-Wentworth-Niagara Susan Bland, The Youth Centre Heather MacDonald, Woolwich CHC Peter Marshall, Mary Berglund CHC Peter McKenna, Sandy Hill CHC Marilyn Nadjiwan Rasi, Shkagamik-Kwe Health Centre AOHC: Arlene Herman Nominations

Chair: Norm Tulsiani, AOHC Board Eunadie Johnson, Women’s Health in Women’s Hands David Hole, South East Ottawa CHC Wanda MacDonald, North Lanark CHC Ex-officio: Pat McLean, AOHC Chair Gary O’Connor, AOHC Executive Director Public Relations

Chair: Jack McCarthy, AOHC Board Denise Brooks, Hamilton Urban Core CHC Bill Davidson, Langs Farm Village Association Liana Frenette, Board member, Ogden East End CHC Hazelle Palmer, Planned Parenthood of Toronto AOHC: Carole Elliott, Gary O’Connor


Resolutions

Chair: Norm Tulsiani, AOHC Board David Hole, South East Ottawa CHC Eunadie Johnson, Women’s Health in Women’s Hands CHC Wanda MacDonald, North Lanark CHC Pat McLean, Chair, AOHC Board Gary O’Connor, Executive Director, AOHC

AOHC

award

1993 Ruth Wildgen, Ottawa 1994 Omer Deslauriers, Toronto 1995 Michael Rachlis and Carol Kushner, Toronto 1996 Fredrick H. Griffith, Sault Ste. Marie 1997 Mary Berglund, Ignace 1998 Cathy Crowe, Toronto 1999 Dennise Albrecht, Ottawa 2000 Linda Jones, Ottawa 2000 Catherine Walker, Toronto

EPIC

award 2000

The Award for Excellence in Primary Health Care – the EPIC Award – recognizes the diversity and flexibility of programming designed to meet the specific needs of people in their communities. Community Development

North Lanark Community Health Centre -Youth Outreach Project Programs and Services

Hamilton Urban Core Community Health Centre -Community Oral Health Program

health is a community affair

award 1998

Roger & Vivianne Chartrand, New Liskeard Eastern Ontario Chiropractic Society, Ottawa McNeil Consumer Products Company, Guelph Csilla Nagy, Toronto Raymonde Pelland, Sudbury Pamela Prinold, Toronto Welcome Inn Community Centre, Hamilton 1999

Dr. Terry Hicks, Barrie Jardins communautaires de Cornwall Merrickville Senior Walking Groups McDonald Corners, Elphin Recreation and Arts Association, Lanark Victim Services of North Leeds, Portland Catherine Walker, Ajax 2000

Linda Carr, North Leeds Club 74, Merrickville-Wolford Doreen Chapman, Longlac Dwayne Cline, Hamilton Ana Costa, Toronto Penny Driediger, Hamilton Larry Elliott, Barrie Marta Escobar, Toronto Diane Holmes, Ottawa Rosa Iliev, Toronto Linda Jones, Ottawa Laurette Lévy, Toronto Paul A. Morin, Toronto Maleda Mulu, Toronto Ruth Montoya, Toronto Qamar Osman, Toronto Joyce Phillips, Toronto

partnerships

Honourable Mention

Gateway Community Health Centre -Passport to Healthy Diabetes Program

Canadian Alliance of Community Health Centre Associations, CACHCA Health Determinants Partnership, HDP Ontario Health Providers Alliance, OHPA Ontario Healthy Communities Coalition, OHCC Ontario Public Health Association, OPHA The Ontario Rural Council, TORC 3


table of

contents

Vision ........................................................................page 1 Board of Directors ......................................................page 1 Staff List ....................................................................page 1 Committees ................................................................page 2 Award Recipients ........................................................page 3 Partnerships ................................................................page 3

message

Executive Message ......................................................page 4

executive

Strategic Directions ....................................................page 6

The year 1999/2000 has been a key time of building for the

-Strengthen the role of health centres................... page 8

Association of Ontario Health Centres, building on the activities

-Support development of existing members..........page 8 -Ensure financial stability....................................page 10 -Support new and emerging primary health care organizations and share goals and values............page 11

and accomplishments of recent years. Our advocacy projects are starting to pay dividends for us. Both our Election Preparedness project and our position paper, Investing in Community Primary Health Services: A

-Strengthen relationship between member centres and AOHC....................................................... page 11

proposal to help meet primary health service needs in Ontario

-Promote healthy public policy........................... page 11

care reform debate.

-AOHC Board Development............................. page 11

The Association’s adherence to the goals and objectives of our

Financial Statements ................................................page 12

have positioned the Association as players in the primary health

strategic direction enables the Board of Directors and the organization to remain focused and effective. These strategic directions are:

• Strengthen the Role of Health Centres within Broad Health and Social Services Delivery System

• Actively Support Development of Existing Members • Ensure Financial Stability of AOHC The illustration on the cover is the artwork for AOHC’s Award for Excellence in Primary Health Care.

4

• Support New and Emerging Primary Health Care Organizations that Share Goals and Values

Artist: Sue Todd

• Strengthen Relationships Between Member Centres and AOHC

Designer: Millie Shale

• Promote Healthy Public Policy

Translation: HSN Linguistic Services, Gloucester

• AOHC Board Development


This Annual Report outlines the major activities we undertook

nity to say a special thanks to outgoing directors — Marina

on behalf of our membership this year.

Lundrigan, Paris and Jack McCarthy, Ottawa.

These activities are only possible because of the funding and sup-

Member support is vital to AOHC’s ability to represent the

port we receive from our funders and the assistance provided

interests of health centres with key leaders in health care and

by our volunteers and staff.

government. We want to recognize those who share their expertise on committees. Your participation in Association business

In particular, we want to say thank-you to our member centres whose contribution of volunteer and staff time and energies

enables our decisions to reflect the diversity and wisdom of our membership.

enable us to work together on many projects. As well, we want to express our appreciation to the Ministry of Health, Community

This millennium will be a new era for health centres. All seg-

and Health Promotion Branch for its funding, especially

ments of the health care system acknowledge that reform is

of the Centre Development, Information Technology and

required. Many acknowledge that a model of care such as ours

Evaluation Systems projects. These have represented major con-

is integral to the public’s well being.

tributions to the welfare of health centres.

Health centres are positioned to play a pivotal role in providing

Our Making Connections projects — web site, booklet and

primary health care in Ontario. This year has been one of

posters — are making important contributions to the public’s

growth for us. In the years to come, we will continue to grow in

understanding of the determinants of health. We are indebted to

ability and stature. The future presents excellent opportunities

Health Canada, Health Promotion and Programs Branch,

for our solution to the health care needs of the citizens of

Population Health Section, Ontario Region for funding this

Ontario. Working together, we can grow in scope and in

project.

numbers.

AOHC’s Board of Directors has again held its meetings in centres around the province offering opportunities for our Directors to gain an understanding of local issues and to pro-

E. Patricia McLean

Gary O’Connor

Chair

Executive Director

vide local Boards of Directors with opportunities to network with provincial representatives. Thanks to host centres: Centre de santé communautaire de l’Estrie, Cornwall; Hamilton Urban Core CHC; and LAMP, Etobicoke. The Association is fortunate to have such a dedicated group of Board members. On your behalf, we express our thanks to AOHC’s 1999-2000 Board of Directors. We take this opportu5


AOHC strategic directions

Annually, AOHC’s Board of Directors meet to review and revise the organization’s strategic

directions in view of past accomplishments, future challenges, and the current health care

environment. Association activities during the year are tested against these strategic directions

to ensure AOHC’s activities are focussed. In June 1999, the Board of Directors affirmed these

strategies for 1999-2002.


1 2 3 4 5

6 7

Strengthen the Role of Health Centres within Broad Health and Social Services Delivery System

Actively Support Development of Existing Members

Ensure Financial Stability of AOHC

Support New and Emerging Primary Health Care Organizations that Share Goals and Values

Strengthen Relationships Between Member Centres and AOHC

Promote Healthy Public Policy

AOHC Board Development

7


Funding Freeze Lifted

1. strengthen the role of health centres Advocacy Projects

The overall objective of strengthening the role of health centres is to promote the health centre model of care and advocate for more resources. Our advocacy projects emanate from this initiative. The development and distribution of Investing in Community Primary Health Services: A proposal to help meet primary health service needs in Ontario (released in December 1998) provided the foundation for AOHC’s advocacy projects. In it we stated our views that for Ontarians to receive effective primary health care, the government should:

During 1999, there was a lifting of the funding freeze on new health centres. The Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care announced funding for Kitchener Downtown InterCommunity Health Centre, Grand Bend and Area Rural Community Primary Health Care Centre and satellites in Crysler (Centre de santé communautaire de l’Estrie), Chelmsford and Hanmer (Centre de santé communautaire de Sudbury) and Armstrong Health Clinic (Ogden East End). Salary Survey

In June 1999, AOHC released the Salary Survey results which showed that salaries for all health centre staff are below the market level; middle and senior management ranks are most effected. We have used this survey to advocate for increased funding for salary and pay equity needs with the Minister of Health and cabinet members as well as with various levels of the Ministry of Health staff.

2. support development of existing members

a. increase the number of health centres from the current

65 to 130 in three years; and

AOHC Supports Centres

b. expand the programs and services at the existing

AOHC supports member centres through:

centres to enable more people to access the programs needed to maintain and enhance health. We distributed this position paper to government representatives, allied health organizations and others. Election Preparedness ‘99

b. Evaluation Systems; c. Building Healthier Organizations Quality Management and Accreditation Program;

Member centres joined us in a concerted election strategy whereby we placed our position on the public agenda. Volunteers and staff met with candidates to explain our goals and gain support for the health centre model of health care. We made important contacts during this exciting project. We encountered significant enthusiasm for the health centre model.

d. Various Centre Development programs:

Phase II

g. Annual General Meeting Resolutions Actions.

During this year we have gathered data and refined our position as we prepare to take the next step in our campaign. Community Health Centres: A Cost-Effective Solution to Primary Health Care Reform was released this Spring.

8

a. Information Technology Support;

Once again, AOHC Board members and member centres have worked to keep our solution to the health care needs of Ontarians in the forefront with key decision makers.

-Executive Support, -Best Practices Project, -Getting Ready for BHO Workshops, -Board Development Workshops; e. Year 2000; f. Salary Survey;

Information Technology Support

We undertook major Information Technology activities during the year with the needs analysis, selection of one supplier and the implementation of a province-wide program. Fifty community health centres were installed with a new software product that was customized to meet the data col-


lection requirements of the CHC Program Evaluation System. This implementation included the upgrading of hardware to meet new standards set jointly by the vendor, AOHC and the Ministry of Health. CHCs have been trained to use the new product and are expected to begin reporting evaluation data to the Ministry during the next year. Evaluation Systems

The CHC Program Evaluation System was originally implemented in CHCs in 1997/98. CHCs have been collecting client demographic as well as individual and group service data since that time. This year, data for Community Initiatives started to be collected, following the implementation of a data model developed last year. Data quality issues were addressed for the CHC Program Evaluation System. Existing CHC data was reviewed and “cleaned up.” This process allowed for the development of a data entry standards manual to ensure ongoing data consistency across all CHCs. The User Support Sub-committee was also formed to act as a quality assurance team that will review data issues on a continuing basis. Building Healthier Organizations Quality Management and Accreditation Program

Building Healthier Organizations (BHO) was developed by AOHC in co-operation with member centres and the Ministry of Health to provide an objective measure of health centre performance, to promote continuous quality improvement, and to identify and share examples of excellence. The BHO process is also used in conjunction with an accreditation program offered by Community Organizational Health Inc., an organization set up to administer a peer review and accreditation program for health centres in Ontario. AOHC’s role is to provide support to health centres to ensure that they have the resources they need to prepare for the BHO process and achieve accreditation. Resources now available include a reference library, workshops and development of prototype policies and procedures. And the BHO Manual is undergoing updating to maintain currency. Executive Support

Our new Executive Support program is off to an excellent beginning. This program has two streams:

The intent of the program is to: a. support Executive Directors’ and Boards’ decision

making and long-term planning; b. stabilize the operation of health centre organizations; c. strengthen the position of health centres in response to health care reform; d. reduce personal stress for participants; e. increase resolution of organizational and human resource conflicts; f. support experimentation with program initiatives, local partners and alliances, new funding streams and other financial supports; g. increase recognition of the role of health centres in local health service delivery; and h. respond to emerging issues.

Evaluations show that participants gained useful information from the program and support the need for its expansion. The next phase is to explore offering seminars tailored to health centres in a Centre of Excellence format. Best Practices Project

The Best Practices Project — begun in 1998 — continued momentum during the past year. The goal is to develop an integrated understanding of best practices among health promotion and clinical health centre staff through the development of common principles and a vision for multidisciplinary approaches to health care. The focus of this year’s work has been a study of best practices in the management of diabetes. Through a comparison of three sites, we have moved toward a broader definition of “best practices in CHCs” which includes issues related to guideline implementation, resources, community diversity and building interdisciplinary teams. Several discussion papers have also been developed and circulated to encourage discussion within the sector. Over the past year, AOHC created an environment of readiness to develop health promotion (HP) best practices in health centres through educational opportunities and development and distribution of HP guidelines.

a. Workshops and seminars for health centres

Executive Directors, Managers and Board members; b. Executive consulting services provided to centres to

support their decision-making processes.

Board Development Workshops

CHC Boards and staff have come to rely on AOHC’s Board Development Workshops to discuss topical issues and network with colleagues from nearby centres. Again this year, we held a Fall and a Winter series of workshops.

9


Attendees appreciated opportunities to learn about various governance models as they did in the Fall. Health care reform was the focus of the Winter meetings. During these workshops, AOHC Board members facilitated the discussions and created energetic dialogues on the role of the CHC model of care in health care reform. Year 2000

Many activities were carried out to both prepare AOHC and support AOHC members in getting ready for Year 2000. AOHC’s participation on the Ontario Health Provider’s Alliance was key in providing members with up-to-date information, as well as opportunities to attend workshops and participate on emergency planning committees in their communities. The considerable preparatory and remediation efforts of AOHC and its members resulted in a limited number of minor Year 2000 issues after January 1st, 2000. Resolutions from 1999 AGM

Voting Delegates approved these five resolutions at the 1999 Annual General Meeting: a. CHC Comparative Analysis; b. Volunteer Services; c. Platform for Action; d. Developing Partnerships; and e. Social Work & Social Service Work Act.

CHC Comparative Analysis

...that AOHC conduct a comparative analysis to examine Ministry of Health funding models re health centres to identify inconsistencies and advocate for appropriate resources for all centres. Action: AOHC surveyed health centres to map income sources, programs and staffing levels. Data will focus a report comparing urban, rural and remote health centres to other health service organizational models. This report will be used to advocate for funding, programming and administrative needs of centres. Volunteer Services

...study volunteers services, i.e., levels of funding and staff resources, scope of services, and challenges facing services to educate Ministry of Health about volunteers’ role, and lobby for appropriate funding. Action: Volunteer co-ordinators met in a focus group to discuss needs and test research design. Health centres were surveyed to gather data about volunteer usage and support. 10

Staff have assessed and developed a volunteer resources position paper which will be used to educate the Ministry of Health on the value of volunteers at health centres. Platform for Action

...work with Women’s Health in Women’s Hands (WHIWH) to share Platform for Action program with member centres. Action: AOHC sent an information package and a survey to member centres to support the project and worked with WHIWH to follow up on the survey and to support members’ work on the Platform for Action. Developing Partnerships

...develop a partnership strategy with key stakeholders to address shortfalls of health and medical and human resource professionals in underserviced areas. Action: AOHC is a member of the Ontario Rural Council and promotes health centres as part of the solution for rural and remote communities. We are also members of the Ontario Healthy Communities Coalition which works to help grass root action on health and service needs in communities. Social Work and Social Service Work Act

...investigate the implications of Social Service Work Act legislation on health centre system; assess job titles, equivalency and salaries; and report findings to each centre. Action: A working group met to develop recommendations to enable health centres to adapt social work activities to conform to the act effectively. The Salary and Benefits working group developed a second level position and has adapted the job descriptions to be more generic and renamed Councillor I and II (Clinical).

3. ensure

financial stability

Business Development

Business Development as a means of enhancing AOHC’s financial base took another important step forward with the development of a series of Business Plans. The Association’s Trade Show project entered the second year during Healthlink 2000, the annual conference. There is obvious growth from 11 exhibitors in 1999 to 20 in 2000. Other business plans are underway and will be launched in 2000.


4. support new and emerging primary health care organizations and share goals and values

Other activities include: a. developing a standing column in AOHC’s newsletter,

healthlink, that addresses issues of interest to governance volunteers; b. reviewing new membership applications; c. providing information on AOHC’s newly designed web site; and d. responding to emerging membership issues.

Providing Support

We continue to support the development of Aboriginal Health Access Centres (AHAC) and are encouraged that three additional centres joined the Association this year. We have met with, talked to, and/or corresponded with over 200 community groups over the year. Over 55 groups are interested in the health centre model of care and await the availability of funding to pursue their development.

6. promote healthy public policy

Health Services Restructuring Commission

Focus on Communications

The Health Services Restructuring Commission (HSRC) issued a paper, Primary Health Care Strategy, which supports our model. AOHC issued a response to the HSRC paper, including the proposal of a new primary health care community governed model.

Most activity related to promoting healthy public policy has been done through our alliances with other organizations, i.e., OHPA, OPHA, CACHCA, TORC. We have tried to raise the profile of health reform issues in the membership through the Board Development Workshops.

5. strengthen relationship between member centres and AOHC Strengthen Relationships

The Membership Secretariat has worked to define and support member needs. One of its goals is to provide opportunities for Board networking during the Regional Board Development Workshops. Board members gain from discussing issues of mutual interest.

AOHC Board

7. development AOHC Board Needs Evolve

We have defined our Board training needs and have budgeted for them in 2000/2001. We have initiated a process for succession planning and Board skills monitoring and acquisition. We will be reviewing issues of diversity and access as we expand our scope.

The fees and the fee structure have been reviewed. The possibility of aggressively selling associate memberships was reviewed and rejected. 11


AUDITOR’S report C H A RT E R E D A C C O U N TA N T 5805 WHITTLE ROAD, SUITE 209 MISSISSAUGA, ONTARIO, L4Z2J1 TELEPHONE: (905) 502-7660 FAX: (905) 502-7662 e-mail grclow@netcom.ca

To the Members of the Association of Ontario Health Centres:

I have examined the balance sheet of the Association of Ontario Health Centres as at March 31, 2000 and the statements of revenue, expenses and fund balances and of changes in financial position for the year then ended. These financial statements are the responsibility of the Association’s management. My responsibility is to express an opinion on these financial statements based on my audit.

I conducted my audit in accordance with generally accepted auditing standards. Those standards require that I plan and perform an audit to obtain reasonable assurance whether the financial statements are free from material misstatement. An audit includes examining, on a test basis, evidence supporting the amounts and disclosures in the financial statements. An audit also includes assessing the accounting principles used and significant estimates made by management, as well as evaluating the overall financial statement presentation.

In my opinion, these financial statements present fairly, in all material respects, the financial position of the Association as at March 31, 2000 and the results of its operations and the changes in its financial position for the year then ended in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles.

Graham R. Clow C.A. May 11, 2000 Mississauga

12


ASSOCIATION OF ONTARIO HEALTH CENTRES BALANCE SHEET - MARCH 31, 2000

2000 Operating Fund

2000 Special Purpose Fund

2000

1999

Total

Total

$288,606 211,144 36,401 536,151

$172,781 1,180 173,961

$461,387 211,144 37,581 710,112

$327,754 35,799 31,580 395,133

16,797 16,797 -

26,516 26,516 -

43,313 43,313 -

43,313 43,313 -

$536,151

$173,961

$710,112

$395,133

$383,249 79,604 462,853

$125,923 21,001 8,078 155,002

$509,172 21,001 87,682 617,855

$23,446 111,061 161,265 295,772

73,298 $536,151

18,959 $173,961

92,257 $710,112

99,361 $395,133

ASSETS

Current assets

Cash and short term deposit Accounts receivable Prepaid expenses

Office equipment

Cost Less: Accumulated depreciation

LIABILITIES AND FUND BALANCES

Current liabilities

Accounts payable and accrued liabilities Due to COHI (Note 3) Unused grants repayable Deferred revenue

Fund balances

Approved by the Board

13


ASSOCIATION OF ONTARIO HEALTH CENTRES STATEMENT OF REVENUE, EXPENSES AND FUND BALANCES FOR THE YEAR ENDED MARCH 31, 2000

2000 Operating Fund

2000 Special Purpose Fund

2000

1999

Total

Total

$176,687 9,600 -

$1,506,186 128,509 678,988 -

$1,506,186 128,509 176,687 9,600 678,988 -

$734,587 89,717 163,223 24,775

102,540 19,008 34,561 342,396

15,365 2,329,048

102,540 19,008 49,926 2,671,444

94,856 24,376 12,000 51,720 1,342,725

119,805

1,270,696 393,700

1,270,696 513,505

374,867

12,240 31,483 47,725

225,111 248,899 140,259

237,351 280,382 187,984

176,005 230,690 352,124

85,047 37,801 334,101

65,782 2,344,447

85,047 103,583 2,678,548

86,258 26,120 157,089 1,403,153

Excess of revenue over expenses

8,295

(15,399)

(7,104)

(60,428)

Fund balances, beginning of year

65,003

34,358

99,361

159,789

$73,298

$18,959

$92,257

$99,361

Revenue

Grants from Ministry of Health, Ontario Grants from the Federal Government Memberships Special contributions CHC computer systems upgrade Accreditation fees (Note 3) 1999 Annual Conferences AOHC Great Lakes Secretariat fees Other revenue

147,471

Expenses

Hardware and software Salaries and related expenses Administrative Direct Other Consulting 1999 Annual Conferences AOHC Great Lakes Meeting expense

Fund balances, end of year

14


ASSOCIATION OF ONTARIO HEALTH CENTRES STATEMENT OF CHANGES IN FINANCIAL POSITION FOR THE YEAR ENDED MARCH 31, 2000

2000 Operating Fund

2000 Special Purpose Fund

2000

1999

Total

Total

$8,295

$(15,399)

$(7,104)

$(60,428)

8,295

(15,399)

(7,104)

25,586 (34,842)

207,396

(66,659)

140,737

(74,661)

215,691

(82,058)

133,633

(109,503)

72,915

254,839

327,754

(10,416) 447,673

$288,606

$172,781

$461,387

$327,754

Operating activities

Excess of revenue over expenses (expenses over revenue) Add: Non-cash expenses Depreciation expense

Changes in non-cash elements of working capital

Cash provided by operating activities

Investing activities

Additions to office equipment Cash and term deposit, beginning of year

Cash and term deposit, end of year

ASSOCIATION OF ONTARIO HEALTH CENTRES NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS MARCH 31, 2000 1. Status of the Association The Association was incorporated, without share capital, in 1982 by Letters Patent, as amended in 1996, under the Corporations Act of Ontario. In addition, the Association is registered as a charity under the federal Income Tax Act. The mission of the Association is to represent member centres in the promotion of healthy public policy, healthy individuals and communities through the creation and continuing development of health centres which embody principles of accessible quality primary care, health promotion and active community ownership and participation. 2. Significant accounting policies: Basis of accounting and financial statement presentation The Association reports revenue and expenses using the accrual basis of accounting. It follows the deferral method of accounting for revenue from specific projects, whereby funding is recognised as revenue in the year in which the related expenses are incurred. ...continued on next page. 15


The financial statements separately disclose the activities of the following funds maintained by the Association: Operating fund – Reflects the various activities associated with the Association’s day to day operations Special purpose fund – Reflects the activities associated with grants received for specific projects. Fixed assets Fixed assets are recorded at cost, or, where contributed, at the fair value at the date of contribution. Those assets that are acquired from specific project funding are depreciated over the term of that project. Other assets are depreciated over their estimated useful lives using the straight line method as follows: computer hardware and software is depreciated over a period of two years and other equipment is depreciated over four years. Deferred revenue Deferred revenue consists of cash received by the Association that will not be recognised as revenue until a future fiscal period and includes membership dues for the following fiscal year and the unspent portion of grants and other funding in respect of projects in progress. Contributed services Without volunteers contributing a substantial amount of time each year to the Association’s activities, it would cease to operate effectively. However, because of the difficulty of determining the fair value of these contributed services from an accounting standpoint, they are not recorded in these financial statements. 3.

Community Organization Health (COH) Inc (COHI) To carry out the accreditation process of the Building Healthier Organizations program, the Association’s material, developed in conjunction with the Ministry of Health, has been licensed for a nominal annual fee to Community Organization Health (COH) Inc, (COHI) the organization now responsible for the accreditation review.

4.

Funding by the Ministry of Health The Ministry of Health funds many of the Association’s projects and such funding is provided on the basis that amounts not spent on the particular project are to be refunded to the Ministry. At March 31, there was $21,001 (1999 - nil) repayable to the Ministry in respect of projects completed but for which a portion of the funding remained unspent. As the Ministry funds most of the special projects undertaken by the Association, it is in a position to significantly influence the operations of the Association in this respect. This risk is managed by closely defining relationships through contracts and funding letters.

5.

Financial instruments The carrying value of cash and short term deposit, accounts receivable, accounts payable and accrued liabilities reflected in the balance sheet approximate their respective fair values due to their short term maturity or capacity for prompt liquidation. Cash and the short term deposit which matures on April 25, 2000, have been placed with a major Canadian chartered bank and the credit risk is therefore considered insignificant.

6.

Commitments The Association has committed to the lease of office space for the period to March 31, 2001 at a monthly rent of $6,540 plus applicable taxes. In addition, the Association has committed to a lease, expiring in 2002, for office equipment. Minimum quarterly charges will amount to $2,760 for each of the fiscal years through to 2002.

7.

16

Contingent liability During the year, the Association has been served with a statement of claim relating to alleged abuses of the procedures used in the selection of a software supplier. In the view of the Association’s board of directors, its management and its solicitors, the statement of claim is without merit and will be vigorously contested. As no subsequent liability is anticipated other than legal fees incurred to defend the Association against this claim, no provision has been made for this matter in these financial statements.


Association of Ontario Health Centres Association des centres de santé de l'Ontario

410-5233, rue Dundas O., Toronto (Ontario) M9B 1A6 Tél : (416)236-2539 Télécopieur : (416)236-0431, courriel : mail@aohc.org Web : www.aohc.org


mission Représenter les centres membres dans la promotion d’une saine politique de santé publique et de la santé individuelle et collective par l’établissement et le perfectionnement continuel de centres de santés prônant l’accès à des soins de santé primaires de bonne qualité, la promotion de la santé ainsi qu’une prise en charge et une participation communautaires actives.


vision Que la population ontarienne :

1.

vive dans des communautés pleines de santé et de dynamisme;

2.

voie dans les centres de santé le modèle privilégié de soins de santé primaires;

3.

ait accès, dans ses collectivités, à un centre de santé qui offre des programmes sociaux et de santé traitant des déterminants de la santé.

Que les membres :

1.

se tournent vers l’Association des centres de santé de l’Ontario (ACSO) pour un leadership dans l’ensemble du secteur de la santé communautaire comme au niveau interne, proposant des solutions originales aux problèmes posés par les membres;

2.

aient un sens d’appartenance à l’ACSO et participent activement à ses initiatives à l’échelle de la province.

conseil d’administration

1999-2000 Présidente : Patricia McLean, Elmira Comité exécutif

Vice Président : Robert Groves, Lanark Secrétaire : Norm Tulsiani, Toronto Trésoriers : Walter Weary, Toronto Liana Frenette, Thunder Bay Administrateurs

l’association :

1.

a efficacement positionné les centres de santé dans le cadre général du secteur de la santé en Ontario;

2.

est reconnue et sollicitée par les fournisseurs de soins de santé comme une association de spécialistes des soins de santé primaires s’appuyant sur une politique de pointe;

3.

a efficacement établi un dialogue ouvert parmi les centres membres.

APPROUVÉ EN OCTOBRE 1999 PAR LE CONSEIL D’ADMINISTRATION DE L’ACSO

Richard Bissonnette, Cornwall Denise Brooks, Hamilton Betty Kennedy, Thunder Bay Marina Lundrigan, Dorchester Susan Milankov, Toronto Jack McCarthy, Ottawa Altaf Stationwala, Toronto

liste du personnel Gary O’Connor, directeur général Susan Arai, recherchiste spécialisée en information Rishia Burke, coordonnatrice, enrichissement des centres Carole Elliott, coordonnatrice, communications et développement Charmaine Haddock, secrétaire-réceptionniste Arlene Herman, coordonnatrice, enrichissement des centres Momoudou Jeng, coordonnateur, systèmes d’évaluation des programmes Marion Jones, assistante, systèmes d’information Cory LeBlanc, adjointe administrative Joe Leonard, conseiller en soutien à la haute direction Christine Miller, adjointe administrative Linda Stewart, technologie de l’information 1


comités Planification des congrès

Sous-comité consultatif de la recherche

Co-présidentes : Marina Lundrigan, Conseil d’administration de l’ACSO Beth Beader, CSC de North Hamilton Comité : Patrick Lapointe, représentant, RCACCS Dianne Musgrove, ACSA, Noojnowin Teg Teo Owang, CSC du Centre de Toronto ACSO : Carole Elliott, Cory LeBlanc, Gary O’Connor

Présidente : Rosana Pellizzari, CSC de Davenport Perth Michael Birmingham, CSC de Carlington Jan Campbell, CSC de Davenport Perth Dale Guenter, CSC de North Hamilton Carla Palmer, CSC de Barrie Pamela Smit, CSC Centretown Altaf Stationwala, Conseil de l’ACSO David Thornley, ministère de la Santé Karen Tu, IRSS Walter Weary, CSC du Centre de Toronto Jack Williams, IRSS Lynn Wilson, CSC de Four Villages ACSO : Momodou Jeng Gary O’Connor Linda Stewart

Coordination des systèmes d’information

Co-présidents : Barbara MacKinnon, Services communautaires et de santé Pinecrest-Queensway Altaf Stationwala, Conseil de l’ACSO Membres : France Gélinas, Région du Nord Jeanne Goodhand, Région de l’Est Cathy Paul, Région de Toronto Jean-Gilles Pelletier, Région de Toronto Clint Rohr, Région du Sud-est Walter Weary, Conseil de l’ACSO Membres extraordinaires : Jan Barnsley, Université de Toronto Jack Williams, IRSS Représentants du ministère de la Santé, David Thornley, Wayne Oake ACSO : Marion Jones, Linda Stewart Gary O’Connor, membre d’office Systèmes d’information, sous-comité de soutien aux membres

2

Président : Jean-Gilles Pelletier Pam Ferguson, Région de l’Est Suzanne Giroux Sheldrick, francophone Simon Hagens, Région du Sud-ouest John Hawkins, Région de l’Est Michelle Hurtubise, Région du Centre Ella Litwin, Région du Centre Kay Marsh, Région du Centre Christine Randle, Région du Centre Jennifer Rayner, Région du Sud-ouest Lori Trelinski, Région du Nord Sue Vieira, Région du Sud-ouest Karen Yik, Région du Centre Représentant du ministère de la santé, Jeff Kwok ACSO : Marion Jones Linda Stewart, représentante du CCSI

Secrétariat des membres

Co-Présidents : Robert Groves, Conseil de l’ACSO Susan Milankov, Conseil de l’ACSO Robert Bisson, CSC de Hamilton-Wentworth- Niagara Susan Bland, Centre des jeunes Heather MacDonald, CSC de Woolwich Peter Marshall, CSC de Mary Berglund Peter McKenna, CSC de la Côte de sable Marilyn Nadjiwan Rasi, Centre de santé de Shkagamik-Kwe ACSO : Arlene Herman Nominations

Président : Norm Tulsiani, Conseil de l’ACSO Eunadie Johnson, Women’s Health in Women’s Hands David Hole, CSC du Sud-est d’Ottawa Wanda MacDonald, CSC de North Lanark D’office : Pat McLean, présidente de l’ACSO Gary O’Connor, directeur général de l’ACSO Relations publiques

Président : Jack McCarthy, Conseil de l’ACSO Denise Brooks, CSC du centre urbain de Hamilton Bill Davidson, Assn. Langs Farm Village Liana Frenette, membre du conseil, CSC de Ogden East End Hazelle Palmer, Planned Parenthood of Toronto ACSO : Carole Elliott, Gary O’Connor


RÉsolutions

Président : Norm Tulsiani, Conseil de l’ACSO David Hole, CSC du Sud-est d’Ottawa Eunadie Johnson, CSC Women’s Health in Women’s Hands Wanda McDonald, CSC de North Lanark Pat McLean, présidente, Conseil de l’ACSO Gary O’Connor, directeur général de l’ACSO

prix

de l’ASCO

la santé

est une affaire communautaire 1998

Roger et Vivianne Chartrand, New Liskeard Eastern Ontario Chiropractic Society, Ottawa McNeil Consumer Products Company, Guelph Csilla Nagy, Toronto Raymonde Pelland, Sudbury Pamela Prinold, Toronto Centre communautaire Welcome Inn, Hamilton 1999

1993 - Ruth Wildgen, Ottawa 1994 - Omer Deslaurier, Ottawa 1995 - Michael Rachlis et Carol Kushner, Toronto 1996 - Fredrick H. Griffith, Sault Ste. Marie 1997 - Mary Berglund, Ignace 1998 - Cathy Crowe, Toronto 1999 - Dennise Albrecht, Ottawa 2000 - Linda Jones, Ottawa et Catherine Walker, Toronto

prix

prix

EPIC 2000

Le prix d’excellence on soins de santé primaires (EPIC) honore la diversité et la souplesse de programmes conçus pour répondre aux besoins particuliers des personnes dans leur collectivé. Dévloppement communautaire

North Lanark Community Health Centre - Projet d’approche pour les jeunes Programmes et Services

Hamilton Urban Core Community Health Centre - Programme communautaire de santé bucco-dentaire Mention d’honneurr

Gateway Community Health Centre - Programme de santé pour les diabétiques

Dr Terry Hicks, Barrie Jardins communautaires de Cornwall Merrickville Senior Walking Groups McDonald Corners, Elphin Recreation et Arts Association, Lanark Victim Services of North Leeds, Portland Catherine Walker, Ajax 2000

Linda Carr, North Leeds Club 74, Merrickville-Wolford Doreen Chapman, Longlac Dwayne Cline, Hamilton Ana Costa, Toronto Penny Driediger, Hamilton Larry Elliott, Barrie Marta Escobar, Toronto Diane Holmes, Ottawa Rosa Iliev, Toronto Linda Jones, Ottawa Laurette Lévy, Toronto Paul A. Morin, Toronto Maleda Mulu, Toronto Ruth Montoya, Toronto Qamar Osman, Toronto Joyce Phillips, Toronto

partenariats Regroupement canadien des associations de centres communautaires de santé, RCACCS Partenariat sur les déterminants de la santé, PDS Ontario Health Providers Alliance, OHPA Ontario Healthy Communities Coalition, OHCC Association pour la santé publique de l’Ontario, ASPO Conseil ontarien des affaires rurales, COAR 3


table des

matières

Vision ........................................................................page 1 Conseil d’administration ............................................page 1 Liste du personnel ......................................................page 1 Comités ......................................................................page 2 Prix ............................................................................page 3 Partenariats ................................................................page 3

message

de la direction

Message de la direction ..............................................page 4 L’exercice 1999-2000 a été marqué par la croissance de l’AssoOrientations stratégiques ............................................page 6 -Renforcer le rôle des centres de santé ................page 8 -Soutien et développement des membres ............page 8

ciation des centres de santé de l’Ontario; croissance fondée sur les activités et réalisations des dernières années. Nos projets de défense des droits des patients commencent à donner

-Assurer la stabilité financière............................page 10

des résultats tangibles. Notre projet de préparation électorale et

-Soutenir les nouveaux organismes de soins de santé primaires qui ont les mêmes buts et les mêmes valeurs.. ........................................................................page 11

notre exposé de principe Investir dans les services communautaires de santé primaires : proposition permettant de répondre aux besoins en matière de services de santé pri-

-Resserrer les liens entre l’ACSO et ses membres ..page 11

maires en Ontario, ont permis de classer l’Association parmi les

-Promouvoir une saine politique de santé..........page 11

participants au débat sur la réforme des soins de santé primaires.

-Développement du Conseil de l’ACSO............ page 11

L’adhésion de l’ACSO aux buts et objectifs de notre orientation

États financiers ........................................................page 12

stratégique permet au Conseil d’administration et à l’organisme de conserver leur orientation et leur efficacité. Cette orientation stratégique consiste à :

• renforcer le rôle des centres de santé dans le système général de prestation des services de santé et de services sociaux;

• appuyer activement le perfectionnement des membres actuels; • assurer la stabilité financière de l’ACSO; • soutenir les organismes nouveaux et naissants de soins de santé primaires qui partagent nos objectifs et nos valeurs; Couverture : l'illustration de la couverture représente le Prix ACSO d'excellence pour les soins de santé primaires. Illustration : Susan Todd Conception : Millie Shale Traduction : Services linguistiques HSN, Gloucester 4

• renforcer les relations entre les centres affiliés et l’ACSO; • promouvoir une saine politique de santé publique. • travailler au perfectionnement du Conseil d'administration de l'ACSO


Ce rapport annuel présente les principales activités que nous avons

remercier le Conseil d’administration de l’ACSO de 1999-2000

entreprises cette année au nom de nos membres.

et profitons de l'occasion pour remercier aussi très chaleureusement les administrateurs sortants Marina Lundrigan, de Paris et

Ces activités ne sont rendues possibles que grâce au financement

Jack McCarthy, d’Ottawa.

et au soutien reçus de nos bailleurs de fonds et à l’aide fournie par nos bénévoles et notre personnel.

L'appui des membres est essentiel pour que l’ACSO puisse défendre les intérêts des centres de santé auprès des principaux

Nous tenons particulièrement à remercier les centres membres de l'ACSO dont la contribution, par l'effort dynamique de leurs bénévoles et de leur personnel, nous permettent de travailler ensemble sur de nombreux projets. Nous tenons également à manifester notre gratitude à la Direction de la santé

responsables des soins de santé et du gouvernement. Nous tenons à reconnaître aussi l'apport des personnes qui font profiter les comités de leur expertise. Grâce à leur participation aux affaires de l’Association, nos décisions peuvent refléter la diversité et la sagesse collective de nos membres.

communautaire du ministère de la Santé, surtout pour son financement des projets de développement des centres, systèmes

Le nouveau millénaire marque le début d’un temps nouveau

d’information et évaluation des systèmes, lesquels ont grande-

pour les centres de santé. Tous les secteurs du système recon-

ment contribué au bien-être des centres de santé.

naissent la nécessité d'une réforme et un bon nombre admettent l'idée qu’un modèle de soins comme le nôtre est essentiel

Notre projet Contacts – site Web, livret et affiches – aide beau-

au bien-être de la population.

coup le public à comprendre les facteurs déterminants de la santé. Nous remercions la Section de la santé publique de la

Les centres de santé sont prêts à jouer un rôle de premier plan

Direction générale de la promotion et des programmes de santé

dans la prestation des soins de santé primaires en Ontario.

- (Ontario) de Santé Canada, de financer ce projet.

Pour nous, l’année qui se termine a été une année de croissance et celles qui s'annoncent verront croître encore nos possibilités et

D'autre part, le Conseil d’administration de l’ACSO s’est, une fois de plus, réuni dans des centres situés un peu partout dans la province, permettant à nos administrateurs de comprendre les problèmes locaux et offrant aux conseils d’administration

notre importance. L'avenir nous offrira d’excellentes occasions de faire valoir nos solutions aux besoins des Ontariens en matière de soins de santé. En travaillant ensemble, nous pourrons élargir notre champ d’action et nos effectifs.

locaux l’occasion de constituer un réseau avec les représentants provinciaux. Merci aux centres qui nous ont accueillis : Centre de santé communautaire de l’Estrie, Cornwall; Hamilton Urban Core CHC; et LAMP, Etobicoke.

La Présidente,

Le Directeur exécutif,

E. Patricia McLean

Gary O’Connor

L’Association a la chance de pouvoir compter sur un groupe d’administrateurs aussi dévoués. En votre nom, nous tenons donc à 5


orientations stratégiques

de l’ACSO

Tous les ans, le Conseil d’administration de l’ACSO se réunit pour se pencher sur les orientations

stratégiques de l’association en regard des réalisations passées, des défis à venir et de l’actualité

dans le domaine de la santé. Les activités de l’association pendant l’année sont passées en revue en

regard de ces orientations stratégiques afin que les activités de l’ACSO restent bien axées sur leurs

objectifs. En juin 1999, le Conseil d’administration a établi les stratégies suivantes pour 1999-2002 :


1 2 3 4 5

6 7

Renforcer le rôle des centres de santé dans le cadre général du système de prestation des services sociaux et de santé

Soutenir activement le développement et le perfectionnement des membres

Assurer la stabilité financière de l’ACSO

Soutenir les nouveaux organismes de soins de santé primaires ayant les mêmes objectifs et les mêmes valeurs

Resserrer les liens entre l’ACSO et ses membres

Promouvoir une saine politique publique de santé

Perfectionnement des qualités et compétences du Conseil de l’ACSO

7


Fin du gel financier

1. renforcer le rôle des centres de santé Projets de promotion des droits

Le renforcement du rôle des centres de santé a pour objectif général de promouvoir le modèle des centres de santé et de solliciter des ressources supplémentaires. Nos projets de défense des droits procèdent de cette initiative. La préparation et la distribution du document publié en décembre 1998 sous le titre Investing in Community Primary Health Services: A proposition to help meet primary health service needs in Ontario (L’investissement dans les services de santé primaires : proposition pour la prestation des services nécessaires en Ontario) a jeté les bases des projets de l’ACSO pour la promotion des droits. Ce document contient les points de vue de l’association selon lesquels, pour que la population ontarienne puisse recevoir de bons soins de santé primaires, le gouvernement devrait : a. augmenter le nombre de centres de santé de 65 à 130 en trois ans; b. étendre les programmes et services offerts dans les centres existants afin d’élargir l’accès aux programmes de maintien et d’amélioration de la santé. Cet exposé de principe a été distribué notamment aux représentants du gouvernement et aux organismes de santé connexes.

Préparation aux élections 1999

Les centres membres se sont joints à nous dans l’élaboration d’une stratégie d’élections concertée par laquelle nous avons placé notre position sur le calendrier des activités publiques. Des représentants de l’ACSO et des bénévoles ont rencontré des candidats aux élections pour leur exposer nos objectifs et gagner leur appui au modèle de centres de santé. Au cours de cet intéressant projet, d’importants contacts ont été établis et le modèle des centres de santé a soulevé un bel enthousiasme. Phase II

Au cours de l’année écoulée, nous avons recueilli des données et précisé notre position en vue de la prochaine étape de notre campagne. Le document Community Health Centres: A Cost-Effective Solution to Pimary Health Care Reform (Les centres de santé communautaires : une solution économique pour la réforme des soins de santé primaires) a été publié au printemps. Une fois de plus, les membres du Conseil de l’ACSO et les centres membres ont travaillé pour que notre réponse-santé aux besoins de la population ontarienne reste à l’avant-plan dans l’esprit des décideurs. 8

Au cours de l’année 1999, le gel financier imposé aux nouveaux centres de santé a été levé. Le ministère de la Santé et les Soins de longue durée ont annoncé l’octroi de fonds au Centre de santé intercommunautaire du centre-ville de Kitchener, au centre communautaire rural de soins de santé primaires de Grand Bend et région ainsi qu’à ses satellites de Crysler (Centre de santé communautaire de l’Estrie), Chelmsford et Hanmer (Centre de santé communautaire de Sudbury) et à la clinique de santé d’Armstrong (Ogden East End). Enquête sur les salaires

En juin 1999, l’ACSO a publié les résultats de l’enquête sur les salaires. Celle-ci a révélé que les salaires du personnel des centres de santé sont inférieurs au niveau du marché et que les éléments les plus touchés sont les cadres moyens et supérieurs. Cette enquête nous a servi pour solliciter des fonds supplémentaires au titre des salaires et de la parité salariale auprès de la ministre de la Santé et de divers paliers de son ministère ainsi que des membres du Cabinet.

2. soutien et développement des membres L’ACSO soutient les centres membres

L’ACSO soutient les centres membres par les moyens suivants : a. Soutien aux technologies d’information; b. Systèmes d’évaluation; c. Programme Bâtir des organismes plus sains (BOPS)

Accréditation et gestion de qualité; d. Divers programmes de développement ~Soutien à la haute direction, ~Projets exemplaires, ~Préparation pour les ateliers BOPS, ~Ateliers de perfectionnement pour le Conseil d’administration; e. An 2000; f. Enquête sur les salaires; g. Résolutions de l’assemblée générale annuelle 1999. Soutien aux technologies d’information

Au cours de l’année écoulée, nous avons entrepris d’importantes activités de soutien aux technologies d’information : analyse des besoins, choix d’un fournisseur et mise en œuvre d’un programme à l’échelle de la province. Un nouveau logiciel a été installé dans cinquante centres de santé communautaire, puis adapté aux exigences du système d’évaluation de programme des CSC pour la collecte de données. Cette installation comprenait la mise à niveau du matériel pour répondre aux nouvelles normes conjointement établies avec le vendeur,


l’ACSO et le ministère de la Santé. Les CSC ont reçu la formation nécessaire pour utiliser ce nouveau produit et devraient commencer à présenter au Ministère des données d’évaluation au cours de l’année prochaine. Systèmes d’évaluation

À l’origine, le système d’évaluation de programme avait été établi dans les CSC en 1997-1998. Depuis, les centres recueillent des données démographiques sur les clients ainsi que des données de service sur les clients individuels et les groupes. Cette année, on a commencé à recueillir de l’information sur les initiatives communautaires après l’installation d’un modèle de données mis au point l’année dernière. Les questions de qualité des données ont été réglées pour le système d’évaluation de programme des CSC et les données existantes ont été passées en revue et épurées. Cela a permis de préparer un manuel de normes sur la saisie des données afin de garantir la permanence de l’uniformité des données dans tous les CSC. En outre, le sous-comité de soutien au utilisateurs a été formé et chargé d’assurer le contrôle de la qualité en examinant continuellement les problèmes de données. Programme Bâtir des organismes plus sains (BOPS) Accréditation et gestion de qualité

Le programme Bâtir des organismes plus sains santé (BOPS) a été établi par l’ACSO en collaboration avec les centres membres et le ministère de la Santé pour donner une mesure objective du rendement de ces centres en vue d’en améliorer la qualité et de diffuser les exemples d’excellence. Le processus BOPS est également utilisé parallèlement à un programme d’accréditation offert par Commuait Organizational Health Inc., organisme administrant un programme d’accréditation et d’évaluation par les pairs pour les centres de santé de l’Ontario. Le rôle de l’ACSO est de soutenir les centres de santé et de veiller à ce qu’ils disposent des ressources nécessaires en préparation du processus BOPS et de leur accréditation. Les ressources actuellement disponibles comprennent une bibliothèque de référence, des ateliers et l’élaboration de modèles de politiques et de procédures. On procède en outre à la mise à jour du manuel BOPS. Soutien à la haute direction

Notre nouveau programme de soutien à la direction a connu un excellent départ. Il comprend deux grands axes : a. des ateliers et des séminaires pour les directeurs, les ges-

tionnaires et les membres du conseil d’administration des centres de santé; b. des services exécutifs de consultation fournis aux centres à l’appui de leur processus de décision. Ce programme vise à : a. appuyer le processus de décision et de planification à long

terme de la haute direction, incluant le conseil d’administration;

b. stabiliser l’exploitation des centres de santé; c. renforcer la position des centres de santé dans le cadre de

la réforme des soins de santé; d. réduire le stress personnel auquel sont soumis les participants; e. améliorer la résolution des conflits mettant en cause l’organisation et les ressources humaines; f. appuyer l’expérimentation avec les initiatives de programme, les partenaires et les alliés locaux, les nouvelles voies de financement et tout autre forme de soutien financier; g. mieux faire connaître le rôle des centres de santé dans la prestation locale des soins de santé; h. traiter les nouvelles questions. Les évaluations ont révélé que les participants ont tiré du programme des données utiles et qu’ils en appuient l’extension. Au cours de la prochaine étape, on examinera la possibilité d’organiser des séminaires spécialement adaptés aux centres de santé de type centre d’excellence. Projets exemplaires

Le projet des pratiques modèles, lancé en 1998, s’est poursuivi au cours de l’année écoulée. L’objectif est d’établir, pour le personnel clinique et responsable de la promotion de la santé, une vision commune intégrée des meilleures pratiques en établissant des principes communs et une perspective comprenant une approche pluridisciplinaire des soins de santé. Cette année, le travail a porté sur l’étude des pratiques modèles dans la gestion du diabète. En comparant trois centres de santé, nous avons adopté une définition plus large des pratiques modèles dans les CSC; définition qui comprend les questions de mise en œuvre d’une ligne directrice, les ressources, la diversité communautaire et la formation d’équipes pluridisciplinaires. En outre, plusieurs documents de travail ont été préparés et distribués pour encourager le dialogue dans ce secteur. Au cours de l’année écoulée, l’ACSO a établi un climat de réceptivité propice à l’élaboration des meilleures pratiques de promotion de la santé, en favorisant l’accès à l’enseignement et en diffusant des lignes directrices. Ateliers de perfectionnement pour le Conseil d’administration

Le personnel et le conseil d’administration des CSC comptent maintenant sur ces ateliers de perfectionnement de l’ACSO pour discuter de questions d’actualité et constituer un réseau avec leurs collègues des centres voisins. Cette année également, l’association a organisé une série d’ateliers d’automne et d’hiver Les participants ont apprécié, notamment à la session d’automne, l’occasion qui leur était donnée de s’informer sur les divers modèles de direction. Quant aux ateliers d’hiver, ils ont porté sur la réforme des soins de santé. Les membres du conseil de l’ACSO y ont animé les échanges et suscité des dialogues animés sur le rôle du modèle du CSC dans la réforme. 9


An 2000

Programme d’action

Beaucoup d’activités ont été organisées pour préparer l’ACSO et aider ses membres à se préparer pour l’an 2000. L’adhésion de l’association à la Ontario Health Provider’s Alliance a été très précieuse pour obtenir des renseignements à jour pour ses membres et permettre à ces derniers d’assister aux ateliers et de participer aux comités de planification d’urgence dans leurs collectivités. Les gros efforts déployés par l’ACSO et ses membres pour cette préparation et pour établir des mesures correctives ont permis de n’avoir que des problèmes mineurs après le 1er janvier 2000.

...travailler avec Women’s Health in Women’s Hands (WHIWH) pour faire connaître le Programme d’action aux centres membres.

Résolutions de l’assemblée générale annuelle 1999

À l’assemblée générale annuelle 1999, les délégués votants ont approuvé les cinq résolutions suivantes : a. Analyse comparative des CSC; b. Services de bénévolat; c. Programme d’action; d. Établissement de partenariats; e. Travail social et Loi sur les services sociaux.

Analyse comparative des CSC

Que l’ACSO entreprenne une analyse comparative pour examiner les modèles de financement des centres de santé adoptés par le ministère de la Santé, afin de cerner les incohérences et de solliciter des ressources suffisantes pour tous les centres. Mesure à prendre : l’ACSO a fait enquête dans des centres de santé pour établir les sources de revenu, les niveaux de programme et de dotation. Les résultats permettront de comparer les centres de santé en zone urbaine et rurale ainsi que dans les régions éloignées à d’autres modèles organisationnels de services de santé. Ce rapport soutiendra la promotion des intérêts et des besoins des centres de santé en matière de financement, de programmation et d’administration. Services de bénévolat

Étudier les services de bénévolat, c’est-à-dire les ressources humaines et financières qui s’y rattachent ainsi que leur portée et leurs difficultés, pour informer le ministère de la Santé du rôle des bénévoles dans les CSC et faire pression pour obtenir assez de fonds. Mesure à prendre : Les coordonnateurs des bénévoles se sont réunis en groupe de réflexion pour parler des besoins et tester la méthode de recherche. Les centres de santé ont été sondés pour recueillir des données sur l’usage qu’ils font des bénévoles et le soutien apporté par ceux-ci. Après évaluation, un exposé de principe a été préparé sur l’apport des bénévoles. Cet exposé instruira le ministère de la Santé sur la valeur des bénévoles dans les centres de santé.

Mesure à prendre : l’ACSO a envoyé à ses membres un dossier d’information et un sondage pour appuyer le projet et a travaillé avec WHIWH à assurer le suivi du sondage et pour appuyer le travail des membres concernant le Programme d’action. Établir des partenariats

Établir une stratégie de partenariat avec des intervenants clés pour doter les régions mal desservies des professionnels de la santé, du personnel médical et des ressources humaines qui leur manquent. Mesure à prendre : L’ACSO est membre du Conseil ontarien des affaires rurales et promeut les centres de santé comme partie de la réponse aux problèmes des collectivités rurales et éloignées. Elle est également membre de la Ontario Healthy Communities Coalition, qui s’applique à soutenir l’action locale pour répondre aux besoins des collectivités en matière de services et de santé. Le travail social et la Loi sur les services sociaux

Étudier les répercussions de la Loi sur les services sociaux sur le système des centres de santé. Évaluer les titres de poste, les équivalences et les salaires et informer les centres des résultats obtenus. Mesure à prendre : Un groupe de travail s’est réuni pour préparer des recommandations qui permettront aux centres de santé d’adapter les services sociaux en vue de mieux les conformer à la loi. Le groupe de travail sur les salaires et les avantages sociaux a élaboré un poste de deuxième ordre et adapté les descriptions de travail pour les rendre plus génériques. Il a aussi donné un nouveau nom au poste de conseiller I et II (clinique).

3. assurer la stabilité financière Le développemnt d’entreprise

Le développement d’entreprise comme moyen d?améliorer l’assise financière de l’ACSO a fait encore un important pas en avant en permettant de dresser une série de plans d’affaires. Le projet d’exposition de l?association est entré dans sa deuxième année au cours du congrès annuel, Connexion Santé 2000. Le nombre d’exposants a fortement augmenté, passant de 11 en 1999 à 20 en 2000. D’autres plans d’affaires sont en préparation et seront lancés en 2000.

10


4. soutenir les nouveaux organismes de soins de santé primaires qui ont les mêmes buts et les mêmes valeurs

Autres activités : a. Créer dans le bulletin d’information de l’ACSO, health-

link, une chronique permanente portant sur des questions intéressant les dirigeants bénévoles ; b. Examiner les nouvelles demandes d’adhésion; c. Informer les membres sur le tout nouveau site Internet de l’ACSO; d. Répondre aux nouvelles questions qui se posent concernant les membres.

Aide et soutien

Nous continuons à soutenir le développement des centres de santé pour Autochtones et trouvons encourageant que trois nouveaux centres se soient joints à l’ACSO cette année. Au cours de l’année, nous avons rencontré, contacté et/ou écrit à plus de 200 groupes communautaires. Plus de 55 groupes s’intéressent au modèle des centres de santé et attendent que des fonds soient disponibles pour poursuivre leur développement.

6. promouvoir une saine politique de santé

Commission de restructuration des services de santé

Pleins feux sur les communications

La Commission de restructuration des services de santé (CRSS) a publié un document intitulé Primary Health Care Strategy (Stratégie de soins de santé primaires), qui appuie notre modèle. L’ACSO a préparé une réponse à ce document avec une proposition concernant un nouveau modèle de soins de santé primaires à direction communautaire.

C’est grâce à nos alliances avec d’autres organismes, comme l’ASPO, le RCACCS et le COAR, que s’est fait l’essentiel du travail touchant la promotion d’une saine politique publique. Nous avons tenté de rehausser, parmi les membres, le profil des questions de réforme de la santé par les ateliers de perfectionnement du conseil d’administration.

5. resserrer les liens entre l’ACSO et ses membres Resserrer les liens

Le secrétariat des membres s’est appliqué à cerner les besoins de ses membres et à y répondre. L’un de ses objectifs est de trouver un moyen, au cours des ateliers de perfectionnement régionaux, d’établir un réseau d’administrateurs. Les membres des conseils d’administration gagnent à s’entretenir ensemble de questions d’intérêt commun. Il a été question, d’autre part, des cotisations et de leur structure. La possibilité de vendre activement des adhésions de membre associé a été étudiée et rejetée.

7. développement du Conseil de l’ACSO Besoins du Conseil

Nous avons énoncé les besoins de notre conseil d’administration en matière de formation et prévu, pour y répondre, un budget 2000/2001. En outre, l’ACSO a amorcé un processus de planification de la relève et de contrôle des compétences et des acquisitions des conseils. Elle se penchera aussi sur les questions de diversité et d’accès à mesure que s’étendra son champ d’action.

11


RAPPORT C O M PATA B L E A G R É É 5805, CHEMIN WHITTLE , SUITE 209 MISSISSAUGA (ONTARIO) L4Z 2J1 TÉLÉPHONE: (905) 502-7660 TÉLÉCOPIEUR: (905) 502-7662 e-mail grclow@netcom.ca

Aux membres de l’Association des centres de santé de l’Ontario, J’ai vérifié le bilan de l’Association des centres de santé de l’Ontario au 31 mars 2000 et les états des résultats, des recettes, des dépenses, des soldes de fonds, des changements de situation financière, des bénéfices non répartis et des flux de trésorerie de l’exercice terminé à cette date. La responsabilité de ces états financiers incombe à la direction de l’Association. Ma responsabilité consiste à exprimer une opinion sur ces états financiers en me fondant sur ma vérification. Ma vérification a été effectuée conformément aux normes de vérification généralement reconnues. Ces normes exigent que la vérification soit planifiée et exécutée de manière à fournir l’assurance raisonnable que les états financiers sont exempts d’inexactitudes importantes. La vérification comprend le contrôle par sondages des éléments probants à l’appui des montants et des autres éléments d’information fournis dans les états financiers. Elle comprend également l’évaluation des principes comptables suivis et des estimations importantes faites par la direction, ainsi quíune appréciation de la présentation d’ensemble des états financiers. À mon avis, ces états financiers donnent, à tous les égards importants, une image fidèle de la situation financière de l’Association des centres de santé de l’Ontario au 31 mars 2000, ainsi que des résultats de son exploitation, de ses changements de situation financière et de ses flux de trésorerie pour l’exercice terminé à cette date selon les principes comptables généralement reconnus.

Graham R. Clow C.A. 11 mai 2000 Mississauga

12


ASSOCIATION DES CENTRES DE SANTÉ DE L’ONTARIO BILAN AU 31 MARS 2000

2000 Fonds de fonctionnement

2000 Fonds à des fins spéciales

2000

1999

Total

Total

ACTIF

Actifs de roulement

Encaisse et dépôt à court terme Comptes débiteurs Frais payés d’avance

288 606 $ 211 144 36 401 536 151

172 781 $ 1 180 173 961

461 387 $ 211 144 37 581 710 112

327 754 $ 35 799 31 580 395 133

16 797 16 797 -

26 516 26 516 -

43 313 43 313 -

43 313 43 313 -

536 151 $

173 961 $

710 112 $

395 133 $

383 249 $ 79 604 462 853

125 923 $ 21 001 8 078 155 002

509 172 $ 21 001 87 682 617 855

23 446 $ 111 061 161 265 295 772

73 298 536 151 $

18 959 173 961 $

92 257 710 112 $

99 361 395 133 $

Matériel de bureau

Coût Moins : amortissement cumulé

PASSIF ET FONDS CONSOLIDÉS

Passif à court terme

Comptes créditeurs et charge à payer Payable à la SOCI (note 3) Subventions disponibles à rembourser Recettes différées

Solde de fonds

Approuvé par le Conseil

13


ASSOCIATION DES CENTRES DE SANTÉ DE L’ONTARIO ÉTAT DES RECETTES ET DÉPENSES ET DES SOLDES DE FONDS POUR L’EXERCICE FINANCIER PRENANT FIN LE 31 MARS 2000

2000 Fonds de fonctionnement

2000 Fonds à des fins spéciales

2000

1999

Total

Total

Recettes

-$ 176 687 9 600 -

1 506 186 $ 128 509 678 988 -

102 540 19 008 34 561 342 396

15 365 2 329 048

19 008 49 926 2 671 444

94 856 24 376 12 000 51 720 1 342 725

119 805

1 270 696 393 700

1 270 696 513 505

374 867

12 240 31 483 47 725

225 111 248 899 140 259

237 351 280 382 187 984

176 005 230 690 352 124

85 047 37 801 334 101

65 782 2 344 447

85 047 103 583 2 678 548

86 258 26 120 157 089 1 403 153

Excédent des recettes sur les dépenses (des dépenses sur les recettes)

8 295

(15 399)

(7 104)

(60 428)

Soldes de fonds, en début d’exercice

65 003

34 358

99 361

159 789

Soldes de fonds, en fin d’exercice

73 298 $

18 959 $

92 257 $

Subventions du ministère de la Santé de l’Ontario Subventions du gouvernement fédéral Cotisations Cotisations spéciales Mise à niveau des systèmes informatiques des CSC Frais d’accréditation (voir la note 3 et la liste) Conférences annuelles de 1999 ACSO Grands Lacs Frais de secrétariat Autres recettes

1 506 186 $ 128 509 176 687 9 600 678 988 -

102 540

734 587 $ 89 717 163 223 24 775 147 471

Dépenses

Matériel et logiciel Salaires et dépenses connexes Administration (voir la liste) Directes Autre Consultation Conférences annuelles de 1999 ACSO Grands Lacs Dépenses de réunions

14

99 361 $


ASSOCIATION DES CENTRES DE SANTÉ DE L’ONTARIO ÉTAT DES CHANGEMENTS DE SITUATION FINANCIÈRE POUR L’EXERCICE PRENANT FIN LE 31 MARS 2000

2000 Fonds de fonctionnement

2000 Fonds à des fins spéciales

2000

1999

Total

Total

Activités de fonctionnement

Excédent des recettes sur les dépenses (des dépenses sur les recettes) Ajouter : Dépenses hors caisse Amortissement

8 295 $

(15 399) $

(7 104) $

(60 428) $

8 295

(15 399)

(7 104)

25 586 (34 842)

Changements aux éléments hors caisse du fonds de roulement 207 396

(66 659)

140 737

(74 661)

215 691

(82 058)

133 633

(109 503)

72 915

254 839

327 754

(10 416) 447 673

172 781 $

461 387 $

327 754 $

Encaissements provenant des activités de fonctionnement

Activités d’investissement

Acquisitions de matériel de bureau Encaisse et dépôt à terme en début d’exercice

Encaisse et dépôt à terme en fin d’exercice

288 606 $

ASSOCIATION DES CENTRES DE SANTÉ DE L’ONTARIO NOTES RELATIVES AUX ÉTATS FINANCIERS 31 MARS 2000 1. Statut de l’Association L’Association a été incorporée, sans capital social, en 1982 par lettres patentes telles que modifiées en 1996 en vertu de la Loi sur les corporations de l’Ontario. De plus, l’Association est enregistrée comme une oeuvre de charité aux termes de la Loi fédérale de l’impôt sur le revenu. L’Association a pour mission de représenter les centres affiliés dans la promotion d’une politique de santé publique et de santé personnelle et communautaire, par la création et le développement continu de centres de santé fidèles aux principes des soins de santé primaires accessibles et de qualité, de la promotion de la santé et de la participation et de la propriété collectives actives. 2. Politiques comptables importantes Base de la comptabilité et de la présentation de l’état financier L’Association fait rapport de ses recettes et de ses dépenses sous forme de comptabilité d’exercice et s’en tient à la méthode de report d’impôt fixe pour la comptabilité des recettes, le financement des projets spéciaux étant reconnu comme une recette dans l’année où les dépenses connexes ont lieu. Suite à la prochaine page... 15


Les états financiers décrivent séparément les activités des fonds suivants gérés par l’Association : Fonds de fonctionnement : Reflète les diverses activités associées au fonctionnement quotidien de l’Association. Fonds à des fins spéciales : Reflète les diverses activités associées aux subventions reçues pour des projets précis. Immobilisations Les immobilisations sont enregistrées au prix coûtant ou, dans le cas d’apport, à la juste valeur marchande à la date de l’apport. Les immobilisations acquises pour le financement de projets précis sont amorties sur la durée du projet. D’autres immobilisations sont amorties sur leur vie utile prévue en calculant la dépréciation quant à la durée de la façon suivante : le matériel et le logiciel infor matiques sont amortis sur une période de deux ans et le reste de l’équipement est amorti sur une période de quatre ans. Recettes reportées Les recettes reportées comprennent les entrées de caisse qui ne seront reconnues comme des recettes que dans un exercice financier futur et incluent les cotisations de membres pour l’exercice financier suivant et la partie non dépensée des subventions et des autres fonds consacrés aux projets en cours. Services prêtés À défaut des quantités importantes de temps consenties bénévolement chaque année au profit de ses activités, l’Association cesserait de fonctionner efficacement. Cependant, à cause de la difficulté d’en déterminer la juste valeur sur le plan comptable, il n’est pas tenu compte des services prêtés dans les états financiers. 3.

Santé des organismes communautaires (SOC) inc. Pour entreprendre le processus d'accréditation du programme Bâtir des organismes plus sains (BOPS), les documents de l'Association, préparés en collaboration avec le ministère de la Santé, ont été accrédités pour un coût nominal annuel à Santé des organismes communautaires (SOC) inc., organisme maintenant responsable de l'examen d'agrément.

4.

Financement du ministère de la Santé Le ministère de la Santé finance bon nombre des projets de l’Association pourvu que les sommes non dépensées pour chaque projet soient remboursées au Ministère. Au 31 mars, il y avait 21 001 $ (1999 - néant) à rembourser au Ministère pour des projets terminés avec un surplus de fonds non dépensés. Comme le Ministère finance la plupart des projets spéciaux entrepris par l’Association, il est ainsi en mesure d’influer grandement sur le fonctionnement de l’Association. On gére ce risque en définissant avec précision les relations dans le cadre de marchés et de lettres de financement.

5.

Instruments financiers La valeur comptable des espèces et des dépôts à court terme, des comptes débiteurs, des comptes créditeurs et des charges à payer figurant dans le bilan s’approche de leur juste valeur respective à cause de leur échéance à court terme ou de leur capacité de liquidation rapide. Les espèces et les dépôts à court terme qui viennent à échéance le 25 avril 2000 ont été placés dans une grande banque à charte canadienne et le risque bancaire est donc jugé négligeable,

6.

Lettres de financement. L’Association s’est engagée à louer de l’espace à bureaux jusqu’au 31 mars 2001 à un loyer mensuel de 6 540 $, plus les taxes applicables. De plus, l’Association s’est engagée à louer jusqu’en 2002 de l’équipement de bureau. Les frais atteindront au moins 2 760 $ par trimestre pour chaque exercice financier jusqu’en 2002.

7.

Passif éventuel Au cours de l'année, l'Association a reçu une demande introductive d'instance faisant état de prétendus abus de procédure dans le choix de fournitures logicielles. Aux yeux du Conseil d'administration de l'Association, de sa direction et de ses conseillers, cette demande est sans fondement et sera vigoureusement contestée. Comme aucun engagement ultérieur n'est attendu autre que des frais judiciaires encourus pour défendre l'Association contre cette demande, aucune place n'a été faite à cette question dans ces états financiers.

16


Aohc annual report 1999 2000