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Leading Transformative Change REPORT ON THE 2012-2015 AOHC STRATEGIC PLAN


Association of Ontario Health Centres Report on Strategic Plan 2012-2015 TA B L E O F C O N T E N T S 1

AOHC vision & mission 2012-2015

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Board chair message

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Leading by example

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Shift the Conversation: Community Health and Wellbeing

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Making the case for healthy public policy

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Supporting populations who face systemic barriers to good health

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Championing a high performing primary health care system for Ontario

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Information management strategy

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Investing in our members

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Knowledge and learning

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Defining success 2015-2020

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Supporting AOHC

This report is also available in French upon request.


AOHC vision and mission 2012-2015 Vision The best possible health and wellbeing for everyone living in Ontario. A future without systemic barriers that prevent people from reaching their full health potential, a future in which everyone can make the choices that allow them to live a fulfilling life. A future in which individuals, families and communities are served by, and are able to actively participate in, trusted healthcare systems that respond to people’s and communities’ needs in coordinated and comprehensive ways. A future in which people share responsibility with their health providers for their health and wellbeing.

Mission As the voice of community-government primary health care in Ontario, AOHC works: To promote public policy that supports health and wellbeing, and that emphasizes health promotion and illness prevention through a strong focus on the determinants of health. To advocate for eliminating systemic barriers to health and to champion health equity. To promote people– and community-centred innovations in the primary health care system that improve health and wellbeing and support healthcare sustainability. To support our member centres to continuously improve the quality and efficiency of their services and to advocate for the resources they need to deliver high-quality care. To advocate for the protection and improvement of Medicare, ensuring that reforms to our publicly funded system focus on keeping people well and benefit everyone.

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REPORT ON STRATEGIC PLAN 2012-2015


Board chair message

An ambitious plan that has delivered strong results In 2012 AOHC launched a three year strategic plan designed to move Ontario closer to our vision of the best possible health and wellbeing for everyone. We chose to follow an ambitious two Cheryl Prescod, Board Chair part strategy: to work not only in the best interest of our member centres but for everyone living in Ontario. In both cases, we’ve made strong gains. For members we’ve delivered a wide range of supports and resources to maximize the potential to deliver the highest quality people and community centred primary health care. Working for province-wide impact, we’ve made strides advocating for health system transformation and public policy that is shaped by our guiding principles: health equity and social justice. To lay the groundwork for the long-term change we envision we’ve pulled together some powerful tools. To advance health equity we created a ground breaking Health Equity Charter. To clearly articulate our vision for primary health care we’ve refreshed our Model of Health and Wellbeing. To advocate for a higher performing primary health care system

we’ve developed ten guiding principles, many of which are now incorporated within public statements from our provincial government. As you review this report that provides some highlights of the last three years, you’ll see that innovation underscores all our efforts. We’re pioneers applying measurement frameworks that move far beyond clinical measures to evaluating health and wellbeing. Our leading edge Information Management Strategy is enabling members to drive quality improvement and our persistence in advocating for more appropriate resourcing from the provincial government has secured important wins. Looking back on these three years of achievements, I am most excited to see that AOHC is now firmly positioned to deliver even greater value in our next strategic plan. At our Annual General Meeting we will share our strategic directions as we continue our journey together to create the best possible health and wellbeing for everyone living in Ontario.

Cheryl Prescod, AOHC Board Chair

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Leading by example As you read through this report you will see that in many cases our approach has been to lead by example — while holding ourselves to the highest values and standards driven by our Model of Health and Wellbeing.

Advancing health equity Advancing health equity and reducing health disparities is perhaps the most important area of endeavour for our association. Far too many people living in Ontario suffer from poor health because of difficult living circumstances. Their health problems are not just medical or biological; they are caused by social conditions that affect access to resources and power. And their access to resources and power is often constrained by the interconnected factors like poverty, racism, sexism, homophobia, transphobia, ageism, ableism and other forms of social exclusion.

a narrow focus on treating sickness to a more comprehensive holistic approach that addresses quality of life in its full breadth of expression. To further articulate this vision, both for our member centres and the rest of the province, in 2013 we updated our 2008 Model of Care. This resulted in a revised Model of Health and Wellbeing. The principles of Health Equity, Social Justice, Community Vitality and Sense of Belonging are now key guiding principles. And three new attributes have been added: Anti-Oppression and Cultural Safety, Population Need-Based Practices and Accountability and Efficiency. As we move forward pressing for positive transformative change in our health system this model will anchor our efforts.

AOHC is committed to challenging the situations that lead to these disparities. To lead by example, in 2012 AOHC adopted a Health Equity Charter which committed our asociation to be “bold, strategic and relentless” challenging systemic barriers to good health. The charter outlined 13 areas of action AOHC members will pursue to recognize and confront barriers to equitable health. The charter is accompanied by a new Health Equity Online Resource Library that enables the sharing of tools and resources to guide our collective efforts.

Modeling the best possible delivery of primary health care AOHC believes Ontario must transform its delivery of primary health care and move from

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Shift the Conversation: Community Health and Wellbeing When we launched implementation of our strategic plan three years ago we realized some pretty big shifts had to happen in Ontario for us to realize our vision of the best possible health and wellbeing for everyone. We knew we had to shift the conversation about how our health system has traditionally been conducted and move from an emphasis on treating illness to a strong focus on preventing people from getting sick in the first place. And so between 2012 and 2015 we laid the groundwork for what we envision will be a multi-year, multi-pronged initiative to change the provincial debate, discourse and decision making around how to improve health and wellbeing in Ontario.

Championing the Canadian Index of Wellbeing (CIW) as a powerful lever for change A powerful tool to make the change we envision is the Canadian Index of Wellbeing (CIW), a comprehensive framework that measures overall quality of life. By analyzing 64 indicators grouped into eight domains, the index goes beyond economic indicators and measures quality of life relative to those things that matter to Canadians: Community Vitality, Democratic Engagement, Education, the Environment, Healthy Populations, Leisure and Culture, Living Standards and Time Use. In 2013 AOHC began piloting a wide range of CIW applications. Through the publication of a discussion paper, Measuring What Matters: How the Canadian Index of Wellbeing

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can improve quality of life in Ontario, we generated province-wide dialogue about the potential of the CIW to leverage transformative change across the province. Because of the success in our first Trillium grant we are now in the midst of another three year Ontario Trillium Fund-CIW grant. Thirty centres are applying the CIW framework and indicators in a wide range of ways: to guide strategic planning, to build community collaboratives around shared goals, to measure and improve community initiatives, to create survey tools, and to develop community and wellbeing reports to advance healthier public policy. In Ottawa, a major milestone was the release of a multi-media report called Bridging the Gap: The Ottawa Community Wellbeing Report 2014. A similar report is under development this year for Vaughan. Meanwhile, 19 centres are now conducting the “Be Well� surveys with questions based on CIW indicators.

Raising awareness about the need for shifts Community Health and Wellbeing Week (CHWW) has been another successful vehicle to raise awareness and engage the public about the need for a new kind of conversation about health and wellbeing. Over the last three years participation in CHWW has grown substantially. In 2014 over 100 events were held across Ontario.

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Making the case for healthy public policy While health providers like AOHC members can play a major role in improving health and wellbeing in the communities they serve, their efforts must be strongly supported by healthy public policy. And so over the past three years, AOHC has been a persistent voice at policy tables pressing decision makers to make the right choices to improve health and wellbeing in Ontario.

A leader advocating for high quality public dental programs Addressing the needs of people living on low incomes to access publicly funded oral health programs has been a priority. Working with partners and stakeholders, AOHC successfully advocated for increases in income eligibility so that 70,000 more low income children now have access to dental services under the Healthy Smiles Ontario program.

parliament. These efforts helped secure the government’s commitment in the 2014 Ontario budget to extend public dental programs to low income adults by 2025. Both behind the scenes, and through outreach to provincial media, AOHC will continue our efforts to convince government that oral health services should be planned and funded as part of the healthcare system.

Universal pharmacare We have also played an important role reactivating advocacy efforts for universal pharmacare. By sharing new research on pharmacare savings with the Ontario government and opposition parties, and spearheading a national network pushing for pharmacare in the next federal election we are moving the campaign forward.

Poverty eradication

70,000 more low income children eligible for dental services Since 2012, AOHC has also been providing the strategic advice to the Ontario Oral Health Alliance (OOHA). This work resulted in a public education campaign that saw 50,000 signed postcards sent to members of the provincial

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As part of the 25-in-5 Network for Poverty Reduction AOHC worked to identify and advocate for specific requests to reduce poverty in Ontario and improve community health and wellbeing. As a result of this advocacy work with partners, the minimum wage and social assistance rates have increased (though not enough). Ontario’s new Poverty Reduction Strategy includes a promise to extend health benefits to low income children, and explore options to extend health benefits to all lowincome people in the province.

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Supporting populations who face systemic barriers to good health From 2012 to 2015 AOHC responded to ongoing opportunities and threats to populations facing systemic barriers to good health.

Health to deliver leading edge, patient-centred health care for people who suffer from these painful and debilitating conditions.

Seasonal agricultural workers

As a result, in 2014, an interministerial committee was created and six medical fellowships in environmental medicine were funded through the University of Toronto’s Faculty of Medicine. At Queen’s Park, MPP John Fraser, on behalf of Minister Hoskins, stated that “it is time to bring issues related to the environment and health out of the shadows, and to shine a light on the experiences of people living with environmental health conditions in our system.”

In 2014, we achieved success through a partnership with Occupational Health Clinics for Ontario Workers that focused on providing primary health care to migrant farmworkers. As a result of a business case submitted to the Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care, the Hamilton Niagara Haldimand Brant Local Health Integration Network (HNHB LHIN) funded Grand River and Quest CHCs to deliver primary care services to seasonal agricultural workers. There is strong potential to scale this model up across the province.

Ontario Centre of Excellence in Environmental Health campaign AOHC has also tackled the growing issue of chronic, complex environmentally-associated illnesses. More than 568,000 people in Ontario over the age of 12 suffer from a range of sensitivities, syndromes and diseases caused by chemicals circulating in our environment. To address this situation, the Myalgic Encephalomyelitis Association of Ontario with support from AOHC and a steering committee, submitted a business case proposal to create an Ontario Centre of Excellence in Environmental

Rural and northern health Rural communities and providers face unique, systemic policy, service delivery and service access challenges. In partnership with Community Health Ontario, and based on consultations with diverse rural providers, a report was created to summarize issues and opportunities to form the foundation of a Rural and Northern Health Strategy. One element focuses on rural health hubs as a solution to close the service gap. AOHC participated in a multi-stakeholder advisory committee to create a Rural Health Hubs Framework for Ontario, ensuring a flexible, equity-informed and community-centred approach.

SNAPSHOT Grand River Migrant Worker Clinic In May 2014, Grand River CHC (GRCHC) opened the Grand River Migrant Worker Clinics in Simcoe and Delhi. That season, they served almost 350 seasonal agricultural workers with 500 visits. GRCHC also went beyond the clinic walls and participated in a Seasonal Agricultural Worker fair, partnered with a health literacy program, and hosted a healthy cooking demo. 5

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Championing a high performing health care system for Ontario Between 2012 and 2013, AOHC deepened our focus championing a higher performing primary health care system for Ontario. Effective and persistent efforts making our case have paid off. Our members are now referenced repeatedly in presentations from senior MOHLTC representatives as they describe their plans for health system transformation and the roll-out of Minister Eric Hoskins’ Action Plan.

Stepping up as a system player An important part of our overall strategy has been to work towards a more integrated and coordinated primary health care system. In June 2014 AOHC spearheaded and hosted a ground-breaking conference bringing together Public Health and Primary Care for the first time. The conference strengthened our links with these organizations and also highlighted for decision makers that our members are leaders in partnering with Public Health. AOHC is a key partner in the Ontario Primary Health Care Council, comprised of six other provincial associations representing primary care providers including: the Association of Family Health Teams Ontario, the Nurse Practitioners’ Association of Ontario, Ontario College of Family Physicians, the Ontario Medical Association, the Ontario Pharmacists Association, and the Registered Nurses’ Association of Ontario. We are also chairing the “Strategic Priorities Working Group”.

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Michael Rachlis and Rosanna Pellizzari presenting at the 2014 Prevent More to Treat Less joint public health and primary health care conference.

The Council’s mandate is based on primary care being the foundation of Ontario’s healthcare system. In 2014-2015 the AOHC board endorsed the Council’s foundational framework document as well as a statement on care coordination and system navigation we played a key role in crafting. Going forward we anticipate the strong collective voice of Council members will positively shape the evolution of primary health care in Ontario.

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HEALTH LINKS CHCs are actively involved in every Health Link province-wide.

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of the 45 Health Links are led or co-led by CHCs.

the report “Towards Equity in Access” enabled dialogue with decision makers about the need for improving access through appropriate planning. Meanwhile, promising initiatives led by CHCs are now underway in the Champlain, South-East and South-West LHINs that are paving the way for more people to access the benefits of our model.

No Time to Wait: Healthy Kids Strategy Defining our principles and commitments Between 2012-2015 AOHC also clearly articulated what we believe are the most important elements for system transformation. In the summer of 2012 AOHC released “An Emerging Primary Care Strategy for Ontario” that outlined changes required from provincial and LHIN decision makers. It also set out seven commitments from our member centres to enhance their contribution to an improved primary care system.

AOHC has also made progress ensuring our members and those they serve benefit from provincial programs focused on upstream interventions to prevent illness and promote healthier populations. In 2013, we organized a forum to spotlight the Healthy Kids programs (including prenatal and early years) at multiple member centres. Shortly afterwards, the provincial government’s announcement of the Healthy Kids Community Challenge provided funding for four AHACs and two Aboriginal CHCs as leads, and 22 CHCs working in partnership with their municipalities, to deliver local programs and activities that will support children to be more active and healthy.

As the province and the LHINs increased their focus on performance measurement, AOHC has also been developing the capabilities to report on our members’ efforts advancing these commitments. An updated CHC sector snapshot that demonstrates our progress is included with this report and was drawn from data from the Business Intelligence Reporting Tool (BIRT), Practice Profiles, and the results of the new organizational survey.

Advocating for population needs-based planning AOHC has also made strides facilitating the implementation of population needs-based planning. This work is aimed at increasing and improving access to primary care for populations that face barriers. The release of 7

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Information management strategy

One of the most valuable achievements of the past three years has been the implementation of AOHC’s Information Management Strategy (IMS), an especially ambitious plan to harness the power of technology to support priorities for AOHC members, as well as directions for change set by decision makers at the provincial and LHIN level.

AOHC ELECTRONIC MEDICAL RECORD PROJECT 93% COMPLETE

First guiding principle: “Get electronic” The first IMS principle was to “get electronic” — and in a big way. Over the past three years AOHC has been implementing one of Canada’s largest electronic medical records (EMR) projects. A recent evaluation has revealed participating members have increased the meaningful and advanced use of their EMR systems, leading to better quality of care for the people they serve. The project is 93% complete with 84 centres now operating the Nightingaleon-Demand EMR including: 64 Community Health Centres (CHCs), 10 Aboriginal Health Access Centres and 10 Nurse Practitioner-led Centres. A bilingual version that meets the needs of all member centres, and especially for the 6 Francophone centres, is expected by the end of 2015. Ensuring the Francophone centres are fully implemented remains a firm commitment based on health equity. Other transformational IMS changes include the implementation of BIRT (business intelligence reporting tool), the Community Initiatives Online Resource (CIOR), and coordinating

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the MIS/OHRS financial system deployment for 49 CHCs. Using these robust tools we are now equipped to analyze data across multiple programs, drive quality improvement, and help member centres make strategic planning decisions. These tools will also be invaluable to building evidence-based understanding about why funders should invest in our model.

Second guiding principle: “Share your data” The Canadian Institute for Health Information (CIHI), Institute for Clinical Evaluative Sciences (ICES), Local Health Integration Networks (LHINs) and the MOHLTC have all expressed interest in the type and quality of data being tracked by participating members. Leadership in this area is also shown by the decision of the MOHLTC to include Quality Improvement

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Decision Support Specialists on Family Health Teams; based on the success of the Data Management Coordinator (DMC) and Regional Decision Support Specialist (RDSS) model in CHCs.

Third guiding principle: “Promote collaboration” It’s clear that to build a more integrated coordinated system that supports health and wellbeing collaboration is the key. Our IM strategy promotes this collaboration within clinical teams and between organizations. It also supports broader stakeholder collaboration such as with clients (Consumer Health-e pilot projects), LHINs and MOHLTC (Health Links) and researchers (ICES, CIHI, etc.) Other valued outcomes: • EMR advanced use program (members fully utilizing available features of the EMR), quality improvement benchmarking, methodology to measure the complexity of populations served • Integration with other parts of the health system via: Hospital Report Manager, Physician Office Integration, Timely Discharge Information System, South West Physicians Office Interface to Regional EMRs, Ontario Laboratory Information System, Integrated Decision Support,

Clinical Connect, Appointment Reminder system).

Fourth guiding principle: “Improve Health” The final guiding principle is core to the business of our members: improving health. To further this goal, our strategy has focused on measuring outcomes and facilitating the adoption of clinical best practices. Over the past three years, we’ve aimed for improvements in health status and the experience people have through the health system by creating electronic clinical templates, clinical best practice resources and evidence-based research.

Evaluating success A mid-term Benefit Evaluation (BE) completed by Deloitte confirmed that the large resource investment in the IMS project added significant value. The BE study showed substantial improvements to the ability to gain insight into the performance of programs and services and how this affects the health of the people served. The next stage of the IMS will be informed by the past three years of experience, the recommendations from the BE study and the same guiding principles.

SNAPSHOT Measuring What Matters: Belonging Another successful development in our efforts to shift our health system to a wider focus has been the push for the recognition of non-clinical indicators such as measures for a sense of community belonging and physical wellbeing. These indicators have been identified and will soon be included in MSAA accountability agreements. This work, led by the AOHC Performance Management Committee, is a formal acknowledgement that health is much more than just primary health care. Better health and wellbeing begins in our homes, in our schools, in our workplaces, and in the communities where we live. 9

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Investing in our members

Our Model of Health and Wellbeing positions our member centres to be powerful catalysts for positive change as the delivery of primary heatlh care evolves and improves. But there are a wide range of constraints that prevent our members from maximizing their potential.

Advocating for appropriate resourcing To support the operations of member centres AOHC has worked diligently to overcome challenges related to capital policy barriers. Successes include:

21 $300M $10M

21 new CHC and AHAC capital projects were announced, representing a total of approximately 90 million dollars. The 2014 Ontario budget included a commitment to expand the Community Capital Fund to a 10 year strategy with $300 million to ensure adequate infrastructure capacity for AOHC’s members and community based mental health and addiction programs. The creation of a new $10M Community Infrastructure Renewal Fund to help our members and public health units with infrastructure renewal.

Budget changes:

1.5%

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AHAC budgets increased by 1.5% and in 2012 access to physician funds was given so that unused monies could be allocated where needed.

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Making the case for equitable compensation A major challenge for our centres is recruiting and retaining staff because compensation in the primary care settings is significantly less than other settings. To address this inequity, AOHC has formed an alliance with the Association of Family Health Teams Ontario, and the Nurse Practitioners’ Association of Ontario. Our alliance commissioned a report with a recommended provincial equitable sector salary grid and presented this to senior MOHLTC officials. The detailed four year plan to phase in compensation increases makes a strong case for how to address the situation. The report showed that it would take 121 million dollars to bring compensation rates to the recommended 2012 levels. This represents only one quarter of one percent of the health budget. This is an issue of the highest priority for AOHC and we will escalate our efforts in the coming months.

The need for better budget systems Community Family Health Teams (CFHTs) have traditionally been tied to line-by-line budgets constraining the ability to meet the changing needs of their organizations. Completing governance attestations showed to the MOHLTC readiness to move to a semi-global budget system. Most CFHTs are now able to allocate funds where needed within predetermined

buckets. In anticipation of Nurse PractitionerLed Clinics (NPLCs) also moving to semi-global budgets, AOHC organized three days of NPLC governance learning events.

This year, AOHC also supported AHAC members in the development of a report about the history and the Model of AHAC centres. This includes an “AHAC sector in a snapshot” and presents the Aboriginal health framework recognizing the Aboriginal right to self-determination. The report also focuses on the need to restore and rebalance the physical, mental, emotional and spiritual wellbeing of Aboriginal peoples, families, communities and nations.

SNAPSHOT The Agenda with Steve Paikin: Fixing Ontario’s Primary Care On February 25th AOHC CEO Adrianna Tetley was invited to a panel discussion on TVO’s The Agenda with Steve Paikin. She made the case for community-governed primary care models as vital building blocks in health system transformation, population needs-based planning and the benefits of salaried physicians working within interprofessional teams.

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Knowledge and learning Integral to all our efforts has been knowledge and learning support for member organizations. A wide range of sessions have provided member centres with best practices, new ideas, tools and resources to deliver high quality, people and community-centred practices grounded in the new Model of Health and Wellbeing. • In 2012, our Knowledge and Learning team led a Quality Improvement (QI) maturity assessment to benchmark member practices relative to the Excellent Care for All Act. Annual Quality Improvement professional learning events over the last few years have aimed at supporting member centres with the transition to mandatory annual quality improvement planning and strengthening clinical team practices. In 2014, the focus was on sharing best practices for increasing access and panel improvement as well as

interprofessional team practices. • Workshops to increase the capacity, competence and skills for member centres to provide accessible people-centred care for people with disabilities were well received. A total of 450 staff from 112 member centres attended the sessions that were funded by the Ministry of Economic Development, Trade and Employment in 2013 and 2014. • The Effective Governance for Quality and Patient Safety program was coordinated by AOHC in partnership with the Canadian Patient Safety Institute. A total of 517 board members and executives from 238 primary care organizations attended the workshops across Ontario including over 170 board members and executives from 77 member centres including AHACs, CHCs, CFHTs and NPLCs.

Professional learning event attendance Quality Improvement Professional Learning Event

Health Promotion Professional Learning Event

SUMMER INSTITUTE

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Defining success 2015-2020 Our five year plan: Leading Transformative Change, After reviewing the highlights of our 3 year plan, we think you will agree that AOHC delivered strong value while implementing this very ambitious plan. This is only the beginning of a much longer journey; our success during the past three years will enable further progress working towards the best possible health and wellbeing for everyone. As our Board reflected on the past three years and envisioned how we would define success going forward, one key concept continually arose: transformative change. The people and communities who face the greatest barriers to health need transformative change so that they can achieve a better quality of life that supports improved health outcomes. AOHC’s Strategic Plan for the next five years, 2015-2020, sets a very similar course to the one we have already followed but with a bold new mission and vision. The powerful momentum we’ve already developed is a strong foundation from which to champion the transformative change we envision and to continue to strengthen AOHC and member centres.

Vision The best possible health and wellbeing for everyone in Ontario.

Mission We champion transformative change to improve the health and wellbeing of people and communities facing barriers to health.

Strategic directions 1. Champion health equity and population needs-based planning, and challenge systemic inequities to achieve improved health outcomes. 2. Advance people centered, high quality primary health care as the foundation of the universal and publicly funded health system to increase access to appropriate services especially for populations facing barriers. 3. Demonstrate the value and impact of the Model of Health and Wellbeing on the improved health outcomes and experiences of people and communities. 4. Advocate for appropriate policies, processes and resources to ensure members are equipped to operate healthy organizations and realize their potential as effective catalysts in system transformation.

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Supporting AOHC New members 2012-2015 AOHC welcomes new members that have joined between 2012-2015. All of AOHC’s members are not-for-profit, interprofessional, community-governed primary health care organizations, committed to AOHC’s vision and mission, anti-oppression framework and the Health Equity Charter. • • • • • • • • • •

Bluewater Area Family Health Team Harrow Health Centre Inc French River NPLC Health Zone NPLC Huronia NPLC Waterloo Region NPLC Algoma NPLC Lakehead NPLC Hong Fook Connecting Health NPLC City Centre Health Care Community Health Centre

• • • • •

Rainbow Valley CHC North Bay NPLC Capreol NPLC North Channel NPLC Canadian Mental Health Association – Durham Branch NPLC • North Muskoka NPLC • Petawawa Centennial Family Health Centre

Financials 2014-2015 The financial health of AOHC remains strong with total assets of $3.6 million and total revenues of more than $10 million for the fiscal year which ended on March 31, 2015. The revenue was earned primarily from four sources of income: eHealth funded electronic medical records (EMR) project, IMS fees for program operations and development, membership fees and government and other funded projects. Our leadership in EMR implementation continues this year with revenues totaling $4.3 million from eHealth Ontario. The EMR project now supports 84 members that have gone live, with an additional 6 scheduled to implement this strategy in FY 2015-16. The joint 2014 Public Health and Primary Care Conference was our largest to date, bringing more than 500 delegates together. The revenue generated from this project and other internal savings contributed $28,983 to our reserve fund. AOHC continues to operate on the principle of fiscal and operational transparency through the leadership of our member organizations. AOHC is honoured to have the opportunity to promote health and wellbeing in Ontario and is grateful for the support of our members. Audited statements are available upon request.

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AOHC Board Members 2014-2015 Board Chair and Member-atLarge

Cheryl Prescod

Executive Director - Black Creek Community Health Centre

Vice-Chair and Central Constituency

Sarah Hobbs-Blyth

Executive Director - Planned Parenthood Toronto

Secretary and Community Family Health Team Constituency

Marina Hodson

Executive Director - Kawartha North Family Health Team

Treasurer and Eastern Constituency

Robert Fletcher

Board Member - Lanark Health and Community Services

Aboriginal Constituency

Constance McKnight

Executive Director - De dwa da dehs nye>s Aboriginal Health Centre

Central Constituency

Martha Lowrie

Board Member - The Four Villages Community Health Centre

Central East Constituency

Catherine Danbrook

Chief Executive Officer - Community Care City of Kawartha Lakes

Eastern Constituency

Janet Bowes

Program Director - Carlington Community Health Centre

Francophone Constituency

Jocelyne Maxwell

Executive Director - Centre de santé communautaire du Témiskaming

Northern Constituency

Denis Constantineau

Executive Director - Centre de santé communautaire du Grand Sudbury

South Central Constituency

Peter Szota

Executive Director - Grand River Community Health Centre

South Central Constituency

Richard Gerson

Board Member - Woolwich Community Health Centre

South West Constituency

Cate Melito

Executive Director - Grand Bend Area Community Health Centre

South West Constituency

Bonnie Burke

Board President - Chatham-Kent Community Health Centres

Member-at-Large

Clara Tsang

Board Member - HF Connecting Health Nurse Practitioner-Led Clinic

Member-at-Large Resigned October 2014

Adam Awad

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Aohc 2012 2015 report english for web  
Aohc 2012 2015 report english for web