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Visual Identity for

National Museum of Indian Cinema


Studio

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Visual Identity for

National Museum of Indian Cinema Guide: Chakradhar Saswade

Anuj Vijay Gadre S0901103 PG Graphic Design 2009 National Institute of Design


This documents is prepared by Anuj Vijay Gadre, as a part of his Studio Project #2. Set in Kepler Std and DIN Std. Published at:


Contents

INITIAL IDEA

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PROPOSAL

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INFORMATION COLLECTION

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NATIONAL MUSEUM OF INDIAN CINEMA

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REDEFINED BRIEF

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VISUAL ATTRIBUTES

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FORM/CONCEPT DEVELOPMENT

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TYPEFACE EXPLORATION

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EXPLORATION

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APPLYING COLOUR PALETTE

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COLLATERAL EXPLORATION

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FURTHER EXPLORATIONS

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LEARNING

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Bibliography

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Web References

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Acknowledgements

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Initial Idea

My initial idea of the project was to something related with films and production design. I started the research and went out to write a brief for the project. After few initial talks with exhibition designers and production designer, and visits to film studio in Mumbai, I came on to the conclusion that the involvement of core graphic design is very less in these areas ad so I have to widen my scope to find a suitable project.

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Then I found out few areas where I could certainly find a project related to this field. They were publications related to production design, set design, exhibition design and surface graphic design. I also came across the information on National Museum of Indian Cinema that was proposed by the Ministry of Information and Broadcasting, and was commissioned to come up by year 2013. My idea was to amalgamate above ideas with the above museum and take up the design of the Display Graphics and the Museum Exhibits as my project. I also proposed to look into the film making process and likewise create something in exhibition and space design.

Production Design

Visualizer

Set Design

Exhibition Design

Art Direction

Space Design

Museum Design / Exhibit Design National Museum of Indian Cinema

Visual Identity


Narrowing Down

After the jury’s recommendation, I looked into the proposal again and tried to narrow down my scope. To start with the museum was a hypothetical one to me as a site and what I had planned to do was not possible till I get a fair idea of the architecture of the museum site. Again, to start with any graphic design work for the building it was important I follow a certain language and tone to achieve a uniform tonality to the whole project. This led me to the need for a comprehensive and appropriate visual scheme and language for the museum project. Thus I zeroed down on the fact that to start with anything which is visually communicated in the museum I need to introduce a visual identity system to the museum so that it sets the overall tonality for the project and comes out to be a cohesive blend of individual characters that are following a certain visual language.

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Proposal

They say Indians take cinema as a religion and not just entertainment. People love watching films and dream about being a part of this dream world. Cinema not only provides entertainment but has proved to be a well-received platform to promote social reforms, revolutionary ideas and positive thinking among its audience. In all this, the multicultural, multiregional and multilingual Film Industry of India has been there.

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Indian Film Industry is going to complete a century of cinematic extravaganza, a journey with a lot of stories told and untold. The city, which can be as well called the epicentre of this phenomenon, Mumbai (Bombay), has grown over and with the Indian Film Industry or ‘Bollywood’ as it’s fondly called. The city consists of many such places where one can see the grandeur and the elegance of cinema and places where you can see how gruesome and arduous actually, film production as a craft and business is. Though cinema has been there for almost 100 years in the country we still lack a consolidated space where the film enthusiasts can get

BACKGROUND They say Indians take cinema as a religion and not just entertainment. People love watching films and dream about being a part of this dream world. Cinema not only provides entertainment but has proved to be a well received platform to promote social reforms, revolutionary ideas and positive thinking among its audience. In all this, the multicultural, multi-regional and multilingual Film Industry of India has been there Indian Film Industry is going to complete a century of cinematic extravaganza, a journey with a lot of stories told and untold.

CONTEXT

Visual Identity for

The city, which can be as well called the epicentre of this phenomenon, Mumbai(Bombay), has grown over and with the Indian Film Industry or ‘Bollywood’ as its fondly called. The city consists of many such places where one can see the grandeur and the elegance of cinema and places where you can see how gruesome and arduous actually, film production as a craft and business is.

National Museum of Indian Cinema

Though cinema has been there for almost 100 years in the country we still lack a consolidated space where the film enthusiasts can get to know this craft from a closer point of view. Seeing this need, the Kolkata based National Council for Science Museums, the nodal agency under the ministry of culture, has proposals for setting up 20 museums across India. By 2013, Mumbai will host India’s first museum for cinema, run by the Films Division of India. Apart from displaying artefacts such as cameras and photographs, scripts, it plans to screen regional films.

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Studio

OBJECTIVE To create the Visual Identity for the National Museum of Indian Cinema.

TARGET The cinema enthusiast of all ages, sex and class can be the titled target audience. For the limited scope for this project I would emphasise on film makers, film students, enthusiasts and critics who might look up to the museum as to know and evaluate the development of cinema as a medium of artistic expression

SCOPE 1.

Study the Indian Film Industry’s history, and identifying the key events, people and films and the hierarchy to present this information. 2. Finding visual associated to the film the process of film making. 3. Study of Museum Spaces and Space Design. 4. Creating a visual language which can be later applied to other spheres of the museum.

Anuj Vijay Gadre

anuj.g@nid.edu

PG Graphic Design 09

S0901103


Project Process Phases

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Research 1. Looking into history of Indian Cinema 2. Studying Identities for museums 3. Case study of existing visual identities of film museums 4. Studying Information Graphics 5. Information about the city

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Analysis 1. Classification and consolidating the data required for the project. 2. Redefine the scope of the project. 3. Translate the data collected into an order.

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Ideation and Concept 1. Develop design ideas right from the visulas, symbol, typeface, colour scheme to concepts for space design and wayfinding. 2. Refining onto specific Items as per the scope.

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Execution 1. Final design Solution with prototypes and models. 2. Feedback and Inferences.

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Documentation Detail documentation of the whole process in the form of a publication.

Visual Identity for

National Museum of Indian Cinema

Guide

Anuj Vijay Gadre

Student

anuj.g@nid.edu

PG Graphic Design 09

S0901103

to know this craft from a closer point of view. Seeing this need, the Kolkata based National Council for Science Museums, the nodal agency under the ministry of culture, has proposals for setting up 20 museums across India. By 2013, Mumbai will host India’s first museum for cinema, run by the Films Division of India. Apart from displaying artefacts such as cameras and photographs, scripts, it plans to screen regional films. The museum is targeting the cinema enthusiast of all ages, sex and class. For the limited scope for this project I would emphasise on film makers, film students, enthusiasts and critics who might look up to the museum as to know and evaluate the development of cinema as a medium of artistic expression.

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Information Collection

I started off with my research and analysis work, with collecting information from books and internet. After series of discussion with the guide, I went on to collect and analyse data for the project. The information collection is done in three major parts:

1. Literature Study:

Around the topics of visual identity and branding, Indian cinema and visual culture in cinema.

2. Case study:

Study existing visual identities of similar projects.

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3. Scenario Building:

Find out keywords for objects and expressions that relate to the concepts, aim, objective and philosophy of the organization.


Literature Study

A brand identity to an organization is a ‘Visual’ and ‘Verbal’ expression to the receiving end about the organizations aims, ideas and culture. A successful Identity can be identified on the basis of its perception, behaviour, and performance in the field.

WHAT COMPRISES TO BE AN EFFECTIVE IDENTITY? ◆◆ Being bold, memorable and appropriate ◆◆ Being immediately recognizable. Provide a clear and consistent image of the organization. ◆◆ Communicate the organization’s persona ◆◆ Being legally protected ◆◆ Having enduring Value ◆◆ Working well across media scale, and Colour or B/W.

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CHARACTERISTICS OF AN IDENTITY ◆◆ Vision: The identity of an Organization is a direct implication that expresses the its vision visually. ◆◆ Meaning The meaning attached to the symbol or mark should be a distilled, well assigned one and its meaning evolves over time.

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◆◆ Authenticity Authenticity is the uniqueness of the organization which is only possible if the organization has clear market positioning, value proposition and knows about the competitive differences. ◆◆ Differentiation The Uniqueness of an identity will provide the basic differentiation it needs from its competitors. ◆◆ Sustainability Ability of an identity to sustain through time, changing media and modes of communication.

◆◆ Coherence An identity is the visual point of the organization where messages given out are in a unified voice with one company strategy. ◆◆ Flexibility An Identity should perform with variable scale, colour, B/W in electronic and print media. ◆◆ Value A good identity is an asset and not a liability to the organization. It adds value to the organizations marketing and communications. ◆◆ Brand Strategy A good identity helps to establish a good brand strategy, since it comprises study of its history and culture, its vision and needs and perception.


WHAT ARE THE KEYWORDS THAT HELP DEFINE A NEW IDENTITY? These keywords are basically questions to be asked when one designs a new identity.

Positioning Purpose Culture Mission Composition Personality

Goals of the organization

Perception

Growth

Desired Perception

Promises

Competition

Current Audience

Response

Audience Goals

Marketing Objective

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PARTS AND PIECES OF IDENTITY

TYPOGRAPHY:

COLOUR

Pieces of Identity:

Typography is decode, as we decipher images. The letterforms work together to convey a message. The attitude, history, and culture of a organization are conveyed with the letttreforms of the logo. Choosing the appropriate typeface for a logo is a complex task. The shape of thye letterforms in combination must be considered, as well as the legibility and distinct sound of the word.

Colour is integral for the mnemonic value. It conveys the tone of the organization. Colour is also culture specific.

Typography, Colour, Image/ Iconography:, Shape, Hierarchy and Scale, Character.

Typeface may be created for a logo, or an existing typeface can be used for the logo, whichever suits the best.

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IMAGE / ICONOGRAPHY: Icons are images loaded with powerful messages and convey large amounts of information quickly. ClichĂŠs are instinctively very recognizable. Such symbols if not disregarded, and presented in a fresh form will always engage the viewer. Icons can be Diagrammatic, Metaphoric or Symbolic.

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SHAPE:

HIERARCHY & SCALE:

STATIC OR CHANGEABLE:

Shapes are at core of mnemonic values of icons. Logos may or may not be contained within shapes, or they can have unique shape of their own. The overall form can be contained in a shape though. This is achieved by the letter forms and icon being constrained or comprised in a shape.

Almost harmonious to the mnemonic values of icons. Size of the icons may vary from a visiting card, to fifty feet billboards. So a logo has to be positioned accordingly.

A logo, icon or symbol, is tool that provides voice to the organization on a wide range of application. This means that a logo not necessarily be inert but can mutate, change or diversify in a way that it suits its application. The designer presupposing any scenario, set guidelines of how the change in the logo would happen.


Parts of Identity system:

CONSISTENCY OF CONCEPT

CLARITY OF MESSAGE

Identity design must be fluid. When the logo is complete, many more elements need to be created to make the logo truly usable in a variety of applications. An identity system needs to be designed that will be dynamic enough to allow for the ever-changing needs of the client. Therefore, it is essential that designers create logos with flexibility in mind.

It is important that the identity system functions as a cohesive group of visual and verbal elements that serve to continually identify the client to its target audience(s). Consistency is central to effective branding. This does not preclude creativity. An identity system will fail if it is predictable and lifeless. Power, clarity, and freshness must accompany consistency.

The role of the identity system is to provide a visible and obvious shorthand that supports the intended image of the client. To achieve this, every graphic element within the identity system must clearly support the logo.

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ACCOMMODATING TO THE CLIENT When the system is developed, the designer must understand who will use it and how they will use it. With this information, the designer will be able to create a system that is graphically appropriate , and capable of both accommodating the requirements and reflecting the personality of the client. The designer must create a system that can be customized within the constraints of the client’s needs.

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FLEXIBILITY FOR USERS The identity system must allow for an individual user’s own modifications. As much as the original designer may not wish it, other creatives will use the identity system. Plan for enough variables in the system to keep the identity fresh.


CLASSIFICATION OF IDENTITIES

WORDMARK Freestanding words, company name Acronyms Involve a legible word with distinctive font characteristics and may integrate abstract elements or pictorial elements

LETTERFORM Single letter, sometimes two Distinctive graphic focal point for a brandmark Unique, proprietary design, with significant personality and meaning. Acts as a mnemonic device.

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PICTORIAL Literal and recognizable image May allude to name or mission, or attitude. Usually for product based brands.

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ABSTRACT Visuals to convey big ideas and brand attitudes. Effective for large companies, with strategic ambiguity and for service based and technology companies.


WHAT IS INDIAN CINEMA? ?

The Indian film industry is the oldest and the largest in the world with over 1200 movies released annually. The majority of films are made in the South Indian languages mostly Telugu; Tamil and Malayalam, but Hindi films take the largest box office share. Mumbai (Bombay), Chennai (Madras), Kolkata (Calcutta), Bangalore and Hyderabad are the main film production centres. With more than 12000 cinema halls, the Indian film industry turn out more than 1000 films a year to hugely appreciative audiences around the world. The history of Indian Cinema can be traced back to 1896 when the famous Lumiere Brothers’ of France demonstrated six soundless short films in Bombay. By 1899, Harishchandra Bhatvadekar made India’s first short film. This was one of the major milestone in Indian Cinema. Throughout the first two decades, the trend continued with filmmakers. Dhundiraj Govind Phalke who was generally known as Dada Saheb Phalke produced India’s first full length silent film, ‘Raja Harishchandra’, in 1913. He laid the

foundation for the beginning of a regular feature film industry in India. By 1920 there was a regular industry bringing out films starting with 27 per year and reaching 207 films in 1931. Many new companies and film makers came up during that period. The 1930’s saw sweeping changes to the industry, technically and stylistically. The most remarkable thing that happened in Indian film industry was in 1931, when India’s first talkie, ‘Alam Ara’, directed by Ardeshir Irani was released. Dubbed into Hindi and Urdu, the film was a smash hit and a new revolution began in the Indian film industry. It’s phenomenal success all over India lead to other ‘Talking, Singing and Dancing’ productions to be hurriedly put into production. At the same time, it marked the beginning of the Talkie era in South Indian film industries also. The first talkie films in Bengali (Jumai Shasthi), Telugu (Bhakta Prahlad) and Tamil (Kalidasa) were released in the same year 1931. The 30’s is recognized as the decade of social protest in the history of India films. In the 30’s three major film centres developed which

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were based in Bombay (Mumbai), Calcutta (Kolkata) and Madras (Chennai). Of these centres, Bombay was known for the making of films geared for national distribution, while Madras and Calcutta were known for their regional films.

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Following India’s independence, the period from the late 1940’s to the 1960’s is regarded by film historians as the ‘Golden Age’ of Indian cinema. From the 1940’s to the late 1950’s, the films with their concentration on vibrant song and dance were, for many, the most memorable in Indian film history. The 1940’s and 1950’s also saw the emergence of the ‘playback singing’, the off-camera voice that performs the songs that the actors and actresses subsequently mime to. Lata Mangeshkar, her sister Asha Bhonsle, Muhammad Rafi, Kishore Kumar etc are the singers who dominated the Hindi film industry. Now music became an important ingredient in Indian cinema. The 1940’s is marked a essential rise in the ’Formula’ films which were catering to the new urban and bourgeoisie for their ‘entertainment’. The 50’s was a unique time in Indian

cinema, blessed with talented directors and artistes who could stamp their individuality in their work.. The big turning point came in 1953 with the arrival of Bengali director Satyajit Ray and his classic ‘Pather Panchali’. International recognition came to it with the Cannes award for the best human document, followed by foreign and national awards. Apart from Ray, Mrinal Sen, Ritwik Ghatak and others made internationally acclaimed movies. They are known as the founding fathers of the new cinema in India. While, Satyajit Ray, Mrinal Sen, Aravindan, Ritwik Ghatak, Rituparna Ghosh were pioneering the nation’s art cinema with their introspective cinema, around the same time India also had a kind of popular cinema with social themes - again, particularly in Hindi - made by commercial film-makers like Bimal Roy, Raj Kapoor, Mehboob Khan, Guru Dutt etc. Many of these films no doubt broke records at the box office. eg. Bimal Roy’s ‘Do Bigha Zameen’, Mehboob Khan’s ‘Mother India’, Raj Kapoor’s ‘Shree 420’ and ‘Awara’, Guru Dutt’s ‘Pyasa’ etc.

Another factor that encouraged truly good Indian cinema was the establishment of National Film Awards, the Film Finance Corporations, Indian Motion Picture Export Corporation, the National Film Archives of India and the Film and Television Institute of India. The first International Film Festival in 1952 held at Bombay, Chennai, Delhi and Calcutta had great impact on Indian Cinema. Introduction to international films left a deep impact on Indian film makers. In the sixties and seventies, big budget films as well as off-beat films increased. The popular Hindi films of this period were: Kamal Amrohi’s Pakeeza, Raj Kapoor’s Bobby, Ramesh Sippy’s Sholay, Kabhi, Amar Akbar Anthony, Hum Kisise Kum Nahin, and Muqaddar ka Sikandar. In the South, in Karnataka, Tamil Nadu and Kerala film directors like Adoor Gopalakrishnan, M.T. Vasudevan Nair , B.V. Karanth, Girish Karnad, Girish Kasara Valli, G. Aravindan, K. Balachander, K.G. George, P.A. Backer, G.V. Iyer made some distinguished films.


Pattabhi Rama Reddy ( Damskara ), Adoor Gopalakrishnan (Swayamvaram), M.T. Vasudevan Nair ( Nirmalyam), B.V.Karanth ( Chomana Dudi), Girish Karnad ( Kaadu), Girish Kasara Valli ( Ghatasradha), G. Aravindan’s Uttarayanam and Thamp, K. Balachander’s Arangetram, Avargal and Apoorva Ragangal, K.G. George’s Swapnadanam and P.A. Backer’s Chuvanna Vithukal and G.V. Iyer’s Hamsageethe, Durai’s Pasi were some of the most relevant films of the times. In the eighties and nineties, Shyam Benegal’s Bhumika, Govind Nihlani’s Aaghat, Damul (Prakash Jha), 36-Chowringhee Lane (Aparna Sen), New Delhi Times (Ramesh Sharma), Mirch Masala (Ketan Mehta), Rao Saheb (Vijaya Mehta), Debshishu (Utpalendu Chakraborthy), Mahesh Bhatt (Arth), Trishagni (Nabayendu Ghosh), Ijaazat (Gulzar), Umrao Jaan (Muzafar Ali), Dakhal, Paar (Gautam Ghose), Dooratwa, Neem Annapurana, Andhi Gali (Buddhadeb Dasgupta), Aajka Robin Hood (Tapan Sinha), Tabarana Kathe, Bannada Vesha (Girish Kasara Valli), Accident and Swamy (Shanker Naag), Daasi

(B. Narasinga Rao) and Roja, Bombay (Maniratnam) were the significant films of this period. In the south, Adoor and Aravindan, consolidated their position in the eighties and nineties with their films Elippathayam, Mukha Mukham, Anantharam, Esthappan, Pokkuveyil, Chidambaram, Mathilukal, Videyan, and Oridath. But in Hindi commercial cinema, musical love stories become a new trend in the late eighties and nineties. Mr. India, Tezaab, Qayamat se Qayamat Tak, Main Pyar Kiya, Chandni, Jo Jeeta Wohi Sikander, Hum Hain Rahi Pyarke, Baazigar, Hum Apake Hai Kaun, Krantiveer, Raja, Dilwale Dulhaniya Le Jayenge, Rangeela were some of the popular Hindi films of the last decade. The 1990’s also saw a surge in the national popularity of Tamil cinema as films directed by Mani Ratnam(Roja, Bombay, Nayagan) captured India’s imagination. Ratnam’s earlier film Nayagan (1987), starring Kamal Haasan, was included in Time magazine’s “All-TIME” 100 best movies, alongside four earlier Indian films: Satyajit Ray’s The Apu Trilogy (1955–1959) and Guru Dutt’s

Pyaasa (1957). The South Indian film industry not only released cinema with national appeal but also featured multicultural music which found appreciation among the national Indian audience. Some Tamil film composers such as A. R. Rahman and Ilaiyaraaja have since acquired a large national, and later international, following. Rahman’s debut soundtrack for Roja was included in Time Magazine’s “10 Best Soundtracks” of all time, and he would later go on to win two Academy Awards for his international Slumdog Millionaire (2008) soundtrack. In the late 1990’s, ‘Parallel Cinema’ began experiencing a resurgence in Hindi cinema, largely due to the critical and commercial success of Satya (1998), a low-budget film based on the Mumbai underworld, directed by Ram Gopal Varma and written by Anurag Kashyap. The film’s success led to the emergence of a distinct genre known as Mumbai noir,urban films reflecting social problems in the city of Mumbai. Later films belonging to the Mumbai noir genre include Madhur Bhandarkar’s Chandni Bar (2001) and Traffic Signal (2007), Ram Gopal Varma’s Company (2002)

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and its prequel D (2005), Anurag Kashyap’s Black Friday (2004), and Irfan Kamal’s Thanks Maa (2009). Other art film directors active today include Mrinal Sen, Mir Shaani, Buddhadeb Dasgupta, Gautam Ghose, Sandip Ray, Aparna Sen and Rituparno Ghosh in Bengali cinema; Adoor Gopalakrishnan, Shaji N. Karun and T. V. Chandran in Malayalam cinema; Nirad Mohapatra in Oriya cinema; Mani Kaul, Kumar Shahani, Ketan Mehta, Govind Nihalani, Shyam Benegal,[32] Mira Nair, Nagesh Kukunoor, Sudhir Mishra and Nandita Das in Hindi cinema; Mani Ratnam and Santosh Sivan in Tamil cinema; and Deepa Mehta, Anant Balani, Homi Adajania, Vijay Singh and Sooni Taraporevala in Indian English cinema. Now, Indian Cinema especially, Hindi cinema is not only popular in India but in parts of the Middle East, Pakistan, UK and virtually every other place where Indians live. Films like Lagaan, Salaam Bombay and Monsoon Wedding making the international market sit up and take notice definitely indicate that India is poised for bigger things as far as Cinema goes. Monsoon Wedding

was the all-time top 10 foreign boxoffice hits in America. Today, Indian cinema has reached many a mile stone with advanced technologies using new digital projectors, converting digital format etc.


WHAT ARE THE INFLUENCES ON INDIAN CINEMA ?

There have generally been six major influences that have shaped the conventions of Indian popular cinema. The first was the ancient Indian epics of Mahabharata and Ramayana which have exerted a profound influence on the thought and imagination of Indian popular cinema, particularly in its narratives. Examples of this influence include the techniques of a side story, backstory and story within a story. Indian popular films often have plots which branch off into sub-plots; such narrative dispersals can clearly be seen in the 1993 films Khalnayak and Gardish. The second influence was the impact of ancient Sanskrit drama, with its highly stylized nature and emphasis on spectacle, where music, dance and gesture combined “to create a vibrant artistic unit with dance and mime being central to the dramatic experience.” Sanskrit dramas were known as natya, derived from the root word nrit (dance), characterizing them as spectacular dance-dramas which has continued in Indian cinema. The Rasa method of performance, dating

back to ancient Sanskrit drama, is one of the fundamental features that differentiate Indian cinema from that of the Western world. In the Rasa method, empathetic “emotions are conveyed by the performer and thus felt by the audience,” in contrast to the Western Stanislavski method where the actor must become “a living, breathing embodiment of a character” rather than “simply conveying emotion.” The rasa method of performance is clearly apparent in the performances of popular Hindi film actors like Amitabh Bachchan and Shahrukh Khan, nationally-acclaimed Hindi films like Rang De Basanti (2006), and internationally-acclaimed Bengali films directed by Satyajit Ray. The third influence was the traditional folk theatre of India, which became popular from around the 10th century with the decline of Sanskrit theatre. These regional traditions include the Yatra of Bengal, the Ramlila of Uttar Pradesh, and the Terukkuttu of Tamil Nadu. The fourth influence was Parsi theatre, which “blended realism and fantasy, music and dance,

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narrative and spectacle, earthy dialogue and ingenuity of stage presentation, integrating them into a dramatic discourse of melodrama. The Parsi plays contained crude humour, melodious songs and music, sensationalism and dazzling stagecraft.” All of these influences are clearly evident in the masala film genre that was popularized by Manmohan Desai’s films in the 1970’s and early 1980’s, particularly in Coolie (1983), and to an extent in more recent critically acclaimed films such as Rang De Basanti.

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The fifth influence was Hollywood, where musicals were popular from the 1920’s to the 1950’s, though Indian filmmakers departed from their Hollywood counterparts in several ways. “For example, the Hollywood musicals had as their plot the world of entertainment itself. Indian filmmakers, while enhancing the elements of fantasy so pervasive in Indian popular films, used song and music as a natural mode of articulation in a given situation in their films. There is a strong Indian tradition of narrating mythology, history, fairy stories and so on through song and dance.” In addition, “whereas Hollywood

filmmakers strove to conceal the constructed nature of their work so that the realistic narrative was wholly dominant, Indian filmmakers made no attempt to conceal the fact that what was shown on the screen was a creation, an illusion, a fiction. However, they demonstrated how this creation intersected with people’s day to day lives in complex and interesting ways.” The final influence was Western musical television, particularly MTV, which has had an increasing influence since the 1990’s, as can be seen in the pace, camera angles, dance sequences and music of recent Indian films. An early example of this approach was in Mani Ratnam’s Bombay (1995). Like mainstream Indian popular cinema, Indian Parallel Cinema was also influenced also by a combination of Indian theatre (particularly Sanskrit drama) and Indian literature (particularly Bengali literature), but differs when it comes to foreign influences, where it is more influenced by European cinema (particularly Italian neorealism and French poetic realism) rather than Hollywood.

Satyajit Ray cited Italian filmmaker Vittorio De Sica’s Bicycle Thieves (1948) and French filmmaker Jean Renoir’s The River (1951), which he assisted, as influences on his debut film Pather Panchali (1955). Besides the influence of European cinema and Bengali literature, Ray is also indebted to the Indian theatrical tradition, particularly the Rasa method of classical Sanskrit drama. The complicated doctrine of Rasa “centres predominantly on feeling experienced not only by the characters but also conveyed in a certain artistic way to the spectator. The duality of this kind of a rasa imbrication” shows in The Apu Trilogy. Bimal Roy’s Two Acres of Land (1953) was also influenced by De Sica’s Bicycle Thieves and in turn paved the way for the Indian New Wave, which began around the same time as the French New Wave and the Japanese New Wave.


Case Study

As part of the case study I studied various identities of similar organizations on the basis of certain key points or characteristics, For example, categorizing them on the basis of their classification as letterform, wordmark, pictorial or abstract. Some of the identities are as following.

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SOUTHEASTERN CENTER FOR CONTEMPORARY ART Winston-Salem, North Carolina Pentagram

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◆◆ Dynamic ◆◆ Wordmark ◆◆ The fonts used for the identity are from the Monotype Grotesque family. The colour palette, employing a rich spectrum of greens, reflects the wooded property and lush foliage surrounding the centre. The bold new colours are featured in fins of green across the building’s façade.


NATIONAL MUSEUMS LIVERPOOL Liverpool Pentagram

◆◆ Static ◆◆ Wordmark ◆◆ Based upon the multiinstituitional usage. Inspired by the Quote” Liverpool- pool of life”, it is designed as a flexible solution linking all of the venues with a ribbon twisted to form the letter ‘L’. The reverse of the ribbon is decorated with a repeating pattern of the words “National Museums Liverpool” representing the oral nature of the city.

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real things, revealing stories

re id

case study

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NATIONAL MUSEUMS SCOTLAND Edinburgh, Scotland Hat-trick design consultants Limited London

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national museums scotland 13

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national museums scotland real 15 things, revealing stories

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national museums scotland real things, revealing stories identity

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case study

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W Ig

Our

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◆◆ Static ◆◆ Abstract ◆◆ The symbols used are based on the very nature of the museum and its content. Though the symbol is abstract its easy to decipher and generates curiosity. The form is clearly inspired from the flag of Scotland, a derivative of the Union Jack

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Where am I going? Our collections


CASA DA MUSICA Portugal Stefan Sagmeister

◆◆ Dynamic ◆◆ System based, brand mark ◆◆ Inspired from the architectural form of the museum, the identity is designed by developing a system where the recognizable, unique, modern form transforms itself like a chameleon from application to application, changes from media to media where the physical building itself is the ultimate (very high-res) rendering in a long line of logos.

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MUSEUM PLAZA Louisville, Kentucky Stefan Sagmeister

◆◆ Static ◆◆ brandmark ◆◆ A 45 degree steep funicular serves as the main entrance to the building, it’s the navel, it’s hub, the connector of museums, but also the center of Louisville, the hub of Kentucky, As this is the only angled architectural element in Louisville it lent itself well to become the focus of the identity.

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NORTH CAROLINA MUSEUM OF ART Raleigh, North Carolina Pentagram

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◆◆ Static ◆◆ Letterform, Wordmark ◆◆ In order to create a identity that would work across the four letter acronym and the full name of the museum, development of a custom alphabet was done based on the expansion building’s most distinctive architectural feature: the ovalshaped skylights that will bring light into all the gallery spaces.


GIBBES MUSEUM OF ART Charleston, South Carolina Talk Branding

◆◆ Static ◆◆ Wordmark ◆◆ The main element of the new logo is the actual signature of James Shoolbred Gibbes, taken from his last will and testament. Mr. Gibbes’ signature started into motion what is now the Gibbes Museum of Art. The logo is designed to tell the story and to reflect the mission of the Gibbes.

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MUSEUM OF ART, GUANGDONG MUSEUM Guangzhou, China Nivard Thoes

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◆◆ Static ◆◆ Abstract ◆◆ The identity is seemingly inspired by the architectural appearance of the museum building. Also its resemblance lies with Chinese system of Chen, for astrological predictions.


LONDON FILM MUSEUM London Radim Malinic

◆◆ Static ◆◆ Abstract, Pictorial ◆◆ Inspiration drawn from the most significant objects on film making, river Thames, and letter F for film. The designer is essentially an illustrator who tried to bring together the above elements to create an identity.

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MUSEUM OF CONTEMPORARY ART Los Angeles Chermayeff & Geismar Studio

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◆◆ Static ◆◆ Abstract, letterform ◆◆ Based on the type of letters in the acronym, the basic shapes of what roman glyphs are said to be formed. The ‘c’ used in original form is kind of disturbing. This logo was designed in 1980, then changed to a simple wordmark, and then reverted back to this version recently.


DEUTSCHE KINEMATHEK Berlin Pentagram

◆◆ Static ◆◆ Abstract ◆◆ Inspired from the type of content and the context of the museum. Included in the design of posters, brochures and promotional collateral, signage, merchandising, and eventually, the website.

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DEUTSCHES FILMMUSEUM FRANKFURT Frankfurt

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◆◆ Static ◆◆ Abstract ◆◆ Looks like inspired from Zoetrope, Though the concept seems closely related to advent of motion picture, identity application is not powerful.


NATIONAL FILM ARCHIVES OF INDIA Pune

◆◆ Static ◆◆ Wordmark ◆◆ Concept based on combining Devanagri script characteristics in Roman letters to achieve the Indian touch. It is very ineffective. The letter ‘f ’ can be read as small ‘t’ also.

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TATE, London Wolf Ollins

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◆◆ Dynamic ◆◆ Wordmark ◆◆ Concept is based on its various applications.. A whole new set of logos were designed to accompany the various identities, yet have one common language. The TATE mark helps to build a brand that is fresh and fluid, but has some consistency – one TATE, with constantly changing expressions.


MUSEUM OF MODERN ART New York Pentagram

◆◆ Static ◆◆ Wordmark ◆◆ While the logo is iconic in itself, the museum needed a comprehensive institutional identity that would carry the spirit of MoMA across multiple platforms. The designers created a focused, organized and flexible identity system that supports program material in print, web and environmental applications.

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HOW IS IT IN INDIA ?

Museums day by day are perceived to be the boring, old, tattered and smelly places or something where there is nothing for a normal individual. Both intellectually and visually, many museums in India fail to attract visitors. Museum Identity is not something which has been taken too seriously in India. It is not a established fact that creating a powerful museum identity would actually benefit the museum by anyway. The reasons could be the following. ◆◆ Museums are not promoted in India as they are done abroad. ◆◆ The museums created are either not high in standards or are not well planned. ◆◆ They are poorly maintained. ◆◆ There is also money constraint since most of the museums run in India are run by Government. ◆◆ The communication maintained by the museums is mostly made once and not updated regularly. Same is with the content which is also most of the time, stagnant and rhetoric. ◆◆ There is a clear lack of research and development work, in museum planning and management in India.

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Scenario Building

WHERE TO START? After a series of collecting information around the topic, it was now time to analyse and contemplate what was the scenario for which the design decisions have to be taken. After a number of brainstorm sessions,I concluded on what would be the words associated to the project.

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National Museum of Indian Cinema The Government of India has envisaged to establish a “National Museum of Indian Cinema” in Films Division Complex, Mumbai- first ever of its kind in Asian Region with a view to give impetus to the movement of showcasing the history of Indian Cinema and its global impact.

The main objectives of the proposed museum are to: ◆◆ To encapsulate the sociocultural history of India as revealed through the evolution of cinema; ◆◆ To develop as a research center focusing on the effect of cinema on society; ◆◆ To exhibit the work of the noted directors, producers, Institutions etc. for the benefit of visitors/ film enthusiasts; ◆◆ To arrange seminars, workshops for film makers & film students; ◆◆ To generate interest in the future generation in the field of film movement;

The Museum of Moving Images will not only provide a store house of information to the laymen but it will also help film makers, film students, enthusiasts and critics to know and evaluate the development of cinema as a medium of artistic expression not only in the country but also in all parts of the world. Following are the proposed kind of exhibits to be kept in the museum: ◆◆ Artifacts, ◆◆ Equipment like Cameras, Editing, & Recording Machines, Projectors etc., ◆◆ Costumes, ◆◆ Photographs and other material ◆◆ Posters, ◆◆ Copies of important films, ◆◆ Prints, ◆◆ Promotional leaflets, ◆◆ Developing equipment books, ◆◆ Biographies , ◆◆ Sound tracks, ◆◆ Trailers, transparencies, ◆◆ Cinema magazines.

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The Museum of Moving Images will cater to the needs of contemporary people for acquainting themselves with the changes in the field of film production and also enlist their active support in appreciating the technological changes in the present media scenario. The Museum is expected to be ready in the year 2013. The Films Division of India has unveiled plans to construct a film museum at its Mumbai premises at Gulshan Mahal, Peddar Road. This will be India’s first ever film museum. A total area of 2,000 sq.m. has been earmarked for the project.

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The Redefined Brief

Seeing the current scenario it becomes very important that it’s important to emphasize on creating a museum that is engaging, interesting and educative at the same time. To give a new face to museums in India, they need something as to look up to, as benchmark. Creating a visual identity that would define the overall visual language of the museum is very important. It would create an organized perception and would certainly generate interest.

The visual identity created should be suitable to carry forward to all mediums: print, electronic and spatial. Our contemporaries in the worldwide have created such strong examples of visual identities that really changed the face of many museums. Wolf Ollins created TATE and after which the gallery doubled its target visitor numbers, and became the most popular modern art gallery in the world. After a year, Tate’s overall annual visitor numbers had risen 87% to 7.5 million. As the Observer wrote in May 2005, Tate ‘has changed the way that Britain sees art, and the way the world sees Britain’.

This museum is targeting visitors, who are Indians, youth and film enthusiasts, Educated mostly. To cater to such an audience, the identity of the museum can certainly not be an abstract form. But it can be a mix of a Word-mark or Pictorial. To create an identity that reflects the museum’s vision and sustains itself through time and medium. A rigid identity that is ambiguous and open to interpretation. Though this type of identity system may work for some organizations, they may not work for such subject specific museum. Keywords: Cinema, Entertainment, Celebration, Story-telling, Powerful, Education, Art-form, Museum, Indian

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Visual Attributes

After defining the brief again, i was clear about ceratin visual attributes that would be associated to the Museum’s persomality. U.S.P. Talking about what would sell the medium to its audience, one thing was clear that its location in Mumbai and association with Bollywood is of great assistance and its potential can be tapped.

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Other than that the content of the museum was something which would take its audience a step closer to the process of film making. This is important since most of the audience are unaware of the details that go into the film making process.


PERSONALITY

DECIDING THE COLOUR PALETTE

The museum is film specific which is directly related to entertainment, hence this museum cannot afford to be like other museums which are perceived to be boring. Therefore there is a need of introducing a certain playfulness to the image of the museum.

To decide upon the colour palette for the museum, the obvious choice was the location of the museum. Both Mumbai and Gulshan Mahal dabble in wide spectrum of lively as well as grounded colour. The palette is derived from the architecture of the place which has shades and tints of hues like red, blue and green in wide range.

But this cannot be on account of its institutional identity. Since it is a Government enterprise and is also meant to educate people. Therefore the identity should be a good balance between the two.

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Furthermore, simplification of the palette was carried out. The similar hues were grouped and arranged in a gradient of tint to shade. The final colour palette has hues of brown, green and violet.

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C=0 M=20 Y=80 K=0

C=0 M=60 Y=80 K=0

C=25 M=80 Y=90 K=15

C=40 M=80 Y=90 K=35

C=50 M=0 Y=60 K=0

C=70 M=0 Y=80 K=10

C=80 M=0 Y=100 K=20

C=90 M=15 Y=100 K=40

C=70 M=50 Y=0 K=0

C=100 M=50 Y=0 K=40

C=85 M=100 Y=0 K=40

C=55 M=90 Y=45 K=35

C=12 M=17 Y=40 K=0

C=25 M=80 Y=90 K=15

C=40 M=65 Y=90 K=35

C=50 M=70 Y=80 K=70


Form / Concept Development

Based on these guidelines drawn by the visual attributes, I went ahead on exploring forms and concepts related to them. Here are some of the initial ideas.

The peacock represents festivity and represents the nationality, while the reel as the peacock tail represent Cinema and growth.

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The Reel in itself is a good way to represent, while the rectangular frames can have a dynamic use.


The reel can also be applied in three dimensional format and space could be created out of it.

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A very direct approach could be the reel box itself which contains the reel, just as the museum contains artifacts.


Typography and the acronym was one of the main areas of interest. In case of big names like this its easy to put it in few letters for better association. I thought of arranging the letters , in specific form. Also there was the idea to derive the acronym letters N,M,I & C from old and new Bollywood posters.

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The clap holds a strong association to films, production and represents initiation of something.

The square are could be used in a way that creates a frame of ever changing visuals.


The letters of the acronym also could be arranged to create space within themselves, which is juxtaposed by planes bounding a three dimensional space.

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Other ideas were of the production process, the light-camera-action gesture, or the gesture done by hands to show the frame.


The city Mumbai holds an important part in the identity, so I decided to use the city’s identity, the Gateway of India, as one of the options. I tried to generate a logotype out of the architectural form.

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The Bioscope is another instrument that is deeply associated with the nostalgia and films, and keeps everyone, captivated.


Feedback

The feedback I received for the above concepts was mixed. Many of the ideas were marked as clichĂŠ, although they held relevance and were appropriate. I was asked by the guide to work on a different form for such ideas. Some ideas which were in just conceptual state were asked to worked upon.

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Concept Exploration Concept 1 THE PEACOCK AND REEL

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This represents cinema, Indianness, organizational characater, celebration etc.

Pictorial


Concept 2 THE BIOSCOPE

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A bioscope adds to the idea of nostalgia and celebration which are both associated to the museum. Still it fails to be transformed to a simplistic image, easy enough to identify. Also it fails to work on all user levels.

Abstract


Concept 3 The arches, in both the museum site and the Gateway of India, ironically are similar and hence stand a great chance to represent the museum.

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This exploration which was inspired by the architecture of the city, connected with the identity of the place and Bollywood which is an integral section of the museum. I tried to abstract the shape, and try differences in heights.

Letterform

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Concept 4 The signature arches, inspired this form. The M for museum is inspired by the arches while the ribbon represents the Celebration of 100 years of Indian Cinema.

Abstract

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Concept 5 The arches here are represented in a abstract form, in the backdrop of the sea, whose waves represent liveliness and celebration, and what is called as the spirit of Mumbai.

Abstract

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Concept 6 The Hand Gesture, is connected to the museum in many ways, The whole connection of Indian Cinema to Natya, where Mudra or hand gestures are and important part. Also the two hand gesture is widely identified with films and film making.

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Some prevalent uses of hand gestures.


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nmic

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As I explored more it zeroed down to either select a single hand representation or use a pair.

I took feedback from many people, who are the prospective audience of the museum as to what each one of them conveys to them.

It was also seen than the angle between the fingers add thumb should be a right angle so that the invisible frame created is more clear.


Finalizing

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While the single hand was confused with either stop signal, or numbering gesture, the pair of hand was more recognizable to the mnemonic image of the director’s hand calling for shots.

Thus affirmative, indicative, and very Indian the identity suits to represent the museum. Pictorial


Typeface Exploration

When it came to the logotype, it was necessary that typeface should have the required amount of formality, that would compliment the playfulness of the symbol which is more towards celebration. Hence a NEO CLASSICAL, ROMANTIC, SERIF, typeface would be appropriate for the logo.

Therefore the following typefaces were selected out of which Kepler and Paperback were the two typefaces that were selected for the logo.

Baskerville Crimson Calluna Liberation Serif KEPLER Std Display Kingthings Exeter Nyala 84 Palatino LT Std Paperback 12 Roman


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National Museum Of Indian Cinema

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National Museum Of Indian Cinema National Museum Of Indian Cinema

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Exploration

The following explorations were to see an arrangement of the symbol and the logotype. Also it was carried out to decide whether to keep only the acronym, or the name, or both, with the symbol.

NMIC

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C NMIC N

u Museum i National m Indian Cinema of In

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National Museum of Indian Cinema

NMIC National Museum of Indian Cinema Various forms of hands were tested, The open hand pair was more recognizable than the closed one which was confused with numbering.

NMIC National Museum of Indian Cinema

NMIC National Museum of Indian Cinema

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Typeface Improvement

NMIC

National Museum of Indian Cinema

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PAPERBACK 12 After the exportations paperback was chosen because of its lesser contrast between the thick and thin and less chiselled edges. The decrease in contrast enhanced eligibility and soften the overall feel of the logotype.

KEPLER STD On the other hand several explorations and analysis later kepler proved to be less eligible in the full name logotype, and also the sharp contrast was better if the organization was a very formal type. For a museum, that too for film, Kepler did not suit the image.


NMIC

National Museum of Indian Cinema

Based on legibility and feel, the logotype was judged. It was seen, if the small caps were better then the lowercase or the uppercase was better than the small caps. Also, if a combination of acronym and full name is to be added or just the individual elements.

nmic

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National Museum of Indian Cinema

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On all the exploration, it was found that the frame created within the hands was to enhanced with the type. Hence the area between the hands was left blank. But the area below the thumb couldn’t be left blank which created a void. Hence it was the perfect place to locate the text.


NMIC

National Museum of Indian Cinema The following symbol was finalized representing the following. ◆◆ The open hand gesture represents the notion of film making . ◆◆ The frame created in between the fingers created the canvas on which films are put in front of the audience.. ◆◆ The logotype adds to the perspective and joins the symbols together.

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Applying the Colour Palette

National Museum of Indian Cinema

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National Museum of Indian Cinema

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National Museum of Indian Cinema

National Museum of Indian Cinema

National Museum of Indian Cinema

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NMIC

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National Museum of Indian Cinema

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National Museum of Indian Cinema

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National Museum of Indian Cinema

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Final Logo

NMIC

National Museum of Indian Cinema 95

C=12 M=17 Y=40 K=0 TYPEFACE: PAPERBACK 12

C=50 M=70 Y=80 K=70


Collateral Explorations

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Letterhead Size: A4

NMIC

National Museum of Indian Cinema


Vivek Singh +91-99204-85893 hcurator@nmic.nic.in

Head Curator

NMIC

National Museum of Indian Cinema Films Division Complex 24-Dr. G. Deshmukh Marg Mumbai 400 026

National Museum of Indian Cinema

Visiting Card Size: 92cm x 54cm

Envelope Size: 220cm x 110cm

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National Museum of Indian Cinema

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NMIC

National Museum of Indian Cinema

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Letterhead Size: A4


Vivek Singh Head Curator

NMIC

National Museum of Indian Cinema

+91-99204-85893 hcurator@nmic.nic.in

National Museum of Indian Cinema Films Division Complex 24-Dr. G. Deshmukh Marg Mumbai 400 026

Visiting Card Size: 92cm x 54cm

Envelope Size: 220cm x 110cm

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National Museum of Indian Cinema


National Museum of Indian Cinema

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Further Explorations

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Here I have tried to bring in the aspect of asymmetry. The logotype is balanced along the axis of the angle made between the hand to enhance the ‘Frame’. Along with asymmetry, here i tried to add in the aspect of illusion and mystery to the symbol.

National Museum of Indian Cinema

NMIC

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National Museum of Indian Cinema

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National Museum of Indian Cinema

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National Museum of Indian Cinema

Here i tried new approach. Keeping the same profile, i used a raw, broken line to create the hand and kept the ends open. this is to bring in the constructive quality of the medium, cinema.

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National Museum of Indian Cinema

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The hand of a dancer, with the ‘alta’ as a symbol. Does not work that well.


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The reason for selecting hand gesture as the symbol is its strong associations to the keywords that define the institution as a whole. The stance of the gesture is suggestive to the stance of a director calling a shot or even visualizing it, which forms the basis of cinema in its making. The stance also creates a frame, which in turn enables the viewer to see what is happening in this frame. The hands together form the association to cinema hall and the screen where it all sums up to. The stance or the gesture has a universal appeal, yet also the gesture is closer to the mudra of ‘Bharatnatyam’ called Arohachandra. This mudra symbolizes the hand of goddess ‘Saraswati ‘which marks the beginning and basis of knowledge and arts. The open hands and the broken rough outline, signify the progressive yet ingrained value which cinema holds in minds of the people of this country.


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Learning

The following are my learning from the project:

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◆◆ While deciding upon the topic I learned to narrow down on subjects based on interest and capacity to have a vision about it which will drive you through the rest of the remaining work. ◆◆ During the case study stage I learned to decipher meaning out of images that are simplified to the extent where most of the meanings are either hidden or are associative. I learned to make connections and get those meaning out. It helped me to analyse images in a better way. ◆◆ The literature study helped me to get to the details and specifications involved in the symbol design process, ◆◆ While narrowing down to the actual design and getting to the explorations I learned to connect word and images and getting to the most appropriate image for a given set of words. ◆◆ The typeface selection helped me to understand what is the best possible accompany for the symbol in a logotype, which compliments the symbol and adds to the logo.

◆◆ I learned how the symbol and logotype interact to create forms, during more explorations ◆◆ Overall, I learned to manage a project with a self designed brief. I read a lot and tried to make it a habit for all upcoming work. ◆◆ Also sticking to the process helped me to understand the necessity and importance of each step.


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Bibliography

◆◆ Adams, Sean, Noreen Morioka, and Terry Stone. Logo design workbook: a hands-on guide to creating logos. Gloucester, Mass.: Rockport Publishers, 2004. Print. ◆◆ Devraj, Rajesh, Edo Bouman, and Paul Duncan. The art of Bollywood . Hong Kong: Taschen, 2010. Print. ◆◆ McAlhone, Beryl, and David Stuart. A smile in the mind: witty thinking in graphic design. London: Phaidon Press, 1996. Print. ◆◆ Rouard, Margo. Museum Graphics . London: Thames and Hudson, 1992. Print. ◆◆ Thoraval, Yves, Veena Kilan, and T. K. Gopalan. The cinemas of India . Delhi: Macmillan India, 2000. Print. ◆◆ Vasudev, Aruna, and Philippe Lenglet. Indian cinema superbazaar . New Delhi: Vikas, 1983. Print. ◆◆ Wheeler, Alina. Designing brand identity: a complete guide to creating, building, and maintaining strong brands. Hoboken, NJ: John Wiley, 2003. Print. ◆◆ Winata, Kalim, and Reed Darmon. Made in India . San Francisco: Chronicle Books, 2008. Print.

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◆◆ Yew, Wei. Museum & art gallery graphics . Edmonton: Quon Editions, 1993. Print.


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Web References

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◆◆ “Cinema of India - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia.” Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cinema_of_India>. ◆◆ “Do museums need a brand? « Design Influence.” Design Influence. <http://designinfluence.org/do-museums-need-a-brand/>. ◆◆ “Envirodesigners Pvt. Ltd. - Architects, Registered Valuers, Tourism Consultants, Environmental & Landscape Designers.” Envirodesigners Pvt. Ltd. - Architects, Registered Valuers, Tourism Consultants, Environmental & Landscape Designers. <http://www.envirodesigners.com/awards/award4.htm>. ◆◆ “Films Division : About Us.” Films Division : Welcome to Films Division. <http://www.filmsdivision.org/Suggestion_appeal.php>. ◆◆ “Films Division : Facilities On Hire - GULSHAN MAHAL .” Films Division : Welcome to Films Division. <http://www.filmsdivision.org/mahal.php>. ◆◆ “Identityworks: Tools - common identity tools.” Identityworks - Tony Spaeth, Identity Consultant: corporate identity and corporate brand building. <http://identityworks.com/tools/index.htm>. ◆◆ Name. “Behance Network :: Gallery.” Behance Network :: Gallery. <http://www.behance.net/>. ◆◆ “Pentagram.” Pentagram. <http://www.pentagram.com/>. ◆◆ “indian movies, - movies- Indian Cinema.” Bollywood Movies,Film,Actress,Movie News,Reviews,celebrity photos,Cinema. <http://movie.webindia123.com/movie/fact/history.htm>.


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Acknowledgement

I would like to thank whole heartedly to Mr. Chakradhar Saswade, my guide. Under his guidance the project went in the right direction and he supported me although out. I would like to thank my seniors, Vidisha and Gati, for their respective guidance and work, which inspired me and helped me to envision things. I would like to thank my classmates Mira, Sai and Rohit for their constructive criticism and time to time help.

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Finally I thank my family for their support.


Visual Identity for National Museum of Indian Cinema  

Studio 2 project under the guidance of Mr. Chakradhar Saswade in NID Ahmedabad.