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Antique DOLL Collector January 2014 Vol. 16, No. 12


Four Important Catalogued Auctions To Tempt Every Collector January 10, 11, and 12, 2014, Friday, Saturday and Sunday Newp or t Beach, California at the Westin Hotel

Friday, January 10, 2014

Sunday, January 12, 2014

“Fabulous Fifties and Beyond” - American Dolls from the Golden Age of the 1950s

“The Hanne Büktas Collection of Antique Needlework Tools and Sewing Accessories” Extraordinary rarities from the finest European estates garnered for more than 30 years by this illustrious Viennese collector. Preview 9 AM. Auction 11 AM.

9 AM Preview. 11 AM Part I of the Auction begins, followed immediately by Part II. Part I. The Outstanding Barbie Museum Collection of Judene Hansen of Florida. Part II. And continuing with rare dolls from Madame Alexander, Terri Lee, Mary Hoyer, Arranbee, and others and, featuring the exceptional Ginny Collections of Michelle Borsellino and the archive dolls of the Vogue Company.

“The Vanity Fair, Rare Half-Dolls, Powder Puff Ladies, Bathing Beauties and Other Toilette Table Fancies”

Saturday, January 11, 2014 “The Empress and the Child”

The cover doll is a French bisque Bébé A.T. by Thuillier, its condition as flawless as its beauty, still further enhanced by its provenance. An able companion is a wonderful “Bébé Triste by Jumeau, also being sold with its original family provenance, including photographs of the child owner with the doll, having descended in the family of Robert Louis Stevenson, and still wearing its original Marquis costume. As for the Empress, she is present in two splendid variations, one a rare 21” model with Bru depose wooden body. The auction features the complete private collection of Gail Nichols of Clarence New York with special emphasis on French bébés and a fabulous group of their look-alike cousins from Sonneberg. Also highly featured are early Steiff animals and character dolls from the Helen Welsh collection, a one-owner private collection of mignonettes, and a stunning array of fine French automata. Saturday Walk and Talk with Florence Theriault in a preview of The Empress and the Child auction at 8:30 AM. 9 AM Preview. 11 AM Auction begins.

More than 350 fabulous examples highlights by the half-collection of the Margaret Woodbury Strong Museum (sold to benefit the museum’s collections funds) and the private collection of Vicki Lee Little. Preview 12 PM. Auction 1 PM.

Absentee, Telephone and Online Bidding available for all auctions For information about the auctions or to order your catalogs call 800-638-0422 or 410-224-3655 or email info@theriaults.com or visit www.theriaults.com.

the dollmasters PO Box 151 • Annapolis, Mar yland 21404 • Toll-free: 800-638-0422 • Fax: 410-224-2515 • www.theriaults.com


Fabulous Fifties and Beyond, American Dolls from the Golden Years of the 1950s

The Vanity Fair, Rare Half-Dolls, Powder Puff Ladies, Bathing Beauties and Other Toilette Table Fancies�

With an eye for the best, and the charm and perseverance to seek it out, the indomitable Judene Hansen of Florida gathered an exceptional collection of Barbie and family dolls; her collection of more than 250 of the rarest early models with accessories and costumes will give collectors of all types of dolls an appreciation for this iconic American doll. Too, the charm of the little child blossomed in the sweet, yet impish Ginny doll by Vogue, and more than 100 rare models are included in this auction, from the private collection of Michelle Borsellino and the archives of the Vogue Company.

Among the roll call of mid-20th century doll and decorative arts enthusiasts, the name of Margaret Woodbury Strong resonates with vigor and it is no exaggeration to state that she single-handedly inspired entire generations of future collectors. The museum, created in her name in Rochester New York continues in that tradition, seeking to acquire new pieces of historic importance that define the history of play in American culture, and with that goal in mind, and with the sole purpose of building their acquisition fund, the Museum has decided to present at auction the half-doll collection of the Strong Museum. A very few of the rarities are shown here. In complement to that collection, is the private collection of Vicki Lee Little of New York who has spent the past 25 years in pursuit of the rare and elusive in half dolls, powder boxes, and other toilette table rarities with a particular emphasis on the Art Deco movement.


“The Hanne Büktas Collection of Antique of Antique Needlework Tools and Sewing Accessories” World collectors first learned of the eminently-private collector, Hanne Büktas of Vienna Austria when her collection of dollhouses and miniatures was sold by Theriaults in 2010. Then in November 2013, her stunning collection of French poupées was presented. The January 12 auction, featuring extraordinary needlework and sewing rarities from the finest European estates, garnered for more than 30 years by this illustrious Viennese collector, completes that auction trilogy. Examples range from superb examples of the Palais Royal sewing boxes and tools, to an extraordinary sewing table with music box to a collection of Viennese sewing boxes with miniature painted scenes on the lids by early 19th century Viennese artist Balthasar Wigand. English sewing boxes pose side-by-side with luxury French necessaires, and there are, quite literally, 100s of rare sewing tools in silver, wood, bone, and other precious materials. The auction features 350 lots of rare treasures, notable not only for their rarity, but for their completeness - each set has each and every of its rare little complements.


A stunning array of fine French automata will be sold at the January 11, 2014 auction.

x Other Weekend Events x Appraisal Services. Theriault’s expert team of appraisers will be available throughout the weekend to appraise dolls you may be considering for placement in an upcoming auction. (Note: for larger collections, an appointment may be scheduled in your home. Please call 800-638-0422 for no-obligation information.) The Dollmasters Shop. Browse Dollmasters line of authentic antique-style doll costumes and extensive library of doll reference books.

And mid-day hot fudge sundaes for all.


LAYAWAY AVAILABLE Member UFDC & NADDA

(Nat'l Antique Doll Dealers Assn.)

Visit my website: www.grandmasatticdolls.com

14” Bru Modele Bebe #0, gorgeous pale bisque, outstanding blue bulging outlined p/w eyes, early mauve blush under brows & Fr. ant. mohair wig & orig. pate. Magnificent ant. Fr. aqua silk Bru dress Fr.silk hat, ant. socks & “signed” EJ shoes w/ rosettes. She has the Brevette face (First Generation Bru) RARE wooden Modele body, fully jointed (including ankles). This is the most desirable & rarest body of the Bru Bebe doll and is a very rare size #0. Has tremendous presence & OUTSTANDING beauty!!! CALL OR WRITE FOR PRICE

11” Schmitt & Fils Round Face Bebe, blue p/w eyes, gorgeous pressed bisque, orig. mohair wig & pate, wears magnificent ant. silk dress, orig. shoes, socks & ant. undies. On orig. “signed” Schmitt body, Schmitt shield on her bottom plus Schmitt shield, #4/0 on head. Has orig. box that she ties into, orig. furniture, fabulous aqua silk & lace extra dress, hat & xtra orig. Fr. leather shoes, comb, mirror & muff. Box opens in center for display. Xtra clothing, shoes & furniture all match. Rare find. The most darling RARE cabinet size with a most ESQUISITE FACE!!! $14,500.

23” Steiner Gigoteur, desirable early “closed dome” head, blue threaded p/w eyes, early mauve blush under brows, immaculate pale bisque. Wears beautiful orig. batiste and lace baby dress & knitted booties & vintage hat. On orig. Gigoteur body that kicks, cries & moves her arms up & down, with key wind & on/off lever. By far the most beautiful I have ever seen. STUNNING!!! And ONLY....$3500.

Joyce Kekatos e-mail: joycedolls@aol.com I buy dolls and sell on consignment. 2137 Tomlinson Avenue, Bronx, NY 10461 home: 718-863-0373 cell: 917-859-2446

5” Orsini All Bisque “Didi”, mint bisque overall, blue glass sl. eyes, orig. mohair wig, orig. dress. Hard to find in such wonderful orig. condition. Rare brown painted shoes, high white stockings. BEAUTIFUL!!! $1400. 5” All Bisque Georgene Averill Bonnie Babe, brown glass eyes, great bisque, deeply molded painted curly blond hair, o/cl/mo. w/2 lower teeth, all bisque body, jointed arms & legs & “swivel neck”. Wears darling orig., pink shoes & orig. bonnet. A little jewel. Perfect bisque overall!! ADORABLE!! $1295. 13” Kestner #247 Character Baby, br. sl. eyes, perfect eye wax, peaches & cream bisque, 2 upper teeth, celluloid tongue & orig. blonde mohair wig & Kestner plaster pate intact. Wears orig. baby gown & jacket, ant. underclothing. Great expression, orig. Kestner bent limb baby body. Known as “Hilda’s Little Sister”. ADORABLE!! $1550.

6 1/2” China Head Doll, perfect condition, with glossy porcelain head, shoulders & chest, glossy hair, center part. Beautiful facial decoration. Wears beautiful silk dress, shawl & bustle attached to orig. undies. Will display very nicely in a doll’s arms. Great teeny size & absolutely DARLING!! $195.

Pink & Gold Leaf Marklin Bed, 6” in length, 4” headboard height 3” footboard height & 3” wide, absolutely darling & very hard to find. It is painted pink, adorned with gold leaf deco., thin orig. mattress with springs under bottom. GREAT color, some scuffing to paint. FABULOUS!!! $495. FIRM


Nelling, Inc.

P.O. Box 4327 Burbank CA 91503 Cell: 818-738-4591 Home: 818-562-7839

Member NADDA and UFDC Divine,15” unmarked French bebe, attributed to Mothereau. Superb, antique costume from head to toe. $10,900. From Sonneberg Germany and so French, 22 1/2” mold no. 136, cl. mo. w/ space between lips, palest bisque, French type body, (tiny eyefleck repair), flowing antique costume. $2950. Etienne Denamur bebe in a grand 31” size, o.m., huge p.w. eyes, creamiest bisque. $2400. Exhibiting: January 25 Verdugo Hills Doll Club Show, Glendale CA, Glendale Civic Auditorium

BUYING & SELLING QUALITY DOLLS FOR OVER 20 YEARS

Visit us at: www.maspinelli.com • e-mail: nellingdolls@gmail.com

published by the Office Staff: Publication and Advertising: Keith Kaonis Editor-in-Chief: Donna C. Kaonis Administration Manager: Lorraine Moricone Phone: 1-888-800-2588 Art/Production: Lisa Ambrose Graphic Designer: Marta Sivakoff Contributors: Ursula Mertz, Lynn Murray, Samy Odin, Andy Ourant Subscription Manager: Jim Lance Marketing: Penguin Communications Publications Director: Eric Protter Antique Doll Collector (ISSN 1096-8474) is published monthly by the Puffin Co., LLC, 15 Hillside Place, Northport, NY 11768 Phone: 1-631-261-4100 Periodicals postage paid at Northport, NY. and at additional mailing offices. Contents ©2014 Antique Doll Collector, all rights reserved. Postmaster: Send address changes to Antique Doll Collector, P.O. Box 239, Northport, NY 11768. Subscriptions: Send to Antique Doll Collector, P. O. Box 239, Northport, NY 11768. Phone: 1-888-800-2588 or 1-631-261-4100 Subscription Rates: One Year (Twelve Issues) $42.95; Two Years (Twenty-four Issues) $75.95. First class delivery in US add $25 per year. Canada add $27 per year. Europe add $31 per year. Japan, Australia, New Zealand and Mexico add $33 per year. South America and Singapore add $36 per year. Bermuda and South Africa add $41 per year. Foreign subscriptions must be paid in U.S. funds. Do not send cash. Credit cards accepted. Advertising and Editorial: Call 717-517-9217 or email antiquedoll@gmail.com

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Antique Doll Collector is not responsible for any inaccuracies in advertisers’ content. An unsolicited manuscript must be accompanied by SASE. Antique Doll Collector assumes no responsibility for such material. All rights including translations are reserved by the publisher. Requests for permissions and reprints must be made in writing to Antique Doll Collector. ©2014 by the Puffin Co., LLC.

MOVING?

Important: We need your old address and your new. The Post Office does not forward magazines. Call 1-888-800-2588 or write to us at: P.O. Box 239, Northport, NY 11768. 4

ANTIQUE DOLL COLLECTOR

JANUARY 2014


Tel: 425.765.4010 Valerie@beautifulbebes.com

16”Brevete Bru Jne with dreamy face, fantastic teal and bronze costume. Please call for additional details~$13,800

20” Beautiful large Bru Fashion in orig. ensemble and wig with desirable wooden arms. Amazing beauty with hypnotic eyes~$11,500

Stunning 19” articulated wood body Bru fashion with rare face, huge blue p.w. eyes, original signed 1879 two pc. crème and floral ensemble. Dressed for a day in the park this haunting beauty will entice and mesmerize. All original, exquisite condition. Please call~

Member UFDC & NADDA

18” Size 7 Chevrot Bru Jne with perfect creamy bisque, grey-blue paper weight eyes, open/closed mouth with hint of tongue, gorgeous orig. red silk mariner costume, orig. Bru underwear, & signed Bru shoes. Fantastic doll at very affordable price!

Adorable petite 14” Belton Bebe made for the French Market. Perfect bisque, huge brown p.w. eyes, gorgeous auburn mohair wig, darling dress and bonnet. $2200~

Superb Gigoteur Bebe by Steiner ~ Working with key wind mechanism. Simply beautiful face; gorgeous blue paper weight eyes, original fantastic Bebe dress, mohair wig, antique leather shoes in overall wonderful condition. $2295~


The Complete Guide to Antique, Vintage and Collectible Dolls

January 2014 Volume 16, Number 12

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HAT, TIPPET AND MUFF FOR TWELVE INCH LADY DOLLS

By Susan Sirkis The author advises how to easily change a pattern size and shares easy to follow instructions for a delightful hat, muff and tippet.

18

A FACE IN THE CROWD

12 News 14 Auction Gallery 48 Emporium

49 Mystery 60 Calendar 63 Classified

THE PINTEL SAGA (1887-1976)

By Samy Odin A close look at the company’s products from their earliest Bebes Mignons to their later years producing cloth dolls and teddy bears.

By Michael Canadas The fascinating history of the Dehors firm and a look at the rare portrait dolls they produced.

44

THE COLEMAN COLLECTION

By Donna Kaonis A rare peek at the legendary Coleman doll collection.

39

About The Cover

THE VANITY FAIR

Toilette table fancies from the Strong Collection and the Vicki Lee collection will be offered January 12, 2014 by Theriault’s. 6

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ANTIQUE DOLL COLLECTOR

JANUARY 2014

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2013 UFDC MODERN COMPETITIVE EXHIBIT BLUE RIBBON WINNERS WASHINGTON, D.C. PART 2

Our cover features an extraordinary fashion doll by Auguste Dehors. The article that accompanies it, written by Michael Canadas, discusses these regal poupées with their imperial portrait faces, which he admits to being his favorite among the countless fashions that he has handled over the years. Photo courtesy Carmel Doll Shop


1. Victorian Paper Fashion Doll– 8” tall die cut with stylish crepe and pierced silver tinsel construction. Mint! $125.

(212) 787-7279 P.O. Box 1410 NY, NY 10023

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2. Handsome 17” Wax Officer – scarce portrait of a gentleman with great color, artwork and manners! $450. All original 16” Wax Aristocrat in richly detailed silk fashion layers w/ nobel graceful aspect and luxurious golden ringlets! $395

Quality Antique Dolls by Mail Return Privilege • Layaways Member UFDC & NADDA matrixbymail@gmail.com

3. Mint Victorian Ornament – 8” tall featuring outstanding cotton batting dress with a hood and muff! $150.

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Happy New Year!

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8. All Original Poupée with her Wardrobe – radiant quality – has it all! Factory fancy wig, jewelry, original silk dress w/ the fancy underlayers and great stockings, leather boots, plus her other two colorful original silk ensembles plus velvet coat/hat coat/hat, now all contained within an antique trunk including some miniature accessories as well! $3750

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4. 7” Victorian Wax Enfant Jesus – in orig. diarama, silk robe and wig reclining on a bed of fabric flowers under his delicate oval glass dome, shelf size! $395.

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5. Very rare 9-1/2” Size ‘1” Block Letter F.G. – you may have some other tiny bebes but probably not this rare gem w/original stiff wrist jt. body, factory chemise included, and some flaws which are nearly impossible to see in her size, making her well worth the catch at just $3250 6. Fabulous Deco Heubach Googly – rare mold ‘10790’ in a striking 10” size w/ 8” circ. head and dashing factory original Pierrot costume over chubby toddler body! $1250 7. Large Early Halbig ‘886’ – 7-1/2” tall model with coveted 5-strap bootines! The 1880’s mignonette is all original w/ factory hip length wig, 2 square teeth, original tailored, button back textured frock and what a face on an all bisque!! $1995

9. Elegant 7” Miniature Officer – molded elder man with mustache, stunning uniform with die-cut buttons, medals, etc., metal sword, detachable helmet and leather boots. $550 10. 11” 1840’s Cabinet China – doll house scale, side paneled waves loop into a coiled bun, mint leather body and vintage silk gown, so romantic! $1495 11. 2-1/4” Bohemian Crystal table top Xmas tree, c. 1935. Precious! $295 12. Jumeau ‘221’ Portrait Doll – all original 10” portrait of Empress Josephine, flawless quality in full factory gown w/wig, stand and swing tag! $895

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& LOWE

Connie

Jay

15” Incised Depose Jumeau on a composition 8 ball jointed Jumeau body with straight wrists. Beautiful pale bisque accentuated by deep blue paperweight eyes and finely detailed facial features. Dressed in an appropriate French Bebe outfit of newer vintage with a light brown human hair wig. $5250 16” closed mouth German on a fully jointed composition body wearing her original clothing. Marked on the rear of head 32-26 with no other markings or indication as to the maker. Similar in nature to a Belton, however this doll has the typical open head cut with pate and a wig. $950 20”(50cm) K*R 117 character child. An exceptional all original example directly from a mid western attic! Composition body is near mint, great bisque w/blue glass sleep eyes & a fine cotton outfit w/matching bonnet. Clothing is slightly soiled with age but would clean be as good as new. $3750 14 1/2” S&H 1199 Oriental child on a fully jointed composition body. The more desirable S&H mold, she exemplifies the “look” with the oriental eye cut. The bisque head and body have the normal “olive” coloring and the doll appears to be all original although not the normal Oriental clothing. Tagged to the underside of her clothing is a hand written note indicating that this was a Christmas present to Hilda in 1908. $1750 14” S&H 1279 character child. A special character with dimples, open mouth, blue glass sleep eyes & dressed in period clothing and blond mohair wig. Great cabinet size, this fellow has a lot of charm! $875 Door of Hope husband & wife in very fine original condition with carved wooden hands. Minimal fading to their cotton outfits, their faces are still quite bright not having darkened with age, the male retains his original queue and the female retains her original fancy beaded head covering. $950 pr Clockwork/musical rabbit popping out of the cabbage with his original box! One of the nicest examples I have ever seen, the coloring is a vibrant green, bright white rabbit fur with virtually no loss and in excellent working condition. Stamped on the underside of the cabbage is “Austria”. Cardboard box has a paper label stating: Musical Rabbit in Cabbage. $1850 11 1/2” J.D. Kestner character child marked B Made in Germany 6, 143. On a fully jointed composition body, blue glass sleep eyes, dressed in a multitude of undergarments & a christening gown. Slight scuff to right cheek thus priced accordingly. $475

P.O. Box 5206 Lancaster, PA 17606 FAX 717-396-1114 Call Toll Free 1-888-JAY LOWE or (717) 396-9879 Email: big.birds@comcast.net

Always Looking to Buy Quality Dolls, Toys, Marklin Doll Carriages or Entire Estates Buy & Sell With Confidence Member of UFDC & NADDA 8

ANTIQUE DOLL COLLECTOR

JANUARY 2014


NEWS

Colleen Moore’s Fairy Castle

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his fairy dream home of fantastic proportions is getting a facelift at the Museum of Science and Industry, Chicago this winter. The nearly 9-foot elaborate house was completed in 1935 by silent film star Colleen Moore and is filled with remarkable miniatures and artifacts collected from celebrities, artisans and Tiny artifacts from the Castle’s rooms. craftspeople around the world. The Fairy Castle structure, which took seven years and cost $500,000 at the time to create, is in need of conservation to stop ongoing deterioration and ensure its long-term preservation. The conservation project will focus on repairing damage to the structure, some of which was caused by its 80-year-old electrical and plumbing systems, and replacing these systems with more sustainable options. This project runs through mid-February 2014 in a public gallery space, providing a unique opportunity for guests to see a beloved MSI icon in a whole new way. This exhibit is included in Museum Entry. Guests will be able to watch and engage with structure conservators as they work Tuesdays through Saturdays. On Sundays and Mondays beginning December 8, the public will be able to see book conservators treat 58 miniature books from the collection of more than 80 books created exclusively for the Fairy Castle library. Museum of Science and Industry 5700 S. Lake Shore Drive, Chicago, IL 60637, (773) 684-1414.

Käthe Kruse Doll Company Under New Management

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fter more than two decades, company owners, Andrea and Stephen Christenson, sold Kâthe Kruse Puppenfabrik GmbH to company to Hape Holding Company of Lucerne, Switzerland. Mrs. Christenson, who had been the director and heart of the former family run business for more than twenty years, stayed with the company in a management position until October, 2013. For more than a century the company has been run as a family business, both in the former GDR at Bad Kôsen and later in West Germany at Donauwôrth, under the direction of the Kruse family. The Christensons, who took their direction from Hanna Adler Kruse and Max Kruse, maintained the workshops in Donauwôrth with long-time highly skilled employees and local homeworkers. In order to support the classic collector dolls, the Christensons expanded the Kâthe Kruse line of play dolls, toys and baby products. Sadly, for collectors, it is the end of an era. An educated prediction is that under new ownership, the product lines may be reduced, the focus placed on more moderately priced play dolls and baby products. 12

ANTIQUE DOLL COLLECTOR

JANUARY 2014

Fairy Castle Great Hall

TLC Doll Tours Announcement

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ince 1993, TLC Doll Tours has been providing the foremost all-inclusive fully escorted tours to Europe and the UK. Tour members join the tour from all over the world: Australia, the UK, France, Italy, South Africa, the USA and Canada. Tour Director, Lynn Murray, spends weeks each year exploring new venues, creating a unique and well-balanced itinerary for every tour. In addition to dolls, toys and Christmas, every itinerary includes visits to historic monuments and the great art museums of Europe. With the rapid closing of so many private doll and toy museums in Europe, Lynn is fortunate to have friends who will open their homes and studios exclusively for her tour groups. TLC Doll Tours is very pleased to announce that Marshall Martin has joined the company as a Tour Leader. Lynn and Marshall have traveled together for more than two decades, working to establish their network of doll dealers, collectors and artists in Europe. Both are highly regarded for their expertise and experience in the world of dolls. The team additionally brings to the tours a high degree of history and art knowledge, laced liberally with a sense of humor and fun. The Grand Tour in May-June 2014 will fortunately include several museums and collections soon to be disbursed as the owners retire. Tour members will have the opportunity to join Marshall and Lynn for discussions and first-hand experience with attending European flea markets and the exciting Doll Festival in the heart of the German doll world, Neustadt, near Sonneberg. See the display ad in this issue or go to the website for complete details: www.tlcdolltours.com


LAYAW AVAILA AY BLE

Gigi’s Dolls & Sherry’s Teddy Bears Inc. Allow Us To Help You Discover The Child Within You!

17 ½” All Original Simonne Fashion with straight flange neck, bisque forearms w/ leather over wood w/ tenon joints at shoulder, kid body, jointed kid lower legs, cobalt blue eyes, HH wig, dress melting in front, hat as is $4650.

18-3/4” CM Incised Brevette SGDG Jumeau 8, blue pw eyes, applied ears w/ earrings, blue Jumeau stamped body, hairline on back of head $4500 $4500. Now $3495.

10” All Original Wax over Papier mache Walking Doll, Patented July 15th, 1862, works, wax as is on cheeks, black pupiless eyes $795.

19” CM Bru Jne 8, brown pw eyes, shading above eyes, antique dress, undergarments, socks & burgundy leather boots $13,850 $13,850. Now $9,995.

17” CM German Character #111, French Jumeau body, stationary blue eyes, hairline on forehead and back of right side of head (has been sanded), antique undergarments & shoes, mohair wig $9500. Now $6250.

20” 1936-39 Effanbee American Child – Dewees Cochran Design all original in red, white & blue crepe dress, blue & white coat & hat, blue leather gloves, knit mittens, unders, socks and 1 shoe $1450.

4-3/4” All Original Pair of 292 Kestner Googlie’s dressed in Swedish costumes, all bisques with jointed heads, arms & legs $1595 $1595. Now $1395.

11” Jumeau Fashion size 2 on kid body, beautiful antique clothing & undergarments, no shoes, lt blue pw eyes, blonde mohair wig $2150 $2150. Now $1995.

2 ½” All Original French All Bisque, jointed head, arms & legs, painted blue eyes, blonde mohair wigs Boy in black felt suit & hat, brown boots $275. Boy in gray felt uniform, brown boots $275. Boy in brown shorts & hat, blue boots $250. Nanny w/ Baby, brown boots $325. 2” x 2” Fur covered Horse w/ glass eyes, saddle w/ stir-ups $75.

4” German glass eyed all bisque boy in gray felt uniform w/ red trim, w/ hat $295. 3” x 3” Fur covered horse, glass eyes, saddle & trappings, front foot as is $95. 4” German glass eyed all bisque girl in blue & white striped dress, blonde mohair wig, molded shoes & socks $295.

7” Set of Fischer Quints, 1964, all original in tops, diapers & bottles in bunting, outfits tagged Manufacture of the “Original Quintuplets” by Madame Alexander $265 17” Binnie in Box #1830 & 12” Janie all original in matching outfits of wale cotton with red jersey sleeves $185. pair

13-1/2” Poulbot SFBJ 239, repair back of head, hands touched up, possible original clothing, shoes, socks and red mohair wig (sparse) $4500 $4500. Now $2595. 11” French A P5G, Pintel & Godchaux, blue pw eyes, mohair wig, antique dress, leather shoes & socks $1095 $1095. Now $950.

17 ½” All Original Wax Over Composition doll, brown sleep eyes, beautiful mohair wig, some repair on forehead, red boots paint as is, red silk top & skirt melting, squeaker in body $395.

14” S & H 1249, brown sleep eyes, pierced ears, original mohair wig, stiff wrist ball jointed body $695. 5” UNIS 301 All original with label “Fabrication Francaise Eden Bebe” in red & white striped pants & hat, white shirt, compo 5 piece body, painted blue eyes $150. 4” All Bisque Sold

25” CM Tete Jumeau (red mark), blue pw eyes, pierced ears, original wig and cork pate, antique sailor dress & hat, blue stamped Jumeau body w/ momma/poppa strings $4650 $4650. Now $3650.

21 ½” Heinrich Handwerck 420 Baby w/ brown flirty eyes, original pink coat, pants & hat, 2 fingers as is $475. 8 ½” All Original CM S & H dome head shoulderplate, brown stat. eyes, mohair wig, wonderful costume $525. 25” ABG #1326 on walking body, brown sleep eyes, 2 fingers left hand repaired $350. 22-1/2” B4 in original clothing & HH wig, brown sleep eyes $345. 7” Steiff Jocko w/ chest tag & ear button, 1950’s – 60’s, cute expression $65. 24 ½” S & H 550, brown sleep eyes, mohair wig, repainted hands $395.

6029 N. Northwest Hwy. Chicago, IL 60631 • 773-594-1540 • (800-442-3655 orders only) • Fax 773- 594-1710 Open: Tues., Wed., Sat. 10 a.m. - 5 p.m., Thurs., Fri. 10 a.m. - 6 p.m. Closed Sun. & Mon. Near O’Hare, Park Ridge & Niles

Chicago’s finest selection of Antique, Modern and Collectible Dolls, Barbie, Gene, Alexander, Tonner, Fashion Royalty, Steiff, Dollhouses and Accessories. Member U.F.D.C. & NADDA • Worldwide Shipping

Contact us for Monthly Specials! Tour our shop at: www.gigisdolls.com & join us on Facebook


Auction Gallery

Theriault’s November Auction Brings 2.5 Million

Ensemble...

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ne of the greatest iconic hotels in the world, New York City’s Waldorf Astoria, was the perfect setting for the recent Theriault auction, November 23 and 24th. Saturday’s sale, entitled Ensemble, featured the collection of Hanne Büktas, whose collection of rooms, dollhouses and miniatures was sold in a 2010 Theriault auction. This time her amazing collection of French poupées, costumes, furnishings and accessories, assembled over the last thirty years, was center stage, bringing record prices. Emphasis was on original costumes, some lady dolls possessing elaborate trousseaux, complemented by fine fashion doll-sized furniture and accessories, and rare mignonette “children.” Florence Theriault conducted a complimentary full day seminar at the Waldorf on Friday for a close, hands-on look at the dolls to be sold. The following day’s auction entitled Lulu’s Story, was a comprehensive collection of important French and German dolls including a rare Albert Marque Bebe with brought $210,000. The collection of the late Kate Hoffman offered rare dolls by Martha Chase, some amazing snow babies, an all original Bru Jne in the original box and the Bebe Gourmand. It was a spectacular doll weekend guaranteed to bring doll collectors a very merry holiday season. Prices do not include the buyer’s premium. For additional prices visit www.theriaults.com and click on Proxibid.

This dramatic painted eye “mystery” fashion with her original wig and costume, sold for $54,000. The painted eye mystery doll is shown with this lovely 8-inch ebony finish Huret table with delicate mother-of-pearly decorations and a painted center scene, c. 1855, $7,000.

A petite Rohmer, 14 inches tall, notable for its Rohmer deposed swivel neck, with her trunk and trousseau, circa 1858, realized $36,000.

With her original gutta percha body, a lovely 17-inch Huret with her original trunk labeled “Aimee”, along with several costumes and accessories sold for $36,000.

A very rare lady model with sculpted bonnet, maker unknown, 13 inches, kid poupee body, $5,500. A 16-inch gentleman poupée dressed in his original suit, complete with his beautiful wooden trunk filled with a variety of accessories, brought $20,000. 14

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Creating quite a stir was this outstanding Viennese Rosewood and Bronze folding screen with oil painted scenes, 30 inches wide, circa 1892. It brought $16,000.

Auction Gallery continued on page 50


A Face in M

y partner, David, and I are “savers.” By this I mean that like our dearly departed friend John Darcy Noble who had his black belt in saving, we prefer not to dispose of anything old. John saved seashells, scraps of foil paper no bigger than a postage stamp, hazy mirror, broken dollhouse furniture, and so on, and on, and on. From him we learned that a sheet of water stained and yellowed paper could prove to be invaluable in mending an antique paper doll or what have you. We also save photographs and slides, and we maintain a collection of images that includes practically every doll that we have ever owned, or handled. Recently, our Carmel Doll Shop web designer has been kept busy transferring all of our two-dimensional images over to a digital format. Storing the photos digitally is so much easier, and even better, we have access to the images so much faster. The designer tells us that our doll photo archive contains well over 20,000 images, so the chances are good that if you mention a particular type of doll, we have handled it. This exercise in scanning has been somewhat like watching your nearly 30-year career in dolls pass before your eyes. As a doll collector, I am sure that you have been asked that inevitable question while sharing your dolls with the uninitiated. “What kind of doll is your favorite?” For me, that particular query is a close second to the number one question I am asked as not only a dealer, but also as a male collector of dolls, “How exactly did you get into this? It must be a very interesting story.” I usually reply that it actually isn’t a very interesting story and quickly change the subject back to the interests of the customer. But now that I think about it, that first question is a difficult one to answer, and liken it to asking a father to pick his favorite child. The answer to the second question remains not that interesting. I collect antique dolls, but am interested in many different kinds of dolls, from antique to modern, but in each category I have to admit that I definitely have my favorites. Most of the time I keep this sort of information to myself, or share it with just a small circle of friends and suppliers. I learned early on that the collector who broadcasts to everyone they know exactly what types of dolls they are looking for, ends up competing with themselves in the long run. To explain, a special doll could change hands multiple times before it gets to the hands of the customer who planted the seed of desire in the first place, because each dealer thinks that they have “the customer” for the doll. Left: Following the designs of Dehors’ 1866 patent, this bisque head is able to turn not only left and right, but also up and down, while the doll shown above her bears the earlier cup and saucer swivel neck mechanism. Right: Note the exquisite modeling details upon the breastplate. Dehors ladies have been found dressed in some of the finest clothing of the era, and the attire given this elegant example is no exception. She is costumed in a shade of tulle referred to as “Eugénie blue.” 18

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the Crowd

By Michael Canadas

There are doll examples that are considered among the super rare by collectors and I am proud to state that we have been fortunate enough to have handled more than one of any of them. These could be the dolls that remain in a class all to themselves and we collectors might only see one of them every few years, if that. Those dolls are the ones that I want too, but please don’t tell anyone. At the beginning of our career in antique dolls, at a time when it seemed most collectors were not interested in French fashion dolls, fashions became the focus of our collection. We have bought and sold thousands of fashions over the years and I confess that we enjoyed them all. In their passing through our hands, we learned about them and then we sprinkled them all over the world into the doll cabinets of other collectors. Having the opportunity to handle countless fashion dolls, combined with this recent trip down memory lane via the photo scanner, I am ready to claim my most favorite fashion dolls, and they would be those masterworks created by Auguste Dehors. A very limited number of these dolls, so regal with their imperial portrait faces, have survived. This phenomenon can easily be chalked up to the fact that not very many existed in the first place. I suppose that I have always been fascinated by the “different” face, and am more attracted by a stunning face, or elegant face, than the pretty face. Some dolls, and people for that matter, look the same in every photo, from every angle, and don’t exhibit a “bad” side. I am more attracted to the face that owns the camera when you peer through the viewfinder. In my opinion, a Dehors doll not only owns the camera, but also

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Although today we today might be intimidated by the splendor of a nineteenth century salon, the Dehors doll seems right at home. Remarkably, this lady does conceal a secret, as she is a candy container. We have never seen another Dehors quite like her. Lift her up to reveal her lower half, which holds the secret container. Note that her bisque legs are quite lovely.

the shelf in the doll cabinet upon which it stands, easily dominating the doll cabinet. The dolls created in the 1860s by the Dehors firm, a time that coincidentally marked not only the height of France’s Second Empire, but also the golden age of French dollmaking, are without question, an acquired taste. Not a lot is known of the man himself, but like many makers of dolls and toys, Dehors fell into the business by marrying 20

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into it in 1848. Interestingly, Dehors father in law, Nicolas Schanne, for whom he worked, is forever immortalized in the story La Vie de Bohème, as the carefree toy maker Parpignol. But as we all know, “carefree” and “business” are two words that do not always mix happily. It can be inferred that their relationship may have been an unstable one, because in 1853, Dehors formed a partnership with Delphine Delondre, the widow of Joseph Deschevailles who had operated a successful toy export and import company until his death. Dehors’ role was to operate the business, but the partnership was short-lived. The next business partnership, one with François Chatel, was also short-lived, and after the division, Dehors went into business on his own around 1860. As they say, timing in life is everything. The year 1862 found Dehors and his wife Alexandrine working in a third floor space on Rue des Vieilles Haudriettes. Described as a wholesale fancy goods manufacturer specializing in toys, Madame Dehors was left in charge of the doll department, including the dressing of the dolls. But it must have been their imperial portrait dolls that provided the fame and notoriety in their time and it continues to this day.


This elegant portrait of the Empress of France utilizes one of the first known types of neck movements, the so called “cup and saucer”, and one that predates Dehors’ own 1866 patent. We have seen a variety of eye colors and types used in Dehors dolls, from paperweight examples to flat cobalt eyes. Note that this lady was given brown eyes – quite a rarity in the world of fashion dolls of any type.

Some Dehors ladies were provided the most expressive hands that can found on a French fashion doll. Even better, the arms can be posed in such a way that the hands can easily hold things - in this case, a tiny ring that matches the rest of her jewels.

Here we have a bisque shoulderhead doll that not only displays an elegant side profile, but also illustrates the lack of ear piercing that is common to the dolls. Photo courtesy of Carmel Doll Shop Archives

These very special portrait dolls possess well-sculpted bisque heads and breastplates. Some have uniquely sculpted arms, while others were fitted with the standard bisque arms of the day - arms that would have been available to any doll assembler in Paris. Dehors’ firm was what we would term an assembler as well, meaning that it did not make the bisque parts in house, but were ordered to particular specifications and then put together in the workshop. In 1866, Dehors patented a particular mechanism centering upon neck movement which utilized a wooden cup and metal screw. In the patent drawing that was submitted, one can clearly see that the firm was at the time producing the portrait heads. With his patent, Dehors challenged the mighty Huret firm - not for the idea of neck movement itself, but for the sheer novelty of a moving head in a realistic manner – one that could tilt forward and back, as Some Dehors dolls, such as this pretty well as side-to-side. Miss, can be found dressed as young girls In examining all of the earliest in the enfantine manner, however in our experience, most are found dressed as head models to which we have had adult women. Photo courtesy of Carmel personal access, one constant has Doll Shop Archives ANTIQUE DOLL COLLECTOR

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It is interesting to note that this Dehors gentleman has a very unique, all-leather body, but there are wooden joints present that enable him complete movement. We have never seen this particular body type used anywhere else. It goes without saying that his charms are in high demand by the ladies in the doll cabinet. This gentleman’s eyebrows are painted an unusual shade of russet, and represent a color that we have not noticed on any other fashion example. His wig and facial hair are in a coordinating shade of goatskin, while his eyes are the early flat type in a piercing shade of cobalt blue.

become clear - none of the dolls have pieced ears, neither the ladies nor the gentlemen. Like other dolls of their era with non-pierced ears, we suppose the ladies improvised and simply wore their earrings suspended from the edges of their wigs. Like many other doll assembling firms at the time, Dehors was also experimenting with different types of bodies, so there is not one style of body in particular that we can associate with the Dehors product. The same can be said about the bisque arms that the dolls were sometimes given, because I have counted at least five different varieties utilized. One very interesting doll that went through our hands many years ago was a shoulderhead model that was clearly marked A DEHORS. To our surprise, while examining the doll, we discovered a folded sheet of paper inside the head. We quickly realized that the sheet was a copy of the patent papers for a doll body, and the maker of the body illustrated was Marie Cruchet. This discovery would lead me to believe that Dehors supplied the Cruchet firm with heads for a time. Yet another aspect that set the Dehors firm apart from others is the fact that they produced male dolls, meaning 22

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It is not every day that we are witness to a true French fashion male. This fact is proven by the muscular shoulderplate that he possesses.

not just dolls dressed in men’s clothing, but dolls with true masculine features such as painted moustaches, and sculpting that included muscular shoulderplates. Conversely, although the majority of the ladies we have seen were given shoulderplates that can be found on a typical fashion dolls of the time, others were given molded breasts, which add an air of elegance, especially when dolls are costumed in ballgowns with tight fitting, low cut bodices. Although I love the dolls from this time in the Dehors history, I wonder if the appeal that radiates to collectors today was felt by the children who might have played with them as toys years ago? Let’s face it; many of the dolls’ faces bear a superior look, which could be conceived as intimidating to some children. Obviously it was the special creative touches such as the ones mentioned above that helped the Dehors firm win a bronze medal at the 1867 Exposition Universelle in Paris, an award which marked that place in time in which Dehors’ dolls were at their pinnacle with a lasting honor. Another pinnacle, one that would be reached over a century later, was their value in financial terms. Did you know that the first French fashion doll to sell in the sixfigure range was a Dehors?


Edward could, in my opinion, compete for the title of the rarest of Auguste Dehors’ dolls. He was given a molded and painted mustache, leaving no question about his gender! Clothing for male fashion dolls requires perfect tailoring and Edward’s costume exhibits that trait. Plus, the lucky fellow owns a trunk full of equally fine clothing, along with all of the things a stylish man needs to attract the ladies.

Here Edward enjoys a plein air repast with his canine companion.

Illustrating the exceptionally elegant movements provided by the 1866 swivel neck patent is a spectacular example of a Dehors lady. Placed on a classic leather body, she was blessed with lovely, long, bisque arms and a superb wig. Sumptuous hairstyles were also a calling card of the Dehors firm it seems - not to mention the fabulous faces, of which one is provided here. Photo courtesy of Denise Buese Collection ANTIQUE DOLL COLLECTOR

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Could it be that even the Jumeau firm felt the artistic pressure that Dehors applied to the doll industry with their imperial portrait dolls? As exemplified here, Jumeau attempted their version of a male with similar facial painting. The moustache and shadowing might fool someone into believing that this gentlemen could be a Dehors, but the fatal clue? Yes, the pierced ears are a give away, but their presence makes this handsome soldier no less stunning.

Passing time found Auguste Dehors making more changes in business partnerships, a fact which could have contributed to the growing number of dolls possessing the patented swivel neck mechanism being given a more homogenized look. Another factor to consider is that after 15 years, the Dehors neck movement patent became public domain, meaning that anyone could use it. It appears that many doll assemblers did so, which would also help explain how today it seems that every other fashion doll includes the name “Dehors” to refer to not the doll’s face, but only to the mechanics of the neck movement! The Dehors firm would go on to display its dolls and wares at fairs staged around the world, where many awards were won and high praise was received for their work in the toy business. In 1880, Dehors not only took on a new partner in his toy business, a new son in law, but also branched out into the world of photography by offering accessories and equipment relating to that field. By 1898, according

Eugénie the Empress of France reigned as the artistic muse of her countrymen and without a doubt also served as inspiration for the Dehors imperial portrait lady dolls that helped to make the firm memorable.

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to research by François Theimer, it appears that Dehors had abandoned his toys for the photography business exclusively, and in 1899 Auguste Dehors passed away. It is difficult for me to fathom that Dehors’ dolls, these time capsules of grace and elegance, are nearing 150 years of age. It is clear that time may fade some things, but the glory of the Second Empire, and the glory of the golden age of French doll-making still radiates brightly from these sublime dolls. Just as they did in the beginning, their faces continue to exude confidence, as they know who they are, where they have come from, and that they will never be considered simply another “face in the crowd.” In my opinion, Dehors’ work represents the best that France gave to the world of dolls. Each masterwork that I have had the honor to view, handle and study, I count as experiences that have been among my greatest privileges. I extend my thanks to François and Danielle Theimer for their research into the dolls of Auguste Alexandre Dehors.


Hat, Tippet and Muff

T

Suzanne McBrayer’s twelve-inch reproduction dressed as a bride. She wears a wedding dress made from the Mary Frances pattern for eleven-inch dolls. Her little friend, a UFDC souvenir, wears a dress made from the same pattern drafted for eight-inch dolls.

The same two models wearing the Mary Frances coat, hat, muff and tippet. Changing pattern sizes is an easy challenge in this day of computers! 26

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By Susan Sirkis

he doll dressmaker’s search for suitable designs and patterns is never-ending. First the design has to be appropriate to the age and style of the doll. Next the size of the chosen pattern has to actually fit the doll for which it is selected. Since there are many more dolls than patterns this challenge has not always been easily met. Computers have changed all that. Today, patterns can be re-sized as quickly as the stitcher can get to a computer or a print shop. A pattern made for a nine-inch doll can be made to fit a sixteen-inch doll; one made to fit a sixteen inch child can be quickly altered to fit a twelve-inch lady. The process is a mathematical one but it need not be frightening. There are tools generally available to assist even beginners change pattern sizes. Patterns, like recipes, are failures if they are not copied and used. Recipes are changed all the time. We adjust salt and sugar amounts. We substitute one type of flour for another, raisins for cranberries and chicken for pork. When printed in a cook book, however, recipes are copyrighted. They can be adjusted for personal use but they may not be printed for sale in another cookbook. It is the same with doll patterns. Copying a pattern and changing its size is permitted; selling the results is not. Sharing is a gray area. The copyright laws to which we have all become accustomed are often not well observed in this day of Google images and Pinterest pins. To be safe, do not make a profit from the distribution of a copied pattern or image. Always ask permission of the originator before distributing, in any way, material not original to you. To illustrate the facility a computer can bring to sewing for dolls, consider the patterns printed in the 1913 book, Adventures Among The Thimble People, today commonly referred to as “Mary Frances.” Designed to teach children to sew, the book contains patterns for a wardrobe to fit a sixteen-inch tall German bisque-headed, jointed doll. The wardrobe is very complete and a wonderful resource for modern doll stitchers. As a result, the simple patterns have been converted into many sizes to fit other dolls from Hitty to the American Girl. The original book has long ago entered public domain; patterns from the original book can be copied and distributed by anyone. The original may be found at the Library of Congress website from which it can be downloaded and printed at no cost. Because it is so easy to change pattern sizes today, the usefulness of the patterns in the Mary Frances book does not end with the children’s clothing depicted in the original. Remember that the book was printed in 1913. The designs were not unique to the book. They were based on children’s fashions of two or three years before the book was published and likely culled from magazines of the day. A glance at those magazines reminds us of a fact still true: children’s fashions are derived from adult fashions. Strong similarities exist between the Mary Frances patterns and adult fashions


for Twelve Inch Lady Dolls of the day. So it doesn’t require a great leap to adapt the Mary Frances patterns to the currently popular Edwardian lady dolls. A copy of the Mary Frances patterns in eleveninch, or Bleuette size is included on the Wish Booklet CD, Mary Frances and Me. With the addition of an inch at the hem and a minor adjustment at the waist the patterns convert to the adult fashions upon which the originals were based. Some of the patterns needed a little tweaking but essentially they fit the twelve-inch lady doll quite well. As an example try making the muff and tippit from the eleven-inch patterns. The hat is a new pattern drafted expressly for this article to reflect a more adult style than the Mary Frances bonnet. If you wish to make your own pattern size adjustments, you will need a proportion wheel, available at art and craft supply stores, or at Kinko’s. Measure the length of the doll for whom the original pattern was drafted. Enter that and the measurement of the doll for which the adjustment is intended on the proportion wheel. The directions are printed right on the wheel, but if you need help, ask a clerk at Kinko’s or other print shop. Learn to use your printer software; if you can’t or don’t have a printer, ask your school-age grandchild. Once learned that wheel and your printer will open up a new world of clothing patterns you can make for your dolls.

DIRECTIONS

The hat, muff and tippet may be made of cotton velveteen, rayon or silk velvet, baby cotton flannel or baby cotton batting. The “fur” pieces may be lined with China or other lightweight silk. Use baby cotton flannel for the inner facing. Ermine tails may be indicated by embroidering Lazy Daisy stitches with one strand of embroidery floss, dabbing the tails onto the velvet with acrylic paint, or dabbing them on with a narrow pointed black sharpie. In all cases the ermine must be created before the piece is stitched.

TIPPET:

1. Cut the pattern out of paper. Pin it to the “fur” and cut one, adding 1/4 inch seam allowance all around. Pin the “fur” to the silk and cut an identical piece. Finally, use the pattern to cut the inner lining of flannel, cutting 1/8th inch inside the cutting line. 2. Baste under the seam allowance on the velvet, clipping edges so that it lies smoothly. 3. Center the flannel inner facing on the silk lining. Turn the seam allowance of the silk over the flannel and baste in place, clipping edges so the silk fits smoothly around the flannel. 4. Lay the “fur” and the silk together, matching edges and sandwiching the flannel between them. Blindstitch all around the tippet joining the two pieces together.

Finished hat, muff and tippet.

5. Trim bottom front with three tassels. 6. Use small buttons where indicated on pattern and thread loops to close the front.

MUFF:

1. Cut the “fur” 2 and 3/4 inches wide and 4 and 3/4 inches long. Cut the silk lining to match. Cut the flannel inner facing 2 inches by 4 wide and 3/8th inches long. 2. Baste under a 1/4 inch seam allowance all around the “fur.” 3. Center flannel inner facing on the silk lining and baste 1/4 inch seam allowance down all around. 4. Lay the “fur” and the silk together, matching edges and placing the flannel between them. Blindstitch all around muff joining the two sides together. The result will be a lined rectangle. Bring the two short edges together and blindstitch them together. 5. Trim with two tassels. If you wish, you may run a length of silk thread around the doll’s neck and attach it to each side of the muff.

HAT:

1. The hat requires a form to give it shape. Use a good fabric glue like Bond Instant Grrrip to assemble the hat. 2. Make the form out of buckram or index card stock. Cut the crown or side, slashing the seam allowance as shown. Glue into a circle. Dampen and let dry around a suitably shaped object (spice bottle?) if necessary. 3. Fold the seam allowance smoothly toward the center of the circle. 4. Run a bead of glue along the outer top edge of the crown seam allowance. Glue the crown to a flat piece of buckram or card stock. 5. Trim excess buckram or card stock away, leaving a smooth edge to the top of the hat. ANTIQUE DOLL COLLECTOR

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Wrap embroidery floss around cardstock to form tassels.

After all the tassels are wrapped they are ready to be stitched into shape at the top and cut again. After forming a circle for the sides or crown for the hat, glue the seam allowance to a piece of buckram. When the glue has dried, cut way all excess to make hat form.

6. Lay the top of the hat, top down, on a piece of baby batting and cut a piece of the batting in a circle to fit the top of the hat. Hold in place to the top with a dot or two of glue. 7. Lay the hat, top down, on a piece of the tippet/muff lining material. Cut a circle 1/4 inch larger than the top of the hat. Slash all around the seam allowance. 8. Run a thin line of glue around the seam allowance on the side facing the hat. Glue the top in place around the crown of the hat. Pull the seam allowance smoothly down over the side of the hat. 9. Cut a strip of flannel 1/8th inch more narrow than the crown. The edges should meet in the back but not overlap. 10. Cut a piece of velvet 1/4 inch wider all around than the flannel. Turn under the extra on one long side and both short ends and baste in place. 11. Embroider or mark the ermine tails. 12. Wrap the completed “fur” strip Around the crown of the hat, butting the edges in the back. The fourth (remaining) seam allowance of the “fur” strip will hang down over the bottom of the hat form. 13. Run a line of glue along the dangling seam allowance and fold it up, gluing in place to complete the hat construction. The hat may be lined if desired.

TASSELS:

1. Use a single strand of black silk or cotton thread to make the tassels. 2. Cut a piece of card stock 6 inch by 1 and 1/2 inches. Fold in half the long way producing a 3/4 inch by 6 inch strip. 3. Starting at one end, wrap the thread around the card stock about a dozen times. Move the thread along the card and wrap again. Continue moving and wrapping along the card until you have wrapped a sufficient number of times to complete the number of tassels needed. 28

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Finished tassels with thread still attached.

4. Thread a needle with a single strand of matching thread. Pass the needle back and forth through the top of each tassel. As each is completed cut the connecting thread, releasing the tassel. 5. Insert the needle into the top of the tassel and exit it about 1/8th inch down the tassel. Wrap tightly. Pull the thread out the top of the tassel. Cut the thread after anchoring it with a few stitches. Leave a length of thread long enough to attach the tassel to its position. 6. Cut the loops at the bottom of the tassel and trim evenly. 7. Sew the tassels in place with black thread where desired on the hat, muff and tippet. NOTE: Brown or black fabric can be used instead of white to represent differing types of fur.


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Th e Pintel Saga (1887-1976) by Samy Odin

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Marked HP and a size number, the heads are poured bisque with the rims typically cut off, making them appear similar to pressed bisque heads. Clothing was sewn directly onto the bodies. 32

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Pintel made small rubber squeaker toys during his early years in business.

he name Pintel means a lot to collectors of antique playthings. For more than two generations, members of this family created classic articulated bébés, rubber toys, cloth dolls and stuffed animals that are still cherished today. Despite the popularity of Pintel’s varied production, very little history has been published about this company. Henri Pintel, who was born in 1860, founded the firm in 1887 at 231 rue St Denis in Paris. According to The Encyclopedia of French Dolls, he also owned a factory producing doll bodies at 52 rue Bichat, in the 10th district of Paris, as well as a small porcelain atelier on rue du Sergent Bobillot in Montreuil, where he made doll heads. The latter location is where he made his first bisque headed Bébés Mignons, which were marked with the initials “H. P.,” a fact that still seems ignored by the doll community. Most of these early bébés are documented as having been small to medium size, as reflected by his early advertising campaign, which also mentions rubber toys such as the little squeaker doll shown above. This very first generation of bébés by Pintel is marked with the HP initials either above or surrounding their size numbers. The heads are made of poured bisque, but their rims are usually cut off, which may be confusing as they look similar to pressed bisque heads. All of the documented models have closed mouths, stationary glass eyes and straight-limbed five-piece bodies. Their factory original clothing is typically Parisian, cut from cheap cotton taffetas and machine made lace. It is interesting to note that these simple toilettes were sewn directly onto the body with no buttons or snaps. Even shoes were sewn to stockings and hats to their mohair, which was directly glued onto the pates, with no skullcaps. All of these elements demonstrate the inexpensive level of these popular, yet becoming, playthings.


In 1890, Henri Pintel took on an associate in the person of Ernest Godchaux, who essentially brought cash into this already promising business, and relocated the main office to 79 rue des Archives, in the 3rd district. This is when the name of the company became “Pintel & Godchaux” and its doll head marking became, logically, “P. G..” This new partner’s ambitions probably drove a decision to part with the porcelain factory in Montreuil and concentrate the business on making doll bodies to be assembled with bisque heads bought from a different porcelain maker. All of Pintel’s attention was directed to the body of his dolls. In fact, in 1891 he patented a system to assemble doll bodies using as little rubber elastic as possible. In 1892, the Bébé Charmant came into existence. That most elaborate product of the Pintel & Godchaux line came with a bisque head which, according to the early research of Florence Poisson (later reported by the Colemans), was provided by the Gaultier Frères porcelain company. Bébé Charmant could have a closed or an open mouth and bore the initials “P. G.,” clearly visible on its neck. Next to those initials are usually found a size number, sometimes the word “DEPOSE” and some other letters that keep intriguing advanced researchers. For several years, I couldn’t quite figure out what bothered me in the “evidence” that Gaultier was the porcelain maker responsible for Bébé Charmant heads. Looking more closely at dozens of models by this company, I came to a conclusion that conflicted with the written proofs that Pintel & Godchaux had been Gaultier’s clients. If Gaultier had really made those heads, why did none of this porcelain factory’s product characteristics appear on “P. G.” marked bébés? For example, the typical position of the marking, up high in the rear of a bébé head, next to the rim cut, never shows on “P. G.” heads. The font of the letters also differs entirely from what Gaultier used for special orders, such as the “P. D.” (for Petit & Dumoutier), “R. D,” (for Rabery & Delphieu), “A. T.” (for André Thuillier), “C. P.” (for Charles Pannier), etc. All of those markings are consistent with the Gaultier “style” but Pintel & Godchaux’s are not. Even considering the fact that Pintel became a client of Gaultier’s in later years, when the marking pattern had already changed by inserting the initials into a “scroll,” the “F. G.” touch is not recognizable on his dolls!

The earliest “Bébé Charmant” still had a head marked HP with closed mouth, stationary glass eyes and straight limbed five-piece body. This pristine model still wears its factory original chemise marked “Bébé Charmant”.

Pintel took a partner, Ernest Godchaux, in 1890. Here we see the markings “P.G.”

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Porcelain makers often subcontracted special orders. It is my belief that heads were produced in a Gaultier-made mold and then poured and painted by the Léon Coiffe Company.

The only thing in common with Gaultier is the head mold’s shape. In fact, Bébé Charmant has indeed a Gaultier “look,” but everything else speaks of a different head origin. I also started brainstorming about all of those different letters that frequently come around the “P. G.” initials (“A.,” “B.,” “C.,” “L. C.”), another non-Gaultier characteristic. “L. C.” especially intrigued me. Why would Gaultier use such odd letters, suggesting a person’s initials? Who else could have had a name matching these initials? I first thought they could have a link to Léon Couty, of Limoges, but the dates didn’t match: Couty didn’t succeed Henri Coiffe until 1909. The explanation of it all came from a discussion with another researcher, who was also struggling with the same enigma without having had the opportunity of studying as many Pintel bébés as I had. Her name is Elisabeth Deconchat. She is doing a very deep study of the various porcelain companies active in Limoges, and will share the results of her research in a book to be published in the fall of 2013. We both knew how frequently porcelain makers subcontracted special orders. It now seems very plausible that this was what happened with the heads made for Pintel. Produced in a Gaultier-made mold, “P. G.” bisque heads were very likely poured and painted by the Léon Coiffe Company. Henri Coiffe was not the only porcelain maker with this family name operating in Limoges at the end of the 19th century. Léon Coiffe, related to Henri, also had his own company at 66 route de Paris in Limoges, which was active beginning in 1872. Yes! Thanks to this 34

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piece of information supplied by Madame Deconchat, we can now better explain where these strangely marked bisque heads came from. The other unexplained letters, “A”, “B”, “C,” could refer to various molds made out of one die. Depending on how big an order was, a porcelain company needed several identical molds based on the original sculpture chosen by the client. Over the years, Gaultier probably provided Léon Coiffe multiple, sequentially-lettered molds to be used for the Bébé Charmant. Florence Poisson was right: the Pintel/Gaultier connection was real, yet heads for Bébé Charmant were very likely provided to Gaultier by the porcelain factory of Léon Coiffe. It’s important to understand that Pintel was not a maker of “pricey” bébés. His Bébé Charmant was rather inexpensive, as an 1892 ad published in the catalog of “Aux Classes Laborieuses,” a modest department store located on boulevard de Strasbourg in Paris, shows. Bébé Charmant only cost 3.90 Francs, as opposed to the Bébé Le Parisien by Steiner, which in its simplest variation cost 8.75 Francs. At around the same time, a deluxe Bébé Printemps in an equivalent size, by Rabery & Delphieu, cost 37 Francs and a Bébé Jumeau even more – 39 Francs. A basic Bébé Charmant was one tenth the price of a luxury Bébé Jumeau! How could that be? The head of a doll, which means so much to 21st century doll collectors, was not perceived as the most important part of a doll in 19th century. The price charged for a doll was instead based on the type of body, richness of clothing and elaborateness of packaging. The


An all original Bébé Charmant, formerly in the Madame Peyt Collection. It wears an elaborate silk dress with matching bonnet over an original chemise with the Bébé Charmant label. Bébé Charmant with head from Ernst Heubach, marked 1900.

head was almost irrelevant in determining the value of a play doll. Most of Pintel & Godchaux’s business consisted of making and assembling doll bodies, not making doll heads. The majority of Pintel’s bébés, in fact, originally came with a straight-limbed bébé body of the cheap paste kind that today’s doll collectors usually do not appreciate. Unfortunately, most of the nice looking bisque heads made for Pintel are now found assembled on fully articulated bébé bodies that look to be later additions. The popularity of fully articulated bébé bodies has pushed professionals and collectors to replace original Pintel-made crude paper paste straight bodies with marked or unmarked Jumeau fully articulated ones that originally were meant for more expensive playthings. Among Bébés Charmant I could study over the years, one that had been kept in its fully factory original condition was in the revered collection of Madame Petyt in Brussels. It had a spectacular Kate Greenway type of silk dress with matching bonnet, worn on top of an equally original chemise that showed the Bébé Charmant label (see lot 750 in the catalogue of Madame Petyt’s collection, by Theriault’s). Madame Petyt’s Belgian collection displayed this straightlimbed doll together with another fully original Pintel & Godchaux bébé, one with an open mouth and sleeping eyes and bearing the enigmatic “L. C.” marking. Other bébés by Pintel & Godchaux were probably sold for wholesale prices to doll dressmakers specializing in folklore costumes. Many of the “P. G.” marked bébés, when found in their fully original condition, show a straight

limbed body and a traditional costume sewn directly onto the body (see Theriault’s French Dolls in Folklore Costume, lots 30 and 60). Bébé Charmant also came with German-made bisque heads, imported from Ernst Heubach’s porcelain factory. The mold number usually seen on these models is #1900. Pintel & Godchaux, like many of their French competitors, followed Fleischmann & Bloedel’s example: they imported cheap bisque heads from Germany and assembled them on French-made bodies in order to satisfy the demand for inexpensive “French-made” dolls. In 1899, Pintel & Godchaux merged into SFBJ, representing 9% of the capital of this huge new company. It is an eye opener to realize that Pintel & Godchaux accounted for twice as much value as Paul Girard, of the BRU company, in the capital of SFBJ. In fact, at the end of 19th century, doll makers who targeted an up-scale clientele, like Bru, were seriously struggling, while companies such as Pintel & Godchaux, which served a more modest yet wider clientele, achieved better financial results. Sale of the Pintel & Godchaux Company to SFBJ did not push Henri Pintel out of the toy business. With his son Marcel, they came back into this specialized market after having sold, in 1901, another part of their business that produced rubber belts and garters (see The Encyclopedia of French Dolls). By 1909, Marcel Pintel had established the company at its new address of 74 rue de la Folie Regnault in the 11th district of Paris. Ads of that year mention “Manufacture ANTIQUE DOLL COLLECTOR

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Pintel continued his successful business with cloth dolls. Left: “P. F.” button hooked onto the doll garment.

Beginning in 1911 with mechanical teddy bears, Marcel Pintel went on to establish an important teddy bear business. Left: This is a later example of a Pintel cloth doll.

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de jouets en étoffe, animaux bourrés, sur roues, poupées bourrées, sujets divers” (manufacture of cloth toys, stuffed animals rolling on wheels, stuffed dolls and various other products). In 1911, Marcel Pintel hit the market with a new revolutionary toy, a mechanical teddy bear. It was immediately successful and lead the company to include a representation of two dancing teddy bears surrounded by the initials “P. F.” (Pintel Fils) in its logo. This new logo, in the shape of a gilded metal round button, was used starting in 1913. Beginning in 1919, Marcel Pintel was not only making mechanical bears, he also started a major classic teddy bear business, as well as being active producing stuffed plush animals. He used a quality mohair plush that, when well preserved, is still soft and sturdy today. A couple of years later, in 1921, Marcel Pintel began consistently producing stuffed cloth dolls as well. Looking at the way he evolved in the toy market of that time, it seems evident that this manager had a “nose” for fashionable playthings. During the two decades between the world wars, combining the success of its stuffed animals with its cloth dolls lines, the Pintel company made a fortune and climbed the ladder of that profession to the point where Marcel Pintel became one of the leading figures in his field. He was even elected President of the Chambre Syndicale for the French Toy Makers and was awarded the Legion of Honor while holding that office. Cloth dolls by Pintel are sometimes difficult to identify, since the only marking affixed by the maker was a metal “P. F.” button hooked onto the doll garment. Easily lost, this distinctive sign is the best way we have to distinguish, beyond the shadow of a doubt, a Pintel-made doll from anonymous cloth dolls of the same period. Nonetheless, by comparing several marked Pintel dolls it is possible to establish their common characteristics. The type of cloth used for the face and body, for example, seems consistent in all four models presented here. The cotton cloth has usually a pale beige tone, enhanced by sprayed rosy tones on the cheeks. The eyes, nostrils and mouth are hand painted in bright colors. Depending on molds, the eye make-up can be very simple and almost crude or more elaborate, with singly-stroked lashes and upper lids often painted in a grey color. Mouth shape varies by mold but is usually painted with a single color, eventually highlighted by a white dot. In later years, painting standards seem to have changed, as the doll standing with a blue felt knot and collar clearly shows. When WWII broke out, cloth doll production was discontinued. Only plush animals continued to be produced throughout the conflict. Those


became Pintel’s specialty after the war. At that time, the main factory was located at 4 and 6 avenue du Trone, in the 12th district in Paris. According to Marcel Pintel’s nephew, Gaston Soto, who I was privileged to meet, the factory’s atmosphere was magical. Of course, little Gaston had known it since his childhood, before WWII, when he adored visiting his elegant uncle, walking with him through the factory, admiring the way playthings were being made and learning about production. Monsieur Soto explained that the mechanical and stuffing departments were mostly staffed by men, while the assembly line and clothing department predominantly employed women. When I asked him if “cottage industry” procedures were used by Pintel, he responded in the negative. He remembers that workers entering the building would stop at the time clock and do the same when leaving, and he didn’t think other workers were doing their jobs from home. In 1941, fate was to change the evolution of this family business. In spite of the war and his Jewish origin, Marcel Pintel didn’t leave Paris. Only his sister’s family fled to spend the war years in safety. Marcel thought that, given his prominent position and close friendship with several influential politicians of the time, he would be safe. German soldiers arrested him at the end of 1941 and deported him to a camp from which he would never return. Shortly before he was arrested, Marcel Pintel sold his company to a very good friend, the owner of the well-known rubber toy factory Delacoste. An agreement was made that once he came back from Germany Pintel would re-purchase the business. When the conflict was over and chances of ever seeing Marcel Pintel again vanished, Delacoste sold the company to someone else, The Pintel family then turned in a new direction that did not involve Marcel’s toy making tradition. During the 1950s and 1960s, under new management, Pintel’s stuffed animal production kept growing, especially wheeled models. However, after 1968, demand started to decrease and expenses rose to the point where, in 1974, a decision was made to stop production. Its 1974 catalog was to be the last for Pintel. By 1976, the company had closed for good, even if its name was sold to a toyshop that kept selling contemporary toys from an outlet in the 12th district of Paris. For questions about this article, please contact the author at samy.odin@noos.fr. Acknowledgments: the author is grateful to the following individuals for their input in the preparation of this article: Gaston and Michèle Soto, Elisabeth Deconchat, Dominique Pennegues and Lori Santamaura. In memory of dear Andrée Petyt. Photo credits: Guido Odin, Eric Giovannini, Jean Dalmard and the Soto family. See also: Odin, S., Boules de Poils, Musée de la Poupée-Paris, 2006.

Henri Pintel

Marcel Pintel ANTIQUE DOLL COLLECTOR

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So realistic as to appear as actual fabric, the draping and folds on the costume of this and very rare half doll are enhanced with colorful flowers.

“He loves me, he loves me not” was one of the endearing sentimental themes of the Goebel firm. This example is notable for wonderful decoration of costume.

An ensemble of 1920s toilette table fancies include a smoking flapper lady in powder box chair by Galluba and Hoffman and a French porcelain lady with fan as powder box by Aladin.

Four rare early half doll models from Ernst Bohne Sohne of Germany with remarkable detail of accessories and costume.

The Vanity Fair A

collection of half dolls, powder puff ladies, bathing beauties and other toilette table fancies from the Margaret Woodbury Strong Museum, being sold for the benefit of the museum collection fund, and the private collection of Vicki Lee Little, whose collection has appeared in prominent research books, is presented by Theriault’s at auction on January 12, 2014 in Newport Beach, California. The auction, entitled The Vanity Fair, takes its name from the town of Vanity in Pilgrim’s Progress. There was a never-ending fair in the town – hence, of course, known as The Vanity Fair – that offered all that was frivolous and fancy for the ladies of the town.

Fittingly, a baker’s dozen of half dolls inspired by the theme of the Baker’s Cocoa Lady are included in the auction. Shown here are two modes, the larger 7 1/2” by Gebruder Heubach.

Two porcelain Art Deco powder boxes from the French firm of Henri Delcourt, one shown with actual original artist rendering.

The buxom lady gathers a bountiful basket of Dresden flowers in her arms. ANTIQUE DOLL COLLECTOR

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Detail photos of Dressel Kister’s “Lady Balancing a Basket of Flowers with Hidden Cherub” illustrate the superb and intricate sculpting.

The very rare sought-after “Girl with Basket of Fruit” attributed to Kister was inspired by the 16th century Titian painting.

The double-figure half dolls depicts a dancing couple in formal wear.

The double-figure half dolls with intertwined fingers have original porcelain legs, and depict ballerinas.

An unusual hip-length nude flapper has stylized cloche and white gloves.

Two porcelain bathing beauties feature nude ladies with thigh-high lavender stockings.

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Pierrot supports a flapper lady whose skirt forms into a powder box.

From the rare series of Medieval figures created by Dressel Kister is this lady with jointed arms, holding a falcon.

It takes both Pierrot and Harlequin to support Pierrette with powder puff skirt.

Another from the wonderful models by Goebell is the half doll Lady in Carnival Costume, here with her original powder puff skirt, legs and powder box.

Her red hot hair is the powder puff while her hollow head serves as powder dish, on this whimsical toilette table fancy.


The rare powder dish depicts Josephine Baker balancing on her trademark bunch of bananas.

Another double-figure half doll features the nude dancing couple.

The 1920s Parisian dance hall sensation, Mistinguett, is depicted. The half doll is attached to her original base whose lace skirt hides a candy box.

A portrait half doll of Princess Wilhemina by Goebel. We know it’s a portrait of her because she has her original gold paper label of identification.

Two examples of the splendid porcelain half dolls on French ormolu and porcelain powder boxes.

Call them little vanities, whimsies, biblelots, ladies of the dressing table, ladies of the sewing room, these precious little figures modeled as “half dolls” and even, sometimes, full dolls, were particular to the early 20th century. Certainly some had been created before, but that was a novelty. What happened in the first quarter of the 1900s was different. It was a phenomena that was peculiar to its time, when sewing was still a skill of every woman, yet where a burgeoning middle class made the possibility of owning little luxuries a likelihood for most, and where industrialization of the porcelain factories made volume production an option. The result was an extraordinary outpouring of the imagination created in a luxury quality that seems impossible to achieve today. Hearkenings back to the romantic 18th century stood side-by-side with the popular culture figures of early 1900s. Here are just a few of the 350 lots being presented. For more information visit www.theriaults.com or call

Berries anyone? A rare model by Dressel Kister from their series of child models, of which several others are included.

Three porcelain flappers with stylish hats of the 1920s have “fur” collars which are actually powder puffs, and the heads rest in their original shoulder-shaped powder dishes.

The Sitzendorf firm of Germany created “Little Girls All in a Row”. Look closely, each model is different.

What imaginative frenzy of thought designed this stretched cat half doll. Of course it’s rare. ANTIQUE DOLL COLLECTOR

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Happy New Year from Blackberry Studio

Margaret Gray Kincaid Member NADDA and UFDC Cell: 646-709-4340 Margaret.kincaid@gmail.com

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DOLL AUCTION Part 2:

February 8th, 2014 at 11am

From the collection of renowned collector & dealer Barbara Carroll Presented by: Pac Shoppe Auctions, INC. 10610 Metric Drive Suite #150 Dallas, TX 75243 www.pacshoppe.com 972-840-0998 214-403-5855 Email: info@pacshoppe.com

Auctioneer: Steve Kaplan - TX License #10877

Barbie, Gene, Madame Alexander, Ginny, Boxed Dolls, Ashton Drake, Christening Gowns, Accessories & More.


The Coleman Collection by Donna Kaonis

I

n our collective consciousness the name Coleman looms large. Dorothy, and her daughters Evelyn Jane and Elizabeth Ann, are considered the first ladies of the antique doll world for their 1968 landmark publication The Collector’s Encyclopedia of Dolls, Volume I, shortly followed by Volume II. These massive books remain the go to books for researching dolls. Attendees to the 2013 UFDC national convention in Washington, D. C. were invited to a fundraiser at the Coleman house, built in 1939 by Dorothy’s father, Harold Clinton Smith, a leading architect and builder. Remarkably other than updating a few appliances, little in the house has ever been changed. Much of the furnishings and paintings were commissioned by prominent furniture makers and due to the home’s historical significance it eventually will be gifted to the city. A few years ago Ann wrote an article in this magazine about the family’s history with dolls. After a normal childhood interest in dolls Dorothy moved on and it was only after daughters Evelyn Jane and Elizabeth Ann began to collect 44

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antique dolls that their mother put her prodigious talents as a statistical analyst and genealogist to work in the doll field. Aiding their endeavors were several books and pamphlets on dolls left to them by an “aunt” of Dorothy’s. While still in college Ann wrote her first book, Dolls, Makers and Marks. Crown Publishers asked them for an encyclopedia and the rest is history. In between Volumes I and II they also authored The Collector’s Book of Doll Clothes, Fashions in Miniature, 1700-1929. Ann’s career trajectory is impressive to say the least. She is the former Curator of Costumes and Textiles at the Brooklyn Museum of Art and the Museums of Fine Arts in Houston and Boston. She is an avid traveler and has been virtually everywhere, even to exotic destinations that most of us never imagine visiting. Currently Ann serves as the Chair of the UFDC Museum Committee, committed to fundraising and growing the museum’s collections. Ann graciously allowed us to photograph during our visit and we are thrilled to bring you this brief glimpse. This was the second time we had been invited to the Coleman house. Many years ago when Dorothy was still alive we had occasion to visit. I remember dolls in suitcases under beds, in drawers and closets! This time Ann ANTIQUE DOLL COLLECTOR

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had spent considerable time grouping and displaying dolls throughout the house, as well as writing descriptive comments about the dolls and their history. All antique doll mediums are well represented but it is clear there is an obvious bias towards early chinas with original clothing, in fact originality is the key emphasis here. Many of the dolls have stories to tell, one of the most amusing being the May-December marriage between the dolls George and Lena, the subject of an article written by Ann for this magazine. 46

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Over the years, many collectors and doll researchers have spent time at the Coleman house, home to not only a doll collection of major breadth and scope, but also voluminous records, trade and manufacturing materials and doll references. In short, it is a doll collector’s paradise and speaking on behalf of doll collectors everywhere we are grateful for its eminent custodian.

The Tender Years

10” Fire A Steiner. Piercing dark brown P.W. eyes. Tons of dark lashes. Dark locks with French hat. Soft pink lips. White painted fingernails indicating the doll was specially made for the Paris Toy Store, Au Nain Bleu. Wears full slip and silk dress with silk bows. Has lace cape to wear or not. A TRUE BEAUTY. 5,900

Deborah Varner Member UFDC • 303-850-7800 queenbeev1@comcast.net

9” Kestner all bisque. Very rare in such a large size. Early peg strung body. Br. glass sleep eyes. Blonde mohair wig. Perfect bisque with gorgeous modeling. Black boots with blue tassles. Long white socks. Orig. blue silk dress with organdy collar. French hat. SO SWEET. 5,275.

WWW .THETENDERYEARS.NET

5” All bisque Orsini “MiMi“ Deep Bl. painted eyes. Orig. brown mohair wig. Lovely brown coat with faux collar. Perfect body with orig. MiMi label on chest. Painted black shoes with high white stockings. DARLING AND SWEET. 1,275.

19-1/2” Bahr and Proschild DEP 320 character doll. Early, old long blonde with a tinge of red human hair wig with hand stitched cap. Old stationary Br. glass eyes. Om. with upper teeth. Pierced ears. Hair matches brows. Orig. white dress with pink silk ribbon at collar, waist and wrists. Lg. pink silk bow in hair. GORGEOUS CHILD. 875 ANTIQUE DOLL COLLECTOR

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SELL A DOLL IN THE EMPORIUM Purchase of an ad includes FREE internet ad on our website.

Send us a photo or a digital photo of your doll with a description and your check or credit card information. We do the rest!! Take advantage of this special forum; the cost is only $95 for a 2.4”w x 2.9”h ad space. Antique DOLL Collector, P.O. Box 239, Northport, NY 11768. Phone 1-888-800-2588. Email: antiquedoll@gmail.com

Kathy Libraty’s ANTIQUE DOLLS Exceptional crèche figure with wooden head, extravagant long flowing tresses, glass eyes, wooden lower limbs, approx. 16 inches. Deborah Fratino

Call 203-434-6733

18” FRANCOIS GAULTIER BLOCK FG c1875 - Gorgeous $4300 19” SUPER RARE PORTRAIT JUMEAU FASHION FAB antique Ensemble $5800 16” BELTON w/closed mouth for the French Trade $1800 18” FABULOUS PORTRAIT JUMEAU BEBE in GREAT CONDITION-EPIC! $9800

email: debfratino@aol.com

WWW.KATHYLIBRATYSDOLLS.COM

Phone: 718-859-0901 email: Libradolls@aol.com MEMBER: UFDC OR—Buy My Dolls on eBay where I begin most of my antique dolls for just $1—Search seller name kathylibraty.

8 MONTH LAYAWAY PLAN AVAILABLE

WWW.RUBYLANE.COM/SHOPS/KATHYLIBRATYSANTIQUES

BABES FROM THE WOODS

SARA BERNSTEIN DOLLS Email santiqbebe@aol.com 732-536-4101 View Quality Dolls at affordable prices. 100’s of pictures and prices at my Ruby Lane Shop...

Faithful reproductions of hand carved Queen Annes, dolls by Izannah Walker, and Early American Cloth Dolls. Kathy Patterson Ph. 705-489-1046 toysintheattic@ sympatico.ca

Exclusively at

www.sarabernsteindolls.rubylane.com

www.babesfromthewoods.com

Hard-to-find Schoenhut Jolly Jiggers. This is the double jigger version with the Dutch boy and girl. Toy is complete and all original. Some damage to boy’s clothing. Price: $1,250. Always a nice selection of Schoenhut toys are Andy’s Schoenhut Shop on Ruby Lane. Andy Yaffee Phone: 717-584-5104 910 Rivergate Court, Millersville, PA 17551

Etrennes: A French tradition of a New Year’s Day gift.

“ Modiste” box in unplayed with condition containing a S&H all bisque black stocking mignonette along with millinery trims to decorate the 5 original hats attached inside. Still folded inside is the original “La Mode des Bebe’s” 4 page booklet. Remains of a Paris label on the bottom. Circa 1895. $1,195.

Simon Halbig 151 - (unmarked), 13”, blue painted eyes, rare under eye shadowing, open/closed smiling mouth with molded teeth, dimples, original blonde mohair wig, perfect bisque. She has a composition ball jointed body with normal wear, one finger re-glued $3950. Call 215-794-8164 or email alloyd@nni.com. Member NADDA and UFDC. Other photos and dolls may be seen at RubyLane.com/shops/anntiquedolls. 48

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“Au Nain Bleu” labeled room box of a millinery shop containing 8 original hats, flowers, and trim. Still tied in place is a mirrored vanity table, 2 side work tables, 2 hat stands, and a center table for display. The shopkeeper is an all bisque French mignonette wearing original silk costume. $1,250.

Email: Latte303@msn.com or call 480-332-5158 Debra Borrud • Member UFDC

28-1/2 inches of heat stirring beauty! Gorgeous coloring, perfect bisque and mesmerizing blue eyes. Her magnificent clothes of embroidered net over pale mint silk is a joy to behold. Her chapeau of delectable flowers frame her stunning face. She is an entrancing showstopper, we’ve named her Princess. $5800

Evelyn Phillips (914) 939-4455 17 Loch Lane, Rye Brook, NY 10573 Email: poupees57@aol.com


Do You Have a Mystery Doll?

I

’m trying to find out more about two of my dolls. The first has a carved wooden shoulder head with wood arms and legs and a cloth body. She is 17.5 inches long. The second doll is a bit of a mystery... she has six teeth, human hair, sleep eyes, a blue jointed wood and compo body and is marked 10D. She is 24 inches tall. If you can help email Christine at marshmellowc51@me.com

C

an you help? This is a 13-inch black papier mache shoulder head with a wooden box inside that when squeezed the mouth opens. He has compo hands and feet and molded orange boots, original clothes. Any information please call Paula at 901-867-8932.

Perhaps there is a doll in your collection that you and others have never seen before. Send us a high resolution photo and any information you have to antiquedoll@gmail.com (you may also send a print photo to Antique Doll Collector P.O. Box 39, East Petersburg, PA 17520). If you can identify a mystery doll, write to us at the address or email above.

All original Steiner C, precious at only 11 inches. Call.

Marion Maus Specializing in Dolls and Miniatures Ellicott City, MD Email mmausantiques@gmail.com Phone 443-838-8565 Member NADDA, UFDC ANTIQUE DOLL COLLECTOR

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continued from page 14

The Rohmer porcelain fashion, with Rohmer neck pivot, body style and rare bare feet, 18 inches, $30,000.

An early Jumeau portrait poupée, 23 inches, c. 1878, $26,000.

A lovely poupée by Pierre Francois Jumeau, 21 inches, with a French kid gusset-jointed body, wearing an ivory silk ensemble, sold for $16,000.

This porcelain poupée by Adelaide Huret, wearing the original costume, c. 1855, with kid poupée body, $21,000.

The same buyer bought these two sister dolls, a 17-inch Barrois with a rare articulated wooden body and extensive trousseau and a 17-inch poupée in the Pierre Jumeau manner, also with her trousseau. The dolls descended in the same Rhode Island family, and originally belonged to Mary Elizabeth Taft , born in 1858, and her sister of Providence, Rhode Island. Their father, Royal Chapin Taft, was Governor of Rhode Island at the time. The Barrois realized $12,500 and the Jumeau sister, $11,000.

Lulu’s Story... A rare cloth gentleman by Martha Chase, 15 inches, c. 1890, $8,000.

Bebe Bru, 25 inches, with original shoes and box, realized $34,000.

A rare Heubach all bisque snowman, 9 inches, $6,200. The bisque child on a snowball candy container, $900. 50

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Albert Marque’s rare character doll, 22 inches, inscribed 23 on the head, with blue glass paperweight eyes, c. 1916, realized $210,000 at Theriault’s New York City auction.

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A rare teaching doll made by Florida WPA works in 1935, used to instruct midwifes, sold for $7,000.

Presented in its original gift box, this 13-inch all original Bye-lo brought $4,000.


Auction Gallery

A T

he “Mysterious Illusion” by Henry Phalibois, c. 1920, depicting a Chinese magician and his vanishing assistant, brought nearly $50,000 at the November 16 auction of Auction Team Breker.

T

his classic example of a Bru Jne, incised Bru Jne 4 (right) on the head and shoulder, 16 inches, with her original wig, brought $18,000 at the November 22nd James D. Julia auction.

size 6 Bru Jne, c. 1880, 21 inches tall, with kid leather body and bisque lower arms and wooden lower legs, surpassed her pre-estimate to sell for $34,749 at the recent Bonham’s sale. The George II wooden doll, c. 1730, 18 inches tall, in the original costume including a secret pocket in the quilted under-skirt, brought $47,014.

T

his 11-inch rare, diminutive bisque swivel head Bru, 6/0, was an estate find. It sold at the recent Dotta auction for $14,850.

We would like to thank the following auction houses for their participation:

T

his unusual and rare articulated pressed bisque bebe by Brouillet-Cacheleux, 18 inches, circa 1861 (left), realized approximately $19,000 at Francois Theimer’s November 23 auction in Paris.

Auction Team Breker, Otto-Hahn-Str.10, 50997 Koln, Germany www.breker.com Bonhams, Banbury Road, Oxford OX5 1 JH www.bonhams.com Dotta Auction Company, 330 W. Moorestown Rd. (Route 512), Nazareth, PA 18064 (610) 759-7389 www.dottaauction.com James D. Julia, 203 Skowhegan Road, Fairfield, ME 04937 (207) 453-7125 www.jamesdjulia.com François Theimer, 4 rue des Cavaliers, 89130 Toucy, France Email: francois.theimer@wanadoo.fr www.theimer.fr Theriault’s, PO Box 151, Annapolis, MD 21404 1-800-638-0422, email: theriaults.com ANTIQUE DOLL COLLECTOR

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COMPOSITION – Effanbee Patsy. L-R: Suzanne Swanton, Margo Delaughter

2013 UFDC MODERN COMPETITIVE EXHIBIT COMPOSITION – Effanbee American child. L-R: Nancy Joyner, Suzanne Swanton

Blue Ribbon Winners Washington, D.C. - Part 2 Photos taken by D. Keith Kaonis

COMPOSITION– Raleigh child. Marilyn Parsons COMPOSITION – Effanbee Skippy. L-R: Linda Campbell, Suzanne Swanton, Ursula Mertz

COMPOSITION – Madame Alexander Military. Suzanne Swanton COMPOSITION – military doll, excludes Madame Alexander. L-R: Ursula Mertz, Mary Winslow

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COMPOSITION – American Character Doll Co., Petite Girl. L-R: Ursula Mertz Marilyn Rogers

HARD PLASTIC – Ideal Saucy Walker. Marna Conley

HARD PLASTIC – Arranbee Nancy Lee. L-R: Flo Burnside, Althena Crowley, Sheri Opijnen

COMPOSITION – Mary Hoyer in original factory tagged cloth. L-R: Alfred Edward, Margaret Hottensen

COMPOSITION – American Character Sweet Sue. Robert Tonner, Sherri Opijnen (below)

COMPOSITION – Mary Hoyer in knitted or crocheted outfit from Hoyer pattern. L-R: Pat Schlotzhauer, Janet Smith

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COMPOSITION – Madame Alexander Elise. L-R: Margaret Hottensen, Sandra Moore

CELEBRITY – Ideal Shirley Temple, composition. L-R: Trudy Craig, Belle Curry

CELEBRITY – Shirley Temple, excludes Ideal. Suzanne Swanton

CELEBRITY – pair or group of public figures, excluding vinyl or plastic. Above, L-R: Ursula Mertz, Marie Reynolds, Below, L-R: PRESIDENT’S CHOICE, Suzanne Swanton, Lois Cohorst CELEBRITY – pair or group of public figures, hard plastic. Susan Piefer

ADVERTISING – wood. Marie Reynolds

ADVERTISING – cloth. L-R: Marie Reynolds Kathleen Zell 54

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ADVERTISING – non human. Pam Coghlan

ADVERTISING – hard plastic. L-R: Suzanne Swanton, Judy Heckert

SPECIAL DOLLS – doll house family, MIB. Margaret Hein

SPECIAL DOLLS – English, rubber compound or HP head. Suzanne Swanton SPECIAL DOLLS – Girl Scout/Brownie, 8” or under. L-R: Birdie Dapples, Evelyn Rutledge, Ruth Walker

SPECIAL DOLLS – Girl Scout/Brownie, over 8”. Suzanne Swanton

SPECIAL DOLL with Companion Book – cloth. L-R: Steiff Struwwelpeter, Sherri Dempsey, Litle Orpan Annie, Karen Wolf

ANTIQUE DOLL COLLECTOR

JANUARY 2014

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SPECIAL DOLL with Companion Book – composition. “Lucinka,” a Hungarian fairytale, Julie Blewis SPECIAL DOLL with Companion Book – hard plastic. Ginger Strain

TEDDY BEARS – mechanical. Nabisco Feed Me Bear, Kathleen Zell.

TEDDY BEARS – musical. L-R: Selina Smith, Gae Ward

TEDDY BEARS – American. L-R: Gladys Woodward, Pam Coghlan, Kathleeen Zimmerman

TEDDY BEARS – previous national blue ribbon winner. Arlene Coleman

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ANTIQUE DOLL COLLECTOR

ARTIST DOLLS – Fawn Zeller L-R: Emmett Kelly, Patricia Troxler Catherine of Arragon, Laura Wade

JANUARY 2014

ARTIST DOLLS – Kathy Redmond Anne of Cleaves, Jill Kaar Hanson


ARTIST DOLLS – Martha Thompson. L-R: Michael Albanese, Princess Caroline, Patricia Rooney, ARTIST DOLLS – Hitty. Susan Booker

PAPER DOLL – Lettie Lane. Bonnie Rudeski

It’s Easy To Join UFDC

If you collect dolls, you owe it to yourself to belong to the UFDC! For membership information contact:

UFDC, Inc., 10900 North Pomona Ave., Kansas City, MO 64153 Phone 816-891-7040 Fax 816-891-8360 Visit www.ufdc.org

The Enchanting Trousseau of Chiffonnette

Long-awaited new book by renowned author, Sylvia Mac Neil

The 304 page book has more than 500 exceptional color photos with many dramatic portrait photos and captions in the vernacular of the mid 19th C fashion world, in the unique style Sylvia is noted for. It features 53 exceptional dresses, attendant accessories and spectacular hats, totaling more than 170 trousseau items, carefully researched and created using the finest antique materials and rare embellishments. A beautifully illustrated book full of fancies and splendors designed for inspiration and enjoyment for both the collector and the couturier.

Available August 1st – $85 plus $5 Shipping Sylvia Mac Neil, 2325 Main Street, W. Barnstable, MA 02668 jimsyl@aol.com

Manufacturers of Fine Doll Jewelry, Brass Accessories, Miniature Trunks & Hardware 336 Candlewood Lake Road, Brookfield, CT 06804 Phone 203-775-4717 Email: info@catspawonline.com

Visit our website and shop online: www.catspawonline.com Catalog price is $8.95 post paid

Accessorize Your Dolls!

Cats Paw has been in business since 1982 specializing in quality reproductions made from antique originals, and unique old store stock. Our antique reproductions are made by hand using the lost wax technique, and each item is hand finished to achieve an authentic “antique” look. We offer exquisite doll accessories that only look expensive! • Jewelry • Trunks • Items for the Boudoir • Buttons and Clasps • Purse Frames • Presentation Boxes • Bleuette Accessories & More ANTIQUE DOLL COLLECTOR

JANUARY 2014

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Review Jean & Ken Book Love from Tin Lizzie: Nordquist’s With A History of Metal Heads, Collectible Doll Co. Gourmet Doll Supplies for the Discriminating Doll Collector

*Nordquist Doll Molds *Daisyettes *Bleuette Premiere *Mignonettes *Presentation Displays *Paper Toys for Dolls *Thurlow Patters for Knit & Crochet Outfits *Collectible Doll Fashions

Metal Dolls, Mechanical Dolls and Automatons. by Ellen M. Tasagaris

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his well researched book, the first of its kind, begins by discussing today’s doll collecting phenomenon and a look back at dolls and toys from ancient times and the middle ages that used metal in their making. A chapter on toy solders, which might be considered tiny dolls made of metal, proves their enduring popularity from Medieval times to the present. Mechanical dolls and automatons are included as so many of their parts are metal. Walking, talking, singing, kissing and crawling…dolls that were animated have always proven to be popular choices.The author devotes another chapter to the history of automata and some of the more unusual pieces that have captivated us. We come to dolls with metal heads from Germany, America, Belgium and France – makers familiar to collectors such as Juno, Minerva and Giebeler-Falk. Dolls with metal parts include those by Schoenut with their steel springs, dolls with metal hands, even bodies such as the rare zinc bodied fashion doll by Rohmer. Drawing on several museum collections as well as information from noted doll researchers, this broad approach shows us the many ways that metal has played a role in doll making. Soft cover 142 pages, $20. ISBN 978061550557-2 www.dollmuseumblogspot.com

*Finished Crocheted Outfits *Cat’s Paw Doll Jewelry *Feather Trees *Paper Ornaments *Vintage Postcards *Doll Sewing Projects *Leather Doll Shoes *Mohair Doll Wigs *Miniature Accessories Mold & Global Catalogs not shown

BACK ISSUES SALE 1 to 3 copies $6 each • 4 to 9 copies $5 each • 10 or more copies $4 each

Complete 5 Catalog Set - $25 ppd. Includes $15 money back coupon with purchase.

jeannordquistdolls.com Order Desk

1-800-566-6646 Collectible Doll Company P.O. Box 697, Cedar Hill, TX 75106 58

ANTIQUE DOLL COLLECTOR

JANUARY 2014

(Price includes postage in the U.S.; overseas and Canadian subscribers call 631-261-4100 or email: adcsubs@gmail.com To see our complete list of available back issues go to

www.antiquedollcollector.com Not a computer user? Call or email (see above) and we will mail you an easy to read listing of all back issues.


Ashley’s Dolls & Antiquities

Please contact us for more information and prices. Billye Harris • 723 NC Hwy 61 South, Whitsett, NC 27377 • (336) 266-2608 • Website: AshleysDolls.com • E-mail: AshleysDolls@gmail.com Visit us on Rubylane.com/shops/Ashleysdollsandantiquities • Generous Layaways • Member UFDC and NADDA Be sure to visit us at the NADDA Doll Show in Greensboro, NC May 3 & 4, 2014


Located in Stoudtburg Village 8 N. Village Circle P.O. Box 705 Adamstown, PA 19501 Currently open by appointment only. We welcome your visit.

Come visit us and experience our charming location and superior selection of French and German dolls. We are always interested in purchasing collections and fine quality dolls.

Telephone: 717-484-1200 • Mobile: 610-662-5473 • Email: ourant@me.com

Now there are two ways to buy great dolls from us...

Becky’s Back Room

Open 24 hours a day / 7 days a week, visit our exclusive shop at

BECKYSBACKROOM.RUBYLANE.COM New dolls listed every week!


Antique DOLL Collector February 2014 Vol. 17, No. 1


LAYAWAY AVAILABLE Member UFDC & NADDA

(Nat'l Antique Doll Dealers Assn.)

Visit my website: www.grandmasatticdolls.com

17” A. Thuillier (AT), blue spiral threaded p/w eyes, early mauve blush under brows, luscious lashes, immaculate pale bisque, orig. mohair wig & pate. Wears fabulous Fr. Ant. aqua silk & lace dress, w/pleats & tucks, magnificent Fr. Ant. silk hat to match, ant. “signed” Jumeau shoes, that she came in, ant. socks & undies. Out of the famous Vierny Collection of England sold many years ago at Southerby’s. I was lucky enough to get first crack. Orig. dress & hat she was sold in, will be included to show provenance. On orig. chunky 8 ball jointed st. wrist body. BREATHTAKING!!! $78,000.

15 1/2” Schmitt Bebe, watery bl. p/w eyes, gorgeous pale bisque, fabulous orig. mohair tailed wig w/extensions. Wears gorgeous factory orig. 3 pc. burgundy & ecru silk & lace costume, PLUS undies consist of orig. corset, camisole & pantaloons that join at waist, matching ant. orig. Fr. hat, socks & ant. Fr. shoes. Fully “signed” Schmitt head & 8 ball jointed st. wrist “signed body. An OUTSTANDING beauty!!! $14,500.

9” K *R 101 “Marie” Character, gorgeous perfect bisque, blue intaglio side glancing eyes, orig. mohair braided wig & pate, wears orig. costume w/cotton blouse & silk jumper w/ featherstitching. On orig. body. Very pouty expression, enough to melt your heart. Early modeling. ADORABLE darling cabinet size!! $1750.

8” Rare K * R 112 Character, blue intaglio side glancing eyes, mint bisque, orig. mohair wig & pate, wears orig. Ethnic costume of silk, cotton & velvet, orig. ant. leather shoes & socks. On orig. fully jointed body. Been mine for years. The cutest teeny size they make. Very pouty expression. Absolutely DARLING!!! $9800.

Joyce Kekatos e-mail: joycedolls@aol.com I buy dolls and sell on consignment. 2137 Tomlinson Avenue, Bronx, NY 10461 home: 718-863-0373 cell: 917-859-2446

RARE 10” Fr. Wooden Au Nain Bleu Cradle. Beautifully fully carved & engraved, rocks & would probably hold a couple of small 5 or 6” all bisque babies & more. Original Au Nain Bleu, Paris, “paper label” underneath wooden bottom, (2 rungs missing from one side) otherwise fabulous. Minor paint wear, as near to perfect as can be. 9” long expanding to 10” long at the top, with a width of 4 ½” expanding to 5 1/2 tall in center of head and foot board & 6 ½” tall to the knobs. Very intricate decoration overall. An absolutely FABULOUS tiny display piece. ONLY....$450.

6 1/2” RAREST “Sonny” All Bisque, perfect pale bisque overall, br. glass sl. eyes, sweetest cl/mo., painted molded reddish hair. Wears darling orig. ant. romper & hat. Orig. mint fully marked “Sonny” all bisque jointed body. I begged to get him away from someone else for years, but he needs a new home. Most adorable all bisque EVER!!!! VERY Rare!!! $7800.


& LOWE Connie

Jay

P.O. Box 5206 Lancaster, PA 17606

FAX 717-396-1114 Email: big.birds@comcast.net Call Toll Free 1-888-JAY LOWE or (717) 396-9879 Always Looking to Buy Quality Dolls, Toys, Marklin Doll Carriages or Entire Estates Buy & Sell With Confidence

Member of UFDC & NADDA

An exceptional 14-1/2” 1st series Portrait Jumeau marked 2/0 on rear of head. Exceptional bisque, large almond eye cut with spiral blue paperweight eyes, marked “8 ball” composition Jumeau body and dressed in antique clothing, shoes & wig. $12,500. A very fine E 10 J by the Jumeau firm on a straight wristed composition Jumeau body approx. 21-1/2” tall. Beautiful pale even bisque accentuated by her blue paperweight eyes and antique clothing. $6000.


Nelling, Inc.

P.O. Box 4327 Burbank CA 91503 Cell: 818-738-4591 Home: 818-562-7839

Member NADDA and UFDC 13” Early Simon Halbig male fashion w/ twill over wood body, bisque lower arms and legs, original costume and a refined molded moustache! $6600. 18” Rare Kestner 180 character w/ o.cl. mouth and molded teeth, very rare gl. eyes. $2850. 6” Kestner 260, 5-pc toddler body w/ starfish hands, all orig. $525. Exhibiting: March 8 - Santa Barbara Doll Club Show, Santa Barbara CA, Earl Warren Showgrounds

BUYING & SELLING QUALITY DOLLS FOR OVER 20 YEARS

Visit us at: www.maspinelli.com • e-mail: nellingdolls@gmail.com

published by the Office Staff: Publication and Advertising: Keith Kaonis Editor-in-Chief: Donna C. Kaonis Administration Manager: Lorraine Moricone Phone: 1-888-800-2588 Art/Production: Lisa Ambrose Graphic Designer: Marta Sivakoff Contributors: Ursula Mertz, Lynn Murray, Samy Odin, Andy Ourant Subscription Manager: Jim Lance Marketing: Penguin Communications Publications Director: Eric Protter Antique Doll Collector (ISSN 1096-8474) is published monthly by the Puffin Co., LLC, 15 Hillside Place, Northport, NY 11768 Phone: 1-631-261-4100 Periodicals postage paid at Northport, NY. and at additional mailing offices. Contents ©2014 Antique Doll Collector, all rights reserved. Postmaster: Send address changes to Antique Doll Collector, P.O. Box 239, Northport, NY 11768. Subscriptions: Send to Antique Doll Collector, P. O. Box 239, Northport, NY 11768. Phone: 1-888-800-2588 or 1-631-261-4100 Subscription Rates: One Year (Twelve Issues) $42.95; Two Years (Twenty-four Issues) $75.95. First class delivery in US add $25 per year. Canada add $27 per year. Europe add $31 per year. Japan, Australia, New Zealand and Mexico add $33 per year. South America and Singapore add $36 per year. Bermuda and South Africa add $41 per year. Foreign subscriptions must be paid in U.S. funds. Do not send cash. Credit cards accepted. Advertising and Editorial: Call 717-517-9217 or email antiquedoll@gmail.com

SEE US ON THE WEB AT: http://www.antiquedollcollector.com email: AntiqueDoll@gmail.com

Antique Doll Collector is not responsible for any inaccuracies in advertisers’ content. An unsolicited manuscript must be accompanied by SASE. Antique Doll Collector assumes no responsibility for such material. All rights including translations are reserved by the publisher. Requests for permissions and reprints must be made in writing to Antique Doll Collector. ©2014 by the Puffin Co., LLC.

MOVING?

Important: We need your old address and your new. The Post Office does not forward magazines. Call 1-888-800-2588 or write to us at: P.O. Box 239, Northport, NY 11768. 4

ANTIQUE DOLL COLLECTOR

FEBRUARY 2014


Carmel Doll Shop is pleased to announce a very colorful

“Lunch, Listen and Learn” Event:

The Lenci Luncheon Saturday, June 21, 2014

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Our doors will open at 11:00 am

egistered guests are invited to spend a memorable day at the Carmel Doll Shop when Nancy Lazenby, our speaker for this entertaining and educational event, will share her enthusiasm for those lovable and entirely artful felt dolls. Ms. Lazenby is the author of numerous magazine articles on the subject of Lenci examples, but is best known for her must-have volume Lenci – The History and the Dolls. Plenty of knowledge will be exchanged, plus a tasty, Italian-inspired luncheon will be offered as well. Per usual, attendees can expect the white glove treatment from the staff of Carmel Doll Shop.

The cost for this special event is $55 per registrant, and attendance will be limited to 40 guests only, so it is suggested that you sign up early. (A waiting list will be compiled after our 40 seats have filled.)

The event will take place at the spacious home of Carmel Doll Shop: 213 Forest Avenue, Pacific Grove, California 93950 (831) 643-1902 www.carmeldollshop.com

RESERVATION FOR

“Lunch, Listen and Learn” Event: The Lenci Luncheon

Please complete this order form and send with Credit Card information or Check made out to Carmel Doll Shop. $55 Send to: Carmel Doll Shop 213 Forest Ave. Pacific Grove, CA 93950

NAME / PHONE ADDRESS

CITY, STATE, ZIP

CREDIT CARD INFORMATION: CARD#

3 DIGIT SECURITY CODE

EXP. DATE SIGNATURE


The Complete Guide to Antique, Vintage and Collectible Dolls

February 2014 Volume 17, Number 1

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THE SANDRA SUE DOLLHOUSE

By Margaret Gray Kincaid A team of volunteers led by Margaret Kincaid renovates a very grand dollhouse.

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FRASHER’S: FEBRUARY 23 IN KANSAS CITY, MISSOURI

AND THEN THERE WERE THREE. . . A LITTLEKNOWN SIMON & HALBIG FASHION DOLL By Jan Peterson

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THE FOUR SEASONS OF SANDRA SUE – A 2013 UFDC SPECIAL EXHIBIT

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THE ENCHANTING TROUSSEAU OF CHIFFONNETTE: A SPECIAL 2013 UFDC EXHIBIT

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By Constance King A landscape of mystery and magic charms the viewer in this early 17th century cabinet.

NIGHT, NIGHT! SLEEP TIGHT! A STUDY OF ACCORDION DOLL BEDS & CRADLES By Donilee Popham

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HANDKERCHIEFS AND DOLLS By Jane Foster

FEBRUARY 2014

Auction Gallery Emporium Mystery Calendar Classified

About The Cover

A CHILD’S GARDEN OF DREAMS

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DECEMBER GAITHERSBURG SHOW

On February 23, Frasher’s Doll Auctions will conduct an important sale featuring Kewpie characters from the estate of Janet O’Neill Sullivan, a great, great niece of the artist. Rare German characters including the cover doll, a rare portrait by Fritz Bierschenk, plus French bebes and poupées and dolls by Schoenhut will be offered.

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SWEETBRIAR’S DECEMBER AUCTION


1. 17” Tailored Arranbee ‘Nancy Lee’ – extra pretty debutante w/ great color, sensational factory styling – a 50’s dream girl! $295. 2. 14” Patsy Pend. w/Trunk and Wardrobe – what selection in a great J.C. Penny wardrobe trunk filled to the brim with numerous coats, hats and other factory outfits. $425. 3. Adorable 14” Maggie – the big eye Alexander favorite A/O in classic fashionable striped ensemble from coat/hat to side snap 2 tone shoes! $395. 4. 12” Rare Alexander ‘Captain January’ – A/O with nametag, tin eyes, a seldom seen competing version of the popular Shirley Temple in choice condition! $495. 5. 25” Very Pretty ‘Winnie’ – the tagged Mme Alexander walker all original hat to shoes! $250. 6. The 17” Nancy Lee w/hoop skirt and parasol! See # 1. $295. 7. 17” Classic 1950’s Skater A/O in her decorated hooded ensemble w/skirt, mittens and signed Sonja Henie Skates! $295. 8. McGuffey Anna – factory original and sweet as pie, clo/mo, with label, this classic 14” Alexander is at the top of her game! $295. 9. 16” Shirley Temple Baby – a really pretty one too! Great original wig, clothes, booties, and condition in cute 16” size. $895.

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(212) 787-7279 P.O. Box 1410 NY, NY 10023 9

10. Rose O’Neill Kewpies – from $50! Also celluloids, compos, etc. 9” Mint Kewpie, $395. Kewpie Cup Hanger! $110 11. 15” Effanbee ‘Mary Lee’ – hip length lush curls, early tin sl. eyes, great color and factory clothes, mint! $275. 12. Mint Brown Alexander ‘Cynthia’ – 14” rarity made for one year only with clear eyes, all in spotless never played condition! $750. 13. Factory Fancy ‘Nancy Lee’ – what style and energy on this pristine 14” young miss in her crisp colorful period ensemble! $275 14. 18” Mme Alexander ‘Winnie’ – the iconic Alexander fashion plate in pink and blue with tailored dresscoat and hat. $325 15. 14” Patsy Type Kewty – we love this angelic little pet with tin sleep eyes, rosy cheeks and frilly period clothes – a kitten! $250. 16-17. Rare Mary Hoyer Boy – w/caracal wig, Mary Hoyer knit cowboy suit w/hat, holster, gun and boots. Rare! $425. 18. 27” All Original ‘Shirley’ – from wig to shoes with pin, facial restoration, 2 extra dresses also! $395.

matrixbymail@gmail.com

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(212) 787-7279

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P.O. Box 1410 NY, NY 10023

Quality Antique Dolls by Mail Return Privilege • Layaways Member UFDC & NADDA

matrixbymail@gmail.com 20

19. Oh Those Newlyweds! 5” pair with top hat and bouquet! $250. for both. Rare Kewpie Minister w/ bible, robe and glasses! $325 4” Bridesmaid, all orig. and mint w/ painted silver shoes. $295. 4” and 5” Jointed Kewpies, signed, w/ stickers! $350. and $450. 3” Seated Action Kewpie - arms away! $275.

20. Comic Character Nodders – Germany, ca. 1920 Patsy and Fatso, fully signed with name and designer, mint. $95 each

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21. 8” Googly Boy w/ Molded Cap – top quality and probably original clothes/shoes! $395. 7” Rare Heubach Girl Googly – important September Morn type ‘9143’, intaglio eyes, widow’s peak and novel triangular ‘oh oh’ mouth! Choice. $895

22. Doll House Dolls – 3” Pair All Bisque Children – gl. eyes, all orig. wigs and fancy clothes. $495. 6” Couple – she with elaborate original clothes incl. fancy hat. He too, with top hat, cane and moustache. $695. 23. 3-1/2” Over The Knee ‘Black Stocking’ Halbigs – choice all bisque pair, factory original in precious clothes, fancy wigs, glass eyes – true miniatures! $1250. Rare Models

24. 7-1/2” Gbr. Heubach Toddler – Googly ‘9589’ with big eyes, mld. curls, chubby jtd. barefoot body and original clothes! $595

25. Important 6” Wood Body China – ca 1840, lovely face too, mint glazed limbs and flat sole slippers, fluid joints allow her to sit elegantly in regal splendor. A gem! $4250.

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26. 7-1/2” Mignonette w/ Rare Pink Bootines – 5 straps! Slender, tall and sultry, blue sleep eyes, French trade Halbig head, ca. 1880 mohair tresses and period clothes. $3250. 27. 27” Romantic Bru Jne Bebe – ca 1980 signed by V. Seely, gorgeous quality, lovely bisque arms/legs and elegant clothes – a mint showpiece! $295. 28. Important and Witty Heubach – scarce handsome fellow in daddy’s clothes, fully signed, 13” and mint. $575. 29. 20” Exquisite ‘A.T.’ Bebe – beautifully made artist signed rendering w/ faultless quality and compo jtd. body. $495

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31. Historic Johnny Gruelle’s – one of only 3 documented prototype pairs of pre-Volland Raggedy Ann and Andy’s! Hand made and signed by Gruelle himself! Comes with documentation. Smithsonian caliber dolls that are literally one in a million! $5000.

32. Continental Half Doll – a preferred model with intricate detail and superior quality, 5” tall. $450.

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30. See #28. $575.

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33. Early Kathe Kruse Dolls I – wide hip girl and boy w/ separate thumbs and really wonderful faces with clear bright features and charming period clothes w/ original shoes! Left $2800, Right $2500. 34

36. 14” Unusual Revalo ‘Coquette’ – what a character! Open/closed smiling mouth w/ 6 carved teeth, original clothes, fully jtd body – all mint! $695. 14” Mibs by Amberg and in snappy period clothes and shoes – rare $850.

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(212) 787-7279 P.O. Box 1410 NY, NY 10023

34. 8-1/2” Kestner All Bisque – chunky size, pretty quality, sleep eyes, orig. wig and unusual rose stockings. $395. 3-1/2” Glass Eye All Bisque – tubby tot with blue eyes and matching drop waist dress! $125.

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35. ‘Kewpie’ Googly Baby – mint 9” imp w/ top knot and 5-piece composition googly body w/ period dress! Pristine! $1495. Seated Action Kewpie – scarce one with arms away, mint. $275.

38. 20” Delicate ‘Hanna’ Baby – sensitive heart shaped face of dewey fine bisque, original wig, lashes and the clothes – all mint – a true love! $850 12” Art Déco Pierrots – bisque head pair of miniature boudoir dolls, all orig. with caps and guitar. $250 the pair.

Quality Antique Dolls by Mail Return Privilege • Layaways Member UFDC & NADDA

37. Rare ‘Kewpie’ Googly - hard to find AM 252 sweetheart! A peek-a-boo cutie! $1495.

matrixbymail@gmail.com

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39. Rare Brown Teri Lee Pair – adorable Benji w. caracul wig and Bonnie Lou, early pat. pend. w/ hand painted features, all factory perfect from caps to shoes in matching tagged outfits – the ultimate! $2500.


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ANTIQUE DOLL COLLECTOR

FEBRUARY 2014


Tel: 425.765.4010 Valerie@beautifulbebes.com

Precious 10” Bru Jeune 1 from Henri Chevrot period with adorable little face. Dressed in original ensemble of claret tint satin silk frock and matching bonnet, beautiful ashy-gold flowing mohair curls, pale blue eyes and rosebud mouth. Perfect bisque from head to fingertips and desirable slender body with articulated wood legs. $21,800~

Enchanting 17” brown eyed Bebe Bru darling with number 5 & circle and dot incising at base of head and Bte SGDG on forehead. Minty and original with gorgeous full mohair wig, white pique drop waist frock with pale rose sash and antique pin watch, matching straw bonnet with ribbonwork, signed Bru Jne shoes, gorgeous bisque from head to fingertips. Please call for additional information.

Adorable 13” Mulatto baby as Hilda by JDK. Marked as such and on a very pristine and chubby 5pc. bent limb baby body. Dressed in long ecru cotton gown with matching bonnet over original wig. Perfect!

Member UFDC & NADDA Fantastic rare 20” Louis Schneider Bebe in all original ensemble. Gorgeous characterlike face on this French Bebe. Very rarely seen! Please call for details. $12,800~

Peaches and cream bisque frames two huge blue paper weight eyes that beckon you to fall into their depths. This is the face of a hard to locate & treasured 17” marked Mascotte Bebe by May Freres. She is a bon-bon indeed in her sweet French ribbon bonnet, blue silk and ecru lace frock and glowing golden antique mohair locks. Marked head and body. $7200~

Precious all original pair of 4.5” All Bisque French Mignonettes in antique egg shaped basket. Perfect and ready to display! $2650 pair.

Petite all original 6.5” barefoot all bisque mignonette with lovely gown and excellent condition. Blue eyes, blonde upswept mohair wig and sweet ribbons wrapped on tiny feet. $2200~


SANDY’S DREAM DOLLS

Sandy Kralovetz Always Buying Dolls of Quality For a Houston adventure please visit our spacious location at

Thompson’s Antique Center of Texas

Texas’ largest antique center with over 50 antique dolls and accessories for sale. 9950 Hempstead Road 600 Northwest Mall Houston, TX 77092 602.228.1829 • 281.339.0269 skayk43@aol.com mailing address: 9825 Moers Rd Houston, Texas 77075 Call for doll information Member UFDC & NADDA

From left to right: 36” 1079 Simon Halbig BR Eyes 1488 Simon Halbig 22 ½ Rare Doll o/c mouth BL SL Eyes Original Body & Mohair Wig 33” S&C Simon Halbig o/m BL Eyes

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ANTIQUE DOLL COLLECTOR

FEBRUARY 2014


Auction Gallery

Five Kewpie Soldiers Standing Guard

Frasher’s: February 23 in Kansas City, Missouri F

rasher’s will kick off 2014 with a catalogued auction in Kansas City, Missouri, February 23rd, titled “Smile Awhile”. The title based on the philosophy of Rose O’Neill which is revealed in her autobiography “Do good deeds in a funny way. The world needs to laugh or least smile more than it does”. And who could help but laugh and smile at the merry Kewpie characters from the estate of Janet O’Neill Sullivan, great, great niece of famed Kewpie creator, Rose O’Neill. Janet was a frequent visitor to her aunt’s Branson, Missouri home known as Bonniebrook.

Schoenhuts and Kewpies – a great combination.

The numerous Kewpies and all the special Kewpie items, which came to market as the immense popularity of all things Kewpie became a marketing blitz, are featured throughout the catalog. Complementing the Kewpie offering are rare googly eyed German bisque characters by Hertel and Schwab, Kammer and Reinhart, and Kestner. Also offered is an exceptional German bisque character doll by Fritz Bierschenk. The seldom-seen mysterious portrait model, circa 1910, was manufactured for only a few years by the Sonneberg doll maker. She has wonderful

Sweet-faced model 719 by Simon & Halbig and Kewpie with blue vase.

A grand size, 29”, Series C Steiner bebe all in pink. ANTIQUE DOLL COLLECTOR

FEBRUARY 2014

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The largest size of Kestner’s 221 googly surrounded by Kewpies.

For lovers of large bebes, a stunning 31” Incised Depose Jumeau in original dress.

Hertel & Schwab googly, very impressive at 16”.

Choice glass-eyed model of Kestner character 187.

sculpting with distinctive cheek bones, an enigmatic smile and unique slender adult-modelled body. Rounding out the auction are French bebes and poupees from Jumeau, Steiner, Gauthier and other makers plus German closed-mouth dolls and character models by Kammer & Reinhardt, including open mouth and closed-mouth models of Simon & Halbig mold 719, along with a rare glass-eyed 18” Kestner, in addition to many other characters as well as babies and dolly faces. Several models of Schoenhut include a scarce model of the Tootsie Wootsie character.

Beautiful Jumeau poupee with extreme almond-shaped eyes.

Rare Friz Bierschenk portrait doll with enigmatic smile.

The auction, to be conducted at the KCI Expo Center & Holiday Inn Hotel, Kansas City, Missouri, Sunday, February 23, 2014, with a 9:00 a.m. preview followed by the auction getting underway at 10:30 a.m. Although attendance is the best option for acquiring a doll from the auction, collectors may also place bids by written or telephoned absentee bids, making a reservation for live telephone bidding, or pre-bid and live internet bidding at liveauctioneers.com. For further information or to order a 68page color catalog phone Frasher’s at 816-625-3786; or view the full auction at liveauctioneers.com website. More Auction Gallery on page 54

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ANTIQUE DOLL COLLECTOR

FEBRUARY 2014

Kestner’s composition-body Kewpie is all smiles aside a Kewpie inkwell.

Emile Jumeau’s rare size 1 premiere model bebe.


And Then There Were Four… By Jan Peterson

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h, my goodness! I LOVE her face!” I stared at my computer screen at the photo of a lovely little fashion doll who didn’t look French to me, but who was very intriguing all the same. An elderly gentleman in France was thinning out the possessions of his old family home before moving into a smaller place that would be much easier to care for. No one else was even interested in the old doll lying on a table among the other items the old fellow had for sale. None of his children or grandchildren wanted the doll, so he had added her to the possessions he had decided to sell. My French “grandson of the heart,” Stéphane, was willing to serve as the go-between which would allow me to purchase the doll. Although not related by blood, we both love searching for treasures, and Stéphane has become as dear to my husband and me as family. He knows how passionate I am about collecting antique dolls and has sent me loads of pictures of what he finds in estate sales, rummage sales, and the auctions in France he loves to haunt. The moment I saw THIS doll, my heart started to pound, and I knew she must be mine. I offered what I could afford, the French gentleman was delighted with my offer, Stéphane secured her for me, and soon she was on her way from France to Minnesota. When I unpacked the doll a couple weeks later, I was delighted to see her obviously original wig was in near perfect condition. Her homemade black silk dress was melting beyond saving, but her underwear was in great condition, and only her shoes and stockings were missing. Her body was very clean, and I was so pleased to see she did, indeed, have bisque lower arms and hands. It 22

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A Little-Known Simon & Halbig Fashion Doll Photos Elwyn Peterson Made for the French market, Marie Alice is marked S & H 1385 1. Measuring 13-1/2 inches tall, she has a swivel, solid bisque head with pierced ears, blue glass fixed eyes and original wig. The stiff muslin body is stuffed with sawdust. Her lower bisque arms and hands are beautifully formed.

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Marie Alice’s twin in Morphy auction.

Marie Alice’s twin in Theriault auction.

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had been hard to tell in the picture because the sleeves of her gown were so long. As I turned the doll over, I wasn’t surprised to see the markings S&H 1385 1, which did confirm my suspicion the doll wasn’t French in origin. I have always loved the S&H lady dolls, and have a beautiful 1159 model and another 1469 lady doll who just melts my heart. This doll was one I had never seen, however, and I was a bit perplexed. I had read Jan Foulke’s wonderful reference book on Simon & Halbig dolls several times, and I didn’t recall ever seeing this doll in her book. I pulled my copy from my doll reference books shelf once more, and I still could not find any mention of this mold number. Nor could I find a picture of the doll. Thus, a frustrating quest began to identify my new doll. I had written to the old gentleman in France to thank him for selling the doll to me and to tell him she was now safe and sound and in America. I was delighted when he answered my thank you note! He told me the doll had been his mother’s favorite, and that he remembered that when growing up, his mother would allow his sisters to play with the doll when they were home sick from school or on a rainy day. He said his mother always hovered near, and the girls understood that only gentle play was allowed with this special doll, and that it was forbidden to comb her hair. He said it had made him quite sad that nobody in his family cared about keeping her, and that he was very pleased that she was in a home where she would be treasured once more. He said his mother’s name was Marie Alice. I was so charmed by his letter, I named the doll for his mother and wrote him back telling him so. His reply was very touching . . . he said he liked to think his mom, who has been deceased for decades, somehow knew her beloved doll was “happy” again. Now, I had a little information to go on, at least. Apparently, the doll had been purchased in France for his mother long ago, although it had been made in Germany. Therefore, I knew she might have been produced

specifically for the French market by Simon & Halbig, just like their early, unmarked mignonnettes had been. Perhaps, seeing the huge success the French makers like Jumeau and Bru had enjoyed producing fashion dolls, S&H decided to test the market with this little doll. I searched every reference book I could find, but was unable to learn a thing. Finally, I wrote to Jan Foulke herself and sent her pictures of Marie Alice in the hope that she might recognize her. Jan was so kind to write right back. She told me she had, indeed, seen this doll before---ONLY ONCE! Jan serves as a consultant for Morphy’s Auctions, and she had written the description for a doll with the same mold number for one of their auction catalogues. It was obvious this doll being sold at auction had been made for the French market because she was dressed in a French folklore costume from the Maine et Loire region. I was starting to feel like Sherlock Holmes, putting clues together. However, that was as far as my sleuthing had taken me. I had never seen another doll like Marie Alice or the one in Morphy’s auction. I recently wrote back to Jan, and to date, she has still only seen two examples of this mold, my doll and the one she described in the auction catalogue. She very kindly gave me permission to use both her description and the auction photo for this article, and her research has been a wealth of knowledge. On a whim, this past August I was shopping on the web site Ruby Lane. A shop-owner had acquired a huge lot of Theriault’s auction catalogs and was re-selling them. I bought one called The Young Girl Stood by the Window… (1994) because the painting used for the cover was so appealing. At least I thought that was the reason the catalog “spoke” to me. . . When it arrived a few days later, I opened it to look at the dolls, and lo and behold, on the second page of the photos of the dolls to be sold at auction was Marie Alice! Or, at least her TWIN SISTER! In the auction description, the doll is identical to mine, and like the doll in the Morphy’s auction, she came in a French folklore costume. All


three dolls are on classic French doll fashion bodies. The description goes on to say that the doll’s bisque shoulder plate was patented in 1891, so that is the supposed date of manufacture. She is described as the only known model of this doll ever to be found! She also came in what was assumed to be her original box with an AU LOUVRE, PARIS original box. So, then there were three! Simon & Halbig in Germany has been renowned for the excellence of their dolls. Because they were a porcelain factory, with the exception of their little all-bisque dolls, they never actually made complete dolls. They furnished doll manufacturers in both Germany and France with their beautifully molded doll heads, shoulder plates, and lower arms and hands. They are known for producing doll parts of the highest quality bisque and with exquisite, detailed painting. It is known that in France, S&H heads, shoulder plates, lower arms and legs were provided to Jumeau, Roullet & Decamps and Dasprès. That my little lady doll was sold in France at one time is consistent with what is known about the markets Simon & Halbig served. I have learned from Jan’s research that some elusive S&H molds were apparently made in very small quantities. That is consistent with other research she has done about their lady dolls in general. “Lady dolls were the dominant type which appeared throughout most of the 19th century, except during the last two decades after 1880, when they were pushed almost to obscurity by the new child dolls. By 1900 some lady dolls were again being made by such firms as J.D. Kestner, Armand Marseille, and, of course, Simon & Halbig. The 1910 to 1912 years brought a real upsurge of interest in the lady dolls, but they never did diminish the popularity of the child doll, and the ladies became only a very small part of the doll market, more of a novelty item. During this resurge in popularity, lady dolls were made in both France and Germany, but it is known that some French companies used German heads by Simon & Halbig.” Simon & Halbig

Dolls The Artful Aspect by Jan Foulke Because Marie Alice has a high mold number in the upper 1300s, I was guessing she was manufactured circa 1910 when the other S&H dolls with similar mold numbers were being produced. Jan agrees this is a possibility, but knowing no more, it must remain a supposition until other information can be discovered. Theriault’s identifying the shoulder plate as being patented in 1891 does indicate these three dolls could have been made in the late 19th Century, but the possibility that the same shoulder plate was used for a couple more decades also exists. Perhaps the fact that by the turn of the 20th Century, lady dolls, and certainly little fashion dolls, were considered oldfashioned by most children, explains why few dolls of the mold 1385 were manufactured. Perhaps Marie Alice and her two sisters auctioned by Morphy’s and Theriault’s were even part of an attempt to test the market that proved unsuccessful. In any case, I am so thankful the little French girl, Marie Alice, who received this doll as a child, treasured her and kept her in such wonderful condition. Unlike her blonde-haired, browneyed sister sold in the Morphy’s auction and the blue-eyed light brownhaired sister in the Theriault’s auction, Marie Alice has lovely blue glass fixed eyes and a wig of raven black tresses. Her bisque swivel head has pierced ears and is attached to a bisque shoulder plate with a typical French wood button and spring attachment. That also makes me suspect the doll was assembled in France after being manufactured in Germany. She has a stiff muslin body stuffed with sawdust in the typical style of lots of French fashion dolls. Her lower arms and hands have the beautiful, detailed molding found on S&H dolls. Her wig of black mohair is attached to a muslin cap. Thanks to the original Marie Alice for whom the doll is named and her obedient daughters, the wig is still full and is shaped into a chignon at the nape of the neck. She has a solid bisque head just like those of early S&H all-bisque

dolls made for the French market. Her face painting is beautifully detailed and done with the excellence and skill found in almost all S&H dolls. The delicate tinting of her arms and hands totally matches the color on her face and shoulder plate, evidence they were fired together and were intended for this doll. Marie Alice measures 13 1/2 inches tall, a fact that delights me, because she can share clothes, shoes and accessories with my French fashion dolls of the same size. Textile artist, Rhonda King, designed two lovely outfits for Marie Alice (including matching hats) made totally by hand and using all antique materials. Rhonda uses antique carte de visite photographs as inspiration for her patterns. Marie Alice’s black and white costume was made from a circa 1880’s lady’s cotton skirt. I was able to find antique knit stockings and a pair of antique red leather bottines and another antique pair of red leather doll shoes that fit her perfectly. She now resides in the large curio my husband teasingly calls The Château with my French fashion dolls who are close to her in size. Just when we think we have discovered them all, a new doll shows up in an estate sale or fresh from an attic with a brand new story to tell. Marie Alice’s story, with a blend of both German and French heritage, is especially intriguing to me. Surely she has other sisters out there still to be discovered with their own stories to tell! STOP THE PRESSES! After submitting this article, Stephane sent me a FOURTH example of this doll! This one, however, is a LITTLE sister to the other three, and measures only ten inches tall. Like the dolls in the Theriault’s and Morphy’s auctions, she too is wearing a French folklore costume. Her shoes are identical to the ones seen in the auction catalog pictures, and her folklore costume is from yet another region of France! She is beautifully dressed in the costume of Arles, a city in Provence famous for the paintings done there by the Dutch artist, Vincent Van Gogh. This little doll was yet another beloved poupée that had belonged to the same owner ANTIQUE DOLL COLLECTOR

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The lost antique brooch that completes Francine’s folklore costume.

Francine’s traditional Arlésienne coif flatters her lovely face.

Ten-inch version of Francine, a S&H 1385 doll. The original owner received Francine on her 8th birthday from her godmother. Francine’s shoes are identical to those in the photos of her two “sisters” in auction catalogs.

An early lithograph of a young woman dressed in the Arlésienne manner. Marie Alice (13 1/2” tall) and her little “sister” Francine (10” tall). 26

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her entire life. The lady who sold her was just shy of her 100th birthday. The doll’s name is Francine, and Francine it will stay. Her pantalets and petticoat, shoes, silk blouse and skirt are in amazing condition. She wears the traditional plastron of rows of white lace at the bodice and a delicate lace-trimmed shawl covers her shoulders. Even the little black velvet choker is still tied around her neck. Her hair is piled high on her head, secured in a net snood and then the “beehive” is wrapped in the wide black ribbon with one streamer iconic of the coif of Arles. I could not believe my luck in receiving another S&H 1385 doll. I was floating in air after carefully unwrapping her when my husband came into the room and said, “Look what I just found.” He had been working on a drawer in a beautiful doll commode that had arrived from France a month earlier. There was an empty space behind the bottom drawer where the drawer did not go all the way to the back of

the commode. Lost for who knows how long, was a little sterling silver repoussé brooch. Finding a jewel in a piece of doll furniture is exciting in itself, but when my husband polished the tarnish off the brooch, we were both astounded to see the profile image a beautiful woman surrounded by an olive branch with olives, and the wild flowers of Provence. She was wearing the headdress of ARLES, and above her head was written ARLESIENNE (French for woman of Arles)! Cue the theme music from The Twilight Zone . . . It was almost spooky that this brooch, long lost in the bottom of the commode bought in a completely different town in the Limousin region of France, far from Arles, had found its way to my home in Minnesota, and was discovered the same day the Arlésienne doll arrived! I pinned the brooch to the black silk ribbon at the doll’s waist, and discovered a couple days later while researching the folk costume of Arles, that the costume is not

complete without beautiful gold or silver jewelry, usually worn on a long heavy chain often draping to the waist . . . Francine has been in my doll cabinet a week now, and I still get shivers up my spine when I look at her. Her discovery seems to cinch the notion these dolls were made of heads, shoulder pieces, and molded bisque lower arms and hands made in Germany, and then sent to France, where they were assembled on French lady doll bodies of cotton and sawdust, dressed in regional folklore costumes and sold around the turn of the Twentieth Century. Marie Alice and Francine look like long lost sisters or cousins, and are obviously so happy to have found each other once again. It is adventures like this that make collecting antique dolls one of the most exciting passions imaginable. I would like to thank Jan Foulke for her invaluable help in identifying my old doll and for her generosity in sharing her research and knowledge.

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The Tender Years

N EW Lo w Pr ic es

Deborah Varner Member UFDC • 303-850-7800 queenbeev1@comcast.net 17” Incised Jumeau. Mkd. on neck Depose Jumeau with 7 and tick marks. Orig. body finish is pristine. Pale bisque with soft blushing. Bulging Bl. eyes. Kiss me lips. Pierced ears. Orig. Bl. and lace dress. French leather shoes. Orig. Bl. silk, lace and flowered bonnet. So sweet, pensive look. Take Me Home. 7,650.

12” Series Two Portrait Jumeau. Strong blue eyes. Creamy pale bisque with blush under brow. Fabulous modeling. Factory orig. Orig. blonde wig. Orig. pate. Head coil intact. Blue dress with intricate lace overlay. French presentation hat with feathers and velvet ribbon. A special doll to own. 8,650.

12” Simon and Halbig 1279. Wonderful modeling with dimples on cheeks and chin. Bl. eyes with tons of lashes. Pierced ears. Fabulous red hair with French lace hat. Orig. batiste dress, with slip and pantelettes. Cabinet size, ready to show your friends. 2,850.

8” FS and Co. # 1295 toddler. All orig. French hat. Mint composition body. OM. with teeth. Br. eyes. Starfish hands. Blonde braids. SE. Jointed neck, arms and legs. So Sweet. A treasure at only 1,175.

18 “ E8J Jumeau. Super creamy bisque. Buldging blue PW eyes. Bee stung lips. All orig. with fabulous presentation hat. Marked Jumeau shoes. Honey blonde curls. Cork pate. Head coil intact. A wonderful early EJ. 8,700.

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Gigi’s Dolls & Sherry’s Teddy Bears Inc.

LAYAW AVAILA AY BLE

Allow Us To Help You Discover The Child Within You! 12” Smiling Bru all original in aqua blue walking suit, blonde mohair wig, blue PW eyes, pierced ears $3750. Now $2995. $3750 17” CM Paris Bebe, blue pw eyes, pierced ears, chip at right ear, peppering on forehead & cheek, body marked Paris Bebe, small hairline on forehead from rim $2995. Now $2250. $2995 5” Steiff Cosy Koala, fully tagged of Dralon $95.

6 pieces of Battersen Austrian Bronze Painted Enamel 3”x 2 ½”x2” Table w/ pull out drawer, 3”x3”x1 ¼” Seatee, 2 ¾”x1 ½”x1” 2 Arm Chairs & 2 side Chairs, paintings of men and ladies some with musical instruments, marked Austria $1295.

12” CM Jumeau size 2 on blue stamped Jumeau body, blue PW eyes, replaced hands, hairline on forehead, pierced ears, antique HH wig and cork pate, paint worn on toes $2150.

18” Lenci Tennis Boy 110 Series, blonde mohair wig, brown eyes, felt top & pants, leather shoes, tennis racket, LS embroidered on top $1850 $1850. Now $1250. 11” Alexander Scarlett O’Hara all original in tagged dress, pantalets & straw hat, replaced shoes, clear green eyes, black HH wig, tip of right middle finger chipped, slight crazing on arms $295.

15” All Original Glass Eyed K star R 114, all original clothing, hat, shoes & socks, HH wig $5900 $5900. Now $5495. Steiff’s – tagged and most have original 1970’s price tags 5” Peggy the Penguin w/ all tags $65. 7” Jocko Monkey 1970’s $55. 5” Flossy the fish w/ button tag $37.50 4” Perri – Walt Disney’s Squirrel w/ all tags $57.50 11 ½” Bendy the giraffe w/ all tags $79.95 17” K star R 121 Toddler, blue sleep eyes, original mohair wig, adorable face $850. 13” JDK Jr. Hilda 245 1914 F 10, original wig and plaster pate, blue sleep eyes $1495. Now $1195. $1495

15” Schoenhut w/ brown intaglio eyes, original mohair wig, sticker on back $995 $995. Now $945. 4 ½” German All Bisque marked P4 / 4, jointed arms, molded shoes and socks, original clothing $69.95 14 ½” Carved Hair Schoenhut Girl with pink ribbon in hair, blue intaglio eyes, embossed markings on back, w/ doll & dog in basket $1450 $1450. Now $1350. 10” 1930-40’s Swiss Linden Craved Wooden Family, Tagged Benne - Work Day #800/60, Berne- Work Day #800/61, 8 1/2” Berne - Highland, jointed limbs, from Brienz, Switzerland $675. set

Ottles of Scootles designed by Rose O’Neill from Cameo: 21” Rare Sleep eyed Scootles, original shoes & socks, slight crazing $725 $725. Now $625. 12 ½” All compo Scootles with blue painted eyes, redressed $175. 8” Scootles all compo with great molding & expression, very faint crazing $395 $395. Now $295.

1970’s Steiffs – mohair, fully tagged – some with original price tags 14” x 11” Cockie w/ collar, jointed head, ear tag loose $195. 7” Rooster – great coloring $65. 4” Cockie w/ collar, no chest tag $75. 6” Pecky w/ jointed head & ribbon $82.50 4” Hansi Parakeet, great coloring – green $52.50 4” Parakeet, great coloring – blue no chest tag $49.95 5” Pucki Dwarf, vinyl head and hands $57.50 7” Lucki Dwarf, vinyl head and hands $75.50 7” Mecki & Micki – Hedgehogs, fully tagged $115. pair

24” Portrait Face Jumeau Fashion 1876 w/ applied ears, shadowing above pw eyes, HH wig, gusseted kid body, costume made of vintage fabric $5995 $5995. Now $4995.

9” 1939 Effanbee Button Nose all original in floral print dress & bonnet, some crazing, brown painted eyes $165. 8” Vogue Toodles Matching Pair from mid 1940’s, tagged blue jersey outfits and hats, pink shoes & socks, blue painted eyes, mohair wigs $425 $425. Now $375. 10” 1935 Alexander Swedish Boy & Girl all original w/ 1 box & 1 gold tag, high coloring, some crazing on faces $145. pair 4 ½” Steiff chick w/ jointed head, fully tagged, plastic feet $47.50 Steiff Tagged – Woolies 2” Birds & 2 ½” Roosters, with original Wiebolts price tags $24.95 each

21 ½” 1955 American Character Eloise designed by Bette Gould in original blouse & skirt, face has a little wear on nose, left temple, cheek & chin $135. 15” Tagged Krueger N.Y. Doll all original in red & white organdy dress, mohair wig $125. 15” American Comp Doll “Trudy The Three Face Doll”, smiling, sleeping and crying, all original in blue and pink felt bunny suit $125.

25” 152 13 Hertel, Schwab & C0 Baby, blue sleep eyes, left pinkie as is $245. 25” Probably Kley & Hahn with bellow crier in head (doesn’t work), blue sleep eyes, original mohair wig, left pinkie as is $245. 18” 152 10 Hertel, Schwab & C0 Baby, lt. blue sleep eyes, hands repainted, few rubs on face, 8” Alexander Wigged Dionne Quints, original HH wig $160. Yvonne, Emilie, Annette, Cecile all original in green wool tagged coats & hats, organdy dresses w/ attached 15 1/2” 1986 Roche pantie, shoes & socks, gold name pins, Freddie & Florence tag faces crazed, mohair wigs $425. for 4 #154, bisque and wood 26” Baby Hendren in original cotton bodies, blue eyes, dress, slip, bonnet & shoes, replaced mohair wigs, signed panties & socks, cute expression, few behind ear $750. crazes on front curl $95.

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The Four Seasons of Sandra Sue – A 2013 UFDC Special Exhibit

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argaret Gray Kincaid displayed her ongoing passion for Sandra Sue at last year’s national UFDC convention in the exhibit, “The Four Seasons of Sandra Sue.” Margaret began collecting Sandra Sue dolls when she was six years old. As a long-time resident of Baltimore, she has fond memories of Hutzler’s department store during the holiday season and the magnificent display of dolls and Christmas trees. The company was founded by Ida Wood who named the company Richwood (using her husband’s name Richard Wood). In 1947, Mrs.Wood began dressing small composition dolls, followed the next year by hard plastic

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dolls. Not entirely satisfied with the dolls she purchased for dressing, she hired a sculptor to create a doll representing a little girl 6 to 8 years of age. It was fully articulated, allowing a child to easily change the doll’s clothing. During 1951-52 Sandra’s Sue wardrobe expanded to include more than 40 outfits and a full line of accessories. Richard Wood made furniture to display with the dolls and happily found a ready market. A grand dollhouse was constructed by Richard Wood for use in department store displays. Sandra Sue furniture as well as some special pieces were created for the Federal Style building. In a separate article, Margaret shares the


story of the renovation of this massive structure with our readers. Margaret, along with Peggy Millhouse, published a booklet in conjunction with the UFDC exhibit. I strongly recommend it for anyone interested in Sandra Sue dolls and furniture. Peggy Millhouse has researched Sandra Sue for years, and collectors will ďŹ nd the original source material, interviews with family members and abundant color photographs the best possible reference on Sandra Sue and Richwood Toys. To order contact Margaret at 646-709-4340, email margaret.kincaid@gmail.com

Blackberry Studio

Margaret Gray Kincaid Member NADDA and UFDC Cell: 646-709-4340 Margaret.kincaid@gmail.com

Blonde high heeled Marsha Washington $165. Little women doll $200. Glen Garry girl $200. Brunette doll with shorts $200. Auburn doll in sailor outďŹ t $200. Twin brunette dolls in box $300. Wardrobe in box $125. Original bed & bedding - mend on bedspread $100. Table & chairs original in box $350. Pink vanity set in original box $60. Hang tags are not original. Sandra Sue booklets available for $20. ANTIQUE DOLL COLLECTOR

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The first meeting of the Sandra Sue restoration project. All present with the exception of the author who took the photo!

The Sandra Sue Dollhouse By Margaret Gray Kincaid

T

hree years ago Barbara Stone, United Federation of Doll Club Region 11 director, told me about a Sandra Sue dollhouse. It had been built by the Richwood Toy Company in Annapolis, Maryland to feature the Sandra Sue dolls and her furniture at the company’s displays in department stores. I had loved Sandra Sue dolls as a child and had many pieces of her furniture; they were charming and well-made toys known mostly to collectors from the Mid-Atlantic States. After the company closed in 1958, the dollhouse was eventually put on display at the Maritime Museum Barge house, but unfortunately it had been flooded with 4.5 feet of water during Hurricane Isabel in 2003. I was sure in my hubris that it could be repaired and I wanted to put it on display at the Washington, DC National convention of the UFDC in 2013. With a group of loyal friends, this project came together and was a lot of fun. Richwood Toys, Inc. began in 1947 when Ida Woods started dressing little dolls in red and green snowsuits for Christmas to make some money while her children were in college. Within the year she had an agent and was madly dressing dolls for a big order from FAO Schwarz. Jerry Wood, Ida’s son, came to work for the company to sell and promote the little dolls. Richard Wood, Ida’s husband, began making scale furniture based on some of their family antiques to go with the dolls. One of the department stores suggested the company make a dollhouse to showcase the dolls and the furniture. Richard created a very grand dollhouse which could be taken apart for transporting and Jerry drove the big dollhouse up and 32

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down the eastern seaboard to set up displays. After the company closed in 1958, the dollhouse was stored in Ida Wood’s basement. When she died her son Jerry retrieved it and gave it to the Maritime Museum in Annapolis. The dollhouse filled the Barge House Museum which was an actual converted barge. During the Christmas season the dollhouse was a popular feature at the museum. Flood waters from Hurricane Isabel severely damaged the wood and finishes and the museum wanted to dispose of the dollhouse. The dollhouse was turned over to Helga Altoff, a volunteer at the Benson Hammond House museum and a member of the Chesapeake Doll Club. Helga was the custodian of the dollhouse for years. With my love of Sandra Sue dolls, I thought it would be a great idea to put on a Sandra Sue exhibit at the UFDC National Convention held in Washington DC in July 2013. I thought a display of dolls and the renovated dollhouse would be a special treat for everyone to see. Barbara Stone put me in touch with Vicky and I became the person to oversee the dollhouse renovation. My training at Columbia University in historic preservation as well as having renovated 16 full sized houses and built three from scratch, equipped me to tackle this project. When the current president of the Chesapeake Doll Club, Kim McIntyre, drove the dollhouse up from the Eastern Shore to Baltimore in her truck and I actually saw it, my heart sank. It was made of 4 foot by 8 foot pieces of plywood which were supposed to be screwed together to make it 4’ x 8’ x 5 ½’. It was huge, it was in terrible


The Sandra Sue dollhouse fully restored at the 2013 UFDC convention.

shape, the plywood had delaminated, pieces were broken, the wallpapers were all stained and still covered in mud. If I had not been committed to the Special Exhibit and been a serious lover of Sandra Sue Dolls, I would have recommended taking it to the dump as a lost cause! Initially, the dollhouse was moved into my basement doll shop and workroom. It took up so much space there was no room for my doll business inventory and workroom. We discovered the dollhouse was infested with silverfish and my assistant, Kate Mack, pointed out the risk of contaminating my home and inventory. The dollhouse was moved to the garage and fumigated while I tried to come up with a plan. In November the fumigated dollhouse was moved to the third floor of my home because it was safe and heated. It took three men to move it and set it up on saw horses so we could begin the tedious process of restoration. Luckily at the Christmas Gaithersburg Show I met Peggy Millhouse who had much more knowledge about all things Sandra Sue than I did. She had actually seen the dollhouse at the Barge House Museum and had documented it with pictures. These pictures became our guide for the restoration. After the holidays, I was about to get the project moving with many volunteer helpers that included members of the Chesapeake Doll Club, Victoria and Dean Christopherson, Barbara Dugan, Kim McIntyre, Sandy Hohne, Karen Irish, Peggy Millhouse and Susan Piefer. Helga Altoff came to that first meeting; she is really the Godmother of the whole

project since she had saved the dollhouse from being sent to the dump years before. Thirteen of us met at my house on a Sunday in early January to put the plan in motion to begin the dollhouse restoration. Helga is the volunteer curator for the two rooms of furniture that are a part of the Benson Hammond House inventory, which is located on the grounds of the Baltimore Washington International Airport. Their inventory includes the original living and dining room furniture for the Sandra Sue dollhouse. Helga asked the board of the museum if we could borrow the furniture to put in the house for the display at UFDC and they agreed. She also took on various sewing projects of dresses and curtains. Liz Davison, niece of Vicky Christopherson, assisted by reproducing the wallpaper to be used where it had been significantly damaged. Ms. Davison is a Professor of Photographic Imaging at The Art Institute of Washington and specializes in computer graphics. The broken windows were restored by Dean Christopherson who also agreed to make a large plywood base so we could set it 27 inches off the floor for more accessible views of the interior. Kim took the damaged curtains away with her promising to clean and repair them. Sandy took measurements so she could replace the kitchen appliances and counter tops. The dollhouse team continued to work on Sundays and Wednesdays throughout the winter and spring. Initially we had to clean the mud off the plywood walls, a laborious process, but we were able to save the original brick work. Sandy Hohne began clamping the delaminated plywood ANTIQUE DOLL COLLECTOR

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Fortunately, the original upstairs custom made furniture for the upper rooms became available for purchase. Dealers and eBay were additional sources.

back together. The plywood was so warped we did not know if it would come together. On the third meeting we stood up the walls and tried to screw it together. It actually worked and stood up! We cleaned and sanded the original woodwork and painted two coats of fresh paint over it. Liz got back to us with the newly made wallpaper; it was so perfect that it is impossible to tell which walls have new paper and which ones still have original paper. Dean brought all the cut pieces for the new windows and it was like a puzzle getting them all installed. In March at the Gaithersburg show we were introduced to Betsy Derrick whose husband is a nephew of Ida Woods. This introduction to the Woods family was of great help in Peggy Millhouse’s research for our book. The Derrick’s told us the kitchen and furnishings looked just like the ones in Ida and Richard’s house in Annapolis. We were worried about how we would furnish it to look like the original. I would hound Kathy Evans and Terry Mahoney of Kathy and Terry’s dolls for Sandra Sue dolls, clothes and accessories. Of course this gave me license to get on eBay and search for Sandra Sue dolls and furniture, but we did not see how we could replace the custom made pieces shown in the house. In April we had some real luck! Jennifer, a dealer from Annapolis, had been negotiating buying the remnants of the Sandra Sue Collection from the Maritime Museum. This past spring, the museum decided that the dolls had no relevance to their purpose as a Maritime museum and 34

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sold her the collection. I had bought Sandra Sue dolls from her, but she did not realize I was so involved in the dollhouse project. Karen Irish made the connection and one glorious Sunday in April, Jennifer brought over boxes of Sandra Sue things. She had the original upstairs furniture for the dollhouse and I was able to buy it from her. This felt like real serendipity and my fears about displaying the dollhouse in July were over. In June and July the dollhouse came together. We had not realized how big it was until that moment. I am six foot one inches tall and I could not reach the back wall. Transporting 4’ x 8’ pieces of plywood through the UFDC hotel lobby was a difficult, but I was prepared with large tips for all the men. Everyone who had helped with the project came to help set up the dollhouse and doll display. Many of us put the furniture in the house and we used Peggy’s original photographs of each room to guide us. Most of the collectors coming through our exhibit had never known about Sandra Sue dolls or Richwood toys. The dollhouse and the exhibit were a tremendous success. The Woods family came to see the exhibit and they were so happy they have asked Peggy to give a presentation at their family reunion. The exhibit was all I had dreamed it would be with all the help I received on the project. The Benson Hammond house has said they will display the dollhouse for a year starting in March 2014 but the long term future of the dollhouse is in question. In the end, we would love to see it displayed permanently in a museum somewhere in the Mid-Atlantic region.


The Enchanting Trousseau of Chiffonnette: A Special 2013 UFDC Exhibit

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eaders of this magazine are no doubt familiar with Chiffonnette, a Huret doll for whom its owner, Sylvia Mac Neil, has been creating an amazing trousseau for more than twenty years. Taking the name of doll who appeared in the first 1863 issue of the popular children’s magazine La Poupée Modèle, Chiffonnette has always been the consummate arbiter of taste and elegance, first in the magazine as an experienced doll advising the fashion doll Lily and now with Sylvia’s Mac Neil’s talents, as an example of the luxurious world of fashion under Napoleon III. At last summer’s national UFDC convention, Chiffonnette was on display, along with fifty enfantine costumes 36

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and coordinating accessories, impressive to say the least. Dresses, hats, gloves, muffs, snoods . . . all were beautifully grouped by color, making for a breathtaking display. In the case containing Chiffonnette were antique trimmings of the type used to embellish various articles of clothing. Using antique fabrics and trims and using authentic sewing techniques of the period, coupled with extensive

research in France where she and her husband enjoy a country home, Sylvia has greatly influenced fashion doll collectors to sew for their dolls. After all is one dress ever enough? Chiffonnette’s enchanting trousseau can be seen in Sylvia’s 304-page book which was published to coincide with the convention. For more information email: jimsyl@aol.com ANTIQUE DOLL COLLECTOR

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A Child’s Garden of Dreams By Constance King

A special rosewood case was constructed sometime during the 1800’s to contain the delicate treasures within. On close examination we can see several glass figures and animals in the leafy garden.

“John Noble would have adored this piece” was my first thought as I gazed at a strange and fascinating tableau discovered in a furniture dealer’s workroom in an English market town. Over the years, like so many readers of American magazines, I had enjoyed the toy gardens and scenes that this most artistic of collectors had shared with other enthusiasts. He was a revered figure to British collectors as he had taken his knowledge and skills to New York and became one of the most important people in the doll scene. His approach to antiques was that of an aesthete rather than that of an investor or chronicler, his taste formed in the mid 20th century long before the age of price guides and the hedonism of the 1980’s. I met him once on the steps of the Museum of the City of New York where he worked, it was an unexpected introduction and he was just going out for lunch but he immediately clasped my arm saying, “I have something wonderful to show you. You must come!” I was taken to his basement office where he

was appraising a superb English 18th century wooden doll in original costume. For several hours we compared and contrasted to our hearts content. I missed my appointment, saw nothing else of the museum and never met John again but the knowledge and enthusiasm he displayed that day in the 1980’s has remained. When I looked at the Garden of Dreams I was, momentarily, back in the atmosphere of that room in New York with an expert who really appreciated the artistry of strange and curious toys. Other collectors have told me how they are still influenced by his taste while his articles are re-read for their sense of wonder and discovery. The Garden of Dreams is contained in a glazed rosewood case, it is a landscape of magic and mystery where fashionably dressed ladies talk to peasants, where flowers are larger than people and where mica, cardboard, fabric and glass are woven into a make-believe world at whose centre is a sleeping waxen child. Curious figures, each with its own story, seem to inhabit her dreams as they wander ANTIQUE DOLL COLLECTOR

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among twisting paths surrounded by flowers, berries and shells. Constructed in the early 18th century, this is a tableau very much of its time, reflecting a period when follies and grottoes were constructed not only on the estates of grand families but also in the gardens of smaller houses. While the great curiosity cabinets were already a fashion of the past, many scenes suitable for less wealthy houses were assembled in shadow boxes, their structures often revealing pieces that could be purchased from toy and fancy goods shops. The substantial rosewood outer case, measuring 28 by 21 inches is 19th century and, with its locking A sleeping child, made of beeswax is the centerpiece of the garden. front panel, indicates a piece of some importance as most shadow boxes are simple and from a variety of materials are found in both religious constructed of painted or paper covered pine. The setting and secular settings: in this instance the beeswax child is was probably treasured by its original owners and a draped in fabric. In the section where the child lies there special display case was constructed. I was unable to learn are no figures or birds to disturb her dreams. Above her, anything of the history of the garden as the dealer had and probably representing her home, is a miniature early purchased it many years before at a country house auction Georgian dolls’ house with a slated blue roof surmounted in Shropshire. It had not gone on sale as the lock could by a gilded cupola. The painted card house stands on its not be opened and the whole setting was covered in dust, own garden base with a painted card fence. Some of the cobwebs and mould. Despite the risk of buying something windows are open and through them can be seen a red quite expensive that could barely be seen, the magic was draped four-poster bed in the upper room and a large irresistible even though, in the end, the lock had to be cut chimneypiece in the lower. Tiny dolls’ houses of this type through. After cleaning out the dead spiders and brushing are extremely rare as they were so fragile, though there every leaf, figure and shell with a soft artist’s brush the is a simpler example, dating to the early 18th century, but complexity of the scene was revealed. without a front, in Ann Sharp’s Baby House in Norfolk. The A sleeping poured beeswax child doll, 5 inches long, small painted baby house in the Garden of Dreams, still in with applied hair that was made from a mixture of linen fine condition, would by itself make the garden irresistible thread and floss silk forms the centrepiece of the garden. to any collector of early toys. Approaching the house is a Eighteenth century figures and dolls in similar poses made draped female figure carrying a baby in one arm and a ball

Peering through an upper window of the early Georgian dolls’ house one can see a draped four-poster bed. Approaching the house is a woman holding a baby. A peacock is nearby. Both are made of Nevers glass. 40

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or rattle in the other. A blue and white peacock stands near her while to the left of the house is a small hunting dog, also made of glass. When I purchased the garden I thought the figures were made of wax or, possibly, gum tragacanth, but as the dirt and mould were removed the rich colours and fanciful designs of Nevers glass were revealed. Pieces of Nevers spun glass are sometimes found in Continental cabinet houses, for example, the glass Blackamoor in a miniature cupboard contained in the Dutch Cabinet house of Sara Ploos van Amstel assembled in 1743. The products of the Nevers region are more commonly associated with crèche type settings usually protected in a glass case as they are so fragile, but the fanciful figures were also sold as whimsical toys in the fancy goods shops of Paris where they were acquired by adults for fashionable curiosity cabinets. Some were also used for that very special French toy, a ménage, in effect a box filled with a variety of small objects. Heroard, the personal physician to Louis XIII when a child, mentions in his exhaustive notes on the infant’s development that he owned a toy ménage that contained fine Nevers figures. Sometimes the glass is found in mica and card architectural settings and, occasionally, classical themes were created such as Bacchus and Ceres, the figures set under a spun and twisted arch.

A bare breasted woman carries a bird under her arm. A woman with long glass curls is surrounded by eight opaque glass sheep being driven by a dog. A cut-out building can be seen behind the lush growth.

In the right segment of the Garden of Dreams a glass bare breasted woman with flowers in her hair carries a bird under her arm while an opaque glass pig lurks in the undergrowth. In the left section a 17thcentury style lady, her hair arranged in abundant curls, has clasped hands and the black bead-like eyes associated with all the figures. She wears a red enamelled dress and around her is gathered a flock of eight opaque glass rough coated sheep. A dog drives the sheep towards her despite the fact that she appears to be a court lady. In the background is a card outline-cut painted building with two towers. The dividing foliage between the various scenes is made of scrunched linen thread embellished with wired leaves, shells and bits of red coral.

Curious enamelled glass figures of this type were first produced in Nevers in the late 16th century. Nevers is the capital of the department of Nievre, south, south east of Paris and is situated on the river Loire where it joins the Nievre. The town, with its narrow winding streets leading down to the quay, became important in the Roman period when it was a military depot. The feudal ducal palace now houses a ceramics museum. During the reign of Louis X1V Venetian glassmakers were bribed to teach their skills, particularly those related to the manufacture of chandeliers, to French ANTIQUE DOLL COLLECTOR

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craftsmen. These Venetian workers were especially skilled in the creation of enamelled beads and devices that could be made without expensive equipment but needed imagination and sleight of hand in the manipulation of the molten metal. The marriage of Ludovico Gonzaga and Henriette de Cleves made Ludovico Duke of Nevers and it is believed that he encouraged Italian glassmakers from L’Altare to settle in Nevers where glass figures continued to be made until the mid 19th century, though by then the industry was declining so rapidly that the skill was eventually lost. Most of the small primitive figures were made of blown opaque glass, seen to great effect on the sheep, with parts of the costumed figures enriched with enamel colours. These techniques were ideal for people working in small workshops or even in the streets, as only a burner and a supply of glass rods were needed. Though mainly

The man on the right may represent St. Francis of Assisi. The woman is beautifully rendered in her yellow and white dress with her frilly sleeves.

associated with Nevers the craft was also practiced in Normandy and in other parts of France and there were many itinerant workers who would create whimsical animals and figures at fairs while the customers watched them at work. The enamels were made from finely powdered glass coloured with metal oxides and applied to the surface of the figures before being fused by firing. Glass friggers were made in the 19th century from the waste glass of many factories in England and America but the colours and the designs are much harder in effect. The Nevers figures belong to a much earlier and more primitive style, seeming to step out of Medieval tapestries or books of A woman with a glass bodice carries a pot on her head. Behind her, one can detect, a cow with massive horns, a small white dog and a deer. A grotto type scene with a glass lake and opaque swans and birds.

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hours with their strange colours and very skilled rendering of hair and other textures. In the central scenes of the Garden of Dreams that itself is reminiscent of 17th century stump or raised work panels, a glass lady with a green bodice and white apron carries a pitcher on her head while behind her stands a cow with massive horns, a deer and a small white dog. In the distance is a painted card tower. The right segment shows a stag climbing a hill with a brown stag standing behind bushes. It seems possible that the garden was assembled

wearing a Greek style classical tunic. Because these glass friggers were produced over a long period they are difficult to date precisely as it seems that atavistic costumes were often used, some of the women in this setting, for instance, seeming to reflect the styles of the mid 17th century with exposed breasts and abundant long curls. Although some Nevers figures were played with as toys and they were sold in fashionable gift shops in Paris in the late 17th and 18th centuries the Garden of Dreams must have been constructed for a relatively wealthy family possibly to decorate a child’s room but more probably as a piece for a reception room. Curiosity chambers and architectural cabinets that contained everything from fossils to taxidermy were a feature of many grand Continental houses in the 17th century but the spread of education and wealth to the middle classes encouraged less wealthy people to house their own collections in specially made chests and display cases. The eighteenth and nineteenth century shadow boxes and even the baby houses that were frequently filled with small treasures were the last vestige of this old collecting tradition. Today Nevers figures of any kind are rare because of their fragility though occasionally a piece is discovered in the furnishings of an old dolls’ house. Several of the religious scenes have survived as Christian families tend to avoid discarding objects of veneration, with nativity scenes and crucifixions sometimes appearing on the market. Some of the secular figures and settings suffered because their strange primitive style was not liked in the 19th century and many pieces must have been discarded. Fortunately, like

A brilliant red stag hides in the foliage. Two small yellow dogs run toward a man in a red tunic.

in France utilizing Nevers figures as the atmosphere is more complex and whimsical than late 18th and early 19th century English shadow boxes where the flowers, leaves, and other decorative devices are simpler. The two lower scenes are much larger and more in the manner of grottoes with glittering mica encrusted backgrounds. To one side is a bearded robed, wizardlike old man who appears to be carrying a bird and probably represents St. Francis. Another bearded elderly man carries a basket and walks towards a woman whose arms are outstretched. This is one of the most doll-like of the glass people and she wears a yellow and white dress with gilded bands above her sleeve frills. The last scene is completely in the manner of a grotto with a glass lake with opaque swans and other birds and a fountain made of spiral twisted clear glass. Some of the birds and snakes in this scene are less than half an inch in size but are beautifully detailed and coloured. Two minute yellow lapdogs run towards a man

the stump work panels and embroideries of the 17th century they are current favourites and command greater interest than more sophisticated late 18th and 19th century creations. Unfortunately the glassworkers in this region of France seem to have left no order books or detailed records of their production and as there is virtually no written history, we are left only with the ephemeral figures that tease and tantalise with their ancient mystery, glowing colours and theatrical poses. © Jane Vandell Associates, 2014. ANTIQUE DOLL COLLECTOR

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Laura Turner, proprietor, 1909 Old Taneytown Rd., Westminster, MD 21158. Open Thurs- Sun 11-5. We also carry a quality line of antiques, textiles, furniture and jewelry. 30 years of experience where you can buy or sell with confidence. Call us with your wants, we have an ever-changing inventory 410-848-0664 or 410-875-2850.

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Night, Night! Sleep Tight!

A Study of Accordion Doll Beds & Cradles By Donilee Popham / Photos by Scott Popham

L

This drawing accompanied Fenner’s first cradle patent application, awarded in 1873. Notice the flared ends on the cradle.

ong ago but not so far away, there lived a little girl. Times were simpler and this little girl enjoyed the childhood pleasures of a bygone era—making mud pies, catching fireflies in a jar, and playing with dolls. But most of all, she loved to go to Grandma’s house. Grandma lived on a farm and had an old house with an upstairs just made for exploring. Under the eaves in Grandma’s upstairs was a long, dark closet packed full of dusty treasures. With no light, though, it was a little scary to even think about going in. In fact it was so frightening this closet was dubbed the “Spook Closet,” and it required a lot of bravery on the part of the little girl to venture inside, but treasures beckoned—old dolls, toys, and doll furniture. On one of her trips into the Spook Closet, the little girl emerged with an unusual item: a little wooden, folding doll bed. It was a bit the worse for wear as another little girl had played with it a generation earlier. Grandma let her take the bed home and she spent many hours playing with it, even though it was missing part of a leg and a slat. The small bed from the Spook Closet was probably made in the 1920s, but this style of bed, known as “accordion” or “expansion” beds and cradles, was first patented in the United States by Charles Fenner in 1873, only eight years after the Civil War. Fenner’s first patent drawing, called simply “Cradle,” featured a folding latticework bottom and sides. When opened, the ends of the cradle were flared, and when closed the ends were parallel. The space left between the head and foot of the bed when closed was to be used to store bedding. Fenner noted that the rockers could be replaced with feet of any length to turn the cradle into a crib or bed. A canvas bottom was also mentioned in this patent, but examples of this feature have not been found on these earliest cradles. They are easy to identify, though, as they

A cradle, made according to Fenner’s first patent, featured flared head and footboards. The space inside a closed Fenner cradle could be used to store bedding.

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have the flared head and foot, and bear a label on the bottom frame of the footboard, on the inside, which reads: Patented by C.A. FENNER, Nov. 11, 1873 Manufactured by C.A. FENNER & CO. at MYSTIC RIVER, CT Four years after being awarded his first accordion cradle patent, Charles Fenner was operating his own business. In “History of New London County, Connecticut,” written in 1882, D. Hamilton Hurd said, “C. A. Fenner & Co., Mystic River, Groton, manufacturers of extension toy cribs, cradles, and extension canvas boats, commenced business in 1877. Their success has been great and their sales have increased rapidly. In 1879 they sold 20,000; 1880, 40,000; 1881, 50,000. These goods are made under patent of Mr. Fenner for his invention of a new application, and are manufactured under his personal supervision.” Unfortunately, Mr. Hurd did not specify 20,000, 40,000, or 50,000 what – dollars worth of sales, cribs, cradles, or boats. In addition to the beds and cradles, a most unusual item manufactured by the C.A. Fenner company was folding canvas boats. In 1876 Fenner was awarded a patent for what he called “Portable Folding Boats.” The drawings remind one of the accordion cradle drawings, as they employ a lattice frame covered with rubber or waterproof cloth. Fenner referred to the latticework of the boats as “lazy-tongs,” a term he also used in his cradle patents. Lazy-tongs, as defined by Merriam Webster, is “a series of jointed and pivoted bars capable of great extension used to pick up or handle something at a distance.” If this reminds you of something from a late twentieth-century TV ad called “The Grabber,” you are not alone, but the first known use of Lazy Tongs was way back in 1836, early enough to have been Fenner’s inspiration for his folding boats and doll beds. Anyway, it sounds as if C. A. Fenner & Co. met with a bit of success as they were selling thousands of something. In 1881 Fenner was awarded a second patent for improvements to his original folding cradle design, including parallel ends when in the open position to make the structure sturdier. Also, “bowed” or “arched” pieces on the tops of the head and footboards were mentioned in this patent application which could be used as handles or could be omitted, if desired. Decals, always used as decoration on the head and footboards of the beds and cradles, where sometimes placed on the tops of the bowed handles. Beds manufactured after Fenner received his second cradle patent are marked: Patented by C.A. FENNER, Nov. 11, 1873 and July 12, 1881 Manufactured by C.A. FENNER & CO. at MYSTIC RIVER, CT According to Leigh Fought writing in “A History of Mystic Connecticut: From Pequot Village to Tourist Town,” by 1883 Fenner had sold his

Decals featuring children or animals found on the head and footboards of the bed with “handles.”

A stereo glass negative shows Fenner’s folding boat on the Mystic River in Connecticut. Courtesy of Mystic Seaport.

This Fenner bed has a pointed style headboard.

Arched tops of the head and footboards were designed for use as handles. ANTIQUE DOLL COLLECTOR

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Fenner sold his business in 1883 to I. D. Clift who continued to use the same design. This cradle has the Clift label.

A cradle manufactured according to Fenner’s third cradle patent, using latticework and arched pieces made of metal strips. The label found on the footboard of Fenner’s last cradle design states it was manufactured by Southington Toy Co.

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business. The wooden folding beds and cradles were still manufactured in Mystic River according to Fenner’s design, though, by I. D. Clift & Company. A third label may be found on the beds to reflect this change: Patented by C.A. FENNER, Nov. 11, 1873 and July 12, 1881 Manufactured by I. D. Clift & Company at MYSTIC RIVER, CT Around this time, disaster fell. In “Groton, Connecticut: 1705-1905,” Charles Rathbone Stark stated that “the cradle business started by Charles A. Fenner” was “burned out.” Charles Fenner, though, had not yet given up on the idea of folding doll beds. In 1889 he was awarded a patent for a “Folding Bed or Cradle” which he described as “simple and economical.” This bed had a canvas bottom to support the bedding and arched tops on the ends to strengthen the structure. These arched tops could also be used to support a canopy or mosquito-net. In a major departure from his original design, the latticework and arched pieces were made of metal strips. The only extant example this author has examined was manufactured by the Southington Toy Company. The city of Southington is located in Connecticut, not too far from Mystic River. What Charles Fenner’s involvement with this company was is not known, and after this point, Fenner and his doll beds fade into history. Other manufacturers took up where Fenner left off. Cradles of German origin can be found made in a simpler design with slats to support the bedding while omitting the lower latticework. These beds were usually made with unstained wood, in different sizes, and can be found with a variety of lithographed paper pictures of children in idyllic settings on the head and footboards. A rare example has been discovered stamped “GERMANY” on the base of a rocker, but the newer beds and cradles are not usually marked. The 1914 Marshall Field & Company Kringle Society Doll Catalog offered an Extension Crib for sale. It featured a single piece of lattice across the slats for support and had no design on head or footboard. It came in two sizes. The 10” size was sold by the dozen for $1.64; the larger 13 ¼” cradles sold for $4.00 for ½ dozen. Other styles can be found which have been stained or were ready to finish. Some have stamped designs on the head and footboards, and some no design at all. These beds and cradles make a nice addition to any doll collector’s stash, and are really charming to display with antique dolls. Best of all their novel design allows them to fold up nicely so they don’t take up too much room. That little girl from a bygone day would highly recommend searching for them. Now as for Fenner’s folding canvas boats-that’s another matter. Better stay away from them and stick with something you can use on dry land!


A simple German accordion cradle.

Charming lithographs decorated the headboards and footboards of the German cradles. An all metal baby is “sleeping tight” in the bed found so long ago in the “Spook Closet” at Grandma’s house.

A German-made bed in the Kringle Society style has a paper lithograph decorating both ends. The other side of the bed features more baby pictures.

REFERENCES: Fought, Leigh. A History of Mystic, Connecticut: From Pequot Village to Tourist Town. Charleston, SC: The History Press, 2007. Google Patents (http://google.com/patents) Hurd, D. Hamilton, comp. History of New London County, Connecticut: With Biographical Sketches of Many of Its Pioneers & Prominent Men. Philadelphia, PA: J.W. Lewis & Co., 1882. Merriam-Webster Online Dictionary and Thesaurus (http://merriam-webster.com) 1914 Marshall Field & Company Doll Catalog: Kringle Society Dolls. Cumberland, MD: Hobby House Press, 1980. Stark, Charles Rathbone. Groton, Conn.: 1705-1905. Stonington, CT: The Palmer Press, 1922.

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Handkerchiefs and Dolls By Jane Foster

Photography by Kim and Vanessa McBurney and Annette Snodgrass

Boxed Paper Doll Ladies’ Handkerchief, c. 1950’s.

P

Rose O’Neill’s Kewpies featured on this early 20th century handkerchief.

erhaps you have a few pretty handkerchiefs in a drawer somewhere. Maybe they were given to you by one of your grandmothers or an aunt. Traditionally they have been given to brides to carry on their wedding day. The pocket handkerchief is about 400 years old. However, the history of the handkerchief begins as far back as Classical Greece and the Roman Empire. In the early years handkerchiefs were used as face cloths. In Roman times when a handkerchief was dropped games were signaled to begin, and the spectators’ cheers were the waving of handkerchiefs. There were many other functional uses of handkerchiefs in history, but through the centuries they changed from being functional to fashionable. Lovely laces and fringed edges were added. In the 19th century ladies carried handkerchiefs in their hands instead of stowing them away in their purses. In the Victorian era ladies commonly used their handkerchiefs in flirtation mannerisms. Hankies were a very popular teacher-gift at one time. During the decades of the 30’s, 40’s and 50’s it was very common for a student to give a handkerchief as a present. Fancy and embellished handkerchiefs seemed to have been very popular in the 50’s. Some have even called this decade “the heyday of the hankies.” I have a friend who has inherited hundreds of beautiful handkerchiefs from her aunt who was a teacher during the days of 50

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the one-room and two-room school houses. These were inexpensive tokens of appreciation at this time. Historically, handkerchiefs were considered to be the perfect gift for anyone, male or female, young or old, close friend, or just an acquaintance. According to Katie Dix, a vintage handkerchief expert and storyteller, “Handkerchief design began reflecting pop culture when the Sunday Comics were printed in the early 1900’s. One example is a child’s handkerchief produced in 1909 to promote the Kewpie dolls whose whimsical nature appealed to children.” The Kewpie handkerchiefs were sold in attractive, colorful box sets of three as many other hankies were. In the 1930’s there was a handkerchief that was sent to little girls who were Shirley Temple fans. When requested the movie studio would send the little girl a letter back with a hanky which said “To My Friend.” How special this would have been for a little girl living in the 1930’s. The Raggedy Ann and Andy dolls appeared on several children’s handkerchiefs in this decade. Also the Dionne Quintuplets graced some of these delicate little squares of cloth. Although we think of all handkerchiefs as being square, they were sometimes made round or triangular. Tom Lamb was known for designing the Dionne Quintuplet handkerchief series. From the 1920’s to the 1940’s he was the most prolific designer of children’s handkerchiefs. Also in the 30’s the famous comic couple, Popeye and Olive


From dolls to handkerchiefs Shirley Temple keepsakes were the hit item of the 1930’s.

Dionne Quintuplet 1930 Handkerchiefs

Segar added the cantankerous Popeye to his popular comic strip in 1929.

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The 1937 Disney film Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs inspired a variety of related merchandise.

Oyl, were featured on handkerchiefs as were Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs. The Effanbee Doll Company, who produced so many of our favorite dolls, gave us Popeye and Olive Oyl and Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs as dolls. Handkerchiefs with images of these popular characters were made with children in mind, but I’m sure many present-day doll enthusiasts would enjoy finding these special pieces to enhance their collections. There was a depression era lady’s hanky made that commemorated the classic epic, “Little Women.” Of course, Madame Alexander captured these characters in the form of dolls for many different years. Queen Elizabeth II inspired hankies and dolls as well as “Scarlett” from “Gone With the Wind.” During the Civil War handkerchiefs were made into dolls for little girls. They were, naturally, very light-weight, and did not make noise if they were dropped onto the floor. They were also known as one of the “Sunday toys” that children were allowed to play with only on Sundays, along with a few other quiet toys such as Noah’s Ark, Jacob’s Ladder, and Buzz Saw. Sometimes mothers would put sugar cubes or candy in the head of the handkerchief doll for their child to suck on to keep them quiet during long church services. Other names for this type of doll are “pew doll,” “pew babies,” “church doll,” “church babies” and “prayer dolls.” These little homemade dolls many times were made from men’s plain white handkerchiefs. Sometimes a smaller woman’s hanky would be used to stuff the head. Some sewing thread or simple twine was tied around the doll’s neck. After these dolls were made for a few years they became more elaborate. These darling little companion dolls had lace added to make a skirt hem, and also gathered lace would be attached around the doll’s head, giving these babies a bonnet. Facial features were embroidered on the faces. Oftentimes these Church Dolls were made as gifts, and then the child’s name could be

The blockbuster hit Gone with the Wind inspired this handkerchief. The 1939 composition Scarlett doll by Madame Alexander.

52

ANTIQUE DOLL COLLECTOR

Louisa May Alcott’s “Little Women,” first published in 1868, became a children’s classic.

FEBRUARY 2014


Marked Simon Halbig / K*R 62, this doll came with her extensive wardrobe including a boxed set of hankerchiefs. Photo and Collection Jean Grout.

Dolls naturally needed a place to store their hankies, this rare example is made of taffeta. Photo and Collection Jean Grout

embroidered at the hem. In the South nannies made handkerchief “Plantation Dolls” for children because toys were so scarce. Today similar types of dolls are made as collectors’ dolls and as decorations. These small handkerchief dolls are hung on Christmas trees to add a bit of Victorian charm and tradition. Additionally wreaths, duvets and quilts have been beautifully pieced together from these little elegant pieces of cloth. An interesting and beautiful craft currently is the use of vintage hankies for making doll dresses. This is yet another perspective to consider as we think about the relationship that dolls and handkerchiefs have had. Lovely frocks have been made recently for 11-1/2 inch fashion dolls and the ever-popular little Ginny dolls. Hankies have also been used to dress paper dolls. A historical character doll from the American Girl Doll series, Josephina, has her own hanky which is draped over a purse that is around her waist. Two lovely handkerchief-doll related pieces were shared with me by Jean Grout. In her Replica of a Church Handkerchief Doll, Plantation Doll, holding a very small doll in one hand, Courtesy collection she has a beautiful K*R doll with an Courtesy of Darlene Shultz of Darlene Shultz extensive wardrobe which includes a boxed the handkerchief was unnecessary and unsanitary set of her handkerchiefs. Also, very unusual to find is the with the slogan “Don’t put a cold in your pocket.” taffeta hankie holder. This was made for a doll to carry her Understandably, consumable products were not hankies in, and several doll-size hankies are included. successful during the Depression. At the height of the The use of handkerchiefs sharply decreased when polio epidemic Kimberly Clark tried again. Little Lulu, Kleenex tissue made its appearance. Kleenex was a comic strip character from the mid-1930’s, became the introduced in 1924 by Kimberly, Clark and Company poster girl for Kleenex tissues. A Little Golden Book was for use as a cold cream remover and disposable facial published featuring Little Lulu and Her Magic Tricks. The towel. This company, founded in 1872, began as a paper book included a sample package of tissues on the inside mill. Kimberly Clark tried to convince America that ANTIQUE DOLL COLLECTOR

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front cover. Many school children in America received one of these books. American women became convinced that handkerchiefs were unhygienic, and of course, Kleenex were much easier to use. Also, paper tissues were

not as costly to make as handkerchiefs. With the introduction of convenient paper tissues beautiful stacks of hankies disappeared from the stores of America. In 1948 Marshall Field’s, a department store in Chicago,

References and Resources Katie Dix-Website-Story of Vintage Hankies.com “Church Dolls” by Charlotte Semple, Doll Costuming-Issue July 2003 Darlene Shultz Xlyphia Beaver Jean Grout Andrea Jones Children’s Handkerchiefs by J.J. Murphy, 1998

Kimberly Clark used popular comic character Little Lulu to help convince the public of the unsanitary use of cloth handkerchiefs. Photo Andrea Jones

Auction Gallery

cont. from p. 20

M

arked Bru Jne 5, this Chevrot style model, 16.5 inches tall, realized approximately $16,700 at Galerie de Chartres’s recent auction. The size 11 Jumeau triste, 23.5 inches, brought nearly $13,800.

A

t Ladenburger’s three-day auction, December 5-7, this Gaultier socket head fashion poupée with a jointed wood body, 17 inches, sold for $4,000. The dollhouse kitchen, likely made by Christian Hacker, 25.5 inches wide, 15.5 inches high and 14 inches deep, sold for $2900.

We would like to thank the following auction houses for their participation: Galerie de Chartres, 10 rue Claude BERNARD BP 70129 28630 Le coudray CHARTRES.chartres@galeriedechartres.com Ladenburger Spielzeugauktion, Lustgartenstraße 6, 68526 Ladenburg, Germany www.spielzeugauktion.de 54

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offered 800 drawers full of beautiful, fashionable cloth hankies. By 1960 the Montgomery Ward catalog had stopped listing ladies handkerchiefs in their inventory. Perhaps a few handkerchiefs can still be found in department stores, but the best place for a nice selection today would certainly be an antique establishment. Both handkerchiefs and dolls are keepsakes that have been handed down from one generation to another. Beginning in the early 1900s and continuing to this day, handkerchiefs as well as dolls have been used as promotional tie-ins for imaginary and real-life characters.


Auction Gallery A

weekend of total doll immersion! Four auctions, conducted by Theriault’s, took place over three days, January 10-12 in Newport Beach, CA. A magazine deadline prevents us from reviewing all the sales but we can share a look at the Saturday auction featuring the collection of Gail Nichols and a bevy of classic French dolls, mignonettes, automata and all original Sonneberg dolls. Saturday’s auction also included rare Steiff dolls and early animals from the Helen Welsh collection. For more results visit theriaults. com and click on Proxibid. Prices listed do not include buyer’s premium.

An early kid-bodied bebe by Gaultier with block letter markings, 23 inches, realized $10,000.

Marked A 12 T (Andre Thuillier), this 23inch doll with family provenance back to the original owner, Eugenia Huwer, born in France in 1883, brought $37,000.

A porcelain Huret with trousseau, some pieces signed Huret, with original gutta percha body, c. 1857, 17 inches, realized $30,000.

A portrait poupée by Pierre-Francois Jumeau, c. 1867, 19 inches, $14,500.

“Bob and his Learned Piglet” by Vichy, 50 inches overall, a rare automaton in original condition, surpassed its high estimate of $35,000 to bring $125,000.

This impressive 54” tall by 85” wide musical automaton, “The Magnificent Peacock,” sold for $125,000.

A Series A Jules Steiner bebe, 24 inches, c. 1885, $14,500.

Similar to early bebes by Jules Steiner, a mystery doll, 16 inches, with a body style attributed to Brouillet et Cachelux, sold for $13,000.

Dressed in antique lace and silk, this Schmitt et Fils bebe, 24 inches, c. 1882, sold for $14,500.

Gaultier’s Asian Lady in the original costume, 17 inches, c. 1865, likely a special commission doll, sold for $10,500.

Steiff velvet rabbit on skittle, button in ear, 9 inches, $1,400, Steiff Peter Rabbit dressed in red felt, 10 inches, $3,000.

A lovely Huret poupée with swivel neck and wooden articulated body with Huret label, 17 inches, brought $42,000.

Theriault’s, PO Box 151, Annapolis, MD 21404. 800-638-0422 www.theriaults.com ANTIQUE DOLL COLLECTOR

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12” Kestner 243 Oriental pair, all original, $7,950. Gigi and Sherry, IL, email: gigisdolls@aol.com

Kley and Hahn 520, $4500. Ann Lloyd, PA, email: alloyd@nni.com

Becky and Andy Ourant, Village Doll Shop, PA, email: ourantptd.net

December Gaithersburg Show F

Early Kathe Kruse, $5,000. Nancy Smith, MA, email: nasdoll@ comcast.com

French Joan of Arc, 18-1/2”, $5,200. Sandra Bullock and Lorrie Dove, MI, email: sbullock4085@ wowway.com

12” fashion with trunk, clothing and accessories, $3,000. Virginia Aris, NJ, email virginiaaris@aol.com 56

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Moira Hatton, CT, email: hattonsgallery@cox.net

MaryAnn Spinelli, CA, email: nellingdolls@gmail.com

or serious doll and toy collectors there are, each year, a handful of “must attend” shows. For a long time, the December Doll and Toy Show in Gaithersburg, MD, has been such a show, and it remains a “must attend” show to today. This past December’s Gaithersburg event was no exception, offering a very fine array of collectibles in a wide variety of categories -- dolls, of course, but also holiday collectibles and toys. The December Gaithersburg show presented a very fine selection of antique dolls from many of the best dealers. In addition, and perhaps less well known, is the fine assortment of antique toys that find their way to this show -- everything from early American clockwork, automatons,

Rick Saxman, PA, email: ricksax@earthlink.net


An intricately made pair of figurines, $750, screen, $300. Phil May, NJ, email: dollmanofog@aol.com

Frizellburg Antiques MD, email: frizellburgantiques@yahoo.com

Marshall Martin, CA, email: marshallmartin@earthlink.net

Ann Pruett Phillips, CA, email: ann@annpruettphillips.com

Marion Maus Antiques, MD. Email: mmausantiques@gmail.com

Straw Bear Antiques, GA, email: strawbearantiques@gmail.com

Valerie Fogel, WA, email: Valerie@beautifulbebes.com

22� 165 googly, Fritzi’s Antique Dolls, IL, email: fritzisantiquedolls@ comcast.net

Glen Rollins, UT, email: glencrollins@yahoo.com

Jay and Connie Lowe, PA, email: big.birds@comcast.net ANTIQUE DOLL COLLECTOR

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Nancy McGlamery, PA, email: mcpelton@aol.com

Deborah Fratino, CT, email: debfratino@aol.com Billye Harris, NC, email: ashleysdolls@gmail.com

Sheila Needle, CA, email: dollwitch@cox.net

Margaret Kincaid, MD, email: Margaret.kincaid@gmail.com

tin wind-ups and even a two-seater pedal car from the 1930s! Along with the price of admission attendees can enjoy the benefits of the “UFDC Learning Room.” At the December show Saturday’s talk on portrait dolls was followed on Sunday by a discussion of mechanical dolls. Doll stringing and repair was also available. The next Gaithersburg Doll Show will take place at the Fairgrounds, March 1 and 2.

Do You Have a Mystery Doll? T his doll was purchased in Italy in the summer of 1966. I have searched the Web to learn by whom it was made, and can find nothing that helps me answer the question. I love it and our family treasures it, not only for the personal memories it brings back, but for its composition and execution as a work of art. I would like to buy others from this artist if I could find where to search. Also would like some estimate of the cost of dolls similar to this in today’s market. I have no idea what we paid for it at the time. Email James at jamesleu@sbcglobal.net

Perhaps there is a doll in your collection that you and others have never seen before. Send us a high resolution photo and any information you have to antiquedoll@gmail.com (you may also send a print photo to Antique Doll Collector P.O. Box 39, East Petersburg, PA 17520). If you can identify a mystery doll, write to us at the address or email above. 58

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HAVE YOU SEEN OUR WEBSITE LATELY?

IT’S WHERE YOU’LL FIND: Ads for auctions not in our print edition Sign up for our Sneak Peek, a preview of what’s in the next issue Check out back issues for sale Renew your subscription View our calendar of events And so much more!

ANTIQUEDOLLCOLLECTOR.COM


Sweetbriar’s December Auction

S

weetbriar’s December 14 auction held in Westampton, NJ, featured dolls from the collection of Kathy and Mike Embry, a well-rounded grouping of French and German bisque dolls, all bisques, papier maches, chinas, dollhouse dolls and furniture. There was a healthy turnout of collectors and a few dealers as well in attendance, along with numerous absentee and phone bidding. Here are some of the lovely dolls that caught our eye. Prices reported do not include the buyer’s premium. For more information contact Sweetbriar Auctions P.O. Box 37, Earleville, MD 21919, 410-275-2094, sweetbriar@live.com. From left to right: an all original size 7 Tete Jumeau, 16” with signed shoes, $4500, a 28” Jumeau Triste with signed Jumeau shoes, $10,100, an exceptional mystery bebe incised 14, 31”, wearing the original costume, $16,100, Joanny Bebe incised J9, 22”, $4500 and a Henri Phenix Bebe, 24” with signed shoes, $3300.

An early poupee, originally from the Dina Vierny collection, Rare 12 EJA by Jumeau, 26”, 17”, $2350. original dress and shoes, $16,100.

A.M. 700 character, 12”, $1250.

“A.T.” Kestner child, 13”, Bru style kid body An exquisite half doll, circa and bisque 1840, 6”, brought $3800. forearms, $3550.

Villa Mase, 24” wide x 36” tall, with early electric lights (refer to the article in our November 2013 issue), $8500.

The mischievous all bisque duo of Max and Moritz 5”, with their original clothes, $4800.

Kestner 178 character, 11”, $1350

A French style papier mache by Voit, 14”, all original $1950.

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s ’ i z t i FArntique Dolls

Buying entire collections of antique dolls and dolls of merit. Email: fritzisantiquedolls@comcast.net Fritzi’s cell# 630-247-1144 Rick’s cell# 630-247-1219

“Be my Valentine”

Left, 13” scroll FG. Middle, 14” FG block letter automaton playing mandolin. Right, 14” block letter FG.

UFDC

OUR UPCOMING SHOWS: March 1 & 2, Eastern National Doll Show, Gaithersburg, MD at the Fairgrounds March 9 Maquoketa, IA, Jackson County Fairgrounds March 22, Madison Area Doll Club Show. Madison, WI, Alliant Energy Center


Located in Stoudtburg Village 8 N. Village Circle P.O. Box 705 Adamstown, PA 19501 Currently open by appointment only. We welcome your visit.

Come visit us and experience our charming location and superior selection of French and German dolls. We are always interested in purchasing collections and fine quality dolls.

Telephone: 717-484-1200 • Mobile: 610-662-5473 • Email: ourant@me.com

Now there are two ways to buy great dolls from us...

Becky’s Back Room

Open 24 hours a day / 7 days a week, visit our exclusive shop at

BECKYSBACKROOM.RUBYLANE.COM New dolls listed every week!


Antique DOLL Collector March 2014 Vol. 17, No. 2


Another Dollmastery Seminar

Coming Up For You

Dollmastery Vignette Series

Educational videos ab out antique dolls— a v a i l a b l e f o r v i e w i n g o n Yo u Tu b e .

Friday, March 28th at the Waldorf Astoria in Naples, Florida

Florence Theriault, co-founder of Theriault’s, will be your guide in her many virtual walk-throughs that explore details, highlights, and rarities of the many exciting antique dolls that are offered at Theriault’s famous doll auctions.

Florence Theriault’s one-day antique doll seminars are fast becoming the new must-go doll events.

Simply visit theriaults.com/vignette After March 10th, watch for a new video featuring rare dolls from the Stein am Rhein Museum Collection to be sold at auction March 29-30, 2014 at the Walforf Astoria, Naples, FL.

Absentee, Telephone and Online Bidding available for the Auctions For information about the auction or to order your collectors book call 800-638-0422, 410-224-3655 or email info@theriaults.com or visit theriaults.com.

25 lucky collectors (yes, the seminar is limited) sit around a large U-shaped arrangement as dolls are discussed and then gently passed around for your up close and personal view. You’ll see rarities you’ve only read or dreamt about, and you’ll listen as Florence talks about the dolls, points out special features you might not have noticed, and candidly answers all of your questions.

Florence Theriault, Theriault’s founder.

It’s an intense, yet fun and casual, 7-9 hour day and as one person who attended last year’s seminar in San Francisco said, “I left with my brain exhausted, but I fell in love with doll collecting all over again.” Space fills quickly, so call or email immediately to reserve your space. The seminar is complimentary.


Another Dollmastery Seminar

Coming Up For You

Dollmastery Vignette Series

Educational videos ab out antique dolls— a v a i l a b l e f o r v i e w i n g o n Yo u Tu b e .

Friday, March 28th at the Waldorf Astoria in Naples, Florida

Florence Theriault, co-founder of Theriault’s, will be your guide in her many virtual walk-throughs that explore details, highlights, and rarities of the many exciting antique dolls that are offered at Theriault’s famous doll auctions.

Florence Theriault’s one-day antique doll seminars are fast becoming the new must-go doll events.

Simply visit theriaults.com/vignette After March 10th, watch for a new video featuring rare dolls from the Stein am Rhein Museum Collection to be sold at auction March 29-30, 2014 at the Walforf Astoria, Naples, FL.

Absentee, Telephone and Online Bidding available for the Auctions For information about the auction or to order your collectors book call 800-638-0422, 410-224-3655 or email info@theriaults.com or visit theriaults.com.

25 lucky collectors (yes, the seminar is limited) sit around a large U-shaped arrangement as dolls are discussed and then gently passed around for your up close and personal view. You’ll see rarities you’ve only read or dreamt about, and you’ll listen as Florence talks about the dolls, points out special features you might not have noticed, and candidly answers all of your questions.

Florence Theriault, Theriault’s founder.

It’s an intense, yet fun and casual, 7-9 hour day and as one person who attended last year’s seminar in San Francisco said, “I left with my brain exhausted, but I fell in love with doll collecting all over again.” Space fills quickly, so call or email immediately to reserve your space. The seminar is complimentary.


Theriault’s Presents An Extraordinary Doll Auction Saturday and Sunday, March 29-30, 2014 at the Waldor f Astoria, Naples, Florida, USA

the

stein am rhein

museum collection

that had stood for years on a small cobblestone pedestrian street in

O

this quaint locale. She would never open again. Then, one day, the

that will, for many of the new generation of collectors, give a

family made contact and told us that, in fact, the dolls still sat in

first-time look at the vision of Frau Steiner and what had been the

the very same location and had not been touched in all this time.

Puppenmuseum Stein am Rhein.

Nearly fifteen years ago, in the small Swiss village of Stein am Rhein, Frau Steiner turned out the lights, closed and bolted the doors, and locked the window shutters of her beloved doll museum

n March 29th and 30th, 2014 an auction will take place in Naples, Florida at the beautiful Waldorf Astoria Beach Resort. Two full days and nearly 1000 pieces

will be presented in this hard-bound commemorative catalog

PO Box 151 • Annapolis, Mar yland 21404 Toll-free: 800-638-0422 • Fax: 410-224-2515

the dollmasters

www.theriaults.com


Another Dollmastery Seminar

Coming Up For You

Dollmastery Vignette Series

Educational videos ab out antique dolls— a v a i l a b l e f o r v i e w i n g o n Yo u Tu b e .

Friday, March 28th at the Waldorf Astoria in Naples, Florida

Florence Theriault, co-founder of Theriault’s, will be your guide in her many virtual walk-throughs that explore details, highlights, and rarities of the many exciting antique dolls that are offered at Theriault’s famous doll auctions.

Florence Theriault’s one-day antique doll seminars are fast becoming the new must-go doll events.

Simply visit theriaults.com/vignette After March 10th, watch for a new video featuring rare dolls from the Stein am Rhein Museum Collection to be sold at auction March 29-30, 2014 at the Walforf Astoria, Naples, FL.

Absentee, Telephone and Online Bidding available for the Auctions For information about the auction or to order your collectors book call 800-638-0422, 410-224-3655 or email info@theriaults.com or visit theriaults.com.

25 lucky collectors (yes, the seminar is limited) sit around a large U-shaped arrangement as dolls are discussed and then gently passed around for your up close and personal view. You’ll see rarities you’ve only read or dreamt about, and you’ll listen as Florence talks about the dolls, points out special features you might not have noticed, and candidly answers all of your questions.

Florence Theriault, Theriault’s founder.

It’s an intense, yet fun and casual, 7-9 hour day and as one person who attended last year’s seminar in San Francisco said, “I left with my brain exhausted, but I fell in love with doll collecting all over again.” Space fills quickly, so call or email immediately to reserve your space. The seminar is complimentary.


LAYAWAY AVAILABLE Member UFDC & NADDA

(Nat'l Antique Doll Dealers Assn.)

Visit my website: www.grandmasatticdolls.com

12” French RD Bebe, blue p/w eyes, immaculate pale bisque, orig. long HH wig. Wears orig. batiste & lace dress, ant. undies, orig. Fr. shoes w/rosettes, crocheted socks & gorgeous ant. straw hat lined w/silk. Early st. wrist RD body. Tremendous presence. Absolutely STUNNING!!! $4900.

13” JDK Hilda Toddler #237, blue sl. eyes, mintest pale bisque, orig. mohair wig, & pate. Wears orig. fine delicate batiste & lace dress w/tucks, orig. undies, ant. crocheted pink socks & vintage shoes. On orig. “fully jointed” Kestner “toddler” body. Beautiiful crisp modeling & ADORABLE in a great cabinet size!!! $3475.

12” Early S & H #719 Character, perfect bisque, blue sl. eyes, orig. long mohair wig, “original” magnificent vibrant colored ornate costume of silk, wool & velvet, velvet hat & orig. shoes & ant. undies, orig. early st. wrist S & H body. Cl/mo., little double chin from the early S & H #700 series. Smallest I ever saw in this model #. Absolutely GORGEOUS!!! $3350.

5 1/2” “Our Fairy” All Bisque, blue glass eyes, great bisque overall & orig. mohair wig. Darling orig. costume. She is the cutest Our Fairy EVER!! All bisque body w/“starfish hands”, o/cl./mo., 2 molded upper teeth & a smiling face. A little JEWEL!!! $1050. 6 1/2” “All Bisque” Bye Lo Baby, br. sl. eyes, perfect bisque overall, wearing orig. dotted swiss batiste & lace Christening gown & ant. hat. On orig. all bisque body w/“swivel neck”. A little GEM & rare large size all bisque Bye Lo Baby!!! $1100.

9” JDK #211 “Sammy” “All Bisque” Baby, perfect bisque overall, br. sl. eyes, orig. mohair skin wig & plaster pate (never been removed). First out of mold modeling, op/cl./ mo. & extremely modeled “all bisque” orig. body having fat rolls on thighs, dimpled & well modeled toes & chest label. RARE find in an All Bisque!! ABSOLUTELY ADORABLE!!! $2200.

5” Rare Kestner “All Bisque” Googlie, br. side glancing sl. eyes, watermelon mouth, mint bisque overall, orig. mohair wig, orig. net & silk ribbon dress & undies. Rare & desirable “jointed elbows and knees”. Too adorable for words. Sure to make you smile. DARLING!! $3800.

Joyce Kekatos e-mail: joycedolls@aol.com I buy dolls and sell on consignment. 2137 Tomlinson Avenue, Bronx, NY 10461 home: 718-863-0373 cell: 917-859-2446

14" Tete Jumeau Bebe, bl. p/w eyes, orig. "head coil", orig. mohair wig, magnificent thin wool, silk & lace ALL FACTORY orig. costume, matching slip & undies, orig. crocheted socks, orig. "signed" PRESENTATION Jumeau shoes w/ rosettes, signed in gold leaf, orig. Jumeau earrings & ant. Au Bon Marche hat. She has it all!! Orig. "signed" Jumeau body with great orig. finish. She is absolutely AMAZING!!! $9550.


& LOWE Connie

Jay

18 1/2” Black Alabama Baby, a seldom found black cloth doll in what appears to be all original clothing with no paint touch up and/ or repairs! Overall very fine plus condition with just a few minimal scuffs. She has molded ears & a faint blue stamping on lower part of torso indicating the maker. An unusual opportunity to acquire a rare and desirable doll! $3750 An all original 10 1/2” Fre A Steiner. Although her fanciful couture outfit has faded a bit and slightly melted, she has an adorable face and is ready to place within your cabinet. On a marked 5 piece Steiner body, she retains her original wig and shoes. Deep blue paperweight eyes and great bisque with finely painted facial embellishments further add to her charm. Marked on the rear of the head Steiner Fre A 3. $3250 An all original 7” painted bisque “Just Me” child by Armand Marseille. A nice example with painting that is well executed & intact with minimal loss to finish under her mohair wig. $650 An exceptional all original 39cm K*R flirty eyed character child. Marked on the rear of the head K*R 39, this gal has great bisque, blue glass flirty/sleep eyes and her original white cotton outfit, tosca mohair wig, black leather shoes, and beautiful finish to her pink composition body. Currently her original stringing is a bit loose but will re-string for buyer free of charge if desired. $600

P.O. Box 5206 Lancaster, PA 17606 FAX 717-396-1114 Call Toll Free 1-888-JAY LOWE or (717) 396-9879 Email: big.birds@comcast.net Always Looking to Buy Quality Dolls, Toys, Marklin Doll Carriages or Entire Estates Buy & Sell With Confidence Member of UFDC & NADDA


Nelling, Inc.

P.O. Box 4327 Burbank CA 91503 Cell: 818-738-4591 Home: 818-562-7839

Member NADDA and UFDC

published by the 1-3. 16-1/2” Ultimate Meissen China. $6950. 4-6. 10-1/2” Exposed Ear 1840 Milliner’s Model. $1500. Exhibiting: March 8 Santa Barbara Doll Club Show, Santa Barbara CA, Earl Warren Fairgrounds March 29 Jewel City Doll Club Show, Glendale CA, Glendale Civic Auditorium

BUYING & SELLING QUALITY DOLLS FOR OVER 20 YEARS

Visit us at: www.maspinelli.com • e-mail: nellingdolls@gmail.com

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ANTIQUE DOLL COLLECTOR

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The Complete Guide to Antique, Vintage and Collectible Dolls

March 2014 Volume 17, Number 2

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LA POUPÉE BIEN ELEVÉE – THE WELL-BRED DOLL THE JOYS OF CROSS-COLLECTING

CHINESE CRYING BABIES, ENIGMAS, MOTSCHMANNS, TÄUFLINGE By Carol Corson

At an annual meeting of the Doll Collectors of America, members shared an extraordinary number of these early dolls.

By Samy Odin The author points out that it is hard to resist doll-related antiques, especially images that represent the dolls we love and collect.

Traditional täuflinge, also known as Motchmann Babies or Enigmas, were made for some fifty years. At the 2012 annual meeting of the Doll Collectors of America, members shared their examples, revealing the simple charm of these dolls which still captivates us today. Photo Carol Corson

About The Cover

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THE RARE PAIR CELLULOID MARIE AND PETER BY KAMMER & REINHARDT

By Margo Delaughter Kammer and Reinhardt’s popular mold 101 was also made in celluloid, few examples which remain. 6

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ATTIC TREASURES

By Mary Krombholz A group of dolls stored in an attic for over a hundred years remain pristine.

14 Auction Gallery 59 Emporium 66 Mystery

68 Calendar 71 Classified

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The author shares her learning experience exhibiting at the national UFDC convention.

One of two special exhibits organized by Donelle Denery.

RIBBONS: A COMPETITION EXPERIENCE By Kathy Meador

2013 UFDC SPECIAL EXHIBIT: LETTIE LANE & FRIENDS


1. Roullet et Decamps Mechanical ‘Tata’ – this 14” french R.D. keywind is still in her factory clothes and ‘rocking’ the original baby as seen in Decamps original advertising! A comic cabinet character of early 20th century Paris! $2250 2. Lithesome Wax Fashion – what an exquisite all original bustled silk gown on this unusual turn of the century 20” fashion lady w/ perfect arms and carriage! $1100 3. Original French Trade Fashion – Rare and early Simon Halbig ‘920’ Long Face Jumeau look w/ PW’s, cl. mo. and Factory Original from bonnet to shoes; a true fashion plate of bustle back french design w/ mint bisque arms. $3500 4. 4-1/2” ‘Schafer and Vater Naughty’ – choice quality, Edwardian whimsy, signed and mint! $175 5. 14” Rare German Fashion – stunning mint factory wig coiffure, crystal tri-color blue eyes, pursed cl. mo w/ drawn teeth, orig. earrings and leather body, a vintage jewel! $1800 6. 17” Elegant D & K Lady – the renowned chiseled features and molded breasts with shapely body in 5 fantastic layers of clothes! $950 7. Some spoiled bebe will have this ‘lifesize’ 10” high Fur Kitten w/ green eyes and orig. bow! So mint! $495 8. 23” Vibrant ‘Bebe Charmant’ – by Francois Gaultier for Pintel and Godchaux, with a hidden invisible flaw and huge blue PW’s set in creamy, plump cheeks plus the rare patent P & G body! Just $1250 9. The Proposal – a large 10” Child holding her doll in its long gown. $450 The Suitor – w/ love letter and flowers in hand! $150 10. 14” All Original Halbig ‘Character’ – a choice ‘1299’ youth, powder fine quality and mint from her wig and lace cap to leather shoes for her First Communion! $750

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Tel: 425.765.4010 Valerie@beautifulbebes.com

Strolling the Bebe - If you love the magic of the day when elegant young ladies took to the park with their charges for a sunny stroll in a pram, then this little walker will charm you! Sweet little poupee in fabulous satin walking suit & bonnet pushes a metal pram holding a delightful little all bisque mignonette darling in orig. christening gown w/ flowing locks & blue glass eyes. 11.5” length Walker -9” Baby 4.5”. Baby has a swivel neck & jointed arms & legs. $6200~

6 Over EJ - An exceptionally beautiful Bebe w/ smoldering brown eyes, gorgeous soft coloring of bisque & lovely expression. In superb pale blue coat dress w/ elaborate lace accents & matching hat; a confection of gathers and lace. delicate plumes &floral accents. Sensational long tailed wig of deep ash blonde perfectly framing dark spiral threaded eyes & gently tinted bisque. Lovely French leather shoes, sturdy orig. eight ball jointed body lightly refreshed. 18 inches tall. Please call for add’l details~$7599

LILY - If you have been hoping to aquire the beautiful Lily; an inspired creation of Madame Lavallee Perrone, this beauty should delight you! This 17” poupee has large sweet blue spiral threaded eyes set in creamy bisque beneath feathered brows. Her lips were gently washed with rosey peach & sensitive tracings of deeper rose. Her sturdy leather body has the better part of the original stamped tag intact. Mademoiselle has been dressed in a charming three pc. cotton flowered promenade suit of burnt orange and ivory and crowned with a flowered straw-brimmed hat to shield her from the sun. She has bisque arms with carved fingers. Please call for add’l details! $5800~

Kewpie Sends a Postcard! What a joy! This is a rare and precious Rosie O’Niell Kewpie indeed. 4.5” w x 3.5” tall. Utterly adorable! $2100~

Gorgeous Mein Leibling True beauty with cornflower blue sl. eyes fringed with sweeping silky lashes, original human hair wig in lovely russet curls. A stunning doll dressed in antique ecru silk dress with lovely lace adornments and original chestnut colored velvet cape and matching elaborate signed bonnet. 28” tall~ $5600

Member UFDC & NADDA

Fantastic little ormolu mantle clock for 1” scale doll house or to grace the desk of an elegant Fashion Poupee. Perfect original condition. $275~

Rare and precious Kewpie playing a mandolin while seated on a beautiful dish emulating a pond. Rare, rare, rare! 2.5”tall x 2.5”wide. Perfect condition ~ $1295.


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17” CM German Character #111, French Jumeau body, stationary blue eyes, hairline on forehead and back of right side of head (has been sanded), antique undergarments & shoes, mohair wig $7500 $7500. Now $4950.

20” Incised Depose Jumeau 9 on working Mama pull-string body, blue pw eyes, applied pierced ears $6650 $6650. Now $6150.

22” Tete Jumeau #10, original wig, earrings, shoes (#10 Paris Depose, as is) & socks, blue pw eyes, great face $4895 $4895. Now $3950. 10” 1957 Cissette “Lady Hamilton” all original in tagged dress, slip, panties, shoes, and straw hat, no bracelet $295.

19” CM Bru Jne 8, brown pw eyes, shading above eyes, antique dress, undergarments, socks & burgundy leather boots $13,850 $13,850. Now $10,995. 4” All original glass eyed German all bisque boy in uniform $295. 4” Glass eyed German all bisque, all original girl in striped dress and straw hat $295.

18 3/4” CM Incised Brevette SGDG Jumeau 8, blue pw eyes, applied ears w/ earrings, blue Jumeau stamped body, hairline on back of head $4500 $4500. Now $3650.

20” over all 15” CM Tete Jumeau (red mark) Mechanical, blue pw eyes, boy with fur wig, hand moves hitting pan, head moves back & forth and hat pops up & down, redressed nicely & box recovered, pierced ears, plays music $6995 $6995. Now $4995.

13 1/2” RARE 239 SFBJ Poulbot in possible original clothing, original red sparse wig, shoes & stockings, 5 piece body with touch up on hands, professional repair on back of head $4500 $4500. Now $2450.

17” K*R 121 Toddler, blue sleep eyes, original mohair wig, adorable expression $850. Now $750. 16” K*R 116 on Toddler $850 body with original celluloid hands, professionally repaired eye chip right eye, stationary blue eyes, great molding & coloring $1550 $1550. Now $1250.

20” SFBJ 227 with brown jewel eyes, o/m w/ teeth, repainted body, few scuffs on cheeks, antique boots $1150. Now $795. $1150 14” C/M Tete Jumeau 5, blue pw eyes, blonde mohair wig, antique leather shoes, French style dress $4350. Now $3995. $4350

12” Rare S & H 1304 Adorable Pierrot on Jumeau body, pull strings to sleep brown glass eyes, original hat & wig, faint hairline rim of forehead $3995. Now $2550. $3995

9 1/2” Steiff Dicky Bear 1930’s w/ velvet pads, mohair as is $445. 16” Volland Raggedy Ann w/ wooden heart, some stitching on face, original dress (faded & left top sleeve as is), left leg by shoe - fabric separated, original yarn wig & shoe button eyes $450.

8 1/2” x 6” x 8” Pouty Heubach possible #7602 pull string mechanical, when pulled doll lays down in bed with toy rattle, marked Heubach in square, works great $550 $550. Now $395.

28” 1880’s C/M, Rabery and Delphieu, paperweight eyes, brown HH wig, antique dress & shoes, lovely coloring, some body repaint, professional repair by right eye $1650. Now $995. $1650

19” BP Bahr & Proschild #604 character, sweet face, blue sl eyes, molded o/m w/ teeth, antique clothing and brown HH wig $725.

Schoenhut Pinn Family, 2 men, 2 ladies, 1 girl and baby (hair as is), all in original clothing $295. 24” L’ Eden Bebe Walking Doll in Original Wooden Box w/ worn labels, works great, original stockings and shoes, head marked DEP 10, blue sleep eyes, mohair wig, repro dress $3995 $3995. Now $2450.

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Auction Gallery

Among the treasures of the Stein am Rhein Museum are two exquisite A.T. bebes, a stunning and rare Petit et Dumoutier, and a pair of extremely rare bisque Steiner dolls in original military costumes.

Two rare googly-eyed dolls peer wide-eyed at the all-original Roullet et Decamps automaton featuring four small bisque dolls riding the elephant who marches along and heaves his trunk from side to side. Many other googlies and automata are featured in the auction. 14

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Gorgeous, yet demure, is the prized bebe of French dollmaker Halopeau, known as the “H” bebe.

The brown-eyed Albert Marque doll, known to collectors as “the lost #27 boy” (as the doll is #27 from the series of only 100 examples made), is wearing his entirely original costume with Margaine-Lacroix label intact.

The only doll ever designed by French artist, Francisque Poulbot, was the street urchin, made famous in his poster illustration work. The dolls were offered as pair, Nenette and Rintintin, in Paris department store catalogs in 1914, this then marking their 100th year anniversary! A pair are offered, in entirely original unplayed with condition, from the Stein am Rhein doll museum.

A Mystery Solved! The Stein am Rhein

MARCH 2014

early fifteen years ago, in the small Swiss village of Stein am Rhein, Frau Steiner turned out the lights, closed and bolted the doors, and locked the window shutters of her beloved doll museum that had stood for years on a small cobblestone pedestrian street in this quaint locale. She would never open again. For the next fifteen years, mystery surrounded this museum, for when Frau Steiner took down her signs she also vanished from the doll world. For years people talked about it, wondered what happened, speculated that the dolls were now in storage, or had been sold intact to one collector in a faraway part of the world. There was even an old website that documented all of the known Albert Marque dolls across the world that listed “the lost #27 that was part of the Stein am Rhein Puppenmuseum of past” and asked collectors to “please help us find out whatever happened to this doll and to the museum.” Tales ran amok. But, in fact, the dolls had quietly sat there, tended each week, year after year, by a neighboring caretaker and family members, and visited only by Frau Steiner herself, who, in truth, could not bear to part with her museum although she was no longer able to welcome others. In time, the tales stopped and memories faded. Then, one day, several years ago, the Steiner family contacted Theriault’s and told them that, in fact, the dolls still sat in the very same location and had not been touched in all this time. Everything was as it was when the doors closed. They were just starting to consider the possibility that the dolls should be auctioned. At the time, Frau Steiner was alive but having difficulty checking on the museum each week. However, knowing that the dolls were there was enough for her and everyone decided to let it be for now so that she could still enjoy the thought that her beloved museum still stood as it was. Stuart Holbrook recalls that first meeting, “I will never forget the doors opening the first time I visited. Large wood gates creaked and squealed on that foggy and damp March afternoon. I peered into the darkened room as the family found the light switch. The first thing I saw was a sign publishing the entrance fee, proving just how long the museum had been closed. It


Doll Museum of Switzerland Comes to Auction March 29-30 gave the amount in Swiss Francs - but next to it also offered the alternative of “5 Deutsch Marks.” I could barely recall what a Deutsch mark even looked liked”. “Though I had heard whispers over the years of the fabulous dolls that Frau Steiner had collected, the reality was even better. Two floors were completely full of classic and splendidly rare French and German dolls and unusual accessories and playthings. The museum stood as a time capsule of perfection…one of the best I had ever seen in Europe. This was a perfectly assembled crosssection of everything collectors have come to love today in the world of fine and rare antique dolls.” And there at the entrance stood the all-original A. Marque doll, the so-called “lost #27”, its costume being bearing the desirable Margaine-Lacroix label. Holbrook continued, “After a few moments the cases were lit and the bounty was further unveiled to me, the first outsider in years to witness what was here. Bebes by Thuillier, Halopeau, Bru, Jumeau, Steiner, Schmitt, Petit et Dumoutier, and others. Poupees large and small, automatons and rare German characters…an endless vault of nearly 1000 pieces that stood exactly as they were on that day 15 years when the museum closed.” Now the moment has arrived. After Frau Steiner’s passing last year, Theriault’s was contacted again. The family felt that now was the time. The museum must go back into the hands of collectors and the mystery unveiled. And so it will be. On March 29th and 30th, 2014 the auction will take place in Naples, Florida at the beautiful Waldorf Astoria Beach Resort. The weekend events begin on Friday, March 28 with a free one-day Dollmastery seminar presented by Florence Theriault, in which dolls from the Museum will be examined in depth with hands-on study (the seminar is free, but attendance is limited to 25 people so call early to reserve a place. Then, two full days of auctions on Saturday and Sunday will offer these cherished dolls to today’s collectors. A hard-bound commemorative catalog will give many a first-time look at the vision of Frau Steiner and what had been the Puppenmuseum Stein am Rhein. (See the fold-out piece on the inside cover of this magazine for a grand view of some of the dolls). All of the dolls can be viewed online after March 10, 2014. For more information about the auction or to order a catalog call 800-638-0422 or 410224-3655, or email info@theriaults.com.

French poupees in the collection include examples from Huret, Rohmer, Bru, Jumeau and others in classic 17” size, as seen in these two fine examples. The museum also has a notable collection of extremely rare larger poupees (see photo on inside fold-out cover of this magazine).

Very rare French poupee with expressive features and original signed Rohmer body.

German bisque dolls include this trio in wonderful factory-original costumes or chemise.

Several dolls with trousseaux are featured in the auction, including this Bleuette with trunk and wardrobe of original costumes.

Some of the miniature doll-sized furniture treasures from the Stein am Rhein collection.

More Auction Gallery on page 60 ANTIQUE DOLL COLLECTOR

MARCH 2014

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Gorgeous 22” Depose Tete Jumeau - Composition Jointed Body - Straight Wrist - Blue Body Stamp Original Blonde Mohair Wig and Pate - Old French Shoes - Silk Dress from Old Fabric. A delightful addition to anyone’s collection.

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mailing address: 9825 Moers Rd Houston, Texas 77075 Call for doll information Member UFDC & NADDA


Chinese Crying Babies, Enigmas, Motschmanns, Täuflinge by Carol Corson

Photos by the author except where noted

The 8 ¼” doll is accompanied by an 11” brother. Both have separated big toes.

Photos of 9” ( 23cm.) Mitsuori ningyo, Taisho Period, undressed to show his body structure. The thighs are hollowed out in the back to allow his calves to fit neatly when he kneels. He has a tiny penis and tufts of hair in front of each ear and at the base of his head in the back as well as a longer one on the crown.

Research and many of the photographs for this article were done in preparation for an educational exhibit and program at the 2012 annual meeting of the Doll Collectors of America. The dolls photographed belong to members of DCA. In the late 18th and early 19th century there were few commercially produced baby dolls in Europe or America. Dolls made of wood, or composition over wood heads, were not cuddly and though some were designed to be babies, they didn’t have the softness or easily folding joints that encouraged a child to “care” for the baby represented. Thus they were not as popular as those representing adults, boys and girls. Although some of these dolls were quite large, 20

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many were quite tiny. Cuddly cloth dolls were mainly home made at this time and few have survived to this day. Japan began making jointed baby dolls in the Edo Period (1615-1868). These first dolls were Mitsuore Ningyo, or “three bend dolls”. They had joints at the neck, hips, knees and rotating joints at the ankles. The backs of the thighs were hollowed out so the calves could fit neatly into them allowing the doll to kneel in Japanese style. The upper arms were made of silk crepe over wire. From the elbows through the fingers they were wood or composition with many layers of fine smooth white gofun (oyster shell) cover, as were the torsos, heads, legs and feet. The ankles were jointed and the feet turn out to facilitate kneeling.


There was no wrist joint. These dolls were popular with wealthy women who played with them and changed their clothes. By the second quarter of the nineteenth century the Ichimatsu Ningyo was developed. The head, shoulders, pelvis, hands and feet were made like those of the Mitsuori Ningyo, however, they have a soft mid torso section with a cry box in it. They also have soft upper arms with no wire in them and soft thighs. Some had “floating” hands and feet. These dolls represented young children and were specifically made for children. These new dolls were exhibited at the World Exposition held in London in 1851. Edmund Lindner, of Louis Lindner & Söhne, Sonneberg, is thought to have seen the Ichimatsu Ningyos at the World Exposition. Varying histories state that he brought one back to Sonneberg either from the fair or from a toyshop in Belgium or Cologne. He gave the doll to a Sonneberg factory owner and had a German adaptation made which at first looked quite Asian. As a Verleger, an export businessman, he ordered a number made by various factories in black as well as white. According to the Ciesliks a Verleger was educated in several languages and was responsible for seeing what the next great seller would be and giving the design to factory owners to produce. The factory owner then parceled out assignments to the many home workers who produced parts, which were then assembled in the factory. Kestner is believed to be the only German company that produced everything in the factory. Soon baby dolls based on the Japanese baby were being produced in large numbers. Most had the hard parts, head, shoulders, hips, hands and feet made of composition or papier maché. They came with jointed necks or in a shoulder/ head version. The lower arms and legs were wooden tubes. Many of these early examples have floating, loosely jointed, hands and feet. The upper arms, and legs as well as the mid torso were cloth. The mid torso contained a cry box, some activated by squeezing the torso. Others cried when the shoulders were pressed towards the hips. The Germans dressed them in simple shirts and bonnets and called them Täuflinge (singular: täufling from the German word taufe, Baptism or Christening). English speaking collectors tended to think all things Asian were Chinese and first called them Chinese Crying Babies.

The largest boy is 22” (54 cm.) His pale blue tie dye obi is an indication that he represents a young child.

The body design of this 9” täufling was directly taken from the Japanese dolls as were the almond eyes and the painted hair style. There is no separate big toe on the Sonneberg dolls.

This 9 1/2 inch fully jointed täufling has curved hands which can grab things. He bears an uncanny resemblance to Alfred Hitchcock!

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23” fully jointed “Baby”, previously from the Dorothy Dixon Collection. Her lower arms and legs are wood. Her Head, shoulder plate, lower torso, hands and feet are composition. The upper arms, legs and mid torso are cloth. Her almond eyes have a sleepy look emphasized by gray lines accenting her upper lids. She has fine single stroke brows and a dimple in her chin. 19 ½” Tilly B., clearly a child, has the short curly mohair wig, blue sleep eyes with black pupils, an open mouth with four teeth which became popular about 1860.

This 16” fully jointed charmer is dressed to go to town. Her curved hands with separate thumbs hold her basket steady.

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The heads of the white babies were often quite white, like their Japanese ancestors. They had wisps of hair painted above the ears and at the nape of the neck also like the Japanese dolls. Some have a wax coat over the paint. Black babies often had African type modeling of their faces and short molded curls painted black for their hair. The earliest dolls appear to have inset black glass eyes and closed mouths. Although this first design was made through the 1880s, by the mid 1850s some were made with a wax coating on the head with softer and more realistic coloring. The early täuflinge were quickly joined by those with eyes that slept and dolls with open mouths and tiny teeth. There were even dolls made with a jointed lower jaw which allowed the mouth to open and close. Tightly curled short mohair wigs were added. Täuflinge with wooden heads and other hard parts were also made, but appear to be much rarer than the papier maché/composition combinations. Although we think of these dolls as German products, dolls have been found with French toy store labels. American and British collectors became aware of the confusion over the origin of these and changed what they called the German version of these dolls to Enigma, in other words, we didn’t know what we should call them. Elizabeth Jo Gerken, an early researcher of papier maché and wax dolls found a täufling with the label of Ch. Motschmann on its soft torso. She naturally concluded that the dolls were made by Motschmann and collectors, leaping at the chance to be more knowledgeable, adopted that name for these dolls. Soon firms producing china parts began producing the typical täufling hard parts in china. Sometimes the china parts were the heads, hands and feet with the shoulders and hips made of papiermaché or composition. Some had china hips and upper torsos. The lower arms and legs might be the usual wood tubes with floating


This group ranging from 5 ¼” to 8” shows a variety of faces probably by different German makers. They are all fully jointed.

china hands and feet or made in one piece in china. Some had a torso made entirely of cloth with no hard parts. These were still referred to as Täuflinge and made in black as well as white versions. The meaning of the word täufling continued to expand over time. In later German toy catalogs the term was used to describe dolls without the floating hands and feet and without the hard upper chest and pelvis areas. The traditional Japanese form of baby continued to be offered along with the newer forms. This 7” china täufling has “floating” china feet at the bottom of his turned wooden lower legs. He has lost the china hands that used to “float” at the end of his turned wood lower arms. He has brown wisps of hair painted on his head. His chest plate and lower torso are composition. He has a working squeaker in his cloth mid section. George was originally a Sanitary Fair doll from the Civil War period. He was shown in catalogues as a täufling although he doesn’t have the shoulder and pelvis parts.

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The china “Alice” style doll is more frequently found. This example is 10” tall with hair which shades from brown to black. She has composition upper and lower torso sections, china head, lower arms and legs with black heeled boots decorated with gold buttons. Her gilded headband shows white where the gold has worn off.

In time older children were included. The most commonly found are the dolls with molded hair in the “Alice” style. These dolls were often made of china hard parts with china or composition torso sections. Boy dolls with short hair were also made. Dolls with the Alice style molded hair are found with composition and wax over composition as well as china heads. Although the early style babies continued to be made through most of the period (1851 to about the turn of the century) täufling designs tended to become simpler and at the same time showed more variety. Dolls with wigs and those representing young women were made. Fewer of the dolls had multiple jointing and thus had less flexibility to encourage active play. The simplification of the bodies allowed them to be made more cheaply. Some had molded hair with decorations held by the wax coating and some had molded hats. By the 1880s they were competing with popular ball jointed dolls with bisque porcelain heads.

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A miniature blond china. She has cloth upper arms and legs and a swivel head, but no hard pelvis or upper torso. By the time she was made the term Täufling was applied to a wider variety of dolls including some who were clearly not babies.

According to Dorothy McGonagle’s study of The Dolls of Jules Nicholas Steiner, Steiner adopted the täufling form for some of his earliest bébés at least by 1870. The earliest of these dolls had wax over composition heads. Soon these dolls had the heads, upper torso and shoulders, hips including the beginning of the top of the legs and the lower legs and feet made of bisque fired porcelain. Cloth formed the upper arms, legs, and mid torso. This torso contained a leather covered cylindrical bellows for the voice box. The head might be a closed dome shoulder head with no neck joint or might have a socket head with a separate shoulder section having a small opening in the back of the head for the insertion of small almond shaped eyes. A cork pate closed the hole and a short curl wig covered it. Some of these dolls had a hole in the left side of the bisque hip with two cords with beads attached, which activated mama and papa cries from the bébé. A larger round hole in the back of the shoulders probably let the sound out more clearly.


This doll actually has a maker’s mark attributing it to the Mueller and Strausburger Company pressed into the back right side of his shoulder. He is 8 1/4” tall with glass eyes. The head and upper and lower torso sections are composition; the lower arms and legs are wood. Coleman photograph This original later catalog page shows that traditional täufling babies, Alice style, molded hair dolls and wax-overs with snoods and hats were made at the same time.

Charles Augustus Fortesque in person. He is 17” tall, with a wax over shoulder head. He has a typical täufling style body with a squeaker and composition limbs. He wears his original 1860s Danish style suit and lives in his original wooden and glass case. He has always worn the glass bead necklaces. Coleman photograph

This wonderful boy has a composition shoulder head with black eyes and incised and painted eyelids. He has cloth upper arms and legs with composition lower arms and wooden lower legs.

This 12” boy has a composition head with a jointed neck, and typical täufling body with floating hands and feet. He has molded hair with a side part.

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A 14” Steiner with open mouth and tiny teeth. The hole in the left side of her bisque hip allows the cord which control her voice box to function. The hole in her bust allows the sound to come out. Some of these dolls have two voice cords coming out the left hip. Roberta Heintz photograph “Jerome” is 9 1/2” tall. He was made by Jules Nicolas Steiner and his head is marked SieA “3/0. His head is porcelain. His upper chest and hip section are papier maché. His arms are ball jointed wood and composition. His mid torso and upper legs are cloth. His original clothes are by Au Nain Bleu.

The original Bébé Parlant Automatique, or kicking, crying Steiner, was made from the 1860s through the 1890s with a bisque head, papier maché torso, composition arms and lower legs, and cloth upper legs. It didn’t have the full täufling body. This bébé was followed by the täufling style body in the 1870s. By the early 1880s some of the small, (about 9 1/2” tall) series bébés were produced with the täufling style bodies. The shoulder plates, hip sections, upper and lower arms and lower legs are made of composition. The arms are jointed with wooden balls at the shoulders and elbows and the mid torso and upper legs are cloth. The head is bisque porcelain. This version is not common and Steiner appears to have quickly moved to a jointed composition body for all sizes of his Series and Figure marked bébés. The traditional bodied täuflinge were made for almost fifty years, a long time in the life of a doll design. Although never as fancy as the later bisque dolls with their variety of eye and hair color and fashionable clothing, their simple charm is still cherished by today’s collectors. Many thanks to the following for sharing their dolls: Diane Buck, Elizabeth Ann Coleman, Carol Corson, Linda Edward, Jan & Howard Foulke, Joy Harrington, Penny Hadfield, Roberta Heintz, Ruth Love, Meriel Marlar, Sue Popp, Tore Scelso, Nancy Smith, Kathy Turner, Gae Ward. Bibliography Cieslik, Jürgen and Marianne: German Doll Encyclopedia 1800 – 1939 Coleman, Dorothy,Elizabeth Ann, Evelyn Jane: The Collector’s Encyclopedia of Dolls Volumes 1 & 2 and The Collector’s Book of Doll Clothes: Costumes in Miniature 1700 – 1929 Gräfnitz, Christiane: German Papier-Maché Dolls 1760 – 1860 Krombholz, Mary Gorham: A Pictorial Reference Guide for German Chinas McGonagle, Dorothy A: The Dolls of Jules Nicolas Steiner Sura, Agnes: A Motschmann By Any Other Name From Doll News, Summer 1995 Original catalog pages from the Coleman Collection Pate, Alan Scott: Ningyō: The Art of the Japanese Doll, and Japanese Dolls: The Fascinating World of Ningyō

This 9 1/2” Steiner is marked Serie A. 3/0. Her body is just like Jerome’s. Her owner has kindly photographed her nude, with her Au Nain Bleu sticker as well as modeling her wonderful outfit. Nancy Smith photograph

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La Poupée Bien Elevée – The Well-Bred Doll The Joys of Cross-Collecting By Samy Odin

Le Moniteur de la Mode, April 1846. Hand-colored Jules David-signed fashion engraving features a springtime stroll by two beautifully-gowned ladies taking in the view from a terrace. PRIVATE COLLECTION

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hen one asks a doll collector which objects are featured in his or her collection, most of the time, it is better to expect a long, complex response. Yes, extensive and involved. Often, when dolls are the main focus of a collection, myriad other “collectibles” are gathered around the “plat de résistance” of each ensemble. How to resist doll-related children’s books, for example? How not to feel attracted by those exquisite images from the past that represent dolls of the kind we all enjoy collecting in their three-dimensional form? This is how I started amassing children’s literature pertaining to dolls. The first title I found, back in the 1980s, was La Poupée Bien Elevée. It is the story of a doll written by Madame Julie Delafaye-Bréhier during the late 1840s. A prolific author who was Nantes-born in 1785 and died in 1850, she wrote 28

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July 1847, Le Moniteur de la Mode. Hand-colored fashion engraving signed by illustrator Jules David depicts a promenade with mother and children, all attired in high-styles of the day, accompanied by their regally-collared dog. PRIVATE COLLECTION

several children’s books that were very popular during the first half of the 19th century. They were re-printed during the Second Empire. The daughter of merchant Jean Julien Marie Bréhier and his wife Marie Jeanne Pichon, she married a doctor, G. C. Delafaye, and moved to the Saintonge region adjacent to the Atlantic coast. There she became a protestant and began writing popular books for children in 1812. La Poupée Bien Elevée was illustrated by Jules David (18081892). This well-known artist was much appreciated in the United Kingdom for his watercolors. His primary income derived from illustrating books, particularly those meant for a young readership, and ladies magazines, such as Le Journal des Demoiselles, Le Journal des Jeunes Personnes and Le Moniteur de la Mode. His images were predominantly “gravure sur bois” (etched into wood), an intaglio printing process.


Twelve black and white plates, engraved by Trichon, grace this charming book, published in Paris by Paul Ducrocq, whose publishing company was located at 55 rue de Seine, on the left bank, in the district where many publishers were active during the 19th century. In 1853, Briton David Bogue, located at 86 Fleet Street in London, published a translation of this popular novel under the title The Well-Bred Doll. The translator is unknown, but her/his initials were “J. C.” Interestingly enough, the British version mentions that the same book, “The story of a doll which was brought up with the greatest care, and was taught to behave in every way like an amiable child,” could be ordered with “coloured pictures and

gilt edges.” Sadly, I have never been able to personally examine the deluxe colored version of this book. Looking at different editions of this novel, featured in the documentary section at Musée de la PoupéeParis, one can see that some plates illustrating the first edition were slightly changed for the reprints, which were produced during the later years of Napoleon III’s reign. For example, the hairdos of some ladies were re-drawn in order to make those characters look more fashionable to the next generation. The text and most other illustrations were unchanged. Like many educational novels written for 19th century children, La Poupée Bien Elevée uses the character of ANTIQUE DOLL COLLECTOR

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a play-doll as a pretext to share moral teachings. This book shows how at the time dolls were viewed as allies of adults in educating youngsters. Despite a plot that is rather simple and predictable, this novel reveals how dolls of that era looked and the ways they were used in everyday life. Lolotte, as she is named in the pages of this story (Lottie in the English version), is first seen by Céline and Laurette, the two main characters, at the Fête de Vincennes, a street fair where numerous peddlers had tempting playthings on display. Among their offerings was this doll, which caught the two sisters’ attention. How is Lolotte described? From the first chapter:”Belle Poupée vêtue de satin rose, avec une ceinture en argent, et un chapeau du meilleur gout” which translates, “A nice doll dressed in pink satin with a silver belt and wearing a hat of the best taste.” In the second chapter: “Elle avait une petite robe blanche et son

negligé était charmant. Un petit coffret était à côté, et renfermait toute sa garde-robe” which translates, “She wore a simple white dress with charming negligee (read fichu). A small chest contained all her wardrobe.” These two sisters shared Lolotte, the older playing the role of “Mother” and the younger giving her voice and movements to the doll herself, in a ‘Let’s pretend’ game that lasts until the end of the novel. In the sixth chapter, the two sisters converse as follows: “Maman, allez-vous me mettre ma belle robe de mousseline à pois roses? Non, ma fille; il ne faut pas tant de parure pour déjeuner avec ses amis. Voici votre robe de percale et votre pantalon brodé; c’est tout ce qu’il faut.” “Mother, will you have me wear my nice muslin dress with pink dots? No, my child, it’s not proper to be as dressy to simply have lunch with your friends. Here is your 30

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percale dress and your embroidered pantaloon, this is all you need.” “Allez chercher vos brodequins de coutil.” “Go look for your twill shoes.” “Voilà un ruban rose, il ira bien avec le chapeau rond doublé aussi en rose.” “Here is a pink ribbon to match the round hat also lined in pink.” “Oui maman, je vais chercher mes gants et ma petite ombrelle.” “Yes mother, I’m going to take my gloves and my small umbrella” Aside from a brief mention of an extra “robe de merinos,” a “merino wool dress,” in the seventh chapter, no other

descriptive sentence helps shed further light on Lolotte’s appearance. However, the engravings show a few more details and accessories belonging to this doll of the Romantic era. When Lolotte visits with friends, they are served coffee, seated at a table where: “Le café fut servi dans de belles tasses d’étain fin, brillantes comme de l’argent, et grandes comme des coquilles de noix.” “Coffee was served in beautiful tinware cups, as shiny as silver and as big as a nut shell.” In the last chapter, Lolotte is placed in a metal cradle, like those manufactured by Huret, which was lined with lace and muslin. Next to the cradle, one sees a doll carriage with folding top. It contains pillows and a mattress. Assuming the engraved illustrations are as realistic as they ANTIQUE DOLL COLLECTOR

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Wedding gowns were requisite wardrobe elements for dolls of high quality, particularly those with papier-mâché heads produced by the German company of Andreas Voit. This silk gown and veil worn by an 1840s closed mouth 18-inch example with black glass eyes includes the traditional wreath of orange flowers, which were created in wax. © Musée de la Poupée-Paris

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Play dolls could be found in regional costume. Representing a young girl or bride from France’s picturesque coastal Atlantic region of Saintonge/Poitou-Charentes, this 17-1/4-inch doll has meticulously painted, uniformly defined features. © Musée de la Poupée-Paris

look with respect to human fashions, the representation of Lolotte suggests a paper-mâché-headed doll with, most likely, a leather body. At the time, socalled “poupées empeaussées” were the most popular in France. Since Lolotte was bought from a peddler, she is unlikely to have been a poured wax doll made in England, since those luxury models were mainly offered for sale in upscale toy stores. Nor could Lolotte be a porcelain-headed doll with molded hair, since the engravings show her with slightly different changing hairdos as the story progresses. Finally, bisque-headed poupées hadn’t yet appeared on the market at that time, so Lolotte definitely can’t be a Parisienne. Like later bisque-head ‘poupées,’ Lolotte owns a wardrobe and refined accessories that reflect her social milieu. Céline and Laurette seem to grow up with bourgeoisie values. These characters’ names as well as the way they dress and behave suggest a middle class upbringing, probably inspired by the childhood of the author herself. Among dolls featured in the permanent collections at Musée de la Poupée-Paris, a few could match Lolotte’s type. The first we acquired from Christie’s, during the period when our friend Olivia Bristol was head of the doll department. It has painted features, wears a human hair wig (which is glued onto the domed head) and is graced by a most exquisite party dress that matches the fancy fabric shoes this doll still wears.


Another French poupée empeaussée with papermaché head, exhibiting Andreas Voit characteristics, is dressed in its original wedding gown with a cut typical of the 1840s. The third example is a delicate plaything showing off her Saintonge traditional costume, which would have been worn on festive days by women of the region where Julie DelafayeBréhier once lived. Finally, the fourth and more modest doll has a paper-mâché head with leather body and wooden lower limbs. She is still wearing an original everyday garment similar to what one sees on dolls in peasant attire from the era when La Poupée Bien Elevée was first published. Having confessed my avid habit of crosscollecting, I wish you all to experience the same compulsion and thereby derive even more satisfaction from your collecting passions.

Remarkably well-preserved, this 16-1/2-inch papier-mâché shoulder head retains its original braided human hair wig. The flowing gauze dress with silver embellishment is typical of the mid-1850s. © Musée de la Poupée-Paris

Other books by Julie Delafaye-Bréhier include: Petit-Jules le sauteur, ou histoire d’un enfant enlevé par des baladins, Les Six nouvelles de l’enfance, Théâtre de l’enfance, Les Trois orphelines, nouvelles veillées du château, Les Nouvelles nouvelles de l’Enfance, Raoul, ou le disciple reconnaissant, Les enfants de la providence, Le Collège incendié ou les écoliers en voyage. It is interesting to observe that the original title in French, focusing on how well-educated Lolotte was, which would best translate today as “WellBehaved Doll,” is changed in English into a doll that is “well-bred.” This subtle difference underscores plaything’s social status more than the role it was meant to assume in the moral education of children. Acknowledgments: The author wishes to express his gratitude to Lori Santamaura for her precious help with this project, photographer Jean Dalmard and publisher Reverie for the use of photos featured in the book “Fascinating Dolls from the Musée de la Poupée-Paris.”

This 8-inch example dating from the mid-nineteenth century is clothed in a vibrant red traditional costume and has a solid papier-mâché head with delicately painted features, leather body with wooden lower limbs. © Musée de la Poupée-Paris

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The Tender Years

N EW Deborah Varner Lo w Pr ic es 303-850-7800 queenbeev1@comcast.net Member UFDC

Fabulous 6” Mignonnette. Pale Bisque. Blue eyes. CM. Superb modeling. Orig. long blonde Couture, Black, Factory mohair wig. Orig. 11” Simon and Early peg strung. Halbig 739; one of the Rare bare feet. earliest of the Simon Cupped hands. and Halbig›s dolls. Smiling lips. Orig. Brown toned body Old pale aqua in excellent condition. coat dress with Straight wrists. Br. SE, old undergarments. Pierced ears. OM with One of the most teeth. Orig. black mohair wig in curls. Wonderful modeling. All orig. red dress with beautiful Mignonnettes hand stitching. Orig. straw and red matching that I have ever seen. $3,550. hat. Red socks and brown leather shoes. A true treasure, a wonderful find. $2,850.

15” Couture Steiner, Fire A. Rosy cheeks, fabulous modeling. DK blue eyes. Fly away brows. Dimple in chin. Long blonde hair. Sweet lips. Long lashes. Mint and Factory orig. DK purple silk dress and hat with lace inset plus lace on hat. Numbered black French shoes with buckles. Crocheted socks. Pierced ears with orig. earrings. Wears First Place National ribbon for 1978. This doll has it all. $7,150.

13 “ Sonneberg child. She has the face of an early Portrait. Large almond shaped eyes. Bl. threaded eyes with blush under brows and cheeks. Blonde mohair wig. Pierced ears. CM. Old Br. wool dress with old wool red cape over body and head. Br. leather shoes with rosettes. You will LOVE this doll in your collection. $2,900.

16” Antique early Kestner XI. DK. Br. eyes. Soft creamy white bisque with rosy blush on cheeks. Long blonde hair. Early straight wrists. Orig. Steiner pate. Bl. cotton dress with old lace. Elaborate French presentation hat. Antique leather white boots. Great price of only $5,250.

5” All Bisque. BR. glass eyes. OM. with teeth. DK. BR. mohair wig with silk pink bow in hair. Old flowered dress, hand sewn. Pink silk ribbon at waist. Black Mary Janes. Sweet little girl. $750.

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WWW .THETENDERYEARS.NET

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ATTIC TREASURES By Mary Krombholz

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ith each passing year it is more and more difficult to locate antique German dolls dressed in original clothing because exposure to light and changing temperatures can so easily damage fabric. Therefore, it is an exciting occurrence to have the opportunity to study a group of dolls that were stored in a fourth-floor attic for over a hundred years. As my friend unwrapped each of the 40 dolls, I marveled at the pristine condition of each piece of clothing, wig and accessory. I felt like I was in a time bubble, and it was 1900 instead of 2013. I have chosen 21 of these antique German dolls to picture in this article, and with one exception, the dolls are dressed exactly as they were originally dressed at each Thuringian doll factory. The bald parian shoulder head on this 15-inch doll (1) was made by the Alt, Beck & Gottschalck porcelain factory in Thuringia. The facial features include typical ABG brown, single-stroke eyebrows which thicken in the center, red and black eyelid definition lines, partially outlined 36

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irises with glazed black pupils, white highlight on the top left side of each iris and a closed mouth with a darker red accent line between the lips. The original cloth body on this doll was made by the Philip Goldsmith doll factory in Covington, Kentucky. Goldsmith bodies are recognizable by the small sticks inserted into each finger of the leather hands, as well as by the striped stockings and the pair of cotton tassels tied to the top of each laced boot. The doll is wearing an original wig, underwear, and clothing. Bands and ruffles of pink cotton accent the cotton dress and longer, matching underskirt. This 21-inch doll (2) is identical, except in size, to the doll in the preceding photograph. It also has a bald, ABG parian shoulder head mounted on an original Goldsmith body, and it is wearing an original wig, underwear and clothing. The bodies on the two dolls do not contain the printed corsets which were patented by Goldsmith on December 15, 1885. Philip Goldsmith made composition doll heads


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3 and cloth doll bodies from 1870 until his death on July 12, 1894. The A.W. Fr. Kister porcelain factory in Scheibe-Alsbach, Thuringia made this glazed-porcelain shoulder head with a Flat Top hairstyle (3). The 19-inch doll, circa 1860s on, has a cloth body with leather arms. The facial features include the typical Kister singlestroke eyebrows, red and black deďŹ nition outlines of the eyelids, blue-painted irises without outlines or highlights and closed mouth. The doll is wearing original underwear, clothing, shoes and socks. This 4-inch glazed-porcelain Frozen Charlotte (4) was made by the Hertwig & Co. porcelain factory in Katzhuette, Thuringia. It has a Flat Top hairstyle, single-stroke eyebrows, outlined eyelids, blue-painted irises without outlines or highlights and a closed, heart-shaped mouth. The glazed-porcelain, attached body contains arms which are bent at the elbows, and legs which contain typical Hertwig blue-painted garter bows and gold-painted shoes. The doll, made circa 1880s on, is wearing an original cotton dress and underwear. A 16-inch Hertwig shoulder head (5) has a Low-Brow hairstyle and facial features which include single-stroke eyebrows, black outline of the upper eyelids, no outlines or highlights on the irises and a closed, heart-shaped mouth. The cloth body contains the bulbous lower legs and typical blue-painted garter bows which identify the doll as a Hertwig. The doll, circa 1880s on, is wearing an original cotton dress and underwear.

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7 The back of the head of this 14½-inch Simon & Halbig bisque socket-head doll (6), circa 1887, is marked with the capital letters DEP. The facial features include multi-stroke eyebrows, hair upper eyelashes, lower painted eyelashes only, and an open mouth with 4 upper teeth. The doll has a fully-jointed composition body,an original wig, mechanical, side-glancing blue-glass eyes and two voice cords which hang on the right side of the body. The doll is wearing many layers of original clothing which include three pieces of lace-trimmed cotton underwear, a red wool skirt trimmed with a black velvet band, a net skirt with scallops, a lace-trimmed blouse tied at the elbows with red silk ribbon, a fringed scarf held in place with a silver rhinestone pin, a strand of pearls, a lace-trimmed bonnet featuring a large ribbon bow and original socks and shoes. The back of the head of this 8½-inch bisque sockethead doll (7), with a 5-piece composition body, is marked: 1079/2/0//DEP//S&H. The facial features include brown, single-stroke eyebrows, upper and lower painted eyelashes, blue-glass sleep eyes, and an open mouth with upper teeth. The Simon & Halbig doll, GM (Design Patent) 1892, is wearing an original wig, a black cotton dress and a bonnet trimmed with bands of bright-yellow cotton fabric. The bisque socket head on this 7-inch doll, GM 1895 (8), was made by the Gebrueder Kuehnlenz porcelain factory in Kronach, Thuringia. The back of head is marked with the

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10 9 Kuehnlenz trademark Sunburst enclosing the letters “GK,” as well as the mold numbers 44.15. The facial features include single-stroke eyebrows, stationary, brown-glass eyes, upper and lower painted eyelashes and an open mouth with upper teeth. The regional costume on the 5-piece, composition body includes a black cotton skirt and red cotton apron, a cotton blouse with lace-edged, elbow-length sleeves tied with red bows, and a black wool vest embellished with braid. The doll is also wearing an original wig with ribbon-tied pigtails, and an original hat tied with a black ribbon bow. The back of the bisque head of this 16-inch Kestner shoulder-head doll (9), circa 1897, is marked: I. 154. Dep. The facial features include multi-stroke eyebrows, traces of hair upper eyelashes,straight lower painted eyelashes only, and an open mouth with 4 upper teeth. The shoulder head is mounted on a kid body with bisque lower arms, which is pin-jointed at the shoulders, knees and hips. The doll is wearing an original mohair wig, underwear which includes pantalets with pink-silk ribbon woven through the lace edging, a pink cotton dress with lace insertions and lace trim on the neckline and sleeves, as well as original socks and shoes. The back of the head of this 12-inch Kestner bisque socket-head doll (10), GM 1897, is marked only with the size number 4½ 4½, but identical bisque heads are often

11 marked with the mold number 143. Author Jan Foulke provides the following information on this characterlike head in her book titled Kestner, King of Dollmakers: “This is a puzzling doll because it really is a character face, but it was in production in the late 1890s long before the character dolls of 1909 and thereafter were produced.” The facial features include light-brown, multi-stroke eyebrows, upper and lower painted eyelashes, blue-glass sleep eyes and an open mouth with upper teeth. Her kid body is pin-jointed at the shoulders, hips and knees and the bisque lower arms have beautiful dimpled hands. The doll is wearing an original mohair wig with curly bangs attached to a flat, braided strip of hair, as well as original socks and shoes. The original clothing includes a pink-and-white checked skirt with crossed straps over the shoulders, and a lace-trimmed cotton blouse. The original cotton underwear includes eyelet-trimmed pantalets and a lace-trimmed petticoat. The bisque shoulder head on the 14-inch doll (11), circa 1890s, is marked with the Kestner configuration of letters: G. made in Germany. The facial features include brown-glass sleep eyes, multi-stroke eyebrows, upper and lower painted eyelashesand an open mouth with 4 upper teeth. The doll is wearing an original wig and clothing which includes a lace-trimmed cotton dress and bonnet, a lace-trimmed petticoat and pantalets, as well as original socks and shoes. ANTIQUE DOLL COLLECTOR

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A 14-inch Simon & Halbig doll (12), circa 1900, is wearing a French regional costume of Alsace, which includes lace-trimmed underwear, a maroon skirt trimmed with a black velvet band, a silk striped apron, a lace-trimmed cotton blouse, a black velvet vest embellished with braid and a large, black bow with streamers on her head. The doll has a fully-jointed composition body and is wearing an original mohair wig, striped socks and brown-leather shoes. The facial features on the bisque socket head include multi-stroke eyebrows, upper & lower painted eyelashes, blue-glass sleep eyes and an open mouth with 4 upper teeth. The back of the head on this 12-inch bisque sockethead doll (13) with a jointed composition body, is marked: PR//1900. According to information in the Ciesliks’ German Doll Encyclopedia, the PR initials indicate that the Paul Rauschert porcelain factory in Huettensteinach made the head. Facial features include single-stroke eyebrows, upper and lower painted eyelashes, dark-brown, glass-sleep eyes and an open mouth with 4 upper teeth. The village of Huettensteinach adjoins Koeppelsdorf and Sonneberg. This doll is wearing an original Alsatian regional costume which includes a red silk skirt, a plaid silk apron tied with owered silk ribbon, a cotton blouse trimmed with lace on the neckline and sleeves, a black velvet vest banded with 2 rows of braid and

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decorated with 8 pierced, gold metal circles. The doll is also wearing an original wig and large bow on her head, as well as original white cotton pantalets trimmed with eyelet, striped cotton socks, and red leather shoes. A bisque socket head 14-inch doll (14), with a fully jointed composition body, is marked: Made in Germany//Floradora//A./2/0./M. The facial features include light-brown, single-stroke eyebrows, upper and lower painted eyelashes, blue-glass sleep eyes and an open mouth with 4 upper teeth. The circa 1901 doll is wearing an original mohair wig and an original Alsatian regional costume which includes a light-orange wool skirt trimmed with 2 velvet bands, a cotton blouse trimmed with lace on the neckline and sleeves, a fringed apron, a black velvet vest decorated with pearls, at leaves, circles and a star, a large, patterned silk hair bow made of the same material as the apron, striped socks and maroon leather shoes. The bisque socket head on this 9-inch doll (15), with a 5-piece composition body, is marked K(star) R//21 (centimeters). According to information in my 1911 Kaemmer & Reinhardt 25th Anniversary booklet, Simon & Halbig dolly-face heads like this example were designed by Ernst Kaemmer circa 1902, and made for K&R during the following two decades. The facial features include brown, single-stroke eyebrows, upper

and lower painted eyelashes, dark-brown, glass sleep eyes and an open mouth with upper teeth. The doll has an original blonde mohair wig and the original clothing includes a red and blue patterned coat and matching hat trimmed in beige-colored lace. An 8½-inch bisque-head doll (16), circa 1902 on, has a 5-piece composition body. The back of the head is marked: K(star)R//21. The facial features include brown, single-stroke eyebrows, upper and lower painted eyelashes, dark-blue, glass sleep eyes and an open mouth with upper teeth. The doll is wearing an original mohair wig, underwear which includes pantalets tied with red silk ribbons, a dress made of patterned cotton with a lace-edged neckline and sleeves, painted socks and 2-strap, reddish-brown painted shoes with low heels. The back of the head on this 6-inch bisque sockethead doll (17), circa 1902 on, is marked S&H//K(star) R//15. The facial features include brown, single-stroke eyebrows, upper and lower painted eyelashes, darkblue, glass sleep eyes and an open mouth with upper teeth. The 5-piece composition body has black-painted socks and 2-strap, reddish-brown shoes with low heels. The doll is wearing an original mohair wig and clothing which includes a white crocheted hat, sleeveless vest, jacket, full skirt and underpants; all of which have paleblue crochet as a decorative edging. ANTIQUE DOLL COLLECTOR

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A 28-inch bisque socket-head doll, circa 1902 on, has a fully-jointed composition body with separate ball joints at the shoulders, elbows and knees. The back of the head is marked: HALBIG//K(star)R, and the neck is marked: 70 (centimeters). The facial features include brown, multistroke eyebrows, hair upper eyelashes, upper and lower painted eyelashes, blue-glass sleep eyes and an open mouth with 4 upper teeth. The upper and lower lips are partially outlined in a darker shade of red. The K&R doll (18) is wearing an original wig, bonnet, chemise, petticoat and pantalets, as well as original socks and brown-leather boots with ball-shaped metal buttons. This is the only doll pictured in this article which is not wearing an original factory dress over her original underwear. This pair of Shilling composition shoulder-head dolls (19), circa 1900, are 11½ and 19 inches tall. They have the cloth bodies and composition lower arms and legs typically found on dolls made by this Sonneberg doll factory. Original mohair wigs cover the dome-shaped heads. Both dolls doll have similar facial painting with multistroke eyebrows, upper and lower painted eyelashes, dark-brown, glass sleep eyes and open mouth with 2 lower teeth. The 11-1/2 inch doll is wearing an original

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wig and clothing which includes a lace-trimmed chemise and pantalets, a lace-trimmed petticoat and a long, lacetrimmed baby dress. The lace-trimmed bonnet is tied with a blue-ribbon bow. The short wool jacket has scalloped edges decorated with embroidery. The 19-inch doll is also wearing an original short, curly mohair wig. The original clothing includes an off-white long wool petticoat with scalloped edged trimmed with decorative white embroidery, a long, lace-trimmed dress and white, crocheted booties with pink bows. This 11½-inch bisque socket-head character boy (20) was made by the Gebrueder Heubach porcelain factory in Lichte, Thuringia circa 1910. The back of the head is marked: 1//Germany. The facial features include multistroke eyebrows, upper and lower painted eyelashes, blue-glass sleep eyes and a closed, pouty mouth. The doll has a fully-jointed composition body and an original mohair wig. He is wearing original clothing which includes brown-velvet knee pants with gold metal buttons, a matching jacket with gold metal buttons, a large, lightbrown cotton collar edged with 2 rows of white braid, a large flat hat with a brown-silk ribbon headband, as well as original brown socks and leather shoes. Credits: Private Doll Collection. Doll Photographs by Tony Arrasmith.


THE RARE PAIR

Celluloid Marie and Peter by Kammer & M Reinhardt

ost doll collectors are familiar with the bisque head dolls by the Kammer & Reinhardt doll company. The company made both bisque dolly-faced dolls and character-faced dolls. The character dolls are quite endearing and especially by Margo Delaughter sought after by collectors. However, the company Celluloid heads made of composition, did not produce and market Marie & Peter celluloid and even cloth. just dolls with bisque heads, Courtesy Some of the Kammer & but used other materials for Marilyn Parsons Reinhardt bisque character the heads as well. This article dolls’ celluloid heads were is about two popular supplied by the Rheinische character dolls, Marie and Gummi und Celluloid Fabrik Peter, whose heads are Company whose turtle mark celluloid instead of is recognized by celluloid bisque. doll collectors. Many of Ernst Kammer these character dolls can and Franz Reinhardt be found today with the founded the Kammer exception of this rare pair & Reinhardt doll with celluloid heads. company around 1885 Opening night of the in Waltershausen, salesroom at any UFDC Thuringia, Germany. Convention is always Their doll production one of excitement for lasted until 1932. Their buyers as well as sellers. early dolls were made Such was the case at of wax and later of bisque. the 2013 convention in The company designed the Washington, DC. I was molds for their bisque dolls’ following a fellow club heads, but most of the heads member down the long themselves were supplied by rows of merchandise Simon & Halbig as Kammer & when she spotted two Reinhardt did not have its own dolls in one seller’s booth. porcelain factory. Other companies Much to my delight she pointed that also supplied their bisque out Kammer & Reinhardt’s Marie and dolls’ heads included Kling and Peter with celluloid heads. I had seen Schuetzmeister & Quendt. The both Marie and Peter in my book on Kammer & Reinhardt doll company celluloid dolls, but had never seen any proved to be quite successful examples outside the covers of that book. Finding either and by 1920 the company had acquired both the Heinrich Marie or Peter with a celluloid head is rare, but finding Handwerck and Simon & Halbig doll factories. both dolls together is almost unbelievable. The purchase The Kammer & Reinhardt dolly-faced dolls with bisque was quickly made as neither one of us thought the dolls heads on ball jointed composition bodies or kid bodies were would remain in the booth for very long. made from 1886 to 1909. Then, when in 1908 the Munich Art Now that my friend had the dolls in her possession dolls introduced the character doll movement, Kammer & and we were able to examine them closely, we both Reinhardt developed their own line of character dolls. As wondered if any appeal was lost when the mold was stated earlier, the company used many different materials reproduced in celluloid. In order to answer that question besides bisque for their doll heads. After 1909 these included ANTIQUE DOLL COLLECTOR

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it was necessary to look at the bisque head Marie and Peter for comparison. The mold 101 was used for both Marie and Peter. Whether the doll was Marie or Peter depended on wig style and costuming. The 101 mold gives the doll a slightly pouty look that is quite appealing. A lovely example of Marie is shown here. The doll is 19 inches tall and her bisque head is mounted on a composition ball jointed body. She has blue painted smooth eyes, closed slightly pouty mouth and original reddish brown mohair wig with snail braids around each ear. There is a black line defining her upper lid and single stroke eyebrows. The back of her head is marked: K*R 101. An example of the mold 101 dressed as Peter has a short blonde mohair boy’s wig. He is 16 inches tall and his bisque head, like Marie’s, is mounted on a composition balljointed body. A close-up of his head allows us to see his crisp “first out of the mold” features with blue painted smooth eyes with deeply molded upper eyelids outlined in black, single stroke eyebrows and closed mouth. Like Marie, the back of his head is marked K*R 101. This mold must have been popular as several versions of this bisque doll were produced. Below, a flocked haired Peter and two examples of Marie, with both painted and glass eyes. If Kammer & Reinhardt used different hair styles and eye techniques, why not a different material for the dolls’ heads? This brings us to our “rare pair”. The celluloid heads of both Marie and Peter described in this article have a matte finish and are quite brittle. This may be why we do not find many in existence today. Couple that with the combustible nature of celluloid and it is any wonder that any celluloid dolls produced during this period survived. Celluloid head Marie shown in her original dark blonde mohair center-parted wig has snail braids around each ear. I can’t say if her outfit is original, but the material is of the period and very detailed. It was either factory made or sewn by a skilled seamstress. One can see in Marie’s close-up that the facial molding is wonderfully clear in celluloid. She has a slightly pouty mouth and molded eyelids. Her brown painted smooth eyes are topped with single stroke eyebrows. The back of her head is marked: K*R, turtle symbol, 701. Her counter-part, Peter, has features even “crisper” than Marie’s. He is 14 inches tall and is dressed in a coordinating outfit. If we look 46

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Bisque head Marie Courtesy Marilyn Parsons

Bisque head Peter Courtesy Vicki Kutz, Victoria’s Doll House

Bisque head Peter with flocked hair and two examples of Marie, a painted eye and glass eye. Courtesy Rick Saxman


at the close-up of his face we can see how beautifully the 101 mold was reproduced in celluloid. His short boyish cut wig is a reddish brown in color and his brown painted smooth eyes are topped with single stroke eyebrows. His lips are pink and slightly pouty. He too is marked: K*R, turtle symbol, 701. Shirley Buchholz’s book, “A Century of Celluloid Dolls,” has another version of Marie in celluloid. The doll pictured in the book on page 76 is 15 inches in height and is the celluloid shoulder head version. She is on a kid body that has cloth lower legs and celluloid forearms. This Marie has blue intaglio eyes with molded lids and painted lid lines. Her wig is of brown mohair with the familiar snail braids. She is marked on the back of the shoulder: unframed turtle, K*R, 301. Even Celluloid Celluloid in celluloid Kammer & Reinhardt did not Marie Peter make just one version. Was any appeal lost when the 101 mold BIBLIOGRAPHY was reproduced in celluloid? Opinions will vary, but this Buchholz, Shirley; A Century of Celluloid Dolls; Hobby House Press, Inc; 1983 Kammer & Reinhardt Dolls 1886-1932 German; www.dollreference.com/ writer does not think the celluloid versions are any less kammer_reinhardt_dolls.html appealing. These are two wonderful dolls that can be Krombholz, Mary Gorham; The Story of German Doll Making 1530-2000; Hobby enjoyed in both bisque and celluloid. House Press; 2001

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Ribbons: A Competition Experience By Kathy Meador

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any people attend the annual UFDC convention and never enter one of their prized dolls in competition. Whether this is due to lack of information concerning the process, or reluctance to transport their valuable dolls, or just shyness regarding competing, is an interesting question. At the most recent convention in Washington, I decided to jump in the fray, and I would like to share my positive and also hair-raising experiences. Hopefully, you will feel enabled to try yourself this next year. I actually first entered dolls in the 2012 competition in New Orleans as I could take them easily in the car. I was thrilled to win a first with this paper doll! Happily, I won some ribbons, but I also lost out on several due to my notorious reluctance to read the directions. So, this year, armed with the school of hard knocks knowledge, I tackled this year’s competition in Washington to try to exceed my first haul of ribbons. Determined to outdo myself, I added dolls to my travel inventory until I had five dolls to tempt the gods of fortune. I felt that I finally had a grasp on how to enter because this year I decided to read and re-read the instructions. Knowledge is an enabling thing! So my first tidbit of advice is to understand the category in which you want to enter your doll. If the category states the doll must be German with a closed mouth, then obviously, you should not enter your Handwerck 109. The categories vary slightly from year to year, so don’t think that there will automatically be a category for that favorite hard plastic or treasured German doll. This is designed to keep the competition fresh each year. Make sure that you understand all elements of the description. The first year, I somehow neglected to note that to enter a doll in the “paper doll created by competitor category,” the doll had to be a certain size. I spent the entire summer leading up to the convention drawing and redrawing a doll representing a “French Historical figure.” I researched many historical people before deciding on Vigee LeBrun’s daughter. (Vigee was Marie Antoinette’s portrait artist). I proudly toted that doll into the competition only to sadly discover the next day that I had drawn it two inches too large and it had to be eliminated. This year, I made sure it was the correct size, and I even called to clarify instructions. Result? The Kestner XI snagged a third, likely because her clothing was antique but replaced (originality factor). A blue ribbon at Washington. ANTIQUE DOLL COLLECTOR

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My Bye-Lo took a second, the blue ribbon doll being much rarer.

Understanding how the dolls are judged will really affect how you choose the dolls you enter. I had the opportunity to speak with a judge after the competition. She spoke of the acronym R.O.C.A. which is code for the elements used in judging: Rarity, Originality, Condition and Appearance. This is roughly the order in how the dolls are weighted during scoring, meaning rarity is the factor that lends the most points. This explains why you will sometimes see a bedraggled doll proudly wearing a first place ribbon that she earned because of rarity and originality standing next to a lovelier example that is bereft of a ribbon. Let’s say you decide to enter dolls at this coming year’s competition in San Antonio. First, you need to read over the Competition Booklet that is sent out when you sign up for convention. Very carefully study each category to decide where your doll will best fit in and stand out. She may qualify for more than one category but where will she best fit into qualifying for rarity, originality, condition and appearance? This year I had a little all-original wigged glass-eyed bisque Bye-lo that fit into two categories, but I went with the one that I felt had the best chance of standing out and it paid off with a second place ribbon.

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The doll that won first place was a harder-to-find doll (there’s that rarity factor) and deserved the blue ribbon. In certain events like “Costuming by Competitor,” it is extremely important that you are aware of what the judges want. Originality, technical skill and appearance are paramount. Last year, I casually decided to create a costume and all the accessories and was still sewing parts of it until I had to carry it downstairs into the competition showroom! Since I had neglected to research this category well, I did not realize that the judges are actually not only looking at the total effect of the costume, but also, the technical skills (i.e., French seams) and precision sewing skills. When I saw the entries, I felt fortunate to be given a fourth place. Because I hate not doing well, I decided to sharpen my skills and was rewarded with a third place ribbon this year. Next year, I aim for a second place! After making your selections, carefully fill out the form that comes with your convention packet and mail it by the correct date to the director of either modern dolls or the antique dolls, depending on where your categories lie. In my case, I had entries for both divisions. Ensure accuracy when stating how much the doll is worth for insurance purposes. After a few weeks, you will receive the competition tags to put on your dolls. Keep up with these! Now is a great time to fill out the 4”x6” index cards sometimes requested to describe your doll. Be sure to be honest in your description. It will be a flag to the judge if you write ”perfect bisque” when there is an obvious hairline or if you say it has its original outfit when it was obviously bought from DollsR-Us. Make sure your doll is in her best condition – iron her clothes if needed or repair a distracting torn seam. Of course, making sure she is clean helps. Think like you were taking your child to church. Your next task is deciding how to transport your dolls. Since we still cannot beam them up a la “Star Trek”, you have to decide whether to ship them there to yourself at the hotel, drive them there yourself, or (don’t faint) fly on the airplane with them! Let me assure you, this option is not for the faint hearted or for the poor planner. Before you do anything, if you have valuable dolls, you should really check into getting insurance. My insurance covers leaving the house with them, but check your policy. Driving is obviously the easiest option—pack them well to prevent injury and lock your car when you stop for road trip snacks. I have not tried the second option yet, which is to ship them to the hotel, but I spoke with some folks that did. Obviously, pack them well and insure them. I would imagine that alerting the hotel might be important also. I would check with the Post Office or Fed Ex to nail down that delivery date, too. As I said, there is a third option and that is to take them on the airplane with you. If you have a heart condition, or are a little on the excitable side, this may or may not work. Since I had to fly to Washington, I blithely chose this option. Let me begin by saying there are several things you may want to consider. First up:


your suitcase(s). I chose to take two – one for my clothes and one for my dolls. With my husband standing over me with a “You have really lost it” look, I packed and repacked that doll suitcase over and over to make sure my babies were going to go in comfort. I just threw my clothes in the other suitcase as if they were tennis balls. Of course, I had not considered how I was going to lug around those two big bags. As soon as I got to the airport, I ditched the clothing bag to Southwest’s baggage handlers to check. Hopefully that suitcase would not take a detour to Hawaii… then, carefully lugging the doll suitcase around (oh, please don’t bump me, people) I got in the security line where the first hurdle came up – luckily, the security people did not think I was a lunatic when I told them I was hand carrying $6,000 worth of dolls and would they please be extra careful putting it through the machine. They were actually nice and assured me while I hovered over them. Getting the suitcase into the overhead bin was the next snafu. It was heavier than I expected and I nearly toppled it on a poor lady’s head but finally lurched it into place and zealously watched the other travelers to make sure they did not knock it about while arranging theirs. After landing and retrieving my other suitcase, my roomie and I found a shuttle for the hotel. There were several people on the shuttle with various hotel destinations. We were the first to be let off and the driver placed our suitcases on the ground. Trying to focus on my manners, I was searching my purse to give him a tip when he took off for the other hotels. Shrugging, I reached for my suitcases when I came to the realization that he had left a larger one than mine for me. OH NO! You guessed it – he had my dolls! I ran as fast as my 60-year-old legs could go, but the shuttle vanished into rush hour Washington traffic. Dejected, I dragged some unknown man’s suitcase full of boxer shorts (no name tag anywhere) into the hotel and called the shuttle company. Put on hold, it took an hour to reach someone. Finally, they told me that the shuttle driver would return “tomorrow” with my suitcase and pick up the other man’s. Now normally I would have considered wearing boxers for a day, but in this case, my answer was to get some backbone and say that that was unacceptable. Surprisingly, that worked and two hours later, the cranky driver returned with the kidnapped dolls. At this point, I do think I cried a little even though my husband had tried to reassure me on the phone, “But they are insured, honey.” It was a sense of great relief when the time came to actually check them into competition. There is a designated check in time of about two hours and you must do it then. Naturally, everyone will cram unto the elevators at the same time to enter them at the beginning of the entry period. I learned from the previous year that if you wait until the last half hour, the line is not so long and your arms will thank you. The clerks are excellent volunteers and know where each category is located. They are sensitive to the value of your dolls and will

My doll in the costuming division placed third which actually thrilled me. This doll was a tribute to my maternal grandfather who was a “newsie” (newsboy) as a child in order to avoid being slated to working in the coal mines in Ohio. Although he never received higher education, he ultimately became the editor of his town’s newspaper. To create his 1912 look, I taught myself how to knit to make his sweater; I made his newsboy cap, his news bag and the miniature copies of his newspaper, his pet mouse, his boots and socks and knickers, suspenders and shirt. Oh, and the miniature political pins I forgot to pin on him. My biggest reward was not the ribbon, but my mom’s tears when she saw the doll, a Dianna Effner “Little Darling” that uncannily closely resembled my grandfather as a child. Worth all the effort!

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My Depose Jumeau won a third. Although she was all original and lovely, there were several entries in this particular category, including the very doll that won the President’s Choice Award, a spectacular Jumeau dressed as a Pierrot, a very unusual costume (remember about that rarity factor).

help you. However, realize that because of the value of all the items, no one can carry in any extra bags, and that includes your wallet, so leave it elsewhere or with a friend. You will not be permitted to touch anyone’s dolls but your own, but you can set yours down and take the time to arrange them to good advantage. Make sure you have included everything that needs to be with the doll. You will be thanked for entering your items and given a token of appreciation – tickets for the Helpers. Undoubtedly, you are a much more organized planner than I, and you will not encounter some of the pitfalls into which I tripped. Be organized, be informed, be generous and enter your dolls – the experience is worth the time and the worry, especially when you finally enter the competition room and realize that your dolls are in rarified air! Maybe next time I will tell you the story of getting home…

Blackberry Studio

See you at the March Gaithersburg Show Exceptional First Series Jumeau Bebe 14 inches tall Marked 2/0 $14,500 Adorable little all bisque in a box with all sorts of clothes and goodies $1550 52

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Margaret Gray Kincaid Member NADDA and UFDC Cell: 646-709-4340 Margaret.kincaid@gmail.com


Mary Ann Spinelli Open Forum

April 11th 7-9pm. Deacquisition sale

April 12th 12-5pm

Hundreds Hundreds of of new new dolls dolls for for sale. sale. Call for details.

See Violet’s sisters, Flora and Dora, on the cover of our April issue!


HAVE YOU SEEN They disappeared from a UFDC member’s collection and were sold on the Internet.


THESE DOLLS? Please contact Antique Doll Collector for possible repurchase: P.O. Box 39, East Petersburg, PA 17520. Phone 717-517-9217 or email antiquedoll@gmail.com


2013 UFDC Special Exhibit: Lettie Lane & Friends Donelle Denery organized two exhibits at last year’s National Convention, Lettie Lane and Friends and Edwardian Lady Dolls and Their Wardrobes.

Assisting her with the Lettie Lane exhibit was Jennifer Bell, Jan Riordan and Barbara Frohhlich.

The earliest Daisy, still tied in her original box, wearing chemise, socks and shoes, was a Kestner 171. The dolls measured 18 inches.

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Daisy as a beautiful bride, patterns shown in the April, 1911 issue of LHJ.

ettie Lane was the name of a paper doll series by Shelia Young that ran in the Ladies Home Journal (LHJ) beginning in 1908. In December, 1910 the magazine’s editorial page first mentioned that a Lettie Lane doll would soon come to life. That doll was Daisy and to receive her a child had to sell three subscriptions and in return she would receive Daisy in a chemise, shoes and socks as well as patterns for all the outfits worn by Daisy in that month’s paper doll page. Like Bleuette in France, Daisy taught little girls how to sew, an important skill in the early years of the 20th century. The first Daisy dolls were mold 171 by Kestner and the second order were dolls from Heinrich Handwerck with heads by Simon and Halbig. 56

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Daisy’s vacation clothes, promoted in the June, 1911 issue of LHJ.

School clothes were the focus of the October, 1911 issue of LHJ.

Daisy celebrates the holidays. Patterns for these clothes were in the December 1911 issue of LHJ, the final issue to feature Daisy. ANTIQUE DOLL COLLECTOR

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SELL A DOLL IN THE

EMPORIUM

BABES FROM THE WOODS

Kathy Libraty’s ANTIQUE DOLLS

15” K & R 114 “GRETCHEN” Closed Mouth Character doll exc. CONDITION $2800 18” KESTNER “DAISY” 171 DOLL w/ALL ANTIQUE WIG & COSTUME $2500 14” PETITE ETIENNE DENAMUR FRENCH BEBE JUST DARLING! $1900

WWW.KATHYLIBRATYSDOLLS.COM

Phone: 718-859-0901 email: Libradolls@aol.com MEMBER: UFDC OR—Buy My Dolls on eBay where I begin most of my antique dolls for just $1—Search seller name kathylibraty.

8 MONTH LAYAWAY PLAN AVAILABLE

WWW.RUBYLANE.COM/SHOPS/KATHYLIBRATYSANTIQUES

AM 340 character - 12”, closed mouth, blue painted eyes, original brown human hair wig, early straight wrist composition body with upper wood legs, and clothes that may be original. $1500. Call 215-794-8164 or email alloyd@nni.com. Member NADDA and UFDC. Other photos and dolls may be seen at RubyLane.com/shops/anntiquedolls.

Faithful reproductions of hand carved Queen Annes, dolls by Izannah Walker, and Early American Cloth Dolls. Kathy Patterson Ph. 705-489-1046 toysintheattic@ sympatico.ca

www.babesfromthewoods.com SARA BERNSTEIN DOLLS Email santiqbebe@aol.com 732-536-4101

18” E 8 J - This enchanting girl in exquisite clothes has everything going for her. Bisque, coloring and beautifully painted features.Original marked shoes, socks, and undies. Including original mohair wig under her superb french child’s beribboned bonnet. All that, and the face of an angel! 8,200

Evelyn Phillips (914) 939-4455 17 Loch Lane, Rye Brook, NY 10573 Email: poupees57@aol.com

Purchase of an ad includes FREE internet ad on our website.

Send us a photo or a digital photo of your doll with a description and your check or credit card information. We do the rest!! Take advantage of this special forum; the cost is only $95 for a 2.4”w x 2.9”h ad space.

Antique DOLL Collector,

P.O. Box 239, Northport, NY 11768. Phone 1-888-800-2588. Email: antiquedoll@gmail.com

FRIZELLBURG ANTIQUE STORE A quality group shop specializing in dolls, toys and holidays. Visit our website today!

www.frizellburgantiques.com Susie Q and Bobby Q by M. Alexander all original 13” $495 pr. We also carry a quality line of antiques, textiles, furniture and jewelry. 30 years of experience where you can buy or sell with confidence. Laura Turner, proprietor, 1909 Old Taneytown Rd., Westminster, MD 21158. Open Thurs- Sun 11-5. Call us with your wants, we have an ever-changing inventory 410-848-0664 or 410-875-2850.

View Quality Dolls at affordable prices. 100’s of pictures and prices at my Ruby Lane Shop...

Exclusively at

www.sarabernsteindolls.rubylane.com

Two Sylvia MacNeil Workshops

Personalized instruction by Sylvia herself! 19th Century Sewing Techniques to construct Chiffonnette’s Pink Silk Ensemble with Chemisette! The Highlight of the Paris Special Exhibit! April 4-5-6, 2014

Hat Workshop Choice of 2 Hat styles constructed from antique straws and trims. May 31 & June 1, 2014 Amicalola Falls Lodge, North GA To register or for more information contact: Mary Ann Byers 706-636-4321o or email: mabyers382@aol.com ANTIQUE DOLL COLLECTOR

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Auction Gallery

Wonderful 14” early china lady with molded bun

Morphy March 2014 Doll Sale

Elegant 19” “Morning Glory” china lady

Impressive 20 ½” papiermâché lady with exposed ears and molded barrette

Auction Gallery cont. from page 15

Desirable Schoenhut “Tootsie Wootsie”

Splendid 18” Cloth Izannah Walker prepatent model, Central Falls, RI, Ca. 1850 Exquisite 26” Jumeau triste bébé with signed Jumeau shoes Charming Schoenhut “Mary Had a Little Lamb” set

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orphy Auctions March 22, 2014 premiere doll auction will showcase the multigenerational collection of the Foote family of Maryland. Doll collectors in the Washington D.C. suburbs are very familiar with Iverna and Irving Foote, as they were very active members of the Dollology Club, UFDC convention attendees, and regulars at the Gaithersburg Doll Show. However, the Foote collection is actually the legacy of Irving’s mother, Dorothy Budde Foote from Medina, Ohio. She joined her first doll club in 1940, though her doll collecting had started even before that with oriental dolls that she had bought so that she could use them in her Sunday School classes at her church. Then piqued by a cover of Antiques magazine, she became interested in antique dolls. She was fortunate to be able to attend the lst annual UFDC convention in 1950. Her sister Bertha Budde took up doll dressing, and many of the dolls in the Foote collection were costumed by “Aunt Bea.” Dorothy had five children. All of them shared in the dispersal of her collection when she died, but only two actively continued her love of doll collecting: her son, Irving, and her daughter, Dorothy Foote Mishler. Dorothy resides in Wooster, Ohio, and is still a member of UFDC. ANTIQUE DOLL COLLECTOR

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Irving’s wife, Iverna, shared his interest in collecting. Upon the foundation of the dolls inherited from his mother, they built a remarkable and diverse collection with a strong emphasis on early china dolls and wooden Schoenhut dolls and toys, but also including French bébés and fashions as well as early cloth, papier-mâché and parian dolls. They enjoyed pursuing their doll collecting interest together, planning vacations that included visits to doll and antique shops, going to auctions, and attending conventions, as well as the usual vacation activities. Irving also enjoyed photography, and combined his two hobbies by photographing dolls and giving talks to help collectors learn how to take better pictures of their dolls. The Foote family legacy is being enthusiastically continued by third generation collector Mary Foote, daughter of Irving and Iverna. Mary was encouraged in her collecting by her grandmother, who would make presents of dolls to her. Irving Foote passed away in 2004, and at 94 years old, Iverna has moved to an assisted living facility where she has space to display only a few treasured dolls. Mary has chosen some of her parents’ dolls to enter her own collection, and other Foote family members have selected dolls as mementos. Now the remainder of the Foote collection will be offered to doll collectors around the world.


Fabulous 13” Bru Brevete

Remarkable Kathe Kruse “Hampelchen” Doll XIIH

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Spectacular 17” Simon & Halbig IV

Outstanding 16” Kathe Kruse Doll I

omplementing the Foote Collection will be an extensive private collection from Europe, which reflects the owner’s love of children. Highlights are an impressive group of Kathe Kruse dolls, representing the whole spectrum of her career, including wistful Doll I models, smiling “Schlenkerchen,” sleeping and awake “Sand Babies,” and a boxed “Hampelchen.” Saucy and mischievous googlies abound, representing makers, such as Kestner, Heubach, Marseille, K*R, SFBJ, and Hertel Schwab. Not to be overlooked is a wide variety of Gebr. Heubach characters, showing the gamut of emotions from pouting to laughing, and several of the elusive SFBJ 252 pouty toddlers. K*R characters are represented by at least 12 different models with many multiples, including the desirable pouties. Happy toddlers and babies by various

Saucy JDK 221 googly

Very pouty 18” SFBJ toddler

Pouty 19” Schoenhut, all original

Laughing 17” Gebr. Heubach 5636

German factories add a touch of idealism to this group. From Maryland, comes a group of antique doll houses and miniatures, which feature a rare Tynietoy Farm house and a lovely selection of Tynietoy furniture. Other consignments from around the United States bring the auction total to about 700 lots. Do come, bring a few friends and plan to spend the whole day with dolls! Auction starts at 9 a.m. at Morphy’s gallery in Adamstown, PA, just ½ mile from the Reading/ Lancaster PA Turnpike exit. Preview everyday 9-4. All types of bidding are accepted – absentee, phone, internet and live gallery. To order catalog or arrange for phone bidding, call Morphy Auctions at 717-335-3435. For more information contact janfoulke@aol.com ANTIQUE DOLL COLLECTOR

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Auction Gallery Ivy Auctions March 15

Rohmer Poupee, 1857-1880, 20” French Fashion shoulderhead doll, antique clothing

Kley & Hahn #536 character doll, 14”

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28” Pouty Heubach character doll, beautifully dressed in green velvet coat

vy Auctions, Inc., located in Laurens, South Carolina, will hold their annual spring auction on March 15 beginning at 9 a.m. EST. Along with their usual fare of 18th, 19th, 20th century vintage, select, period, and fine furniture and decorative accessories, they will be offering over 100 dolls, the majority coming from the collection of Jimmy Draper of Spartanburg, South Carolina. Draper has been a collector of dolls for sixty years. His passion for dolls started at an early age as he traveled throughout Europe and visited the finest doll collections, both private and public. He is an eclectic collector, and the dolls offered on March 15 reflect this. The auction will feature early chinas and parians, German character and French fashion

Madame Alexander, Cissy, all original with hat box and wrist tag, high color

Lilli (Bild Lilli of Germany) 11 1/2”, 1956, original outfit, high color

bisque, celebrity dolls from the 1930’s to 1960’s, Barbie, and rare B. Lilli as well as bears, toys, and a large collection of early bride and groom cake toppers. A complete catalog with pictures and descriptions will be available online approximately two weeks prior to the auction at IvyAuctions.com. For a complete listing of dolls offered or for answers to any questions, call Ivy Auctions at 864-682-2750. In addition to on-site bidding, phone, absentee, and online bidding will be available. For information regarding phone and absentee bids, call Ivy Auctions at 864-682-2750 or visit their website at IvyAuctions.com. Online bidding will be available through LiveAuctioneers.com and Invaluable.com.

Theimer Auction March 29 in Paris

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he upcoming auction, conducted by François Theimer, will include numerous important French bébés including Bru Jeune, Lioregraph Jumeau, a large group of Steiner Bébés (Figure and serie A-B-and C), a large group of small sized bébés by Jumeau, Steiner and Joanny, and a rare bébé Mothereau signed T.M. on the neck. Doll rooms, doll furniture and doll accessories, a trunk marked Au Nain Bleu, a Léopold Lambert Automaton, mechanical toys, etc. will be offered. At the time of this writing consignments are still be added every day. Visit www.theimer.fr for more information.

20-inch Tiburce Mothereau

24” Circle Dot Bru 62

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Size 13, Jumeau Triste, 24 inches


A “bird’s nest” French sewing necessaire, 7 inches, c. 1870, $3800.

Auction S Gallery Theriault’s January 12

A necessaire in the shape of a grand piano, 12 inches long by 7 inches high with lock and original key, $16,000.

Viennese sewing box with 19 miniature watercolor scenes, 9 inches, $22,000.

Napoleon III gilt sewing necessaire in the shape of a beehive, $4200.

unday, January 12 was a special day for doll collectors with two back to back auctions: the Hanne Büktas Collection of Antique Needlework Tools and Sewing Accessories, followed by Half Dolls and other Toilette Table Fancies from the Margaret Woodbury Strong holdings and the private collection of Vicki Lee Little, both part of Theriault’s three day auction extravaganza in Newport Beach, CA. Whoever thought sewing implements could be so beautiful or half dolls so detailed! Prices listed do not include the buyer’s premium. Theriault’s, PO Box 151, Annapolis, MD 21404. 800-638-0422 www.theriaults.com

Lady with Flowered Bonnet by Sohne, 6-1/2 inches, $5000.

Lady with Garland of Flowers, 6 inches, $17,500.

“He Loves Me, He Loves Me Not,” by Goebel, 6-1/2 inches, $5500.

7-1/2 inch doll “Serving Cocoa” by Gebruder Heubach, $6250.

Aristocratic Lady with Cup of Tea, 9 inches, $6750.

Lady with Feathered Hat, by Sohne, 6-1/2 inches, $6200.

Dressel and Kister’s Lady with Basket of Flowers and Cherub on Head, 5-1/2 inches, $9750. Powder Puff Pierette with Pierrot and Harlequin, 8 inches, $5000. ANTIQUE DOLL COLLECTOR

MARCH 2014

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Auction Gallery A

lovely early unsigned bebe, 28”, c. 1878, realized approximately $11,100 during Francois Theimer’s January 25 auction. Not shown is a rare Albert Marque doll body with the original bisque arms. It sold for nearly $20,500.

A

n early Jumeau bebe with pressed bisque head, closed mouth, pierced ears, the articulated body marked gold medal Paris, sold for approximately $11,800 during a recent Chartre auction. The Bru fashion, with blue paperweight eyes, pierced ears, kid and wood body, realized $6900.

W

endy by Bruno Schmidt, 18”, the ball jointed composition body with original finish, sold for $11,000 and the rare Heubach 7975 character, 15”, with removable bonnet, brought $6600 at Sweetbriar Auctions during their February 1 sale.

We would like to thank the following auction houses for their participation:

A

17” unmarked French Fashion with swivel head and wood arms realized $4245 at the January McMasters Harris auction. The 24” (including stand) SFBJ Marquis Fumeur Automation brought $3520.

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ANTIQUE DOLL COLLECTOR

Galerie de Chartres, 10 rue Claude BERNARD, ZA Le Coudray, BP 70129, 28630 Le coudray CHARTRES, Email: chartres@galeriedechartres.com McMasters Harris Apple Tree, 1625 W. Church Street, Newark, OH 43055, (740) 344-4282, www.mcmastersharris.com Sweetbriar Auctions, P.O. Box 37, Earleville, MD 21919, (410) 275-2094, E-mail: sweetbriar@live.com Theimer Auctions, 4 rue des Cavaliers, 89130 TOUCY France, Email: francois.theimer@wanadoo.fr

MARCH 2014


Another Great Toledo Doll Show Coming April 6 T he October 2013 show featured an incredible abundance of rare and high end antique and vintage dolls, yet those that came looking for artist and contemporary dolls were not disappointed. Well-known doll artists also displayed some amazing creations for consideration. Barbie and her friends from all decades made a grand appearance at the show as did those wonderful antique and artist teddy bears we all love to see. A few of our great dealers included Fritzi’s Antique Dolls (IL), Floyd Jones (IL) Sherry Dempsey (PA), Sue Brightwell (PA), Nancy McGlammery/Ed Pelton (PA), Gigi’s Dolls & Sherry’s Teddy Bears (IL) Diane Kirsch Smith (IN), Lorrie Dove (MI), Chuck & Barbara Buysse, Two Beth’s Dolls (OH), Bob Severns (IN) and Allen Cunningham/ Deana Ellis. We hope to see you our next show on April 6, 2014.

Jean & Ken Nordquist’s Collectible Doll Co. Gourmet Doll Supplies for the Discriminating Doll Collector

*Nordquist Doll Molds *Daisyettes *Bleuette Premiere *Mignonettes *Presentation Displays *Paper Toys for Dolls *Thurlow Patters for Knit & Crochet Outfits *Collectible Doll Fashions

*Finished Crocheted Outfits *Cat’s Paw Doll Jewelry *Feather Trees *Paper Ornaments *Vintage Postcards *Doll Sewing Projects *Leather Doll Shoes *Mohair Doll Wigs *Miniature Accessories Mold & Global Catalogs not shown

Complete 5 Catalog Set - $25 ppd. Includes $15 money back coupon with purchase.

jeannordquistdolls.com Order Desk

1-800-566-6646 Collectible Doll Company P.O. Box 697, Cedar Hill, TX 75106 ANTIQUE DOLL COLLECTOR

MARCH 2014

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www.toledodollshow.com

APRIL 6, 2014

10am - 4pm

(Theater Lobby open at 9:30 am) Future shows: 10-12-14 & 04-12-15

Stranahan Great Hall 4655 Heatherdowns Blvd. - Toledo, Ohio 43614 Only 3 minutes off exit 59 of the 80/90 Ohio Turnpike (between I-75 & 475)

Admission $5 ($1 off with ad)

Early bird entry available on show day with advance registration. Following are just a few of the many great dealers coming in from coast to coast. Check the web site for others & as well as hotel group rates. You won’t want to miss this one. Beth Ryan & Beth Karp/ 2 Beth’s Dolls (Ruby Lane)  Fritzi’s Antqiue Dolls (IL)  Geri Gentile (MI)  Ron & Robyn Martin / Straw Bear Antiques (GA)  Erika/Axel Pinkpank (IL)  Vivian Brady (Vivian’s Dolls)  Sue Brightwell (PA)  Mary Jo Koets (Mary JO’s Enchanted Doll Closet)  Linda Cantwell (IN)  Gail Lemmon (All Dolled Up)  Artist Deana Ellis (OR)  Allen Cunningham - Bethany Lowe Artist & Designer  Cynthia Oregon (LA)  Barbara Russell (SC)  Artist Bob Severns (Two Spirit Dolls)  Chuck & Barbara Buysse (MI)  Angela Simko (IN)  Donna Kirsch Smith (IN)  Sandy Johnson Barts (MI)  Sharon & Jan Napier (MI)  Joan Nagy (MI)  Lorrie Dove (Antique Doll Treasures - Ruby Lane)  Cindy Budin (OH)  Michael Wolk - Laniewski (MI)  Sonja Bryer (OH)  Ed Pelton/Nancy McGlamery (PA)  Joyce Kintner (PA)  Floyd Jones (IL)  Alora’s Attic - www.alorasattic.com & many many more.

Doll Appraisals by Floyd Jones Doll Appraiser for the televised Antique Road Show (WI, OR, MT, MI, PA, OH, Fl, VA, SC & TN episodes)

Door prize to include an antique doll give-a-way Information - Sandy Bullock 734-282-0152 Email: sandy4085@hotmail.com (email for info. - discount coupons)


Ashley’s Dolls & Antiquities Be sure to join us for the NADDA Doll Show & Sale, May 3 and 4, 2014 in Greensboro, NC. Southern Garden Party on Saturday, May 3 at 4 pm, with speaker, Rosalie Whyel. Alan Pate will be presenting a progam on Sunday morning, May 4 at 9 am. There will be an entire hotel floor of some of the country’s BEST dealers. Embassy Suites 336.668.4535 for reservations. More info at NADDA.org. Do not miss!!

Billye Harris • 723 NC Hwy 61 South, Whitsett, NC 27377 • (336) 266-2608 Website: AshleysDolls.com • E-mail: AshleysDolls@gmail.com Visit us on Rubylane.com/shops/Ashleysdollsandantiquities • Generous Layaways Member UFDC and NADDA


Antique DOLL Collector April 2014 Vol. 17, No. 3


LAYAWAY AVAILABLE Member UFDC & NADDA

(Nat'l Antique Doll Dealers Assn.)

Visit my website: www.grandmasatticdolls.com

13” F.G. Scroll Bebe, br. p/w eyes, newer mohair wig & orig. cork pate, fabulous ant. Fr. aqua silk dress, ant. Fr. shoes, ant. crocheted socks & magnificent ant. Fr. hat. On orig. early 8 ball jointed st. wrist body (touch up on parts of body). Absolutely GORGEOUS!!! Only....$3900.

10” JDK “Hilda” Baby, blue sl. eyes , cl. dome, mint pale bisque, gorgeous batiste christening gown, ornate ant. ribbon & lace bonnet & pearl & silver rattle, orig. 5 pc. Kestner baby body, o/mo w/2 upper teeth. Desirable tiny size “Hilda” baby. Head Incised “Hilda”. An absolute DARLING!!! $2650.

24” S & H #939 Cl/ Mo., perfect bisque, blue threaded p/w eyes, early “closed dome” , ant. blonde HH wig, vintage cotton dress, big velvet ant.. hat, crocheted socks & darling ant. leather shoes. GREAT early orig. chunky 8 ball st. wrist body (lower arms have vintage revarnish, not noticeable). A real KNOCK OUT!!! 3500.

13” K * R 101 “Marie”, immaculate bisque, brown intaglio eyes, orig. mohair wig & pate, darling orig. ant. dress, ant. undies, vintage hat, ant. leather shoes & pink socks. On orig. fully jointed K * R body. Great pouty expression. Darling small size!!! $2250.

21” S & H #550, blue sl. eyes, mohair & painted lashes, mint bisque, orig. full mohair wig & pate, orig. batiste dress & ant. coat, undies & vintage silk shoes. On orig. S & H body. Absolutely BEAUTIFUL!!! $950.

9” Kestner Pouty, gorgeous mint pale bisque, brown p/w eyes, orig. mohair wig & Kestner pate, orig. aqua silk dress, orig. leather shoes, socks & undies, added ant. Fr. hat. On great early orig. Kestner body w/ large upper balls. DARLING pouty face. GORGEOUS in this wonderful desirable small cabinet size!!! $3550

10 1/2” Gebruder Heubach #5636 Character, , mint bisque, blue sl. eyes, slightly op/mo., 2 lower molded teeth, deep dimples, ant. mohair wig & orig. pate, darling ant. wool dress, orig. slip, undies, socks & leather shoes. On orig. fully jointed body. DARLING little character in a great rare teeny cabinet size!!! Crisp modeling!! $2150.

Darling Antique French pink corset w/ lace for about a 13 to 14” French Bebe. 3" x 3", metal ring holes & edged in lace. Ties with silk ribbon. A nice find in this small size!!! GREAT condition. $375.
 Antique Sterling Silver French Purse, etched in center on both sides, orig. chain in tact, working latch. Out of my collection & GORGEOUS!!!

Joyce Kekatos e-mail: joycedolls@aol.com I buy dolls and sell on consignment. 2137 Tomlinson Avenue, Bronx, NY 10461 home: 718-863-0373 cell: 917-859-2446


Nelling, Inc.

P.O. Box 4327 Burbank CA 91503 Cell: 818-738-4591 Home: 818-562-7839

Member NADDA and UFDC

published by the Set of six 3” Hertwig Immobiles and Their Precious Pets-Marked “Germany” and in excellent condition! $650 for all. K * R 114 Gretchen 15-1/2” and 101 Marie 15” sisters w/ their coordinating outfits and belongings in the trunk they have called home for years. $4950 for all.

Exhibiting: April 11-12 Legacy Doll Museum, Open Forum Friday night and Sale Saturday, Billings MT May 3-4 NADDA Show, Greensboro NC, Embassy Suites Hotel

BUYING & SELLING QUALITY DOLLS FOR OVER 20 YEARS

Visit us at: www.maspinelli.com • e-mail: nellingdolls@gmail.com

Office Staff: Publication and Advertising: Keith Kaonis Editor-in-Chief: Donna C. Kaonis Administration Manager: Lorraine Moricone Phone: 1-888-800-2588 Art/Production: Lisa Ambrose Graphic Designer: Marta Sivakoff Contributors: Ursula Mertz, Lynn Murray, Samy Odin, Andy Ourant Subscription Manager: Jim Lance Marketing: Penguin Communications Publications Director: Eric Protter Antique Doll Collector (ISSN 1096-8474) is published monthly by the Puffin Co., LLC, 15 Hillside Place, Northport, NY 11768 Phone: 1-631-261-4100 Periodicals postage paid at Northport, NY. and at additional mailing offices. Contents ©2014 Antique Doll Collector, all rights reserved. Postmaster: Send address changes to Antique Doll Collector, P.O. Box 239, Northport, NY 11768. Subscriptions: Send to Antique Doll Collector, P. O. Box 239, Northport, NY 11768. Phone: 1-888-800-2588 or 1-631-261-4100 Subscription Rates: One Year (Twelve Issues) $42.95; Two Years (Twenty-four Issues) $75.95. First class delivery in U.S. add $29 per year. Outside the U.S. add $30 per year. Foreign subscriptions must be paid in U.S. funds. Do not send cash. Credit cards accepted. Advertising and Editorial: Call 717-517-9217 or email antiquedoll@gmail.com

SEE US ON THE WEB AT: http://www.antiquedollcollector.com email: AntiqueDoll@gmail.com

Antique Doll Collector is not responsible for any inaccuracies in advertisers’ content. An unsolicited manuscript must be accompanied by SASE. Antique Doll Collector assumes no responsibility for such material. All rights including translations are reserved by the publisher. Requests for permissions and reprints must be made in writing to Antique Doll Collector. ©2014 by the Puffin Co., LLC.

MOVING?

Important: We need your old address and your new. The Post Office does not forward magazines. Call 1-888-800-2588 or write to us at: P.O. Box 239, Northport, NY 11768. 4

ANTIQUE DOLL COLLECTOR

APRIL 2014


Scintillating Bru Jne Beauty. Beguiling blue eyes reflect the sea and sky. Superbly rendered features with exquisite attention to velvety coloring and texture of bisque. C. 1882. This exemplary Bebe is dressed in lavish ruched silk and lovely lace bonnet with large silk bow. Perfect bisque head and hands. Please call for details. 19.5” tall

Tel: 425.765.4010 Valerie@beautifulbebes.com

Captivating Jumeau Poupee Bois has a serene beauty and lovely wood body. This enchantress has two dresses; one cotton floral print for the day’s errands or relaxing in the garden and the other in white pique and soutache embellishing with a matching flannel lined cape for afternoon tea or a summer dinner on the verandah. At only 15.5” she is a sublime addition for the descriminating collector. Special Antique Doll Collector Magazine Price Only~$7700 (please mention this Ad)

Amazing and desirable boy known as the Little Prince. Soft blue eyes, aquiline nose & sensitively shaped lips with dewy finish, softly tinted bisque with perfect coloring & defined deep blonde curls that sweep across his head. Depicting a lad of the Victorian period, jaunty in antique navy wool blazer w/ brass buttons over cream colored wool knickers & navy and red plaid scarf at his throat to keep the chill away. Red silk knit stockings and antique leather shoes complete his look. His ball jointed body has excellent original finish. Overall in fantastic condition. $11,800~

Come See Beautiful Bebes at the upcoming NADDA SHOW & SALE MAY 3 & 4 in Greensboro, NC. 14” Belton Bebe. This little cherub will melt your heart with her expressive eyes and pale creamy bisque. Perfect in every way! $1995~

Mention this Ad for a special savings at the show!

Glorious 17” Papier-Mache. This is a stellar molded doll from the early 19th century Biedermeier Era with complicated braided coronet in a fashion that was referred to as a Giraffe hairstyle. She is wearing her original empire style gown with cream ground and tiny flowers over her muslin and wood body. Generally in superb condition. $3750~

Gorgeous Gottschalk dollhouse in wonderful 1/2” scale. In overall excellent condition with expected age and patina. All walls and floors retain original designs. Delightfully compact and perfect for display! 21.5”w x 23”x t x 10” d. $3600~

Member UFDC & NADDA

Sublime Offerings - The artistry of Diana Shorey Boettger will be offered at the upcoming NADDA Show in North Carolina in early May. Also, available on www.bebesatticfinds.rubylane.com and by telephone or email of course! Many sizes and wig styles! Prices range from $99 and up plus shipping.


The Complete Guide to Antique, Vintage and Collectible Dolls

April 2014 Volume 17, Number 3

30

DRESSING DOLLS IN THE SONNEBERG AREA OF GERMANY By Mary Krombholz

19

2013 UFDC SPECIAL EXHIBIT: EDWARDIAN LADY DOLLS AND THEIR WARDROBES A perfect complement to the

convention theme, “A Capital Affair,” and its emphasis on the early years of the 20th century.

14 Auction Gallery 44 News 44 Books

55 58 60 63

25

HOPPIN’ DOWN THE BUNNY TRAIL By Alicia Carver and Barbara Close As warmer weather approaches, doll and holiday collectors naturally think of rabbits!

Our final 2013 UFDC Convention article features a wonderful exhibit presented by Donelle Denery. The Edwardian period, popularized in fashion by the “Gibson Girl” drawings of Charles Dana Gibson, has often been described at the last true age of elegance. In this exhibit you will see dolls and their wardrobes reflecting the sinuous curvy shapes and the later columnar shapes of this era. Photo by Donelle Denery

About The Cover

Mystery Emporium Calendar Classified

38

MOMMY’S LITTLE DARLING!

By Elizabeth K. Schmahl, DDS A Mother’s Day tribute to baby dolls, collectibles and traditions.

46

GAME ON! MINIATURE FRENCH TOYS AND GAMES FOR DOLLS By Jan Peterson Collecting these tiny treasures is a delightful quest for today’s antique doll collectors.

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ANTIQUE DOLL COLLECTOR

52

APRIL 2014

SEE WHAT YOU WILL BE MISSING IF YOU DON’T ATTEND THE MAY NADDA SHOW!

54

CROSSROADS: A DOLL & TEDDY BEAR GATHERING IN ALBUQUERQUE

56

GAITHERSBURG ANTIQUE DOLL SHOW


(212) 787-7279 P.O. Box 1410 NY, NY 10023

matrixbymail@gmail.com Quality Antique Dolls by Mail Return Privilege •Layaways Member UFDC & NADDA

P

OTS O B ’ USS N

F

antasy, grandeur and charm all combine in this exceptionally rare and important ‘allegorical’ automaton attributed to Roullet et Decamps, so celebrated for their exceptional depiction of animal whimsy. In this man meets animal tour de force the satirical and sartorial courtier is splendidly dressed as Puss ‘n Boots in the finest of raw silks from his plumed hat and walking stick to ‘leather’ dress boots. He rotates in hot pursuit of a charming goat skinned mouse he has captured by the tail! But who is chasing who?! Never meant to succeed, Monsier Le Puss whirls lavishly in balletic circles angling to and fro – his jointed neck turning here to there – all to the tune of a cheerful gavotte! Put aside, for the moment, the redundant Jumeau automata and indulge yourself in certainly the finest and most comical and functional of elegant parlour toys – complete with original dome. $9,500


1. 12” Happy Gbr. Heubach tyke with spirited eyes, op/cl smile with molded tongue, 6 teeth, deep dimples and pompadour! $550. 2. Rare Recknagel Character – what a find! Never seen unlisted RA, mold ‘12’! A 7” tall powerhouse doll w/ playful intaglio eyes, a real grin, funny hair and toddler body! $995. 3. Supersize 12” Googlie ‘254’ – a happy, snappy fellow w/ big round intaglio eyes, watermelon grin, double cheeks and a ‘big boy’ haircomb in factory clothes with cap! $1100.

4. 17” French Raynal Child – cheerful brilliant coloring in her cunning Deco outfit w/ matching shoes and pretty blush. Saucy! $495.

(212) 787-7279 P.O. Box 1410 NY, NY 10023 matrixbymail@gmail.com Quality Antique Dolls by Mail Return Privilege •Layaways Member UFDC & NADDA

5. 15” Factory Original ‘Halbig Lady’ – flapper style abounds in the period portrait of this factory mint and stylish lady w/ the iconic slender womanly body, chiseled Deco features, mint factory heeled shoes and her jazzy little dog! $3600

7. 9” Large Simon Halbig ‘886’ – w/ orange stockings, sleep eyes w/ both lashes and orig. long uncut wig, om with 2 square cut teeth, some minor invisible body flaws make her a steal at just $2500.

6. 13” French Boutique China – exciting, signed ‘Maison Marot//Palais Royal’ leather fashion body in the original tailored ‘Broderie Anglaise’ couture w/ signed french shoes and a Rohmer inspired solid crown china head with original intricate braided wig – unique and fascinating souvenir from the history of French doll making. $1800 Rare body mark

8. 13” Heirloom Original Sweetheart – a pre-1900 bundle of delicate baby wool layers embrace this tender French Export face and pw eyes of this loving one of a kind doll, $450

9. Factory Original Handwerck w/Signed Shoes – a flawless scarcer model ‘119’ seldom in the tender 18” size with mint, signed body, elaborate factory clothes, mint wig and even the box! $650.


10. 14” SFBJ 233 ‘Screamer’ Toddler – on the success of the Jumeau 211 girl, they followed with this boy – SFBJ’s rarest and most exaggerated character, mint flawless quality, jewel blue PW’s, fully jtd. toddler body and original period clothes! $3000.

11. 18” Gbr Heubach ‘Screamer’ – this mint character is the German response by Heubach – king of characters – providing ample furrows, wrinkles and tear filled intaglio eyes with wailing tongue, as well as the perfered ball-jointed body! $2400.

(212) 787-7279 P.O. Box 1410 NY, NY 10023

Quality Antique Dolls by Mail Return Privilege • Layaways Member UFDC & NADDA

matrixbymail@gmail.com

14. 35” All Original China – 1870’s elegance in this heirloom china portrait w/ her original ladylike body, sloping shoulders and all 4 layers of her clothes and shoes. So Stately! $795

12. One Owner Family Doll – fine and fancy original clothes w/factory shoes as well as the prettiest brown coloring on this lovely 19” exceptional enigma signed BS//457. Mint too! $895

18. Rich and dramatic 1850’s Motschmann with Rare Black Hair – and all the floating joints including hands and feet and all original clothes incl. the slippers! Elegantly austere. $495

13. 14” Choice Cabinet Belton – a rarely signed example ‘TR 806’ with dazzling blue PW’s, clo/ mo, mohair wig, orig. stiff wrist body and darling original clothes! So tender! $1250.

15-16. French Export Kuhnlenz Closed Mouth – none better than this 1890 all original ‘949’ type in a scarce 27” size! Jumeau brows PW’s, orig. cork pate w/ French paper, long mint orig. Fr. wig, Fr. body and even Fr. signed shoes (see below) plus lavish original silk ensemble! $2500. 17. 23” Luxurious Handwerck ‘119’ – mint heirloom original condition with the early signed body, factory wig in ringlets, choice quality and splendid Bebe style clothes! $750.

20. 18” Bebe Phénix Steiner – a gem from the Lafosse era with brilliant and arresting features, exquisite coloring and detailed artwork, stunning blue PW eyes, plus fully jointed stiff wrist Steiner body and antique shoes! $3500. 19. 16” Glass Eye Swivel Neck Parian – aristocratic grace from this powder fine lady w/early cobalt blue eyes plus original body and clothes. $1200.


Dolls With a Mission is an overview of the Door of Hope Mission in Shanghai during the years 1901-1951. It depicts not only the history of the mission but provides insight into the everyday lives of the women and children rescued from a life of sin and shame in the brothels of Shanghai’s red light district. Original source material and extensive photographs of the dolls make this an invaluable reference for collectors and historians. Hardcover, $75 plus $5 for shipping, handling and tracking. Books may be ordered from the author Jean Kestel 155 Spring Drive, East Meadow, NY 11554. It can also be ordered at dohbook.com using Paypal. If choosing this option, please call the author at 516-561-8447. 14

ANTIQUE DOLL COLLECTOR

APRIL 2014

Auction Gallery T

his rare portrait doll by Fritz Bierschenk, marked F.B. 616, 18 inches, realized $11,200 at the recent Frasher Doll Auction held in Kansas City, MO. The cloth mask pressed Scootles by Krueger, c. 1930’s, brought $6,720. Frasher’s Doll Auctions, 2323 S. Mecklin School Road, Oak Drive, MI 64075. 816-625-3786


SANDY’S DREAM DOLLS

Sandy Kralovetz Always Buying Dolls of Quality For a Houston adventure please visit our spacious location at

Thompson’s Antique Center of Texas

Texas’ largest antique center with over 50 antique dolls and accessories for sale.

9950 Hempstead Road 600 Northwest Mall Houston, TX 77092 602.228.1829 281.339.0269 skayk43@aol.com mailing address: 9825 Moers Rd Houston, Texas 77075 Call for doll information Member UFDC & NADDA

Happy Easter! Simon Halbig 1249 DEP BL Eyes - 25” • K*R 101 19” Blue Painted Eyes

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ANTIQUE DOLL COLLECTOR

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LAYAW AVAILA AY BLE

Gigi’s Dolls & Sherry’s Teddy Bears Inc. Allow Us To Help You Discover The Child Within You!

27” FG on Gesland jointed body with bisque hands and lower legs (right leg has repair, left leg small hairline), mohair wig in original style, blue PW eyes, pierced ears, antique style dress $6050.

16” SH 1300 - 2 1/2 DEP Swimmer works, metal hands, blue stat eyes, pierced ears, original? costume (faded), mohair wig, part cork body, key wind $1995.

19” Kathe Kruse Du Mein Baby with box (Traumerclau? on box), feet marked Kathe Kruse & 7. Nov 1983, has tagged cotton top, undershirt & diaper, Beautiful painting $895. 22” “Old Salty” Centerseam, One of a kind mohair bear by Frances Harper of NH, German wool felt pads, stuffed with pellets and excelsior, great face $145.

13 3/4” JDK 211 Toddler, brown sleep eyes, brown mohair wig, molded o/c mouth, ball jointed toddler body $525. 5 1/2” x 5” Steiff Donkey, air brushed velvet, great personality, tag in ear $79.95

6” Kestner “0” Barefoot Af Am All Bisque, jointed head, arms and legs, black pupiless glass eyes, original mohair wig, chip at left hip string hole $1595.

16 1/2” CM Alt Beck & Gottschalck 879 N.8, pierced ears, blue st eyes, cloth body, compo & wood jointed arms (repainted), HH wig $285. 11” Kestner Century Doll Co. Baby, blue sleep eyes, wonderful molding, cloth body, compo hands (repainted ) $275.

8” Heubach #7760 in Square Baby, blue intaglio eyes, pinkie right hand as is $395. 9” Heubach #34 Germany 0 Pouty Baby, blue intaglio eyes, some pitting by chin $295.

14” Madame Hendren Whistling Cowboy all original, whistling mechanism in legs ( no boots) $145. 12” Alexander Lissy all original in red cotton dress, panties, socks and red shoes $155. 1950’s Grill with folding legs, has roasting spit with chicken, warmer, oven, 2 pots, Oscar Meyer Hot Dog, fork, battery operated (doesn’t work, old battery rusted mechanism) $95.

11” Smiling Bru “A” Fashion, blue eyes, pierced ears, kid body, mohair wig, dressed in antique style dress $2995.

24” #136 Hertel Schwab & Co, blue sleep eyes, pierced ears $295. Steiff Lamby 14.5” x 13” alpaca, fully tagged, cute expression $145. 15” Schoenhut Boy brown intaglio eyes, paint chip on nose, mohair wig as is $850. 9 1/2” L. Amberg & Sons 2/0 K Baby, blue sleep eyes, left arm has had repair, right 2 fingers chipped $145.

16” French Fashion dome head w/ stiff neck, blue eyes, antique style walking dress, kid body mohair wig $1095.

30 1/2” French Silk Face Boudoir Doll, nose as is, dress faded & stained left side, great doll $195 $195. Now $110. 28” Alsace Loraine French Silk Face Bed Doll, silk apron as is, face is worn in 2 small spots $95. 21” Norah Wellings w/ tag on foot $125.

13” Jumeau “3” Fashion, brown pw eyes, Jumeau stamped beautiful kid body, antique undergarments and leather shoes $2250.

13 1/2” Ideal Snow White w/ Shirley Temple head, mint condition all original, slight crazing on arms, tag on dress “Rayon An Ideal Doll” $325.

19” Patsy Ann by Effanbee all original in mint condition, beautiful compo & green eyes(1 crack lower left eye), 1 small crack back of head $295. 22” EIH Horsman Baby Dimples all original with tagged dress, beautiful compo head and arms, legs have few cracks $165. 8” Topsy Turvy compo, Af Am / Cauc Baby original in blue/pink floral dress $95.

31” O/M Tete Jumeau w/ applied ears, blue pw eyes, HH wig, cork pate, red Tete Jumeau mark, antique clothing and fabulous bonnet $2850.

36” Ideal Shirley Temple 1957 in vintage dress, fabulous full hair in original set, newer replaced shoes, socks and unders, some staining on arms $525.

27” Flirty Eyed Shirley Temple, cute redressed doll with her original wig (restyled), slight crazing $295. 16” Schoenhut Rolly Polly, great coloring, some chipping paint by right hand & seams, fun piece $195. 11” Effanbee Patricia in original outfit (faded) & red hat, vintage shoes & socks, brown tin eyes, HH wig, slight crazing $105.

13” Early 1900 hand carved wood pin jointed fully articulated doll (artist model), great detailing $395.

6029 N. Northwest Hwy. Chicago, IL 60631 • 773-594-1540 • (800-442-3655 orders only) • Fax 773- 594-1710 Open: Tues., Wed., Sat. 10 a.m. - 5 p.m., Thurs., Fri. 10 a.m. - 6 p.m. Closed Sun. & Mon. Near O’Hare, Park Ridge & Niles

Chicago’s finest selection of Antique, Modern and Collectible Dolls, Barbie, Gene, Alexander, Tonner, Fashion Royalty, Steiff, Dollhouses and Accessories. Member U.F.D.C. & NADDA • Worldwide Shipping

Contact us for Monthly Specials! Tour our shop at: www.gigisdolls.com & join us on Facebook


2013 UFDC Special Exhibit: Edwardian Lady Dolls and Their Wardrobes

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he exhibit Edwardian Lady Dolls and their Wardrobes, presented by Donelle Denery with assistance from Susan Sirkis and Kathy Embry, was a perfect complement to the convention theme, A Capital Affair and its emphasis on the early years of the 20th century. Named for Edward VII who followed the lengthy rein of Queen Victoria, the early Edwardian period saw the emergence of Art Nouveau reflected in fashion… the sinuous S curves of the Edwardian lady. A new corset which tilted a woman’s body so that the bosom was pushed forward as a whole, resulting in a mono-bosom while the shoulders and rear were tilted backwards. A tiny waist completed this ultra feminine curvaceous look. Hair was worn in a fashionable pompadour with waves and puffs topped off by a large wide brimmed hat. The “Gibson Girl” immortalized by the drawings of Charles Dana Gibson was the idealized modern woman, an arresting combination of fragility and voluptuousness. After 1906 a new style, claimed by Paul Poiret as his own invention, began to take precedence featuring a rising, less constricted waistline and a slimmer skirt. A longer corset that constricted the hips and a narrow silhouette made it difficult to sit down. Although lovely to look at, women’s fashion again was less than comfortable. During the Edwardian period, dolls with molded breasts and slim waists wore clothing that emulated the fashions worn by the well dressed woman. In this exhibit we enjoyed a look at what has been called the last true age of elegance. Information on the dolls in the exhibit was compiled by Donelle Denery and included in a handout given to exhibit attendees.

Kestner Gibson Girls mold number 172. This doll has a distinctly lady-face look with her long thin nose and closed, thin mouth. It most often came in sizes which ranged from 10” to 21”. Mold 172 appears to be based on the popular drawings of Charles Dana Gibson from which the term “The Gibson Girl” derived. Three of the dolls are bisque shoulder heads with no articulation of the neck. You will also see a fourth undressed Gibson Girl which is a very rare socket head (bisque head fits into the neck sock of a composition body). The 15-inch and 21-inch dolls shown in the picture are on leather bodies with slim waists which have riveted articulation at the shoulders. This is the most common type of body for these dolls. The smallest Gibson Girl shown without clothes has a muslin body with porcelain lower arms and legs. There were some interesting variations in the painting styles of these dolls: single stroke eyebrows (most common) and multi stroke eyebrows as well as eyelashes painted on a slant on both the upper and lower lid and eyelashes painted straight down and only on the lower lid (mohair lashes were on the upper part of the sleep eye to simulate real lashes). The Kestner Gibson Girl had a distinctly adult face with a long and thin, closed mouth as compared to the more dollyfaced 162 with its open mouth and teeth. ANTIQUE DOLL COLLECTOR

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At left, the childhood doll of actress Jane Withers, Kestner mold 162, 20 inches. This doll has a one-piece forearm and hand. On her right is Blanche, c. 1908, who has over 60 articles of clothing and accessories. She has an articulated wrist. Blanche, named by her original owner, Katherine Derr Barney, was rediscovered in Connecticut in 1995 by the owner’s granddaughter along with a journal which detailed the family’s vacation to Europe in 1908 and their trip to Paris for a wardrobe the for doll. Her clothing reflects the earlier Edwardian period with an “S” shape. Mold 162 with its dolly-faced look is seen more often than 172. Perhaps little girls favored the lady doll with the adult body but childlike face.

18” Lady Gwendolyn Pingree is a Kestner 162 lady doll whose clothing replicates costumes belonging to Lady Betty Modish, a 162 lady doll accompanied by her exquisite wardrobe and donated to the Wenham Museum in 1956 by the original owner, Mary Pingree. Lady Betty Modish and her extensive wardrobe continues to attract visitors to the Wenham. The doll had been a gift in 1902 to Mary on her first birthday. Over the next several years, Mary’s mother and aunt created the outstanding costumes. Lady Gwendolyn Pingree’s wardrobe is nearly as lavish as her look-a-like cousin, Lady Betty Modish. A fundraiser for the Wenham in 1987, Lady Pingree’s patterns were drawn by Michelle Hamilton, a talented pattern drafter. Skilled doll seamstresses including Sylvia MacNeill, Estelle Johnston, Agnes Sura and Sally Griffin among others created duplicate outfits for Lady Pingree from fabrics provided by the raffle organizer curator Lorna Lieberman.

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On the right, a pristine Kestner 162 18” nurse dressed in a uniform of the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA school of nursing. In the hem of her skirt is a hand written tag which reads “Of Univ of PA, Phila PA”. She has an articulated wrist. Several lady dolls of this era were dressed as nurses, one of the few types of work suitable for women at the time. The doll to her left is a S & H 1469 and the smallest figure on the far left is a German candy container.

Mold #1469 was made for several companies; one of the dolls in the exhibit has the mold mark from Cuno and Otto Dressel. She was shown unclothed to display the doll’s distinct body style with long slim legs and forearms, molded breasts and ample derrière. One of the Edwardian nurses is also mold # 1469. The painting on these dolls is often of a lesser quality than normally found by S&H.

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Kestner 162 Nita, 16 inches, so named for her original owner Nita Pesant, is shown with many of her 34 pieces of clothing and accessories. The Pesant family, as documented by the travel labels on the doll’s trunk, left Hoboken, NJ on August 24th, 1911, traveled to Paris and returned on June 17th, 1912. Their ship was the “Cincinnati” of the Hamburg-American line. Nita’s outfits reflect more of the influence of the later Edwardian period with more of a columnar shape. The length of the Pesant family’s vacation was long (almost 10 months) even by the norm of the typical wealthy American family’s European vacation. It has always made her current owner wonder - did the family extend their vacation after the sinking of the Titanic on April 15th, 1912. There were three Simon & Halbig lady dolls from mold #1159 in the exhibit. The smaller two (by no means small at 22 and 26 inches!) reflect what is most often found in dolls of this mold: bisque head, glass sleep eyes, painted lower lashes with mohair upper lashes, upswept hairstyle of mohair or human hair, open mouth with four teeth (shown here), shapely lady composition body (molded breasts and slim waist), painted lip accents and earrings. S&H sold this head to several companies, among them Handwerck and Jumeau. The doll shown on the left has a body with a Jumeau stamp. The largest 1159 in the exhibit measuring 30,”(center) is the less common variant of this mold which has a closed mouth. Marketed as “La Patricienne” from 1905 – 1915, this doll is attributed to Edmond Daspres who was the successor to the Jules Steiner Firm. The body seems almost hand sculpted and likely had limited production. The hands are large and resemble Steiner “banana” fingers. This information is from the writings of Florence Theriault and Dorothy McGonagle. 22

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15-inch Flora and Dora are marked 1469/ Simon & Halbig/2. These lucky ladies have 22 pieces of clothing and 13 hats in their vast wardrobe! For the most part, their outfits are in the style of 1912-1914 late Edwardian era with the “I” shape. Their triplet sister, Violet, is displayed at the Legacy Doll Museum in Billings, Montana.

REFERENCES Dorothy McGonagle, The Dolls of Jules Nicolas Steiner Kathy Embry, “The Original It Girl,” January 2010, Antique DOLL Collector Coleman, Collector’s Book of Doll Clothes; Costumes in Miniature 1700-1929

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Hoppin’ Down the Bunny Trail By Alicia Carver and Barbara Close

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he Hare as a symbol of fertility can be traced as far back as the ancient Egyptians who considered the Hare sacred. While the first known mentions of the bunny as an Easter symbol appears in 15th century German literature, the first edible bunnies were not made until the early 1800’s in Germany. By the middle of the 19th century, rabbit-shaped objects with or without chromolithographed eggs, became the gift of choice to celebrate the Easter holiday and many were designed as candy containers. For children, these candy containers also doubled as toys and an entire cottage industry sprung around it in Sonneberg, Germany, then center of toy making in Germany and the world. The average family involved in making rabbits could produce between a dozen and

Large, early rabbits range in size from 11” to the largest at 20.” Notice the wonderful, realistic modeling of the three flocked rabbits on the left. The largest rabbit is covered in a flannel material and carries an original woven basket.

Rabbit candy containers from the early 1900’s range in size from 5.5” to 6.5”. Notice their distinctive personalities and molded clothing. Also, note the difference in ear construction on these rabbits com-pared to the later ones made during the 1930’s.

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The white bisque man riding a rabbit candy container on the left measures 10” by 10” and is earlier. Notice his paperweight eyes, molded moustache and the rabbits construction which includes flocking, glass eyes and realistic modeling. The Schoenau & Hoffmesiter little boy on the right is riding a candy container circa 1910. Notice the lack of realistic detail on the rabbit and the cotton flannel covering.

This Schoenau & Hoffmeister doll riding a tricycle measures 8” tall. Dressed with rabbit ears, his cart which now contains a collection of small antique toys, would have carried candy at Easter.

These doll faced rabbit candy containers range in size from 5” to 7” tall. The boy in the back dressed in a rabbit costume measures 9” tall. Notice the range of materials used on these doll-faced containers. They range from bisque and celluloid to wax. Circa 1910. These AM 390 Armand Marseille Dutch candy container pair measure 9.5” and 10.5” tall. Dressed for Easter, he holds a cotton carrot and she holds a basket of goodies. The candy container is located in the torso of the doll which separates at the waist into two pieces. The molded pressed cardboard eggs with choromolithography covering and dresden trim opened to reveal candy and small goodies for children at Easter. These same images can be found on postcards from the early 1900’s. They come in many different sizes with the smallest and extra large ones being the most difficulty to find. 26

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fifteen rabbits per week. These rabbits were hollow toys crafted of papier mache with removable heads and could be filled with candy. Most of the earlier rabbits created by these individual artisans and families were realistically detailed and many resemble the local chamois-colored, brown-eyed Thuringian breed. By 1890, Carl Schaller founded his own company in Germany and his descendants continue producing holiday candy containers until this day. During this time, he hand-crafted over 100 original molds. He was one of five mold makers, called brassiere (one who makes a mold by hand) who supplied pre-molded figures to local artisans and families. To this day, the Ino Schaller family business still carries on producing new molds and new re-productions. As rabbit-shaped candy containers grew in popularity, craftsmen, paid by the piece, were supplied with these premolded figures which they could then paint and dress. Once completed, the rabbits were exported by the thousands to England, France and the United States. At first, they were sold to candy stores and later to larger importers such as then dime-store giant F.W. Woolworth. The artisans who finished the pieces worked with matte finish paint and flocking and a variety of fabrics such as felt, mohair, silk, cotton, velvet,


This 9” pair of Rabbit-faced candy containers made to depict Jack and Jill date to the early 1900’s. Each still carrying their original buckets for water, they are in superb condition and stand on their original wooden bases. Their heads lift off to reveal the candy compartment.

chenille, and lace. These earlier pieces contain realistic modeling and individual personality. Since Germany was also the center of doll making, it was only natural that rabbits and dolls would merge into novelty toys such as dolls riding rabbits, clock-work pieces, nodders, rabbits pulling carts and even comic characters. After World War I, with the advent of mass production, the rabbit-shaped candy containers continued to be produced but many changes occurred. The flocking commonly found on early rabbits was replaced by air brushed finishes, and many of the pieces were now made out pressed cardboard instead of papier mache. Stick legs like those found on putz pieces and cardboard ears replaced the earlier and more realistically modelled rabbits. By the 1930’s, rabbits were assembled by joining two pieces of pressed cardboard with staples and a binding tape that was painted over. Early pieces made before the turn of the century are generally unmarked. Relying on stamps for dating pieces is not always reliable since many were imported in boxes and the boxes themselves were stamped and not the individual pieces. However, pieces found with the Germany stamp were generally produced

Another novelty of Victorian era rabbit candy containers are these rabbits coming out of eggs. The rabbit coming out of the blue egg has his candy opening in the base while the others open at the neck.

These 1930’s rabbits range in size from 7.5” to 10”. Notice the lack of detail in the ears and the loss of realistic modeling replaced by painted features. They are lighter in weight and the tallest one in the back is a roly-poly. These earlier flocked rabbits are in a sitting position with their forepaws on the ground. They range in size from 4” to 8”. Notice all the variations in molds. All have glass eyes.

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before World War II and some much earlier. East Germany, German Democratic Republic, West Germany and Federal Republic of Germany marks all date after World War II. Pieces stamped US Zone Germany or USSR Zone Germany were produced from about 1947-1952. If stamped, the stamp can be found either on the bottom of the candy container or inside the neck cardboard insert and in other unusual places such as on the rabbit’s stomach. However, after the Berlin wall came down, Germany began using the Germany stamp again. This stamp is not be confused with the earlier pieces which were made in the first quarter of the 20th century. For dating purposes, the craftsmanship of the piece is a better guide. Undressed rabbits can be found in three basic poses: resting, sitting with their forepaws on the ground, and sitting back on their haunches. This group of early flocked rabbits are all in a seated position sitting back on their haunches. They range in size from 4” to 10”. Again, notice the variation in this grouping with some carrying a basket, others holding carrots and another one with a carrot in its mouth.

This flocked rabbit candy container pulling a cart is in the less often found running position with his ears swept back and an open mouth. Measuring 9” long, he pulls a moss covered cart with metal wheels while an angry chick candy container looks on. This group of 1930’s rabbit candy containers pulling carts are made of lighter pressed cardboard and feature stick legs. Unlike the earlier carets whose wheels were made of metal, the wheels in this grouping are made of either wood or heavy paper. The rabbit candy container to the far right in the green egg house is marked, “US Zone Germany” dating it from about 1947-1952.

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This 9.5” long rabbit pulling a rabbit in a moss cart is a seldom found piece made of mohair covered papier mache. The rabbit in the front retains its original store ribbon around its neck. It reads “Mintzer’s Minbt-Zer-Mint Shop.”


Some wonderful signed reproductions can be found. This great 14.5” Heubach in an Easter rabbit costume is a reproduction made by Kathy Patterson in 2006. Clearly marked with her signature, it opens at the middle. The rabbit is also a replica and marked, “HS.” This 7.5”painted bisque Armand Marseille “Just Me” is pictured with a pair of white rabbits to her left. White rabbit candy containers are rarer than their brown counterparts. The larger rabbit with the pink ribbon dates to the 1920’s and is covered in Venetian dew. The unmarked white rabbit to her right painted with blue accents is stamped “Germany.” The smallest rabbit in the picture is the earliest. Notice the realistic modeling of his body.

Rabbits in running positions are rarer as are finding pairs that survive to this day. Rabbit dressed as humans and with molded clothing can usually be found standing erect. Rabbit-shaped candy containers are great cross-over holiday collectables that easily blend with doll and toy collections. Although the rarer, early pieces can run in the thousands, the 1930’s rabbits can be readily found for under $100 on the internet and at shows. Also readily available are excellent quality signed reproductions as well as papier mache collectibles still being produced by the Ino Schaller family to this day. As with any highly collectible item, one must be weary of fakes being sold as authentic antiques.

Many of these fake pieces have been coming out of Germany for years and are plentiful on Internet auction sites. Rabbit-shaped candy containers and rabbit-faced dolls are a great way to decorate for the holiday and even enjoy year-round when placed in a doll cabinet. They can add interest, diversity, charm and color to your doll displays. Note: All of the pieces photographed for this article belong to the collection of Barbara Close. Photographs by Alicia Carver. Bibliography Walker, Jessie. Country Living Collectibles: Rabbits. New York: Hearst Books, 1966.

Blackberry Studio

Margaret Gray Kincaid Member NADDA and UFDC Cell: 646-709-4340 Margaret.kincaid@gmail.com

Sandra Sue wishes you a Happy Spring! Brunette Glen Garry girl $200. Brunette girl in red shorts $200. Tosca Girl in Red top and skirt $175. Auburn girl in White top and skirt $175. Bed with original bedding $100. Wardrobe $125. Sandra Sue book by Peggy Millhouse and Margaret Kincaid $20 ANTIQUE DOLL COLLECTOR

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Dressing Dolls in the Sonneberg Area of Germany By Mary Krombholz

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or hundreds of years, a small German town made most of the world’s dolls and toys. The residents of the Thuringian town of Sonneberg made thousands of dolls a year during the 1600s and 1700s. By the 1800s, doll exports totaled from 300,000 to over 500,000 a year. From the 1800s until World War I began in 1914, Sonneberg doll makers made and exported millions of dolls a year. This doll-making town, with a population of 21,717 in 2012, looks much the same today as it did a hundred years ago when almost every resident, young and old, made dolls of wood, papier mache, wax and porcelain. Most of the doll factories still line the streets of Sonneberg today as reminders of the past. This original 1910 postcard, which has been hand colored, shows two child-size wagons filled with dolls parked on the right curb of a street in Sonneberg. Children often used their wagons to deliver dolls and doll parts made and/or assembled by their families in the home factories located on every street. Muddy streets filled with horses and wagons were a typical sight during the early doll-making years. Hand-carved wooden dolls were the earliest Sonneberg dolls. Lathe-turned wooden dolls followed the hand-carved examples. This 6-inch, jointed wooden doll (1), circa 1840s, is dressed in an original “Faschingkostum” which is trimmed with triangularshaped, gold-colored, embossed paper. Fasching is a celebration similar to our Mardi Gras celebrations. The doll has a string loop attached to the top of her head which allowed it to be hung on a candle-lit feather tree. This 6-inch Sonneberg papier-mache doll (2), circa 1840s, has bust-line modeling of the shoulder plate, an upswept hairstyle with a braided bun in back and a cloth body with wooden lower arms and legs. She is wearing original cotton pantalets under her ballerina-style dress. The dress is trimmed with small rectangular pieces of gold-colored, embossed paper and the doll has a matching cloth decoration nailed to the top of her head.

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A 16-inch Sonneberg papier-mache, shoulder-head doll (3) is wearing an original wig, hat, underwear, dress and tasseled leather boots. These inexpensive dolls, circa 1880s-early 1900s, were popular exports. A 1996 book by Angelika Tessmer titled Sonneberg Geschichten, Von Puppen und Kuckuckspfeifen (Sonneberg Stories of Dolls, Slate Pencils and Cuckoo Whistles) provides an oral history told by the daughter of a home-trade worker. She described dressing dolls in Sonneberg with the following words: “I helped my mother since I was twelve years old. I turned the dresses and sewed buttons on them. The quality of materials and the cost of processing and decorating the dresses depended on the amount of money the buyers wanted to spend. There were often matching shoes and stockings. We styled the wigs and decorated them with bows and barrettes that matched the dresses. Then my mother sewed the dolls into boxes of suitable sizes with a few stitches. Our small home business worked mostly with the store owners who were interested in small quantities. They valued the highly individual style of our dolls, all because of my mother’s own designs. Thousands of our dolls traveled by trains or ships to distant countries and played a small role in ensuring that Sonneberg remain famous as the largest doll center in the world.” This 12½-inch, Sonneberg wax-over-papier-mache, shoulder-head doll (4), circa 1870s, is completely original from her braided wig down to her leather boots. An 11-inch Sonneberg wooden socket-head doll (5), with a paper label marked “Bebe Tout en Bois,” is still tied inside an original cardboard box. The doll is wearing an original wig and chemise. For a number of years, the F.M. Schilling, Rudolph Schneider, Loeffler & Dill and possibly other Sonneberg doll factories made this type of French-trade doll, beginning about 1914 when the Rudolph Schneider doll factory registered the trademark “Bebe Tout en Bois” (doll all of wood). An 8½-inch, circa 1890, Gebrueder Kuehnlenz doll (6) is wearing an original felt hat and clothing. The back of the doll head is marked: 36.18.. The doll is wearing a uniform trimmed with white braid, as well as an oval-shaped metal belt buckle and a pewter sword marked with the initials “RW.” The painted boots end just below the knees. The New York doll importing company Butler Brothers continued to advertise soldier dolls like this example in 1907. ANTIQUE DOLL COLLECTOR

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7 Armand Marseille fired his first bisque doll heads in 1890. Some of his first registered heads were made for the Cuno & Otto doll factory in Sonneberg, and they were marked: “C.O.D. “ 93 Dep.” The number “93” is an abbreviation for the 1893 registration date. By 1893, the Marseille porcelain factory employed 250 workers. This 13½-inch bisque-head doll (7) is marked: 1894//AM 2/0 DEP//Made in Germany.. A doll which contains the same incised marks is pictured wearing identical original clothing on the back cover of a 1908 edition of a magazine titled Brown Book of Boston. Boston The promotional advertisement below the doll’s photograph stated that an identical doll would be awarded and mailed to each person who sold 15 packages of Smell-Sweet perfume. This circa 1900 archival photograph (above), which has been hand colored, pictures a family of Sonneberg workers dressing and completing dolls in a home workshop. The following oral history can be found in the Tessmer book, and it was provided by the daughter of a similar family of Sonneberg doll makers: “The doll maker completed the preparatory work carried out by the wig makers, shoe makers, doll-head makers, eye setters, voice makers and box makers. Many doll makers worked in large factories like those owned by Adolf Fleishmann and Cuno & Otto Dressel, but there were also many small family businesses like ours, working from their homes. My parents had this type of small home business where they made dolls. Depending on the degree of supplied parts, we had to further process them. For example, we received arms, legs and bodies of papier-mache and composition. They were produced, but not yet colored or varnished. This was mostly a child’s job. First we had to dip them into paint. Then we let them dry, and then we dipped them into varnish and let them dry again. The drying was carried out on boards with long pins. My father glued the voice boxes in the backs of the finished bodies. My mother was very creative and skillful. She designed the hairstyles and clothes for our dolls herself, made the hair strands, sewed the wigs and styled the hair.” Many composition doll bodies are hanging from the ceiling in the room behind the male worker in this photograph. Sonneberg doll factories often look more like large homes than factories. The family lived in the front section of the house, and doll work was done in a rear section of the home/doll factory. I know that this building, shown below, once contained the Johannes Franz doll factory because Sonneberg doll-factory owner, Hanns Schoenau, identified this building as the Franz doll factory in his booklet of walking tours which contained many color photographs of the Sonneberg-area doll factories. I also know that the Franz doll factory dressed dolls inside this building because the Franz name can be seen on a sign hanging on the wall of a dolldressing room pictured on my 1890s stereoscopic card. My original 1890s stereoscopic card clearly shows the dolldressing scene that took place in Sonneberg doll factories. An 1879 entry for the Johannes Franz doll factory in the Ciesliks’ German Doll Encyclopedia is as follows: “vacancies for female workers to dress dolls.” The photograph (top, p. 33) is a hand colored version of my 1890s stereoscopic card which pictures ladies dressing dolls in the J. Franz doll factory. A photograph on page 48 of my 2013 book 32

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titled 500 Years of German Doll Making pictures the entire Franz sign which reads: “J. Franz//Sonneberg S.M.//Dressed Dolls//Jointed Dolls.” An 1879 entry for the Johannes Franz doll factory in the Ciesliks’ German Doll Encyclopedia is as follows: “vacancies for female workers to dress dolls.” A circa 1890s bisque socket-head doll (8), dressed in Native Americantype clothing, was made by the Armand Marseille porcelain factory in Koppelsdorf, a village which adjoins Sonneberg. The 9-inch doll, marked: Germany//7/0, is wearing an original braided wig, headband, fringed dress, long pants and moccasins. Note the eyebrow painting which varies from the standard eyebrow painting seen on dolly-face dolls. The Cuno & Otto Dressel doll factory in Sonneberg commissioned the Simon & Halbig porcelain factory in Graefenhain, Thuringia to make a group of bisque socket heads for their 1896 Portrait Series. Uncle Sam (9) was one of the most popular dolls in the series. My 12½-inch Uncle Sam, marked: S1 is completely original from his hat to his shoes. An original portrait of Rear Admiral William Sampson was used to create a bisque-head doll for the Cuno & Otto Dressel Portrait Series (10). This series of dolls represented naval heroes of the Spanish-American War, and they were introduced following the year-long war of 1898. The 8½-inch doll, marked: 17 SP, is wearing an original uniform, hat and accessories which closely resemble the clothing worn by Sampson, credited with establishing the blockade of Cuba during the Spanish American War. This George Washington bisque socket head (11) was patented in 1895 by the Cuno & Otto Dressel doll factory for their Portrait Series. The head, marked: 13//AW 13//AW, was made by the Simon & Halbig porcelain factory for the Adolf Wislizenus doll factory in Waltershausen. The gray wig is styled to look like the military hairstyles worn by American officers during the Revolutionary War. The 9-inch doll has a wooden body and lower legs, and it is sitting on a papier-mache horse mounted on a wooden base with metal wheels. The expressive facial features closely resemble the image of the first President of the United States. Two socket-head dolls (12), 6 and 8½-inches tall, are marked: Hexe and a size number. They are from the Dressel Portrait Series of 1896, and their facial features include witch-like teeth and red-painted warts. The Carl Harmus doll factory in Sonneberg advertised a Topsy-Turvy doll in 1898 which closely resembles this 9-inch unmarked papier-mache example (13). The original clothing includes a double-layered skirt which matches the top of the dress when each shoulder-head is held in an upright position. The Armand Marseille doll and porcelain factory made millions of dolly-face dolls like this 11-inch example (14), wearing an original wig, underwear, dress, shoes and socks. The doll, circa 1900, is marked: Made in Germany//390//A.6/0M.

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The wig on the 390 A.M. is an excellent example of the wigs made in the Sonneberg area by home and factory workers. A few years ago, several home-workers’ rooms were reproduced for the doll-making exhibits located in the basement of the Sonneberg doll museum. A home worker, known as a “hair dresser,” created hair strands in a room that looked much like this room shown below left. Hair strands and bisque doll heads are grouped on a typical type of work table once found in the small kitchen of a Sonneberg home worker. The work table contains wooden pegs connected by a piece of string; and strands of hair were knotted on the string which was stretched tightly between the pegs. Children often did this kind of work because their tiny fingers could quickly knot the fine strands of hair. This 1910 archival photograph below, which has been hand colored, pictures six home workers and a child. They are making wigs in a room located in a Sonneberg house. The string holding the hair strands is attached to the far end of the table filled with doll heads. An Armand Marseille bisque shoulder-head in the largest example pictured on the table. The cardboard box to the left of the child is filled with bisque shoulder heads which recently received wigs.


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A 14-inch Armand Marseille bisque-head doll (15), circa 1900 on, is wearing an original wig, head covering, underwear, dress, apron and accessories which portray a woman wearing a Dutch Volendam regional costume. The back of the head is marked: Germany//390.//A.4./0.X.M. This 12-inch Armand Marseille bisque-head doll (16), circa 1900, is wearing an original hat, jacket, skirt, underpants and accessories which are similar to the clothing worn by an English palace guard. The head is marked: 390//A.7/0/M.

16 For decades, Sonneberg home workers made clothing by hand for all-bisque dolls like these 2-inch examples (17). The original clothing varies on each doll. The dolls faces contain very little facial painting detail, and similar German dolls sold for pennies in American “Five and Dime” stores, including the Kresge and Woolworth stores. Both stores had export branches in Sonneberg. F.W. Woolworth bought Wilhelm Dressel’s doll factory in 1913. In 1925, Woolworth built a 5-story building across the street from the train station, and it was the largest building in Sonneberg.

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*Credits: Mary Krombholz Doll and Archival Paper Collection. Doll Photographs by Tony Arrasmith. Computer Colorization of Archival Photographs by Paul Brinkdopke.

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A 4-by-9-inch Limbach pull-toy (18) contains an 8-inch, bisquehead doll which raises her right arm when the toy is pulled. The chickens move in a circle as the wheels turn. The back of the doll’s head is marked with the Limbach name as well as the Limbach trademark clover symbol. The doll is wearing an original wig, head scarf, underwear, dress, socks and shoes. This 7-inch bisque socket-head Recknagel doll (19) is still tied inside her original cardboard box marked: “Luella from Aunt Emma Dec. 25, 1903.” In 1886, Theodor Recknagel founded the Recknagel porcelain factory in Alexandrienthal, a small Thuringian town located near Sonneberg. The doll, marked: RA, is wearing an original wig, hat, underwear and dress.


HAVE YOU SEEN THESE DOLLS? These, in addition to the dolls shown in our March issue*, were taken from a UFDC member’s collection. Please contact Antique Doll Collector for possible repurchase and to be put in touch with the owner. Phone 717-517-9217 or email antiquedoll@gmail.com *see correction page 55


Mommy’s Little Darling! A Mother’s Day Tribute to Infant Dolls, Collectibles, and Traditions By Elizabeth K. Schmahl, DDS

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o maternal bond has ever been stronger than that of a mother and her infant. Every little coo, each little sigh, and that first endearing smile are memories so eternally etched on a mother’s heart. Perhaps nothing exemplifies this sentiment more than watching a little girl holding her favorite baby doll. As young girls, we teach our dollies to say, “Mama” and drink from a bottle. We put “Baby” to bed and tuck her in so carefully. And we make sure to “hush” little brother or sister to ensure that they don’t wake the “baby!” For generations, little girls have rocked their baby dolls, fed them, sung to them, and pacified them. And the most wondrous part is that no one has to teach a Little Mother these things! The maternal instinct comes so very

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naturally when it comes to loving and caring for our baby dollies! As a tribute to doll collectors on this upcoming Mother’s Day, let us share the charm and warmth of infant dolls, collectibles, and traditions. The Arrival of the Stork: The legend of the stork is thought to have had its origins in Germany a number of centuries ago. Generally regarded as a symbol of prosperity and happiness, the stork has become one of the most recognized symbols of a newborn baby. The stork is generally monogamous to one mate only throughout its life, a characteristic that makes it an animal revered for its faithfulness and devotion. The stork is also considered a harbinger of good fortune and prosperity. Pictured here


is a 12” German bisque K8R #126 baby that has just flown in for delivery on her stork! The stork is a circa 1910s 24” painted plaster display that would have decorated a store’s infant section counter. Surrounded by storks, a six-inch bisque Armand Marseille Dream Baby is a brand new arrival, wearing her original factory dress and bonnet. She has a bisque head marked, “A.M. Germany” with painted eyes, composition arms, cloth legs, and a cloth body. The arrival of the stork and a new baby dolly is a most exciting event for any doll lover! Playing Mommy: What little girl doesn’t remember playing with her favorite doll? Dolls have historically been a child’s plaything for thousands of years and countless generations of little girls have “played Mommy” at one time or another. A small child’s instinct to nurture and care for her “baby doll” seems to be such a natural part of pretend play. Over the centuries, doll manufacturers have tried to make baby dolls as unique as possible to appeal to these young doll mothers. Doll companies often had significant competition which required each doll to have a special selling point.

This circa 1870s 7” topsy-turvy papier maché doll, for example, is unique in that there are two different babies for a little girl to play with. This doll of unknown maker has sweet infant-like painted facial features that are just charming. Each doll on either end has her own dress that flips over to a different color. Also pictured is a circa 1880s wax mechanical doll wearing her original clothes and laying in her original wicker basket. She has glass eyes and her precious little hands are curled up in a very lifelike tiny fist. When her key is wound, she lifts her head up and then lays back down. She is believed to be German-made. ANTIQUE DOLL COLLECTOR

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During the 1920s, the style of the “baby doll” was revolutionized as Grace Storey Putnam became famous in the United States for introducing her very lifelike baby doll called, “The Bye-Lo Baby.” With her chubby cheeks and “frog-like” cloth floppy body, she most resembled a real newborn infant. The bisque heads were made in Germany but Putnam marketed the Bye-Lo Baby dolls in the United States. In an early 1920s advertisement for the “Bye-Lo Baby Doll”, the ad states, “A million little mothers want this baby!” How could a little girl resist wanting to be mother to a doll baby so cuddly, so lifelike?

Other doll companies such as Louis Amberg and Armand Marseille tried to capitalize on the lifelike baby doll design perfected by Grace Putnam. This 1928 Marseille #351 “Our Pet” has her original tag and playpen. Pictured is a 9-inch tall example with a bisque head and a bent-limb composition body. She has a smiling face showing her two bottom front teeth. Our Pet wears her original factory dress and socks with blue ribbon tied around the ankles. She has sleep eyes and the back of her head is marked, “A.M. Germany 351 4/0 K.” Her original tag reads, “Made in Germany OUR PET Registered SECO N.Y.” Written in pencil on her tag is her original store price of $1.45! As the craze for bent-limb composition-bodied baby dolls began to replace the traditional cloth-bodied babies, doll companies had to find ways of marketing their dolls so that children would want to purchase them. The playpen, having been invented only twenty years prior, was just the accessory Marseille needed to entice a little girl to select his company’s doll over any other! Our Pet’s playpen is made of a bamboolike material and has its original straw-stuffed cotton mattress. There is a metal wire running across the playpen that holds sixteen colorful wooden beads with which Our Pet can play. In 1926, the Arranbee Doll Company came introduced a doll called “Bottletot”. Bottletot’s new and innovative drinking bottle style with milk that “magically disappeared” was a favorite seller as it satisfied many a little girl’s desire to comfort and nurture her little baby doll. Bottletot is marked, “Germany Arranbee”. Bottletot has celluloid hands that are marked, “Arranbee” around the wrists and a painted white celluloid bottle marked “Arranbee” that is attached to the right hand. Other Bottletot examples have been found with an unpainted orange-toned celluloid bottle. The Bottletot babies pictured have the rarer bisque heads with sleep eyes. Later Bottletot dolls had composition heads. They both have a cloth body and cloth legs. 40

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Another exciting baby from the Arranbee company is an all-original 1935 “Drink ‘N Babe” in her original box. Marketed as “The Doll that Drinks Like Magic”, Drink ‘N Babe also had a bottle with disappearing milk. This doll measures 10 inches tall and has an allcomposition bent-limb body with hand-painted facial features and painted side-glancing eyes. Drink ‘N Babe comes in an original layette suitcase that contains her original glass bottles,

hot water bottle, bubble-blower, rattle, and three different organdy dresses. What fun a little girl could have pampering and spoiling her little Drink ‘N Babe angel with all her accessories! Feeding time has always been a time of bonding between a mother and a child. Nearly every little girl has experienced the joy of cradling a delicate newborn baby doll in one arm and a pretend bottle full of milk in the other. Historically, mothers have fed and nurtured babies in many different ways. Certainly, the history of feeding Baby Dolly is no different! In this antique postcard, Little Mother prepares the milk for Dolly to make sure it is the right temperature. Doll mothers feed their babies until the bottle is empty and their infants are content and well-fed and ready to sleep soundly! But the true history of baby bottles has a slightly sadder history. From the earliest baby vessels found, up until the 1900s, baby bottles were nearly impossible to sterilize due to their failed designs. As such, the mortality rate of bottle-fed infants was nearly 30% among certain populations. Very early baby feeders were often made of clay, wood, and stone. Later, during the Medieval era, baby feeders were often made of cowhorns with a leather nipple. The first glass baby bottles were not made until the mid-1800s. These glass nursing bottles varied in design from those with glass tubes and corks inside (c1860s) to banana-shaped bottles with two ends (c1890s). Doll-sized baby bottles varied in design as well. This grouping of antique doll baby bottles shows the variety of the shapes in which baby bottles were made. In this picture, one must also note the “Mammy” doll was made from a discarded black rubber baby bottle nipple, an inexpensive dollmaking trend during this time. ANTIQUE DOLL COLLECTOR

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It wasn’t until the early 1900s that the straight baby bottle design became popular. Many were made of clear glass or milk glass with a rubber nipple. As time progressed and doll mommies learned the importance of good sterilization techniques, baby doll bottles started to include items such as bottle brushes to help little girls have a clean little bottle for their baby doll. During the 1930s to 50s, even doll “sterilizers” became the craze for dolly moms to play with! Today, doll collectors love to accessorize our doll babies so we can feed them properly. Certainly, our doll babies never should go hungry! Soothing Baby – Pacifiers and Teethers: Doll mothers know our babies cannot speak or tell us when they are unhappy. But we do know one of the easiest ways to sooth a crying baby is with a pacifier. In Biblical times, pacifiers were often as simple as a honey-soaked rag. Over the centuries, pacifiers have been made of everything from corn cobs, bone, ivory, and carved wood to coral, mother-of-pearl, sterling, and rubber. A precious 5.5” all bisque German baby (possibly Kestner) is wearing her little metal pacifier around her neck, a most convenient place if she should need it. And this 18” French cloth Venus baby would certainly not have such a smile on her face if she were to lose her pink plastic “binky!” Because a baby’s crying was often associated with teething pain, pacifiers and “teethers” were often one in the same. “Teething Rings” also became popular in the late 1800s to early 1900s. The cold feeling of the mother-of-pearl was meant to give a soothing feeling to the baby’s gum pain. Many a mother has stayed up at night consoling an infant with pain from teething. Historically, women have dipped pacifiers and teethers in all kinds of medicaments to aid a teething infant, including alcohol, morphine, and laudanum! Thank goodness our more modern doll babies have benefitted from wise mothers abandoning these controversial practices! Rattles: The development of baby rattles most likely stemmed from variations of pacifiers and teething rings. Rattles often contained bells, seashells, beans, or anything to make noise and attract the attention of a baby. During the 1700s and 1800s, the noise of the rattle was believed to protect the baby by warding off evil spirits. Early baby rattles were made of many of the same materials as the pacifiers and teething rings. But most of the rattles produced for babies and dolls after 1900 were made of plastic beginning with celluloid and bakelite (both unfortunately flammable) and the current plastics babies play with today. Some dolls were even rattles themselves! Another little doll is sitting in her wicker highchair, showing off her round celluloid rattle with bright pink and white colors! She is an 8” 42

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bisque German Gebruder Heubach Baby. Her little face is content and her intaglio eyes calm as she quietly plays in the high chair that her doll mommy bought for her! Doll Mothers and Their Babies: Even our dolls themselves can be mothers to other dollies. This circa 1880s 5” parian mother from Germany lovingly holds her penny doll infant. Note the matching lace trim on the mother’s pantaloons and baby’s christening gown. Little doll mothers are among the best mothers in the world! Mothers are teachers, introducing their babies to all the excitement and wonders of each new day! But most of all, they never forget to kiss baby goodnight! As little girls, we beg Santa for another new baby doll under the tree! As adults, we search endlessly for the perfect collectible doll at a flea market or antique shop! I have spotted adult women at doll shows nuzzling noses affectionately with antique baby dolls or pacifying their bisque “babies” by holding them over their shoulders and patting their straw-stuffed torsos with love! I have seen the great care, time, and effort a doll collector has taken to select just the perfect outfit for their doll-baby. I have also seen grown women proudly show off their childhood baby dolls and, no matter what the condition, handle them with such care as if it were a very real and fragile infant! Our doll babies mean every bit to us, perhaps because as time passes, the baby dolls in our collection stay eternally young and constantly remind us of those little miracles and memories of our childhood. Whether young doll collectors or old, we all deserve to celebrate a Happy Mother’s Day… after all, we are all Mothers to our little dollies!

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N EWS

150 years of Japan and Switzerland April 19, 2014 –October 5 2014

Princess playing the biwa lute by Ave Shôun

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special exhibition will take place at the Toy Worlds Museum Basle to celebrate the 150th anniversary of Japanese-Swiss diplomacy and friendship. The first documented reference in Switzerland to Japan dates from 1522. In 1864, Switzerland finalized one of the first bilateral trade and friendship treaties with Japan, giving rise to a dynamic economic exchange. The exhibition has been made possible with the cooperation of the Japanese Information and Cultural Centre of the Japanese Embassy in Berne, and the Japan Cultural Institute in Cologne. The sophisticated contemporary dolls originate from the travelling exhibition Dolls of Japan – Shapes of Prayer, Embodiment of Love and are provided by the Japan Cultural Institute in Cologne. The contemporary ceramic objects and decorations including the lacquer ware provide a fascinating insight into hundreds of years of Japanese history. They are characterized by both ancient traditions and modern influences. The Japanese tea ceremony ceramics are famous in Japan and that is reflected by the very high prices for objects made by recognized potters. The collection Contemporary Japanese Crafts is part of the Japan Foundation Traveling Exhibitions. For more information www.toy-worlds-museum-basle.ch

Crawling baby by Kajimura Zuikan

Book Review

Dolls with a Mission by Jean M. Kestel

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he author never realized her purchase of two Door of Hope dolls would lead to years of research and study. The Door of Hope Mission officially opened in Shanghai November 1, 1901, its purpose to rescue women and children from slavery and brothels. This comprehensive volume covers fifty years of operation and the changes that came with a less repressive government and gradual westernization. Original source material from the Door of Hope Mission Reports along with photographs and postcards from the author’s collection are poignant reminders of the wonderful giving efforts of the mission’s founders. Detailed information on Chinese clothing is an introduction to the making of the dolls and their evolution, with excellent photos showing the various costume changes as the years advanced. How to identify Door of Hope dolls – their heights, construction methods, painting techniques, clothing and markings – is discussed in detail. Although the mission did not close its doors until 1951, after 1939, it is believed that no more dolls were made. Touching stores of the missionaries and other individuals who lived and worked in China, often at considerable peril to their lives, shine a bright light on their noble purpose. The book concludes with a look at the dolls available for viewing in museums and historical societies. A valuable and fascinating reference for doll collectors, it is a treasured addition to our understanding of these important dolls and their place in history. Hardcover, 164 pages. ISBN: 978-0-615-89202-3 $75. Books may be ordered from the author Jean Kestel 155 Spring Drive, East Meadow, NY 11554. Include $5 for shipping. It can also be ordered at dohbook.com using Paypal. If choosing this option, please call the author at 516-561-8447. 44

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GAME ON! Miniature French Toys and Games for Dolls

By Jan Peterson

An assortment of miniature French games on top of a fabulous toy inlaid checkerboard/ chessboard table. What group of French fashion dolls wouldn’t love to spend an afternoon at this amazing miniature game table? Courtesy of Laurie Baker

“Be a good sport!” How many times in our growing-up

Tiny complete LOTO game made for French fashion dolls. Photo courtesy of Laurie Baker A playing card from a LOTO game included in an issue of La Poupée Modèle.

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Photos by Elwyn Peterson

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years, did we hear this admonition from our parents! A lot, if you had parents like mine. They saw much more value in playing games that just winning. They saw that learning to be fair, to accept defeat without throwing a tantrum, and to appreciate the talents displayed by others were very important life lessons. So did the parents of young children in 19th Century France. What we commonly call board games in the United States are called Jeux de Société (Games of Society) in France. Being a valued member of society was extremely important in a nation that valued the teaching of good manners as a prime responsibility of parenthood. Children’s games were highly esteemed as a means of learning the importance of taking turns, being patient, sharing, and being a good loser and a gracious winner. Playing games also developed coordination, learning to take risks, intellectual prowess and healthy competition. But most of all, the games were valued for the fun they provided and for the closeness a family shared playing them. During long winter evenings, without the distractions of video games, television and radio, much less texting on cellphones, children adored spending their time with Maman and Papa in a rousing game of wit and skill. And, because these games played such a large role in their lives, little French girls just had to have miniature games with which to amuse their dolls. The myriad of toy stores in the Paris of the 19th Century and large department stores such as the Galéries Lafayette and La Samaritaine, had impressive toy departments. It was easy to find wonderful miniature board games and other kinds of games in diminutive doll size made of wood, colorful lithographs glued to leatherette-covered game boards, and minuscule game pieces carved of bone or, very rarely, of ivory and dyed red, black or bleached to snowy white. Collecting these tiny games to display with our dolls is a delightful quest today’s antique doll lovers undertake with enthusiasm. Among the tiny treasures to be found are little LOTO games. Most consist of very small cards with numbers randomly


printed on them and tiny markers. Loto in France is the near equivalent of Bingo! in the United States. The Loto boxes are often printed with brightly colored lithographs which make them delightful to put into a doll display of bébés engrossed in the game. In addition, wonderful boxed games sets called LA LOTORIE with a numbered spinning wheel and an assortment of tiny toy prizes were made for French children. Finding a Lotorie boxed game still intact in a French estate sale is like actually winning the lottery for a doll collector. Other boxed sets of LA PUCE (Tiddlywinks) were also made in bébé size with the brightly colored playing pieces made of either bone or wood to be flipped into a little wooden cup. The child or doll who flipped the most pieces into the cup won the game A game of manual skill was called BILBOQUET (Ball and Stick). I shudder to think how many children knocked out a front tooth playing this game made of hard wood! A ball with a hole drilled into it is attached to a string, and with one hand, the child launches the ball into the air and tries to catch it on the point of wooden pedestal. The game hearkens back to knights jousting with spears. Engravings from the 17th Century clearly show the game being played, but some claim it dates as far back as the early 14th Century. In any case, the game was made popular my King Henri III (15741589). He loved to play it while strolling through his palace gardens, and it is hoped no royal teeth were lost in the process! Doll sized bilboquets are found most commonly made of wood, but rare bone or ivory ones were made, too, especially as playthings to amuse a French fashion doll. Miniature sets of bone/ivory dominoes measuring only ½” in length were made for French fashion dolls and sold in such prestigious toy stores as Au Nain Bleu. It is a thrill to find a tiny wooden box with a sliding lid and an original store label. Dominoes were also made in bébé size, and some of them have bone/ivory glued to ebonized wood rectangles. For a premium price, toy dominoes could even be found in beautiful containers of ivory carved by the skilled artisans in Dieppe, France. These exquisite containers could be done in fanciful shapes like hollowed eggs and baskets or in boxes with elaborately carved motifs on the lids and sides outlined in various colors. The fact that these exquisite sets often still contain all twenty-eight dominoes makes me think parents valued them as much as their children and that play must have been closely supervised. Amazing CROQUET sets were made in the perfect size for little all-bisque mignonnettes to enjoy. The balls, feet for the arched hoops, the starting and end point markers, and the mallets were all carved from bone. The sets were made so that four little dolls could play at once. Each mallet and each ball was dyed a different color. A full set of rules accompanied each set so that little girls to read them to their dolls. French nobility has played this game since the Middle Ages. It was borrowed from the English in 1300, where it has

Child With a Bilboquet by Jeanne Bole Irene at seven inches, is a little small for this bilboquet (ball and stick game), but she doesn’t have teeth to get knocked out by it, so she gets to play with it. This tiny wooden bilboquet game is just like the ones that were eight inches tall made for real children.

The partial label on the tiny wooden box of dominoes shows it, too, was purchased from the GALERIES LAFAYETTE, one of Paris’ oldest department stores that opened in the 19th Century and is still in business today. These tiny sets of dominoes are the perfect scale to display with very smalls dolls. Each tiny domino is only 1/2” long. The lovely carved ivory box was found in England.

This is part of a game included with an issue of La Poupée Modèle that allowed little girls to color the doll dresses on the playing cards.

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Croquet by Winslow Homer. The French borrowed the game of croquet from the English and it became hugely popular in France for centuries. This miniature croquet set made of bone is just the right size for little 4 1/2” allbisque dolls to play. It still has its original page of rules in French.

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been elevated to the status of a sport and was even played as such in the Olympic Games of 1900! During the centuries, croquet became a favorite game of any family who could find a patch of grass to play it on. During the 19th Century, the French adored it, and most families owned a croquet set, so it was de rigueur that dolls had a set of their own. DAMES (checkers) is a great game for two players to teach children reflective thought and risk taking. Tiny wooden boxes were sold that had lithographed checker boards on one side and ÉCHECS (chess) boards on the other side. It is apparent that parents felt chess a bit too advanced for young children, so the interiors of the boxes only held the rules for dames and minuscule playing pieces the size of the beauty spots their mothers wore to masked balls. The little circular markers were carved from bone or wood and half of them were dyed black. These are among the most commonly found miniature antique games made for dolls. Other combination games in little wooden boxes were combination dames/échecs/ backgammon sets. The top and bottom of the boxes had lithographed chess and checker boards glued to them and the boxes opened to reveal a full backgammon board. Tiny markers of bone/ ivory dyed red and black, dice less than ¼” square of bone, and tiny cups for shaking them were inside the boxes. In our era of plastic, it is amazing to consider the time it took to create each little playing part from natural materials. Another game toy miniaturized for dolls was the TOUPIE or top. I was thrilled to find one just the perfect scale for my little allbisque boy doll, Henri. It even has a tiny metal spinning point. Tops were made of all sorts of materials, from luxurious ivory for French fashion dolls, to simple clay pottery. A few have even been found that were homemade for a beloved doll. Tops as toys originated in ancient China and found their way along international trade routes to France in the 15th Century. They have been valued as both an amusement for a solitary child and as a competitive game. Little boys (and boy dolls!) spun them to see whose top would continue to spin the longest. The shapes of tops vary as much as the materials they were made of. Long-ago children were especially proud of a homemade top that won all spinning competitions. Just like a little Cub Scout is so thrilled to be the winner of a Pinewood Derby today, a little French boy of the past who could create a top with the perfect physics for long lasting spins was the envy of his friends. The little girls of France and their dolls absolutely adored playing CORDE A SAUTER or jump rope! Little girls of my generation played it until we wore out our ropes! It could


DAMES is the French word for checkers. This wonderful little wooden box houses two games, both chess and checkerboards appear on front and back. The inside of the game box is for playing backgammon. A partial label shows it was originally purchased at the GALERIES LAFAYETTE department store in Paris.

Checkers by Boilly (1803)

This tiny wooden top made for a doll is perfect in every detail including the metal tip for spinning.

Owning a beautifully carved set of nine pins from France is the dream of every little boy doll.

Boy With Top by Jean-Baptiste SimĂŠon Chardin ANTIQUE DOLL COLLECTOR

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Little Chloe’s miniature jump rope has bone handles, unlike those for real French children that were made with wooden handles. The lithographed labels on the tiny French games are charming and colorful. The label on Question du Jour guarantees “Fun for children and PEACE & QUIET for their parents”! Game rules were sometimes glued inside the box lid.

be played alone or with two girls holding each end of a rope and a third child skipping the rope. I was surprised and delighted to see little girls in France excelling at Double Dutch (using two ropes in coordinated turns). I had to stop and ask them what they called this type of corde à sauter and they said, “Double Dutch, bien sur!” Again, the artisans of Dieppe were the ones to supply toy stores with dollsized jump ropes with handles fashioned of bone for spoiled poupées parisiennes. Less privileged dolls settled for a little corde à sauter with wooden handles like the ones their real little girls used for play. Although children were unlikely to play BILLIARD, the homes of the wealthy often had a gaming room for Papa and a pool table that was also considered a status symbol. Male French fashion dolls had to have them, too! Although very rare because female fashion dolls far outnumbered their masculine counterparts , billiard tables are to be

Henri and Sam are snooping in Papa’s game room . . . hope Nanny doesn’t catch them! This exquisite miniature billiards table is perfect in every detail. There is even a drawer in the front for hiding Papa’s pistol he uses against guests who cheat… 50

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A tiny set of WHIST playing cards are the perfect size for dolls.


A 19th Century French child took such wonderful care of her toys, the rules for the Jeu d’Arlequin game are still in the box! Photo Courtesy Laurie Baker

found in France in estate sales and at toy auctions. Like most miniature toy furniture, and all the pieces made for the children of the wealthy, toy billiard tables are little works of art. One thing about them I have found perplexing, however, is that instead of the green felt we find on billiards or pool tables in America, the antique toy French ones are often covered in luxury silks. Billiards was invented in London in 1560. It became popular in France among the royalty and aristocracy as a reaction to the weather! Louis XI who reigned during the 15th Century, so missed his croquet games in bad weather, he had a variation created for indoors. Louis suffered from a bad back and ordered the royal ébéniste to construct a table to play indoor croquet as tall as man! During the centuries, the table height was lowered, as was the status of the game. What started as amusement for the royals eventually became the entertainment of the working class and working poor in bars and pool rooms across France. The making of tiny apprentice piece tables de billiard basically ended at about the same time bébés replaced les Parisiennes as the doll of choice for little girls. The card game of WHIST has been extolled in novels from Jane Austen to Edgar Allen Poe! It was a card game that was tremendously popular during the 19th Century in England and France, as well as in the United States and Germany, where most of the beautiful playing cards were made. Whist was a rare card game that was considered a ladylike pursuit, much as Bridge is today. Little French girls saw their mothers play whist with their friends, while nibbling delightful confections and sharing gossip. So, tiny cards were produced for their dolls. Patience cards are small cards that were published for playing cards during a train ride or in a park as a diversion. However, the cards made for dolls were much smaller than even Patience cards. Dondorf in Germany printed the most beautiful

sets, with boxes as small as 1 ½ inches tall. The cards inside are tiny versions of the beautifully lithographed cards Maman and her friends used. It is hoped the wellbrought-up French child taught her doll NOT to cheat… Besides the games that are known internationally such as chess and croquet, other board games and game sets are uniquely French. One of them called the Jeu de l’Oie (The Goose Game) and it is as well-known in France as Monopoly is to American children. Its brightly colored game board was miniaturized for dolls and sold in a tiny wooden suitcase type box with a little brass closure. The game included a leatherette playing board, tiny bone/ ivory dice, and markers for moving around the board. Another very popular 19th Century game was the Jeu d’Arlequin (The Harlequin Game) that also came in a tiny wooden box sized perfectly for French fashion dolls and contained among all the game pieces a full set of lithographed illustrated playing cards. In addition to the games available for sale in the toy stores of long-ago Paris, the children’s magazine La Poupée Modèle regularly printed games for their readers and their dolls. Sometimes the games were printed on the reverse side of the Page Rose sewing pattern page for that week’s edition, or game boards were printed on lightweight cardboard and stapled right into the magazine for little girls to remove and use for play with their dolls. A wonderful example is a little game about dressing one’s doll in the latest fashions. Barbie may have her own plastic tennis racket, but so did antique French dolls, and their raquettes were made of real wood, real strings and sometimes even ivory! And Barbie may have a toy plastic computer to play imaginary video games with, but she has never had the array of wonderful miniature games to occupy her time, to teach her good manners and sportsmanship, that antique French dolls of the 19th Century enjoyed! ANTIQUE DOLL COLLECTOR

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SEE WHAT YOU WILL BE MISSING IF YOU

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he promise of the May NADDA (National Antique Doll Dealers Association) show has tingling with anticipation! All NADDA events are among the finest doll shows in the nation, but the May 3 and 4th show, in Greensboro, NC, is over the top! What makes it so special? All show attendees are invited Saturday afternoon (the show closes for the day at 4 pm) to attend a garden party in the gardens and homes of Jim and Virginia Griggs and Billye Harris. The two homes, a Queen Anne Victorian revival built in 1910 and “Midlawn,” a 1908 Dutch Colonial revival, include 21 acres of gardens designed over several years by Mr. Griggs and Mrs. Harris. The gardens include thousands of southern azaleas in several varieties and colors, perennials, annuals, bulbs, flowering shrubs and trees, all of which will be in glorious bloom for the party. The property also includes gazebos with pergola, statuary, walking trails, a twoacre mature bamboo garden with sculptures, fountains, arbors and birdhouses. There are many patios and sitting areas located through out the garden for resting or having a quiet conversation with a friend. Both homes are open to guests and contain fabulous doll collections. Southern hospitality is the order of the day, with a wonderful complimentary southern dinner planned for all guests. Rosalie Whyel will be presenting “All on a Summer’s Afternoon, The Dolls Take Us to Their Favorite Gardens of the World” at the party site. On Sunday morning Alan Pate, the well-known expert on Japanese dolls, will present a program at the Embassy Suites prior to the show opening. The show, held at the Embassy Suites in Greensboro, is one of the largest in NADDA history. The dealer section is sold out with dealers from all parts of the country including California, 52

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DON’T ATTEND THE MAY NADDA SHOW!

For additional information on the historic houses you will be seeing visit: www.livingplaces.com/NC/Guilford_County/Whitsett_Town/Whitsett_Historic_District.html www.hpo.ncdcr.gov/nr/GF0023.pdf library.digitalnc.org/cdm/ref/collection/yearbooks/id/7113

Washington, Arizona, the east coast, Bahamas, Alaska and more. All dealers are located on one floor … visualize an old main street filled with antique doll shops and you get the idea! It is a very intimate and comfortable way to purchase a doll from your favorite dealer. There will be dolls for sale in all genres including antique French, German, Wax, Cloth, Papier Mache, China, Wood and more. There will also be vintage composition, hard plastic, Barbie, Lenci, Paper dolls, Schoenhut, Miniatures, Terri Lee, Ginny’s plus antique and vintage doll accessories and clothing. An exhibit of rare Maggie Bessie’s (she is a North Carolina girl after all) will be on display in the hospitality room. The hotel offers free parking and a free full breakfast to hotel guests. There is also a free cocktail hour between the hours of 5 and 7pm. To make a reservation call 336-668-4535 and ask for the special NADDA rate. For those flying in the airport offers complimentary shuttle service to the hotel. Personally, we don’t think it gets any better than this! Please let Billye know if you will need transportation to and from the party at Ashleysdolls@gmail. com. The homes are a very easy drive from the hotel site with ample parking. There will also be chauffeured golf carts available for those who have some difficulty with walking. Flat walking shoes are recommended for the party. Large hats and flowered dresses are optional!

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A Doll & Teddy Bear Gathering in Albuquerque

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oll and teddy bear shows are really adoption agencies for dolls, teddy bears and all of their accessories. This hobby may not result in world peace, but it can certainly brighten attitudes! And that’s a start! So whether you are an antique, vintage, or new doll enthusiast, finding a treasure at a show can enliven your collection while you enjoy time with other folks that share your passion. One of the bright spots in collecting is obtaining additional knowledge, whether it is about something you already love, or a new subject that has caught your attention. Ever notice that it is not hard to get a conversation going when collectors are in the room? The different conversations are friendly, fun and riveting - all at the same time. And, everyone learns something from others in the process. More than a doll show, less than a convention, the Crossroads organization has created a 2-day gathering for doll & teddy bear collectors and enthusiasts. Set against a back drop of scenic beauty and mingled with a rich historical background, Albuquerque is the place to be on May 30 & 31, 2014. Combing a 1-day salesroom with a full day of fun and educational activities seemed like a really good idea to Dorothy Drake, President of the Crossroads Shows. “Who doesn’t need a get-away?” she reasoned, “And well, a road trip is fun”. So the Roadtrip Gathering in Albuquerque was born. “I wanted to create an opportunity for collectors to spend an affordable 2 days immersed in all things doll and teddy bear in an area known for its rich history and dazzling scenery,” she continued. Gathering attendees will be taking over the hotel and filing it with the excitement, camaraderie, and laughter that can only be found when lovers of dolls, teddy bears, miniatures and all of their friends gather together!

Jumeau, courtesy Dorothy Drake

When: May 30 & 31, 2014 for registered attendees. An off-site evening adventure is planned for May 29. Where: MCM Elegante, 2020 Menaul NE. Albuquerque, NM.

Why? In a recent polling it was clear that doll & teddy bear collectors wanted something fun to do, including opportunities to learn, shop, and raise awareness for local clubs. The Crossroads Shows were willing to sponsor the event, gather speakers and dealers from around the nation, and promote workshops & events that will be enjoyed by collectors at any level of the hobby.

Bed doll, courtesy Marci Carvalho

Special Events: Workshops with Patti Ulrich, Deb Canham, Christine Shively, Dianne Bishop, Pat Chamberlain. Programs: Native American Dolls, identifying antique teddy bears, refreshing dolly’s appearance, appraisal clinic Luncheon: Trains, Tuberculosis, & Tourism sponsored by the Sandia Doll Club Sales room with outstanding dealers from around the nation

Public Sales Day: Saturday, May 31, 2014 from 10AM to 4PM To find booking details, see our ad in this issue or visit www.dolls4all.com or call Dorothy 775 348 7713 The Crossroads Doll & Teddy Bear shows are dedicated to the art and craft of dolls teddy bears, and all related items, from Antique to Modern. Shows are held throughout the year in Albuquerque, NM; Pleasanton, CA; Portland, Or; Puyallup, WA; Roseville, CA; Salt Lake City, UT; San Diego, CA and San Jose, CA 54

ANTIQUE DOLL COLLECTOR

APRIL 2014

1907 Steiff bear, courtesy John Port


Do You Have a Mystery Doll?

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his doll belonged to the seller’s mother who is now deceased. The family has no knowledge of dolls and could not provide any information other than it is an original one-of-a-kind artist doll, age unknown but not an old doll. Head, arms and legs are all covered in silk. Clothes are hand made and not removable. No visible identifying marks on the doll. She is 16 inches tall and posed to play the violin. As you can see she has lovely features with a hint of a smile. While she is one of a kind, I am hoping there are others similar in style or material that might provide clues in discovering the artist who made her. Any information, please call Rosie at 563-355-8309 or email timelesstreasures4@mchsi.com. Perhaps there is a doll in your collection that you and others have never seen before. Send us a high resolution photo and any information you have to antiquedoll@gmail.com (you may also send a print photo to Antique Doll Collector P.O. Box 39, East Petersburg, PA 17520). If you can identify a mystery doll, write to us at the address or email above.

CORRECTION In the March ad featuring dolls taken (pages 54, 55) four dolls were

misidentified as belonging to the owner. They are page 55, third row, first photo, the doll in peach directly below the swimmer and last photo in same row, the three dolls standing behind the Bergner. ANTIQUE DOLL COLLECTOR

APRIL 2014

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Village Doll Shop, Adamstown, PA, email: ourant@ptd.net

Laura Turner, Frizellburg Antiques, Westminster, MD, email: frizellburgantiques@yahoo.com

GAITHERSBURG

A Long Face Jumeau and Paris Bebe, Early E. J. dressed for her Rick Saxman, Valley Forge, PA email wedding. Margaret Kincaid, ricksax@earthlink.net Baltimore, MD, email: Margaret.kincaid@gmail.com

Antique Doll Show

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ortunately Mother Nature failed to disrupt the recent Gaithersburg doll show, held March 1 and 2 at the Fairgrounds. Collectors, suffering from cabin fever, made the most of it, enjoying a great weekend filled with quality antique and vintage dolls, two great displays, programs presented by Janet Gula and Jonathan Green, doll stringing and repair and hourly door prices, all free to show attendees. The next show will be held June 7 and 8th.

Samy Odin, co-founder of the Musée de la Poupée in Paris, with an original Bru Fashion dressed in the style of Bethlehem.

Ball jointed doll designs by Connie Lowe, Lancaster, PA, email: big. birds@comcast.net

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ANTIQUE DOLL COLLECTOR

Jay and Connie Lowe, Lancaster, PA, email: big.birds@comcast.net

Nancy McGlamery, Lancaster, PA, email: mcpelton@aol.com

Strawbear Antiques, Atlanta, GA, email strawbearantiques@gmail.com

Marion Maus, Ellicott City, MD, email: mmausantiques@gmail.com

Virginia Aris, Pennington, NJ, email: VirginiaAris@aol.com

APRIL 2014


Peggy Bealefield, Cockeysville, MD, email: doodlebugdoll@comcast.net

Margie Ann Yocum, Douglassville, PA

Debbie Varner, The Tender Years, CO, email: queeenbeeV1@comcast.net

Grandma’s Attic, Bronx, NY, email: joycedolls@aol.com

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he March UFDC Learning Room two special exhibits for attendees. On Saturday Janet Gula, First Vice President of UFDC spoke on Dolls in Art and on Sunday, Jonathan Green presented his program on Edith Flack Ackley dolls.

S & H 939 in original dress, 38 inches. Fritzi’s Antique Dolls, Yorkville, IL, email: fritzisantiquedolls@ comcast.net Gail Lemmon, OH, email: glemn@frontier.com

Jonathan Green displayed a collection of Edith Flack Ackley dolls. In 1934 this cloth doll artist offered doll-making kits through Women’s Home Companion.

Hand carved wood dolls by Victoria Christopherson Dolls and costuming by Flore Hirsch

Ann Lloyd, Doylestown, PA, email: alloyd@nni.com

Tory Beth Radwick, Chester Spring, MD, email: radwick@aol.com

Billye Harris, Ashley’s Dolls, Whitsett, NC, email: Ashleysdolls@gmail.com

UFDC Region 11 presented a look at some of the talented doll artists working today. Eliza is a reproduction of a doll and wardrobe created by Eliza Lefferts for the 1864 Brooklyn Sanitary Fair.

ANTIQUE DOLL COLLECTOR

APRIL 2014

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Jean & Ken Nordquist’s Collectible Doll Co. Gourmet Doll Supplies for the Discriminating Doll Collector

SELL A DOLL IN THE

EMPORIUM Purchase of an ad includes FREE internet ad on our website.

Send us a photo or a digital photo of your doll with a description and your check or credit card information. We do the rest!! Take advantage of this special forum; the cost is only $95 for a 2.4”w x 2.9”h ad space. Antique DOLL Collector, P.O. Box 239, Northport, NY 11768. Phone 1-888-800-2588. Email: antiquedoll@gmail.com

SARA BERNSTEIN DOLLS Email santiqbebe@aol.com • 732-536-4101

View Quality Dolls at affordable prices. 100’s of pictures and prices at my Ruby Lane Shop...

*Nordquist Doll Molds *Daisyettes *Bleuette Premiere *Mignonettes *Presentation Displays *Paper Toys for Dolls *Thurlow Patters for Knit & Crochet Outfits *Collectible Doll Fashions

*Finished Crocheted Outfits *Cat’s Paw Doll Jewelry *Feather Trees *Paper Ornaments *Vintage Postcards *Doll Sewing Projects *Leather Doll Shoes *Mohair Doll Wigs *Miniature Accessories Mold & Global Catalogs not shown

www.sarabernsteindolls.rubylane.com

Kathy Libraty’s ANTIQUE DOLLS

Left to right, 16” Fashion, marked 3 on head and shoulder plate, $2800; Rabery Delphieu, 13”, cm, $2500; Paris Bébé, 10”, rare size 1, $7850.

Evelyn Gigante, 1507 NE 20th Street, Ft. Lauderdale, Florida 33305 Home 954-565-3079 Cel 954-253-6494

Camilla

Complete 5 Catalog Set - $25 ppd. Includes $15 money back coupon with purchase.

jeannordquistdolls.com Order Desk

1-800-566-6646 Collectible Doll Company P.O. Box 697, Cedar Hill, TX 75106 58

ANTIQUE DOLL COLLECTOR

APRIL 2014

BABES FROM THE WOODS Faithful reproductions of hand carved Queen Annes, dolls by Izannah Walker, and Early American Cloth Dolls. Kathy Patterson Ph. 705-489-1046 toysintheattic@ sympatico.ca

www.babesfromthewoods.com

Extremely Rare 27” Simon & Halbig 120 Character Child - EXC. COND $3200 29” 1907 JUMEAU in FACTORY ORIGINAL COSTUME - WOW! $4200 27” DEP FRENCH BEBE DRESSED AS A LADY STUNNING! $1350

WWW.KATHYLIBRATYSDOLLS.COM

Phone: 718-859-0901 email: Libradolls@aol.com MEMBER: UFDC OR—Buy My Dolls on eBay where I begin most of my antique dolls for just $1—Search seller name kathylibraty.

8 MONTH LAYAWAY PLAN AVAILABLE

WWW.RUBYLANE.COM/SHOPS/KATHYLIBRATYSANTIQUES

K*R 117- 24”, brown set eyes, closed mouth and original light brown mohair wig. She has perfect bisque, a composition ball jointed body and original factory shift. $3900. Call 215-794-8164 or email alloyd@nni.com. Member NADDA and UFDC. Other photos and dolls may be seen at RubyLane.com/shops/anntiquedolls.


s ’ i z t i FArntique Dolls

Buying entire collections of antique dolls and dolls of merit. Email: fritzisantiquedolls@comcast.net Fritzi’s cell# 630-247-1144 Rick’s cell# 630-247-1219

Left to right: 226 kestner all orig toddler; large unmarked rare toddler; 121 K star R orig toddler; 27” F.S. & Co. 1295 toddler.

OUR UPCOMING SHOWS:

UFDC

Sunday April 6th Toledo Doll & Bear Show. Stranahan Great Hall - 4645 Heatherdowns, Toledo, OH. Sunday April 27th The Chicago Toy & Doll Show. Kane County Fairgrounds - St. Charles, IL. May 3rd & 4th National Antique Doll Dealer Association Show. Embassy Suites Hotel. Greensboro, NC. Sunday May 18th Dollicious Show & Sale. Madison Place (new location) 876 Horace Brown Dr. Madison Heights, MI.


Antique DOLL Collector May 2014 Vol. 17, No. 4


LAYAWAY AVAILABLE Member UFDC & NADDA

(Nat'l Antique Doll Dealers Assn.)

Visit my website: www.grandmasatticdolls.com 12” Early Portrait Jumeau #2 Bebe, br. p/w eyes, immaculate early pressed pale bisque, orig. mohair wig & cork pate, orig. head coil, wears darling real Jumeau Fr. ant. wool ecru & pink sailor suit, ant. woolen beret, undies, Jumeau shoes & ant. stockings. On orig. early 8 ball st. wrist “signed” Jumeau body. AMAZING in this tiny cabinet size!!! Great price at only $9800.

10 1/2” S & H #1279 Character, blue sl. eyes, immaculate pale bisque & ant. braided HH wig, wears orig. batiste dress adorned with ribbons & ant undies. The most DARLING rare tiny cabinet size & fabulous modeling!! ADORABLE!! $2450.

13" Bru Jne #2 Bebe, blue p/w eyes, mint pale bisque, orig. mohair wig & pate. Wears orig. silk & lace Bru dress (some fraying), orig. hat, undies and “signed” Bru shoes. On orig. Bru Jne #2 Chevrot body, paper label on chest, wooden legs, perfect bisque “signed” shoulder plate & perfect lower arms & hands. “Signed” Bru Jne #2 head, desirable molded tongue tip & great cabinet size!!! FABULOUS face!!! CALL OR WRITE FOR PRICE 18 1/2” S & H #1279 character, mint pale bisque, blue sl. eyes, desirable early flyaway brows, fabulous orig. long mohair wig orig. pate, wears orig. dotted Swiss dress, orig. undies, orig. socks & orig. pink leather shoes & added ant.ribbon & lace bonnet. On orig. S & H body. Crisp deep modeling!! Absolutely STUNNING!!! Only....$2950.

12” Kestner #143 Character, perfect bisque, beautiful blue sl. eyes & newer mohair wig. Wears orig. batiste & lace dress, ant. socks, leather shoes with buckles & ant. lace & ribbon hat too. On fabulous orig. Kestner body. Tremendous presence & absolutely GORGEOUS!! $1450.

16” K * R 116A Toddler, o/cl./ mo., great bisque, br. sl. eyes,, ant. wig & orig. pate, wears ant. light blue dress, ant. bonnet & ant. blue leather shoes, socks & orig. undies. On orig. chunky fully jointed early st. wrist toddler body. Deep first of out mold modeling. Absolutely ADORABLE!!! $2150.

Joyce Kekatos e-mail: joycedolls@aol.com I buy dolls and sell on consignment. 2137 Tomlinson Avenue, Bronx, NY 10461 home: 718-863-0373 cell: 917-859-2446

5” Parian,blonde painted hair, bisque face, lower arms & lower legs. Wears a her beautiful orig. lacey dress & undies. Darling tiny size!! $195.

6 1/2” S & H All Bisque “Barefoot” Mignonette, huge outlined blue p/w eyes, orig. long mohair wig, wears orig. aqua silk & lace dress, orig. undies & ant. bonnet. On orig. all bisque “barefoot” body, early “peg strung” (one very teeny fleck at 1 stringing hole, nondetracting) & a “swivel neck”. GREAT large size barefoot all bisque & BREATHTAKING!!! ONLY....$4250.


& LOWE Connie

Jay

A fine grouping of “fresh to the market” dolls and related items...call for pricing.

P.O. Box 5206 Lancaster, PA 17606 FAX 717-396-1114 Call Toll Free 1-888-JAY LOWE or (717) 396-9879 Email: big.birds@comcast.net Always Looking to Buy Quality Dolls, Toys, Marklin Doll Carriages or Entire Estates Buy & Sell With Confidence Member of UFDC & NADDA


P.O. Box 4327 Burbank CA 91503 Cell: 818-738-4591 Home: 818-562-7839

Member NADDA and UFDC

Nelling, Inc.

published by the Office Staff: Publication and Advertising: Keith Kaonis Editor-in-Chief: Donna C. Kaonis Administration Manager: Lorraine Moricone Phone: 1-888-800-2588 Art/Production: Lisa Ambrose Graphic Designer: Marta Sivakoff Contributors: Ursula Mertz, Lynn Murray, Samy Odin, Andy Ourant Subscription Manager: Jim Lance

Outstanding 24 1/2” Jumeau Triste size 11, $22,900. Exhibiting: MAY 3-4 - NADDA Show, Greensboro NC, Embassy Suites Hotel

MAY 17 - Forever Young Doll Show and Sale, Pasadena CA, Pasadena Elks Lodge

BUYING & SELLING QUALITY DOLLS FOR OVER 20 YEARS

Visit us at: www.maspinelli.com • e-mail: nellingdolls@gmail.com

Marketing: Penguin Communications Publications Director: Eric Protter Antique Doll Collector (ISSN 1096-8474) is published monthly by the Puffin Co., LLC, 15 Hillside Place, Northport, NY 11768 Phone: 1-631-261-4100 Periodicals postage paid at Northport, NY. and at additional mailing offices. Contents ©2014 Antique Doll Collector, all rights reserved. Postmaster: Send address changes to Antique Doll Collector, P.O. Box 239, Northport, NY 11768. Subscriptions: Send to Antique Doll Collector, P. O. Box 239, Northport, NY 11768. Phone: 1-888-800-2588 or 1-631-261-4100 Subscription Rates: One Year (Twelve Issues) $42.95; Two Years (Twenty-four Issues) $75.95. First class delivery in U.S. add $29 per year. Outside the U.S. add $30 per year. Foreign subscriptions must be paid in U.S. funds. Do not send cash. Credit cards accepted. Advertising and Editorial: Call 717-517-9217 or email antiquedoll@gmail.com

SEE US ON THE WEB AT: http://www.antiquedollcollector.com email: AntiqueDoll@gmail.com

Antique Doll Collector is not responsible for any inaccuracies in advertisers’ content. An unsolicited manuscript must be accompanied by SASE. Antique Doll Collector assumes no responsibility for such material. All rights including translations are reserved by the publisher. Requests for permissions and reprints must be made in writing to Antique Doll Collector. ©2014 by the Puffin Co., LLC.

MOVING?

Important: We need your old address and your new. The Post Office does not forward magazines. Call 1-888-800-2588 or write to us at: P.O. Box 239, Northport, NY 11768. 4

ANTIQUE DOLL COLLECTOR

MAY 2014


The Complete Guide to Antique, Vintage and Collectible Dolls

May 2014 Volume 17, Number 4

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SOCIETE DES BEBES JUMEAUX

By Dominique Pennegues To be competitive in the cloth doll market, S.F.B.J. created a new company. Surviving examples of these dolls are difficult to find.

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THE HOUSE THAT CRIED “RESCUE ME!”

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THERIAULT’S TO SELL THE HELEN WELSH COLLECTION

By Susan Grimshaw Although purchased in careworn condition, the author was charmed by this British dollhouse and its original features.

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DRESSING DOLLS IN THE SONNEBERG AREA OF GERMANY PART II

May 24 and 25 in Las Vegas

By Mary Krombholz All original dolls from this former doll and toy making capital in Germany.

The elegant Bellagio Hotel in Las Vegas will be the setting for two important private collections to be sold by Theriault’s May 24 and 25. Our article features rare and varied treasures from the Helen Welsh collection.

About The Cover

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CREATING A BODY FOR MY DE FUISSEAUX

By Sherry Smith The oldest known doll factory in Badour, Belgium produced bisque doll heads for only a brief time.

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A COVER GIRL

By Ursula Mertz “Sis,” an adorable doll designed by Grace Drayton, was sold by the Averill Manufacturing Company.

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ANTIQUE DOLL COLLECTOR

MAY 2014

Auction Gallery Mystery Emporium Calendar Classified

A ROOM OF THEIR OWN

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By Laurie Baker Easy to follow directions on how to create an elegant salon for your fashion dolls.


1. Beautiful selection of important half dolls – some on original mounts. Call. This one on original mount shown in a full page photo in Marion/ Werner’s Encyclopedia.

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3. Call for large selection of cotton batting die cuts.

2. This sumptuous and regal beauty, the 16” Block Letter F.G. is a glamorous bebe in the league of Bru, PD and Schmitt et Fils. The most desirable of all Gaultier dolls, she is a very important model having a rare fully jointed composition body by Gesland, with powder fine quality bisque, shaded lids and soft brown PW eyes which complete this ultimate image of regal grace. $4700 4

4. 16” All Original Jumeau Fashion w/Bisque Arms – straight from a two generation family held collection, she is all factory original in rarified silk couture with elaborated braided wig befitting her aristocratic French heritage. Her graceful bisque arms are so rare and mint with blush and tinted nails, as is her flawless scintillating bisque – an eloquent host to her captivating beauty! $4250

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5. So expressive is this coquettish 16” Unique and Romantic Fashion Heirloom from hat to signed shoes in her 2-part French blue gown w/ silk trim train, signed French leather body and shoulder length ringlets… so lithesome! $2600 8

8. Luxurious Dressel and Kister Half Doll – aristocratic portrait of grace and style – plus others. Call

6. 22” Lavish E. J. Bebe – earlier gentle face model with the early soft brows, shaded lids, glowing PW’s, orig. 8 ball stiff wrist body also signed; and wearing luxurious silk period clothes and shoes! Breathtaking! $6200

(212) 787-7279 P.O. Box 1410 NY, NY 10023

Quality Antique Dolls by Mail Return Privilege • Layaways Member UFDC & NADDA

matrixbymail@gmail.com

7. For the Dressmaker! A rare 11” Jumeau Fashion ‘size 2’ cabinet gem, perfect and petite w/ factory wig, pate and blue PW’s – you need a ‘little sister’ doll – worthy of your talents! $2100


(212) 787-7279 P.O. Box 1410 NY, NY 10023

Quality Antique Dolls by Mail Return Privilege • Layaways Member UFDC & NADDA

matrixbymail@gmail.com 9. 16” Steiff ‘Clownie – impressive size and all original, mint w/complete costume, hat and tag! $295 10. Miniature K * R 116A – fantastic little 10” example, mint with factory wig and body finish, op/cl mouth, sleep eyes and precious original clothes! $1100 11. 17” Early 1920’s Lenci Toddler – ‘flat nose’ model with painted nostrils, chubby body, oodles of ringlets, organdy and felt ensemble – a scamp! $495 12. Most elegant baby ever – a 13” Swaine Baby Baby, c, 1910, a Hilda type baby with thoughtful aspect, artful shading and coloring, closed lips, orig. period cloths w/miniature bib. $450

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13. 11” Cabinet K * R 122 – charming factory clothes and wig, perfect in every way, amazing dewy bisque, angelic blue sleep eyes and op/cl mouth with tongue. A winner! $495 14. The perfect accessory to the Nursery is this 10” tall Schoenhut Roly Poly Baby with all the original paint and label! $295 15. 16” Rare Sleep Eye Scootles – an exceptional size by Cameo, great condition, factory romper and shoes, with rattle - a prize! $595 16. Heart-shaped lips, rounded tongue and button nose are just part of the charm of this rare ‘641’ Bahr and Proschild, c. 1915, with oily bisque and period clothes – a cabinet cutie! $425

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17. The Classic Bonnie Babe in a wonderful 17” size with flawless bisque, gurgling smile and pure blue eyes on the excellent original toddler body with the factory ensemble to boot! All mint! $495 18. 25” Lifelike ‘Hanna Toddler’ – sold… but we have another! A super size 25” character with brilliant features, oily sheen, vibrant bright eyes and chunky toddler body. $950 19. 11” 1840’s Wire Eye Motchmann Baby – all original historic doll w/ swivel head, wire operated sleep eyes, early jtd. hands and feet, all beneath exquisite layers of finery for 172 years! $750 20. We make a point of buying these important E. Heubach ‘Vanta Babies’ – this one is 16” w/ the butterscotch side part hair, incredible quality ‘oily’ bisque, blush and sleep eyes. A must have. $495

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21. 6” ‘Our Fairy’ – mold ‘222’ mint with original arms, label and wig, glass eyes – the all bisque googly with watermelon grin! $495 22. 20” Heirloom JDK 226 – one never tires of the artful Kestner modeling of this intelligent and sensitive baby w/ glistening eyes and plump cheeks. A ‘no show’ under wig flaw can bring this sweetheart home to you for just $450 23. Endearing 18” Hoffmeister Baby – what a huggable bundle w/chubby body, round blue happy eyes, glistening creamy bisque and her pretty, delightful play dress. $395

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24. A Montana woman created this remarkable doll in 1913. At 34” this stunning Skookums will enliven any room in your home – and keep you safe! $850


25. Mechanical Jester Toy – not your typical doll’s toy – the clever Edwardian character has a very special face! $695 26. 6-1/2” Bebe Face All Bisque – early 1880’s Kuhnlenz in the mignonette manner w/ choice lambs wool wig, dewy bisque, PW eyes, and pretty original clothes! $1100 27. 5” All Bisque Bonnie Babe – all original w/molded shoes and socks, sleep eyes, tiny curls! Flawless $795. Another mint and nude $495

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29, 30, 32 Beautiful Big Girls – perfect bisque, large heads, pc’d ears, sleep eyes, long uncut wigs, fully jointed composition bodes_ fully dressed! 30” Bebe Cosmopolite – for Handwerck, lovely soft coloring. $495. 30” Doe-eyed Bergmann by Halbig – big, rich eyes, delicate color, $475. 29” Ernst Heubach w/ gentle blush, chunky body. $395 31. 7-1/2” Miniature K * R – meticulous little gem, fully jointed incl. hands, tiny leather shoes and oodles of curls, all mint! Call. 3” All Bisque Dolls’ Dolls – factory original, jointed limbs and pretty! $95 each

28. Joyful ‘Laughing Jumeau’ – a winning personification of the french baby, the beloved ‘236’ with original body, op/cl mouth and glistening blue sleep eyes! $995 27

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33. Victorian Pull Toy – adorable cabinet size accessory for all your little dolls to play on!

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37. 5-1/2” Kewpie Serenade – guitar with bud vase, mint and signed. Sold. Velvet Steiff Frog – mint with tag – a real prince! $90. 4” Kewpie Crawler – mint baby with outstretched arms! $425

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34&36. Naughty and Nice – the perfect mix in this rare 12” Hertel Schwab ‘Jubilee Baby’ mold ‘172’ – the preferred model with prominent tufts of molded hair, part pixie, part Kewpie, all perfect quality and mint incl. the original body too. You’ll smile too! $3500

38. You should see this magnificent 20” All Original Poured Wax in layer upon layer of her mint original presentation ensemble, baby blue PW’s, mint rooted mohair wig, a lavish estate doll, historic and lovely. Immaculate condition! $1100

35. Large selection of paper dolls and ephemera. 36

(212) 787-7279 P.O. Box 1410 NY, NY 10023

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Quality Antique Dolls by Mail Return Privilege • Layaways Member UFDC & NADDA

matrixbymail@gmail.com


Auction Gallery

Auction Team Breker May 24 Rock a Bye Mother and Baby

Gustave Vichy Coquette.

A Leopold Lambert “Espagnole” automaton with Jumeau bisque head.

Rare advertising automaton by Leopold Lambert.

This Swiss musical box offers music, dancing dolls and also dispenses candy!

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ANTIQUE DOLL COLLECTOR

MAY 2014

selection of ingenious mechanical toys and automata will be performing for the public at Auction Team Breker’s Spring sale of Mechanical Music, Antique Toys and Technology on 24 May 2014 in Cologne, Germany (please see advertisement on this outside back cover). Amongst the featured pieces are an all-original Leopold Lambert “Espagnole” automaton with Jumeau bisque head and a rare advertising automaton in the form of a black dancer by the same maker. It was designed to stand on a shop counter and rotate gently, powered by a long-duration spring that runs for 15 minutes on a single winding. The business card of the magasin he ‘worked’ for would have been displayed in the brass holder in the automaton’s left hand. The fashionable “Coquette” would have been a familiar figure in the grands magasins of the 19th century. This mechanical lady by Gustave Vichy powders her cheeks as she bends forwards to admire her French bisque features in the cheval looking glass. With less time for the world of fashion is the American “Rock a Bye” mother patented on April 8, 1908 and her German sister, the Sleeping Mother and Baby from around 1910. Childhood is also celebrated in the pair of clockwork walking dolls “Toto” and “Tata” based on the illustrations of French draughtsman Francisque Poulbot (1879-1946) who sketched French children orphaned by the Great War of 1914-1918. This rare pair comes from the collection of the Decamps family. A menagerie of mechanical animals includes a majestic Indian peacock, a bear harpist and a kitten in a milk churn licking his lips as greedily as the proverbial ‘cat who got the cream.’ Of particular interest to collectors of coin-activated, as well as mechanical, antiques is the superb Swiss “station” musical box providing audio, visual and sensory entertainment in the form of music, dancing dolls and candy from the original built-in sweet dispenser! A colourful procession of German pull-toys including several by Gottlieb Zinner & Söhne, rounds off the current auction highlights. To preview other new highlights, please visit www.Breker. com and www.youtube.com/auctionteambreker. The full catalogue is available online from early May onwards at www.liveauctioneers.com and in printed form from the headquarters in Cologne, Germany, on Tel: +49 2236 38 43 40 and E-mail: auction@breker.com OR: the international representatives listed in the ad on the outside back cover page. More Auction Gallery on page 58


PUBLIC AUCTION DOLLS, DOLLS, DOLLS (& Longaberger® Baskets)!

Saturday, May 17, 2014 Doll Auction Begins at 9:00 AM Basket Auction Begins at 10:00 AM Doors Open at 8:00 AM

Special Preview: Friday, May 16th from 12 to 7 PM

Philadelphia baby 18” stockinette child, Terri Lee 16” child, Shirley Temple dolls and related collectibles, Steiff bears and animals, Lenci dolls and bed dolls, several S.F.B.J. French bisque head dolls, Bernard Ravca Mae West doll, Chocolate drop 11” black cloth doll, A.M. 7” Just Me, selection of parian head dolls and china head dolls, 5” all bisque Googly #293 J.D. Kestner 8” toddler #260 19, Martha Chase dolls, Jumeau #221 3/0 bisque head ‘Great Lady’, (2) Unis France 21” bisque head Jumeau #306 149/71, Gebruder Heubach 19” Dolly Dimple #5777, Simon & Halbig 22” toddler w/ flirty eyes #126 50 (all original with original box), selection of J.D. Kestner dolls, Vintage M. Alexander H. plastic dolls, Barbies, G.I. Joe dolls, Betsy McCall, Vogue Ginny dolls, Liddle Kiddles, etc., large Victorian style handmade 2 ½ story wooden doll house (complete with furniture and accessories), S&H #349 14 w/ closed mouth and straight wrists, antique bisque dolls house dolls, country store doll house, and lots more! Terms: 13% Buyer’s Premium with 3% discount for cash or good check.

For more information including catalog and photos, or to learn more about our other upcoming auctions, please visit our website at www.dottaauction.com or www.auctionzip.com (Auctioneer ID #1255)

330 W. Moorestown Road (Route 512) Nazareth, PA 18064 610-759-7389 PA License AY 1950-L


SANDY’S DREAM DOLLS

Sandy Kralovetz Always Buying Dolls of Quality For a Houston adventure please visit our spacious location at

Thompson’s Antique Center of Texas

Texas’ largest antique center with over 50 antique dolls and accessories for sale.

9950 Hempstead Road 600 Northwest Mall Houston, TX 77092 602.228.1829 281.339.0269 skayk43@aol.com mailing address: 9825 Moers Rd Houston, Texas 77075 Call for doll information Member UFDC & NADDA

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Theriault’s to Sell the Helen Welsh Collection May 24 and 25 in Las Vegas A

The very rare 21” Simon and Halbig 150 model is featured in the Helen Welsh collection.

Dainty, demure and ever so beautiful is the 11” Bebe Bru Brevete with original costume and signed Bru shoes.

He’s a fan of Colonel Teddy Roosevelt so he must own a teddy bear. The two models are fine examples from the K*R art character collection of Helen Welsh. 18

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s a young girl, Helen Welsh played endlessly with her toy kaleidoscope. She did not know that the kaleidoscope had been invented more than 150 years before by a Scottish astronomer, Sir David Brewster, not as a toy but as a scientific instrument. She did not know that the Greek word ‘kaleidoscope’ meant “observation of beautiful forms”. But she did know that she loved the way colors and shapes and elements of beauty could shape and re-create themselves over and over in an endless panoply of images. So it is little wonder that when the Pennsylvania woman took to doll collecting she was drawn to the dolls of Lenci, themselves a kaleidoscope of vibrant colors and patterns; over the next 20 years she assembled more than 60 rare examples. And it is little wonder that dolls of every genre - gorgeous French bebes, colorfully-costumed Kathe Kruse dolls, Steiff dolls and animals, German bisque art dolls whose varied faces were a veritable kaleidoscope of expression - intermingled with them. Sizes, shapes, colors of all kinds melded together in the Welsh collection, filling every room of her home, and given flavor by her related collections of antique purses, trinket boxes, and dainty accessories. All of these rare treasures will be presented at an important catalogued auction in Las Vegas on Saturday and Sunday, May 24 and 25 at the Bellagio Hotel. Appropriately titled “Kaleidoscope”, the twoday auction features more than 700 lots of dolls and related childhood ephemera. Many of these dolls were featured in an article in this magazine in January 2012, highlighted by the rare Simon and Halbig boy, model 150, in larger 21” size which appeared on the cover of that issue. A family of art character dolls by Kammer and Reinhardt are included in wonderful original costumes, among others a large model 114 boy whose rare antique pin proclaims his support of Colonel Teddy Roosevelt and a model 107 boy who solemnly awaits his wedding day, garbed in original formal attire including top hat. K*R models with unusual variations include the brown-complexioned 101 Marie, and the flocked hair 101X, Peter. Other rare characters include German bisque googlies such as all-bisque with jointed elbows and knees, Kestner models such as the elusive and endearing 239 toddler, and rarities from Simon and Halbig and Gebruder Heubach. French bebes include an all-original 11” Bebe Brevete by Bru, as well as a petite size 3 classic Bru Jne in wonderful Scottish costume, and a stunning 28” classic Bru Jne model. There are early-period fine bebes by Jumeau, Schmitt et Fils, Steiner, Gaultier, and Petit et Dumoutier, each in wonderful antique costumes. Allbisque dolls include rare mignonettes, as well as early German models including jointed knee models by Kestner. In her Pennsylvania home, Helen displayed


Left: He’s been waiting for his bride for more than a century. Some call him Karl, he’s the very rare 107 model by Kammer and Reinhardt, circa 1910, still wearing his original bridegroom costume. Above: Two’s company, but in this case three is not a crowd, for you can never have too many of the sought-after Series I Kathe Kruse dolls.

Stylish children of the late 1920s and 1930s were a highlight of the Lenci firm, as evidenced in this trio.

A Scottish lass? But wait, she’s French. A wonderful size 3 classic era bebe by Leon Casimir Bru. ANTIQUE DOLL COLLECTOR

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So very rare is this duet of characters by Lenci in vibrant costumes, and with unique sculpting and painting of faces.

Three Lenci girls whose fancy original organdy dresses and pajamas have done little to dispel their fretful expressions, from the rare 1500 series.

Early block-letter bebes by Gaultier have been a favorite of the Pennsylvania collector who has examples in both large and small sizes. Imaginative designs of Lenci dolls just seem to inspire whimsical captions. What could you say about this rare pair from the Welsh Collection. 20

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Helen Welsh began her collection with early dolls, and in this miniature woodenbodied example she found a treasure.

If you seek Bebes Jumeau in original costumes, you will find them in the Helen Welsh collection, as well as wonderful doll furniture and accessories.

From the series of Asian children presented by Lenci is this rare couple, with all accessories including wooden lantern of the young lad.

the dolls in charming vignette scenes with doll-scaled furnishings and accessories of their era, such as a collection of grandfather clocks, rare cast iron fireplaces, and salesman sample chairs. American dolls have been of particular interest to Helen, particularly those from nearly regions such as her redoubtable collection of Kamkins dolls, two in their original boxes. And Schoenhuts, too, offer an impressive variety of faces. There are, too, dolls by Martha Chase and Ella Smith. All of the dolls are displayed in playful poses with early Steiff animals and toys. Paper mache dolls were among her first loves; during her 20 years of serious collecting, wonderful examples of early models from American and German firms were assembled, and the auction, as well, features a fine collection of Chinese ANTIQUE DOLL COLLECTOR

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Rare all-bisque models including two examples by Kestner, the seated with jointed knees.

Door of Hope dolls, German bisque Asian characters, wonderful Sonneberg bisque dolls in the French manner, and numerous other treasures. In closing her collection, Helen Welsh lingers not only on memories of her favorite dolls, but also cherishes the occasions which brought the dolls to her home. She and her husband collected side by side; the

From the collection of Kamkins dolls in the Welsh Collection; not shown are two wonderful other examples in their original boxes (one with rare red hair).

Three colorful character dolls by Lenci, a veritable kaleidoscope of colors.

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Three examples from the exemplary collection of Sonneberg dolls in the French genre in the Welsh collection.

A Lenci bellhop stands at attention to the pair of stylishly-costumed children.

Lenci dolls, she confesses, were first his love and only later hers; he was drawn by their rich textures and colors. The couple traveled to auctions and shows, entertained fellow collectors, and always remained on the hunt for the curious and colorful, the best of the best, in childhood ephemera. So it is only fitting, she says, that her dolls will not only find new homes but that this will occur at a wonderful auction event that promises to create heart-warming memories for the new keeper of each doll. And, yes, she still has her childhood kaleidoscope.

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The House That Cried

“RESCUE ME!” By Susan Grimshaw

I

first saw this careworn British dollhouse a couple of years ago at the same auction where I purchased my Edwardian Villa featured in the July 2012 issue of this magazine. Due to a family obligation, I was unable to bid in person and I later learned it had been passed over. Since I knew the consignor, I attempted to purchase the house directly from her after the auction but because she had overpaid for it in the first place, her asking price was too high for me. Last autumn, it was offered again at the same auction house and I was the only interested bidder, so I took it home for less than $100. I understand why it had few admirers. It is somewhat large and bulky, which makes it less desirable to some collectors, and it was in pretty poor condition with missing or damaged windows, and at some point in its life, a quantity of blood red alkyd enamel paint had been spilled throughout all the rooms of the house. It was not a fixer-upper for the casual restorer but it seemed to cry out for someone to rescue it. I was charmed by the original wallpapers, the picture rail moldings, the generous size of the rooms and the wooden staircase, although at some Still awaiting further restoration, the exterior is covered with its original brick paper and cardboard slate shingles, but has lost some gutters and I believe there was once a thin garden wall encasing the front of the base. This front façade is fixed in place, leaving the back open, and the small oriel window above the door is a feature seen in dollhouse plans from the 1920’s and ‘30’s. I’ve seen some other dollhouses with this feature, but none exactly the same. This “before” photo only hints at the vandalism to which the house had been subjected in the past. You can see the broken upstairs windows and just a hint of the red paint disaster awaiting clean-up. But one can also discern original mellowed wallpapers and the generous number of Victorian fireplaces – no central heating here! The newel post and railing are missing in the foreground, but they left “shadows” that helped me replace them. I do love that little turn of the steps. 26

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The interior of the house features rooms that are spacious enough to easily accommodate typical 1/12 scale furniture and also pieces a little over that scale, although the stairs and hallways are a little narrow. It’s always pleasing when a dollhouse has a realistic, practical floor plan and for this period, it was still traditional to site a family parlor upstairs. I really like the cozy warmth that envelops the whole of the house and revealing the golden glow of the original oak floors and exposed ends of the walls enhances the effect.

point between the two auctions, it lost its newel post. I felt it was very evocative of the period between the two World Wars and it would provide a nice setting for some of my vintage furniture that was slightly larger in scale and didn’t fit in my other vintage English dollhouse. My first task was dealing with the splattered paint. Surprisingly, I was able to carefully chip it off the papered walls of some of the rooms, but the hallways and bedroom were too damaged to save. So I removed those damaged wallpapers and painted the walls of the hallways as a temporary measure until I find the right vintage paper. I also re-papered the bedroom with some vintage Laura Ashley wallpaper I had purchased a dozen years ago in England. I was able to chip the paint off the papers that were used as carpeting in the hallways and kitchen, with some areas of loss tolerated, but the floor papers in the other rooms were beyond saving. When I started removing those damaged floor papers in the other rooms, I was surprised to find the floors, as well as the walls, were made

I used old cigar box mahogany to replace the missing stair railing in the foreground. It was just too difficult to save the floral paper that covered the stairs while removing the paint, so I stripped it down to the bare wood and gave it a coat of satin varnish afterwards. The inner walls of the house are made from thin plywood which has warped a little with time, but the floors and outer walls are solid oak and yes, it weighs a lot!

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The upper hallway contains a private area for using the candlestick telephone. The table is German while the chair is English and a product of the Westacre Village enterprise. The wall lamp is painted metal and a perfect period accessory. The gold paper carpet is original to the house. The dining room accommodates one of my largest tables with ease. The chairs are vintage Victorians made by Mell Prescott and are slightly overscale – I was just waiting for a house with rooms big enough to accommodate her furniture! The vintage oak dresser on the right was purchased in Staffordshire when I lived in England, while the Triang floral firescreen and Westacre painted folding screen came out of a furnished Tynietoy Mansion I bought in 2012. They had been purchased for the original owner when she was a girl and her parents travelled to England in the late 1930’s. I made the draperies from Liberty fabric I purchased many years ago on my first visit to London. Artwork in this room includes two original watercolors by British artist David Williams. I was able to get the paint off the paper floor carpet in the kitchen and I can live with the small areas of loss along the edges. This room is very deep and the far end could be pretty dark so I chose warm pink floral fabric for the shorter curtains. The limed oak wheel-back chair is English and slightly overscaled, as are the vintage ladderback chairs near the window. The sink is German as are the antique treenware plates in the English plate rack above. A vintage coffee grinder is mounted on the wall nearby.

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from heavy oak that had been painted a flat brown throughout the house, as had the windows, door frames and picture rails. It took time, but I chemically stripped the paint from the floors, and all the other woodwork trim and it came up beautifully. The staircase was especially tricky, but worth the effort. The damaged and missing windows were repaired and replaced, and covered with curtains made from cozy cotton prints – I wanted this house to present as a warm, middle class suburban home from the early 20th century, with a few family heirlooms handed down over the years. I had no problem


The wallpaper in the parlor was stained and torn in some places and I had to over-paint those areas to make it presentable. A number of pieces in this room came with my Tynietoy mansion and since they were not actually Tynietoy, I put them aside until this house came into my possession. The red velvet sofa is one such piece while the vintage upholstered armchairs came from another source. In excellent condition, they appear to be homemade but very nice quality. The lamp with hand-painted lampshade is Westacre, as is the little bookstand filled with volumes atop the early Lynnfield radio – one of my earliest purchases as a teenager. Among the vintage English items in this room are the delicate magazine stand and the Dol-Toi fireplace fender covered with leatherette. The original wallpaper in the bedroom was the same as that in the parlor, but too damaged to preserve, so I covered the wall with the vintage Laura Ashley floral paper purchased when I lived in England – the entire roll was only one pound! I made the wire “brass” bed when I was a teenager and fashioned the patchwork quilt from antique scraps. The curtain fabric complements the vintage painted armchair and an old radio with attached speaker rests on a blanket chest in front of the reconstructed window. A coveted Westacre painted bookcase is placed beside the bed and contains all of its original books. Keeping with a floral motif throughout the room, the wall shown here is decorated with an embroidered floral pin, an antique watercolor of a basket of flowers, and over the bed, a tinsel picture in a daguerreotype frame, borrowed from an Alice Steele roombox. The upholstered chaise in the background came with the floral chairs in the parlor. Over the bedroom’s fireplace, I hung this small piece of embroidery about 2” square. It was probably originally on the cover of a powder compact and I never knew what to do with it until I found this tiny frame that was exactly the right size. I feel it reflects the nostalgia that was so popular in that era.

furnishing the house with things I had stored away over time and after about a month of steady work, the project was far enough along that I could vacuum up the steel wool filings and furnish the house. While a little attention is still needed on the exterior such as missing gutters and chimney pipes, I seldom hesitate to furnish interiors as soon as possible, even if it means using a few temporary pieces until the right thing comes along. Some of the artwork is of more recent manufacture, as are some chandeliers, but this is a house that need not look like a museum piece. Indeed, it reminds me of a pet of uncertain pedigree adopted from an animal shelter and happy indeed to have a new mistress! ANTIQUE DOLL COLLECTOR

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LAYAW AVAILA AY BLE

Gigi’s Dolls & Sherry’s Teddy Bears Inc. Allow Us To Help You Discover The Child Within You!

22” SH 1039 10 1/2 w/ red Wimperon stamp on RD key wind walking body ( works great), blue flirty eyes, HH wig, antique shoes & socks $1695.

18” Shirley all original in “Curly Top” blue and white polka dot dress, 1936 doll w/ dark eye shadowing, beautiful doll Never played with, face has very faint crazing $645.

20” Kestner 167 9 1/2 , blue sleep eyes, plaster pate, HH wig, antique shoes, nice body $575. 8 ½” Hertel Schwab & Co 150 Baby w o/c mouth, brown sleep eyes, HH wig, antique clothing & bonnet $185.

14 ½” All Original F-3, Factory Fuisseaux Baudour Belgium 1909 - 1913, beautifully painted bisque face with blue detailed eyes, original HH wig on skull cap, dress faded, shoulder plate marked F3 $1695.

19 ½” Monica 1940’s composition girl w/ inserted human hair wig in folk costume with rick rack & braid trim, blue hand painted eyes $425.

13” Shirley Temple all original in taffeta version of “The Little Colonel” outfit, Rare find, very slight overall crazing $595.

15” Limoges TOTO N2 Mialonef sc, blue PW eyes, pierced ears, right hand paint as is, mohair wig $525.

14” Bing German Boy 1920’s cloth mask face doll w/ hand painted eyes & facial features, rub on nose, paint chip upper lip, redressed some wear on heads paint $295. 8” German Bing 1921 - 32 Pair, cloth painted heads, original clothing, blue painted eyes $495 $495. Now $395.

20” Wax possibly Montanari – stamp on body, from Emma S. Windsor, Kindergarten, Toy & Crawling Rug Depot, 58 Barrington Rd, South Kensington, S.W., blue pw eyes, inserted brunette HH wig (sparse in back), clean body, wax coloring scuffed $1095.

17” C/M Eden Bebe, blue pw eyes, HH wig, pierced ears, antique undergarments $1695.

21 ½” K * R 101 “Peter” with professional repair on head, it appears left side by ear, right side of ear, forehead & front of neck, facial features are all original, fur wig $2150.

18 ½” Kestner “S”, blue sleep eyes, original plaster pate, mohair wig, antique clothing & leather shoes, left pinkie as is $595. 25” Sonneberg Taufling – Motschmann Baby 1850-70, head has had work done on both side seams, bodies cloth has had some mending, chips at head neck rim, nice arms & legs, jointed anklets & wrists $695.

22 ½” BSW Bruno Schmidt 2097 – 5 ½ on toddler body, blue sleep eyes, original HH wig $795.

18” K * R 126 on toddler body, blue sleep eyes, small nose rub, brown velvet outfit $595.

21” COD with K * R 117N look, blue sleep eyes, mohair wig, wear on finger tips $795.

29” 109 Handwerck, brown sleep eyes, HH wig, pierced ears, 2 glass teeth $525. 7” Pair of All Bisques marked Germany 6543, brown sleep eyes, blond mohair wigs, molded shoes & socks $325. pair 7 ½” Heubach 7647 Boy w/ blue intaglio eyes & smile, rub on right cheek, nice molding $565.

17 ½” Regina Sandreuter Boy #15/25, 1989, wood carved body w/ jointed knees, blue hand painted eyes, mohair wig, knit sweater, wool pants, leather boots $1275. 25” SH 1009 w/ early high forehead, nice early body (some repaint on arms & hands), brown sleep eyes, antique mohair wig, bonnet, outfit, undergarments & leather shoes $825.

10 ½” Heubach Koppelsdorf 452-14, black painted bisque on 5 piece toddler body, pierced ears w/ earrings, brown sleep eyes $425.

15” Brunette Alexander Elise all original in red velvet pants, white blouse (stain on right sleeve), sash gold strap shoes $225. 14” Toni blonde all original in tagged dress & Ideal shoes, shading above eyes $125. 16 ¾” Toni Walker all original in tagged dress & Ideal shoes, shading above eyes $90.

24” Pansy, brown sleep eyes, brown mohair wig, bj body $295. 8 ½” Norah Wellings Sailor w/ tag on foot, replaced hat $22. 11 ½” Papier mache 9/0, blue glass eyes, brown mohair wig inserted in slit in head, papier mache head, arms & lower legs on cloth body, antique clothing $99.50

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Societe Des Bebes Jumeaux by Dominique Pennegues

Above: Bébé Jumeaux. Molded felt mask and stuffed felt back head. Blue glass eyes with metal lids and human eyelashes. Red mohair wig. Two toned red lips. Close painted mouth. Says “mama.” 35 cm. Circa 1924+ Private collection. France. Left: Vintage photo published in 1923 Femina showing a young boy and his large Benjamin Rabier stuffed cloth dog.

T

Below: Patent photo of “a cloth doll with sleeping eyes” filed by S.F.B.J. in April 1924. Note the open/close mouth showing teeth. This detail does not appear on the dolls we have examined.

he rage for cloth dolls began in France after Stefania Lazarska had brought them into fashion and continued even more after Elena König started making all felt Lenci dolls in 1919. Emile Lang was already well-known since 1915 for his very artistic cloth dolls and stuffed animals created by well-known artists such as Jean Ray, Albert Guillaume and Benjamin Rabier. He produced stuffed felt animals during WWI, and had already filed patents to improve the making of stuffed cloth dolls and toys. The S.F.B.J. needed to become competitive in the cloth doll and toy market and made an agreement in 1923 with Lang for the making of stuffed cloth animals and dolls. The stuffed animals created by Benjamin Rabier, the artist’s Parisian dolls created by Jean Ray and those created by Beatrice Mallet who had formerly been produced by E. Lang until 1922 became the exclusivity of the S.F.B.J. by 1923. ANTIQUE DOLL COLLECTOR

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“Le Printemps” 1925. The doll is named “Poupée Jumeau” without an x. The chemise has a different lace.

“Le Printemps” 1924: this “Bébé Jumeaux” wears the chemise seen in the patent photo.

Bébé Jumeaux with same chemise as the one shown in the 1925 Le Printemps catalogue. Molded felt mask and stuffed felt back head. Blue glass sleeping eyes with metal lids, human upper eyelashes and painted lower ones. Red dots in the corner of the eyes. Note the painted close mouth, different from the patented model. Molded ears. Vertical seam on the neck. Blond mohair wig. Bow is missing. Molded felt body and stuffed felt limbs. Mitten type hands. Mama voice. 35 cm. Circa 1925. Courtesy Musée de la Poupée Paris. 32

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A new company was created for the production of cloth dolls and toys named “Société des Bébés Jumeaux” with its own factory at 43 rue Corne-de-Cerf in Lyon. The trademark for the cloth dolls was “Bébés Jumeaux” to benefit from the renown of the famous name. The letter “x” was probably selected to make a difference between the two productions. S.F.B.J. continued using the trademark “Jumeau” for some of its dolls until the 1950’s, and even some of the cloth dolls seen in Parisian store catalogs, which should have been advertised as “Bébés Jumeaux,” were listed as “Poupée Jumeau.” Until 1924, the S.F.B.J. cloth doll bodies we have been studying are of the classic type, with stuffed a cloth trunk and limbs. S.F.B.J. had filed a patent for a new machine for stuffing toys the same year. Heads were molded cloth or paper mache with hand painted or printed features. New patents for a cloth doll with sleeping eyes were filed by the S.F.B.J. in April 1924 and in December 1924 for improvement in eyelids. Paris store catalogues of the same year showed some of these dolls made of felt, with sleeping glass eyes and metal lids with human eyelashes. The head and trunk are molded felt. The molded trunk is made in two parts and glued together as explained in 1915 Lang’s patent. It is interesting to note that Lenci’s dolls still had a stuffed trunk at that time, and that for this particularity, the Bébés Jumeaux were far ahead of their time. Their limbs are stuffed felt. Hands are of the mitten type as are Lenci’s of the period. However, unlike Lenci dolls, the ears are molded. The felt used is a surprising hot pink color. The few models we have seen have blue


glass eyes, blond eyelashes, and mohair wigs of different colors. These modern Bébés Jumeaux were more expensive than the bisque head dolls from the same company: a 45 cm Bébé Jumeaux sold for 65 fr while a bisque head S.F.B.J. doll of the same size sold for 49 fr. By 1925, Bon Marché proposed the 38cm model for 82 fr and 102 fr for the taller one. This could be the explanation why these dolls do not seem to have had a lot of success as very few are found in the collecting world today. We recently found a totally unknown model of the rare sleeping eyes Bébé Jumeaux. This one is very different from the model patented in 1924, as only the sleeping eye mechanism remains the same. The slim silhouette indicates the doll represents a young girl, while the previous Bébés had the chubby body of a toddler. The felt used is no longer “hot pink” but fleshcolored, and the neck of this very rare doll does not show a vertical seam, like all other cloth dolls do, but instead the two borders of the felt are glued together, after Lang’s invention patented in 1915. Also, the body is stuffed and not molded, with the top of the trunk in felt and the lower part of the body in cotton. The major difference with the patented model, other than the slim silhouette, is the type of hands with separate fingers, like the Lenci dolls from 1926 on. This could allow us to date the doll from same period. Also, the clothing is more elaborate than those of the 1924 patent model, and could no longer be confused with Lenci dolls. By the end of the 30’s, S.F.B.J. did not reach the success with their cloth dolls that La Venus, La Nicette or Raynal dolls had achieved. They tried to be more

Bébé Jumeaux. Blue glass sleeping eyes. Red mohair wig with bangs. Original all felt rich clothing, including large hat and shoes. Same patented model as the previous one but larger, this one measures 42 cm. Mama voice. Circa 1925. Private collection. France.

Bébé Jumeaux. Nude. Note the short legs giving the doll the appearance of a toddler. Hot pink color of the felt has faded where it was not covered. The original coloring is rarely seen on felt dolls of this period.

Small and large Bébés Jumeaux. 38 and 42 cm. Note the small difference in the coloring of the felt. Courtesy Musée de la Poupée (left), private collection (right).

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Bébé Jumeaux. Rare model (only one found to date) with different head mold and body. Felt head is molded out of a single piece of felt, front and back are both molded, unlike the other models which have a molded face and a stuffed back head. The two sides of the felt are glued at the neck instead of a seam, as proposed by E. Lang in his 1915 patent. Hands have separate fingers, like Lenci dolls from 1926 and after. Golden blond mohair wig. Blue glass sleeping eyes. Human upper eyelashes, painted lower ones. Red dots in the corner of the eyes. Note the two pale pink dots on the lower lip. Molded ears. Original rich clothing consisting of a knitted hat and jumper with orange felt ribbon. Pleated white felt skirt, and white felt gaiters. Light pink shoes. 42 cm. Circa 1926. Private collection. France.

Bébé Jumeaux. Nude. Note: the body is made differently from the patented model. It is not molded but stuffed, and only the upper torso is felt, the lower part of the body is stuffed cotton.

Bébé Jumeaux in white cotton and lace underwear. Note the slim silhouette, with long legs, different from the patented model with a toddler look.

Detail of the dress.

Details of the hand with separate fingers.

Bébé Jumeaux. Mold 247. Flocked pressed carton head with a felt appearance, hand painted features with large blue eyes and molded open/close mouth. Golden brown mohair wig. Stuffed cloth body. 45 cm. Circa 1930. Private collection France. 34

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competitive by producing a model “La Venus” look-a-like head with hand painted features. The heads were first made of rhodoid (non flammable celluloid) on a stuffed cloth body. Later, they were made of composition, on an all articulated wooden body. Those dolls are hard to find today and eminently desirable to the very few collectors who know their origin. Like other French cloth dolls makers, S.F.B.J. had to stop making cloth dolls during WWII as the use of cloth to make toys had become forbidden during war time. They did not resume their production when WWII ended. Bébé Jumeaux. Pressed carton head marked SFBJ on the neck. Hand painted features. Blue eyes. Blond mohair wig. Cloth body. Original hot pink felt clothing. 38 cm. Private collection. France.

Bébé Jumeaux. Composition head. Hand painted features with brown eyes. Light brown mohair wig. This head is mostly similar to the well- known “La Vénus” mold produced from 1932 until 1940. This rare S.F.B.J. head can be found made of rhodoid (unflammable celluloid) with a cloth body, or in composition with an all articulated wooden body. Here, it is costumed as an Alsatian girl. 38 cm. Circa 1938+. Private collection. U.S.A.

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Tel: 425.765.4010 Beautifulbebes@outlook.com

Lady with Hummingbirds Automaton - Exquisite, rare faced beauty captured in automaton by Roullet & Decamps 25” tall. A rare portrait face made by Jumeau company w/ huge darkly lined sapphire blue eyes that engulf you. Coral earrings match the tint of her lips. Wonderful silk taffeta court dress made with shimmering colors match the iridescence of real hummingbirds she tenderly holds. Please call for details~

Rare kid over wood body French Fashion~ Our Mademoiselle has a beautiful face with large, serene spiral enamel blue eyes; in excellent condition. She bears the stamp of Au Paradis des Enfant Perreau Fils Paris, a shop that sold lavish, high end toys on rue du Rivoli. Wonderful articulated kid over wood body with legs able to assume a natural seated position. Her arms are graced with exceptionally pretty bisque forearms with fine attention to the detail of the fingers and pose to enable easy positioning of accessories or props. Her beautiful swivel head is marked 4 and crowned with original long blonde mohair wig swept up with a pretty gold metal comb. This very rare doll awaits. Please call~

An exceptional Huret from the early years with a dear face and many enchanting attributes including her original signed Huret gutta percha body (albeit some restoration), superbly painted, glazed shoulderhead with sensitively rendered eyes and lips, espresso pique ensemble with complex soutache design, original shoes and bag and exquisite presence. 17” tall. Bisque is perfect. Please email or call~

Member UFDC & NADDA

Very beautiful half doll with perfect bisque and serene presence. 5.5” from waist to head. 10.5” total. $525~

Adorable 6.5” all bisque Mignonette in excellent condition, with rare brown boots and brown eyes in all original costume of gold and bronzed silk with brown and cinnamon accents and adorable chapeau. Early labrador included. Excellent, adorable and ready to sneak into your pocket! $2450~

A very endearing and beautiful 15” Jumeau Poupee with huge sky-blue eyes rimmed with sweeping lashes. Bestowed with beautiful bisque expertly tinted a pale shade of creamy rose with a deeper bloom in her full lips. Her perfect swivel head and shoulder plate rests on original gussetted kid body with wired fingers. Mademoiselle is endowed with an original white and green polka dot summer ensemble, antique leather boots, antique silk fringed chapeau and original summer cape with pom decoration. Beautiful upswept wig, blue glass earrings and picnic basket complete her. $5800~


Creating A Body For My De Fuisseaux By Sherry Smith s I was perusing the Internet about two years ago, a face suddenly caught my attention. It was a De Fuisseaux, F.1. head, circa 1909. As a collector of very early dolls, I usually would not have bought something from this era. Nevertheless, I was captivated. So, after many emails with the seller, I bought her. Unwrapping her with much anticipation, she emerged even more beautiful than her photos. Research has always been a huge part of collecting for me, so I set out to learn as much as I could about De Fuisseaux dolls, which, turns out to be very little, as much of the history was destroyed during WWI. I was fortunate enough to make contact with Jacques and Patricia, who live in Belgium and are collectors of De Fuisseaux items, including the dolls. They have been kind enough to share their information and photos with me. Under Nicolas, then his wife, followed by their son, Fernand and, during what is called the De Fuisseaux Period (18471927), the factory made everyday household items, all types of insulators for electric bells, telephone and telegraph lines, lighting and power transport and items for spinning mills, chemists, perfumeries, and hairdressers. In 1898, the company changed its name to Baudour Ceramics Products.

My doll’s head is 5.5 inches tall and is only marked F.1. on the back. Photos courtesy of Patricia Snyder

Left: Head marked D.F. B. F. 1. This doll head is the same size as my example. Photo courtesy of Jacques and Patricia, Belgique

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These two examples are both marked F2.

Photos courtesy Jacques and Patricia, Belgique

De Fuisseaux is the oldest known doll factory in Baudour, Belgium. It produced bisque heads, just before and during World War I, specifically 1909-1913. They only made heads and sold them to craftsmen who assembled them to their own taste, as children and folk people. Various marks are found: F.1., F.2., F.3., D.F. B. Belgique and De Fuisseaux Baudour Belgique. They range in size from about two inches to five and half inches tall. Some are socket heads, meant for some type of composition body and the others are shoulder heads. As the factory did not make bodies, the heads have been found on many different styles. The quality of bisque varies. Most are highly colored and quite ruddy in appearance. Others are strikingly beautiful with lovely bisque. Some have glass eyes, but most have painted eyes. The eyes on the F.1, 2 and 3 shoulder heads have striking bluish/green eyes with mauve eye shadow and black eyeliner. Their eyebrows are varying shades of reds and browns and golden yellow. Their cheeks are quite pink. Some are highly freckled. Many of the character heads have blackish eyebrows. They are definitely unique heads.

Photo courtesy Laurie Christman

Marked F3 this is a rare candy container. Photos courtesy Jacques and Patricia, Belgique.

Another lovely doll marked F3. Photo courtesy Laurie Christman

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A large chunk of basswood was, after months of carving and sanding turned into a beautiful body for my De Fuisseaux head. The lower bisque arms are from a reproduction A. Marque mold.

The examples shown here are all of the F series, 1, 2 or 3, the 1 being the largest of the molds. These heads have been found on cloth and kid bodies and alone. Although the molds are very similar, the painting of the features and the quality of the bisque varies greatly. Some have very freckled bisque and are more highly colored with more mauve eye accents and others have even and paler colored bisque. After trying, unsuccessfully, to find a proper fitting body for my F1, now named Marie, after my beloved Grandmother, who was born in 1898, I decided to carve a wooden body for her with bisque arms. My friend, Linda Marx, obtained a mold for a pair of A. Marque arms for me and hand tinted the bisque, using photos of Marie’s head. She drilled holes in the elbow sockets, which allowed me to peg them to wood upper arms. The shoulder plates of these dolls are very narrow and closed in where the shoulders end. I had noticed that the clothes on dressed F’s often looked droopy at the shoulders. It finally dawned on me that the mold did not allow for the rounded, upper part of the shoulder. So, in designing the upper wooden arms, I added this part to meet with her breast plate. Finally, the sleeves would look correct!

It took many months of carving and sanding, but she was finally completed in October 2013, over a 100 years after her head was made! During the making of the body, I collected period pieces of clothing and accessories for her, not knowing if they would fit! When I sat her in the chair for the first time, her bent knees fit perfectly on the edge! I was thrilled. Her little dog, Ted, was bought for her, by my husband, Allan Mason, who helped me mentally and physically with this project, urging me to keep going! It’s been a wonderful rewarding journey, from a lovely head and a big block of basswood to a complete doll! Many thanks to Pat Snyder for the photos of Marie’s head that began this journey, to Allan Mason, my husband, who helped me through the whole process and photographed Marie, to Laurie Christman for the photos of her dolls, to Jacques and Patricia for sharing the history of the De Fuisseaux Factory and their dolls and to Lynda Marx for the beautifully tinted arms. ANTIQUE DOLL COLLECTOR

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The Tender Years

Deborah Varner 303-850-7800

queenbeev1@comcast.net • Member UFDC Layaways welcomed and consignments taken.

N EW Lo w Pr ic es

18” French Jumeau’s E 8 D. CM. Threaded blue eyes. Long lashes. DK brows. Lips with tongue. Mint eight ball body. Long bl. mohair curls. Working Mama/Papa pull strings. Br/ purple silk dress with pattern and white silk decoration. MKD Jumeau shoes with matching 8. $ 6,575.

NAPERVILLE Doll & Teddy Bear Show  Antique ◆ Vintage ◆ Collectible 

Sunday, June 8, 2014  MARRIOTT HOTEL  (Formerly the Naperville Holiday Inn)

1801 North Naper Blvd. ~ Naperville, IL Directly off I-88 – South on Naperville Rd. Corner of Naper Blvd. & E. Diehl Rd.

9 am ~ 3 pm Admission $5 12 & Under Free

12-1/2“ Kestner A.T.. DK br. eyes. Long French blonde human hair wig. Looks just like the A.T. you always wanted. Blue silk dress with lace overlay. Flowers on lace pink silk cumber bun. Flowered hat with leaves. Old white rouched socks. Blue French shoes with rosettes. $ 6,850. 6” French Mignonette. CM. Rare dome head. Rare bare feet. Pale bisque. Bl. eyes. Smiling lips. Superb modeling. Long blonde mohair wig. Early peg strung. Cupped hands. Aqua silk coat dress. Old undergarments. Mustard colored hat with aqua silk ribbon/bow around brim giving the doll extra clout. The most beautiful Mignonette I have ever seen. $ 3,625.

5” Straw presentation box with orig. 4” doll. Doll has red mohair wig with blue glass eyes. Jointed arms and legs. Lace silk dress. with undergarments. Orig. extra clothes in lid. Doll has white painted stockings with black one strap heels. Top of box has large pink and green silk rose. A BEAUTIFUL PRESENTATON SET. $ 850. 22” Kestner 154. Blue glass eyes. Long lashes. OM with upper teeth. Dimple in chin. Light blonde mohair wig. Pale bisque. Wears fabulous pink satin dress with large amts. of beading with br. lace down front and collar. Also to top it off this doll wears a pink and lace presentation hat that has beading and a large bow. $ 875. 4” French Mignonette. Bl. glass eyes. Long lashes. Superb modeling on such a sm. doll. All bisque. Painted long stockings with black double strap heels. Blonde hair. Wears red silk dress with lace trim. Cream apron. Sweet beret. $ 1,975

WWW .THETENDERYEARS.NET 40

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 DOOR PRIZES   FREE APPRAISALS   ONSITE RESTRINGING  Info – Karla Moreland (815) 356-6125 kmorela@ais.net

www.napervilledollshow.com


A Cover Girl by Ursula Mertz Photos by Christopher Partridge

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hen looking through a stack of old magazines, I made a special discovery. I could not believe my eyes. There from the front cover of The Household Magazine, one of my dolls by the name of Sis smiled at me! There was no doubt that it was my doll. She was identical, right down to the five rust-colored wool pigtails tied with narrow, green ribbons. Even though my doll is well marked, she has always been somewhat of an enigma. Would the magazine have some answers? “Sis” was designed by Grace Drayton and sold by the Averill Manufacturing Company of New York City. Among other offerings, her name was listed on a full- page ad in the trade magazine Playthings of August 1924. Why was she called “Sis” and given five real pigtails? When thinking of the name “Sis” and pigtails, the then popular comedienne Sis Hopkins came to mind. She was often pictured with a similar hairdo. Could there be a connection? Some twelve years earlier, in 1912, the E. I. Horsman firm had sold a Sis Hopkins doll. An extensive search turned up no proof, and the matter was put aside.

Front cover: “The Household Magazine,” May 1928, Vol. 28, No. 5 – Ten Cents signed Davis

Now, after having paid for the magazine, I eagerly leafed through it but could not find any information. Surely, the artist who painted that adorable cover picture must have had a reason for picking my doll. Or, the magazine could have commissioned the subject. The doll must have been important to someone for some reason. I couldn’t wait to get home to find out. Again I was disappointed. The magazine did not reveal the tiniest clue about my doll’s identity or the reason why she was pictured on that cover. While I had not found what I was looking for, I had actually become quite familiar with the contents of the magazine. It was the May issue of 1928. Attention was paid to Mother’s Day with articles and poems. The “Whimsical Story of a FraidCat” prominently featured on the bottom of the cover did not include the doll, as I had hoped but turned out to be just another “to be continued” story of no particular consequence. 13” “Sis” marked on shoulder plate: G. G. Drayton // ©, - Stamp on cloth body: Genuine // Madame Hendren // Doll // 814 C // Made in U.S.A. – Hangtag is marked: Genuine Madame Hendren Doll (in circle) // “Sis” // design Patented // Dolly Dingle // By G. G. Drayton. Composition shoulder head and arms to above the elbow. Cloth body and limbs, stitched hip joints. Molded, painted features and hair. Five holes have been drilled into the head to accommodate five rust colored wool pigtails tied with narrow green ribbons. All original clothes, including shoes and socks. ANTIQUE DOLL COLLECTOR

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Home improvements were featured and household hints in addition to sewing patterns. One article dealt with the importance of homogenized milk, and expressing the hope that safe milk would soon be available throughout the country and not just in the larger cities. Who would have thought that safe milk was not a staple for everybody in 1928? What really held my attention and gave one a glimpse into life some 85 years ago were the ads for various products, from Wrigley’s Spearmint Gum to kitchen stoves, to cars. “For Economical Transportation CHEVROLET The World’s Most Luxurious Low-Priced Automobile.” Pictured is a car that still looks like a Model T and cost all of $585. A full-page ad praised Listerine by the Lambert Pharmaceutical Company of St. Louis. They claimed that dandruff may lead to baldness and that children get it from contact with others. Listerine would be the cure. Morton’s Iodized Salt stated that children everywhere are making higher grades thanks to the help of this healthy salt (no goiters). “Quick Mother’s Oats” delivered dishes right in the package. These were just a few of the advertisements seen. It was amazing to realize how many of the trade mark products listed still exist today. While we know that advertising copy exaggerates, nowadays it is not nearly as extravagant in its claims as some of the text quoted. Times have changed. Sis has changed a little, but not much. She has survived those approximately 90 years with her big smile intact and all five pigtails in place including those tiny green ribbon ties. She seems quite proud of herself to once have been a cover girl. Though, we may never find out why she was named “Sis.”

Blackberry Studio

Close up of Sis.

Correction – refer to “Sunny Orange Maid,” issue of December 2011

“Mr. Foster’s Stores” did not sell oranges but actually was a travel agency. This information was discovered by the late Don Jensen.

Block letter FG, early all original, blue eyes, original skin wig, 16 1/2” $8950 19 1/2” Jumeau, original clothes, brown eyes, marked 8/EJ - early EJ marking, straight wrist, 8 ball joint $12,500 Pair Staffordshire dogs three French poodles on each, one has crackling, 4 1/4” $850 French style clock 5” non-working $495 Marble top 3 drawer dresser, 11”, excellent condition Antique basket filled with old silk flowers

Margaret Gray Kincaid Member NADDA and UFDC Cell: 646-709-4340 Margaret.kincaid@gmail.com 42

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Mother’s Day Wishes from the Dolls at the Doll Museum

Summer Hours: June 18 to August 30

Wednesday-Saturday 12:30-4:30pm with the last tour at 4:00pm. If you would like to book a group or need to make an appointment for a time other than our regular hours, please call us at 406-252-0041 at least 6 days in advance and we will be glad to work out the details.

Vist our website

www.legacydollmuseum.com 3206 6th Avenue North, Billings, Montana 59101 406-252-0041


Dressing Dolls in the Sonneberg Area of Germany Part II By Mary Krombholz

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he Ernst Winkler doll factory in Sonneberg made this bisque socket-head doll dressed in an original wig, felt hat, clothing and shoes (1). The factory, founded in 1903, was sold to Julius Rothschild in 1927. The back of the head is marked: W//Germany//10/0. This marking is pictured on page 336 of the Ciesliks’ German Doll Encyclopedia. The Winkler doll factory was one of hundreds of doll factories which once made dolls in Sonneberg. This 11-inch Cymbalier doll (2), with clown-like facial modeling and original cotton clothing, is marked: AG. The clown facial painting is very similar to the facial painting on a doll in my collection marked with the Gebrueder Knoch mold number 193. This circa 1912 clown doll has a rectangular wooden body with wooden arms and legs. The cymbals come together when the mechanism in the torso is pressed. The Knoch porcelain factory made bisque doll heads in Neustadt, Thuringia from 1887 until 1919, when the factory was purchased by the Max Oscar Arnold doll factory. A bisque socket-head character doll, circa 1912, was made by the Swaine porcelain factory (3). The doll is wearing an original dress and underwear. The back of the head is marked: D.I.//4 above the Swaine green-stamped circle trademark. The old Swaine & Co. porcelain factory building is still

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standing in Huttensteinach, a suburb of Koeppelsdorf and Sonneberg. The factory displayed character dolls at their Leipzig Fair booth only during the years 1910-1913. The Goebel porcelain factory made this 6-inch bisque socket-head doll circa 1912 (4). The colors on the original dress are similar to the colors used to paint the molded flowers decorating the doll’s center-parted hairstyle. The Wm. Und F. & W. Goebel porcelain factory founded their factory in Oeslau, Germany in 1879. The factory produced their first bisque doll heads in 1887, and continued to make bisque-head dolls through the 1930s. The back of the head is marked: Goebel Bee (mark)//R23/x. A Gebrueder Heubach character boy (5) is tied inside his original cardboard box filled with excelsior. The German words printed in a semi-circle on the box lid translate as follows: “Think of Our War Orphans! We Only Have One Will: To Win or Die.” The bisque head on the 10-inch doll, circa 1912, is marked with the mold number 7603. The original clothing, hat and boots are similar to the clothing worn by the boy pictured on the cover of the box. This 23-inch Schoenau & Hoffmeister bisquehead doll (6) is tied inside her original cardboard box marked “Rosebud.” The box is made of heavy cardboard and it is well stapled at each corner. The original redand-white label is in excellent condition. The doll is lying on a paper mattress filled with straw. This type of paper cushion protected dolls from breakage during

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5 4 6 shipment to their ďŹ nal destinations. The doll, marked: S (PB inside Star) H//5200//1906, is wearing an original wig, lace-trimmed underwear, silk dress, socks and boots. This 1911 archival photograph, which has been hand colored, pictures two boys and a male worker making cardboard boxes (below). Box making was a very important part of the overall production of Thuringian dolls. The 1996 book by Angelika Tessmer titled Sonneberg Geschichten, Von Puppen, Griffeln und Kuckuckspfeifen (Sonneberg Stories of Dolls, Slate Pencils and Cuckoo Whistles) provides the following words told by the son of a box maker, which graphically describe Sonneberg box making as it is pictured in this photograph: “The box maker was a profession you had to learn. Mainly boys were trained in the doll factory because the work was very hard and space consuming.

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Only a few box makers worked from their home factories and supplied the doll makers, the manufacturers of Christmas tree ornaments and toy makers in our town. I started my work in the company Martin Eichhorn in Sonneberg after graduating from school. Here dolls were produced and packed in cartons for shipping. We bonded pieces of cardboard in all sizes, stapled the corners and added lining paper as well as labels. The paper liners were often colorful or edged with lace paper borders in order to catch the attention of buyers in shops and department stores. We cut the forms for the boxes from big pieces of cardboard with big punching machines. Then we seamed and folded the edges. With a large staple machine we connected the matching cardboard pieces together.

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The women sewed the dolls with needles and thread onto the back wall of the box. It was important that the stitches would not disturb the overall impression of the doll. The stitches also had to give the doll enough stability that the sleeping-eye mechanism, the clothing and hair would not get damaged during transport. Often the dolls had to take long trips on ships and roads in order to reach their new owners in America or England.� A 13-inch Gebrueder Heubach character boy (7), dressed in original underwear, cotton jacket and pants, is stroking the head of a 5-inch glazed-porcelain dog marked with the blue-stamped Heubach Sunburst trademark. The doll’s bisque socket head, circa 1912, is marked: 6//Germany. This original 11-inch Armand Marseille heart-shaped felt novelty purse (8) contains a bisque shoulder head, circa 1901, marked: Lilly//11/0. The doll is wearing an original wig and felt hat trimmed with silk bows. Thuringian all-bisque dolls sold well in American retail


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stores because they were appealing as well as inexpensive. This 4-inch all-bisque unmarked doll (9) is wearing an original dress and hat made of crepe paper. Dressing a doll in crepe paper rather than fabric lowered the overall cost of a dressed doll. This 11-inch bisque-head Googly doll (10), dressed in original clothing, was made by the Armand Marseille porcelain factory in Koeppelsdorf, a suburb of Sonneberg. The back of the circa 1914 head is marked: Germany//323//A.3/0.M. The family of Sonneberg home-trade workers, pictured in this 1910 hand-colored archival photograph (left), is making composition bodies which resemble the toddler body on the bisque-head Googly doll in the preceding photograph. The six children pictured are helping their parents make composition doll bodies. According to the Ciesliks’ research, on January 1, 1904, the “Act on the Work of Children” was passed. Beginning on this date the following work was officially allowed in the Thuringian doll and toy industry for children from the age of 8 on: “Painting and brushing of doll-body joints; sorting and inserting of doll eyes; blowing of doll eyes by bellows; sewing, crocheting and knitting of doll dresses; sewing of cloth doll bodies; making curls for the doll wigs as long as cleaned hair of wool or mohair was used; and packing the dolls in paper boxes.” The Ernst Heubach porcelain factory in Koeppelsdorf made this 9½-inch bisque socket-head doll circa 1914 (11). The doll is wearing an original wig, hat, underwear, blouse, dress, lace-trimmed apron and bead necklace. The bisque head is marked: Heubach.Koepplesdorf//250.14/0//Germany. Two Ernst Heubach bisque socket heads (12) have identical incised marks which read: Heubach Koeppelsdorf//250.10/0//Germany. The 8-inch dolls, circa 1914, are wearing original wigs, underwear, clothing, socks and shoes. The doll on the right is wearing clothing which resembles a Dutch Volendam regional costume. This bisque socket-head doll is marked: Heubach Koeppelsdorf//250.16/0// Germany (13). The 8-inch doll is wearing an original braided wig, underwear, blouse, scarf, vest and skirt. According to a former Heubach employee, home workers in the Sonneberg area often supplied the wigs, shoes, dresses and

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accessories in order for complete dolls to be assembled inside the Ernst Heubach doll and porcelain factory in Koeppelsdorf. These twelve, 4-inch all-bisque Hertwig dolls with molded hair are still tied inside an original factory box (14). The brightly colored tissue paper is meant to attract the attention of buyers visiting the Hertwig factory sample rooms. Seven of the dolls are dressed in felt jackets and pants while the other five dolls are dressed in sailor-type cotton jackets and pants. Five, circa 1900, Hertwig shoulder-head dolls, wearing bonnets and hats, are still tied inside an original cardboard box (15). The dolls measure about 7 inches in height and are wearing original underwear, slips and dresses made by Katzhuette home workers. The dresses vary slightly in style and trimming details. The porcelain bonnets, hats and boots vary in color and coordinate with the original clothing. These two bisque socket-head dolls (16), pictured in a 1915 Butler Brothers Catalog, are dressed in original wigs, hats, underwear and clothing. They were made by the Dressel doll factory in Sonneberg. The 6½-inch girl is marked: I/15/0 and the 5½-inch boy is marked: I/13/0. A light-brown bisque socket-head was made by the Schoenau & Hoffmeister porcelain factory circa 1920 (17). The 6-inch doll, marked: Germany//S(PB inside Star)H//Hanna//12/0/ is dressed in an original wig, cotton blouse, underpants, grass skirt and lei. This bisque socket-head Googly doll (18), marked: 208.12/0//W&S, was sold by the Walther & Sohn doll factory, which was located in Oeslau, Thuringia. According to the Ciesliks’ research, the doll factory was founded in 1908 and advertised the following products in 1941: “Doll heads, baby heads and bathing dolls.” The doll is wearing an original mohair wig, hat, underwear, cotton dress and coat. This 10-inch, circa 1920 doll (19) was made by the Ernst Heubach porcelain factory in Koeppelsdorf. It is wearing an original mohair wig, hat, underwear, dress and jacket. The bisque socket head is marked: Heubach.Koeppelsdorf.//320.12.0//Germany. The facial modeling includes pierced nostrils. The Armand Marseille porcelain factory made this bisque socket-head Googly doll (20), circa 1925, marked: A.253.M//Nobbi Kid//Reg.U.S.Pat.off// Germany//10/0 for the New York based doll importers, George Borgfeldt & Co. All of the Marseille #253 mold-number heads were made for Borgfeldt. The doll is wearing an original mohair wig, underwear and sleeveless cotton dress. An 8-inch bisque-socket head doll, wearing an original wig, hat, underwear and lace-trimmed baby dress (21), was made by the Armand Marseille porcelain factory circa 1925. The bisque head is marked: Armand Marseille//Germany//990.//A.8/0.M. This 1911 sample-room photograph (right), which has been hand colored, pictures completed dolls ready to be purchased by buyers from all over the world. According to the Ciesliks’ research in their German Doll Encyclopedia, “the Dressel doll factory in Sonneberg

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was supplied by small factories and many home-trade workers which helped the doll factory to produce the incredible assortment of 20,000 to 30,000 different dolls and toys in their sample rooms.� This 10½-inch bisque socket-head Googly doll (22), made by the Ernst Heubach porcelain factory in Koeppelsdorf, is wearing an original wig, velvet jacket and pants, as well as original socks and shoes. The character head, circa 1926, is marked: Heubach. Koeppelsdorf//417-10/0//Germany. Credits: Mary Krombholz Doll and Archival Paper Collection. Doll Photographs by Tony Arrasmith. Computer Colorization of Archival Photographs by Paul Brinkdopke.

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Do You Have a Mystery Doll?

Manufacturers of Fine Doll Jewelry, Brass Accessories, Miniature Trunks & Hardware 336 Candlewood Lake Road, Brookfield, CT 06804 Phone 203-775-4717 Email: info@catspawonline.com

Visit our website and shop online: www.catspawonline.com Catalog price is $8.95 post paid

Accessorize Your Dolls!

Cats Paw has been in business since 1982 specializing in quality reproductions made from antique originals, and unique old store stock. Our antique reproductions are made by hand using the lost wax technique, and each item is hand finished to achieve an authentic “antique” look. We offer exquisite doll accessories that only look expensive! • Jewelry • Trunks • Items for the Boudoir • Buttons and Clasps • Purse Frames • Presentation Boxes • Bleuette Accessories & More 50

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hope your readers can help me identify these artist dolls. They are about 9 1/2” tall and are made of a plaster/ composition type material. There are no markings on them except for their paper tags. They were part of an old-time collector’s things and I’m guessing 1940’s. Here’s another doll I’d love to find out about. She is all hand carved wood and totally jointed at neck, hips, knees, and shoulders. She is in her wooden rocking chair that is made of clothespins. She has a small paper label stitched to her skirt that says Aunt Sophronia. She is 10” tall and her clothing is totally hand stitched. She is dark wood and the only painting is her boots. Thanks for your help. I look forward to each issue of your magazine. Contact Sherri at 1009sld@gmail.com Perhaps there is a doll in your collection that you and others have never seen before. Send us a high resolution photo and any information you have to antiquedoll@gmail.com (you may also send a print photo to Antique Doll Collector P.O. Box 39, East Petersburg, PA 17520). If you can identify a mystery doll, write to us at the address or email above.


A Room of Their Own

by Laurie Baker

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hen my first French fashion doll arrived, I was besotted! I carefully placed her in the mirrored doll cabinet with a bevy of German china ladies. But something was not working. I moved her onto her own level with just a few pieces of antique miniature furniture. And that was that, or so I thought. Shortly after, I found a hatbox for her. And then, a pair of gloves. Those two purchases were the beginning of a passion for French fashion dolls that would radically change the direction of my collection. As I did more research into French Fashion dolls, pouring over auction catalogs and reference books, I saw dolls displayed against photographic backgrounds of France. Sumptuous French interiors of the day, all to scale, leapt from the pages of my reference books. The dolls were radiant in their lush, period settings, so much more so than my one lady in her rather lackluster display. Epiphany! I made my first salon, moved Mlle. into it, and neither of us has been the same since! My first salon had mirrors and family portraits on the walls, and a picture window looking out on a photograph of the Loire Valley, and heavy draperies. I quickly found, though, that less was more, and abandoned excessive and heavy-handed treatments. Instead, I adopted the credo that rich fabrics, fine passementerie and tassel trims, antique wallpapers, and painted wood moldings were all I needed to make a backdrop that would enhance, not compete with, the dolls themselves. This article will help you to create a salon to do the same for your own poupees. Happily, it is a forgiving process, not so exacting as to be daunting, and is easily adaptable as you go. ANTIQUE DOLL COLLECTOR

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Instructions Decide on your plan: ❖ One fabric with baseboard and crown molding ❖ Two fabrics with a wainscot, baseboard, chair rail ❖ Cornice for depth Here is what you need to get started: ❖ 30” x 40” sheet of foam board. ❖ Elmer’s Craft Bond spray adhesive, medium-loft polyester batting, glue gun and glue sticks, Elmer’s wood glue ❖ Utility knife, metal straight edge, scissors, measuring tape ❖ Fabric and trim: One-fabric backdrop option: 1 yard 54” Two-fabric wainscot option: 1/2 yard each of two 54” fabrics Cornice/wainscot option: 1/3 yard 54” fabric for cornice Trim: (braid, tassels, etc.) 1 to 1 ½ yards, depending on width of the cabinet I recommend medium-weight brocade fabric, jacquard, fine heavier silk like Dupioni, or antique French silk jacquard fabric available online. Very thin fabrics are not recommended with spray adhesive. If you are lucky enough to have a length of antique wallpaper, use that with a coordinating fabric – smashing!

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❖ 2” Styrofoam spacers for behind the cornice. Depth will add dimension to your completed salon. This is a great way to use those flat foam pieces that come in the shipping boxes with the arrival of your latest doll! ❖ Thin wood trim pieces for the chair rail, wider trim for the baseboard and crown molding. Latex paint for the trim pieces. I use a creamy color that goes with everything, but use your imagination! ❖ Read all these instructions before you begin your project. ANTIQUE DOLL COLLECTOR

MAY 2014

Now you are ready to create your salon! Refer to the photographs, and have fun! 1. Measure the back wall of your cabinet. Using the utility knife and straight edge, cut the foam board ¼ inch smaller on each side to allow for the thickness of the fabrics. Save the leftover foam board if you plan to make a cornice. Fit the foam board into the cabinet. Too large? Cut a little off the bottom or sides. Too short? You can move the baseboard down a little, later, to add length on the bottom. 2. If you are using only one fabric, skip to Step 8. 3. If you are using two fabrics on the “wall,” determine how high you want the wainscot, and mark a horizontal line the foam board. 1/3 of the wall height is the usual wainscot guide. 4. Iron the fabrics. Wrinkles will show! Cut the fabrics 1 inch larger than the areas to be covered. 5. Spread newspaper on the work area to protect from overspray. Apply the adhesive spray lightly to the foam board and smooth on the first fabric. Be sure to follow the grain or pattern, and smooth out any air bubbles underneath. Don’t worry if you are off on this. Just peel off the fabric and try again. On the back, wrap the raw fabric edges over and hot-glue in place. 6. Cover the completed section with newspaper, to protect it when you spray the next section. Apply the second fabric, leaving a narrow gap between the two fabrics, to prevent bulk.

7.

Cut the narrow wood molding for the chair rail to the length of the foam board, paint, and let dry. Apply the wood glue to the back, and position the rail over the two fabrics where they meet, making sure it is straight. Things are starting to look good, aren’t they? Skip to Step 9.


8.

If you skipped the wainscot steps, steps, iron the fabric, cut a piece one inch larger than the foam board on all sides. Apply fabric to the foam board, using a light coat of the adhesive spray, aligning any fabric pattern. Smoothing out any wrinkles. Turn over the foam board and hot-glue the edges down. 9. Place the foam board in the cabinet and check for fit, so you will know how to position the baseboard. If the backdrop is too short for the cabinet, you can glue the baseboard a little lower to the foam board to cover the gap. 10. Measure and cut the baseboard and crown-molding trim. Paint, let dry, and wood-glue in place. TA DA!

You could stop right here and have a fine backdrop. But if you want a cornice, continue on with the following instructions.

11. Cut out a newsprint pattern for the cornice. The cornice must be cut 3/8” shorter, on both the right and left sides, than the width of the backdrop, so you can fit it easily into the cabinet. Use a gentle curve in the pattern so it will be easier to work with. Trace the pattern onto the foam board and cut out the cornice piece. 12. Cut a piece of batting one inch larger than the cornice piece, all around. Lap the batting over the back and hot-glue it in place. 13. Cut a fabric piece one 1 ½” larger than the cornice foam board. Clip curves. Lap the fabric snugly over the foam board and batting , folding in corners, and hot-glue at the back. If your fabric has a pattern, be sure to center it on the cornice piece.

14. Glue braid or tassel trim around sides and bottom of the cornice, if desired.

15. Using a bread knife, cut Styrofoam pieces and hotglue all along the top edge of the backdrop. They should not show under the cornice. 16. Hot-glue the cornice securely to the Styrofoam spacers. This 3-D effect adds depth and interest in the finished salon!

17. Carefully place the backdrop into your cabinet space. If the spacers are visible, glue fabric strips over the exposed areas. If the backdrop fits snugly, you are finished! If it falls forward, use a length of adhesivebacked Velcro to hold it against the back wall of the cabinet. Your dolls, at this point, should be itching to move in! 18. In the salon pictures you will see variations on cornices and draperies. Pleats, gathers, festoons and trims add further dimension. 19. Take a few minutes to admire your handiwork! The first salon is the most difficult—the next one will just assemble itself! 20. Now that your backdrop is in place, the real fun begins! Your vignette will come to life as you place your dolls, their furniture, gowns, hats and accessories into the salon. Rich fabrics and trim, your vision for the project, and your skill with display will combine in a lovely, luxurious new home for your dolls. Trust me…they will thank you for it! ANTIQUE DOLL COLLECTOR

MAY 2014

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SELL A DOLL IN THE

EMPORIUM Purchase of an ad includes FREE internet ad on our website.

Send us a photo or a digital photo of your doll with a description and your check or credit card information. We do the rest!! Take advantage of this special forum; the cost is only $95 for a 2.4”w x 2.9”h ad space. Antique DOLL Collector, P.O. Box 239, Northport, NY 11768. Phone 1-888-800-2588. Email: antiquedoll@gmail.com

BABES FROM THE WOODS Lord and Lady Higgs

Faithful reproductions of hand carved Queen Annes and dolls by Izannah Walker. Kathy Patterson Ph. 705-489-1046 toysintheattic@sympatico.ca

www.babesfromthewoods.com Announcing a Sylvia MacNeil Sewing Workshop!

Jean & Ken Nordquist’s Collectible Doll Co. Gourmet Doll Supplies for the Discriminating Doll Collector

*Nordquist Doll Molds *Daisyettes *Bleuette Premiere *Mignonettes *Presentation Displays *Paper Toys for Dolls *Thurlow Patters for Knit & Crochet Outfits *Collectible Doll Fashions

May 31 & June 1 2014

Tete Jumeau - 19”, closed mouth, blue paperweight eyes, blonde mohair wig and perfect bisque. She is marked head and body with original neck spring. She has a compo ball jointed body and old fabric clothing. $3500. Call 215-794-8164 or email alloyd@nni.com. Member of NADDA and UFDC. Other photos and dolls may be seen on RubyLane.com/shops/anntiquedolls.

Kathy Libraty’s ANTIQUE DOLLS

Personalized instruction by Sylvia herself using 19th Century Sewing Techniques. This workshop will feature the construction of two of the Hats featured in her book, The Enchanting Trousseau of Chiffonnette. We will be using antique straws and trims as in the workshops Sylvia taught in Paris. Amicalola Falls Lodge, North GA To register or for more information contact: Mary Ann Byers 706-636-4321 or email: mabyers382@aol.com

*Finished Crocheted Outfits *Cat’s Paw Doll Jewelry *Feather Trees *Paper Ornaments *Vintage Postcards *Doll Sewing Projects *Leather Doll Shoes *Mohair Doll Wigs *Miniature Accessories Mold & Global Catalogs not shown

SARA BERNSTEIN DOLLS Email santiqbebe@aol.com 732-536-4101

Complete 5 Catalog Set - $25 ppd. Includes $15 money back coupon with purchase.

20” K & R 117 “Mein Liebling” Closed mouth Character Child - EXC.COND $4300 26” Simon & Halbig 1159 Lady on shapely Lady Body - WOW! $2200 24” JUTTA 1914 CHARACTER GERMAN TODDLER ALL ORIGINAL & EXCELLENT $1350

WWW.KATHYLIBRATYSDOLLS.COM

Phone: 718-859-0901 email: Libradolls@aol.com MEMBER: UFDC OR—Buy My Dolls on eBay where I begin most of my antique dolls for just $1—Search seller name kathylibraty.

8 MONTH LAYAWAY PLAN AVAILABLE

WWW.RUBYLANE.COM/SHOPS/KATHYLIBRATYSANTIQUES

View Quality Dolls at affordable prices. 100’s of pictures and prices at my Ruby Lane Shop...

www.sarabernsteindolls.rubylane.com

jeannordquistdolls.com Order Desk

1-800-566-6646 Collectible Doll Company P.O. Box 697, Cedar Hill, TX 75106 ANTIQUE DOLL COLLECTOR

MAY 2014

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Auction Gallery

cont. from page 14

Theriault’s Sets New World Doll Auction Record! Stein am Rhein Puppenmuseum

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Swiss doll museum closed some fifteen years ago, no one knowing in the intervening years if its rare contents had been sold or not… it was a recipe for sweet success. Following last year’s death of Frau Steiner, the founder of the Puppenmuseum Stein am Rhein, Theriault’s was contacted by the family to sell its contents. The auction took place March 29 and 30 at the Waldorf Astoria Beach Resort in Naples, Florida. One of the finest doll museums in Europe, it was long renowned for its collection of classic French and German dolls, unusual accessories and foremost, an all original A. Marque numbered 27 which sold for $270,000 (over $300,000 with buyer’s premium). The results seen here speak for themselves. For additional prices visit theriaults.com and click on proxibid. Prices listed do not include the buyer’s premium.

The “H” by Halopeau, 18 inches, c. 1880, one of only a few examples known, brought $40,000. A lovely Huret poupée, c. 1860, with a later wooden body, $19,500.

ANTIQUE DOLL COLLECTOR

These rare all original French character dolls designed by the artist Poulbot, incised SFBJ 239 Paris Poulbot, surpassed their pre-estimate to sell for $40,000.

The musical automaton, clown with Fan and Ball, by Roullet de Decamps, 43 inches, brought $42,500.

This fabulous walking elephant automaton by Roullet et Decamps, 15 inches tall, with its four all original seated bisque dolls, c. 1890, brought $32,000. A lovely A.T., 16 inches, with exceptional deep blue paperweight eyes, dressed in an antique costume, realized $37,500.

A French bisque bebe by Schmitt et Fils, 17 inches, was sold with the miniature dachshund for $19,500. 58

22 inches, Incised A. Marque and 27, with a partial pencil label on foot, and cloth label in the original costume, “Margaine-Lacroix 19 Boulevard Haussman Paris,” this magnificent example (one of 100 dolls made) soared to $270,000.

MAY 2014


Auction Gallery

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rare Steiner Series B, marked “Sie B4”, 23 inches tall, sold for approximately $30,200 during the Chartre auction on March 22.

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n 18-inch early cloth pre-patent model doll by Izannah Walker realized $12,600 at the March 22nd Morphy Auction featuring the collection of the Foote family of Maryland.

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size 10 Tete Jumeau, 26 inches, wearing the original silk costume, sold for $6,435 during the Sweetbriar April 5 auction.

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large Steiff golden mohair bear with muzzle and underscore Steiff button, 24 inches, brought $10,300 at the recent Bertoia auction in Vineland, NJ. An early portrait Jumeau incised 1, (original body but the missing right leg) 16-1/2 inches, realized $5,900.

F

rom the Leon Casimir Bru period, this Bebe Bru with pressed bisque head, 29 inches, brought approximately $13,800 at François Theimer’s March 29 auction in Paris.

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his 7-inch Heubach “Tiss Me” sold for $3,693 at Alderfer’s April 2 auction in Hatfield, PA.

We would like to thank the following auction houses for their participation: Alderfer Auction, 501 Fairgrounds Road, Hatfield, PA 19440. 215-393-3000. www.alderferauction.com Bertoia Auctions, 2141 DeMarco Drive, Vineland, NJ 08360. 856-692-1881. www.bertoiaauctions.com Galerie de Chartres, 10 rue Claude Bernard – ZA Le Coudray - BP 70129 – 28003 Chartres Cedex, France. www.ivoire-chartres.com Morphy Auctions, 2000 North Reading Road, Denver, PA 17517. 717-335-3435. www.morphyauctions.com Sweetbriar Auctions, P.O. Box 37, Earleville, MD 21919. 410-275-2094. www.sweetbriarauctions.com Francois Theimer, 4 rue des Cavaliers 89130 Toucy France. www.theimer.fr ANTIQUE DOLL COLLECTOR

MAY 2014

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Ashley’s Dolls & Antiquities

Billye Harris • 723 NC Hwy 61 South, Whitsett, NC 27377 • (336) 266-2608 Website: AshleysDolls.com • E-mail: AshleysDolls@gmail.com Visit us on Rubylane.com/shops/Ashleysdollsandantiquities • Generous Layaways Member UFDC and NADDA


Antique DOLL Collector June 2014 Vol. 17, No. 5


LAYAWAY AVAILABLE Member UFDC & NADDA

(Nat'l Antique Doll Dealers Assn.)

Visit my website: www.grandmasatticdolls.com

r Look fo C in D F U t: me a tonio, TX San An 16-20 July 26” S & H #1039 DEP Bebe, mint bisque, blue sl. eyes,orig. wig & an Xtra, orig. fabulous pink silk & lace dress, orig. leather shoes & socks, ant. Fr. velvet hat, & orig. matching underwear set, orig. Jumeau body. Has old tagged description plus orig. wrist tag from France. She is described in Coleman Encyclopedia, page 571. Made for the French Market. Fabulous find & a big BREATHTAKING Bebe!!! $2450

15” K * R 116A Character Toddler, blue sl. eyes, celluloid tongue & the deepest dimples in her chubby cheeks, orig. mohair wig, darling orig. fine pink batiste dress, shoes & socks, added hat to top her off, orig. fully jointed K*R toddler body. Sure to make you smile!! SIMPLY ADORABLE!!! $2550.

10” Kestner Hilda Baby, blue sl. eyes, perfect pale bisque, orig. mohair wig & Kestner plaster pate, FACTORY orig. batiste & lace Christening gown, orig. slip & beautiful ant. lace & ribbon bonnet, orig. JDK 5 pc. bent limb baby body. An absolute DARLING in this tiny size!!! $3450.

10” Gebruder Kuhnlenz Bebe, cl./mo., perfect pale bisque, blue p/w eyes, orig. long mohair wig, orig. batiste & lace dress, ant. undies, shoes & ant. Fr. hat. On orig. body, (some flaking in paint). Made for French Trade & she looks it!!! GORGEOUS & great teeny size!! $2575.

9” Rare Large "All Bisque" Tynie Baby by Horsman, swivel neck, blue sl. eyes, rare painted bald head, wears orig. baby gown, ant. bonnet & baby jacket. On orig. all bisque bent limb baby body PERFECT bisque OVERALL. ant. wicker stroller included. Rarely found large bald version of this desirable baby doll. A little GEM!!! $3250.

Joyce Kekatos e-mail: joycedolls@aol.com I buy dolls and sell on consignment. 2137 Tomlinson Avenue, Bronx, NY 10461 home: 718-863-0373 cell: 917-859-2446

18” Kestner #167, beautiful bisque, blue sl. eyes, mohair wig & orig. Kestner plaster pate, fine ant. batiste dress loaded w/tucks & pleats, ant. slip & orig. leather shoes, on orig. Kestner body. Absolutely GORGEOUS!! Great cabinet size! Only...$975.

14” Kley & Hahn Baby, blue sl. eyes, mint bisque & orig. wig, orig. plaid jumper & blouse, undies & on orig. 5 pc. K & H bent limb baby body. She is absolutely ADORABLE!! $975.


Tel: 425.765.4010 Beautifulbebes@outlook.com

In the true Rohmer style, this is an exceptional and very blessed fashion poupée. A petite 15”, this mademoiselle has everything a young lady could want; including a very beautiful glazed china shoulder head with vivid blue spiral threaded enamel eyes decorated with long lashes and darkly lined. She is on her original sturdy unmarked kid body w/ individually stitched fingers. Her trousseau is quite lavish and is comprised as follows: 4 light weight dresses in enfantine style; 1 pair of boots; 1 pair of heeled/buckle tipped shoes; 1 pr. of tan leather gloves; 1 fan with bone structure; 1 leather purse; 1 ladies companion leather valise w/bronze studding; 1 muff and stole in orig. box with litho model on lid; 4 bonnets of straw, velvet and silk; 4 jackets ranging from white pique, black velvet, & wool; 1 two pc. silk chiffon skirt; 1 Ermine Stole w/ tails; 1 Corset; 1 two pc. black silk and tan linen ensemble; 2 extra wigs; kidskin and human hair.; 2 hatstands; 2 Original boxes; 1 Parasol; 1 white detailed night shirt; 2 night caps; 1 Straw floral hand-painted tote; 1 crémé eyelet cape; 1 superb and excellent early French Trunk. $13,900.

Fine 25” Sie C Steiner with very large expressive coffee colored paper-weight eyes set in softly tinted bisque. Exquisite chocolate colored silk dress with creamy appliques and silk chiffon accents. Blonde human hair wig crowned by French style ribboned bonnet. Original body. Excellent. $7900.

Two gorgeous Bébés; a stunning 20” Bru Jne with fantastic face, perfect bisque head and generally excellent condition from the Leon Casimir Bru era. Then we have a fantastic and very beautiful Block Letter FG only 13” tall although her presence is daunting. Also, in overall excellent condition. Both dolls have bisque kid-edged shoulder plates, perfect bisque hands and sturdy gusseted kid bodies. Both dolls have on superb couture dresses made from antique materials. It’s easy to see how closely these competitors made the dolls resemble each other in style; both with desirable tongue tips, huge paper-weight eyes, finely painted details of lashes and brows and delicate pouty lips. FG- $8895. Bru Jne $28,950.

Member UFDC & NADDA

Dreamy 27” closed mouth Simon Halbig 939 with simply stunning face monopolized by spectacular brilliant blue paper weight eyes. Antique auburn wig over cork pate is rich in color & thick with original curls. Original composition body, excellent condition! $4995.

15.5” Simon Halbig Poupée. Just like the twill over wood version, this body is done in doe-soft kid leather over wood with exquisite attention to fine detailing of dainty hands & feet; all in perfect orig condition. Lovely range of motion, able to bend at knees, ankles & point her toes. Fine detail to bisque hands. Beautiful, soft face with large blue eyes and demure mouth. Parasol display only. $5900.

Superb Simone Fashion So much originality! 17.5”, all original from head to toe. Has a lovely face framed by a long mohair wig and crowned with a richly decorated straw bonnet. Her feet are protected in her original early boots. At her waist is a rare belt replete with a satchel style leather purse and very rare châtelaine that holds a scepter style walking stick with topaz tip that extends, a sealing stamp with a ladies head engraving, and a petite bronze whistle. Her flounced two piece ensemble is made of butterscotch colored silk and cinnamon colored velvet. It is evident that this mademoiselle has been very guarded and well cared for. What a treasure! $6800. Mignonnette en Présentation - Superb wee one in perfect condition just 6” tall. Magical all original; long blonde mohair braids tied behind, sweet blue glass eyes, French blue silk dress & tiny silken hat. In presentation box w/ four dresses, two additional bonnets and extras. The box is exceptional w/clear glass orig. lid. PLUS all items & doll are free to move about & play! This box has never had ties inside. $5200. MEET US IN PERSON! Crossroads Doll & Teddy Bear Show June 21-22nd, Fairgrounds Puyallup, WA Shared Passions UFDC Convention & Salesroom, JW Marriot Resort Ballroom July 16-20th


published by the Office Staff: Publication and Advertising: Keith Kaonis Editor-in-Chief: Donna C. Kaonis Administration Manager: Lorraine Moricone Phone: 1-888-800-2588 Art/Production: Lisa Ambrose Graphic Designer: Marta Sivakoff Contributors: Ursula Mertz, Lynn Murray, Samy Odin, Andy Ourant Subscription Manager: Jim Lance Marketing: Penguin Communications Publications Director: Eric Protter Antique Doll Collector (ISSN 1096-8474) is published monthly by the Puffin Co., LLC, 15 Hillside Place, Northport, NY 11768 Phone: 1-631-261-4100 Periodicals postage paid at Northport, NY. and at additional mailing offices. Contents ©2014 Antique Doll Collector, all rights reserved. Postmaster: Send address changes to Antique Doll Collector, P.O. Box 239, Northport, NY 11768.

Lynette Gross Selling a diverse array of unique and antique dolls Telephone (317) 844-6459 Email LynetteDolls@yahoo.com

Open 24 hours, 7 days a week. Visit my exclusive Ruby Lane shop Joan & Lynette Antique Dolls www.joan-lynetteantiquedolls.rubylane.com

See you at the UFDC Salesroom in San Antonio!

Subscriptions: Send to Antique Doll Collector, P. O. Box 239, Northport, NY 11768. Phone: 1-888-800-2588 or 1-631-261-4100 Subscription Rates: One Year (Twelve Issues) $42.95; Two Years (Twenty-four Issues) $75.95. First class delivery in U.S. add $29 per year. Outside the U.S. add $30 per year. Foreign subscriptions must be paid in U.S. funds. Do not send cash. Credit cards accepted. Advertising and Editorial: Call 717-517-9217 or email antiquedoll@gmail.com Editorial Office (Send all catalogs and editorial to this address): Antique Doll Collector, P.O. Box 39, East Petersburg, PA 17520

SEE US ON THE WEB AT: http://www.antiquedollcollector.com email: AntiqueDoll@gmail.com

Antique Doll Collector is not responsible for any inaccuracies in advertisers’ content. An unsolicited manuscript must be accompanied by SASE. Antique Doll Collector assumes no responsibility for such material. All rights including translations are reserved by the publisher. Requests for permissions and reprints must be made in writing to Antique Doll Collector. ©2014 by the Puffin Co., LLC.

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Important: We need your old address and your new. The Post Office does not forward magazines. Call 1-888-800-2588 or write to us at: P.O. Box 239, Northport, NY 11768. 4

ANTIQUE DOLL COLLECTOR

JUNE 2014


The Complete Guide to Antique, Vintage and Collectible Dolls

June 2014 Volume 17, Number 5

38 19

GREAT COLLECTORS THE LIZ KRUPP COLLECTION

By Stuart Holbrook An exciting look at an extraordinary, world-class collection.

26

EVERYTHING OLD, NOTHING NEW, SOME THINGS GIFTED, SOME THINGS BLUE By Jan Peterson

THE PETITE PARISIENNES OF MAURICE MILLIÈRE

32

Creating a Fantasy Wedding for a French Fashion Doll!

THE LITTLEST LENCI DOLLS By Judy Fisher

Only seven inches tall, the author discusses the rare XX series made for only one year in 1931.

In this first of a series about prominent collectors, Stuart Holbrook invites us to view and learn about the world-class collection of Liz Krupp. A special gallery was built beneath their home to display contemporary art and Liz’s collection of French dolls and automata. Our cover features a wonder photo of Liz’s favorite doll, a Jumeau 208. Photo Courtesy Theriault’s.

About The Cover

10 News 49 Book Review 49 Emporium

By Nannette Rod A versatile artist and illustrator, Millière led an aesthetic movement that resulted in an evolution of dolls from children’s playthings to art objects.

58 Auction Gallery 60 Calendar 63 Classified

46

THE HEINRICH HANDWERCK STORY

By Martha Nichols The interesting history of this successful German doll maker.

50

NADDA IN NORTH CAROLINA

A great time was had by all at the May 3rd and 4th show in Greensboro, NC.

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ANTIQUE DOLL COLLECTOR

JUNE 2014

55

JAMES D. JULIA TOY AND DOLL AUCTION JUNE 13


(212) 787-7279 P.O. Box 1410 NY, NY 10023

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Quality Antique Dolls by Mail Return Privilege • Layaways Member UFDC & NADDA

matrixbymail@gmail.com 2

1. 19” Estate Original ‘Gretchen’ – the classic K * R 114 as you rarely see her – regal and richly elegant in tailored Broderie Anglaise with underlayers, the K * R body and her mint factory, ivory shoes. Hidden reglues lie beneath her mint ringlet wig – the perfect complement to her unusual seagreen eyes. If you love original clothes she’s just half price at $2395 2. 20” Fashionable Brushmark ‘Alice’ Lady – unusual 1850 tightly combed coif, the ‘Alice hairband’ and snood plus copious ear to ear perfected brushmarks, lady body, perfect posture and exquisite original plum silk fashion gown w/colored pleats, swags and modified train. $995

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3. Magnificent best describes the eye catching aura of this 22” E. J. Bebe with satin finish bisque and luminous hazel PW eyes plus all the features of this middle period EJ – the gentle brows, large applied ears, shaded lids and signed 8 ball stiff wrist body – all so rightfully adorned by her lavish antique silk couture with silk and lace details, multiple underlayers and leather shoes. Sublime! $6250 4. 23” Important Blonde Snood China – rarely do you find such a stunning ‘Mary Todd Lincoln’ with both blonde hair and blue bows! Plus unusual snood too! Ca 1860, she is a rare and brilliant model with 6 sew holes and a good old body with glazed porcelain limbs and painted garters! All like new! $1250

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5. Museum Class Halbig ‘970’ Lady – for the fashion, lady and character collectors in particular, this important model is a rare find! Like the important (and $6000) ‘969’ patent of the same year, 1887, this intriguing twin mold is so rare there is only a head shown in the Halbig book! This 18” example is a ‘Gibson Style’ showpiece from orig. wig w/hat to fancy shoes and gorgeous heirloom ensemble, PW eyes, shaded lids, early square teeth and the very rare dimpled smile all set her apart! $2500 6. 18” Stately Lady in Important Clothes – a true china fashion wasp waisted doll w/ womanly face, long neck, heavily lidded eyes and a luxurious shoulder length hanging bun in a long snood. She wears a mint, 2 part mid century bustle back jacketed day dress w/ miniature print. A fashion plate indeed! $1495

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7. 11” Dainty French Fashion – with a fine head by F.G., she is mint and all original in splendid festival attire from lace cap to leather slippers. She boasts slender, pretty bisque arms w/long fingers. Be it the French Alps or romantic coastal village, she’ll be the prettiest ‘jeune fille’ there! $950 8. 28” Romantic ‘Adelina Patti’ Mache – with her child-like round eyed innocence and authentic heirloom layers of clothes incl. necklace, ring and slippers; her classic homemade body with owners ‘1851’ notation, and her pristine original ivory pure complexion, you’ll love this prim and proper portrait of Americana! $1250


17 Loch Lane, Rye Brook, NY 10573 • (914) 939-4455 • Fax (914) 939-4569 Email: poupees57@aol.com • Generous Layaways Accepted Member NADDA • Member U.F.D.C.

Top Row: 1. 21” Jules Steiner Fre A Le Parisian, Prettiest example we’ve ever had. Exquisite old clothes. $4,700. 2. 9” Kestner Wrestler all original from tip to toe. We call her “Red”. $3,600. 3. 9” Tynie Baby all original, hard to find, baby with her UFDC red ribbon and of course her handmade blanket. $3,750. 4. 19” Rare Simon Halbig 979 Outstanding all original character. $3,450 Bottom Row: 5. 20” SFBJ 252 Pouty, best we’ve ever had! $5,450. 6. 9” Simon Halbig 886 All bisque, precious and all original. $1,800 7. 28” Superb Jumeau Triste, hauntingly beautiful. $20,500. 8. 24” Simon Halbig Child mold 1488. First Place UFDC winner, showstopper! $5,800.

Please see our website or call for more details, and lots more pictures www.evelynphillipsdolls.com

Photography by Paula Claydon

Two ways to buy great dolls from us...

BECKY’S Back Room on

Located in Stoudtburg Village Open by appointment We welcome your visit 8 N. Village Circle P.O. Box 705 Adamstown, PA 19501

Wood Body China $2000

Jumeau Fashion $2275

View our dolls online at our exclusive shop:

BECKYSBACKROOM.RUBYLANE.COM New dolls listed every week!

Waterfall China $1750

Orsini Didi $1550

K&R 101 $995

Kestner All Bisque $2400

Lydia China $1800

Telephone: 717-484-1200 • Mobile: 610-662-5473 • Email: ourant@me.com 8

ANTIQUE DOLL COLLECTOR

JUNE 2014


NEWS

18th and 19th Century Toymaking and Coopering Artifacts Found on the Hersey Family Farm in Hingham, Mass.

A selection of handcrafted miniature toys made in Hingham, Mass. Photo Credit: Gavin Ashworth

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n upcoming exhibit, entitled Bucket Town: Four Centuries of Toymaking and Coopering in Hingham, opens in June at Old Sturbridge Village. Exploration of the Hersey Shop on the Hersey Family Farm in Hingham, Mass., has revealed a time capsule of the early and vibrant toymaking and coopering industry in New England. Hingham, Mass., known as “Bucket Town” due to its prominence in the early New England coopering industry, was also the home of the first and largest community of professional toymakers in America. Vines that had covered the small building were stripped away in 2008 to reveal an intact coopering and toymaking shop resting on an 18-acre Colonial farmstead just outside of Boston, land that has been preserved by multiple generations of Hersey Family stewardship. Old Sturbridge Village, working collaboratively with the Hersey Farm Collection, will host an exhibit entitled Bucket Town: Four Centuries of Toymaking and Coopering in Hingham to showcase this collection for the first time in public. Additional examples of handcrafted toys and woodenware from dozens of master coopers and toymakers from Hingham will also be on display. The exhibit opens on June 21, 2014 and runs through January 18, 2015. The Hersey Shop, used by generations of the Hersey family from the 1830s through the early 1900s, is the last furnished cooper’s shop standing in Hingham—and, more significantly, what is believed to be the earliest extant preindustrial toymaker’s shop in America. Entering this time capsule, one is met with handcrafted toys, personal artifacts, and tools left as if the artisan had just stepped away from his workbench. Today, descendant Peter Hersey is preserving the pastoral landscape and industrial legacy of his family by managing the small farm, which is the last remaining 18th century, privately owned farm in Hingham. Old Sturbridge Village is one of the largest living history museums in the nation, celebrating life in early New England from 1790 – 1840. For more details, visit www.osv.org or call 800-SEE-1830. Note: Coinciding with the exhibition, a book entitled “Bucket Town: Woodenware and Wooden Toys of Hingham, Massachusetts, 16351945”, will be published by The Hingham Historical Commission. 10

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The interior of the Hersey Shop in Hingham, Mass. An exhibit at Old Sturbridge Village entitled Bucket Town: Four Centuries of Toymaking and Coopering in Hingham will publicly display artifacts found at the shop for the first time, as well as an abundance of handcrafted toys and woodenware from dozens of master coopers and toymakers from Hingham. Photo Credit: Gavin Ashworth


Ashley’s Dolls & Antiquities

Thank you to all of the NADDA Doll Show attendees for coming to visit us in North Carolina

Billye Harris • 723 NC Hwy 61 South, Whitsett, NC 27377 • (336) 266-2608 Website: AshleysDolls.com • E-mail: AshleysDolls@gmail.com Visit us on Rubylane.com/shops/Ashleysdollsandantiquities • Generous Layaways Member UFDC and NADDA


Enjoy the beautiful coastal village of Camden, Maine located on the pristine Penobscot Bay. 49 Bay View Street, Camden, ME 04843 The shop is now open for the season, Wednesday-Saturday 10-4 or call for an appointment 207-322-4851. Shop 207-236-4122 Fax 207-236-4377 email: lucysdollhouse49@roadrunner.com

Wonderful early Queen Anne satinwood desk 11” tall x 10-1/2” wide $1950. Above the satinwood desk is a tintype picture in a wonderful frame for $175.

Old child’s or large doll’s bombe desk 13” tall x 15” wide $595. Staffordshire dogs are 4” tall, $195 for the pair.

21 pieces of soft paste doll’s/child’s dinner set marked “Clews”. Only a couple of small hairlines $395.

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2 beautiful wax ladies from Paris - “Lafitte Desirat” -- one is 12” and one is 13” tall - $795 each. Possibly French 10-1/2” tall chair painted gray with gold accents. Seat is tufted printed silk $495.

Old revolving book stand 4” square by 6” tall filled with early Shakespeare books $795.

We just got in a large collection of Steiff animals. These are small ones. We have all sizes and all prices. Call for details.


Gigi’s Dolls & Sherry’s Teddy Bears Inc.

LAYAW AVAILA AY BLE

Allow Us To Help You Discover The Child Within You!

39” C/M Wire Eyed A Series Steiner, blue eyes marked Steiner on back, HH wig, great body, antique burgundy sailor outfit - top and skirt, black velvet hat, black leather shoes, fabulous piece $14,950. 10-1/2” C/M A Series Steiner F A 3 on stiff wrist body, torso repainted, brown eyes, mohair wig, chips on pierced ears, small rub on nose, vintage clothing & leather shoes $2995 $2995. Now $2495.

28” Walkure 5 ½, blue stat. eyes, HH wigs, pierced ears, professional repair on the back of head, some repaint $395. 10” Steiff 1910-20’s Mohair Bear, great face, body’s stuffing has settled, hole on right foot pad, no button $895. 25” SH 1009 w/ early high forehead, nice early body (some repaint on arms & hands), brown sleep eyes, antique mohair wig, bonnet, outfit, undergarments & leather shoes $825.

25” All original American Character Sweet Sue w/ flexible feet 195758 in “Collegiate” outfit, nylons as is at toes $175. 21” Fabulous all original Ideal Toni P-93 in green dress & panties w/ organdy apron, gold shoes, beautiful platinum blond hair $275.

35” x 32” Joel Ellis Carriage with original paint (as is on left side and handle, black oil cloth top (moves back and forth), front right wheel frozen maybe warped, great display for your special doll $295.

18 3/4” CM Incised Brevette SGDG Jumeau 8, blue pw eyes, applied ears w/ earrings, blue Jumeau stamped body, hairline on back of head $4500 $4500. Now $3495.

28 1/2” Heinrich Handwerck SH 5 1/2, blue sleep eyes, pierced ears, original HH wig, small rub on nose, nicely repainted hands $495. 9 1/2” China Flattop all original with orange - red flat bottom boots, cute size $165.

12” K star R 109 Elise professionally repaired head, 5 piece body, original chemise $1825 $1825. Now $1095.

15” AfAm Armand Marseille 351 3 1/2 Baby, sweet face with nice coloring, brown sleep eyes, repainted body $345.

15” Mother, 12 ½” Son, 11 ½” Daughter WPA Dolls ? possibly by Kansas City WPA Group, girls thumb glued, boys nose has had some work done $750 $750. Now $625 for 3 dolls. 12 ½” Ravca Pair – Lady w/ shawl, Man w/ fishing net (nose as is ), both tagged Ravca and her’s “Nice”, his “Pecheur Broton” all original clothing, nice expressions $150 pair. 14” Ravca Organ Grinder (music works), all original w/ tag signed, “Au Madame A. Bleck avec compliments Bernard Ravca, New York, le 5 Feirir 1940, faded top $105.

9 ½” Cissette Louisa from Sound of Music, all original $155. 10” 1957 Cissette “Lady Hamilton” all original in tagged dress, slip, panties, shoes, and straw hat, no bracelet $295. 9 ½” Scarlett #1181 mint w/box, green taffeta dress & bonnet w/ black trim, cameo necklace $185.

13” Fanny Brice by Ideal on flexy body, all original in pink cotton outfit, overall crazing on head and hands, some head damage $80. 3 1/2” German All Bisque w/ jointed arms and legs, blue glass eyes, blonde mohair wig, original under ware & oil cloth coat $195. Set of 4 Doll House Pieces, 6” Bed, 5” Chest, 6 1/2” Vanity, 4” Rocking Chair $157.

21” French Type Papier Mache w/ bamboo teeth, black pupil less eyes, kid body, original clothing $1750 $1750. Now $1050.

17” Effanbee Patsy Joan all original w/ hang tag “This is Patsy Joan”, pink cotton dress w/ light pink organdy overlay, pink straw hat, pink cotton panties, shoes & socks, slight overall crazing $245. 8” Butin-Nose 1939 all original in tagged blue & white check cotton dress, pants, bonnet, shoes & socks, few paint flakes back of right leg $95. Steiff Bear on all fours w/ underscored F button14” long 10” tall, beautiful brown mohair, nice felt pads $1495.

11” Poured Wax Christ Child figure, inset blue glass eyes, HH blonde hair, newer made silk gown (as is ), wire manger w/ wax covering piece is as found, wax head/shoulder plate, arms & legs, cloth body $545.

17” CM German Character #111, French Jumeau body, stationary blue eyes, hairline on forehead and back of right side of head (has been sanded), antique undergarments & shoes, mohair wig $9500 $9500. Now $6500.

12” Rare S & H #1304 4 Clown on Jumeau body, pull strings to open and shut eyes, original hat w/ wig, very faint hairline left forehead $3995. Now $2795. $3995

21” CM ED 10 Etienne Densmar, blue pw eyes, dr br HH wig, antique shoes, body paint as is $1700 $1700. Now $1150.

6029 N. Northwest Hwy. Chicago, IL 60631 • 773-594-1540 • (800-442-3655 orders only) • Fax 773- 594-1710 Open: Tues., Wed., Sat. 10 a.m. - 5 p.m., Thurs., Fri. 10 a.m. - 6 p.m. Closed Sun. & Mon. Near O’Hare, Park Ridge & Niles

Chicago’s finest selection of Antique, Modern and Collectible Dolls, Barbie, Gene, Alexander, Tonner, Fashion Royalty, Steiff, Dollhouses and Accessories. Member U.F.D.C. & NADDA • Worldwide Shipping

Contact us for Monthly Specials! Tour our shop at: www.gigisdolls.com & join us on Facebook


Marion Maus Specializing in Dolls and Miniatures

A precious gift from the sea. This tiny wooden has been captive in a wonderful shell world for over 150 years! It measures 5” x 7” x 2-1/4 “ deep. $775

Ellicott City, MD Email mmausantiques@gmail.com

Phone 443-838-8565 Member NADDA & UFDC

Victoria: The Enduring Legacy of Lady Alexander by Denise Buese

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omplete with her own history and retaining her original extensive wardrobe, Victoria is a rarity in the world of antique dolls. Companion to a little girl named Carrie Louise Schiff, who grew up to become Lady Alexander of Faversham, Kent, England, Victoria traveled the world and comes down to us with an astonishing provenance. Not only does Victoria possess beautiful and well-preserved original costumes in the exuberant style of the 1870s, her body is the seldom found blown leather example from the French doll manufacturer Pierre Victor Clément. Included in the book is a pattern taken from Victoria’s own riding habit. Many dolls have been used for philanthropic efforts throughout the years, and Victoria is one such doll. Lady Alexander generously donated Victoria and all her possessions as a fundraising raffle during Red Cross Week in 1943, which contributed greatly to the charitable efforts of the town of Faversham during World War II. Victoria proves the value of research and preservation of the treasures of our past, and you’ll enjoy getting to know this remarkable and unforgettable doll.

Order your copy of Victoria: The Enduring Legacy of Lady Alexander today! $45 plus $5 shipping Send check or money order to: Denise Buese, P.O. Box 91282, Pasadena, CA 91109 Or order online at DeniseBueseOriginals.com 16

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Phil May

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Antiques & Collectables

Ocean Grove, NJ 732-604-3011 • dollmanofog@aol.com

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Steiff collectors take note! This 13-inch solider could not be more complete – the soles of his military boots are even covered with tiny Steiff buttons! $2,750 2. Having a dolly tea party? This Happifats Rudolstat set with service for six is in wonderful condition, $245. The Lori Baby by Swaine & Co. is 18 inches, $1,450. The 13-1/2 inch side-glancing black compo dates from the 20’s, $225, and the AM baby is 16 inches, $545. 3. Breathtaking 18-inch A 9 T by Andre Thuillier, original body, couture costume, the ultimate, $34,750 4. Likely a salesman sample , this oak sideboard is a perfect backdrop for your dolls, $345. On the left a rare character boy marked R/A, 15-1/2 inches, $1,750 and on the right, a precious Kuhnlenz Bru, 15-1/2 inches, $2,750. 5. Beautifully detailed Frozen Charlie, marked on foot, 16 inches, $895. 6. A happy little fellow, this K * R Googly, 15 inches with toddler body, will make you smile, $12,750. 7. A great example of K * R Phillip 115/A, 17 inches, with toddler body, $3,250. 8. An all original Phenix Steiner with great presence, 25 inches, $4,750. 9. Ebony Series A Steiner, 26 inches, an exotic beauty, $13,500 10. Seldom seen rare Heubach snow soldier, 8”, $1,150

11. Striking Black Sonneberg child, swivel neck, antique clothing, perfect 12-inch cabinet size, $2,450. 12. Heubach “seashore” pair, perfect with corolene finish, 13 inches, $645. 13. A pretty early Tete Jumeau with straight wrists, $4,950, with her boyfriend, also early and wearing what is probably a Jumeau outfit, $4,450. 14. Double your pleasure with these original family 23-inch Kley and Hahn twin sisters, $1,595 15. In a precious little size, this delightful little 10-inch EJ is perfect in every way, $7,750. 16. Playful Heubach pair with corolene finish, boy with a minor professional repair on right hand, otherwise perfect, 12 inches. $875. 17. Gorgeous bisque on this early beauty, marked 9 over E J, 24 inches, perfect in every way, an outstanding example. $19,750. 18. An 18-inch E J Jumeau shows off her captivating blue PW’s and her couture outfit by Ernestine Jumeau. $11,750. 19. Size 13 EJ , 29 inches, with outstanding bisque, electric blue eyes, fabulous antique outfit, $16,500. 20. So lovely with her resemblance to the AT, this 18-inch Kestner is known as the AT Kestner. She marked 12, $10,750.

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GREAT COLLECTORS The Liz Krupp Collection Above, a small part of the Krupp gallery of contemporary art as it extends into the specially designed area for dolls.

A rare Huret Bebe in original costume from the Krupp collection.

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By Stuart Holbrook

iz Krupp attends every auction with piles of paper. Not just a catalog or scribbled words. When she views a doll to potentially add to her collection she pulls out notes, research, print outs, comparable past prices, and any tidbit of information she was able to find leading up to the sale. Not that she does not buy with emotion, every collector does. What Liz does, though, is weigh her emotions carefully to balance it with facts. As she often says “I can’t buy everything. I want to make sure I buy the right things.” It is this methodical approach that actually led Liz to her first auction some 23 years ago. Studying a catalog at home, she intuitively noticed a beautiful Gaultier that had been estimated at $400/$600. Liz was a new collector and not particularly versed in values or models as of yet, but her keen eye quickly identified what she thought was a beautiful doll that was priced comparatively low to what she imagined it deserved. So, she sent her husband, George, to bid on the doll in Florida during one of his business trips. George, not wanting to disappoint Liz who had hopes for her first French doll, bid up to $4500.00 after it was announced that the estimate in the catalog was a misprint and should have been $4000/$6000. Needless to say it was a rather comedic start to one of the world’s great collections. It was the beginning of greatness. The collection evolved slowly though. Liz started collecting at a relatively young age (with an AM 390, of course, found in a museum shop in New England!) so her first priority was raising children and giving support to an increasingly busy husband whose business was blossoming. But this Armand Marseille became a catalyst to study, to ANTIQUE DOLL COLLECTOR

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A classic “H” bebe which graces the Liz Krupp collection

The legendary Huret Poupee originally from the Victor Hugo family estate. 20

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The Jumeau 208 character girl, partner to Krupp’s beloved 208 Character boy.

attend auctions, and to use her voracious appetite for reading as a way to immerse herself in the complexities that dolls can sometimes have. Her goal was always to own the best and her life at the time forced her to do it in a more studied way. Liz did quickly form a focus for her collecting, however. French. Nothing but. She recognized these dolls as fitting a special need for surrounding herself with beautiful art objects and she was completely focused on all aspects of French doll history and their aesthetic. Which faces were unique, how modeling and painting differed, and, one of the most important aspects to her, how the costume played in the overall presentation. These are still the mantra of her vision today and she is not afraid to walk away from a beautiful doll if she feels that the costume is not offering a “complete package.” It was after her children were raised that Liz’s collecting began to truly take off. And, as with many serious collectors, one plunge is all it takes to move to the next level. For Liz, that plunge was in Las Vegas at the auction Theriault’s presented of the Christian Bailly Automatons. Attending with her husband (she would never send him alone again to a sale!) she fell in love with the rare Roullet et Decamps Magician Lady automaton with an exquisite portrait Jumeau head. Winning this marvelous piece cast Liz into the new realm of wanting the best. There would be no turning back. Today automata frame a large part of her collection. As well, it is a subject enjoyed by her husband as they


also both share a passion for theatre and music for which automata are such a natural fit. While her collection of automata might be more unique in that they fit the mold of what a true doll collector would love (portrait bisque heads, classic child or fashion scenes) she does branch out to more esoteric items like the Mephistopheles automaton which sits in her husband’s library and the immensely coveted Pierrot Writing at a Desk by Vichy. In the early 2000’s Liz’s collection began to evolve at a more rapid pace. Now confident, very knowledgeable, and clear as to her purpose, she jumped straight for the major marquis pieces that would come to market. Two dolls that quickly caught her eye and, as well, thrust her into the spotlight of collectors worldwide were the Albert Marque boy sold in 2009 and the Victor Hugo Huret Poupee sold in 2010. Both dolls deservingly captured world records in their categories and, at the same time, brought the Krupp name into the spotlight as one of the world’s most serious collectors. During her evolving status over these few years Liz was also building one of the finest collections of contemporary art. It is not unprecedented for a doll collector to find joy in the collecting of the seeming antithesis of dolls: paintings, media, and sculptures of modern artists. Liz sums up her love of both as this; “Each is its own art, carrying its own form of presentation, yet collecting both develops your eye to a sense of quality, given that the unifying element in dolls and contemporary art lies in the tiny details.” Yet, this led to a problem. She was seeing an increasing challenge to properly display her dolls and art within her Boston home, giving them the exceptional presentation that they deserved. Liz felt that the pieces themselves were not enough, how they were offered to the eyes of those visiting her home must be of equal importance. So, with this motivation in hand she and her husband George embarked on a three-year project that would be affectionately referred to as “The Big Dig.” With no room to expand their home outside its parameters, the idea arose of going underneath. A gallery that would be dug beneath the house and combine within contiguous spaces her contemporary art gallery and a dedicated exhibit space for automata and dolls. This was a daunting process that involved massive multi-year stages and significant planning. As well, thousands of details that had to be organized in assuring that no small one was overlooked. In some ways the art space was easier to develop; it was an open and minimal frame that best features large contemporary pieces. The gallery for dolls was another story. How do you blend the same feel of space, given that the two rooms flowed together? For that, Liz contacted the finest custom case builder in the world, Goppion, in Italy, which does the casing and exhibit spaces for major museums worldwide. Liz would be their first private home installation. Trips were made back and forth and a genius plan was made for the dolls that respected well the adjacent room of contemporary art while adhering to the principles needed to properly display all the features of

One of the most important and intricate automatons ever produced is this Vichy Pierrot Writing at The Desk from the Liz Krupp Collection

Liz Krupp with her “signature” Jumeau 208 Character Boy in her contemporary art gallery. ANTIQUE DOLL COLLECTOR

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A view into the central area of the Krupp gallery for dolls

her dolls. It is a gallery space like none other in the world also invest in the proper display and presentation of the and completes a perfect flow of art to dolls and vice versa. doll. While not every collector may wish to create a singular During this time, Liz began to develop an appreciation dramatic space as Liz has, it does encourage everyone to for the German art character doll. After years of complete think of new ways to feature a collection in your home dedication to French dolls, she began that best plays off your individual to connect in new ways with the personality and surroundings. personality and sculpting details that Liz’s charm and enthusiasm models, like the 100 Series of Kammer also lends well to her becoming an and Reinhardt, provided her well“ambassador” of sorts to the many trained eye. So she studied again, traveling dignitaries in the art poured over comparables, researched world who visit her space and are every aspect of German characters the immediately entranced by the dolls same way she had years before with and thus leave with a completely French dolls. Her first plunge into new appreciation. Her tireless this expansion of her collection sums promotion of their importance led up much of Liz’s entire collecting one acclaimed international artist, philosophy in “focusing on the best” who recently visited, to return a given that it was the Kammer and week later and video many of her Reinhardt 104 boy sold at a Theriault automata and dolls as she found auction in 2013, and holds the record amazing inspiration in them. today for a German doll (for good So, what is the doll that Liz could reason!), that would be her step into never be without? The one doll this genre. in her collection that she would Liz does, in her own way, contribute keep if she could only have one? greatly to the idea of the doll as an In many ways her choice defines art form and provides collectors with her as a person as well (do we see not only the inspiration of greatness ourselves in our favorite dolls?). It in buying the finest examples, but, is the Jumeau 208. Smiling, full of perhaps equally as important, instills personality, and perfectly presented. The Jean Roullet Magician Lady that a sense of duty for every collector to A fitting choice indeed. stands as one of Liz Krupp’s first major additions to her collection in 2003.

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Varying looks at the Krupp gallery of dolls, which resides below their unique Boston home, allow for a glimpse into the vision and taste of Liz Krupp in both dolls and the presentation of her collection.

Note to our readers, this is the ďŹ rst of a continuing series of articles featuring prominent collectors.

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The Tender Years

Deborah Varner 303-850-7800

queenbeev1@comcast.net • Member UFDC

NOW ACCEPTING

Layaways welcomed and consignments taken.

See You at National with Wonderful Dolls!

18” Fire C Steiner. Bl. PW. eyes. Eyes cut smaller giving this doll a unique and beautiful expression. MKD. Steiner. Pierced ears. Creamy white bisque. Lg. dimple in chin. Honey blonde hair. Steiner hands. Pink dress with Bl. flowers and sash on drop waist. Lg. collar. French shoes. DARLING, WITH LOTS OF PRESENCE. $ 7,875

9” Rare, All bisque Kestner. Mint/Factory orig. Br. SE. OM. with upper teeth. Chunky toddler body. Fabulous modeling. White stockings with red band. Blk. bootines with Bl. tassels. Orig. Bl. dress with organdy collar. Straw hat in pale Bl. with silk band. Lined in white silk and lace. Doll wears union suit under dress. SO RARE AND SWEET. $ 4,750. 14 1/2 “ Jumeau Dep. Mkd. DEP. Bulging bl. pw. eyes. Platinum blonde curls to her waist. Wonderful orig. body finish. White batiste drop waist dress with pleats and lg. bow. Hat has flowers around crown. Rhinestone pin at top of dress. SWEET AND SPECIAL. $ 2,750. Rose O’Neill Kewpie hanky in box. Detailed with busy Kewpies of different sizes. Written in corner “Copyrighted.“ 11” x 11” Hanky. A TREASURE. $ 250

4 1/2” orig./ mint child doll. Peg strung. Bl. glass eyes. Long lashes. Blk. eyeliner. Bee stung lips. Dark bl./white embroidered dress. White stockings with bl. trim. Blk. ankle Mary Jane shoes. ONLY $ 575.

8” Victorian bud vase. Decorated with a young boy with basket and scythe in hands. Flower inside rim. Gold leaf throughout. Fabulous modeling. $185. 4x6” Camisole. Lace on shoulder straps. Riveted holes. Etched fabric. Pink satin ribbon ties. $ 395

WWW .THETENDERYEARS.NET

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Mary Ann Spinelli FINE ANTIQUE DOLLS AND ACCESSORIES

P.O. Box 4327, Burbank CA 91503 • e-mail: nellingdolls@gmail.com Cell: 818-738-4591 Home: 818-562-7839 • Member NADDA and UFDC

BUYING & SELLING QUALITY DOLLS FOR OVER 21 YEARS

18 3/4” Jumeau fashion w/ adult portrait face, fully articulated wood body, antique walking dress and accessories in aged shades of turquoise and aqua. $13,900.

10 1/2” Dainty Jumeau ingenue fashion, all orig. except for shoes, mohair wig that reaches below the waist! $3250.

Visit us at: www.maspinelli.com

13 3/4” Simon Halbig 1079 in charming fleece coat, hat and muff, with matching lace undergarment set, on a very unusual body type. $750.

18” Blampoix fashion on her wedding day, bisque shoulder head and arms, wonderful silk antique wedding gown w/ oppulent accents of crisp, ruffled lace and orig. glass bead trim. (silk jacket quite frayed) $6950.


Everything Old, Nothing New, Some Creating a Fantasy Wedding for a French Fashion Doll! By Jan Peterson Photos by Elwyn Peterson

Seated for a moment before the ceremony, Mattie shares the wedding bouquet with her little flower girl, Evie. Below, the wedding cake is topped by a miniature swan and two gold wedding rings.

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t all began with the dress! My grandson-of-the-heart in France, Stéphane, discovered a lovely woman who was an intrepid doll collector. She was selling some of her items, and she contacted Stéphane about an antique French fashion doll wedding dress tucked away in a trunk in her attic. When Stéphane sent me the photos, I nearly fainted dead away as they came up on my computer screen! This confection was a work of art and the most beautiful wedding gown made for a doll I had ever seen! BUY! BUY! BUY! I typed back, fingers trembling! Stéphane negotiated a fair price, and soon the gown arrived in a package from France to my home in Minnesota. That is when I had one of those OH, YES! OH, NO! moments! In my excitement to purchase the gown, I had never even thought to ask about the measurements. I collect French fashion dolls of mostly thirteen to fourteen inches tall. This gown was made 26

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Things Gifted, Some Things Blue

Champagne cools in a sterling ice bucket all ready for the wedding toast.

for a HUGE doll! My only “big girl” is my FG on a Gesland body named Emilie-Mathilde whom I fondly call Mattie. Mattie is twenty-four inches tall, and the exquisite gown completely drowned even her. So, I sadly faced reality and listed the beautiful dress on eBay. Apparently, very few people own a thirty-six to forty inch French fashion doll, and the gown languished on eBay for over a year. I finally removed it, and it remained wrapped in a box in the top of my closet for over two more years. I was doing some spring cleaning last year and rediscovered the dress one morning. I laid it out on my bed, looked over at Mattie on my dresser, and sighed. Then it hit me! Dare I really attempt this? What if I RUINED this gown in the process? But, I realized the gown was just getting older and older, and someday its antique silk would start to melt, and then it would be worthless and such a shame to lose. So, I started studying the construction of the gown so beautifully handmade by an incredibly skilled French seamstress long ago. I studied it for nearly a month before I finally found the courage to, scissors in hand, start to cut it down (YIKES!) to fit Mattie. Thus began a project of

Last minute primping at the elegant Rococo vanity in the Bride’s Dressing Room.

A June wedding may require a fan. An antique bridal fabric swatches card from Au Bon Marche in Paris is the rarest of finds! ANTIQUE DOLL COLLECTOR

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The wedding rings look lovely in Mattie’s finely sculpted hand.

Mattie readies for a bridal portrait with the train still attached to her gown. This bridal portrait features the back of the gown with its detachable “fan” train. 28

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well over 100 hours that enthralled, terrified, and consumed me. I kept silently praying to the original seamstress to hover near and help me. I think she did! I had lovely natural antique silk thread in the exact pale cream color of the gown. I had bought the thread years before in an antique shop, knowing someday I would find a use for it. The thread is so fine and so delicate, I needed to wax it to even be able to work with it. I had an antique thread waxer that still had the wax, and it worked like a charm. Whew… I unpicked the gown, measured and remeasured, and cut out trial patterns using paper towels. Mattie patiently held still as the paper gown was fitted and re-fitted, and then, heart pounding, I CUT the antique silk! As the project progressed, so did my confidence, and I thanked la couturière a hundred times for the lessons she taught me as I tackled this project. In all, I reduced the entire dress ten inches so it would fit Mattie like a glove. I was able to use everything– the beautiful silk fringe, the woven ribbon passementerie, the delicate cotton voile lining, and the silk taffeta of the body of the gown. It is embellished with yards and yards of soutache, that, thankfully, was already sewn to a delicate mesh backing so I didn’t have to re-sew all the curves and squiggles made from it! Once the dress was done, I put it on Mattie and let out an enormous sigh of relief! It totally fit her and was still the beautiful gown that had been made over 130 years before.


Dual-purpose camisole for both sleeveless gowns and gowns with sleeves made of the finest linen. Every bride knows that what goes under her wedding dress is just as important as the gown itself. Her bridal handkerchief is tucked into the camisole sleeve. Dressed in her “going away” ensemble, Mattie is ready to leave on her honeymoon.

I sent photos of Mattie in her wedding dress to my wonderful doll friends and the gifts for the bride came pouring in! A dear friend I have known for nearly twenty years said that Mattie simply MUST have appropriate underwear for such a lovely dress. Melanie sent an incredible antique dual-purpose camisole from her own collection. It is made of the finest, delicate linen and has detachable sleeves! It can be worn with a sleeveless gown as well as one with sleeves, like Mattie’s wedding dress! As I researched French wedding gowns of the era (18701880), I learned that often women would remodel their wedding dresses to be used as ball gowns or very elegant walking suits. It reminded me of when we used to live in Holland. Dutch women recycled their wedding dresses for their first baby! The skirt was turned into a bassinette skirt and the veil became the drape over the top of the bassinette. My own wedding dress was worn once, and has hung in my closet for forty-six years. I wish I could have found such a sentimental and practical use for it as French and Dutch women have done. Then, a wonderful friend in Colorado found rare fabric

samples for wedding dresses from the famous Au Bon Marché department store in Paris from the same era! The brochure has silk fabric swatches stapled inside with the price per meter of the fabric still attached to each swatch. There is also a gorgeous litho inside the brochure of a bride from the era. I nearly fainted when Laurie said Mlle Mattie simply had to have this, even though the fabric choice for her dress had already been made eons ago! Stéphane sent me a glorious rococo secretary/vanity that has become the perfect place to display the brochure in the bridal dressing room. Over the years, I have managed to haunt hundreds of antique shops… like the proverbial moth to the flame. I already had a miniature bottle of champagne from France, a miniature sterling ice bucket with crushed glass for “ice”, champagne flutes on a silvered tray found in Germany, and a wonderful plaster of Paris wedding cake, circa 1900, found in Germany as well. The topper of the cake is a swan and two gold wedding bands made of wax. I had a French cake plate and little “wedding ring” napkin rings, too. Yes, I am a doll accessories hoarder… Over the years, I had ANTIQUE DOLL COLLECTOR

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This circa 1880 wedding dress for a real woman has a similar long train and lots of fringe like Mattie’s doll gown. Mattie’s sterling monogrammed carnet de bal for the wedding ball at the reception. Of course, Papa gets the first dance.

NOTE: A special thanks to Wendy Feidt for creating Mattie’s gorgeous bridal wig.

managed to find everything needed for a wedding scene without even planning to ever do one! The only thing I lacked now was a veil. I have a plastic bin full of antique French tulle, but none of it matched Mattie’s gown. Then a package arrived from Colorado, with the most delicate antique tulle in the perfect color! Thank you, Laurie! HERE COMES THE BRIDE! A few months after the bridal outfit was complete, Stéphane sent an antique nosegay trimmed in lace and made of wax flowers that must have once been for a French bridesmaid. It was the perfect wedding bouquet. In the same box was an antique French fashion costume that was an exact fit for Mattie! I just needed to replace a couple

thread loops for the closure hooks and it was good to go. So now Mattie even had a “going away” costume for her honeymoon. It has been more fun and more satisfying than nearly any other doll project I have taken on, and that is saying a lot! Now, the only thing left to do is find Mattie a GROOM! My male French fashion doll, Jérome, at sixteen inches tall, looks like a Hobbit next to Mattie. Besides, he is already married to my little FG, Claire. So just one quest is left… to find a male fashion doll in a tux at least twenty-five inches tall. And maybe a miniature altar, and an architect’s model of a chapel, and bridesmaids and a little boy ring-bearer, and a carriage for the honeymoon, and…

Blackberry Studio www.rubylane.com/shop/blackberrystudio Margaret Gray Kincaid Member NADDA and UFDC Cell: 646-709-4340 Margaret.kincaid@gmail.com

We’re packing for UFDC. See you in San Antonio! Exceptional Premiere Jumeau, marked 2/0, $13,500 holding a little Marotte $195 Size 3 ED with her overflowing trunk of clothes, $6950 Block letter FG marked F 9 G, $8950 Lovely sewing box, $450

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The Littlest Lenci Dolls by Judy Fisher

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1931 Lenci catalog page.

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he Lenci Company is known for making the most exquisite felt dolls in the 1920s and 1930s. The dolls came in a variety of sizes from 6 ½ inches to well over 36 inches. These dolls were given a “series” number based on their height, e.g., 12 inches Series 111, 16 inches Series 149 and 159, 17 inches Series 300 and 1500, 18 inches Series 110, and 23 inches Series 109. Also, within these different series, the Lenci Company featured slight changes in height and other features over the years. For example, the Series 300 became an inch taller in 1933 and the number changed to 1000. Considered to be the most popular and collectible series by Lenci enthusiasts are the pouty 17 inch Series 300 dolls. However, there is another 300 doll – the miniature. The miniatures measure between 8 ½ to 9 ½ inches. Just as there were variations on the larger dolls over the years, the smaller dolls, often referred to as mascottes or miniatures, had their differences in height as well. In Nancy Lazenby’s book Lenci: The History of the Dolls, she has a chapter titled “Mascottes, Miniatures and the Series XX Dolls.” The size of these dolls ranged from 6 ½ - 7 inches to 9 - 9 ½ inches. It is often hard to know what to call these smallest Lenci dolls, and for this reason, most people have used the terms mascotte and miniature interchangeably. The catalogs are not of much help since the term mascotte was only used in 1930. The easiest way to identify a “so-called” mascotte doll is measuring the height and examining the legs. They are typically 8 ½ inches and have floppy legs whereas the 9-inch miniature dolls have stiff legs. All the dolls have felt heads; some dolls have felt legs but the majority have muslin legs. The arms are felt and have tab joints; the hands are mitten in design. The bodies are made of flesh-colored muslin fabric. Both the bodies and legs are stuffed very firmly with excelsior. All the dolls have what is often referred to as a surprised look with their eyes in the color of light brown,


XX 4 – The Kid. This doll was made in various sizes and is often referred to as Jackie Coogan. He is wearing a felt shirt, overalls (note the leather on the suspenders), and a mosaic-pieced cap with leather sandals, which are just so Italian. Of course, he has a wooden cigarette in his mouth. Courtesy Susan Voake

brown, or blue, and they are always glancing to either the right or left. The lower lip is painted with a lighter color and the hair varies from rooted mohair to intricate felt. They have single layered ears or no ears. It is fairly common to find a tag on these smaller dolls with the most popular one being a silver round tag where the word Miniatur(a) is written in pencil. However, many dolls retain other tags, such as blue or black rayon, rectangular cardboard with red writing, and heart shaped paper. Oftentimes a collector will be lucky enough to find a doll with multiple tags retained. The tags are usually sewn on with a heavy cotton thread. The line expanded in 1933 and there were simply hundreds of these dolls made in a huge variety of outfits. The majority were dressed in regional/ provincial costumes designed in felt, organdy, taffeta and cotton. On the back of those silver round tags mentioned earlier, there is usually the number 300 followed by another number to indicate the outfit. Because of confusion with the larger 17-inch 300 Series, most collectors only use the term miniature which

XX 5 – Girl/Boy in PJs. This white felt outfit is an example of another technique used by Lenci on clothing; that is, the applied felt strips sewn on top of felt vertically, horizontally or diagonally with more than one direction. The doll is holding a painted wooden candlestick. Courtesy Susan Voake

XX 7 – Soccer player going for a goal. Courtesy Barbara Panunzi

XX 8 – Tennis player. He is dressed in white felt pants and shoes with ties and he has the unique pieced-felt top in yellows and oranges. The catalog shows the doll dressed in different colors which was pretty typical of Lenci to feature the same doll in a different color. He holds a wood tennis racket. Courtesy Susan Voake. I’ve included my 8 ½ inch floppy legged mascotte for comparison. ANTIQUE DOLL COLLECTOR

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XX 9 – Tom. He wears a felt shirt, shorts and shoes as well as a bib with his name Tom embroidered. He has an adorable painted hobby horse. Courtesy Susan Voake.

XX 10 – Girl with Cat. The felt dress and apron exhibit all the wonderful techniques of Lenci felt clothing – applied dots and thin pieces of felt sewn on top. She has wooden Dutch shoes (the hat was remade).

encompasses all these 8 ½ to 9 ½ dolls. As Ms. Lazenby mentioned in her book, these dolls continued to be produced in the 1940s and 1950s with little difference seen between pre-war and post-war dolls. However during this later period, the fabrics used on the outfits changed to more taffeta and cotton. Most doll enthusiasts have seen various Lenci miniatures at UFDC conventions and doll shows; however, the smallest 7-inch Lenci dolls known as Series XX are rarely seen. They are the rarest of the rare because they were only made for one year – 1931. Thus, they are very special and greatly desired by Lenci collectors. It is assumed that the dolls were discontinued because they were too expensive to make and to sell at a price the public would be willing to pay.

XX 12 – Golfer, dressed in wonderful pieced brown and beige felt shorts with red jackets, knitted socks and leather golf shoes. The golf bag is soft leather. The buttons have been replaced and the golf clubs were made out of swizzle sticks. He won a second place ribbon at the Detroit UFDC competition.

XX 13 – Girl jumping rope. Her white organdy dress is accented with red felt dots; she wears black leather shoes. Note the rooted black hair; black hair was not often used on the dolls.

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XX 15 – Girl holding wooden jam jug and spoon. Her sweet white felt onesie outfit is covered with red felt dots to match her red shoes. Courtesy Susan Voake. XX 14 – Girl in pink organdy. Wearing layers of pink organdy with picot edging often seen on Lenci outfits. Her felt hat is embellished with ostrich plumes. Courtesy Susan Voake.

The 1931 catalog page shown on the first page of this article shows 27 different models that are exquisitely dressed with incredible details. Almost all the dolls have accessories, which always make a doll more valuable. Twenty portrayed children doing various activities from playing tennis to eating jam from a jar. After examining photos of the dolls for this article, it became very apparent that the XX Series have predominantly blue eyes. In fact, with the exception of two with brown eyes, all the dolls featured have various shades of blue eyes. This is not often the case with the mascottes and miniatures. There were six black characters with colorful felt wings playing musical instruments and their conductor holding a baton featured at the top of the catalog page. I have never seen one of these black dolls. Many years ago I bought several miniatures from a man in Northern California who told me that he sold his original catalogs and some rare dolls including this little black band to a gentleman in Beverly Hills. What sets these little treasures apart from all the other small dolls, as well as their Italian, French and Spanish imitators, is the construction of the dolls. It is simply outstanding. The heads are felt with rooted mohair. As stated earlier, the average height of these dolls is 7 inches depending on the outfit. The bodies of the dolls are made of flesh colored muslin and the arms are felt like the other miniatures, however their felt legs have a slight bend at the knee and that is why collectors often refer to them as the bent knee mascottes. Their toes are stitched like the larger dolls which is very unlike the undefined toes on the miniatures. Most of the clothing was made of felt with a few outfits in organdy. The outfits that are made of mosaic-pieced felt to create checks and plaids in scale for the tiny dolls are works of art in themselves. The clothing and accessories are so outstanding compared to all the other Lenci miniatures. Many of the dolls have fine Italian leather shoes or wonderful wooden shoes. Also it is important to note that if there is a tag remaining, it is the cardboard square tag seen on only the very early dolls.

XX 17 – The Tyrolean Hunter in his colorful lederhosen and plumed hat. The rifle is a replacement, made by the author for Ms. Lazenby. Courtesy Nancy Lazenby

XX 18 – Girl with wooden rake. Her outfit is fairly typical of the ones seen on miniatures; that is, a felt shirt with an organdy top, apron, and felt vest. However, the hat has a very large pompon, which isn’t usually seen on the miniatures. ANTIQUE DOLL COLLECTOR

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XX 19 – Party Girl. In the catalog, this XX is dressed in red with black hair, but here we have an unusual redhead dressed in pink. Similar to the dots, her outfit is covered with flowers. Her hat has a huge bow which is hard to see in the photo and her black cape is edged with fake fur. She too, has black leather shoes. Courtesy Susan Voake This XX Series doll sold on eBay has been redressed by the author using an outfit made by an Italian friend for a normal sized miniature. Making the little felt shoes was quite challenging. Redressing can happen with Lenci dolls and that is why having the catalogs is very helpful for identification purposes.

Of all the companies that copied Lenci, the Italian company Fiori and the French company Raynal made little 7-inch dolls, which are often mistaken for Lenci. While they are adorable in their own right, no small felt dolls can compare to the Series XX made by Lenci in 1931. The prices for these dolls can range from $300 to $1500. At the November 2012 Theriault’s auction “Apples,” the XX 12 Golfer sold for $11,000 in a bidding war. The main challenge for collectors is where to find these Lenci gems. My first XX doll was found on eBay for less than $100 because she was wearing a replaced outfit and she needed some tender loving care. The next was the XX 12 Golfer who also needed restoration. However, I was very fortunate to find my XX 10 “Girl with the Cat” in her original box, which went on to win a second place ribbon at a UFDC convention. A very special doll is my XX 13 “Girl with a Rope,” which I purchased from a UFDC member after our dolls finished competition. I hope you enjoy looking at these priceless examples of Lenci artistry. Photos by Rick Fisher, Nancy Lazenby and Susan Voake

XX 20 Girl in organdy dress with appliquéd felt flowers and black rick rack trim. She has a huge bow in the back of her dress. Her large brimmed hat is decorated with small flowers. She is wearing wonderful black leather shoes. Courtesy of Barbara Panunzi.

Special thanks to Nancy Lazenby, Susan Voake and Barbara Panunzi for sharing their dolls. Unless noted, dolls are from the Fisher collection. A brief description of dolls not pictured. XX 1 – Girl who has fallen over holding some sort of toy. The shoes are stitched felt, which is very unusual. XX 2 – Another girl who has fallen over wearing a super hat. XX 3 – Girl in pink organdy like XX14 but she has a long-sleeved pink felt jacket with matching pink felt shoes. XX 6 – Boxer player with leather gloves and shoes

The round silver tag is the one most often found on miniatures and there could also be an additional rayon or rectangular tag. However, the square tags are the ones you’ll see on these rare XX dolls.

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XX 11 – Girl holding a book behind her back - great wooden shoes that are tied on with felt bows. XX 16 – Boy in pieced felt bathrobe with felt slippers.


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The Petite Parisiennes “

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here was a sculptor in Paris who speculated in dainty statuettes of slim Parisiennes, and she might have posed for M. Millière, a straight-backed, longlimbed girl, with the tilted chin, the straight nose, the large inquiring eyes, and the confusion of spun-gold hair he loved.” –The Sinister Man, 1924, by Edgar Wallace. Who was the artist M. Millière? Which statuettes did he create? and who was the girl who posed for them? I asked myself these questions and more when I encountered my first Maurice Millière “Parisienne” (left). What sort of doll is this? I wondered. A boudoir doll? A statuette? A carnival prize? A miniature mannequin? It now appears she is all of these. Millière’s obsession had become mine, and I determined to know her secrets. Maurice Georges Louis Millière (pronounced mill-lee-AIR), was born in Le Havre, France, on December 12, 1871. A successful and versatile artist and illustrator, Millière credited his training at Ecole Nationale Supèrieure des Arts Dècoratifs of Paris for his mastery of a wide variety of art techniques, from drawing and painting to sculpture and printmaking. His “petite femmes de Paris” (little women of Paris), also known as “poupèe femmes” or doll women, frequented the pages of gentlemen’s galant magazines, such as La Vie Parisienne and Le Sourire. Modern, vivacious, desirable, and glamorous, Millière’s doll women are embodied in a single character—the artist’s favorite model and muse. This charming coquette wears her blond or hennaed hair in a short, curly, bouffant style, known as Le Flou and is unabashedly comfortable inside her own skin. She enjoys the new social freedoms, and we see her posed sunbathing, shopping, smoking cigarettes, trying cosmetics, playing sports, or simply lounging adorably in pajamas. Millière’s mademoiselle was not only the playful pin-up girl of the Great War, but was admired by women as well, who followed her retail advertisements for the latest in fashionable clothing, coiffures, and cosmetics.

Above, “Naiade” (Sea Nymph), 15½” plaster doll in original paint and costume, with Millière’s facsimile signature inscribed on the figure’s base. Right, “La Poupèe de Millière” (Millière Doll), by Maurice Millière, circa 1922. Photo courtesy of Sharon Weintraub.

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“Le Peignoir” (The Robe; author’s title): Left to right, spelter statuette in original paint, marked Wickham Silver Co. NYC (15”); statuette in patinated brass (15¼” without the marble base), inscribed with Millière’s facsimile signature; carnival prize in painted plaster (16”). Photo left courtesy of Sharon Weintraub


of Maurice Millière When the conflict between Germany and France interrupted the doll trade in 1914, creative French artists, like Millière, led a nationalistic aesthetic movement that resulted in the evolution of dolls from children’s playthings to art objects for adults. In this spirit, Millière fashioned a series of good luck dolls—his “Parisiennes”—modeled in the image of his beloved poupèe femmes. Millière’s “art dolls,” which we shall hereafter call his “Parisiennes,” were created during the period when the artist lived in the Montmartre district of Paris, an artists’ mecca, famous for its cabarets. According to Samy Odin, of the Musee de Poupèe, Paris, Millière sold some of his Parisiennes during the First World War to raise funds for war orphanages. Such charities remained his lifelong passion. Two of Millière’s Parisiennes were registered at the Institut National de la Propriètè Industrial, classed as French Drawings and Models, specifically, a “Statuette Doll named the Parisienne of Maurice Millière,” with the registration number 8912 on August 17, 1921 and 9054 on January 31, 1922. Only one representative figure is pictured with the patent, which we shall call “Le Peignoir” (The Robe). An advertisement for Millière’s Parisiennes from the pages of Paris Plaisirs magazine may be seen to the right. Millière further promoted his Parisiennes by working them into the background of his etchings and illustrations, as can be observed in “La Gourmande D’Amour” and “La Guerre en Dentelles” below. Mr. Odin notes that Millière’s art dolls remained popular until about 1931. A catalog of Millière’s Parisiennes is yet to be discovered.

“La Gourmande D’Amour” (The Gourmand of Love) by Maurice Millière. La Vie Parisienne, September 17, 1921.

by Nannette Rod Photos by John Rod

Advertisement for Statuettes Les Parisiennes of Maurice Millière, Paris Plaisirs, No. 53, 1926.

“La Guerre en Dentelles” (The War in Lace) by Maurice Millière. Fantasio 1923. ANTIQUE DOLL COLLECTOR

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“Naiade” (Sea Nymph): 15 ¾” plaster doll in original paint, with Millière’s facsimile signature inscribed on the figure’s base; stamped underneath “MADE IN FRANCE.” Far right: Millière’s Parisienne as an advertising mannequin promoting Warner’s Redfern Corselette. Photo courtesy of Paris Couture Antiques: http://www.pariscoutureantiques.com

“La Poupèe Modèle” (The Doll Model): 12 3/8” wax-overplaster, re-wigged, in her original costume, with Millière’s facsimile signature stamped in ink on the figure’s base. 40

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“We have quite the same appearance!” “La Poupèe Modèle” by Maurice Millière. La Vie Parisienne, September 10, 1921.


Carnival dolls from the 1929-1930 N. Shure Co. Catalog, Chicago, Illinois.

Millière inspired Mademoiselles from Germany. Left and right by Limbach Porzellanfabrik. Photo courtesy of Sharon Weintraub.

For the purpose of describing Millière’s Parisiennes, let us attempt to distinguish his articulated dolls from his more sculptural statuettes. Both types are cast in solid plaster of paris (sometimes brass in the case of his statuettes) over a wire armature and average between 15 and 16 inches tall. The figures are permanently mounted on a flat or mounded, disk-shaped base, often painted to resemble marble. While statuettes have molded hair and no articulation, dolls are commonly wigged, with arms jointed at the shoulder but fitted precisely to the body and not poseable. Each doll represents a unique design and pose; therefore, bodies and arms not interchangeable between models. Painted facial features are similar in style but not identical and include black intaglio eyes, black one-stroke brow and lid lines, red or coral lips with matching eye and nose dots, and faces sometimes highly colored with vampy kohled eyes and rouged cheeks. Statuettes more often wear molded-on clothing, while dolls may wear little more than molded high-heeled pumps. Fabric costumes, when present, are typically sewn on to the doll and not removable. Mohair wigs may vary in color and style, but bobbed finger-waves or pin curls wrapped in ribbonwork bandeaus are most common. A few of Millière’s Parisiennes deserve special mention; in particular, “Le Peignoir,” who was too naughty for the French, if one may judge by this letter to the editor of the newspaper Bonsoir: All Parisian Women are not Dolls. “How much for the little Parisienne, madam?” “Twenty-five francs. Aren’t they lovely? And they are signed, see.” “Indeed, and do you sell many?” “Do we sell? It’s crazy! Mainly to foreigners—consider the Americans, who buy from me up to a dozen at a time!” “That’s what I thought, thank-you.”

“Un Madrigal Qui Tombe Dans L’Eau” by Maurice Millière. La Vie Parisienne, August 1, 1925. ANTIQUE DOLL COLLECTOR

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“Is it a strong corset? Certainly! but Le Select.” Advertisement for Le Select corsets illustrated by Maurice Millière.

…When Englishmen, Americans, or Spaniards come to stay for a while in France…what do we offer them to take home as a souvenir, but a Parisian! The Parisienne—that is to say, that little statuette made of colored plaster— red jacket and yellow hair, sometimes naked on top, sometimes on the bottom—she is peddled everywhere, this little woman, and we see her in the shop windows from rue d’Hauteville to the Madeleine. Well, no, Mr. Maurice Millière! I’m furious that your unquestionable talent serves us so badly. Whether they are accomplished society women, thrifty women of the middle class, or clever factory girls, Parisian women are not your dolls… —Bonsoir, October 4, 1922. The Bonsoir editorial was also reported in American newspapers under the headlines, “Little Dolls Too Frivolous

for Parisians” and “Paris Peeved over French Girl Doll”: Paris, Oct. 28.—Little dolls representing the Parisian girl and seen in the boulevard shop windows have caused a rumpus. Representative Paris societies and clubs claim “she” is not the real Parisienne. Storms of protest issue from all sides because of the frivolity of these little alabaster folk, and Americans purchase them as souvenirs of Paris. The dolls are little plaster ladies in red pajama coats. The coat is all—and it’s a small coat—or at least it would seem that it is, as it doesn’t quite meet across the chest. Bonsoir asks whether the sculptor, M. Millière, does right in representing the Parisienne in this manner. “No,” says Bonsoir, “these are not the real Paris girls. If the American visitor seeks a real souvenir, a real memory of our girls, let him see them as they come from their

Self-portrait of the artist in his studio from “L’Histoire D’un Dessin De La Vie Parisienne” by Maurice Millière. La Vie Parisienne, April 5, 1919. 42

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offices and shops. Let him see them as they surround the pushcarts at noon, carefully selecting their midday meal. Then he will know the real Parisienne, and the plaster person with the pajama coat will be but a fantasy in his memories of Paris.” —The Washington Times, Washington, D. C., Oct. 24, 1922 / The Daily Messenger, Canandaigua, NY, Oct. 28, 1922. But not every Millière Parisienne raised a rumpus. The demure model “Naiade” is the most commonly found of his dolls. Examples of this model display different titles on their brass plates, corresponding with their manner of dress: “Naiade” (Sea Nymph) costumed in a sailor dress, “Mariee” (Married) costumed as a bride, and “Almee” (Oriental Dancer) costumed as an exotic. She was also commissioned as a countertop display mannequin to advertise both the regular and exclusive Redfern line of Warner Brothers’ lingerie. These miniature mannequins have been found costumed in exquisite lingerie as well as the doll-sized corsets that were given away as customer premiums from 1921 to 1922, as described here: “Free! A tiny Warner Corset for Dolly. Every mother who buys a Warner Corset here tomorrow will receive

“Music Hall” 15 7/8” painted plaster doll, with Millière’s signature and “C. F. G. MADE IN PARIS T. Goyers stat” inscribed on the figure’s base; stamped underneath “MADE IN FRANCE.” An example of this model has been found with its original brass title plate, reading “MUSIC HALL PAR M. Millière.”

Left: “Midinette” (Shop Girl): 15 ¾” plaster statuette in original paint (attributed to Millière), with the title molded in relief on the figure’s base. Postcard by Maurice Millière.

Right: “Midinette” (Shop Girl): 15 ½” painted plaster doll, with an illegible title and “Fabrication Depose Francaise” inscribed on the figure’s base. This doll is adapted from the statuette through the omission of the molded hair and costume to include a mohair wig and articulated arms. For this reason, she is without ears and her mitt-like hands are lacking Millière’s careful delineation.

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one of these cunning Doll Corsets for her little daughter’s doll… Don’t you think your dolly should have a corset just like the one mother wears? A Warner’s Rust-Proof, of beautiful pink brocade, well-boned to hold its shape, one that has laces, that has hose supporters with cunning little ribbon rosettes, that is trimmed with fancy braid—and everything!” One wonders why Warner overlooked Naiade’s plainly uncorseted figure when choosing her as a representative model for their corset line. Perhaps Naiade’s modest pose held particular appeal for women. “La Poupèe Modèle” is unique among the doll sisters, as she is half-hollow, wax-overplaster, strung with springs, and jointed at the shoulders and waist. She is comparatively small, and her proportions are engagingly doll-like. Wire embedded in her hands enables her to hold out the hem of her short tulle skirt. This mischievous mademoiselle is pictured in Millière’s illustrations “Le Poupèe Modèle” and “La Gourmande D’Amour”. If imitation is the sincerest form of flattery, the poupèe femmes of Maurice Millière have won many admirers. In America, Millière’s statuette, “Le Peignoir,” was copied first as a 16” plaster carnival prize by the Texas chalkware artist June “Yates” Jenkins and later by the novelty house N. Shure Co. of Chicago. This model was still being advertised in 1932 as “Frenchy” by the Midland Doll Co. of Chicago and may be found wearing a variety of molded-on costumes. Replicas of “Le Peignoir” were also produced in cold-painted spelter by Wickham Silver Co. NYC. Europeans, too, manufactured novelties modeled after Millière’s designs. In Germany, Millière-inspired half-dolls and figurines were made by Fasold & Stauch of Bock-Wallendorf. A 7” china lamp base by Carl Schneider Erban is an interpretation of Millière’s illustration “Un Madrigal Qui Tombe Dans L’Eau.” Parisiennes “Le Peignoir” and “Naiade” can be found as fine quality 5.5” porcelain bisque figurines by Limbach Porzellanfabrik. The most brazen attempt to profit from the success of Millière’s Parisiennes was perpetrated by the artist Francis Xavier Sager, who created a series of satirical copycat statuettes, which he called his “Parisettes.” The scarcity of Millière’s Parisiennes in the present marketplace is probably owing to their fragile nature. Plaster of paris is a soft, porous material that is easily broken and quite tedious to repair. Once soiled or disfigured, these inexpensive figures were likely to be discarded. It is therefore miraculous that any of the Parisiennes are found today in pristine condition and fortunate even when they are found damaged, repaired, and repainted by

“Zephyr” (author’s title): statuettes in patinated brass (14”) and painted plaster (14 5/8”), with Millière’s facsimile signature and “T. Goyers Stat.” inscribed on the base of the plaster version. “Café de L’univers”: 15” plaster doll in original paint, with the title and Millière’s facsimile signature inscribed on the figure’s base. Café de L’univers is a coffeehouse in Nantes, France. A molded-on fox stole prohibits further costuming of this model.

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“Furia”: 14 1/8” painted plaster statuette (attributed to Millière), with the title and “FABRICATION FRANCAISE DEPOSE” inscribed on the figure’s base.

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amateur restorers who have endeavored to save them. It is my feeling that these salvaged, compromised figures suffer no further harm in the hands of a competent artist who might undertake to restore the semblance and character of their original factory appearance. Unless otherwise noted, the Parisiennes seen here were restored and costumed by the author with only minimal artistic liberty. The original paint was preserved wherever it was present in a stable condition. Maurice Millière died in Normandy on April 5, 1946 and is remembered as the father of the Boudoir Art genre. As for the identity of his enchanting muse, L-R Dauven, an editor of La Vie Parisienne magazine, confides, “Millière’s girls always looked exactly like his wife.” But her name is unimportant. Through the artist’s eyes, she is revealed as the eternal essence of what charms and fascinates us about every woman since Eve. To quote Maurice Millière: “If I have brought to the masses a few visions of youth, a little breath of freshness, it is all that I desire. And that already is very ambitious indeed.” I am deeply indebted to Daniel Auliac, Sharon Weintraub, Clifford Catania, Samy Odin, and Eric Renner for contributing their valuable insight and original research to this article. Kindly share a photo of your Millière Parisienne with Nannette Rod at www.facebook.com/nannette.rod BIBLIOGRAPHY Catania, Clifford P. Boudoir Art: The Celebration of Life. Schiffer Publishing, 1994. Hippisley, Antony D. The Saturday Book Book, Vol. 34, “La Vie Parisienne,” 1975. Ferrier, Arthur. My Method, by the Leading European Black and White Artists. Gordon and Gotch, 1926. Sroufe, Ted. Collectors Digest Price Guide to Carnival Chalkware, Giveaways and Games: 1995 Values. L. W. Publishing & Book Sales, 1995. Theimer, Francois. Dolls, Contemporary Works of Art: The French Artists. Polichinelle Publications, 1995. Weintraub, Sharon Hope. Bawdy Bisques & Naughty Novelties: German Bathing Beauties and Their Risqué Kin. Schiffer Publishing, 2005. http://halfdolls.blogspot.com/p/half-dolls-teepuppen-demi-figurines.html

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1-800-566-6646 Collectible Doll Company P.O. Box 697, Cedar Hill, TX 75106 ANTIQUE DOLL COLLECTOR

JUNE 2014

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The Heinrich Handwerck Story by Martha Nichols

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dward Heinrich Handwerck factory. Kämmer & Reinhardt was born in Gotha, in had their heads made by Simon Thüringia, Germany, in 1858. & Halbig, too, and some of their He served in the lancers division (the bodies were made by Heinrich cavalry) of the army, and as a young Handwerck. The doll companies in man was trained as a locksmith. He the Waltershausen area cooperated became fluent in French and English, with each other for their mutual and took a job in banking where he benefit, and the owners and their interpreted and translated documents. Heinrich and Minna Handwerck, and the factory families socialized with each other they built to house their doll-making business. In about 1880 Heinrich was hired by as friends. the Wislizenus doll and toy factory in Waltershausen as a The Heinrich Handwerck company began to export their salesman in exports. Wislizenus made bodies for Simon & products to the USA and European nations. Eventually they Halbig, who were located in nearby Gräfenhain. became known for quality dolls, and were so successful they In 1884 he married Minna Koch, and after their marriage, were able to build their own large factory. The dolls’ heads in 1885 or 1886, the pair decided to open their own doll were always made by Simon & Halbig, and were marked business. They rented a building which they shared with with an H, HH, or HW (for Handwerck, Waltershausen). the Kämmer & Reinhardt company of doll makers, who The bodies were stamped “Germany,” or “Handwerck” in were also just starting out. The Heinrich Handwerck red or black ink. They also used an 8 pointed star and circle company began with simple cloth, wax, and papier mache mark, and a shield-shaped hangtag. dolls, but progressed to making jointed bodies for bisque Like many Simon & Halbig-made heads, the Heinrich heads, which they designed themselves, but had produced Handwerck molds were all marked with numbers ending for them by the well-established Simon & Halbig porcelain in 9. Their mold numbers were: 69, 79, 99, 109, 119, 139,

Left: The H mark used by Heinrich Handwerck, on a 109 mold doll, size 1. Center: The HW mark, standing for Handwerck, Waltershausen, on a 79 mold doll. Right: The later, more complete mark of the Heinrich Handwerck company showing the Simon & Halbig name as the maker of the head, was used after Kämmer and Reinhardt’s purchase of the company in 1901. This mark is used for dolls with no mold number. 46

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Mold 79 has a barely-open mouth, French-style eyebrows, and pierced ears.

Most molds were available with blue or brown eyes, and mohair wigs. Photo courtesy Kimberly Schweiren

189 and 199. The sizes varied from 25 to 107 cm, or 10 to 42 inches tall. Some of the Heinrich Handwerck dolls had no mold number, but were well-marked. They also made dolls with names for export, which were Bébé Cosmopolite patented in 1895 and Bébé Reclamé patented in 1898. Other names used by the company were La Belle, La Bonita, and Lotti. Like most Simon & Halbig heads, the Heinrich Handwerck heads usually have pierced ears. In 1901 Heinrich developed a serious kidney ailment, and after only 16 or 17 years in the doll business, the Handwercks sold the factory to their former neighbor, Kämmer & Reinhardt.

Mold 109 has one of the happiest expressions, with large eyes and pointed chin with a dimple.

K * R continued to make the Heinrich Handwerck bodies and use the Heinrich Handwerck name. I have come to believe that all of the “no mold number” Heinrich Handwerck dolls are from the K * R period of ownership. They are marked with the same italicized capital letters that K * R used on many of their own molds, and they all

Mold 199 is a nice quality, slightly older child. Heinrich Handwerck developed and produced this body for their dolls, and for other Waltershausen doll makers. Bébé Cosmopolite in original chemise, with the HH shieldshaped tag.

Mold 109 has French-style eyebrows, sleep eyes, and pierced ears. Photo courtesy Kimberly Schweiren ANTIQUE DOLL COLLECTOR

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HH dolls with no mold number date from 1901 on, and were made in a variety of sizes. Photo courtesy Kimberly Schweiren

The “no mold number” mold doll was made during Kämmer and Reinhardt’s ownership of the HH company, with heads by Simon & Halbig. Photo courtesy Kimberly Schweiren

appear to be of the same design. One of the best known of these dolls was the 46 cm (18”) Heinrich Handwerck “Daisy” made in 1911 for the Ladies’ Home Journal magazine. She was a promotional doll used to increase subscriptions, and was always a blue-eyed blonde, of no mold number, marked, “Germany, Heinrich Handwerck, Simon & Halbig, 1.” In 1920 Kämmer & Reinhardt also purchased Simon & Halbig, and became one of the last large Waltershausen doll

companies to survive into the 1930s. Heinrich Handwerck died at home in Gotha in 1902 at the too-young age of 43. He and Minna had eight children, some of whom emigrated to the USA. One of them, Heinrich the 2nd, worked for 5 years at Marshall Fields in Chicago, but returned to Gotha to open a doll company of his own, operating it until the Depression of 1929. His son, Heinrich Handwerck the 3rd, reportedly is still living, as are his two siblings.

Daisy, made for the Ladies Home Journal, Simon & Halbig’s 570 mold had a Heinrich was an 18 inch “no mold number” Handwerck body. Photo courtesy Kimberly Heinrich Handwerck doll. The 18 inch Schweiren Kestner 171 mold was also used as Daisy. Photo courtesy Kimberly Schweiren 48

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Blue and brown sleep eyes were available for the “no mold number” dolls, and they have pierced ears.

The Heinrich Handwerck company made their own leather doll shoes, impressed with an HH inside a heart. Perhaps this heart symbolized the ownership of the company by a devoted young couple.


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Send us a photo or a digital photo of your doll with a description and your check or credit card information. We do the rest!! Take advantage of this special forum; the cost is only $95 for a 2.4”w x 2.9”h ad space. Antique DOLL Collector, P.O. Box 239, Northport, NY 11768. Phone 1-888-800-2588. Email: antiquedoll@gmail.com

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Kley and Hahn 520 character girl - 21”, brown painted eyes, closed mouth, original blonde mohair wig, perfect bisque, and a composition ball jointed body. She wears an original Norwegian ethnic outfit. $4900. Call 215-794-8164 or email alloyd@nni.com.

Victoria: The Enduring Legacy of Lady Alexander by Denise Buese

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n absolutely stunning book, this slim volume tells the story of Victoria, a very special Jumeau fashion belonging to Carrie Louise Schiff, who would go by the name Louise. Her parents enjoyed a live of opulence and luxurious travel. No doubt it was on a family trip in Paris where Louise was pampered with the gift of Victoria. Exquisite paintings of European society, fashion plates and exceptional photographs of Victoria and her lavish, original wardrobe of the 1870’s will delight the fashion doll collector. What is most amazing is the provenance that accompanies Victoria, for her journey through the years has been well documented and is presented here. After raising money for the Red Cross, Victoria would eventually come to live at the SpielzeugMuseum in Davos, Switzerland. Most of our readers know that with the museum’s owner’s ill health, the collection was sold by Theriault’s where it was purchased by Ms. Buese who has continued to uphold the legacy and preservation of this special doll. As an added bonus the author includes a pattern taken directly from Victoria’s riding habit. It is sublimely elegant in its simplicity. Hardcover, 80 pages, $45 plus $5 shipping in the U.S. Order from Denise Buese, P.O. Box 91282, Pasadena, CA 91109 or visit denisebueseoriginals.com

Member NADDA and UFDC. Other photos and dolls may be seen at RubyLane.com/shops/anntique dolls. ANTIQUE DOLL COLLECTOR

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NADDA in North Carolina

Male fashion with swivel neck, wood and leather body, all original. Honey and Shars, email: honeyandshars@yahoo.com

An absolutely pristine Marklin carriage, $5500 and a rare 17inch S & H 1448.Connie Bailey, email: cbbailey@nc.rr.com 50

ANTIQUE DOLL COLLECTOR

A spectacular wood peddlar doll, Ann Pruett-Phillips, email: ann@annpruett-phillips.com

Sheila Needle’s suite featured a variety of chinas including this family group, email: dollwitch@cox.net

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A fabulous Gebruder Heubach 8202. Diane Costa, email: toydepot@comcast.net JUNE 2014

rriving at the Embassy Suites in Greensboro, NC about two hours after the NADDA show opening, we witnessed bustling activity as doll hungry customers, shopping bags in hand, made the circuit around the sixth floor which had been transformed overnight into doll shops. This soldout show had wonderful positive energy and it was a thrill for us to be there. The Saturday show closed at 4 pm but rather than go home, attendees and dealers were invited to a garden party….and what a party it was! Billye Harris orchestrated a spectacular event on the breathtaking 21- acre estate of Jim and Virginia Griggs. The timing could not have been more perfect, everything in glorious bloom, magnificent towering trees, manicured borders, a captivating bamboo garden, antique statuary, fountains, meandering pathways… simply the most beautiful private gardens we have ever visited. We asked Mr. Griggs how all this perfection was achieved and he told us that six full time gardeners were required. Because of the temperate North Carolina climate, there is a year-around display of flowering shrubs and plants. We could easily fill every page of this issue with photos of the garden, but after all this is an antique doll magazine.


A wonderful selection of German bisque was offered by Billye Harris, Ashley’s Dolls, email: ashleysdolls@gmail.com

S & H 769, size 13 long face Jumeau, and in her wonderful ethnic costume, doll marked 128. Rick Saxman, email: ricksax@earthlink.net

Center: An exceptional array of French and bisque dolls were offered by Phil May. Email: dollmanofog@aol.com Right: 24-inch early 20th century Ichimatsu Ningyo, $15,000; the boy dating from the late 19th century was priced at $11,000. Alan Pate, email: info@ antiquejapanesedolls.com Below: A rare Chase doll available from Nancy Smith, email: nasdoll@comcast.net

A rare Lenci sultan, $3750 and winker cowboy, $750, Turn of the Century Antiques, email: toc@rare-dolls.com

Only a very few examples of this rare china are known to exist. Rosalie Whyel, email:dollart@dollart.com ANTIQUE DOLL COLLECTOR

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Lovely all original poured wax doll, $2250. Margaret Gray Kincaid, email: Margaret.kincaid@ gmail.com

Two great black bisque dolls, on the left, a cabinet size Steiner and on the right a doll marked F, believed to be by Jumeau. Fritzi’s Antique Dolls, email: fritzisantiquedolls@comcast.net

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A Jumeau threesome, prices left to right $2200, $2800 and $2800. Virginia Aris, email: virginiaaris@aol.com

It was Teddy Bear Central in the booth of John Paul Port, email: jpport@earthlink.net

Billye Harris of Ashley’s Dolls was in charge of the Saturday evening garden party. She also organized this exhibit of rare Maggie Bessie dolls.

A wonderful Munich Art couple was offered by Nancy McCray, email: nlmccray@q.com

Following a barbecued pork dinner, we toured the two beautiful historic homes on the property owned by Jim and Virginia Griggs and Billye Harris, each a testament to their love of antique dolls. Concluding this most enjoyable day was Rosalie Whyel’s slide program which combined our love of outstanding gardens and beautiful dolls in a presentation entitled, “All on a Summer’s Afternoon… the dolls take us to their favorite gardens of the world.” We were unable to attend Alan Pate’s talk on Japanese dolls Sunday morning prior to the show opening but we heard absolutely rave reviews, one from a former teacher who commented what an entertaining and effective speaker Alan is. Billye Harris organized the exhibit of Maggie Bessie dolls, named for the sisters Margaret Gertrude Pfohl and Caroline Elizabeth Pfohl, Moravian residents of Old Salem, NC. The pair began making dolls in the late 1890’s and continued through the 1940’s. In spite of the number of dolls in the exhibit these adorable American cloth dolls are extremely rare. Most of the attendees stayed over so Sunday was again a busy day with steady attendance as those who had ruminated overnight on possible purchases returned to buy. I’m sure that everyone – dealers and customers alike – who participated in the recent NADDA show have to agree that it pretty fantastic!

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Dollhouse dolls and furnishings were offered by Marion Maus Antiques, email mmausantiques@gmail.com

A rare set of Napoleonic paper dolls, c. 1810, all original, $1500. Marshall Martin, email: marshallmartin@earthlink.net

An 11 inch E 1 J and a no. 1 Bru Jne make a perfect pair, Floyd Jones, email: floydjones@sbcglobal.net

A lovely grouping of half dolls and powder boxes. Sue Kallen, email: suelkallen@yahoo.com

French fashions and their handsome mail escort, Jackie Allington, email: nickandjackie@gmail.com

Unusual 24 inch china with glass eyes, $5,000 and a lovely French china fashion, also $5,000. Constance Blain, email: ceblain1936@aol.com

A precious early Simon and Halbig Mignonette A grumpy SFBJ 252 pouty, $10,995. with her original wardrobe, Mary Ann Spinelli, Joan and Lynette Antique Dolls, email: email: nellingdolls@gmail.com joanlynettedolls@sbcglobal.net ANTIQUE DOLL COLLECTOR

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A Southern Garden Party

Jim and Virginia Griggs (see photo of Jim above) welcomed us to their beautiful gardens and their doll-ďŹ lled Queen Anne Victorian Revival home. Photos by Deanne Dodson and Keith Kaonis

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Captivating 15-1/2” First Series Portrait Jumeau with pale bisque and almond eye cut.

This exceptionally rare and desirable 12” brown tipped Steiff teddy clown bear is in outstanding original condition from head to toe.

James D. Julia Toy and Doll Auction June 13

Of historical significance is one of the earliest bears Steiff ever produced, the rare “Rod” bear. This blond fellow that essentially “started it all” was designed by Richard Steiff after viewing bears at the Stuttgart Zoo.

I

f you ask anyone in the know about Steiff animals, the name of Steffes will likely come up. Enthusiasts like no other, Chuck along with his now dearly departed wife Cathy traveled the globe for approximately three decades forging friendships and hunting Steiff treasures to add to their remarkable collection. According to Rebekah Kaufman, consultant Steiff archivist for Steiff North America who cataloged the collection, “It is amazingly comprehensive and impeccably curated and reflects the finest examples of Steiff design, quality, and craftsmanship from the first third of the 20th century.” Of the approximately 120 stellar examples from the Steffes collection, certainly one of the standouts is an exceedingly rare and historically important black Steiff Titanic “Mourning Bear”. Made to honor those lives lost in the infamous tragedy, it is one of the most sought after vintage bears known. Only 665 were ever produced and only 78 were ever made in this size and configuration. Also of historical significance is one of the earliest bears Steiff ever produced, the rare “Rod” bear. This blond fellow that essentially “started it all” is constructed with rod joints, long arms, humped back, felt paws, black shoebutton eyes, and black hand-formed gutta percha nose. The “piéce de resistance” is his original elephant button, the earliest and most desirable Steiff ID in the world. The 1925 yellow teddy bear known as “Happy” with long, soft curly mohair and deep brown and black glass pupil eyes, a marvelous circa 1930 brown tipped, blue eyed Steiff “Petsy” bear with distinctive facial features and fluffy mohair, and a remarkable brown tipped Steiff teddy clown bear in all original condition are additional museum class additions. Dolls include a lovely 28” Series C Steiner bebe with lovely brown paperweight eyes and pensive expression complemented by an elaborate ivory silk and lace dress and matching bonnet. From the same collection comes a rare and desirable 17-1/2” Steiner with pale bisque moon shaped face with delicate

A nine piece felt rabbit skittles set affixed to wooden plinths make for some lively parlor bowling.

Doll highlights include a lovely 28” Series C Steiner bebe. The doll’s lovely brown paperweight eyes and pensive expression are complemented by a most elaborate ivory silk and lace dress and matching bonnet. ANTIQUE DOLL COLLECTOR

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An exceedingly rare and historically important black Steiff Titanic “Mourning Bear” was made to honor those lives lost in the infamous tragedy. It features highly distinctive red felt backed shoebutton eyes to represent tears and sadness.

A classic Jumeau automaton of a standing figure powders her nose and looks in her hand mirror while soft music plays.

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A marvelous circa 1930 brown tipped, blue eyed Steiff “Petsy” bear with distinctive facial features is one of the most desirable and collectable teddy bears ever produced.

A rare German wax headed Santa figure that opens his fur coat to reveal a Christmas feather tree in his chest was once part of the renowned Gladyse Hilsdorf collection.

JUNE 2014

From the Steffes collection, a 1925 yellow teddy bear known as “Happy” was produced to be warmer, more cuddly, and more colorful and inviting than Steiff’s previous bears.

blush serving as a backdrop to her pert smile and piercing blue paperweight eyes. Another French beauty is the gorgeous 15-1/2” First Series Portrait Jumeau with almond cut eyes, exceptional modeling, and even her original lambskin wig. Also up for bid are several rare automatons, German characters, ethnic dolls, and French fashion dolls. A much anticipated collection of several dozen holiday items that has remained in one gentleman’s possession for several decades will finally be coming to market. Central to the offering is an exceedingly rare German wax headed Santa figure, once part of the renowned Gladyse Hilsdorf collection. When the lever is pressed, he opens his fur coat to reveal a Christmas feather tree in his chest. Another European find is a marvelous composition nodder with a larger than life head of a stoic Father Christmas bobbing atop a speckle painted body. In addition will be several bellsnickles, candy containers, and more in a variety of styles and materials. The sale also features numerous toys for the men – cast iron planes, pressed steel vehicles, American ad European tin toys and mechanical banks. This June 13 auction will be preceded by Julia’s summer fine glass & lamp auction taking place June 11 & 12. Additional information can be obtained by going to Julia’s website at www. jamesdjulia.com or calling 207-453-7125. Free fullcolor brochures will be available, or their lavish, full-color, detailed and illustrated catalogs will be available for $39. Previews for the auctions will be Tuesday, June 10 from 9am-5pm, Wednesday through Friday from 8-10 am before each auction session at Julia’s auction facilities on Rt. 201 in Fairfield, Maine.


MAKE YOUR RESERVATION NOW!

ÉCOLE DES POUPÉES

Samy Odin, Ann Coleman and Margaret Gray Kincaid Welcome you for a winter session of

BEBE JUMEAU Study of Original Fashions

Learn how to Appreciate the Authenticity and Historical Significance of the Jumeau Company Hands-on examination of antique Jumeau Bébés and their wardrobes from the Musée de La Poupée-Paris and private U.S. collections

DECEMBER 24, 2014

to be Held at Margaret Gray Kincaid’s charming house, fully decorated for Christmas, in Baltimore, Maryland It all starts on Tuesday Evening with a welcome dinner. Seminars, workshops and programs on Wednesday and Thursday. All meals included with a Gala Dinner on Thursday night. December Gaithersburg Show following Saturday and Sunday December 6-7 Free Admission with early entry to the show included

Cost: $650 per person CONTACT: Margaret Kincaid 646-709-4340 or margaret.kincaid@gmail.com or write to 17 Elmwood Road, Baltimore Maryland 21210 (Number of attendees VERY limited)


Auction Gallery

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t was a highly successful auction for Withington’s April 10 and 11 sale, the first of 2014. Bringing nearly $26,000 was this 13” bisque incised A6T with brown glass eyes, closed mouth, pierced ears, original chemise, wig and original marked shoes. A 17” Bru incised Bru Jne 5, brown glass eyes, closed mouth, pierced ears, kid body with composition lower legs, bisque forearms, antique clothes and marked Bru shoes, realized close to $20,000.

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n early Gaultier with closed mouth, pierced ears and the original body, measuring 25-1/2 inches, sold for approximately $6,630 at the Ladenburger April 25th and 26 auction in Germany. The Bru Jne Bebe, size 2, 12-1/2 inches, with leather body and replaced arms, realized approximately $7,740.

T

he private collection of the late Flora Gill Jacobs, founder of the Washington Doll’s House and Toy Museum in Chevy Chase, Maryland, was sold by Noel Barrett Auctions on April 11 and 12. The English Regency House dating from the early 1800’s realized $24,150. The South Jersey House Mansion, an American house, c. 1870, once the centerpiece of the museum, brought $13,800. The furnishings for both dollhouses were sold separately.

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t McMasters Harris May 25 and 26 auction in Newark, Ohio, this stunning 13-inch Poupee Bois Fashion Lady by Simon & Halbig realized $5,775; the later 5” All Bisque Dome Head Mignonette w/ swivel neck, all original, brought $1,770.

We would like to thank the following auction houses for their participation: Noel Barrett Auctions, P.O.Box 300, Carversville, PA 18913, 215-297-5109, www.noelbarrett.com Ladenburger Spielzeugauktion GmbH, Lustgartenstraße 6, D 68526 Ladenburg, www.spielzeugauktion.de McMasters Harris Apple Tree, 1625 W. Church Street, Newark, OH 43055, (740) 344-4282, www.mcmastersharris.com Withington Doll Auctions, 17 Atwood Road, Hillsborough, NH 03244, (603) 478-3232, www.withingtonauction.com 58

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s ’ i z t i FArntique Dolls

Buying entire collections of antique dolls and dolls of merit. Email: fritzisantiquedolls@comcast.net Fritzi’s cell# 630-247-1144 Rick’s cell# 630-247-1219

28 inch C series Steiner. Perfect marked head & body. Fantastic wrap around paperweight eyes.

OUR UPCOMING SHOWS:

UFDC

Gaithersburg, MD June 7 & 8 at the Fairgrounds UFDC Convention July 16th - 20th San Antonio, TX


Antique DOLL Collector July 2014 Vol. 17, No. 6


Tuesday, July 15, 2014 Marquis Cataloged Doll Auction “As in a Looking Glass” Preview 9 AM. Auction 11 A.M.

Wednesday, July 16, 2014 Estate Doll Auction (list available) Preview 9 AM. Auction 11 AM.

At the San Antonio Hyatt Regency Riverwalk, San Antonio, Texas

A 140-page full-color catalog with photographs and historical descriptions of each doll is available for $59 by calling 800-638-0422 or visit theriaults.com. Absentee, telephone, and live online bidding is available if you cannot attend.

The important cataloged auction on Tuesday, July 15 will highlight dolls from five major collections including those of noted early collectors Jean Strong of Williamsville, New York (Bru, Jumeau, Huret, fashions, automata, and American cloth), Bonnie Tussing of Florida (classic Bébés and rare German characters), and Patricia Cox of Portland, Oregon (A.T., Jumeau, Bru, German characters, and rare automata). As well, there are extraordinary original dolls and automata fresh from French estates, and part one of important carved wooden and Neopolitan dolls of the Margaret Woodbury Strong Museum (sold to benefit the museum’s collections fund).

PO Box 151 • Annapolis, Mar yland 21404 Toll-free: 800-638-0422 • Fax: 410-224-2515

the dollmasters

www.theriaults.com


To

see many of the dolls from the

“A s

in a

L ooking G lass ” A uction

see

Dollmastery Vignette Series

Educational videos ab out antique dolls— a v a i l a b l e f o r v i e w i n g o n Yo u Tu b e . Florence Theriault, co-founder of Theriault’s, will be your guide in her many virtual walk-throughs that explore details, highlights, and rarities of the many exciting antique dolls that are offered at Theriault’s famous doll auctions.

Simply visit theriaults.com/vignette After July 1st, watch for a new video featuring rare dolls from the “As in a Looking Glass” auction to be sold July 15, 2014 at the Hyatt Regency in San Antonio, Texas.


LAYAWAY AVAILABLE Member UFDC & NADDA

(Nat'l Antique Doll Dealers Assn.)

Visit my website: www.grandmasatticdolls.com 7” Baby Bud All Bisque, perfect bisque overall (has a little rub where his fingers hit his face on each side, non detracting), orig. mohair wig, br. sl. eyes. Marked “Baby Bud” on his back. DARLING!! $675.

16 1/2” E. 7 J. Jumeau Bebe, perfect pale pressed bisque, orig. head coil, blue threaded p/w eyes, early mauve blush under brows, orig. mohair wig & pate. Wears ant. FACTORY Jumeau dress, ant. undies, ant. Fr. shoes & crocheted socks plus magnificent FACTORY Jumeau velvet hat w/plume. On orig. early st. wrist Jumeau body. Tremendous presence. Absolute KNOCKOUT!!! $8875.

16 1/2” S & H #1009 DEP, gorgeous bisque, blue sl. eyes, orig. wig & an extra, wears orig. batiste dress, orig. shoes, ant. slip, orig. red shoes & ant. velvet hat. On orig. S & H body. STUNNING!! $1750.

Look for in FDC me at: U nio, TX to n A San 0 July 16-2

6” “Our Fairy” All Bisque, br. sl.eyes, perfect bisque overall, orig. mohair wig, ant.dress. PRECIOUS & great large size. $1100.

13” Kestner 128, cl/mo, Immaculate pale bisque, gorgeous blue sl.eyes, fabulous orig. mohair wig in orig.set, wears gorgeous FACTORY orig. batiste & lace dress, undie set matches lace trim on her dress, orig. leather shoes & socks & fabulous ant. ruffled bonnet. On orig. Kestner body. Too BEAUTIFUL for words. An AMAZING beauty!!! $2900.

Joyce Kekatos e-mail: joycedolls@aol.com I buy dolls and sell on consignment. 2137 Tomlinson Avenue, Bronx, NY 10461 home: 718-863-0373 cell: 917-859-2446

10" A.M. #240 Kewpie Googlie Toddler, huge blue sl. eyes, big watermelon mouth, painted & molded hair, mint pale bisque, wears great ant. dress w/crisscross stitching & rouching & lace collar, ant. crocheted socks & shoes. On orig. 5 pc. toddler body. The cutest one I have ever seen!!! $5500.

5” Kestner “All Bisque” Jointed Googlie, br. side glancing sl. eyes, watermelon mouth, mint bisque overall, orig. mohair wig, orig. net & silk ribbon dress & orig. undies. RARE model with desirable “jointed elbows and knees”. ADORABLE & sure to make you smile!!! $3800.

12” Steiner Series C Bebe, perfect pale bisque, huge blue p/w eyes. luscious lashes, early mauve blush under brows, fabulous ant. mohair wig in orig. set, orig. pate, orig. batiste & lace dress & orig. “marked” #2 shoes w/rosettes, matching #2 on head, orig. socks & darling ant. hat. On orig. early st. wrist Steiner body, great cabinet size, tremendous presence. GORGEOUS!! $7500.

7” Fun-E-Flex “Pluto the Pup”, wooden body, suede ears, completely poseable legs, tail and neck. Made in the 1930’s. Has his identifying tag on his neck and is ABSOLUTELY ADORABLE!!! $650.


& LOWE Connie

Jay

Call Toll Free 1-888-JAY LOWE or (717) 396-9879 Email: big.birds@comcast.net P.O. Box 5206 Lancaster, PA 17606 FAX 717-396-1114 Always Looking to Buy Quality Dolls, Toys, Marklin Doll Carriages or Entire Estates

Buy & Sell With Confidence Member of UFDC & NADDA

An early 15 1/2” closed mouth German on a jointed composition body with straight wrists in her original clothing. Marked on the rear of head 52-47, she has brown paperweight eyes and an inquisitive look on her face. A nice cabinet sized doll that is also fresh to the market from a Pennsylvania attic. $975 A fantastic 20” closed mouth black “A.T.” Kestner child on a fully jointed straight wristed composition body. Dressed in a period outfit with set brown eyes and cafe au-lait bisque. It is very unusual to find such a large example. $6000

mirror all while a melody plays. In excellent working order and free of any damage to the bisque head or hands. $4750 A wonderful 13” “A.T.” Kestner character child on a jointed wrist Kestner body. Quite the endearing expression having copied the “look” of its French counterpart...A. Thullier. Dressed in a more recent outfit she unfortunately has a faint hairline behind her ear and thus priced accordingly. $2250

Seated on the lap of the previous doll is a 3 1/2” Kewpie Soldier mkd with the typical “C” on the underside of his feet. Overall in very fine condition with no damage to the bisque. $375

An all original 39cm (15”) K*R 101 Marie. Great expression with nice bisque, on the proper pink jointed K*R body wearing her original white cotton outfit & undergarments. A few minor wig chips mostly at the rear of the head and all hidden by the original blonde mohair wig. $1900

A 22” Jumeau Automation of a young lady powdering her nose and looking into her mirror. The doll is standing on an unusually styled fabric covered base, marked Tete Jumeau # 4 with a closed mouth, amber paperweight eyes, bisque arms, pale bisque & her original fanciful bebe style outfit. When activated she raises her hand to powder her nose then turns her head to glance in the

An early 21” S&H 949 character child on a chunky ball jointed composition body. Typical of these early Simon & Halbig dolls they have heavy bisque and quite expressive facial features. This gal has brown glass sleep eyes, pale flawless bisque and dressed in an antique white cotton outfit with her original brown mohair wig. $975


Lynette Gross Selling a diverse array of unique and antique dolls

Telephone (317) 844-6459 Email LynetteDolls@yahoo.com

Open 24 hours, 7 days a week. Visit my exclusive Ruby Lane shop Joan & Lynette Antique Dolls www.joan-lynetteantiquedolls.rubylane.com

See you at the UFDC Salesroom in San Antonio!

published by the Office Staff: Publication and Advertising: Keith Kaonis Editor-in-Chief: Donna C. Kaonis Administration Manager: Lorraine Moricone Phone: 1-888-800-2588 Art/Production: Lisa Ambrose Graphic Designer: Marta Sivakoff Contributors: Ursula Mertz, Lynn Murray, Samy Odin, Andy Ourant Subscription Manager: Jim Lance Marketing: Penguin Communications Publications Director: Eric Protter Antique Doll Collector (ISSN 1096-8474) is published monthly by the Puffin Co., LLC, 15 Hillside Place, Northport, NY 11768 Phone: 1-631-261-4100 Periodicals postage paid at Northport, NY. and at additional mailing offices. Contents ©2014 Antique Doll Collector, all rights reserved. Postmaster: Send address changes to Antique Doll Collector, P.O. Box 239, Northport, NY 11768. Subscriptions: Send to Antique Doll Collector, P. O. Box 239, Northport, NY 11768. Phone: 1-888-800-2588 or 1-631-261-4100 Subscription Rates: One Year (Twelve Issues) $42.95; Two Years (Twenty-four Issues) $75.95. First class delivery in U.S. add $29 per year. Outside the U.S. add $30 per year. Foreign subscriptions must be paid in U.S. funds. Do not send cash. Credit cards accepted. Advertising and Editorial: Call 717-517-9217 or email antiquedoll@gmail.com Editorial Office (Send all catalogs and editorial to this address): Antique Doll Collector, P.O. Box 39, East Petersburg, PA 17520

SEE US ON THE WEB AT: http://www.antiquedollcollector.com email: AntiqueDoll@gmail.com

Antique Doll Collector is not responsible for any inaccuracies in advertisers’ content. An unsolicited manuscript must be accompanied by SASE. Antique Doll Collector assumes no responsibility for such material. All rights including translations are reserved by the publisher. Requests for permissions and reprints must be made in writing to Antique Doll Collector. ©2014 by the Puffin Co., LLC.

MOVING?

Important: We need your old address and your new. The Post Office does not forward magazines. Call 1-888-800-2588 or write to us at: P.O. Box 239, Northport, NY 11768. 4

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JULY 2014


The Complete Guide to Antique, Vintage and Collectible Dolls

July 2014 Volume 17, Number 6

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Important Doll Auction in San Antonio on July 15

All original dolls, source material and fascinating archival photographs from this center of the doll-making industry.

by Samy Odin With the recent discovery of an original catalog, we can now identify dolls made by this Lenci competitor.

THERIAULT’S CELEBRATES TEXAS HISTORY

DRESSING DOLLS IN THE WALTERSHAUSEN AREA OF GERMANY by Mary Krombholz

About The Cover Our July cover

ALMA, UNVEILING A GREAT ITALIAN DOLL COMPANY

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GALLUBA AND HOFMANN; ALWAYS IN FASHION

by Sharon Hope Weintraub These unusual bisque seated ladies from the early 20th century starred in a 1983 national advertisement.

features one of the dolls to be offered at the Theriault’s July 15 auction in San Antonio, Texas, an exquisite Bru Brevete with the rare original body. Everything from sublime French bebes from the Golden Age to rare German bisque art characters, French automatons, mignonettes, American dolls including an Izannah Walker, and early paper mache and porcelain dolls from three important collections will be sold. Here’s a firsthand look! Photo courtesy Theriault’s.

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A MID-NINETEENTH CENTURY HOOD FOR A CHILD DOLL by Susan Sirkis

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THE GRAND TOUR EUROPEAN TRAVEL FOR DOLL COLLECTORS

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by Donna C. Kaonis The recent TLC tour to Italy, Switzerland and Germany offered non-stop doll and toy museums, festivals and flea markets.

PLAYING WITH GOOGLIES

by Alf Ertsland These delightful dolls love being photographed! 6

ANTIQUE DOLL COLLECTOR

JULY 2014

The author shows us how to make a doll hood with soutache using modern materials.

12 Auction Gallery 67 Emporium

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JUNE GAITHERSBURG DOLL SHOW

68 Calendar 71 Classified

www.antiquedollcollector.com


(212) 787-7279 P.O. Box 1410 NY, NY 10023

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Quality Antique Dolls by Mail Return Privilege • Layaways Member UFDC & NADDA

matrixbymail@gmail.com 1. 6-1/2” Fully Jointed G.K. ‘34’ child – incl. hands! Lovely fired in ebony complexion,

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clear features, this quality miniature w/ glass eyes and hip length orig. mohair wig boasts elaborated drop waist period crocheted ensemble incl. pantalettes and hat! $750. 2. 18” Early K * R ‘192’ Sophisticate – if you love complete and lavish antiquity consider this original premier model, first in a legendary series, with sweeping hat, finely constructed Greenway style dress, fancy unders and factory leather shoes – plus the early K * R stiff wrist body of course! You’ll want none other $795. 3. Rafael Tuck ‘Sweet Sybil’ – richly colored and festooned this striking easel back paper doll is doll-like indeed with several changes of fashionable dresses w/matching hats – all contained in original box. $250. (See #15) 4. 8” Mint Brown K * R Toddler – scarce ‘easy to see’ size, ‘starfish hands,’ orig. wig, 2 porc. teeth, lovely color and complexion, (dress not shown), contained in a small trunk with extra dress, hat and orig. must see miniature christening gown with robe and bonnet! $1100. 5. In all their creativity Lenci produced only one model with Glass Flirty Eyes. This Factory Original young miss with 2 tags and her own Lenci Dog is a delight! With stylish brimmed bonnet and stunning red and black checkered silk taffeta gown, she is a ‘must have’ – for dog lovers too! $1595. 6. ‘Spears’ Multi Head Character in Box – paper dolls took up the excitement of character dolls too as in this Rare Boxed Set containing the doll, 4 different heads and all the outfits! A colorful treasure comes with display easel for cabinet color! $450. 7. See # 5 8. 16” Museum Class ‘Taufling’ – prime example of this 1878 first edition Schilling with orig. wig in 5 layers of perfect original christening clothes incl. the flannel swaddling! A one owner estate doll for the lover of Motschmann and other early historic and iconic dolls. $495. 9. We love the sweet heart of this 20” ‘pretty in pink’ demure Rare Brown Fashion Doll with tag, orig. wig and 5 layers of tulle gown with matching shoes! $395. 10. Lenci Dog (see #5) 11. Renowned in the history of 50’s modern dolls this Mint Pat. Pend. Terri Lee is early with big brown eyes and original labeled clothes including velvet coat! $395. 12. 16” Rare Brown Terri Lee ‘Patty-Jo’ – being hand painted no two are alike as seen in her lively expression and widely set exaggerated black eyebrows – matching the orig. pigtailed wig. An early Pat. Pend. Treasure with the daisy on her wrist and dashing velvet coat/hat ensemble! $750. 13. Stupendous describes this outrageous Gladdie Boy in an unheard of 28” size w/ 17” circ. head! With the original body in his elegant period linen belted suit w/ silk velvet trim and brass buttons, you’ll thrill to the excitement of Gladdie as you’ve never seen him before – and probably never will again! $1495 14. True Love was never such fun as this Cabinet Size Pair of 12” Pierrots with rare bisque heads and original costumes – he with his serenading wooden guitar – it’s Kismet! $325. 15. Rafael Tuck with wardrobe (see #3) 16. Art Deco Boudoir Creation – charming long lashes fantasy with painted silk glamour, boutique dressed in charmed pink with her own slim and pretty hand painted hat box for her broad brimmed chapeau and accessories! $395.


Two ways to buy great dolls from us...

BECKY’S Back Room on

Located in Stoudtburg Village Open by appointment We welcome your visit 8 N. Village Circle P.O. Box 705 Adamstown, PA 19501

Dollhouse Gentleman $400

Closed Mouth Kestner $1950

View our dolls online at our exclusive shop:

BECKYSBACKROOM.RUBYLANE.COM New dolls listed every week!

Rare Black China $2500

Sonneberg Child $2200

Steiff Teddy Bear $150

Frozen Charlotte with Wig $295

Dollhouse Doll $350

Telephone: 717-484-1200 • Mobile: 610-662-5473 • Email: ourant@me.com 17 Loch Lane, Rye Brook, NY 10573 • (914) 939-4455 • Fax (914) 939-4569 Email: poupees57@aol.com • Generous Layaways Accepted Member NADDA • Member U.F.D.C.

Top Row: 1. 21” Petit & Dumoutier, exceptionally rare. She is an outstanding example of the much admired mold. $18000. 2. 15” Petite, Stunning Rabery and Delphieu “to die for” as the kids say. $4900. 3. 28 inches of show stopping beauty. This Santa has is all. $2400. Bottom Row: 4. 13” Block letter Francois Gaultier. Adorable face, gorgeous blue spiral eyes, you won’t want to put her down. $6100. 5. 13” #243 Oriental Kestner baby boy. Totally original, from head to toe, Fantastic clothes, an exceptionally adorable face and an especially desirable size. $4600. 6. 25” Gorgeous Simon Halbig #939. The quality of the doll is just superior. This face is nothing less than a work of art. One of the best 939’s we’ve ever had! $4900.

Please see our website or call for more details, and lots more pictures www.evelynphillipsdolls.com 8

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Photography by Paula Claydon


Nancy A. Smith

See us in the UFDC Salesroom, July 16 to 20, 2014, in San Antonio, TX.

E-Mail: nasdoll@comcast.net

Member NADDA and UFDC

Phone: (508) 545-1424 Box 462, Natick Mass. 01760-0005

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Carmel Doll Shop

We’re looking forward to welcoming all of the UFDC Convention attendees to our double booth in the UFDC Salesroom in San Antonio, July 16-20. For all of you local area collectors, please don’t miss Public Day in the UFDC Salesroom on Saturday, July 19, from 12pm to 7pm. Michael Canadas and David Robinson (831) 643-1902 • Carmel Doll Shop 213 Forest Avenue, Pacific Grove, CA 93950 Visa/MasterCard/American Express/Layaway • Always Buying, Selling and Trading Fine Antique Dolls Please visit WWW.CARMELDOLLSHOP.COM • Carmel Doll Shop can now be found on Ruby Lane – buying has never been easier!


Auction Gallery Theriault’s in Las Vegas

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he elegant Bellagio Hotel in Las Vegas was the setting for Theriault’s recent auction Memorial Day weekend featuring the collection of Helen Welsh and Evelyn Heidepriem. These two important collections contributed to a well-rounded event featuring a full complement of antique dolls. For additional results visit theriaults.com and click on Proxibid. Prices listed here do not reflect the buyer’s premium.

The “Flirtatious Red Haired Dandy” by Phalbois. 40 inches, with five movements and two tunes, formerly in the Christian Bailly collection, $48,000.

A 12-inch Schmitt et Fils, the company’s earliest model with a flat-cut neck socket known as “cup and saucer” style, $14,500.

Hotly contested, this petite Bru Jne bebe, size 2, 12 inches tall, wearing an extraordinary Scottish costume, sold for $52,000.

Another small 12-inch doll, this all original E. J. with signed shoes brought $38,000.

An all bisque mignonette measuring 7 inches, marked 5 and made by Gaultier, wearing the original costume sold for $5,600.

Kammer and Reinhardt’s 107 character, c. 1910, the model known as “Karl,” 12 inches, $13,000. Considered one of the rarest Lenci dolls, the 1928 felt portrait doll of Valentino as the Sheik, 30 inches, brought $26,000.

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Auction Gallery continued on page 62


Tel: 425.765.4010 Beautifulbebes@outlook.com A captivating, childlike rendition of a sought after doll. Beautiful execution of painting gives her a tender appearance, accentuated by her plump cheeks and innocent expression. She has the classic heavy lidded dreamy painted eyes and is garbed in a silk crème and lavender checkered dress in enfantine style with black velvet trim and antique straw sun hat with black feather and velvet accents. She also carries a black velvet jacket and black parasol. Mlle. has a desirable stamped Huret wooden articulated body. Please email or call for details~ Meet a magical mademoiselle...clearly a beauty with large sapphire blue eyes, sweetly painted features, exquisite orig wig in long curled set over cork pate & Parisienne couterier summer ensemble with lovely flounced ruffles and tiny rosebud accents. Her most desirable feature; her beautiful highly articulated wood body with perfect bisque arms and carved feet. The kid over wood covering is in excellent, clean condition. She assumes many poses... beauty and talent! $8,995~

Exceptionally gorgeous smiling portrait doll attributed to Dehors with life-like movement in the neck enabling the doll to pose quite realistically. This is a very hard to find model and she has an extra (not shown) original summer weight ensemble. She is in overall excellent condition with replaced bisque arms and sturdy kid body. Please email or call for details~

Truly adorable, tiny size 1 Bru Jne from the Henri Chevrot period with bisque articulated arms and wooden legs. A sensational little jewel in excellent condition. $17,500~ (Special convention pricing this month only!)

For excellent service contact Beautiful Bebes when Selling or Consigning!

We are excited to see you! July 17th-20th • JW Marriot Resort Ballroom Shared Passions UFDC Convention Salesroom

Early Premier Portrait Jumeau with deep chocolate paper weight eyes; incised 8 and signed body. Superior mohair wig, antique ivory dress with petal pink sash and complimentary bonnet. $7995~ Fabulous Incised Depose marked 10 with gorgeous face, deep blue paper weight eyes, original mohair wig, sage taffeta silk dress and French wired bonnet. Truly beautiful. $8995~

Member UFDC & NADDA

Very beautiful Jumeau fashion doll. Stands 17” tall, dressed in very rich looking black velvet ensemble with beaded feathered hat (not shown), orig ornate wig, pierced ears, swivel neck. This is a doll with exceptional presence! $5500~

Petite 15” Bru Poupée with sweet serene expression. Original wig and charming couturier forest green silk ensemble with jaunty lace and flower bonnet. Excellent! $4800~


Mary Ann Spinelli Nelling, Inc.

FINE ANTIQUE DOLLS AND ACCESSORIES

P.O. Box 4327, Burbank CA 91503 • e-mail: nellingdolls@gmail.com Cell: 818-738-4591 Home: 818-562-7839 • Member NADDA and UFDC

BUYING & SELLING QUALITY DOLLS FOR OVER 21 YEARS

Visit us at: www.maspinelli.com

“Hooray for the freedom to collect DOLLS!”

1. 13 1/2” English poured wax portrait of a young King George V. $1275. 2. Endearing 21” Philadelphia Baby with repaint so old, it has it’s own patina! Who knows what is or is not underneath? $2250. 3. 18” Kestner 180 character, so rare with open/closed mouth. $2850. 4. 20 1/2” Biscaloid version of SFBJ 237 character in orig. clothes. $995. 5. 21” Bru Jne. R, who walks, kisses, and says Mama! $5200. 6. 16 1/2” Simon Halbig 1039, chocolate bisque, unusual carton torso. $795. .7. Unique and seldom found New York Rubber Doll in orig. box in surprisingly preserved condition. $1450. 8. 13 1/2” Simon Halbig 1358, mocha bisque, rare size. $6200.


SEE YOU IN SAN ANTONIO!

Stop by our booth and pick up a free gift. (while supplies last)

SANDY’S DREAM DOLLS Sandy Kralovetz

Always Buying Dolls of Quality For a Houston adventure please visit our spacious location at

Thompson’s Antique Center of Texas Texas’ largest antique center with over 50 antique dolls and accessories for sale.

9950 Hempstead Road 600 Northwest Mall Houston, TX 77092 602.228.1829 281.339.0269 skayk43@aol.com mailing address: 9825 Moers Rd Houston, Texas 77075 Call for doll information Member UFDC & NADDA

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Theriault’s Celebrates Texas History

Emile Jumeau’s Bebe Triste in the rare smallest size 9 is presented in her original costume from the Ernestine Jumeau workshops.

Stunningly beautiful early period Bru Brevete with rare original body and exquisite costume.

The early French bisque poupee has a rare and beautiful body by Clement.

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Opening the auction as #1, and standing guard over all, is a French bisque poupee by Gaultier in superb antique regimental costume. 18

ANTIQUE DOLL COLLECTOR

Six beautiful Bru bebes including this rare Bebe Modele with wooden body, and “circle/dot” model in original costume are featured in the “As in a Looking Glass” auction.

JULY 2014

o captivating was the beauty of the legendary 19th-century British actress Lily Langtry, that the infamous Judge Roy Bean of Texas (“the only law west of the Pecos”) fell madly in love, named his hardscrabble courtroom-saloon “The Jersey Lily” in her honor and even changed the name of his Texas hometown from Eagle Tree to Langtry - even though the two had never met. When Lily toured America with her theatrical company in the 1880s and 1890s, his presence was often noted in the audience, and likely he applauded wildly at her performance in the popular play “As in a Looking Glass”. Aptly titled, “As in a Looking Glass” is Theriault’s July 15 cataloged doll auction in San Antonio, Texas. It is likely that even Judge Roy Bean would appreciate the bevy of beauties to be presented there. Three important private collections are featured including that of Jean Strong of Williamsville,


at Important Doll Auction in San Antonio on July 15

German black-complexioned bisque art character, model 1358, by Simon and Halbig is especially artistic in larger 22� size.

Two lovely brown-eyed bebes from the firm of Leon Casimir Bru.

Classic bebe from the golden age of Bru in stunning antique green velvet costume and with original signed Bru shoes.

American folk art is represented by pensive-faced Izannah Walker doll with ringlet curls.

New York, with highlights ranging from the most sublime of French bebes from the Golden Age to rare German bisque art characters, French automatons, mignonettes, American dolls including Izannah Walker, and early paper mache and porcelain dolls.

Ladies of fashion, as was Lily Langtry herself, wearing their original fine costumes are highlights of the auction, including several models with extensive trousseaux.

ANTIQUE DOLL COLLECTOR

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Precious tiny taufling babies are so delightful; included is a porcelain example and a black paper mache model in original costume.

The apogee of French bebes is the exquisite A.T. by Thuilier; this 18” blue-eyed example is in a fine antique costume.

The German closed mouth doll known as “A.T. Kestner” is especially charming in the petite 10” size.

Known as Princess Angeline for her exact likeness to the elder image of the daughter of Chief Seattle, the model was created by Gebruder Heubach firm of Germany, and is very rare.

A 180 page full color catalog with photographs and historical descriptions of each doll is available for $59 by calling 800-638-0422 or visit www.theriaults.com. Absentee, telephone, and live online bidding are available if you cannot attend. 20

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Poupees with rare bodies and provenance are in attendance at the auction including “Lily” from the doll shop of Lavalle-Peronne, and a stunning 33” beauty with a curvaceous wooden fullyarticulated body.

The early 20th century Renaissance of the French Doll is represented by a fine wax lady by Lafitte Desirat, an artistic Prevost-Huret poupee with wooden body, and a delightful coquettish lady on self-base with original costume designed by Milliere.


s ’ i z t i FArntique Dolls

We are bringing a fabulous collection out for sale for the first time! Email: fritzisantiquedolls@comcast.net Fritzi’s cell# 630-247-1144 Rick’s cell# 630-247-1219

Antique wood carved horse, second series portrait, large all bisque, fabulous size 2 E D.

See you at the Greatest Doll Show of the year!

UFDC

UFDC national convention salesroom in San Antonio, Texas. Location is JW Marriott San Antonio hill country resort. Sales room hours are: Thursday July 17th after opening ceremony till 10:30. Friday July 18th 12PM to 6 PM. NEW! Saturday July 19th “PUBLIC DAY” 12 PM to 7 PM. (YOU CAN FLY IN FOR THIS) Sunday July 20th 9 AM to 1 PM. (LAST CHANCE!)


Dressing Dolls in the Waltershausen Area of Germany By Mary Krombholz

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JULY 2014

he picturesque town of Waltershausen, with a population of 10,287 in 2012, looks much like it did when doll making was the principal occupation of the townspeople (1). The castle (Schloss) Tenneberg dates back to 1176, and it contains an excellent doll museum filled with dolls made in the Waltershausen area. The town never housed a porcelain factory, but 19 doll factories remain in Waltershausen to remind visitors of the town’s doll-making history. Thomas Reinecke, longtime Director of the Waltershausen Doll Museum, researched and located all of the old doll factories which are still standing in Waltershausen. Reinecke is credited for finding the doll factory buildings in the January 25, 1996 issue of the Ciesliks’ Puppenmagazin. All 19 Waltershausen doll factories are pictured in that issue. The Kestner doll and porcelain factory made a series of bisquehead dolls marked with letters of the alphabet. The lower edge of the shoulder plate and the back of the head on this 14-inch Kestner doll (2), circa 1880s, are both marked with the letter D.. The center of the original plaster pate also contains the incised letter D and the number 4. The doll is wearing an original wig, a dress embellished with feather stitching, a lace-trimmed petticoat, lace-trimmed pantalets, shoes and socks. The Alt, Beck & Gottschalck porcelain factory in Nauendorf, Thuringia made the bisque shoulder head (3) for this 15-inch doll circa 1880. The lower edge of the shoulder plate is marked: 698 4. The original cloth body and leather arms were made by the Wagner & Zetsche doll factory in Ilmenau, Thuringia. The doll is wearing an original wig, hat, dress, underwear, shoes and socks. This 15-inch bisque socket-head doll (4), circa 1880s, was made by the Kestner doll and porcelain factory.


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The only mark on the back of the head is the size number 7. The doll has an original plaster pate, as well as an original wig, underwear, dress, socks and shoes. Page 18 of my original 1918 Kestner sample book pictures a group of wigs (Perucken) made at the factory (5). The wigs vary in length and styling. An oral history provided by the daughter of a wig maker described the creation of doll wigs with the following words: “Predominantly women work on doll wigs at home. Their work hours were 12 to 16 hours a day. We made wigs for every type of doll according to the wishes of our customers. We made wigs with long and short hair, braids, buns and curls. Gazekappen (caps made of thin gauze) in various sizes served as a base for the wigs. On these caps we stitched or glued simple hair strands and hair partings made from mohair, synthetic hair and real human hair. To style the hair we put the caps on wooden-head forms which were adjustable in size, so the wig caps did not slip. We often used curling irons in various sizes which were heated in a gas ame. We combed the requested

hairstyle, pressed the hot curling iron in a piece of beeswax and burned the curls and waves into the straight hair. In the end we cut the hair and bangs to the desired length. For very curly hairstyles we wrapped the hair on metal rods and put these rods into a hot oven. We had to be very careful to make sure the temperature was not so high that it burned the hair. The heat shaped the hair into curls. The size of the curls depended on the diameter of the metal rods, and we used thin rods for small curls and thick rods for large curls.� This account of wig

making is from the Tessmer book described in the Sonneberg articles. Although these oral histories describe home workers in the Sonneberg area, doll making was carried out in an identical manner in the homes of Waltershausen workers. Seventy-two pairs of boxed doll shoes are pictured on page 20 in the original 1918 Kestner sample book (6). Fifty-three pairs have rounded toes and shoelaces. The high-heeled pairs on the bottom row have pointed toes. An oral history given by a home worker provides the following ANTIQUE DOLL COLLECTOR

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information on making doll shoes: “Every doll, whether dressed in a beautiful dress or a simple play dress, should always have the right footwear. It was the job of the doll shoe maker to produce these shoes. We worked at home in our small family business and delivered shoes twice a week to the doll makers in the larger doll factories. My father formed the shoe soles out of cardboard with the help of a special cutter and a large wooden hammer. Women and children usually made the upper shoe parts out of heavy paper, oilcloth or leather. My mother sewed the upper parts with her sewing machine and then she glued them onto the soles. Eyelets and laces were added, and buckles and bows also decorated the shoes. The color and material of the doll shoes varied with the changes in fashion. For a small, simple pair of paper shoes without any extras we received what would be 35 cents a dozen in American money. The average weekly wage of all family members in 1900 was about 30 German Marks. 24

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This bisque socket head, GM 1891, was made by the Simon & Halbig porcelain factory for the Roullet & Decamps French doll factory (7). The eyes move from side to side by means of a mechanism inside the head. The doll walks by means of a key-wound mechanism. The doll is wearing a replaced wig and original leather underpants, lace-trimmed pantalets and petticoat, dress, socks and shoes. The back of the head is marked: S.H./1039//Germany//DEP//10½.

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The circa 1892 bisque socket head on this 12-inch doll (8) was made by the Simon & Halbig porcelain factory for the Roullet & Decamps French doll factory. The 12-inch doll, advertised as “Ondine,” has a keywound, mechanical cork and wooden swimming body with metal hands. The back of head is marked: 1079/2//DEP// SH//Germany. The doll is wearing an original wig, hair decoration, and lacetrimmed bathing attire. This 2½-inch all-bisque, socket-head


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11 doll (9) was made by the Simon & Halbig porcelain factory. The circa 1890s doll is wearing an original wig, hat, lace-trimmed underwear and dress. The circa 1908 Munich Art dolls are credited with initiating the German character doll movement. Marion Kaulitz designed and made the clothing for many of the dolls which were described as “full of individuality and character and yet childish, so truehearted and bright, so charmingly pert and rakish.” This 13-inch Munich Art doll (10) is wearing an original wig, underwear, blouse, laced vest, skirt, apron, socks and shoes. The Simon & Halbig porcelain factory made this bisque socket head, marked: K*R//114//26 (11) for the Kaemmer & Reinhardt doll factory in Waltershausen. Advertised as “Gretchen,” the 10-inch doll is completely original, and has never been undressed. The original box protected the doll from light damage, and she looks exactly as she did when she was first offered for sale circa 1909. This 1911 archival photograph (12) which has been hand colored, is pictured on page 20 in my original Kaemmer & Reinhardt 25th Anniversary Booklet. Twelve women, seated at long wooden tables, are making wigs which resemble the

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original wig worn by the “Gretchen” character doll pictured in the preceding photograph. The Hertel & Schwab porcelain factory, located in Stuetzhaus, Thuringia, made this 15-inch character baby circa 1912 (13). The bisque head is marked: 151//8½. The doll is dressed in original underwear and lace-trimmed baby dress. The Baehr & Proeschild porcelain factory in Ohrdruf made this bisque character head (14), marked: Germany//K&H (inside) Banner//525//1, for the Kley & Hahn Banner//525//1 doll factory. The 11-inch doll, circa 1912, is wearing original underwear and lace-trimmed baby dress. ANTIQUE DOLL COLLECTOR

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The Simon & Halbig porcelain factory made this bisque character head, marked: K*R//Simon & Halbig//121//36, for the Kaemmer & Reinhardt doll factory (15). The 10-inch doll, sold as “My Little Darling,” has a 5-piece composition baby body. The 121 mold number was registered in 1912, and the heads were still listed in the K&R 1928 catalog. This 1911 archival photograph (16), which has been hand colored, is pictured on page 12 of my original Kaemmer & Reinhardt 25th Anniversary booklet. It shows rows of completed K&R dolls in a K&R sample room, including a character baby similar to the 122 mold number example pictured in the preceding photograph. The Simon & Halbig bisque character heads are mounted on K&R composition child, toddler and baby bodies in the photograph. Thuringian sample rooms were kept filled so that buyers could see the factory’s finished products and place doll orders twelve months of each year. Three “Mein Liebling” character babies, with Simon & Halbig bisque socket heads (17), were made for the Kaemmer & Reinhardt doll factory. These identical heads are marked: K&R//Simon & Halbig//126 along with the size numbers in centimeters. The heads are mounted on jointed composition bodies which represent a child (center), a toddler (right) and a baby (left). The 14½-inch doll in the center has flirty eyes which move by means of a lever on the back of the head. The dolls are wearing original wigs, underwear and dresses. This 1911 archival photograph (18),which has been hand colored, is pictured on page 22 of the original Kaemmer & Reinhardt 25th Anniversary booklet. Two women are placing wigs on K&R bisque socket-head dolls on the left side of the photograph, and a box of dressed and wigged K&R character dolls are visible in a box in the far left foreground of the photograph. Boxed dolls are stacked next to the man standing at a tall desk on the right side of the photograph. These two 3½-inch all-bisque Kewpies “Huggers” (19) were made by the Kestner porcelain factory, and well as other Thuringian porcelain factories, circa 1913 on. The bride originally wore a white crepe-paper bridal dress, but all that is left of her original clothing is a small strip of the net veil which partially encircled her head. The groom is 26

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wearing an original crepe-paper top hat, tuxedo jacket and pants. The groom’s bare feet with molded toes are painted black to simulate shoes. This sample-book page of dolls’ house dolls (20) is from my 1918 Kestner sample book. Twenty one shoulder-head dolls with cloth bodies and bisque lower limbs are pictured. Five unmarked Kestner dolls’ house dolls (21), circa 1890s on, are dressed in original clothing. By comparing the modeling and facial painting of these dolls with the dolls pictured on the Kestner sample book page, it is apparent that they were made by the Kestner porcelain factory. The dolls pictured here all have bisque shoulder heads and cloth bodies with bisque lower arms and legs. They vary from 5½ to 7 inches in height. The 7-inch doll in the center, dressed in an original military uniform, is wearing a red-felt jacket, black-felt pants, as well as black oilcloth boots. The jacket and pants are elaborately trimmed with goldcolored, embossed paper. The soldier’s original accessories include a red, goldtrimmed shield and a realistic pewter curved sword with a gold handle. In 1892, an identical doll sold for 82 cents in a New York toy store. These five unmarked Kestner dolls’ house dolls (22), 5 to 6 inches tall, have bisque shoulder heads, cloth bodies and bisque lower arms and legs. A 1913 F.A.O. Schwartz catalog advertised: “Dolls’ house dolls for use in dolls’ houses. We have a large variety of small dressed dolls such as gentlemen and ladies in different costumes. We also have maids, nurses, waiters, butlers, cooks, etc. The dolls measure from five to seven inches, and range in price from 50 cents to $1.50.”

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*Credits: Mary Krombholz Doll and Archival Paper Collection. Doll Photographs by Tony Arrasmith. Computer Colorization of Archival Photographs by Paul Brinkdopke. ANTIQUE DOLL COLLECTOR

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Enjoy the beautiful coastal village of Camden, Maine located on the pristine Penobscot Bay. 49 Bay View Street, Camden, ME 04843 The shop is now open for the season, Wednesday-Saturday 10-4 or call for an appointment 207-322-4851. Shop 207-236-4122 Fax 207-236-4377 email: lucysdollhouse49@roadrunner.com

Pair dollhouse dolls 8” and 9” tall $2200.

Stacking German blocks wood and paper $295.

Bisque head baby 5-1/2” press her and she squeaks and moves her hands. $195.

Frozen Charlie 11” tall $395.

German village with houses, animals and people $75. German kitchen - complete 31” wide x 15” tall $995.

German Bunny candy container 6” wide x 7” tall - $195.

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Bisque head “Uncle Sam” doll 12-1/2” tall $1250.


Alma, Unveiling a Great

F

by Samy Odin

or a long time, dolls made by the ALMA company in Cremona, Italy were mildly appreciated by cloth doll collectors. Since the publication of the The Collectors Encyclopedia of Dolls by the Colemans (Crown, 1986), then in 1990, Cloth Dolls by Polly Judd (Hobby House Press), Le Bambole Lenci by Michela Giorgi and Hernietta Solmavico (Idea Libri) in 2003 and Lenci, the History and the Dolls by Nancy Lazenby in 2007 (Reverie Publishing), the doll community has been aware of the

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A recently discovered Alma catalog from the early years of the company allows us to finally identify these wonderful dolls.


Italian Doll Company

A young girl still retains her original hang tag.

existence of the Alma dolls, but the lack of documentation about them keeps Alma creations marginal compared to those by Lenci. A recent discovery brings the production of this exemplary firm into a new light. A catalogue dating from the early years of this company makes

it now possible to identify several ALMA models. Settled in Cremona, ALMA was founded by Matteo Soldi on July 15, 1926. It specialized in “bambole artistiche” (artistic dolls) made of felt with hand-painted features. Looking at the paper tag shown on one of the ANTIQUE DOLL COLLECTOR

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The charming and well-executed Chinese boy #304. French private collection.

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dolls displayed at Musée de la Poupée-Paris, one can notice that the name of the company was an acrostic: “Alacriter Laboravi Maxima Attinges”, which means, “he who works hard gets maximum results”. It seems evident that this formula was meant to compete with the acrostic Lenci had used on its own

labels “Ludus Est Nobis Constanter Industria” (play is our constant business). Even the square shape of the paper tag, sewn onto the doll garments, was reminiscent of Lenci’s. The catalogue that the Musée de la Poupée-Paris acquired some time ago shows how deeply the Alma production was modeled on Lenci’s


example, yet nevertheless, revealing a different style. According to Giorgi/Solmavico’s research, this was a typical family affair. The founder had his two daughters work with him, as well as his son-in-law, Vincenzo Pera, who ended up running the company after 1929. Matteo Soldi was actually 72 when he founded ALMA; this leads me to think he actually brought the financial assets to make the project of this company come to fruition for his daughters, who had the skills and the energy to make it work. Maria and Anita Soldi were the artistic and crafting heart of ALMA, when the male figures seem to have been essentially involved in the finances and in the sales. Between the two world wars it was still critical, for an Italian woman, to run a business on her own. For

those who made it happen, it seemed easier or more appropriate to register their firm under the name of either their father, brother or husband. It was the case, for example, of Elena König Scavini with Lenci or Clelia Broggi with Clelia. This unveiled catalogue shows the same type of organization that composed Lenci catalogues from the early thirties: babies to ladies, toddlers to teenagers, small dolls 28 cm tall (11”) to large dolls standing 75 cm (almost 30”), boys and girls with Caucasian or exotic features, dressed in urban or traditional garments… 64 different models are presented in this catalogue! Such a diversified offer could only be possible for a successful company with a large number of employees and an efficient managing committee. ANTIQUE DOLL COLLECTOR

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Some dolls seem inspired by specific models by Lenci, such as Alma’s Pepi (#171 in size 50), which is very similar to Lenci’s Jack (#1500A of 1930) with its typical embroidered apron, or Alma’s little boy wearing a knitted cardigan and a felt pair of shorts (#169 in size 50) dressed like Lenci’s classic #300/10, also featured in the 1930 catalogue, only to name a few among the most obvious “look-a-likes”. Most of the dolls shown in this document are, like Lenci dolls, in the style of the late 1920s and early 1930s, with painted features that always include side-glancing eyes

and wearing garments obtained from the combination of felt and organdy. What makes most Alma dolls very recognizable from Lencis is their assembling system. Most of them were elastic strung, like a regular articulated doll, when Lenci dolls have an assembling system closer to one used for plush animals. 34

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Some Alma models featured in this early catalogue are also documented in private collections. Page 100 of Lazenby’s book, for example, shows the groom #143 and this confirms the fact that it was indeed conceived with no hat. In a French private collection the Chinese boy #304 holds his typical pottery jars. The largest dolls presented in the Alma catalogue measure 75 cm in height (30”). One in this size, preserved in the museum’s collection, wears a spectacular buccaneer costume, but it is not featured in the catalogue shown in these pages. Lenci hasn’t made any doll wearing a similar costume, which makes this creation by Alma even more special. The doll wears high heels boots cut from a black oilcloth. The rest of the costume is made of quality felt in a combination of white, red and black. Boudoir dolls by Alma seem to be very appreciated by advanced collectors, who recognize the high quality of their manufacture and the refinement of the details on their outfits. I hope that this catalogue will give an opportunity to cloth doll lovers to better recognize Alma-made dolls preserved in their collections and I look forward to keeping in touch with those of you who wish to share their Alma dolls for an on-going study about this thrilling topic. The author can be reached at samy.odin@noos.fr. Thank you to Françoise Thevenot for her contribution to this article and to Lori Santamaura for her help in the purchase of the “little girl with a bow”, now displayed at Musée de la Poupée-Paris.

A dashing buccaneer by Alma in the museum’s collection shows a high degree of sophistication.

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Gigi’s Dolls & Sherry’s Teddy Bears Inc.

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Allow Us To Help You Discover The Child Within You! 16 ½” Andreas Voit, type, “Pauline” Papier mache about 1840, o/m w/ 4 bamboo teeth, glass eyes, painted hair & original HH wig, leather body w/ blue paper wraps above wooden lower arms & legs, a few kid patches on body, has dress and bonnet $2150.

27” FG on Gesland jointed body with bisque hands and lower legs (right leg has repair, left leg small hairline), originally styled mohair wig, blue PW eyes, pierced ears, antique silk dress $5995.

31” Kley & Hahn 166 w/ molded hair, brown sleep eyes, great body, antique clothing, w/ artist bear $1695.

25” Kestner K ½ 14 ½. Brown sleep eyes, original HH wig, original clothing and straw hat $795.

9” CM size 1 Block Letter FG, blue pw eyes, mohair wig, 5 piece body, great size $1995.

27” 119 – 13 Handwerck, blue pw eyes, beautiful HH wig, pierced ears, repainted body, hairline back of head $395. 24” K * R 126 62 Baby on repainted body, eye chip left eye $395.

9” CM all original “2” three hole Belton on French bj body, blue pw eyes, pierced ears (chips on holes) $1795.

16” Black compo lady w/ wonderful well sculpted hand painted features, gray mohair wig, all original, cloth body $150. 9” 1930-40’s Black Folk Art doll, Mother with baby that she is diapering $195. 8 ½” 1940’s Black Folk Art convict w/ ball & chain, holds shovel $75.

4” German All Bisque Twins with brown / blue sleep eyes, jointed heads, arms & legs, chips on back of torsos neck, marked 365 9 on heads $395. pair

13” Steiff Eskimo w/ button in ear, made 1908 – 1919, missing hood, felt on hands & back of left foot as is $1495. 11 ½” Wonderful Pierrot with great face w/ finely painted details, bisque hands & plaster? feet, all original with mandolin $225.

14” SFBJ 301 3 original HH wig, blue sleep eyes $595. 18” Scarlett O’Hara all original in floral print dress, pantalets, straw hat, shoes & socks, black HH wig in original set $595. 7 ½” Tiny Betty as Carmen Miranda in Brazilian costume, all original w/ satin dress w/ green & red trim, top w/ sequins $250.

18” Konig & Wernicke Baby all original on stamped body w/ cryer, blonde mohair wig, blue sleep eyes, original dress, slip, flannel slip & belly band $450.

5” Mimi designed by Jeanne Orsini, German all bisque w/ blue sleep eyes (rocker missing), original mohair wig, marked J.IO © 1920 44 $1695.

13 1/2” Ideal Snow White w/ Shirley Temple head, mint condition all original, slight crazing on arms, tag on dress “Rayon An Ideal Doll” $325.

All Original all bisque Bye-Lo in christening gown, slip, diaper and booties with chest label $295. Early NASB Baby in original pink organdy dress, no diaper $105.

21” Sayco Doll Co. Snow White & the 7 Dwarfs 1957-58, distributed by Deluxe Reading $175. set

9” Roldan Dentist w/ tooth, tagged Made in Spain $87.50 10” Roldan Doctor w/ baby, tagged $95. 10” Roldan Expectant Mother w/ knitting, carrying son holding drum, tagged $115. 11” Layna Flamingo Dancer, tagged w/ castanets $65.

Candy Container Doll House Furniture – couch as is, fainting couch – as is, big chair & ottoman, 4 chairs & table, small foot stool $195.

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Galluba and Hofmann; Always in Fashion By Sharon Hope Weintraub

A

friend and fellow collector alerted me to the 1983 Nina Ricci fashion advertisement pictured here. What caught her eye was not the courtier dress, but the three seated ladies. These beautiful bisque belles are Edwardian fashion ladies by the German firm of Galluba and Hofmann, dating from the 1910s. Below is an illustration from a Galluba catalogue, showing how this trio originally sat for tea. Note the ormolu decorations on the Empire-style furniture, as well as the elegant Edwardian fashions of real silk and lace, topped by magnificent miniature millinery. Galluba clearly lavished as much care in costuming its bisque belles as it did in creating them! As dainty and delicate as her tiny teacup and saucer, the damsel on the next page has long lost her outfit to time, but retains her lavish mohair wig and still sits in her original wooden chair with its velvet upholstery and ormolu decoration. She is now clad only in her molded undergarments, pale-yellow stockings, and bronze boots. Of superb bisque and modeling, she is 8 inches tall. Although she is unmarked, her chair is stamped underneath with the Galluba mark, an intertwined “G” and “H” inside a crowned shield. Made of thin wood, lacquered to look like rich red mahogany, and trimmed with tiny ormolu ornaments, the chair is every bit as delicate and fragile as its sitter. Clearly Galluba’s opulent aristocrats were intended to adorn an adult’s china cabinet and not a child’s dollhouse. To her right is another bisque beauty from the Galluba tea party. Again, time has claimed her original garments, leaving her dressed only in her molded underwear, pale blue stockings, and bronze pumps with lavish bows. In her right hand she holds a molded folded fan. Of the same superb workmanship as her sister, she is also unmarked. Since time has taken her chair, she borrowed her sister’s for this sitting. Her face is rather unusual, as there are tiny teeth painted between her parted lips. She is 7.25 inches tall. The final figure from the trio, the literary lady, has an original wig and headdress every bit as extraordinary and exquisite as the beauteous belle herself. On her lap is a molded newspaper on a stick holder. She has also lost her original outfit, as well as her chair. Now wearing only her molded underwear, blue stockings, and bronze one-strap pumps, she is 8.25 inches high and incised underneath “408 B.”

1983 Nina Ricci fashion advertisement photographed by Angus McBean.

Photo from Galluba and Hofmann catalogue. ANTIQUE DOLL COLLECTOR

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L-R: 8-inch tall bisque fashion lady by Galluba and Hofmann, original wooden chair. Note her exquisite face and graceful hands. 7.25 inch tall bisque fashion lady by Galluba and Hofmann with lovely features, full original mohair wig, and rather toothy smile.

A variation of the literary lady, the high-fashion femme to her right has a marvelous molded gown that is the epitome of Edwardian elegance. She also has not only her original lush mohair wig, but her ormolu-adorned chair. Again of the finest bisque and modeling, she is 7.25 inches tall, and neither she nor her chair are marked. The Ricci advertisement was taken by the famed British photographer, Angus McBean. Born in South Wales in 1904, as a child McBean was fascinated by film and theatre, spending many hours in the local cinema watching silent films. At 15 years old, he bought his first camera. After working in a bank and as an antiques restorer, in 1932 McBean began his theatre career, creating scenery and building props. In 1936, McBean took the production photographs for Ivor Novello’s play, “The Happy Hypocrite.” Society photographer Hugh Cecil was so impressed by McBean’s pictures, he took him on as an assistant, but, after 18 months, McBean left to open his own studio in London, where, over the next quarter of the century, he took portraits of many of the great stars of the British theater, as well as serving as the official photographer for many major theaters. When deteriorating health forced McBean to close his studio, he continued to work, taking photographs for album covers for EMI Records, including The Beatles, and photographing portraits of the talented and famous, such as Agatha Christie, and Laurence Olivier. McBean died in 1990, on the night of his 86th birthday.

Galluba and Hofmann mark on chair above.

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L-R: Measuring 8.25 inches high, this beauty is incised underneath “408 B.” She has a rather overwhelming chapeau. 8.25 inch tall bisque fashion lady by Galluba and Hofmann. She is the epitome of Edwardian elegance. Below, three Galluba and Hofmann fashion ladies from the McBean estate under glass dome.

These lovely ladies not only appeared in the Ricci advertisement, for McBean twice used them in his custom Christmas cards. Beginning in 1936, McBean almost annually created his own clever cards, typically featuring the photographer in a black and white surrealistic setting, using both his skills as a theatrical design to build the miniature sets and as a photographer to capture the dreamlike scenes. The elegant trio first starred with McBean in his 1956 card, as the bearded McBean, dressed in a dapper striped Edwardian jacket and white trousers, and the ladies took tea on the deck of a luxury ocean liner, a life saver on the railing behind them carrying the name “S.S. Angus.“ His 1982 card used a photomontage similar to that in the Ricci ad, only it was McBean sharing tea with the ladies, as a larger McBean lifted the glass dome. On April 12, 2013, the English auction house, Lacy Scott and Knight, offered a vast collection of McBean photographs and memorabilia, consigned by his long-time assistant and partner, David Ball. Included was the petite tea party who had starred in the Ricci ad and McBean’s holiday cards. The ANTIQUE DOLL COLLECTOR

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generous collector who purchased this set has shared a photo of the famous three under their glass dome. The mischievous McBean added the miniature beer bottles and tiny cigarettes. (The ladies appear without their glass cover here.) The furniture, while it fits them, appears slightly out-of-scale and does not match the furniture in the Galluba catalogue. I wonder if McBean, who often built miniature settings for his photographs, created the table and chair for this trio? The McBean ladies wear what appears to be their original, if somewhat faded and time-worn, Edwardian outfits. The fact that three bisque belles from the 1910s can star in a 1983 advertisement for a modern French fashion house shows that beauty, elegance, and Galluba and Hofmann are always in fashion! Bibliography Cieslik, Jurgen and Maryanne. German Doll Encyclopedia 1800-1939. Cumberland, Maryland: Hobby House Press, 1985. National Portrait Gallery. “McBean’s Christmas Cards.” http://www.npg.org.uk/learning/ digital/distance-learning/features/angus-mcbeans-christmas-cards.php Lacy Scott and Knight. “The Angus McBean Collection. April 12, 2013.” http://www.lskauctioncentre.co.uk/media/4975085/mcbean_collection.pdf

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Just a peek at the wonder in store for you at

Doll Museum

Summer Hours: June 18 to August 30

Wednesday-Saturday 12:30-4:30pm with the last tour at 4:00pm. If you would like to book a group or need to make an appointment for a time other than our regular hours, please call us at 406-252-0041 at least 6 days in advance and we will be glad to work out the details.

Vist our website

www.legacydollmuseum.com 3206 6th Avenue North, Billings, Montana 59101 406-252-0041

Circa 1840’s attributed to Jacob Petit with extensive trousseau.

September 27th Doll Sale at the museum with hundreds of doll for sale.


Playing with GOOGLIES by Alf Ertsland

G

ooglies should be celebrated this year. For more than one hundred years they have been a part of the great common heritage of dolls we all have enjoyed and shared. Few other dolls have the same ability to evoke a need for playing. Each time you look at them they seem so happy and content, flirty and mischievous and they really bring out the best in you. They are fun to display, alone, or with other dolls. Of course a few of them are grumpy, sulky and angry, but their caricatured expressions are as enjoyable as the smiling ones. Rose O’Neill’s creation of the Kewpies was the impetus for the googlies which followed shortly after production of the Kewpies in doll form. Googlies have been produced in various materials: bisque, paper

“Julia,” Kestner 221 size 5.

mache, celluloid, plastic, rubber and metal. In this article I will focus primarily on the classic googlies with heads of bisque. Doll collecting was a rather new hobby in Norway when we hesitantly started out in 1982. Like most novice collectors, we collected what we found in the market. Finding any kind of dolls was a major event, whether it was about a simple Armand Marseille, a baby doll by Kâmmer and Reinhardt, or a slightly more sophisticated doll from CF Kling. Looking back at the end of 1800 and the beginning of 1900, Norway was a rather poor country. Only a few stores had dolls in their assortment. Most dolls were simple china or bisque head dolls, often attached to homemade cloth bodies.

“Rödluvan,” (Little Red Riding Hood) AM 200, almost 10 inches. ANTIQUE DOLL COLLECTOR

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From Left: “Millie,” (named after Mildred Seeley, of course.) “Agnes,” “Ada,” and “Julia.”

K&R had a sales office in Copenhagen, explaining why so many K&R 126 and a few other molds found their way to Norway in the early 20th century. Many rare and expensive character dolls were brought to light during the 1980’s and 90’s, and some of us probably remember the record-breaking prices from auction houses around the world. These were also the decades when several new books on dolls came onto the market. Serious collectors and researchers shared their experiences and gave us better knowledge about dolls. I remember one particular photo of a SFBJ googly, mold 245 in a book by François Theimer, Ann Marie and Jacques Porot,

“Agnes,” a Kestner 221, size 7 and her little Steiff cat. 44

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“Ada,” and Maja, a Kämmer & Reinhardt, 131, 16 inches tall. She is wearing a Norwegian National costume from Telemark.

released in 1986. This photo of a ginger hair googly with huge eyes really opened our hearts and helped us in discovering these treasures. We suddenly had a new interest, and the hunting for googlies had begun. As the years passed by, we became more used to attending auctions and fairs abroad. This was the only way to find specific dolls. Kestner googlies were rather easy to find, but at that time we found them too expensive for our budget. We had also developed interest in French Bébés and German character dolls, and it was sometimes


Carlotta, a SFBJ 245, is a big girl at size 4.

“Didot”, Hertel Schwaab & Co molds 172, 14 inches.

hard to choose one doll for another. This is a well-known issue for many collectors with a limited budget. In the beginning of 1990’s we were offered several dolls from a collector in Sweden, who had been collecting since the early seventies. We received some lovely photos and among them were some charming Kestner googlies. We had a minor problem however. Based on our financial situation, we were hesitant to buy anything. Yet, based on our emotions we could simply not say no. The only way to solve this was to make a visit and see for ourselves.

Group of Armand Marseille googlies, mold 200 and 210. Largest is 12 inches.

“Ada,” by her chair. Size 10

This is how we were introduced to “Agnes,” “Julia” and “Rödluvan,” (Little Red Riding Hood). The meeting with these irresistible dolls utterly influenced our perception of googlies. The seller was a sweet, elderly lady who had loved her dolls dearly for decades and gave each of them specific names provided the original owners had not named them. We returned home with an empty wallet, but we brought with us a suitcase full of wonderful dolls. Other googlies were gradually added to our collection. Shortly after our meeting with the Kestner googlies, we were offered a large, wonderful K&R 131 from another collector. ANTIQUE DOLL COLLECTOR

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Playing in a circle

This new relationship has brought much joy to us during the years. She was definitely the first googly that invited us to play with her and thus, she obtained a very prominent position in our house. This led naturally to regular photo sessions in the garden. For a couple of middle-aged men, this was pretty fun, and brought many cheerful comments from family and friends. Even though we continued collecting other kind of dolls, googlies always had our attention, and now and then made their entries into our collection. Traveling to France in search of dolls was great fun in the 80’s and 90’s. That is were we found our Hertel, Schwab & Co, mold 172. Almost 15 years later, a long awaited companion, arrived, a mold 173. She is so far our last purchase and came unplanned and unexpected early last summer. I believe she has the biggest smile there is. We still hoped to obtain the googly that captured our attention, and the search for a large SFBJ 245 continued. A few were up for auction, but they slipped out of our hands for one reason or another. It actually took 25 years of searching to find the one we wanted. Our reservations when it came to price range had vanished a long time ago. When Carlotta arrived, she was still as highly appreciated as she would have been during our first years of collecting. Carlotta, a SFBJ 245, is a big girl at size 4. Her eyes are huge, and her inviting smile completely irresistible.

“Herdis,” Porzellanfabrik Mengesgereuth. Marked PM 950, 12 inchés 46

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“Millie,” Kestner 221, size 6 with her Steiff teddy bear. JULY 2014


A group of smaller googlies holding a tea party. From left: Kestner all bisque, 292; Wislisenus, bisque head, marked AW; Limbach, marked SK 10; Kestner all bisque 292, and far right a Kestner, 111 with jointed knees and elbows, 5.25 inches. In front another Kestner all bisque mold 189, 4.25 inches.

“Mirella,” SFBJ 245, size 4 in her Navy Suit, 13.5 inches.

“Thea,” Einco, rarer shoulder head version. Mold 8764, size 3. Head made by Gebrüder Heubach. She stands 12 inches tall.

“Thea” Einco, mold 8764, size 3 and “Nurse Beetle,” a “Hug me Kiddie” with composition mask face, with her syringes. Both dolls produced by Eisenmann & Co.

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Group of Gebruder Heubach googlies

Just one year after, we randomly found Mirella, another 245, also a size 4! They have slightly different looks and body types. First one has the classical SFBJ toddler body with slanted hips, the other also with a quite chubby body, more similar to the usual body used for SFBJ character dolls. They are a wonderful couple well worth the long wait. It is a real challenge to present so many googlies with so many different characteristics. Some of them stand more clearly out than others with exquisite defined characteristics. It has been such great fun photographing these dolls. This was also a way to become even more familiar with all the different expressions. Like I mentioned in the beginning, they are not all laughing and smiling. Some are quite thoughtful,

“Carlotta” standing, and “Lotta,” an SFBJ 245/ 23, 9 inches tall. She has tipped over backwards into a large Marklin carriage.

Gebruder Heubach girl with top knots playing with a jump rope. The two smiling dolls at the right are the seldom seen mold 8995. The largest doll in this group is 11 inches.

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“Nanette” H, S&Co, 173 and “Didot” HS&Co, 172.


and some quite modest or shy. By photographing them in different angles, a new expression appears. And by putting two or more of them together, new situations and new emotions emerge. Our collection is far from complete, and probably never will be. The most important thing has been the joy of collecting. It is a goal in itself. Along the way one will need enthusiasm, patience and intuition. These are qualities that do not always go so well together, but sometimes can give amazing results. The googlies will deďŹ nitely keep on bringing us a little extra sunshine every day. Dolls from the collection of Alf Ertsland and Svein Hellberg. Maja, a K * R 131, clearly enjoys being photographed. ANTIQUE DOLL COLLECTOR

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The Tender Years

Deborah Varner 303-850-7800

queenbeev1@comcast.net • Member UFDC Layaways welcomed and consignments taken. 15” Fire A Steiner. Couture and factory orig. Wears/hat/dress in purple silk. Long blonde mohair. Dk. Bl. Pw. eyes. Feathered brows. Finely strokes lashes. Has her first place ribbon from Nationals in 1978. $ 7,850.

12” French Second Series Portrait. Creamy white bisque. Strong bl. eyes. Blush under brows. Orig. blonde mohair wig. Orig. pate. Jumeau head coil intact. Orig. clothes/ Fabulous presentation hat. St. wrists. $ 8,650

11” Simon/Halbig 739. One of the first in the S&H series. Well over a hundred plus years old. Couture. Factory orig. Lt. Br. toned skin color. Br. eyes. Pierced ears. Om. with teeth. Orig. dress and hat with lace. Orig. red socks & old br. leather shoes. A TREASURE. $ 3,250. 8” FS&Company 1295 toddler. Orig with added hat. OM. with teeth. Dk. Bl. eyes. Excellent body finish. Starfish hands. Blonde braids. Jointed at neck, arms and legs. TOO DARLING FOR WORDS. $ 1,550.

18” French E 8 J Jumeau, Bright blue PW eyes. All orig. with added presentation hat. Orig. cork pate with head coil intact. Chunky French body with SW. French shoes mkd. 8. Fabulous modeling. BEAUTIFUL, BEAUTIFUL $ 8,700. 4 1/2” Mignonette. Dressed in red silk with red silk beret. SO SWEET. $ 1,925.

NOW ACCEPTING

2” Angel half doll. Made in Germany by a company named Orlik. $ 155.

WWW .THETENDERYEARS.NET 50

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Marion Maus Specializing in Dolls and Miniatures

Ellicott City, MD • Email mmausantiques@gmail.com Phone 443-838-8565 • Member NADDA, UFDC


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The Grand Tour European Travel for Doll Collectors

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by Donna C. Kaonis

recently returned from the TLC doll tour to Italy, Switzerland and Germany. Like many of you who have taken escorted tours, the itinerary typically involves historical ruins and churches (as the British say abc, i.e. another bloody church). Not that I have anything against famous landmarks…and in fact we did see several revered sites including the Dresden Frauenkirche, the breathtaking church that was destroyed and then rebuilt after the reunification of Germany. The emphasis of the TLC tour however was on toy, doll and Christmas museums and the week-long Puppenfestival International in Germany. How wonderful to be with like-minded collectors who share your interests! Lynn Murray, ably assisted by her sister Anne Thorton-Trump and business partner Marshall Martin, were our guides for the nineteenday trip. As many of you know TLC has been conducting tours for twenty years and know exactly what venues appeal to the specific tastes of doll collectors. In the coming months I will share photos of the trip. Museums allowed us to take photos providing we did not use a flash, so please forgive the less than professional quality of my photos. The photos shown here were taken in Hagnau am Bodensee at the Das Kleine Museum in Germany, whose owner and proprietor Gerda Rößler has lovingly acquired an outstanding collection of early dolls and doll rooms.

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www.toledodollshow.com

October 12, 2014 10am - 4pm

Only 3 minutes off exit 59 of the 80/90 Ohio Turnpike (between I 75 & 475)

(Children under 12 free) Doll appraisals - Dorothy Hunt (Sweetbriar Auctions)

$2 ea. with proceeds to charity On site doll stringing by Shari McMasters

Please check the web site for up to date Dealer list Sandy Bullock - 734 282 0152 sandy4085@hotmail.com

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A Mid-Nineteenth Century Hood for a Child Doll By Susan Sirkis

Original hood modeled by an antique Huret belonging to Lynn Murray. Photos Lynn Murray

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here were two exhibits at the United Federation of Doll Clubs, Inc., 2013 convention that provided stunning inspiration to doll dressmakers. One was the chef d’oeuvre of Sylvia MacNeil whose beautiful doll Chiffonette was endowed with a gorgeous wardrobe created by Sylvia over a period of thirty years. The other, Les Modes Enfantines curated by Lynn Murray and presented by The Les Ruban Aubergines Club, showed garments contemporary with the exhibit dolls. Both exhibits explored fashions designed specifically for the Rohmer/Huret type midNineteenth Century child-like dolls made in France. Both exhibits were full of wonderful designs crying to be recreated by modern seamstresses for either original or, more likely, modern dolls made in the old style. And yet, no two exhibits could be more different. The Chiffonnette exhibit showcased the extraordinary talents of a modern seamstress while the Enfantine exhibit displayed garments made to be played with by children who were lucky enough to possess original dolls. One exhibit showed beautiful clothing, new and luscious; the other exposed clothing mellowed by time and worn by play. Each has a great deal to teach the modern doll seamstress both in inspiration and technique. An observed commonality between the two exhibits was the ubiquitous pique dress with soutache braid trim. It would appear from the number of these dresses still extant that they were very popular. The antique garments in this style appear to be professionally made. They were made in several colors: cream, white, tan, brown and pale green

have been observed in the past few years. While not always available to investigate, similarities in outward appearance are striking. Sewing techniques are straightforward and somewhat basic. All stitching is hand done. Short sleeves and pleated skirts are characteristic; bretelles are sometimes present and sometimes not. The garments present an almost irresistible challenge to today’s doll dressmaker: change the size to fit a favored doll; make the pattern; sew the trimming in place. The plan is to create a tour de force for dolly. The problem with the plan is that today’s available fabrics and trims are vastly different from those manufactured when the styles were new. Cotton pique, the fabric of choice for the original clothing, is now only available from speciality suppliers, as is soutache. Today soutache is made of rayon, nylon or polyester instead of the original silk or cotton. Its maneuverability is reduced by half, at least. It is also not as narrow as the original. Plus, colors are not as appealing as they once were and because so much test-tube fabrication is used, it does not dye well. As to fabric, local stores usually do not carry cotton piques: it is often necessary to search the internet and order fabric. If the dressmaker wants to try the technique NOW, a throw down challenge must be met. The challenge addressed here is to modify the technique of applying soutache to a hood using only locally available fabrics and trims. At this period of fashion history, women went to great lengths to protect themselves from the sun. Lacking cosmetics with SPF ratings, they resorted to veils, parasols ANTIQUE DOLL COLLECTOR

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and sun bonnets. Many fashion doll wardrobes are found to contain bonnets and hoods. Additionally, hoods were worn in the winter for warmth. Often knitted or crocheted, they were also made of fabric. Several names were used to describe these items including “hood.” Children wore them as well as ladies. The pattern presented here in both 16” and 12” size, is based on a doll hood in the collection of Lynn Murray who generously loaned it for study. The original is made in ribbed cotton pique trimmed with cotton soutache and binding. The soutache appears to have been applied at least in part after the hood was constructed. Seams on the inside are not finished and the garment appears to have been washed several times but the seams have not deteriorated. Most of the fabrics for the reproduction were purchased locally at Joann’s Fabrics and Michaels Crafts. Luckily, there is a fashion for making jewelry out of soutache now so it is possible to find. Be warned; the amount of braid used in this technique is astounding. Buy the braid by the yard rather than the cute little packages in the jewelry aisle.

Original hood made of waffle pique.

Original Hood: outside showing seam joining brim to hood.

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The Hood Pattern

t is absolutely imperative that you be sure the pattern fits your doll before you begin applying any of the braid trimming. To do this, make the hood in muslin, cutting and sewing as directed. If you find the pattern lacking in some area, make it over, altering it as you do. If you make changes, use your muslin to make a sharply defined paper pattern with clearly marked lines and braid diagrams. Use a fine pointed sharpie and white paper to make the pattern. If you needed no changes you may copy the pattern from this magazine. Cut out each pattern piece. Use Scotch or masking tape to affix it to a translucent surface - a windowpane on a sunny day will work. Use a sharply pointed lead pencil to lightly trace the outline of the pattern on the right side of the piece. It is only necessary to mark the dots for the braid design. Release the fabric. The brim and center back can be trimmed before assembly: the hood itself must be cut out before the braid is applied.

Braid Instructions

Soutache braid is a narrow, woven braid. Thread is woven over two parallel lengths of narrow cord in such a way that they are joined into one with an infinitesimal herringbone pattern. The modern generally available

Original hood: inside.

Modern soutache braid; by pulling the threads slightly it becomes possible to shape the braid into patterns. 56

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braid is 3mm wide. Sewing soutache to a surface gives new meaning to “stitch in the ditch” since the classic way of affixing it to a surface fabric is to sew through the channel created by the two cords. Because soutache is often applied in curlicue designs it is necessary to manipulate the braid. Cut a piece of braid at least six times longer than the length of the area to be covered. Apply a good fabric glue to one end to seal the fibers. Dig into the other end of the braid to reveal the base cords. Pull them just a little, as though you were going to gather the cord. Experience will teach you how much of the cords to pull. Work the covering along the cords as though you were gathering them. Care has to be taken to pull the cords all the way to the other (glued) end of the cord just enough so that the braid can be bent into shape on the design. This procedure is of great assistance in laying the braid on the design but there is a trade-off. If the cords are pulled too tightly, the soutache becomes thickened and will be unattractive when applied to the design. Practice, practice, practice! Use pins to apply the braid to the penciled design. Insert pins through the dots of the design picking up as little of the cloth under the dot as possible. Weave the soutache over and around the pins as shown. As you pass each pin, bend the braid into a curved shape to make it fit. Always wrap in the same direction so that the layers of braid overlap in the same direction. Wrap about two inches at a time. Pin the extra braid out of the way as you use small stitches to attach the braid to the design. A combination of running, back and overcast stitches will be the most useful. Take great care to match thread to the braid color. Keep the surface stitches as invisible as possible...stitch in the center channel as much as possible. This is a good television activity since a really good TV program seems to make the work go faster! Again, practice, practice, practice!

Reproduction hoods.

Hood in progress: the best pins to use are 3/4 inch sequin pins. The pins are inserted just under the dots. Braid is then twisted and shaped around the pins.

Reproduction hood: center back.

Wrong side of center back piece: note variety of stitches used to hold braid in place.

Inside reproduction hood.

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Other Options For Trim

Using readily available soutache for the 12” patterns is not advisable. Try it on a small sample. Should you decide not to use soutache, there are other options for applying designs to the surface of the fabric. Cording can be used. Available in craft and fabric stores, cording small enough can be a satisfactory replacement for braid if the cord is soft enough to bend. Cotton yarn can be used. Thread, tightly crocheted into a chain stitch applied as braid may be considered. Embroidery perhaps offers the best alternative. Following the design with either stem stitch or chain stitch is attractive as well as a better scale for the smaller dolls. Use two strands of floss and keep the stitches small so the curves and circles are not lost. If you use embroidery you may want to consider tracing the entire design. Again, patience is required. This decoration whether applied or stitched, is tedious to accomplish, but beautiful when finished.

Hood Assembly Instructions Reproduction hood, front: Doll created by Suzanne McBrayer.

NOTE: Coming this summer: a Wish Booklet Electronic Resource Pattern CD with a wardrobe for mid-century children’s styles based on the Les Rubans Aubergine exhibit and the doll clothing collection of Lynn Murray.

Reproduction hood, back.

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1. Apply braid trim to the brim and center back piece of hood. 2. Sew the center back seam of the hood. Apply braid to curtain as described. 3. Gather slightly along double dotted lines. Draw up to fit around center back piece, matching notches. 4. Sew center back piece to gathered section of hood, around curved section, right sides facing. 5. Make pleats as indicated in curtain. First pin, then baste in place along the top edge of curtain. 6. Turn under the seam allowance at bottom of center back piece. Whip the edge in place to top of curtain, closing the gap. Sew in place securely running a row of stitches along the inside of the seam if necessary to keep the pleats in place. Trim the inside seam neatly. It may be overcast if you wish. Press. 7. Sew the brim to the hood along the straight front edge matching notches. Place the wrong side of the brim against the right side of the hood. Trim the seam neatly. It may be overcast if you wish. Press. 8. Bind the entire edge of the hood with a bias strip matching the color of the braid trim. Press. 9. Sew cotton tape or ribbon where indicated by Xs on pattern. You may want to adjust the position of the tapes to make the hood fit your doll as shown in the illustrations. The tapes tie under the doll’s chin to hold the hood in place.

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Victoria: The Enduring Legacy of Lady Alexander by Denise Buese

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omplete with her own history and retaining her original extensive wardrobe, Victoria is a rarity in the world of antique dolls. Companion to a little girl named Carrie Louise Schiff, who grew up to become Lady Alexander of Faversham, Kent, England, Victoria traveled the world and comes down to us with an astonishing provenance. Not only does Victoria possess beautiful and well-preserved original costumes in the exuberant style of the 1870s, her body is the seldom found blown leather example from the French doll manufacturer Pierre Victor Clément. Included in the book is a pattern taken from Victoria’s own riding habit. Many dolls have been used for philanthropic efforts throughout the years, and Victoria is one such doll. Lady Alexander generously donated Victoria and all her possessions as a fundraising raffle during Red Cross Week in 1943, which contributed greatly to the charitable efforts of the town of Faversham during World War II. Victoria proves the value of research and preservation of the treasures of our past, and you’ll enjoy getting to know this remarkable and unforgettable doll.

See us at the UFDC Publishers Preview

Order your copy of Victoria: The Enduring Legacy of Lady Alexander today! $45 plus $5 shipping Send check or money order to: Denise Buese, P.O. Box 91282, Pasadena, CA 91109 Or order online at DeniseBueseOriginals.com

The Enchanting Trousseau of Chiffonnette

Another Best Seller by Sylvia Mac Neil

The 304 page book has more than 500 exceptional color photos with many dramatic portrait photos and captions in the vernacular of the mid 19th C fashion world, in the unique style Sylvia is noted for. It features 53 exceptional dresses, attendant accessories and spectacular hats, totaling more than 170 trousseau items, carefully researched and created using the finest antique materials and rare embellishments. A beautifully illustrated book full of fancies and splendors designed for inspiration and enjoyment for both the collector and the couturier.

$85 plus $5 Shipping Sylvia Mac Neil, 2325 Main Street, W. Barnstable, MA 02668 jimsyl@aol.com 508-362-3875

Manufacturers of Fine Doll Jewelry, Brass Accessories, Miniature Trunks & Hardware 336 Candlewood Lake Road, Brookfield, CT 06804 Phone 203-775-4717 Email: info@catspawonline.com

Visit our website and shop online: www.catspawonline.com Catalog price is $8.95 post paid

Accessorize Your Dolls!

Cats Paw has been in business since 1982 specializing in quality reproductions made from antique originals, and unique old store stock. Our antique reproductions are made by hand using the lost wax technique, and each item is hand finished to achieve an authentic “antique” look. We offer exquisite doll accessories that only look expensive! • Jewelry • Trunks • Items for the Boudoir • Buttons and Clasps • Purse Frames • Presentation Boxes • Bleuette Accessories & More ANTIQUE DOLL COLLECTOR

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Jean & Ken Nordquist’s Collectible Doll Co. Gourmet Doll Supplies for the Discriminating Doll Collector

Auction Gallery V

ichy’s “Gentleman Smoker,“ a musical automaton from 1900, 35 inches, with professional restoration by Christian Bailly, sold for approximately $32,500 at Auction Team Breker’s May 24 auction.

T

his size 10 E. J. A with pressed bisque, blue paperweight eyes and fixed wrists, measuring 25 inches tall, realized approximately $24,000 at the May 17 auction conducted by the Galerie de Chartres. A lovely doll by Andre Thuillier, size 6 (16-1/2 inches) sold for approximately $28,000 during the same auction.

*Nordquist Doll Molds *Daisyettes *Bleuette Premiere *Mignonettes *Presentation Displays *Paper Toys for Dolls *Thurlow Patterns for Knit & Crochet Outfits *Collectible Doll Fashions

*Finished Crocheted Outfits *Cat’s Paw Doll Jewelry *Feather Trees *Paper Ornaments *Vintage Postcards *Doll Sewing Projects *Leather Doll Shoes *Mohair Doll Wigs *Miniature Accessories Mold & Global Catalogs not shown

Complete 5 Catalog Set - $25 ppd. Includes $15 money back coupon with purchase.

jeannordquistdolls.com Order Desk

1-800-566-6646 Collectible Doll Company P.O. Box 697, Cedar Hill, TX 75106 62

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continued from page 12

A

n exceptional circle dot Bebe Bru model from the first period, with pressed bisque on a swivel neck, 29 inches, brought nearly $16,500 at Francois Theimer’s May 31 auction in Paris.

We would like to thank the following auction houses for their participation: Auction Team Breker. Otto-Hahn-Str. 10, 50997, Koeln, Germany. www.breker.com Galerie de Chartres, 10 rue Claude BERNARD, ZA Le Coudray BP 70129 Email: chartres@galeriedechartres.com 28630 Le coudray CHARTRES Theimer Auctions, 4 rue des Cavaliers 89130 TOUCY France. www.theimer.fr


JUNE GAITHERSBURG DOLL SHOW M

ost collectors know that the December Gaithersburg show is one of the premiere doll events of the year. While the other three annual events are not as large, they remain quality shows with many great antique doll dealers. Perhaps they may even offer the collector a competitive advantage. The June show included two free programs: Building an Eclectic Collection and VEB Bad Kösen Dolls, as well as free doll stringing and a display of Russian Stacking Dolls. Here are some of the wonderful dolls seen at the recent June show. The next event will be held September 13 and 14.

Late 1700’s wooden, all original (including case). Donna Kirsch Smith, Portland, IN

Hilda toddler and 13-inch JDK 247. Fritzi’s Antique Dolls, Yorkvile, IL, email: fritzisantiquedolls@comcast.net

Lencis were priced (left to right) $1795, $1795, $3250 and $2750. Phil May, Ocean Grove, NJ, email: dollmanofog@aol.com

Barrois portrait, $6250. Jackie Allington, Ft. Lauderdale, FL, email: nickandjackie@ gmail.com

Val Star, Wayne, IL, email: vakstarantiques@earthlink.net

Suzie Q and Bobby Q by Alexander. Laura Turner, Frizellburg Antiques, Westminster, MD.

Heubach’s Baby Stuart and a Scottish lad. Margaret Kincaid, Baltimore, MD, email: Margaret.kincaid@gmail.com

Jay and Connie Lowe, Lancaster, PA, email: big.birds@comcast.net ANTIQUE DOLL COLLECTOR

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These artist dolls supplied a lot of chuckles. My Little Dolls, Gaithersburg, MD, email: Jennhaj2@yahoo.com

Jumeaus (left to right) $2800, $2200 and $2200. Virginia Aris, Pennington, NJ, email: Virginiaaris@aol.com

Jumeau Triste, Figure A Steiner and Radiquet & Cordonnier fashion. Rick Saxman, Valley Forge, PA, email: ricksax@earthlink.net

Gigi’s Dolls and Sherry’s Teddy Bears, Chicago, IL, email: gigisdolls@aol.com 64

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Tory Beth Radwick, Chester Spring, PA, email: tradwick@aol.com

Bahr and Proschild Wendy look-a-like, $2685. Strawbear Antiques, Atlanta, GA, email: strawbearantiques@gmail.com

Oma’s Toy Box, Bel Air, MD.

All original twin wax dolls in original box. Nancy McCray, Cedar Rapids, IA, email: nimc@acninc.net

Jonathan Green spoke on Kathe Kruse dolls made during the Soviet German zoning. Jonathan Green, Little Falls, NJ.


Peggye Tombro, Warren, NJ, email: ptombro@gmail.com

Marion Maus Antiques, Ellicott City, MD, email: mmausantiques@ aol.com

Sue Brightwell, New Brighton, PA. Dolls, Etc. Port Orange, FL.

Ecole des Poupees – Sandra Sue Field Trip – September 13-15 Learn about the Sandra Sue Story in Annapolis, Maryland

September Gaithersburg Show – 13 & 14

Free admission & early entry included Saturday Night Banquet Dinner Special Sandra Sue exhibit at the Show Sunday afternoon visit charming, historic Annapolis followed by dinner

Monday Picnic at the Benson Hammond Museum to see the original oversized Sandra Sue Doll House Afternoon lecture by Margaret Kincaid and Dinner at Barbara Stone’s waterfront home in Annapolis

Cost $250 per person Contact Margaret Kincaid 646-709-4340 or Margaret.kincaid@gmail.com or write to: 17 Elmwood Road, Baltimore, MD 21210 ANTIQUE DOLL COLLECTOR

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You, our subscribers, are the backbone of ADC and we need and value your continued support. To this end, we are offering a reward program: two issues added on to your subscription for each new subscriber or gift subscription you bring us. The more friends you sign up, the more additional issues you will receive! Have your friend call us at 888-800-2588 (outside of the US call 631-261-4100) and provide your name. We’ll add an extra issue onto their one or two year subscription and two issues will be added to your subscription. Antique DOLL Collector is the ONLY antique doll collecting magazine left in the world. Help us continue to grow and reward yourself in the process.

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in the Visit us room ales UFDC S tonio! n in San A

Ashley’s Dolls & Antiquities Billye Harris • 723 NC Hwy 61 South, Whitsett, NC 27377 • (336) 266-2608 Website: AshleysDolls.com • E-mail: AshleysDolls@gmail.com Visit us on Rubylane.com/shops/Ashleysdollsandantiquities • Generous Layaways Member UFDC and NADDA


Antique DOLL Collector August 2014 Vol. 17, No. 7


LAYAWAY AVAILABLE Member UFDC & NADDA

(Nat'l Antique Doll Dealers Assn.)

Visit my website: www.grandmasatticdolls.com

14” Block Letter FG Bebe, huge blue threaded p/w eyes, perfect pressed pale bisque, orig. mohair wig & pate, gorgeous Fr. ant. silk & lace dress, all orig. undies, socks & shoes, added fabulous ant. Fr. hat. On orig. kid body w/ bisque shoulder plate & bisque lower arms. Desirable “Bru type” tongue tip & EXTRAORDINARILY beautiful!!! $8800.

13” RARE Tete Jumeau Bebe W/Keywind Sleep Eyes, magnificent bisque, gorgeous big brown glass eyes, luscious lashes, fabulous orig. mohair wig w/ wraparound braid & orig. cork pate, orig. silk dress, plus extra dress due to melting of orig. dress, orig. wool capelet & ant. Fr. velvet hat, orig. undies & “signed” orig. Jumeau shoes. Orig. “signed” Jumeau body. Tremendous presence w/very rare & desirable sleep eyes that open & close w/key in the back of her fully “signed” Jumeau head. AMAZING rare Bebe & GORGEOUS!!! Only.... $6200.

9” Very Early Steiner Bebe, big light blue p/w eyes, perfect pale pressed bisque, outlined lips her orig. skin wig & orig. Steiner pate, wearing a gorgeous Fr. silk ant. dress w/ embroidered flower design silk ribbon, ant. Fr. crocheted socks & orig. Steiner shoes w/ very rare Steiner hat made by Steiner Factory, orig. Steiner body. The most adorable tiny early Steiner and very RARE size. Absolutely GORGEOUS!!! Only....$7800.

13 1/2” Hertel & Schwab #165 Googlie Toddler, mint pale bisque, blue side glancing sleep eyes, ant. curly mohair wig, beautiful pale blue silk & lace dress, ant. undies & slip & orig. leather shoes, added ant. Fr. hat. On orig. “fully” jointed toddler body. Desirable watermelon mouth, darling cabinet size & ADORABLE!!! Only.... $5500.

26” Heinrich Handwerck, perfect bisque, big brown sl.eyes, orig. long mohair wig & pate,her gorgeous factory orig.batiste & lace dress, orig. undies & slip, ant. shoes & hat. On great orig. “signed” Handwerck body. Really STUNNING big girl!!! $1375.

Kestner #260 Toddler W/”Starfish” Hands, blue sl. eyes, immaculate bisque, orig. mohair wig & pate. Darling orig. batiste dress, antique baby diaper, undershirt, anti. knitted socks, hat & jacket, on GREAT orig. Kestner clean & shiny “toddler” body w/desirable “starfish” hands. Cutest tiny size. Too ADORABLE for words!!! $975.

Joyce Kekatos

12” S & H #908 Character, immaculate pale bisque, bulging blue p/w eyes, 3 early square cut teeth, orig. mohair wig in orig. set & orig. pate, wears gorgeous orig. lace dress, orig. leather shoes, socks & undies darling ant. hat, on orig. early strait wrist S & H body, nice early rare mold # from S & H 900 series. Tremendous presence & ABSOLUTELY STUNNING!!! $2250.


e-mail: joycedolls@aol.com

I buy dolls and sell on consignment.

2137 Tomlinson Avenue, Bronx, NY 10461

home: 718-863-0373 cell: 917-859-2446

Antique Corset in it’s “fully marked” original box. Pink silk & lace corset with orig. ties in perfect condition!!! A real find!!! Only....$275.


Mary Ann Spinelli FINE ANTIQUE DOLLS AND ACCESSORIES

P.O. Box 4327, Burbank CA 91503 • e-mail: nellingdolls@gmail.com Cell: 818-738-4591 Home: 818-562-7839 • Member NADDA and UFDC BUYING & SELLING QUALITY DOLLS FOR OVER 21 YEARS 20” Kestner 172 Gibson Girl, bl. sl. eyes, orig. wig, bisque arms, riveted body. $1950.

Exhibiting: August 16 Forever Young Doll Show and Sale, Arcadia CA, Arcadia Masonic Lodge

18” Early Steiner with bisque hip Motschmann body, working “mama” crier in midsection, angelic in early whites (hairline on shoulder, repaired fingers). $7200.

September 13 Angels Attic Doll and Miniature De-acquisition Sale, Santa Monica CA, Angels Attic Museum

published by the Office Staff: Publication and Advertising: Keith Kaonis Editor-in-Chief: Donna C. Kaonis Administration Manager: Lorraine Moricone Phone: 1-888-800-2588 Art/Production: Lisa Ambrose Graphic Designer: Marta Sivakoff Contributors: Ursula Mertz, Lynn Murray, Samy Odin, Andy Ourant Subscription Manager: Jim Lance Marketing: Penguin Communications Publications Director: Eric Protter Antique Doll Collector (ISSN 1096-8474) is published monthly by the Puffin Co., LLC, 15 Hillside Place, Northport, NY 11768 Phone: 1-631-261-4100 Periodicals postage paid at Northport, NY. and at additional mailing offices. Contents ©2014 Antique Doll Collector, all rights reserved.

17” Sonneberg child with 120 mold number, Bru Circle Dot sister for French market, open/closed mouth w/ white space, unique beauty. $2600.

Postmaster: Send address changes to Antique Doll Collector, P.O. Box 239, Northport, NY 11768. Subscriptions: Send to Antique Doll Collector, P. O. Box 239, Northport, NY 11768. Phone: 1-888-800-2588 or 1-631-261-4100 Subscription Rates: One Year (Twelve Issues) $42.95; Two Years (Twenty-four Issues) $75.95. First class delivery in U.S. add $29 per year. Outside the U.S. add $30 per year. Foreign subscriptions must be paid in U.S. funds. Do not send cash. Credit cards accepted.

22 1/2” Wax child in orig., elaborate costume, pink leather fancy boots as feet, brn. gl. sl. eyes, quite special example in incredible condition! $1650.

Advertising and Editorial: Call 717-517-9217 or email antiquedoll@gmail.com Editorial Office (Send all catalogs and editorial to this address): Antique Doll Collector, P.O. Box 39, East Petersburg, PA 17520

9” Lenci Mascotte in clean. pristine orig. colorful condition. $295.

SEE US ON THE WEB AT: http://www.antiquedollcollector.com email: AntiqueDoll@gmail.com

Antique Doll Collector is not responsible for any inaccuracies in advertisers’ content. An unsolicited manuscript must be accompanied by SASE. Antique Doll Collector assumes no responsibility for such material. All rights including translations are reserved by the publisher. Requests for permissions and reprints must be made in writing to Antique Doll Collector. ©2014 by the Puffin Co., LLC.

MOVING?

Visit us at: www.maspinelli.com 4

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Important: We need your old address and your new. The Post Office does not forward magazines. Call 1-888-800-2588 or write to us at: P.O. Box 239, Northport, NY 11768.


The Complete Guide to Antique, Vintage and Collectible Dolls

August 2014 Volume 17, Number 7

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AIDS TO BEAUTY

by Melanie Luther During the late Victorian era, fashion dictates required special undergarments to properly shape a woman’s body.

FRENCH CARIBBEAN DOLLS

by Samy Odin A strong tradition of doll making goes back to the 18th century in the French colonies. Their costumes are representative of their cast in Creole society and suggest they were made by local craftsmen.

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A VISIT WITH ANN MEEHAN

by Donna C. Kaonis We visit this longtime collector who specializes in large, one-of-a-kind dollhouses and their furnishings.

About The Cover

The islands known as the French West Indies had a highly structured caste system. The “câpresse,” a person of black and mulatto parents, were perceived as very good-looking. Five all leather “Popotes” from the Musée de la Poupée, as well as other dolls that exemplify European’s fascination for Caribbean costumes, showcase their fascinating history.

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Auction Gallery Emporium Calendar Classified

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THE TLC GRAND TOUR... LAGO MAGGIORE

by Donna C. Kaonis Exquisite gardens and an outstanding collection of 18th century marionettes add to the charm of Italy’s Isola Bella and Isola Madre in Lago Maggiore.

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JEAN RAY – PRECURSOR OF THE FRENCH ART DOLL MOVEMENT

by Dominique Pennegues A renaissance in French doll and toy making began prior to World War I.

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THE STUFF DREAMS ARE MADE OF Mother-of-Pearl French Fashion Doll Accessories by Laurie Baker This natural substance offers the promise of luxury at an affordable price.

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APRIL TOLEDO DOLL & BEAR SHOW


French Summer Projects!

(212) 787-7279 P.O. Box 1410 NY, NY 10023

Quality Antique Dolls by Mail matrixbymail@gmail.com

1. 10” Sewing Companion Doll with thimble, needles, thread and scissor holder – comes with antique replacement head too! $150

2. 18” Lovely Steiner ‘Gigoteur’ – gorgeous model w/ the 1870’s early round face modeling, sensuous bisque, no damage, original wig and body with partial functions, needs repair and beautiful costuming! So worth your time! Just $1495

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6. Lambert Male Automaton – an elegant courtier stands 24” tall on the original velvet covered mount with L.B. key, in his original frail silk gentleman’s attire, with sporadic partial function. A luxurious opportunity well worth attention at just $1495

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3. 19” Closed Mouth Depose Tete Jumeau – fully signed w/blue PW eyes, lovely quality bisque, small forehead flaw near rim, more than concealed by the french human hair wig, original body awaiting your design. $1795 4. 18” Exquisite Mint Steiner – dramatic chiseled features of flawless quality bisque w/ jewel blue PW’s, closed mouth and mint, fully jointed signed body, w/stiff wrists and luscious mint long antique curls. Worthy of the finest outfit. $2995 5. 16” Mint XI Kestner – the absolute sweetest expression in soft creamy bisque, darling round brown eyes, adorable mohair wig and mint original early body ready to dress! $1795

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9. 20” SFBJ Composition ‘238’ – unusual & fascinating boy with blue PW’s antique wig and beret and good original jtd. SFBJ body! $595 10. 18” SFBJ ‘Tete Jumeau’ Parlant – mint and lovely w/ hazel eyes, French HH wig, pc’d ears and working pull card crier! $495

11. 23” Limoges ‘Talking Doll’ – so much personality, w. vibrant expression, huge PW eyes, lovely bisque plus deluxe fully jointed model and she still really talks! $450 12. 23” Limoge Boy – mint head w/ antique wig, PW eyes, good fully jointed body, to accompany your fancy girl! $395

8. 19” Unusual Tete Jumeau – seldom seen example with closed mouth, made for Fouquet et Douville, closed mouth, blue PW’s, invisible forehead restoration still a pretty one w. orig. body. Just $1295

7. Steiner ‘Gigoteur’ in Original Gown – lovely quality, perfect satin smooth bisque makes this La Fosse era mechanical ‘Kicking Steiner a treasure ! With her original lavish gown, lovely antique bonnet and underlayers plus hip length antique tresses she is well worth some tinkering…but its not necessary to enjoy her! $1495 9

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13. 12” Romantic Art Doll – celebrated artist Linda Cheek succeeded in recreating the famous seaside beauty of the 1794 Thomas Lawrence painting in flawless bisque with jtd. curved arms and original clothes. $195

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(212) 787-7279

P.O. Box 1410, NY, NY 10023 Quality Antique Dolls by Mail Return Privilege • Layaways Member UFDC & NADDA

matrixbymail@gmail.com 14

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14. Cabinet Size ‘Gibson Girl’ – this 10” Kestner ‘172’ mommy is perfect for her seaside stroll beneath her broad brimmed hat and summer white factory dress, body, wig and pate – all mint! $950

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16. All Original Kestner ‘Teen’ – sweet charmer on her mint fully jointed signed high knee body with 4 original layers and shoes too! This 14” JDK 260 character with mohair curls and waves is a kitten! $750

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17. 13” Deep Pink Frozen Charlie – brushmarks and molded tendrils, detailed facial artwork, fully pink and shapely body, delineated fingernails, all mint! $595

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15. Black Stocking Duo! 6-1/2” Round Face All Bisque – closed mouth ‘Simon Halbig’, long over the knee black stockings, all original with mint factory wig, snow pure bisque, sleep eyes, long fingers and perfect original clothes! $1600 ...6”All Original Rarity - unusual cabinet doll with her orig. bisque Simon Halbig arms and paper mache body including well formed legs w/ long black stockings! Plus original crotched ensemble! How really unique! $495

21. 22” Ornate Pierced Ear China – like none other this magnificent attic original example is rich in abundant 1860’s styling with molded head band, fully articulated ears, painted nostrils, unique side by side coils in back and rarely so distinct fully modeled long curls in full dimension! Stunning! $1600

18-20. ‘Coco’ and ‘Titi’ – Goebel ‘Smilers’ – these rare and delightful Poulbot type characters with their original red wigs and impish demeanor were made in Bavaria! Pixie like round eyes, dimpled pudgy cheeks and chins, smiling mouths reveal 4 teeth, all great fun w/quality jointed bodies beneath their matching vintage nautical outfits! Really different! $895 each or $1500 the pair! 23 22

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22. The Doll Doctor – 12” Girl with Broken Doll – French bisque signed ‘Colbert’ features a fully modeled and painted elaborate but downcast child holding the head of her ‘Napoleon’ in one hand and the body in another! $450...13” Gbr. Heubach w/ Spectacles – maybe he can fix it! Hidden flaw rear base. $250 (free with purchase of girl)

23. 8” Mint Fully Jointed Kestner ‘155’ –antique from hip length uncut factory wig and pate to fancy factory leather shoes, molded brows and even the eyelid wax. She’s storybook perfection! $695... 10” Rarely reproduced artist signed Rabery et Delphieu – flawless bisque, PW eyes, shaded lids, jointed body, perfection. $275


25. At only 3” tall and 3” across, this Rare Miniature Sewing Table is perfect for the lady’s sewing room or cabinet parlor. Hinged top lifts to reveal numerous tiny compartments awaiting your tiny treasures... thimble and scissors already present! Rare! $895

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24. Unique French Mansard Doll House - you won’t see one quite like this…an elegant 1910 Bliss fantasy with 9” high ceilings in its twin salons and foyer, accessed from the sides and its detachable roof. An architectural delight in brilliant color with towering windows, tall doors and Palladian portico – all in a manageable 17 x 18 x 8 “ size – for the finest! $1100

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27. 26” Indulgent Bebe ‘Paris’ – the quintessential pampered child of the Golden Age with her kitten like big round PW eyes with shaded lids, rather full lips, dreamy expression, no harm making flaw under French human hair wig and what a luxurious ruffled and swagged drop waist dress w/extravagant matching bonnet! $ 3250

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26. Mint Simon Halbig Lady in Original Box – property of a lady, this 19” exquisite boutique example comes in her original Handwerck special order paisley silk-covered box with silk interior padding and ties. She has a factory set upcombed wig, signed shapely body, factory shoes and fully layered high waisted ladylike dress making her the ultimate in femininity in its most tasteful manner! $ 2500 28

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30. Important Simon Halbig ‘905’ – more rare than the ‘908, this early French trade fashionable model has the Huret patent swivel neck with kid lining, powder fine bisque with dewy gleam, romantic gentle eyes, closed mouth and wearing antique pink silk with lace overlay – the demure young lady! $1800

(212) 787-7279 P.O. Box 1410 NY, NY 10023

28. Early 19th century Tea Set - for the discerning picnic, this signed, English soft paste 17 piece set, including waste bowl, is all contained in its original 6 x 7 x 9” basket with hinged lid! $495

Quality Antique Dolls by Mail matrixbymail@gmail.com

29. 9” Wrestler ‘102’ All Bisque – what a ‘petite-fleur’ in her original wig and linen underset with its lace edgings beneath the French green silk dress w/ lace border and matching hat. Tender blue eyes, shaded lids, square teeth – the works! $4200 31

31. 5-1/2 & 6-1/2” China Pair – she possibly all original in silk taffeta w/ gold paper décor, cupped hands and flat soled shoes. He is a very rare male with modeled hair, brushmarks and mustache w/ goatee, all very fine and rare! $1100 32-33. Very Rare ‘Escritoire’ – how stylish is this novel ‘desk’ with all its drawers and compartments to each side and a hinged top as well to store paper, pens and books Perfect for the ladies writing room! $895

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FOR AUGUST AND S E PT E MB ER 2014 Elan Auction: September 6 Preview 9am. Auction 11am.

August 4th Rendezvous

250 antique dolls, dollhouses, and childhood treasures. Conducted at Theriault’s headquarters in Annapolis, MD - or in your living room! Join in the fun - onsite, online, absentee bidding, or live telephone bidding. Due to space limitations only ten people can attend so call to reserve your space. Visit www.theriaults.com and click on Proxibid to view the dolls in this auction.

Ten2Go Doll Auctions August 11th Rendezvous

Monday, August 4, 2014 and Thursday, September 18, 2014 Previews 9am. Auctions 10am.

At our famous Ten2Go Auctions, everything starts at $10 in an old-fashioned, fastpaced, country-style auction. It’s the best kept secret in the doll industry. At the Sheraton Annapolis. Sorry, no absentee or online bidding. You must be there to bid! Listings of the auction lots for each Ten2Go are available by mail, fax or email for $20.

Rendezvous Monday Night at the Auctions August 18th Rendezvous

If you haven’t experienced the fun of a Rendezvous auction, plan to tune in for an easy evening (1-2 hours only) of great dolls, doll talk, and casual fun.

August 4, August 11, August 18, September 15 Previews 6:30pm. Auctions 7pm.

Conducted at Theriault’s headquarters in Annapolis, MD - or in your living room! Join in the fun - onsite, online, absentee bidding, or live telephone bidding. Due to space limitations only ten people can attend so call to reserve your space. Visit www.theriaults.com and click on Proxibid to view the dolls in these auctions.

Questions? Or for further information call Theriault’s at 410-224-3655 or email info@theriaults.com. PO Box 151 • Annapolis, Mar yland 21404 Toll-free: 800-638-0422 • Int’ l: 410-224-3655

the dollmasters

Fax: 410-224-2515 • www.theriaults.com


Two ways to buy great dolls from us...

BECKY’S Back Room on

Located in Stoudtburg Village Open by appointment We welcome your visit 8 N. Village Circle P.O. Box 705 Adamstown, PA 19501

A.M. 990 Baby $250

Kestner $495

View our dolls online at our exclusive shop:

BECKYSBACKROOM.RUBYLANE.COM Simon & Halbig 950 $795

S.F.B.J. Bleuette-type $950

JDK 247 $750

New dolls listed every week!

Rare Rubber Doll $2000

French-type China $850

Telephone: 717-484-1200 • Mobile: 610-662-5473 • Email: ourant@me.com

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Tel: 425.765.4010 Beautifulbebes@outlook.com

Hypnotic spiral threaded sky blue eyes tug at the heart! Truly the epitome of “Dolls as Art”; this magical 20” Bébé from Petit & Demoutier quells the appetite for the advanced Bebe collector! Beautiful silk costume and matching velvet chapeau. Lovely mohair wig in ash blonde. Superb antique shoes; Bébé in overall excellent condition. $19,500~

Stunning 22” Incised Depose Jumeau 10. Shown in an original Jumeau mohair wig of palest blonde. Marked blue stamp, straight wrists, beautiful sage taffeta Bebe dress and lace and ribbon wire bonnet. Antique leather boots with poms on toes. $8995~

These two 12” Simon Halbig girls have spent a lifetime together! Dressed in coordinated little frocks and bonnets, they make a charming addition to the doll room and promise not to take up much space! Both dolls have antique mohair wigs, 7 pc. articulated wood and composition bodies, sleep eyes with lashes and oodles of charisma! Sold as a pair. $1195~

Toast the happy couple on their glorious day! This tiny pair of only 7 inches elaborately costumed in antique silk, lace and satins. Her veil is flowing and lovely and he is dapper in his tails and top hat. Both dolls German made and marked (she) SC and (he ) K*R presented in darling satin lined springtime egg basket. Adorable! $1495~

For excellent service contact Beautiful Bebes when Selling or Consigning!

Member UFDC & NADDA Come Meet Us on Sunday August 24th at 11 AM - 4PM at the Antique Doll Market & Show at the Red Lion Hotel in Bellevue, WA! A Special Demonstration will be Presented at Beautiful Bébés booth by Diana Shorey Boettger on Hand Crafted Wig Making for Antique Dolls!


Jean & Ken Nordquist’s Collectible Doll Co. Gourmet Doll Supplies for the Discriminating Doll Collector

*Nordquist Doll Molds *Daisyettes *Bleuette Premiere *Mignonettes *Presentation Displays *Paper Toys for Dolls *Thurlow Patterns for Knit & Crochet Outfits *Collectible Doll Fashions

Lynette Gross Selling a diverse array of unique and antique dolls

Telephone (317) 844-6459 Email LynetteDolls@yahoo.com

*Finished Crocheted Outfits *Cat’s Paw Doll Jewelry *Feather Trees *Paper Ornaments *Vintage Postcards *Doll Sewing Projects *Leather Doll Shoes *Mohair Doll Wigs *Miniature Accessories Mold & Global Catalogs not shown

Open 24 hours, 7 days a week. Visit my exclusive Ruby Lane shop Joan & Lynette Antique Dolls www.joan-lynetteantiquedolls.rubylane.com

Complete 5 Catalog Set - $25 ppd. Includes $15 money back coupon with purchase.

jeannordquistdolls.com Order Desk

1-800-566-6646 Collectible Doll Company P.O. Box 697, Cedar Hill, TX 75106 14

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SANDY’S DREAM DOLLS

Sandy Kralovetz Always Buying Dolls of Quality For a Houston adventure please visit our spacious location at

Thompson’s Antique Center of Texas

Texas’ largest antique center with over 50 antique dolls and accessories for sale.

9950 Hempstead Road 600 Northwest Mall Houston, TX 77092 602.228.1829 281.339.0269 skayk43@aol.com mailing address: 9825 Moers Rd Houston, Texas 77075 Call for doll information 15 and 17 Inche K*R 117

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Member UFDC & NADDA


French Caribbean Dolls by Samy Odin

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he term “French West Indies” refers to Guadeloupe, Martinique, Saint-Barthélémy, Saint-Martin and the smaller islands of La Désirade, Marie-Galante and Les Saintes. Due to their geographic and cultural proximity, these islands are often associated with the French Guiana, situated on the coast by South American continent. The tradition of doll-making in these French oversea colonies is strong, even today. It goes back to the 18th century, when the leading colonist society brought new protocols that regulated the relationship between colonizers and local populations. Dollmaking seems to have been influenced by the complex social reality of these islands, where Europeans were interacting with natives or slaves coming from Africa and Asia. It is interesting to remark that interbreeding, in that part of the world, was highly codified. In fact, each individual, depending on the race of his/her parents and grandparents, fit into a precise racial category, where each skin color corresponded to a particular term. For example, a “mulâtre” (mulatto) descended from Caucasian and Negroid parents (50% white and 50% black), but a “métis” (mixed-race) had a slightly paler skin because the parents were Caucasian and mulatto (75% white and 25% black), also a child with Caucasian and mixed-race parents was called a “carteron” and had an even paler skin tone (87.5% white and 12.5% black). Among the varied shades of skin color, the one called “câpre” or “câpresse” was perceived as particularly good-looking. It is the result of black and mulatto parents (25% white, 75% black). Reading through the famous “Mémoires d’une poupée” by Julie Gouraud (alias Louise d’Aulnay), in the first edition dated 1839, one can read the following sentence: “Tous les jouets viennent de France; la poupée seule a son caractère national; ce qui prouve, soit dit


en passant, que tous les peuples reconnaissent une valeur sociale à la poupée. On les appellee “Popotes”: les plus remarquables sont les câpresses de la Martinique” (All toys come from France, with the exception of dolls, that have a national character, that proves that all peoples acknowledge a social value to the doll. They are called “Popotes” and the most remarkable ones are the câpresses from Martinique). Today the term of “câpresse” seems to have disappeared from the West Indian vocabulary, but at the beginning of the 20th century, this category of creole citizens was clearly identified, as seen on an antique postcard, showing a câpresse wearing a traditional costume. Research hasn’t gone deep enough yet to be able to determine if the crafting of these all leather “Popotes” occurred only in the French West Indies or if they were also manufactured in the metropolis. We ignore, for example,

Circa 1830’s – 1870’s, the construction of these leather Popotes suggest local craftsmen. Characteristics include black leather pupils, painted lashes and eyebrows. Embroidered mouths, applied ears and human hair. Their costumes are representative of their cast in creole society.

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French girls in the colonies would have played with Popotes in addition to their Parisian dolls.

Bébé Créole by Jumeau, late 19th century.

Antique postcard dated 1902 representing one of the last “câpresses” wearing a traditional skirt of the same kind seen on some all leather Popotes. The term câpresse referred to the cast of mixed-race people from the French colonies that had one grandparent White and the three others Black.

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the name of the artisans involved in the making of these playthings which are sometimes highly refined. What is thrilling to understand is the fact that these “local” dolls were reflecting the variety of the social classes and their meticulously codified traditional costumes. According to the research of François Theimer (Panorama des Poupées Parisiennes, 2009), the origin of this type of dolls would go back to the very beginning of the 19th century when the most prominent figure of the French high society in the West Indies, Marie Josèphe Rose Tascher de la Pagerie, was sacred Empress by her second husband Napoleon I. On December 2nd, 1804, the world became suddenly interested in the France’s Antilles colonies since these are the exotic islands where the Empress, also called “La Créole”, came from. As was the majority of the French colonists, Empress Josephine was 100% Caucasian and used to interact in her everyday life with the mixed-race population of the West Indies, who worked under the French leadership at the time. It is interesting to note that, because of the political weight of the new Empress’s family milieu, owner of the AUGUST 2014


#60 SFBJ from the late Teens. Photo by Jean Dalmard.

Bisque-headed doll mold #60 by SFBJ, from the late 1940’s to early 1950’s.

greatest plantations in the Antilles, the Emperor restored slavery in these colonies in 1802, in spite of the fact that since 1794 France had already abolished this practice. The condition of slaves in the French West Indies kept being unsolved until 1848, not long before the United States of America also proclaimed the abolition of slavery in 1863. The over-exposure of the creole culture of the Caribbean under the First Empire (1804-1815) could explain the public awareness of dolls from the West Indies, so it is quite plausible that the first dolls of the kind discussed here originated during that period. All of the dolls I had the opportunity to study in recent years, though, seem to all date from a later generation, essentially from the 1830s to the 1870s. This statement is based on the analysis of the fabrics used, the type of leather and stuffing material as well as the shape of the garments that grace these interesting dolls. Five of them are featured in the permanent collections at Musée de la PoupéeParis. Looking closely at their construction, one can notice that the leather used is quite different from the type seen on the “poupées peau” made in Paris during the Second Empire. The construction of the body, also differs and shows a simpler crafting technique. ANTIQUE DOLL COLLECTOR

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The articulations, for example, are quite basic and stiff, with a stationary neck and crudely sewn limbs. The only feature that shows an inspiration from the French “poupées empeaussées” is the separately sewn thumbs, although those on the Caribbean dolls show a not so refined sewing technique. The facial features of these “Popotes” also suggest a local crafting. The eyes have cut orbits, with inserted black leather pupils, painted lashes and eyebrows, embroidered mouth and applied ears, often pierced in order to wear earrings. The hair is always human. It is interesting to remark that both frizzy and straight hair were used to create the most elaborate coiffures, certainly reflective of the fashionable hair-dos of that era. The details of the costumes of these dolls suggest that artisans, who possessed the knowledge of the local culture, made them. We are far from the approximate details seen on souvenir dolls made in Occident during the second half of the 20th century. Each “Popote” of the 19th century represents a particular cast in the creole society. From the simplest barefoot worker, wearing a “chemise trois trous” (a plain white cotton chemise with a hole for the head and two more for the arms) and a scarf, to the bourgeois

An early souvenir doll dating from the late 1930’s was probably a local handicraft.

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SFBJ doll from the late 1950’s.

merchant, adorned with gilded jewels and wearing an elaborate gown as well as proper shoes, the varied traditional Caribbean costumes of the time were precisely represented. The pride of local populations for their own traditions seems evident in the way each of these early dolls was made. Again, the testimony of Julie Gouraud’s literature tells us how these dolls were integrated in the world of the colonizers. Girls from the leading French class, of course, played with dolls that came from Paris but they added to their “poupées empeaussées” Caribbean dolls that reflected, through the children games, the social relationship between the colonists and the natives. This is quite evident when reading another novel by Julie Gouraud titled “Les Deux Enfants de Saint-Domingue”. Not surprisingly, Julie Gouraud, who also belonged to the French planters society, shows a condescending attitude towards the Caribbean natives. In Mémoires d’une poupée, for example, Vermeille writes her own adventures and once settled in Pointeà-Pitre, the main city in Guadeloupe, this doll describes the “Popotes”, the way they are dressed and finishes by this rude sentence: “Rien de plus nul, de plus ignorant qu’une Popote et je ne désespère pas que l’Académie française n’adopte un jour le mot popote en le définissant ainsi: “petite fille paresseuse, ignorante, inutile etc…” (Nothing is more worthless, more ignorant than a “Popote”. I AUGUST 2014


hope the Academie française will once adopt the word “popote” with the following definition: ‘lazy, ignorant and useless little girl”). Ouch! In spite of this very negative point of view, the author describes the garments of the “popotes” with great precision: “leur costume consiste en une chemise en batiste à manches courtes et plissées, fermées par un bouton d’or; un petit corset de batiste brodée s’attache sur le devant de la poitrine; une jupe à queue, de couleur écarlate, est fixée au-dessous du corset; un madras, posé très en arrière, couvre une partie des épaules et de la poitrine. Leur coiffure consiste dans un madras plein de coquetterie; elles portent des boucles d’oreilles en or massif ou en pierreries” (their costume consists in a chemise cut from batiste with short pleated sleeves, tied with a gilded button, a small corset cut from embroidered batiste is tied on the front; a red skirt with a train is worn under the corset; a madras, sported low on the shoulders, covers part of the chest. Their hair-dress consists into stylish madras; they wear earrings made of massif gold or precious stones.) In fact, the Popotes presented in these pages wear original garments that correspond quite closely to this description. Even the shape of the madras follows the tradition of the “pointes” (tips). One single folded fabric tip, on top of the headdress, means a woman is “available”, two tips mean that a woman is already dating and three tips tell a woman is already married. The fascination for the Caribbean costumes was felt strongly among Europeans. In fact, several French doll makers made poupées and bébés that sported such colorful costumes. It is the case of the outstanding Bébé Créole by Jumeau that dates from the last decade of the 19th century. It is interesting to remark that this plaything made in Montreuil is wearing a garment that is only reminiscent of the style of the Caribbean costumes without following the proper tradition. The silk used for the skirt and the headdress is colorful and evocative of the West Indies style but it is not cut from authentic Madras. The shape of the bodice is also an Occidental interpretation of a piece of clothing that never would have been cut in this shape by a local tailor; finally, the shoes are identical to any other Jumeau made leather shoe, bearing the Jumeau marking but, of course, they do not reflect any existing Caribbean footwear. Later bisque headed dolls made by the SFBJ also show this same level of approximation, particularly in the choice of fabrics. These make-believe playthings from the teens and twenties are instrumental to the role that the Caribbean dolls played in the Occidental imaginative cliché of the West Indies. The same nonchalant perspective is evident in other dolls made by European manufacturers that represented foreign cultures, such as the Oriental bébés by Bru or Simon

Capi dolls made of polyethylene wearing costumes from Martinique and Guadeloupe. The title of a popular song is printed on the doll dressed in red.

& Halbig or the black characters made by Heubach, Kestner or the SFBJ, among others. They all incarnate more of the dream of faraway cultures than a proper testimony of the costumes of these foreign countries. Another doll that is interesting to show here is an early souvenir doll, probably dating from the late thirties, presumably made in a French Caribbean island in order to satisfy the first tourist demands of the time. It is all made of cloth but the way it is constructed and the choice of fabrics suggests a local handicraft. This refined doll has embroidered eyes and mouth, black bead pupils sewn with a white thread that simulates the ocular globe, applied nose, sewn-on earrings with no ears and a hairdo cut from a black fabric shaped into three chignons, one on each ear and the third in the back of the head. The garment is simple but done “by the book”, with two layers of hand scalloped underwear, a local calico skirt, a monochrome madras scarf, fixed by a matching gilded button on the shoulders and a three tips yellow scarf on the head. After WWII, the souvenir dolls from the Caribbean islands increased in number, following the touristic appeal of the French Indies. Local doll dressers, such as Sandra Dogué, imported celluloid or polyethylene dolls made by Petitcollin and Nobel and dressed them in the traditional costumes of her country. ANTIQUE DOLL COLLECTOR

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Petitcollin dolls dating from the 1950’s-60’s.

At the end of the 1950s, two popular singers, Henri Salvador (in 1957) and Moune de Rivel (in 1959), sang remakes of an historic song first written by François Claude de Bouillé in 1769. It is called “Adieu foulard, adieu Madras”. Its success was such that a French Caribbean doll, made by Capi in polyethylene, sported a skirt with the title of this song printed on it. Here we can see this doll surrounded by other dolls from the same company sporting the costumes of Martinique and Guadeloupe. Today, some doll dressmakers are still active in the French Caribbean, such as the Poupées Jos Productions. They are, like in the past, dressed in Martinique using imported fashion dolls from the metropolis. They are not conceived as playthings but rather as decorative objects sold as touristic souvenirs. The author can be reached at samy. odin@noos.fr Grateful thoughts to Simone Bélingard and to Claudie Sérée for their help with this research. Some of the Caribbean dolls shown in this article are presently on display at www.museedelapoupeeparis.com Unless noted, all photos by the author.

Ecole des Poupees – Sandra Sue Field Trip – September 13-15 Learn about the Sandra Sue Story in Annapolis, Maryland

September Gaithersburg Show – 13 & 14

Free admission & early entry included Saturday Night Banquet Dinner Special Sandra Sue exhibit at the Show Sunday afternoon visit charming, historic Annapolis followed by dinner

Monday Picnic at the Benson Hammond Museum to see the original oversized Sandra Sue Doll House Afternoon lecture by Margaret Kincaid and Dinner at Barbara Stone’s waterfront home in Annapolis

Cost $250 per person Contact Margaret Kincaid 646-709-4340 or Margaret.kincaid@gmail.com or write to: 17 Elmwood Road, Baltimore, MD 21210 24

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Gigi’s Dolls & Sherry’s Teddy Bears Inc. Allow Us To Help You Discover The Child Within You!

29” Barrois type glazed pink luster china, fixed head, beautiful coloring, cobalt blue glass eyes, leather gusseted body, HH wig, antique undergarments & boots $4750.

18” Beloved Belindy by Georgene beautiful condition, all original outfit, missing apron $750.

16” Schoenhut girl w/ replaced blonde mohair wig, few chips on face paint, body has paint wear – brown eyes $435. 16” Schoenhut girl w/ replaced mohair wig, paint as is $295 or pair $625. 6” Steiff mohair bears 1950 – 60’s, no tags $150 each or $270 pair.

19” Heubach #7763 “Coquette” with fabulous detailing on her molded blue bow, blue intaglio eyes, smile w/ 4 teeth, antique undergarments, shoes & socks $1295.

19” O/M Steiner SieC2 w/ 6 upper and 6 lower teeth, 1880, blue pw eyes, shading above eyes, early stiff wrist body w/ momma/poppa strings, mark on left hip, sweet doll $5995.

18” Shirley Temple in original tagged dress, combination, shoes & socks, slight overall crazing, pretty coloring $445. 10” Patsyette type pair dressed in Hungarian costume, really fine detailing – embroidery & beading $95 pair. 9” Steiff set of 1995 Golli G (no bear) & Molly Golli 1996 w/ Peg – missing 1 arm, limited edition for The Toy Store $345 pair.

11 ½” Glass eyed Parian #1288 on leather body w/ bisque hands $275. 11” K star R #26 in store stock dress, original mohair wig, brown sleep eyes $375. 14” German Parian “5” with beautifully molded blond hair, blue painted eyes, fingers chipped on left hand, ankles glued, antique clothing $295. 12” Schoenhau Hoffmeister 1909 – 10/0 all original painted bisque w/ blue sleep eyes on cloth body $75.

14” CM Tete Jumeau 5, blue pw eyes, antique shoes and mohair wig, pierced ears $3700 Now $3495.

27” CM 16X Kestner w/ round face on great early stiff wrist body with loose top arm & leg balls, blue sleep eyes, original pate & HH wig, antique clothing & fabulous bonnet, small firing flaw $2595.

19 ½” Sonneberg #1570 Cymbalier with pressure mechanism on front of body that makes him move cymbals, squeaks & opens/closes brown glass eyes, wooden arms & legs, wonderfully molded & painted bisque head, costume all original & in great condition, fur wig (as is in back) $1195.

Rare find 18” 1954 Mary Louise #2036D from Me & My Shadow Series with Cissy face, Godey period costume, outfit is all original – missing gloves $895.

17” Howdy Doody Marionette in box by Peter Puppet Playthings, designed by Raye Copeland, Howdy has composition head, gloved hands & boots, doll & outfit is minty fresh, blue googlie eyes, one craze mark by left eye $150. 13” 1928 American Character Puggy in original clothes – red shirt, white pants & leather vest, replaced shoes, no hat, brown painted eyes, crazed, back of head as is $125. 11” WWII “Happy Landing – ParaTrooper” by Elvy Kalep, Aviatxix, all original w/ paper tag & parachute, brass wings, outfit of oil cloth $95.

LAYAW AVAILA AY BLE

17 ½” Rare painted blue eyed Continental Wooden Grodnertal, circa 1800, early heart shaped face and long neck, black slippers, redressed $1895.

21” Painted bisque Heubach Kopplesdorf #251, repainted hands $150. 18” Cuno & Otto Dressel COD 93 on kid body, all original clothing, brown st eyes, HH wig $210. 11” Austrian 1930’s Artist doll all original w/ papier mache head & arms, cloth body, nicely detailed blue eyes & costume $105.

Terri Lee Dolls marked Terri Lee on body: 16” Terri Lee Platinum blonde in tagged Terri Lee outfit $275. 16” Brunette Terri Lee in tagged dress and overdress $275.

4” All bisque swivel head, painted blue eyes #620 / 10, mohair wig $245. 5 ¼” All bisque w/ blue sleep eyes, blonde mohair wig, pink molded socks, antique clothing, chipped on upper right thigh $170. 5” CM French all original Unis, black pupiless eyes, 5 piece compo body $155.

23” Poppy by Lynne & Michael Roche #34/250, 1990, wooden body w/ porcelain hands, brown pw eyes, cute knit outfit w/ cat, HH wig, holds cloth cat $995. 21” Hannah by Lynne & Michael Roche #111 from 1989, blonde HH wig, blue pw eyes $795.

6029 N. Northwest Hwy. Chicago, IL 60631 • 773-594-1540 • (800-442-3655 orders only) • Fax 773- 594-1710 Open: Tues., Wed., Sat. 10 a.m. - 5 p.m., Thurs., Fri. 10 a.m. - 6 p.m. Closed Sun. & Mon. Near O’Hare, Park Ridge & Niles

Chicago’s finest selection of Antique, Modern and Collectible Dolls, Barbie, Gene, Alexander, Tonner, Fashion Royalty, Steiff, Dollhouses and Accessories. Member U.F.D.C. & NADDA • Worldwide Shipping

Contact us for Monthly Specials! Tour our shop at: www.gigisdolls.com & join us on Facebook


A Visit with Ann Meehan by Donna C. Kaonis

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n our thirty-five years of publishing, we have had the good fortune of visiting many outstanding collections. Each is special in its own way, as collectors share with us their special passions and ways of displaying. An extra bonus is that we come away learning something so that gradually our tastes are broadened. We recently were invited to visit Ann Meehan, who along with her husband Michael, live in a stately 1920’s Colonial Revival. It was built by one of the area’s famous candy barons, the maker of Martha Washington Chocolates, once operating with fifteen factories and two hundred stores, but, sadly, like many other institutions, now just a footnote to history. Ann is a dollhouse collector, one who favors early one-of-a-kind houses rather than commercially made examples. Her preference is for big houses… really big houses that take a sizable truck and a few strapping men to deliver. Her home mirrors her love of dollhouses with the same meticulous attention to period details and authenticity.

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he first dollhouse Ann is sharing with our readers is a most impressive feat of carpentry and engineering. Found on Long Island and dated 1903, it was the only object saved from a fire that consumed a house and its entire contents. The outside façade is a work of art with its painstaking detail and embellishments, no doubt the work of a master carpenter. The roof lifts up and the entire front of the house comes off to reveal six rooms. A quick glance is misleading until you begin to study the carpentry – different built-in fireplaces, each with a beveled mirror and intricate carvings, inter-connecting doors, beaded woodwork, carved columns, crown moldings and detailed ceilings. The original wallpaper has a subtle sheen that could easily be mistaken for fabric, original lace draperies add a touch of elegance. Upstairs the children are clamoring for a snack and they call down to the kitchen (yes, there is a tiny speaker). The footman places the food on the dumb waiter and sends it up! Notice the center divider with its brass fitting at

A truly beautiful piece of art, this American-made dollhouse, dated 1903, was saved from a fire. Six well-proportioned rooms are laden with fine carpentry details – built-in fireplaces with beveled mirrors and intricate carvings, inter-connecting doors, beaded woodwork, carved columns, crown moldings and detailed ceilings. 26

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Right: The master bedroom is decorated with a marvelous canopy bed, Boulle furniture and lovely antique needlepoint rugs. Note the carved pilasters on the fireplace. A door leads into the children’s nursery so the parents can keep a watchful eye on the youngsters. Center: In the back left corner we see the dumbwaiter – what an appetite the little boy has! Another great fireplace with a beveled mirror. Below: A cozy parlor setting. Notice the intricate beadwork edging, and the fireplace with its carvings of classical sculpture. A lovely dollhouse lady with a molded hat is ready for a Sunday outing.

the top; it is a pulley that stops at each floor. What looks like a drawer on the side activates the doorbell! Windows can be raised and lowered. In the bathroom my eye was drawn to the ornate toilet with its cast iron basin and porcelain center. It is marked Trenton Pottery Company which is still in existence, leading Ann to believe that it may have been a salesman sample. The floor in the bathroom has been painted to look like tile. Standing next to the bathtub is a water heater that Ann found on one of her many trips to Germany. It looks like the baby is ready for a washing. To complement the many furnishings Ann has added antique needlepoint rugs, ormolu accents, Boulle furniture from the Walterhausen area (named for André-Charles Boulle, a leading French cabinet maker), glass flowers, rare food covers and a wonderful set of blue and white metal dishes by Gerlach in the kitchen. The built-in kitchen sink opens and then closes for use as a work surface. The builder thought of everything! Ann has been collecting for forty-four years and her enthusiasm for dollhouses and miniatures has never waned. “When I was a little girl my best friend, who came from a wealthy family, ANTIQUE DOLL COLLECTOR

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Left: The lady of the house is giving the butler a few last minute instructions for the party to be held that evening. The dumbwaiter will be put to good use! Ormolu accents brighten this welcoming room. The original wallpapers are so finely done they almost appear to be fabric. Center: The Trenton Pottery Company made the toilet which is likely a salesman sample. No need to heat water on the stove, there is a handy water heater that Ann found in Germany. Below: The footman prepares to send some dishes upstairs to the hungry children. The sink is a clever built-in that can be closed and used as a work surface.

owned a dollhouse filled with wooden furniture. I promised myself that someday I would have a really great dollhouse.” Ann was fortunate to live in a great area for collecting, within easy distance to Skinners, Withington’s and Bourne auctions. She found a mentor in Herbert Hosmer from Lancaster, MA who had a museum called the “Toy Cupboard.” A teacher for many years, she spent her summer vacations furthering her knowledge by visiting the area’s museums and historical societies. She laughs about her double life, going to Brimfield in the wee hours with jeans under her dress, then racing down the turnpike to make it to her class on time. In 1978 Yankee Magazine ran an article about Ann and her dollhouse collection, listing her P.O. Box for contact information. “As a result for three months, I would receive fifty letters a day, some, collectors like myself, inquiring about certain miniatures they were looking for and others looking to sell something in their attic. One letter I received was simply addressed to the Dollhouse Lady, Framingham, MA and it was delivered! With all the interest the article produced, it was around this time that I decided to become a dealer.” Since then, Ann has gradually given up shows to focus on her website: www. meehanantiqueminiatures.com, which offers a full complement of dollhouses, furnishings, dolls and accessories. 28

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he next house we photographed is the “Spanish Dollhouse,” whose former owner, Francis Claytor, spent two years before finally receiving permission to remove it from Spain. Ann purchased it from Bertoia Auctions where she has worked as their dollhouse expert for the past twenty-five years. The exterior boasts lovely woodwork surrounding the windows and balconies that simulates cast iron; an ornate railing with balusters and a cupola on the roof add a finishing touch. A house this imposing was the perfect setting for an important gathering, and we see that Ann has assembled a group of twenty-two officers for an important conference. “At first I looked for different faces and beards, and never paid much attention to their uniforms,” she said. “Then I met an antiques weapons dealer who helped me identify individual countries, dates and the wars that they represented.” It should be noted that all this information is carefully documented, in fact every piece, including the tiniest accessory in Ann’s collection, has been recorded, listing when and where it was purchased and for how much along with specific details about each piece. Talk about being a great custodian and steward for antiques! She believes it is so important

Known as the Spanish Dollhouse, the previous owner waited two years for permission to take this house out of Spain. This very large house is the site of an important conference and a large group of officers have assembled.

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Prestigious homes in Catholic countries often had a chapel on the top floor to be closer to God and heaven. This room has all the accoutrements of a real place of worship.

The lady of the house has had a busy day hosting the conference and taking care of the baby who is being trained on the potty chair.

The Dore bronze gilt cabinet, with embellished swags and a marble top, holds several miniature sewing etuis. In the back, a cabinet contains a set of red and white Bristol dishes that complement the 1840s parlor set.

Ann had a heavy hand in decorating this house as few of the original furnishings were intact. She added the Boulle harpsichord from Austria which the lovely lady with the molded plumed hat is about to play for the guests. Notice the beautifully carved ivory shelf.

High-ranking “muckety-mucks” have gathered for an important conference. Ann has researched the uniforms so she knows each country and the war that the soldiers represent. The Rock and Graner piano contains a music box which plays “The Last Rose of Summer.”

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Right: The household staff feels bit stressed for time with all the important officials present. We suspect everything will go off without a hitch. Center: A smaller dining room normally used by the immediate family offers a private getaway for an intimate meeting. The small wooden case in front holds a complete set of sterling silver flatware, each piece carved with an “A.” Below: The sewing room is stocked with sewing implements and etuis. A Boulle cabinet holds bolts of antique fabric. The tiny little china doll on the desk is an emory, used for sharpening needles.

to pass as much information as possible along to the next owner in order to preserve history that might be otherwise lost. The house was not well furnished when she bought it so she had considerable leeway in decorating. Since the house comes from a Catholic country, a chapel for worship was appropriate. She decided to make a room on the top floor the chapel… closer to heaven. The dollhouse priest, a rare find with his chalice and bell, a monk, Mother Superior and a nun discuss the evening service. Furnishings include an altar found in Germany, an organ discovered at a nearby antiques market, and the pièce de résistance, the prayer kneeler, sold by Ladenburger Auctions in Germany. Another room is devoted to sewing cases and etuis, another passion of Ann’s that works harmoniously with the dollhouses. Etuis were ornamental cases, made in a variety of sizes, some appropriate for the tiniest of dollhouse dolls and filled with sewing tools. The variety is endless and they are a charming collectible in their own right. A Boulle cabinet with its doors missing was perfect for holding “bolts” of antique fabric. Ann has another, much larger complete example and, in fact searches out various sizes and variations of the same furniture, using the larger pieces on tabletops as a singular decoration. The ormolu yard winder is quite rare; the tiny little doll on the table is an emory, used for sharpening ANTIQUE DOLL COLLECTOR

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Back in the day when needles were a scarce commodity, little cloth cases such as this made it easy to see if a needle had gone missing.

A close-up of the rare display cabinet in the dining room of the Spanish House. It has all the detail of a meticulously crafted full sized piece of furniture.

Sometimes a dollhouse enthusiast ends up with more furnishings than she has room for! One of Ann’s display cases houses special items like this wonderful piano with carved figures on tiny wires that dance up and down when the keys are pressed.

A few special dollhouse dolls are awaiting homes.

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The Tender Years

Deborah Varner 303-850-7800

queenbeev1@comcast.net • Member UFDC

NOW ACCEPTING

Layaways welcomed and consignments taken.

Ann is sitting in front of her largest dollhouse which stands well over six feet tall. It will be subject of a future article.

needles. Needles were considered precious during the 18th and early 19th centuries and to ensure that one didn’t go missing, little cloth cases with painted scenes held the needles which became lances or bayonets for soldiers, or for the ladies, umbrellas. There are several important furnishings in this grand house including a Rock and Graner piano with a music box that plays “The Last Rose of Summer,” a lovely harpsichord from Austria, a marvelous chandelier made of four different lithophanes, which are thin porcelain intaglio images that can be seen when the piece is lit with a back light. Other trappings of a luxurious lifestyle – the hand painted porcelain paintings purchased from Withington Auctions, signed ivory paintings as well as numerous decorative items made of ivory, a bronze china cabinet filled with Bristol glass, Boulle furniture, ormolu, a complete set of miniature treen ware and a delightful potty chair. Managing to stay intact with the house is a set of hand forged sterling silver flatware, each piece engraved with an A …the list goes on and on. In a future issue we will tour a Sea Captain’s house and the Regency House, each bustling with life and providing an intimate portrait of an earlier age. Photos by Keith Kaonis

11 1/2” Simon and Halbig 1488. Rare character. Fabulous modeling. Tongue between lips. Long br. mohair wig with tons of curls. Pink silk dress. Lace decoration. Pink hat with purple flowers and pheasant feathers. French shoes with buckles. Sweet, sweet expression. Only $ 4,975. I love this doll. You will too!!!

18” Lenci doll most likely from the 1600 series. Called the pouty Cinderella Lenci. All orig. Holds broom. Top knot and pigtails from mohair. Wears earrings. Pink and white checked dress with organdy apron. Have had thirty years in my collection. Needs a new home. Br. painted eyes. $ 2,750.

18” Lenci Lucia face doll. All orig. and mint. Has on her arm a Lenci-like purse. Wears first place ribbon from the National Convention in 1988. $ 3,050.

All orig. Dolly face Schoenhut. Fraying at elbows otherwise mint. Orig. socks and shoes. Orig. Schoenhut stand. Hold the orig. 4” Felix the cat. My first doll, bought at farm sale. Needs a loving new home. Sold as a group. $ 2,650/ set.

All orig. and mint Regional doll. Head and hands made of glazed compo. Molded intricate blonde curls. Orig. old wool outfit. $ 110.

15” White bathing boy with desirable pink tinted face. Lots of detail. Chubby modeling. and superbly painted face. Detailed toes and knees. Blushed cheeks. $ 1,050.

6” Early, very old china. White glazed over. Detailed facial painting. Bl. eyes. Peach painted lips, and blush. Black hair with center part and vertical curls around back of head. Hands fisted and away from body. Detailed hands and toes. Very early china. $ 325.

14 “ Tinted pink bathing boy. Fabulous modeling. Brush stroked hair. Beautiful facial painting with lots of detail. Superb molded ears. Blushed cheeks. Chubby body. Blue eyes. Detailed toes. Curled fists. Owned for 25 years. $ 1,550.

4” China half doll. Low cut gown. Lt. hand on lt. breast. Right hand holds blue fan. Long black hair with painted red hat. Desirable beauty mark. Mkd. Germany with numbers. $ 175.

W W W . T H E T E N D E RY E A R S . N E T ANTIQUE DOLL COLLECTOR

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Ashley’s Dolls & Antiquities

Billye Harris • 723 NC Hwy 61 South, Whitsett, NC 27377 • (336) 266-2608 Website: AshleysDolls.com • E-mail: AshleysDolls@gmail.com Visit us on Rubylane.com/shops/Ashleysdollsandantiquities • Generous Layaways Member UFDC and NADDA


Aids To Beauty

by Melanie Luther

“For shame’s sake, as well as for warmth, we must be clothed, but, vanity at first, and afterwards, taste, have turned the shame and the necessity into occasions of display, and aids to beauty.” Ethel C. Gale, 1872 (1)

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backward gaze into fashion history reveals that during the latter portion of the Victorian period (1865-1890) a lady’s clothing became an outward expression of not only her correct conduct, but also of her social standing. The ritualistic business of “dressing” developed into an art. In fact, it has been said that (while) “the modern woman clothes herself; the Victorian lady dressed.”(2) A crucial element of a lady’s attire was her selection of an undergarment. As fashion dictated features of a woman’s body were both constricted and distended by these “beauty aids”. Namely hoops, bustles and long train supports. And, so it was with the stunning Parisienne French dolls who also wore the elegant fashions of the day. “The underwear worn by French fashion dolls is generally a faithful miniature copy of that worn by fashionable women and girls, made from the same materials and in the same styles.”(3) The creation of these “structures” almost defied the imagination as they concealed the actual figure.

(1) Gale, Ethel C., Hints on Dress or What to Wear, When to Wear it, and How to Buy ItIt, (New York: G.P. Putnam and Sons, 1892) (2) Cunnington, C. Willet, English Women’s Clothing in the Nineteenth Century Century, (New York: Dover Publications, 1990 edition) (3) Tarnowska, Maree, Fashion Dolls, (Cumberland: Hobby House Press, 1986)

VISITING TOILETTE, Harper’s Bazar,, August 19, 1876, p.541. ANTIQUE DOLL COLLECTOR

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Shown are doll-sized skeleton style hoop slips with diameters ranging from 7.5 “-12”. These slips are examples of both a mesh net hoop and cloth covered wire ringed hoops. The number of hoop rings varies. Those shown range from 6” -11”. Cloth strips band the waist. Closures vary including hook and eyes, grommets, pins and string ties. These beauty aids are examples of 3 soft style bustles most likely from the 1870’s. The smallest crescent shaped cushion bustle has a length of 2”. There is a faint purple stamp denoting PARIS, FRANCE. LADY’S CARRIAGE DRESS, Harper’s Bazar, September 14, 1872, p. 612.

In the mid 1860’s, hoops and crinolines created a circular, dome shape as the body resided in the center of the garment. In the latter part of the decade, after 1865, fullness drifted towards the back, forming an elliptical shape, behind the lady’s figure. Parisiennes were always the fashionably elite, as the August 1865 Edition of La Poupee Modele reveals that a very complete trousseau for a doll held both a net crinoline and a gored crinoline.

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This large undergarment is deftly pleated and poufed in the rear. It is semi rigid, more so than the mid-sized bustle, and is trimmed with machine sewn heavy cotton twill. No obvious closure, but the sides are lightly held together with string. Partially lined, it is 6.5” long. The mid-sized miniature tournure is 4” long and firmly gathered with ”poufs”. The poufs are trimmed in a salmon color with polished cotton and are hand sewn.

The new decade of the 1870’s brought conventional dressing farther into the rear silhouette. Any number of padding, bustles, tournures, trains and poufs of fabric could be seen on gowns. A separate crinoline could be made of undulating rows of horsehair and worn over a petticoat. Other substructures composed of fabric and steel bands created a cage like undergarment. Interior laces pulled the shape allowing it to become more or less prominent. Concealment of the figure still ruled the day and the soft curves and flounces formed by puffs and drapery now extended below the knees.

BUSTLES, NIGHTWEAR AND WRAPPER, Harper’s Bazar, September 21, 1872, pp. 624-625. On either side of the mannequin are 2 soft, long trained fishtail semi-hoops circa 1870’s. The undergarment shown on the mannequin is a similar style to the “dimity bustle” popular in 1882. It is shown without a ruffled slip. Many tiered flounces were detachable. This beauty aid was somewhat snugly bound around the lower limbs requiring movement to be in very tiny steps, creating the illusion of “gliding” along. The bustle cage is 8” long. The width tapers from 5” at the bottom, to 2” near the top. ANTIQUE DOLL COLLECTOR

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Both long train undergarments are lightweight and tie at the waist. They lace up with grommets to establish the desired rear shape that is partially formed by cloth covered wire reinforcements. The hems are trimmed with an attached pleated fabric. The brown garment is 10.5” long, and 9” at the widest part. A similar undergarment in pink, is 10.5” long and 6.5” at the widest section.

Similar to the real life female “Myra” bustle, these 3 dollsized examples are fabricated of flexible wire and close with a metal latch whose teeth anchor the thick cotton strap at the waist. The metal bands form a network that supports the extreme exaggeration of fabric in the rear of fashionable garments in the 1880’s. The 2 similar models display extremely rounded curves of 4“ and 5” respectively, while the less curvaceous bustle measures 4.5” long.

Towards the end of the decade, as long dresses evolved towards a slimmer shape, trains and demitrains became fashionable. As a result, necessary train supports appeared as the padding slipped further down the rear. In 1878, a Breton costume was described and pictured in The Delineator, which pointed out “The precious dolly is costumed in the height of fashion. Her skirt is in demi-train length, and is carefully gored to fit her figure so that she shall not look dowdy, as if she were a small queen of the mode.” The stiff bustle made a short revival in the 1880’s. Compared to the earlier soft bustles in the 1870’s, this shape seemed to be somewhat harsh. It faded on its own by the late 1880’s when fickle fashion turned its attention to outlandish shoulder styles. The exaggeration of form into a bouffant ensemble during the Victorian era was not confined to women alone. The artistic influence of original dressing extended to antique bisque French fashion dolls and their trousseaux. Undergarments were no exceptions and innumerable varieties of shapes were sewn as styles continually evolved. The original examples pictured here have aided in forming the beautiful silhouettes that Parisiennes have always held in the world of antique dolls. Fashion Plates reproduced by permission of Blum, Stella, Editor, Victorian Fashions and Costumes from Harper’s Bazar, 1867-1898, (New York: Dover Publications, 1974) References: Beaujot, Ariel, Victorian Fashion Accessories, (New York: Bloomsbury Pubilshing, 2010) Blum, Stella, Editor, Victorian Fashions and Costumes from Harper’s Bazar, 1867-1898, (New York: Dover Publications, 1974) Cunnington, C. Willet, English Women’s Clothing in the Nineteenth Century, (New York: Dover Publications, 1990 edition) Hamilton, Michelle, Sewing Victorian Doll Clothes, (Asheville: Lark Books, 1996)

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The TLC

Grand Tour...

Lago Maggiore by Donna C. Kaonis

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taly’s northern lake region offers breathtaking vistas, medieval castles, world class gardens and sophisticated shopping and dining. It is long been the playground of the rich and famous, most recently home to George Clooney (a personal favorite), Richard Branson and former Italian prime minister Silvio Berlusconi. Arriving at the Milan airport our coach took us to the charming town of Stresa, located on the shores of Lago Maggiore, along the southern banks of the Alps. Our hotel was the majestic art nouveau style Regina Palace, which simply oozed a sense of history and nobility. Our first full day, enjoying perfect spring time weather, we took a short ferry ride to Isola Madre, one of three small islands in Lago Maggiore that since the 16th century has been owned by the Borromeo family. This and neighboring Isola Bella are worldrenowned for their incredible gardens which draw thousands of visitors each year. We visited the palazzo with its amazing collection of 18th century marionettes and puppet theatre. The puppets starred in various musical entertainments that were presented to visiting nobility, the family members, along with guests and servants, providing the voices and movements for the puppets. The theatre was abandoned in 1857 with the War of Independence and for over a hundred years, the family puppets resided in the castle attic, carefully preserved but basically forgotten. Now on display, the exquisitely hand carved wooden figures with their elaborate costumes made of silk, brocade and velvet appear in pristine condition, not having suffered the ravages of time. 40

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Above: Yours truly on Isola Bella. Living like royalty at the Regina Palace.

TLC tour director Lynn Murray and her sister, Anne Thornton-Trump.


The gardens at Isola Madre and Isola Bella take your breath away. ANTIQUE DOLL COLLECTOR

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The hand carved Barromeo marionettes mostly date from the late 1700’s.

Following lunch at Isola dei Pescatori (Fisherman’s Island) we ferried on to Isola Bella, named for Isabella D’Adda, the wife of another influential member of the Borromea family. Construction for the island’s palazzo and the exquisite gardens was begun in 1632. During the late 1700’s and early 1800’s the island played host to European nobility including Napoleon and Josephine. More of the Borromea family puppets reside here and and as I am sure you will agree the gardens offered some fabulous photo opportunities.

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Enjoy the beautiful coastal village of Camden, Maine located on the pristine Penobscot Bay. 49 Bay View Street, Camden, ME 04843 The shop is now open for the season, Wednesday-Saturday 10-4 or call for an appointment 207-322-4851. Shop 207-236-4122 Fax 207-236-4377 email: lucysdollhouse49@roadrunner.com

Lovely Bru Fashion doll in a silk bridal gown 13” tall - $1500. Wonderful German wire baskets 3-1/2” - 5” in diameter - $45 each.

Three 5-1/2” bisque head, glass eyed, composition bodied dolls - all original clothes... $250 each. Simon & Halbig dolls 6” - $295 and 4-1/2” - $195.

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6” tall cast iron Stevens and Brown bureau $195.


Jean Ray

Precursor of the French Art Doll Movement by Dominique Pennegues

“The toy is the first initiation of the child to art,” wrote 19th century French poet Charles Baudelaire.

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his is what French artist Maurice Pillard Verneuil, renowned decorator and designer in the Art Nouveau movement, was convinced of at the beginning of the 20th century, encouraging the French artist community to participate in the doll reform movement already introduced by German artists Kathe Kruse and Marion Kaulitz. Maurice Pillard Verneuil had met Marion Kaulitz at her Zurich Studio after she had presented for the first time her artist dolls at the Munich exhibition in 1908. The French designer felt such enthusiasm for her creations that he wrote a special article on these new artist dolls for the French magazine “Art et Decoration,” which was richly illustrated by

Above: Lily by Jean Ray produced by Emile Lang. She was presented in 1917 by Parisian large stores as “Lily young war god mother” artist’s doll, unbreakable. Costume is luxurious and mostly elegant. One would consider this particular doll as a decoration doll rather than a play doll, even if said “unbreakable.” Her hand painted face is very artistic and well finished. Body is stuffed cloth. Her face expression, as well as her human proportions between head and body, are what Maurice Pillard Verneuil wished to see on dolls in his articles from 1910 and 1912 for Art et Decoration magazine. 36 cm. Courtesy Musée de la Poupée Paris. Left: Jean Ray doll. We have counted around 20 different costumes for Jean Ray’s dolls and there was probably more. Here an elegant dress made of printed cashmere and chocolate silk for the hat and the skirt, with white wool gaiters. 36 cm. Courtesy Musée de la Poupée Paris. 44

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Left: Two Marion Kaulitz dolls. Art et Décoration 1910. Center: Wood dolls and toys. André Hellé’s illustration for Le Sourire, 1910. Right: Arche de Noe by André Hellé. Catalogue Le Printemps 1912. Those modern wood toys were produced by Le Printemps and sold exclusively by the large Parisian store under the name of “Jouets Nouveaux” (new toys, a reference to “Art Nouveau”). Note the innovation in the simplified forms of the 25 animals represented here. The artist’s wood toys by Jean Hellé had been shown at the “Salon d’Automne” (Grand Palais) the same year. Salon d’Automne was an annual art exhibition held in Paris since 1903 as a reaction against the conservative of the “classical art.”

photos of 45 different dolls made by Marion Kaulitz to be exhibited at the Leipzig Fair the same year. In this same article, Maurice Pillard Verneuil complained about the French bisque dolls, “with their too big heads, stupid facial expressions, bleak look and ridiculous clothing.” This introduction to Marion Kaulitz art dolls seems to have had a great impact on the French designer who once more wrote another important article on the renaissance of toys and dolls in the same magazine in 1912. This renaissance of French dolls through the French Art Doll Movement has been up until now erroneously attributed to the impact of WWI on the French doll industries. Two vintage articles are usually referenced on this particular subject: the first, written by Jane Doin, titled “La renaissance de la poupée française” (the renaissance of the French doll) was published in La Gazette des Beaux Arts in 1916. The second, titled “Les jouets des pays de France” (toys from French countries) was written by the well-known author Leo Claretie and published in Les Arts Français in 1918. Right: Jean Ray doll. She is wearing an elegant dark brown silk coat with a brown silk hat. White jersey stockings. Black shoes. 36 cm. Courtesy Musée de la Poupée Paris. ANTIQUE DOLL COLLECTOR

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Left: Illustration by Louis Maurice Boutet de Monvel for French Magazine La Gazette du Bon Ton showing haute couture clothing for a boy and a girl. Private collection. France. Center: Illustration by Louis Maurice Boutet de Monvel for Anatole France’s novel Filles et Garçons. The three children on the left are young boys in dresses. The clothing shows the children are from upper class families. 1910. Private collection. France Right: Jean Ray 1908 illustration for magazine Le Rire. Some of the first stuffed cloth dolls created by Jean Ray had this chubby look. Private collection. France Below: An illustration of two cloth dolls by Jean Ray as well as a stuffed cloth elephant on wheels. Note the similarity of the toddler with Jean Ray’s previous illustration. The little girl on the elephant named “Cornac” is totally similar to Jean Ray’s illustrations of young girls too. Le Rire 1910.

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Both articles tell us that the renaissance of French dolls comes from the call by some “dames du monde” (wealthy ladies) in 1914 for French artists to create dolls to be sold for the benefit of war widows, orphans and injured soldiers. It also tells us that the particular “artist’s cloth dolls movement” was initiated by Polish artist Stefania Lazarska. Misinformed by those two well-known articles, we thought this information to be accurate until some time ago we had found the original articles written in 1910 and 1912 by Maurice Pillard Verneuil. By now we know that the “renaissance of French dolls” has a direct link with Maurice Pillard Verneuil’s call for artistic toys and is not due to war impact which came later and amplified the already existing movement. It is also remarkable that both articles written by Jeanne Doin in 1916 and Leo Claretie in 1918 copy for their own account Maurice Pillard Verneuil’s articles without any “état d’âme” and not even made mention of it. In his second 1912 article titled “Les Jouets” (Toys), Maurice Pillard Verneuil is once again complaining about the ugliness of the industrial modern toys and their misunderstanding of the real needs of children. The French artist insisted that more French artists create new toys allowing children to be free to use their own imagination. His concern was not only about art nouveau wooden toys and a new concept of cloth dolls but also about the decoration of children’s room so that their souls could be inspired by art around them.


In this article, Maurice Pillard Verneuil gives examples of such artists’ toys which were already on the market, created by renowned artists and illustrators such as André Hellé and Jean Ray. Most of them were sold by large Parisian stores including “Le Printemps” and “Les Galeries Lafayette.” From this article, we understand that the renaissance of the French toys had already started a few years before WWI and is not a consequence of the war but of the will by art nouveau artists to introduce art in toy-making like the German artists were already doing with great talent. Jean Hellé was a brilliant illustrator who also became well known for his wooden toys at the beginning of the 20th century. His animals in painted wood were well appreciated by children and their parents, and one can find them today in museums such as Musée de Poissy and Musée des Arts Décoratifs. Jean Ray, also a brilliant illustrator, known for his paintings and illustrations representing children, seems to be the only artist to have totally anticipated the work of Stefania Lazarska, as soon as 1911, and perhaps before. We knew that Stefania Lazarska’s Polish studios started the making of hand-painted wood toys, stuffed cloth animals and stuffed cloth dolls soon after WWI started in 1914. By now, we also know that Jean Ray had first created this artistic and attractive production years before and is the first initiator of the French art doll movement and the maker of what one may call “art appliqué” before Francisque Poulbot

Left: Illustration by Jean Ray for Le Rire 1912. Once again, note the similarity with the cloth doll in the previous illustration. The little girl behind the two babies looks like the second cloth doll shown in this same illustration. Private collection. France. Above: Illustration by Jean Ray for Fantasio titled “La Petite Marraine” (the young god mother). Both children represented here are similar to the cloth dolls made by Jean Ray in 1911, but with a much sadder expression which is very unusual with Jean Ray’s illustrations and painting, even during WWI. Private collection. France. Below: Doll and bedroom for doll by Jean Ray. 1912.

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Animals in painted wood by Jean Ray. Note the difference between those artistic caricatures and those created by André Hellé at the same time. Here one could consider those toys to be more “adult toys” used for decoration rather than children’s toys. At least, this is what Maurice Pillard Verneuil felt when writing about Jean Ray’s animals made of wood in 1912.

Two dolls create by Stefania Lazarska. Note the pointed finger which allows us to recognize a Lazarska doll. 1916.

Vintage illustration of three Jean Ray dolls. Note the haute couture look of the costumes which is very particular to Jean Ray’s creations. 48

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Vintage photo of Nenette and Rintintin. Note the difference in the clothing: those two dolls do not look like ordinary Poulbot’s children living in the streets. “L’Art et l’Enfant.” 1913.

(1913 SFBJ bisque dolls) and Stefania Lazarska (1914 wood toys and stuffed cloth animals and dolls). Jean Ray was born in Pises (Italia) in 1881 and came to France in the beginning of the 20th century. He worked as an illustrator for French magazines such as Le Rire and Fantasio during the same period as Francisque Poulbot, André Hellé and Adolphe Willette. His beautiful illustrations showing young children of leading society families are sometimes compared to those of his predecessor, Louis Maurice Boutet de Monvel, who was a well known illustrator and children’s portraitist of the 19th century. Louis Maurice Boutet de Monvel and Jean Ray had not only their illustrations of children in common, they also were both concerned by fashion and haute couture. One can find some illustrations signed L.M. Boutet de Monvel in the prestigious leading French fashion magazine La Gazette du Bon Ton and Jean Ray’s illustrations in the luxurious French fashion magazine La Guirlande. Examples of Jean Ray’s art nouveau wood toys and stuffed cloth animals and dolls are shown in 1912 Maurice Pillard Verneuil’s article published in “Art et Decoration.” The cloth dolls created by Jean Ray represented here have the same physiognomy as those of his well-known illustrations. Their modernism is stunning, however, we have not yet found any remaining samples of this artistic production and the first dolls we have traces of are those made in


Lily Portrait. Note the large blue eyes with painted eyelashes which are different from the other Jean Ray dolls we know. Golden blond mohair wig.

Note the difference with Lily here, no eyelashes, the blue grey eyes are smaller and the face has a sweet expression with a Mona Lisa smile. Dark blond mohair wig.

1916 and later on, created by Jean Ray and produced by Emile Lang. The Dictionnaire des illustrateurs tells us that Jean Ray also spent time in Italia during WWI teaching wounded Italian solders how to make stuffed cloth dolls (Stefania Lazarska did the same in Paris with Polish soldiers). No examples of these dolls have shown up to date. We are also told that by 1921 he helped children from Russian refugee families in Paris, probably by making toys that we would call now “art therapy.” Jean Ray is also credited for the Art Deco decoration of a few Parisian day nurseries and kindergartens. His wood toys, such as “La Ménagerie de Bob” were sold by Parisian stores Les Galeries Lafayette while Jean Hellé ones, such as “L’arche de Noé” were sold by Le Printemps. Jean Ray’s elegant artist’s dolls were sold for an expensive price by most Parisian large stores and became officially produced by S.F.B.J. after it associated with Emile Lang for the making of stuffed cloth animals and dolls in 1923. Other articles by the author in Antique Doll Collector January 2008. “Stefania Lazarska Dolls.” September 2011: “Jean Ray’s Artist Dolls.”

The painted features are very similar to the previous doll. Both could be later dolls. Blue eyes, smiling little painted mouth. Light blond mohair wig. ANTIQUE DOLL COLLECTOR

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Auction Gallery A

5-inch all bisque Kestner with jointed knees, original wig and four-strap bootines with white stockings brought $3616 at Withington’s June 19 auction. Also in the same sale, a 16-inch doll by Leo Moss, with sculpted paper mache head incised L.M., cloth body and composition arms and legs, sold for $9605.

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ne of the most sought after bears in the world, the Steiff Titanic mourning bear with its Steiff button, produced in limited numbers after the sinking of the Titanic, soared to $35,550 at the James D. Julia June 13 auction. This early Steiner moon face Bebe, 17-1/2 inches, brought $6221. The wax-face Santa whose body opens at the touch of a lever (seen in our June issue) brought $17,775.

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his rare Steiner bebe with Taufling body, bisque hips, bare feet and swivel neck, 21 inches, circa 1870, realized $6210 at Frasher’s June 29 auction.

We would like to thank the following auction houses for their participation: Frasher Doll Auctions, 2323 S. Mecklin Sch. Rd., Oak Grove, MO 64075 (816) 625-3786. James D. Julia, Inc. 203 Skowhegan Rd., Fairfield, ME 04937 (207) 453-7125 www.jamesdjulia.com Withington Auction, 17 Atwood Road, 17 Atwood Road, Hillsborough, NH 03244 (603) 478-3232 www.Withingtonauction.com 50

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HAVE YOU SEEN THESE STOLEN DOLLS? Sold on the Internet Please email owner at starvegut@aol.com

1.

14” SFBJ 226 Paris 4, “jeweled eyes,” sold $462

2.

BRU TETEUR Nursing Doll, all original, Mama squeak, sold $5955

3.

9” BRU JNE 2/0, all original, sold $18,800

4.

20-1/2” FRENCH FASHION POUPEE (her trunk was left behind) sold $2094.99

5.

12” EJ JUMEAU – all original, sold $6400

6.

VERY RARE BISQUE CHARACTER, sold $3250

7.

22” KISSING BRU JNE R – walks and cries, sold $2728

8.

DEPOSE TETE JUMEAU, signed head, sold $2900

9.

Rare 19-1/2” SCHOENHUT MANNEKIN, sold $2845

10. 8” MIGNONETTE IN BOX, top of box left behind, all original, sold $5700 11. JOAN OF ARC JUMEAU FASHION, velvet box base, sold $6364 12. 14” RARE BISQUE RX0 Mark, all original, sold $816.99 13. All original 12-1/2” UNCLE SAM, sold $972 14. 14” FIRST SERIES JUMEAU PORTRAIT WITH WRAP AROUND EYES, Dee Robinson costume, sold $8731.22 15. 16-1/2” K * R 109 ELISE, all original, sold $7300 16. 1878 POUPEE JUMEAU IN BOX, rare, sold $2761 17. 22” BRU JNE 10, all original incl. shoes, sold $18,300 18. 20-1/2” CIRCLE DOT BRU JNE 6, signed forehead, “Vickie” on shoes, she has great provenance, sold $17,100


The Stuff Dreams Mother-of-Pearl French

For the many who could not afford real pearls, mother-of-pearl buttons, made from the iridescent substance forming the inner layer of a mollusk shell, were a fine substitute.

Made of two halves of close-fitting, iridescent clam shells, these sweet purses are just under four inches long.

With the case just under 3 inches tall, this French mother-of-pearl clock is small enough to fit in a poupée’s sac de voyage.

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by Laurie Baker

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other-of-pearl. The very words conjure up images of pastel pinks and blues on a sea of iridescence. It is magical stuff, cool to the touch at first, and then quickly warming in the hand. At times on fire with color, other times subtle as a winter sunset, mother-of-pearl is alive with depth and beauty. It is no wonder, then, that many accessories for antique dolls were fashioned from this natural substance. Lovely as a costly pearl, yet affordable and plentiful, motherof-pearl beckons us with the promise of luxury. A very hard substance, it can be carved, etched, drilled, cut, shaped, and sliced thin for inlay. It can be polished to perfection, yet is durable enough to withstand the years. The product of a variety of shelled sea and fresh-water mollusks, mother-of-pearl is formed, layer by layer, inside the shell. When an irritant or invasive element, such as a grain of sand, enters the shell, it is rendered harmless by the animal inside. Over time, layers of hard nacre envelope the irritant, creating mother-of-pearl, awash with rainbow colors and deep luster. Pinks, blues, lavenders, grays, silvers, cool greens and delicious golds play across the surface. Sea snails create motherof-pearl naturally as their shells grow. Different shells create different background colors, from the abalone shell’s navy blue-gray background, to the startling, pale iridescence of the Nautilus. Mercurial, its colors change when viewed at different angles. Like a snowflake, no one piece of mother-of-pearl is exactly like another. That unique fingerprint adds unique character to objects made from it, a fact not lost on people throughout the centuries. The history of the use of mother-of-pearl is well documented. In 19th century London, street vendors wore mother-of-pearl buttons, bought from area market traders, sewn onto the seams of their clothes, to attract the attention of customers. Not many people of that day could afford a strand of pearls, or even a single real pearl, but mother-of-pearl buttons were common and within the reach of most. Aware of the attention pearl buttons could attract, an orphaned street sweeper, Henry Croft, sewed the lustrous buttons over his entire suit! His intent? Charity collections for the poor. Called The Pearly King, he started a fad, with many following suit (pardon the pun!) with extravagant pearl-button applications, earning them the name Pearlies. He raised over 5000 pounds sterling for London hospitals. When he died, people from all over London attended his funeral. His epitaph read: “ In memory of Henry Croft who died March 16th 1930 aged 68 years. The original Pearly King.” Carved altar pieces from the early 1500’s, gunpowder flasks from the 1700’s, artwork in the Topkapi Palace in Istanbul,


are Made of

Fashion Doll Accessories pistol grips on Wyatt Earp’s six-shooters, inlaid Asian art, Paris opera glasses, the contents of your grandmother’s button box, pearly jewelry without the exorbitant price tag or real pearls – the list is varied and long! Perhaps my favorite is the silverhandled caviar spoon, whose bowl is made from mother-ofpearl, so the taste of the caviar is not adulterated by the silver. Well, ALMOST my favorite…outside the doll room! It is no wonder this lustrous material was chosen to make small doll accessories in France during the Belle Epoque, a time roughly between 1871 and the start of World War I, in l914. An era of peace and prosperity, the arts flourished, and the golden age of the French doll was in full swing! Palais Royale shops in Paris offered a plethora of luxury items using shells, mother-of-pearl and ormolu for stylish, wellheeled women. Likewise, luxury items were being produced for fashion dolls that rivaled the full-size counterparts for ladies of the times. If you venture into your doll room, surely you will find an item or two made from mother-of-pearl. An accessory with even the smallest bit of it gains credence – mother-of-pearl elevates the normal to the sublime! Small envelope purses fashionable for women in the late 1800’s early 1900’s became excellent doll purses, their colorful leather and paper interiors complimenting the doll’s wardrobe and trousseau. Made from two halves of close-fitting, iridescent clam shells, these sweet purses are just under four inches long. Hard enough to withstand drilling, ormolu or brass fittings could be added for style and utility. Detailed engraving on the latches added another dimension of luxury, though the shells have unadorned edges. Lucky is the doll to carry one of these, having a safe place to store her small necessities. Should Mademoiselle La Poupée leave home for an extended stay, she must take her carriage clock. With the case just under 3 inches tall, this French clock is small enough to fit in her sac de voyage. This luxury example is made from slabs of motherof-pearl, on the top, bottom, and four sides. It sits securely in a mauve-pink, embossed leather case, the creamy silk lining protecting it from the bumps and bustle of travel by carriage, the ormolu clasp holding it safely closed. The interplay of color and its diminutive charm are sure to delight, as well as function as a time piece! On arrival, Milady could place it in her boudoir, so she would not be too fashionably late for her many engagements during her stay. Once again, an accessory intended for an adult woman is pressed into service as a fashion-doll accessory! A French perfume vial is made from two halves of the original shell, for a perfect fit, and edged with ormolu trim. A fancy ormolu stopper and chain with a chatelaine ring allows it to accompany the doll as she moves through her day. The glow

This French perfume vial is made from two halves of the original shell.

A sewing etui uses two matched shells.

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At just over an inch tall, these opera glasses are perfect for a poupée at the opera.

At only two inches tall, what fashion doll wold not be delighted to carry this carnet de bal! 54

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of the mother-of-pearl is sure to attract attention, an added benefit to a lady on her travels! A deluxe accessory uses two matched shells as an ornamental case. Don’t be surprised if you hear the sound of the sea when holding this shell to your ear! It seems as fresh and alive as the day it was plucked from the sea. But wait! There is more inside! Those French. Always adding a little something extra! At just under 4 inches long, this sewing etui is in scale with larger fashion dolls. Inside the rainbow-hued shell, which is rimmed in ormolu and held closed with a push-button clasp, are gilded, tiny sewing tools! Lined in silk and velvet, trimmed in small passementerie braid, this shell holds its contents securely, and is both decorative and useful. The scissors cut, the thimble protects the fingertips, and needles in the etui are ready for use. It almost appears as if an elegant poupée might have actually done sewing for herself. With this etui close at hand, she would look lovely, whether or not she could turn a stitch. Souvenir opera glasses, miniature copies of the highly ornate adult versions, were immensely popular in France during the end of the 19th century and after, and were made often of bone, with stanhopes of local attractions inside. This example is elevated by the use of mother-ofpearl panels and brass framework. The candy-container case is added for effect. This diminutive example, just over an inch tall, is the perfect accessory for a fashion doll on her way to an evening at the opera! Her sisters can always carry the following examples on chatelaines, should their hands be full and unable to carry another thing. The smooth mother-of-pearl is held in place by brass fittings, and adds that glow we have come to admire so much. The pink and blue auras in the mother-of-pearl give proof that this carnet de bal belongs to a blushing lady of wealth and taste. It features exquisite carving on its surface, with florals and the word Bal on the front. Ormolu trims add interest and luxury, and a tiny red pencil awaits for writing a dance-partner’s name on a page inside. You could sink right into the depth of this piece. Even the reverse side is alive with color, intricately carved, and scored along the edges. This example is just two inches tall, a perfect accessory for a French fashion doll, dressed for the ball, and hoping to catch admiring glances as she enters the ballroom. Because Mother-of-pearl is hard enough to be carved and pierced, there are many accessories that take advantage of that. This carnet de bal has thin, bone blades for recording dance partners’ names. The front and back are mother-of-pearl, with the whole forming a charming fan. Brass fittings hold it firmly, and ribbons connect each blade. The delicate rose and leaves are perfect motifs for mother-of-pearl, being feminine, elegant, and…noticed! Should a poupée require sealing a personal letter to an admirer, or opening the one she receives in return, these tiny mother-of-pearl accessories are essential. The letter opener features a gleaming, sharp blade for her use. The sealing-wax applicator’s handle has been carved on a lathe to enhance its beauty. No lady’s Bonheur du Jour desk is complete without such a set! Tiny replicas of musical instruments, intricately inlayed with mother-of-pearl, were made for tourists around the turn of the 20th century. Because of their size and delicacy, these little gems were put to use as doll accessories. An example of a small violin, complete with tiny, strung bow, promises sweet music in the doll room! Picture this instrument without the mother-of-pearl…rather ordinary. But add inlaid mother-of-pearl in a floral pattern, and it shines with promise. It may also imply that Mademoiselle can actually PLAY the violin, not a bad skill at a time when any talent was an asset, real or imagined! If we could peek inside doll rooms across the land, we would surely find other splendid French doll accessories using mother-of-pearl –


A carnet de bal (left) records dance partners’ names. The fashion doll kept up her correspondence with this miniature letter opener and sealing wax applicator.

photograph courtesy of Jan Peterson

pierced, inlaid, carved, inscribed, polished – worked into intricate and varied forms. Tiny examples of French artistry and design, these accessories were handled carefully and treasured by their owners. And so, they have survived, intact, the many decades since their manufacture. Perhaps the next time you are at a doll show or in your favorite antique mall, you will be fortunate enough to discover a mother-of-pearl antique doll accessory! When you do, give a wink to those sea creatures whose shells formed mother-ofpearl as they grew. And give a nod to the sea creatures that used mother-of-pearl to cover an abrasive grain of sand. These simple acts gave us the stuff dreams are made of!

Mother-of-pearl adds elegance to this tiny violin, perfect for the musically included poupée.

www.toledodollshow.com

October 12, 2014 10am - 4pm

Only 3 minutes off exit 59 of the 80/90 Ohio Turnpike (between I 75 & 475)

(Children under 12 free) Doll appraisals - Dorothy Hunt (Sweetbriar Auctions)

$2 ea. with proceeds to charity On site doll stringing by Shari McMasters

Please check the web site for up to date Dealer list Sandy Bullock - 734 282 0152 sandy4085@hotmail.com ANTIQUE DOLL COLLECTOR

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April Toledo Doll & Bear Show

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he long winter in the mid-west did not want to end with snow, rain, and more snow hitting us as late as early May. Fortunately, the clouds gave way to some sunshine just in time for another fabulous Toledo doll and bear show. With almost a thousand buyers in the hall, the 240 tables of quality merchandise certainly offered something for everyone. Pictured are just a few of the many quality dolls & dealers at the April Show. Two Beth›s Dolls, Fritzi›s Antique Dolls (IL), Geri Gentile (MI), Ron & Robyn Martin (GA), Sue Brightwell (PA), Cynthia Oregon (LA), Barbara Russell (SC), Bob Severns (IN), Chuck & Barbara Buysse (MI), Angela Simko (IN), Donna Kirsch Smith (IN), Floyd Jones (IL), Linda Cantwell (IN), Gail Lemmon (OH), Ed Pelton/Nancy McGlamery (PA), Joyce Kintner (PA), and many, many more listed on the website (see ad in Antique DOLL Collector). The next show will take place October 12 – see you there!

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ANTIQUE DOLL COLLECTOR

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SELL A DOLL IN THE

EMPORIUM Purchase of an ad includes FREE internet ad on our website.

Send us a photo or a digital photo of your doll with a description and your check or credit card information. We do the rest!! Take advantage of this special forum; the cost is only $95 for a 2.4”w x 2.9”h ad space. Antique DOLL Collector, P.O. Box 239, Northport, NY 11768. Phone 1-888-800-2588. Email: antiquedoll@gmail.com

SARA BERNSTEIN DOLLS Email santiqbebe@aol.com 732-536-4101

View Quality Dolls at affordable prices. 100’s of pictures and prices at my Ruby Lane Shop...

www.sarabernsteindolls.rubylane.com

FRIZELLBURG ANTIQUE STORE A quality group shop specializing in dolls, toys and holidays. Visit our website today!

www.frizellburgantiques.com We also carry a quality line of antiques, textiles, furniture and jewelry. 30 years of experience where you can buy or sell with confidence. Laura Turner, proprietor, 1909 Old Taneytown Rd., Westminster, MD 21158. Open Thurs- Sun 11-5. Call us with your wants, we have an ever-changing inventory 410-848-0664 or 410-875-2850.

Schoenhut’s very rare Lion Tamer Manikin, all original, exc. condition, 18” tall with provenance. Hand carved to hold whip. Call Keith at 717-519-6868

Kathy Libraty’s ANTIQUE DOLLS

BABES FROM THE WOODS

32-inch Queen Anne 21” ALL ORIGINAL RARE BARE FOOT CHINA $5100 28” Museum Covered Wagon w/Articulated wooden legs & Trouseau $2950 Exemplary 18” Parian Gentleman in Tuxedo! c1880 $750 20”Pristine Bonnet-Head Parian in ORIGINAL DRESS $800 18” Lovely Parian Lady in Fabulous Antique Dress, molded upper blouse and tie $550

WWW.KATHYLIBRATYSDOLLS.COM

Phone: 718-859-0901 email: Libradolls@aol.com MEMBER: UFDC OR—Buy My Dolls on eBay where I begin most of my antique dolls for just $1—Search seller name kathylibraty.

8 MONTH LAYAWAY PLAN AVAILABLE

WWW.RUBYLANE.COM/SHOPS/KATHYLIBRATYSANTIQUES

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Faithful reproductions of hand carved Queen Annes and dolls by Izannah Walker. Kathy Patterson Ph. 705-489-1046 toysintheattic@sympatico.ca

www.babesfromthewoods.com


s ’ i z t i FArntique Dolls Email: fritzisantiquedolls@comcast.net

Home 630-553-7757 Fritzi’s cell# 630-247-1144 Rick’s cell# 630-247-1219

24 inch original 141 Hertel Schwab. Very rare size in this rare character. Exceptional not played with condition. Come See Us at These Upcoming Shows:

Sat Aug 16th, Land O’ Sky Doll Club Fall Show & Sale. WNC Agricultural Center. Fletcher, NC. Hours: 9:30 to 4:00 PM. Sat Sept 13th & Sun Sept 14th Eastern National Doll and Toy Show. At the Fairgrounds, Gaithersburg, MD

Buying and selling entire antique doll collections

UFDC


Connect To Theriault’s

Check Out Our Fun-Filled Social Media Sites We invite you to like us on Facebook. We’ve also updated our many social media pages.

5 Theriaults.com f facebook.com/theriaultsdolls

T twitter.com/theriaultsdolls Y youtube.com/theriaultdollauction p pinterest.com/theriaultsdolls Questions? Or for further information about our doll auctions call Theriault’s at 410-224-3655 or email info@theriaults.com. PO Box 151 • Annapolis, Mar yland 21404 Toll-free: 800-638-0422 • Int’ l: 410-224-3655

the dollmasters

Fax: 410-224-2515 • www.theriaults.com


Antique DOLL Collector September 2014 Vol. 17, No. 8


A Weekend of Important Doll Auctions October 4, 5 and 6 in Los Angeles

More than 1000 wonderful antique dolls showcasing dolls of American childhood from the mid-1800s to early 1900s will be auctioned over three dream-filled days. The dolls range from plain and simple folk art dolls to sophisticated and elegant French bébés and ladies - a veritable visual study of play in emergent America, bustling with energy and pioneer spirit.

At Play in a Field of Dolls Featuring the Marysville Museum of Antique Dolls on the Pony Express Trail

Saturday, October 4, 2014 Preview 9 AM. Auction 11 AM. Featuring the fine Lois Cohorst antique doll collection of the Marysville Doll Museum on the Pony Express Trail of Kansas, as well as private estate dolls from important French and German collections.

“These auctions are a perfect opportunity for general collectors of Americana to delve into the doll as an addition to their overall collection of country American memorabilia.” - Stuart Holbrook


Honoring An American Childhood

at the Universal City Hilton A two-volume catalog set including “At Play in a Field of Dolls” and “The Blackler Collection” is now available for $79 including priority postage and after-sale results ($94 international). Call 800-638-0422 to order or visit theriaults.com.

Plan to attend to view and bid on these exceptional treasures. If you cannot attend you can bid absentee, live with telephone bidding, or live with online bidding. To view the dolls online visit theriaults.com and click on the button for Proxibid. For details about bidding call 800-638-0422.

The Blackler Collection Fine Early American Dolls and Teddy Bears

Sunday, October 5 and Monday, October 6, 2014 Preview each day 9 AM. Auction 11 AM. The private collection of Diane and Valerie Blackler of Naples, California offers the most exceptional collection of American cloth dolls ever presented, highlighted by folk art dolls, 19th century studio dolls, and black folk dolls. To see further photographs of the collection, see page 30 of this magazine. Over 500 dolls appear in the auction catalog and will be auctioned on Sunday and Monday to attending, absentee and online bidders. On Monday, a Discovery Day auction of an additional 200 dolls, available only to attending bidders, will immediately follow the catalog portion of the auction.

To order the two-volume catalog set call 800-638-0422. PO Box 151 • Annapolis, Mar yland 21404 Toll-free: 800-638-0422 • Int’ l: 410-224-3655

the dollmasters

Fax: 410-224-2515 • www.theriaults.com


LAYAWAY AVAILABLE Member UFDC & NADDA

(Nat'l Antique Doll Dealers Assn.)

Visit my website: www.grandmasatticdolls.com

14” “Joanny” Bebe, beautiful blue p/w eyes, immaculate peaches & cream bisque, gorgeous clean orig. mohair wig in orig. set & orig. cork pate, “factory orig.” very ornate magnificent silk & lace dress w/ orig. matching bonnet, ant. slip & undies, socks & orig. “marked” Fr. leather shoes, on orig. early str. wrist Joanny body. This Bebe looks just like an “AT” Bebe. I never saw one so beautiful!! Head marked w/typical “J” & she is just out of this world AMAZING!!! $9575.

11” FG Block Letter Bebe, gorgeous bulging blue p/w eyes, early mauve blush under brows, immaculate pale pressed bisque, outlined lips, orig. mohair wig & pate, beautiful ornate ant. ecru batiste & lace dress, orig. chemise underneath, orig. crocheted socks, ant. “marked” Fr, shoes & fabulous Fr, ant. silk & velvet hat. On great orig. early 8 ball jointed compo. body w/straight wrists. One of the most beautiful FG Bebes EVER!!! Tremendous presence!! ABSOLUTELY BREATHTAKING!!! ONLY....$7800.

10” Steiner A “Le Parisien” Bebe, gorgeous blue p/w eyes, immaculate pale bisque, orig. strawberry blonde mohair wig & Steiner pate, wearing “factory” orig. silk & lace dress, orig. full slip & undies, crocheted socks, ant. marked shoes & ant. knitted bonnet w/ ribbons. Orig. early st. wrist Steiner body. Head is incised A-3 & “Le Parisien” in red. Absolutely GORGEOUS!!! $5375.

11” JDK #221 Googlie, gorgeous bisque, huge blue eyes, watermelon mouth, orig. mohair wig & Kestner plaster pate, still in tact, peach brushed cotton dress w/orig. inside label from same time period w/matching coat, lacy ant. bonnet, ant. slip, matching peach shoes & socks. On orig. chunky jointed body w/clean shiny finish. Smallest size made in this mold & sure to make you smile!!! $6750.

5” Orsini AB “Vivi”, brown glass eyes, mint bisque overall & orig.mohair wig w/ silk bow, wears orig. fancy lace dress (ribbon replaced). On orig. Orsini all bisque body. A darling member of the Orsini family :-) with a big smile on her face!! $2400. 6.5” All Bisque Grace Putnam Bye Lo Baby, brown sl. eyes, perfect eye wax, mint pale bisque & “swivel neck”. Wears orig. organdy & lace dress & full matching undies. On orig. perfect all bisque, fully “marked” bent limb baby body. Great large size. Too cute for words!! $1175.

6.5” Rare Kestner All Bisque With Gray boots, perfect pale bisque overall, blue glass sleep eyes, “swivel neck”, original long blonde mohair wig. She wears her darling antique coat, matching hat and original undies. She has rare painted gray boots with black tassel. She is on her original Kestner all bisque body in perfect condition overall. Absolutely STUNNING in this great large size!!! $3100.

5.5” All Bisque Kestner Pouty Barefoot, great pale bisque overall, “swivel neck”, brown glass eyes, orig. mohair wig, orig. silk & lace dress, darling ant. velvet hat, ant. undies & is a desirable barefoot all bisque. Has the best extremely pouty mouth, is early peg strung on orig. all bisque Kestner body (a teeny flake in the paint at stringing hole of her right upper arm, appears to be in the making, but not sure). She is FABULOUS!!! Only....$3375.

Joyce Kekatos

e-mail: joycedolls@aol.com

I buy dolls and sell on consignment.

2137 Tomlinson Avenue, Bronx, NY 10461

home: 718-863-0373 cell: 917-859-2446


Mary Ann Spinelli FINE ANTIQUE DOLLS AND ACCESSORIES

P.O. Box 4327, Burbank CA 91503 • e-mail: nellingdolls@gmail.com Cell: 818-738-4591 Home: 818-562-7839 • Member NADDA and UFDC BUYING & SELLING QUALITY DOLLS FOR OVER 21 YEARS

“Cut from a different cloth...”

published by the Office Staff: Publication and Advertising: Keith Kaonis Editor-in-Chief: Donna C. Kaonis Administration Manager: Lorraine Moricone Phone: 1-888-800-2588 Art/Production: Lisa Ambrose Graphic Designer: Marta Sivakoff Contributors: Ursula Mertz, Lynn Murray, Samy Odin, Andy Ourant Subscription Manager: Jim Lance Marketing: Penguin Communications Publications Director: Eric Protter

Please contact us for details and more photos!

Periodicals postage paid at Northport, NY. and at additional mailing offices. Contents ©2014 Antique Doll Collector, all rights reserved.

Columbian gathering

Postmaster: Send address changes to Antique Doll Collector, P.O. Box 239, Northport, NY 11768. Subscriptions: Send to Antique Doll Collector, P. O. Box 239, Northport, NY 11768. Phone: 1-888-800-2588 or 1-631-261-4100 Subscription Rates: One Year (Twelve Issues) $42.95; Two Years (Twenty-four Issues) $75.95. First class delivery in U.S. add $29 per year. Outside the U.S. add $30 per year. Foreign subscriptions must be paid in U.S. funds. Do not send cash. Credit cards accepted.

Kathe Kruse, Kamkin cousins, and a French leather baby.

Advertising and Editorial: Call 717-517-9217 or email antiquedoll@gmail.com

Moravian congregation

Editorial Office (Send all catalogs and editorial to this address): Antique Doll Collector, P.O. Box 39, East Petersburg, PA 17520

EXHIBITING:

SEPTEMBER 13 Angels Attic Doll and Miniature De-acquisition Sale, Santa Monica CA, Angels Attic Museum SEPTEMBER 20 Wonderland Doll Bear and Toy Show, Oxnard CA, Marriott Courtyard Hotel on Esplanade Dr.

Visit us at: www.maspinelli.com 4

Antique Doll Collector (ISSN 1096-8474) is published monthly by the Puffin Co., LLC, 15 Hillside Place, Northport, NY 11768 Phone: 1-631-261-4100

ANTIQUE DOLL COLLECTOR

SEPTEMBER 2014

SEE US ON THE WEB AT: http://www.antiquedollcollector.com email: AntiqueDoll@gmail.com

Antique Doll Collector is not responsible for any inaccuracies in advertisers’ content. An unsolicited manuscript must be accompanied by SASE. Antique Doll Collector assumes no responsibility for such material. All rights including translations are reserved by the publisher. Requests for permissions and reprints must be made in writing to Antique Doll Collector. ©2014 by the Puffin Co., LLC.

MOVING?

Important: We need your old address and your new. The Post Office does not forward magazines. Call 1-888-800-2588 or write to us at: P.O. Box 239, Northport, NY 11768.


The Complete Guide to Antique, Vintage and Collectible Dolls

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THERIAULT’S ANNOUNCES THE ESTATE AUCTION OF THE BLACKLER COLLECTION

by Jan Peterson Do you name your special French dolls? The author, a retired French teacher, has some great suggestions for names and how to pronounce them.

About The Cover The antique doll world is abuzz with the extraordinary

news of Bonhams upcoming auction, September 24 in London. Rare character dolls include the doll seen on our cover, Kammer and Reinhardt’s 108, the only known example, and another never before seen character marked 11 (possibly for mold 111). In fact every model of the company’s ‘True to Life’ series (excepting mold 116) will be offered at this extraordinary event. Photo courtesy Bonhams.

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Book Review News Emporium Mystery

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IL MUSEO DELLA BAMBOLA E DEL GIOCATTOLO COLLEZIONE BORROMEO

WILLIAM BLAKE LUCE: HINGHAM MINIATURES FROM THE ARTS & CRAFTS PERIOD

The Museum of Dolls and Toys of the Borromeo Collection by Lynn Murray Housed in a medieval fortress on Italy’s Lake Maggiore, this is one of Europe’s leading doll museums. ANTIQUE DOLL COLLECTOR

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A ROSE BY ANY OTHER NAME…

BONHAMS SEPTEMBER 24 AUCTION – RARE CHARACTER DOLLS

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September 2014 Volume 17, Number 8

by Derin Bray An extraordinary archive of miniature wooden toys and photographs celebrates toy making in Hingham, MA. SEPTEMBER 2014

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55 Auction Gallery

60 Calendar 63 Classified

UFDC NATIONAL CONVENTION SALEROOM… A SHOPPER’S PARADISE


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4TH ANNUAL

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BACK OL O H C S TO EVENT!

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Any Fine Quality Doll on this page is priced at $150 to $350

matrixbymail@gmail.com Call 212-787-7279 for information!

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22. ‘Larger than Life‘ truly describes this 28” Baby Character Girl by K*R with her astounding 19” cir. head! Sporting the miracle that is her mint factory wig, the outrageous body is also mint as is her antique fine linen baby ‘short dress‘ - All that and a face to love! $1495

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...by Mail Return Privilege • Layaways

matrixbymail@gmail.com

212-787-7279 PO Box 1410, NY, NY 10023 24. Facade of French Schoolhouse. See #31.

23. 10” Super Rare ‘Aero Baby‘ this bisque head, fully signed cabinet rarity from Grace Putnam melds character and fantasy into a brilliant combination of Peter Pan and Puck! With its impish aspect, highly molded hair and shaded eyelids it is an amazing and important rarity. $3250 27

27. Adorable South Sea Baby - 7-1/2” of mint charm and wit in the palm of your hand! She is factory perfect with creamy fired-in bisque from mohair topknot to the label on her foot! Mint $750

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25. 22” All Original Brown Toddler - plus her labelled box, ‘Rosalinda’ has exceptional quality fired-in bisque , molded hair with beribboned tuffs of mohair, fashionable dress a stupendous doll! $1100

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26. Part pixie, part cartoon, this 10” Very Rare ‘AM 241’ Googly is famous for her oversized wide set eyes and button nose all framed by her factory ringlets ! Her chubby tummy and dimpled knees are all wrapped up in her original lemon ruffles and bonnet too! Here she is....the one you’ve been chasing! $3500

29. 26” Elegant Quality ‘Laughing Jumeau’ - luxurious quality bisque, richly detailed modeling with the expressive subtle coloration so rare in the size and jewel blue eyes are all combined in a life size 16-1/2” cir. head on its mint body. Magnificent layers of antique gowns and matching robe with caplet collar create a monumental french child as dramatic as it is delightful. $1500 29

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28. This Foxy 11” All Original ‘AM 200‘ Googly - has a great fully dimpled body, her red factory wig and original deco Ric-Rac style and buckled shoes! With extra fine quality bisque! Special large size! and teeny molded tongue! She is the works! $1600


30. 29” Rare Size Early Columbian - the Bru of American cloth dolls , this important and rare hand painted baby face sweetheart is uniquely coy with her big round ‘baby blues.’ A museum class doll in her original barn red frock and juvenile pinafore is one in a hundred. A true icon - with a tender heart ! Large but light and easy to hug ! $7500

31. French School Room - a cabinet toy for your ‘cabinet kids‘, this precious 7”x7”x10” Maison D’Ecole opens to reveal a classroom complete with teacher and 4 girls at desks and one boy - the dunce kneeling in the corner! $1200 30

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...by Mail Layaways Return Privilege

matrixbymail@gmail.com 212-787-7279 32

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32. Rare 17” ‘Wendy Face‘ Kley & Hahn ‘546‘ - with those big round, thought filled pools of rich brown eyes, gentle closed mouth, mint body and long factory tresses and her precious, storybook perfect, frilly layers of antique clothes and shoes! A dear heart... $4800

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33. Unique, profound and gorgeous is this Rare 38” Early Kestner Closed Mouth! with ivory pure bisque, meticulous ‘AT style’ modeling and sensuous blush she is a portrait of sophistication and luxury. Fully dressed and drenched in her elegant dress coat with silk lining and matching hat and trims. Early closed mouth dolls are exceedingly rare in this size. Such grandeur! $4900 34. 10” Cabinet Size Jumeau Lady signed Jumeau , she is mint and Factory Original from hat to hang tag, with lady features, clo/mo, PW eyes and jointed body. Choice! $795

35. A 36” K*R Child in Original Box - It is true but rare and she is a beauty with mint factory wig and the original K*R body, a maturing youth with perfect dewey bisque and elaborate Edwardian dress. Quite the teacher’s pet! Like the label says ”My Favorite Doll“!! $1650 35

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36. Stunning K*R 115a ‘Phillip‘ - he has the most compelling ‘breathy‘ bisque complexion, pure and gentle,with warm brown eyes and mint antique wig plus fully jointed toddler body, perfect for his middle school years. Another ‘Teacher’s Pet‘! $2500


Two ways to buy great dolls from us...

BECKY’S Back Room on

Located in Stoudtburg Village Open by appointment We welcome your visit 8 N. Village Circle P.O. Box 705 Adamstown, PA 19501

14.5 Incised Depose Jumeau $5500

6” Sonneberg with jointed knees $1200

View our dolls online at our exclusive shop:

BECKYSBACKROOM.RUBYLANE.COM 10” Series C Steiner $6950

12” Kestner 185 Character $2400

6” Kestner All Bisque $2000

New dolls listed every week!

5.5” S&H Mignonette $2000

15.5” S&H 1029 $1500

Telephone: 717-484-1200 • Mobile: 610-662-5473 • Email: ourant@me.com

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Tel: 425.765.4010 Beautifulbebes@outlook.com

Three Graces All Beauties! 14” Early Bru Fashion$6500 as shown 16” Empress Eugenie$7500 as shown 19” Portrait Jumeau Fashion - $10,800 as shown Additional pictures available. All of these exceptionally pretty dolls have lovely ensembles available. Visit website for more information!

For excellent service contact Beautiful Bebes when Selling or Consigning! Gorgeous Mein Leibling: True beauty with cornflower blue sl. eyes fringed with sweeping silky lashes, original human hair wigin lovely russet curls. A stunning doll dressed in antique ecru silk dress with lovely lace adornments and original chestnut colored velvet cape and matching elaborate signed bonnet. 28” tall~ $4900 What a little angel! This flirty 16” Incised 7 Depose is the whole package! She is so quintessential Jumeau; a perfect plum from the dreams of Emile Jumeau. Gorgeous spiral threaded amber eyes, tender painting of features, delicious ensemble, stellar thick wig. Guard your heart! Exc. Conditon. $7950~

Mignonnette en Présentation: Superb wee one in perfect condition just 6” tall. Magical all original; long blonde mohair braids tied behind, sweet blue glass eyes, French blue silk dress & tiny silken hat. In presentation box w/ four dresses, two additional bonnets and extras. The box is exceptional w/clear glass orig. lid. PLUS all items & doll are free to move about & play! This box has never had ties inside. $5200~

Rare to find Poupée with trunk & trousseau: Every once in a while, a doll captures the imagination... Such is this fantastique Poupée... This beauty was likely a creation by Lazare Frayon, a porcelain manufaturer, that served many houses including Aristide Halopeau, and then marketed by Au Paradis Des Enfants (stamped). Lovely & graceful, this 17.5” mademoiselle is shown in original antique white summer-weight confection with three layers of flowing ruffles over hoop skirt. She has three total outfits consisting of a day dress, a lovely original couture black and royal blue silk walking suit, a long rain coat, a fur muff, an antique watch pin , two parasols, extra white-wear, a trunk, boots and slipper-shoes, two wigs, porcelain chocolate set, books and extra bonnets. Her condition is excellent for her age and she has the ability to sit or cross her legs. This is a rare and classic beauty... truly a dream. Generous terms available! $16,800. Additional pictures available.

Member UFDC & NADDA

Petite Wedding Couple in Satin Lined Straw Egg: A truly heart-warming presentation! These small little 7 inch dolls celebrate in a “made for the French market” type presentation. He is dapper in faux beaver top-hat, silk creme colored long-tailed jacket w/ metallic trim & coordinated black satin trousers. She is a vision in beautiful antique lace dress w/ long flowing veil topped & wax orange blossoms to match a tiny bouquet. She has layers of undies & several gathered layers of lace. The workmanship is delightful. Both dolls German. She is stamped S & C, he is marked K*R. 5 pc. compo bodies w/ painted shoes These little ones may represent Tom Thumb and his bride. Both dolls exc cond. c. 1895+. $1295~

An exceptional Huret from the early years with a dear face and many enchanting attributes including her original signed Huret gutta percha body (albeit some restoration), superbly painted, glazed shoulderhead with sensitively rendered eyes and lips, shown in royal blue velvet and satin Enfantine style frock and antique ribbons. Huret shoes. Additional espresso pique ensemble with complex soutache design and leather bag. Fantastic presence. 17” tall. Bisque is perfect. Please email or call~

Gorgeous Gottschalk dollhouse in wonderful 1/2” scale. In overall excellent condition with expected age and patina. All walls and floors retain original designs. Delightfully compact and perfect for display! 21.5”w x 23”x t x 10” d. $3600~


International PRESTIGE Auction of collectible Antique GAMES, DOLLS, TOYS, CURIOSITIES & AUTOMATONS at the

Saturday September 20, 2014 at 1:30 pm

AMBASSADOR Hotel PARIS “Salon Vendôme”

Sunday September 21, 2014 (10am to 4pm) The 28th POLICHINELLE DOLL FAIR (at our usual location)

“Live Auction” with www.Drouotlive.com English translation

Preview: Saturday September 20, 2014 from 10am to 1pm

Two catalogues, one for the Antique Games and one for the Dolls and Toys: 15 euros each ($25 each with mailing cost) order from: François THEIMER the catalogues can be viewed 2 weeks before auction at: www.theimer.fr & www.lombrail-teucquam.com

François THEIMER

International Appraiser & Historian on French Dolls 4 rue des Cavaliers 89130 TOUCY Tél: (0033) 03 86 74 31 76 Fax: (0033) 03 86 74 32 13 E.Mail: francois.theimer@wanadoo.fr Website: www.theimer.fr


DOLL COLLECTORS AUCTION Friday, September 12, 9:30 a.m. 120 South Spring Street Louisville, Kentucky 40206 www.haysauction.com HAYS & ASSOCIATES, Inc. will be selling at ABSOLUTE AUCTION wonderful private collections of dolls, accessories and toys from a multi-state area. One special collection has been in the family for three generations. A partial listing follows: Lovely French fashions & child dolls - German chinas including grape lady, Alice-in- Wonderland, brown & blue eyed covered wagon style dolls & early 1840s chinas from the Kestner & KPM firms that include Queen Victoria hairstyle & black & brown haired beautifully sculptured heads [some with a pink tint] - German bisques by Kling, Kestner, Simon & Halbig, Armand Marseille, Schoenau & Hoffmeister, Alt, Beck, Gottschalk, Walkure & including Gibson girls & a rare Gebruder Heubach mold #7852 of girl w/coiled braids - Milliner’s model - Antique doll house dolls - Hard plastics including 1950s Mary Hartline & Madame Alexander Poor Cinderella, Cinderella in ball gown & Prince

Charming all w/Margaret O’Brien face - Large papier-maches - Compositions including a large Kewpie - representative time line of Shirley Temple dolls - Doll furniture - Antique costumes & trim including doll shoes - Doll artist dolls including Elke Hutchens, Fayzah Spanos, Dianne Effner & Australian artist Jan McLean’s “Emily Ann” [limited edition of 30] - Celluloid - Ethnic dolls - Toys - Collection of Gene dolls with extra boxed outfits & furnishings - Tyler Wentworth - Steiff circus wagons & animals Vintage Barbies, family & friends dolls - Antique Topsy-Turvy dolls - Early rubber dolls - Wax/over dolls - Parian & tinted bisque dolls - Early wooden lady doll w/glass eyes - All-bisques - 1950s/1960s toys, games, dolls & dollhouse furniture in original boxes First Captain Kirk doll - Early printed & painted cloth dolls thought to be Moravian & Columbian - Danbury Mint Princess Diana & Prince Charles porcelain wedding dolls

UNCATALOGUED Terms: cash, approved check, VISA & MC Inspection: Friday, 8:30 a.m. - 9:30 a.m. NO BUYER PREMIUM

KENNETH S. HAYS KENNETH S. HAYS, JR. GARY CAMPBELL Auctioneers - Appraisers HAYS & ASSOCIATES, Inc. 502-584-4297

Arizona Doll & Toy Museum

The museum has relocated after 26 years from Downtown Phoenix to Historical Catlin Court, Glendale, AZ New address: 5847 W. Myrtle Ave., Glendale, AZ 85301 Phone: 623-939-6186 Hours: Monday thru Saturday 10am to 4 pm

Grand reopening September 6th, 2014 Cake and Punch to celebrate - See You There!

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Gigi’s Dolls & Sherry’s Teddy Bears Inc. Allow Us To Help You Discover The Child Within You!

17” Rare SH 111 character made for French trade on Jumeau body Fabulous blue threaded eyes, antique undergarments, shoes and socks, mohair wig, 2 hairlines- fore head & back of head (sanded), beautiful example of a very rare doll $6500 Now $4995.

13 ½” Schmidt w/parted lips, shading above brown pw eyes, marked w/ shield head & body, head as is – front face glued - was a clean break ear to ear under chin $7750.

19” Early 1850’s pressed bisque ABG of wonderful quality, blue painted eyes, original HH wig, antique clothing $2250.

14” Heubach #8191 character baby w/ crooked smile, blue intaglio eyes, wonderfully molded hair $795.

19” CM Bru Jne 8, brown pw eyes, shading above eyes, antique clothing, undergarments, socks & leather boots, HH wig $13,850.

21” Jumeau 1880’s Deluxe or Portrait model, very clean kid body, antique clothing & bonnet, English mohair wig, brown pw eyes, pierced ears $3995.

12” Smiling Bru size B on shoulder plate, head as is, kid body right hand as is, blue glass eyes, beautiful antique clothing $2295.

13” CM Kestner “8” socket head on shoulder plate, blonde mohair wig, brown sleep eyes, kid body $1695 $1695. Now $1495.

20” Insisted Depose Jumeau 9 on stiff wrist Jumeau body with mama pull strings, blue PW eyes, applied pierced ears, antique clothing, mohair wig $6650. Now $6050. $6650

21” FG Fashion marked G on head, FG on left shoulder, brown PW eyes, small chips by both ears, original hh wig, antique clothing, leather shoes, necklace and earrings $2700 $2700. Now $2395.

10-1/2” S3H 949 Af Am on stiff wrist jointed body, brown glass eyes, pierced ears, mohair wig, slight rubs on cheeks & nose, sweet size $1195.

6” CM French All bisque Lanternier Limoges w/ anchor mark in Alsace Lorraine costume, black pupiless eyes, blond mohair wig, painted black boots $475.

27” CM Kestner 128, brown sleep eyes, HH wig & plaster pate, antique clothing $2495 $2495. Now $2195. 12 ½” Fabulous underscored F Steiff Teddy Bear with beautiful face, mohair is in wonderful condition $1995.

10 ½” A Series Steiner A 3.4 Paris, Af Am, body stamped “La Parisinne” Modeille d’Or Paris, pierced ears, brown pw eyes, small hairline at front forehead $1995.

7” Sweet Pair of the German All Bisques, Limbach? 653/4 on leg, great molding, small chip on blue hair bow $225. pair

LAYAW AVAILA AY BLE


8” Lenci Golfing Boy 1500 Series all original in felt plaid shorts, red jacket, beige cape, leather shoes, yard socks, leather golfing bag with 3 clubs, hazel painted eyes $2050.

21” Lenci “Nini” all original in footed sleeper, Nini embroidered on front, brown eyes & blonde mohair wig $2095.

17” Unusual “Nun” Shirley Temple- she was dressed as a nun by a nun in the 1930’s in black wool habit with details, face has a few crazes , no wig under wimple, chip on left finger $325. 5-1/2” Effanbee Wee Patsy all original, dress as is on netting, really nice paint $145. 7-1/2” Baby Sandy by Freundlich 1939 - 42, nice molding and coloring $185.

18” Sonja all original in tagged off white taffeta dress with marabou trim and flower accents, skates (1 blade as is, 1 missing), HH wig in original set, some crazing $225. 14” All original Sonja in tagged white satin and black velvet dress, swivel waist body, HH wig, slight crazing $225. 15” All original Sonja in tagged skiing outfit w/ skies & poles, outfit is minty clean, shoe snaps (as is), lips repainted, HH wig, few crazes $295. 15” Sonja in tagged yellow taffeta dress, skates are a bit big, finger tips chipped left hand, slight crazing $155.

20” Alexander Dionne Quint toddler in original tagged lavender organdy dress, undergarments, socks, HH wig, face has some crazing $295. 17” Alexander Dionne Quint toddler in original tagged blue coat, hat & leggings, shoes& socks, lips & eyes repainted $325. 10” Roldan Man taking dog for walk, holding candle $125.

17” Lenci Dutch Boy 300 Series 1930’s, all original in felt plaid pants, black jacket, red shirt, mohair cape, felt tulip, wooden shoes, brown painted eyes $1995.

18” Shirley Temple in tagged NRA dress w/ sepia Shirley pin, eyes were replaced, slight crazing, repainted lips $345. 1935 Saalfield #1739 Shirley Temple & her Playhouse, doll, clothes, house & accessories, appears to be complete, table and chairs legs bent $ 5 1/4” Shirley Temple 1930’s soap in Stand up and Cheer $39.95 1935 Saalfield #1727 Shirley Temple standing doll front and back doll, stand and clothing $72.50 1935 Saalfield #1712 Shirley Temple at Play book w/ 11 color pictures $47.50 Shirley - 5 Books About Me #1730, 1934, On the Movie Lot, Twinkletoes, Just a Little Girl, in Staring Roles, Little Playmate. $95. 1935 Saalfield #1726 Shirley’s Pastime Book w/ dustcover, some writing - nicely done $37.50 1935 Saalfield Shirley’s Storybook - few pages as is in front $19.95 1935 Saalfield Shirley Temple by Jerome Beatty w/ dust cover great photos $59.50

23” Humphrey #3/5 1994 by Busser Bears – Leeann Snyder of Ohio, of beautiful wavy mohair $125. 15” Steiff Baby Hot Water Bottle Bear, 2004, wavy mohair w/ original bag $225. Set of Mini Revere Ware – 3 cook pots w/ covers, frying pan, pot, tea kettle (top loose), coffee pot $175. set

Rare 7” x 6” 1930’s Shirley Temple String Holder, wonderful painting, great condition $295.

14 ½” NIADA Artist Fern Deutsch Girl w/ Doll & basket dressed in late 1800’s style costume, 1960’s, hand painted latex composition head $695.

29” x 30” Shirley Temple Grey Witney – Ideal Carriage with decals & ST hubcabs & hood knobs, hood as is $225.

Shirley Temple Saalfield Paper dolls 1930’s, Her Movie Wardrobe #1773, dolls have been punched, 2 pages of clothes have been cut, 4 pages uncut $47.50 1934 ST Dolls & Dresses #2112 – 4 doll set, dolls were punched, uncut clothes, some writing on front, very clean $65. Minty 1930’s Shirley’s Birthday Book by Dell Publishing, uncut doll & clothes, games, stories, pictures, no writing $45. 1958 Paperdolls - uncut, 2 dolls & clothes, bottom corners bent $39.95

Shirley Temple Slipper Box Style #6220, Color Red, Size 11, comes with tag from slippers & advertisement from Trimfit socks $69.95 Shirley Bridge Cards in box, has been played, box has some wear $30. Shirley Bridge Cards 2 decks mint with box, cards are still in wrappers, some wear on box $65. 1934 Saalfield #1762 Shirley “Little Star Her Life in Pictures” $47.50 ST in “Heidi” Saalfield #1771 really clean, great pictures, 1937 $39. ST in “Little Miss Broadway” Saalfield #1778, great pictures, loose spine, 1938 $32.50 ST in “Susannah of the Mounties” Saalfield #1771 really clean, great pictures, 1937 $39. ST in “Dimples” Saalfield #1760 really clean, great pictures, 1936 $39. ST in “Stowaway” Saalfield #1767 really clean, great pictures, 1937 $39.

6029 N. Northwest Hwy. Chicago, IL 60631 • 773-594-1540 • (800-442-3655 orders only) • Fax 773- 594-1710 Open: Tues., Wed., Sat. 10 a.m. - 5 p.m., Thurs., Fri. 10 a.m. - 6 p.m. Closed Sun. & Mon. Near O’Hare, Park Ridge & Niles

Chicago’s finest selection of Antique, Modern and Collectible Dolls, Barbie, Gene, Alexander, Tonner, Fashion Royalty, Steiff, Dollhouses and Accessories. Member U.F.D.C. & NADDA • Worldwide Shipping

Contact us for Monthly Specials! Tour our shop at: www.gigisdolls.com & join us on Facebook


Bonhams September 24 Auction – Rare Character Dolls

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n the early years of the 20th century the doll industry was awash with mass produced German pretty faced girl dolls. Gone were the fine quality French dolls of the last quarter of the 19th century, out priced and marketed by the inferior and cheaper German dolls. But the major German manufacturers were also concerned by the lack of originality in the dolls being produced. In the early years of the 20th century intellectual circles began to take an interest in child psychology. This new awareness of children and interest in the child as a real person had an effect on the design of dolls with the demand being for a more natural and childlike doll rather than a stylized dolly-faced doll. By 1909 the German art scene was strongly influenced by the expressionism movement and the major German manufacturers decided it was time to produce and market dolls that had expression and realism, taking their inspiration from true life models, thus began the Art Doll Series.

The only known example of Mould 108, the estimate is £60,000 - 80,000 Photos courtesy Bonhams

Kammer and Reinhardt were among a number of German manufacturers who embraced the concept of Character dolls. Although this collection includes rare character dolls by Simon & Halbig, Kestner and other makers, the focus is on the Kammer & Rheinhardt series promoted under the ‘Taken from Life, True to Life’ dolls. Between 1909 and 1914 Kammer and Reinhardt designed a number of character children and baby dolls beginning with mould 100; the heads were manufactured by Simon & Halbig from K & R’s own design. K & R, when shown a bronze bust of a six-weekold baby by a well-known Berlin artist Professor Lewin-Funcke, recognized the beauty of the moulding of the head, yet they were reluctant to produce it as a doll. However they went forward with their belief in creating a more realistic doll and put into production mould 100, their now famous Baby doll (commonly referred to as the Keiser Baby). At first the Baby doll was a hard product to sell and at the 1909 Berlin exhibition the doll failed to sell in large numbers with only one new customer There are two 104’s in the sale: boy, estimate £30,000 – 50,000, right, £15,000 – 20,000 (hairline). ANTIQUE DOLL COLLECTOR

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Mould 106, estimate £40,000 - 60,000

ordering a dozen. However these first buyers sold the Baby dolls straight away and reordered in large numbers. At the same exhibition they also showcased mould 101, a beautiful character child, marketed as Marie when dressed as a girl and Peter when outfitted as a young boy. Again sales for these dolls were slow, but after some persistence sales grew and the public become enchanted with these very appealing children. K & R continued with their series of character dolls, mould 102, a character boy doll with heavily moulded blonde hair, then model numbers 103, 104 and 105, all modeled on Professor Lewin-Funcke’s daughter Karin, each depicting a slightly different expression, 103: Girl serious, 104: Girl laughing (although this can be dressed as either a girl or boy) and 105: Girl friendly. None of these three models, together with other moulds 102, 106 (heavily moulded character boy) and 108 (expressive girl doll) were successful at the time and only some were used in the big shops in Berlin for decoration. Two exceptions in this range of moulds (102 to

The two 107s are both estimated at £5,000 – 8,000.

Mould 105, estimate £40,000 - 60,000

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109) was model 107, a wigged version of mould 102 advertised as ‘Carl’ and mould 109 ‘Elise’. Both these dolls had limited success and of all the dolls in the range from 102 to 109 are the easiest (although still rare) to find today. After the disappointments of these character dolls, Kammer and Reinhardt veered towards a more appealing face producing either character baby dolls which had more appeal to young children or more typical dolly faced dolls such as mould 117. This important private collection is being offered in a single owner sale comprising over ninety lots including some rare and unique character dolls by Kammer and Rheinhardt, including every known number in the 100 true to life series (except 116), Simon and Halbig and other renowned German manufacturers. There are also some wonderful Steiff dolls and toys. Estimates range from $500 to $100,000. The sale includes the only known example of mould 108 and what is believed to be a never before seen K&R character from the True to Life series marked 11 (possibly for mould 111). The auction will be held in London at Bonhams Knightsbridge auction rooms on Wednesday September 24th at 2pm and promises to be an exciting and unique sale.

Mould 102 estimate £15,000 25,000

Mould 103 estimate £25,000 - 35,000

True to Life series marked 11

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A Rose by Any Other Name… by Jan Peterson

Fleurette is a 16 inch fashion poupée attibuted to Jumeau. Melanie Luther collection.

Marie is a François Gaultier size 2 fashion poupée. Melanie Luther collection.

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e all know in our heart of hearts that our beloved antique dolls really do “live”. That is quite evident when we greet them in the doll cabinet in the morning and discover a charming accessory isn’t exactly the way we last arranged it. One doll’s head is posed in a slightly different tilt, and the fan that is now lying open on the fainting couch was definitely folded shut when we turned out the lights before going to bed. From the wonderful Raggedy Ann & Andy books, to the unforgettable characters of Woody and Buzz Lightyear in the “Toy Story” film series, every collector knows that dolls frolic all through the night. They have also perfected the ability to “return-to-place-and-freeze” at the first ray of dawn or the click of a light switch. Only the tiniest clues hint at what really goes on in Doll World when the humans go to sleep. Our antique dolls have a rich heritage of having been loved for often well over a hundred years and sometimes much longer. Those little girls’ children and grandchildren often happily received maman’s old doll, and then completely new adventures were experienced as the doll eventually passed into the loving hands of a collector. This most recent chapter in its story often includes travel to faraway lands where its new owner speaks a an entirely different language. It is not at all uncommon for a doll to

Adèle Claire is a rare Steiner series “C” bébé. Wilda Judges collection. ANTIQUE DOLL COLLECTOR

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Babette is an unmarked French fashion doll attributed to Barrois. Laurie Baker collection.

Colette is an unmarked French fashion doll. Judy Fullmer collection. 26

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Annick is a darling SFBJ bebe. Judy Fullmer collection.

become a beloved member of many families during its “lifetime”, and her original name was almost invariably lost along the way. When the doll was brand new and dressed in a frock made just for her, she instantly stole her first child’s heart. With a squeal of delight, a tight embrace, and a kiss on the tip of her little bisque nose, the doll almost always immediately received her name. I have a dear friend who says when she acquires an antique doll, she holds her doll cheek to cheek and waits for the doll to whisper her name. I love that! The only time I feel a little sad is when I am granted the delightful privilege of viewing a new friend’s collection, and the dolls are referred to by their maker’s name, or even more disheartening, by their mold numbers “This is my S&H 1159,” or, “This is my Portrait Jumeau.” I invariably blurt out, ‘Don’t they have names?’ After an awkward silence, the response is usually that the collector would love to give her doll a name, but there are two things standing in the way. They have, indeed, named the doll, but, having so many dolls to keep track of, and getting to an age when lots of us tend to mix up our grandchildren’s names with those of our pets, the dolls’ names are soon forgotten. Or, their owners would love to give the doll an authentic name from the period, but are unsure just what those names were, and, especially, how they were pronounced. I don’t have a clever memory trick for the first problem other than keeping your dolls’ names with their photos in your doll inventory records. In a pinch, when it is 2:30 a.m. and you wake up suddenly and begin to torment yourself with, ‘what DID I name my Bru Breveté?’, you can click on your Ipad, look it up


Francine is an unmarked French-type all original mignonette Kathryn Clement collection.

in a flash, and fall back into a blissful sleep full of dolly dreams. However, I can help you find the perfect name if your doll was made in France. It is still possible to find antique copies of La Poupée Modèle, and these little girls’ magazines are a wonderful source of what names were popular in 19th Century and early 20th Century France. After teaching teenagers how to speak French for twenty-five years in our local high school, I can help you learn how to correctly pronounce the perfect name for your doll. I have several copies of the La Poupée Modèle magazines dating from the late 1860s through the early 20th Century. In each issue, the stories and plays are full of lovely names for little French girls. But, a feature of each magazine that is a treasure trove of names are the Pages Roses that were included in each issue. The Pages Roses were printed on pale pink newsprint paper that was a fold-out in the center of the magazine. One side usually had patterns for outfits for dolls from the lady dolls of the 1860s and 1870s, to the bébé dolls of the 1880s through the 1920s. There are adorable tiny patterns as well for the little pocket dolls, or mignonnettes, of the late 1870s through the 1890s. On the reverse side of each Page Rose were usually embroidery, cross stitch, craft, or game patterns. On both sides, curving among the pattern pieces and craft activities, are dozens of girls’ names. They were meant to be used as embroidery patterns so little French girls could personalize their hankies, underwear, etc. Today, they are a wonderful source of all the popular names of the Golden Age of doll production in France. Just like names in every culture, French names also had a meaning. Some of the names have a delightful history, as well, as

Rébecca, a Bru fashion, comes with her original box marked “poupée Juive” (poupée Jewess). Donna Kaonis collection.

Francette is a porcelain doll by Jacob Petit. Donna Kaonis collection.

Odile is also a size 2 F.G. poupée. Melanie Luther collection. ANTIQUE DOLL COLLECTOR

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Béatrice is an unmarked French fashion attributed to Jumeau. Laurie Baker collection.

Popular names for little girls were printed on the pages roses of La Poupée Modèle to be embroidered on hankies and clothing.

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exemplified by the story behind the name Fleurette! The lovely Atlantic port city of La Rochelle, has an island, the Ile de Ré, just offshore that was once an English naval base. The French girls of the town were not at all encouraged by their parents to fraternize with the sailors when they came ashore on leave. However, who can resist a man in uniform! So, the girls would put a little flower blossom, une fleurette, in their hair to signal to the young English sailors that they were willing to risk the wrath of Papa, and that they could be discreetly approached. As the sailors rotated back to England, they told their replacements headed for the Ile de Ré just what a fleurette in the locks of a French girl meant. However, they mispronounced the word as FLIRT! That is the origin of our English word! Even more amusing, French girls started using the English mispronunciation of fleurette to refer to someone of either sex who gave that “come hither” glance, which is the origin of the French verb FLIRTER! Most French girls’ names were the feminine form of a masculine name because little girls were often named for their fathers, godfathers, grandfathers, or favorite uncles. The feminine form of the names often includes endings that make them diminutive as an expression of affection. For example, the name Charlotte literally means “little (sweet) feminine form of Charles”. That is quite a mouthful! Because French is essentially mispronounced Latin, most names also had Latin or Greek origins. They often came from the place name of the ancient region where one had been born. It is also true that the origins of names often came from a physical or personality attribute that the first person bearing that name had. An example is the lovely name Cécile which means “blind.” They can sometimes be quite sad, as a result. What follows is a list of my favorite names from antique copies of La Poupée Modèle that you can use to choose a name for your antique doll. I will include the pronunciation so you can pronounce these lovely names with confidence and dazzle your friends at your next presentation at your doll club. In French, there is no stress or emphasis of any one syllable in a word. That goes for names, too. So, it keeps it very simple! For example, in English, most words emphasize one or more syllables in a name. Michelle in English places the emphasis on the second syllable: Me-SHELL But, in French, both halves of the name are pronounced with the same emphasis on each syllable: Meshell. That alone makes it easy to pronounce a French name with confidence. There are just a few other “tricks” to good pronunciation. The letter H is always silent. In French, G and J are pronounced exactly like the S in treasure or pleasure. I represent that sound with the letters ZH. And, finally, if you can gargle, you can pronounce a French “R”! Just get a little phlem (euwwwww!) in the back of your throat and say, “R”! Not very ladylike, but it sounds great. When I was still teaching, boys never had trouble with the R, but all of the girls (except the tomboys) had to let go of their feminine inhibitions in order to get it right. Finally,


this is meant to be fun, and not to be a French lesson that requires work. And there will be no test at the end… Laurette: lah-rette (laurel leaf/honorable) Virginie: veer-zhee-nee (maiden/virgin) Adrienne: ah-dree-enn (from Hadria, a town in northern Italy) Valérie: vah-lay-ree (strong) Cécile: say-seel (blind) Claudine: kloh-deen (lame or crippled) Denise: duh-neez (an early saint, Dionysios) Isabelle: ee-zuh-bel (abundance) Anne: ahn (a prophetess) Agnès: ahn-yes (chaste/pure/a newborn lamb) Alice: ah-lees (noble) Geneviève: zhuh-nuh-vee-ev (woman of the tribe) Eliane: ay-lee-ahn (the sun) Clothilde: kloh-teeld (famous in battle) Lidie: lee-dee (from the region of Lydia in Asia Minor) Fanny: fah-nee (French girl) Héloïse: ay-loh-eez (healthy) Mélanie: may-lah-nee (dark/black) Annette: ah-net (“little” prophetess) Clémentine: klay-mahn-teen (gentle/kind) Camille: kah-mee (unknown, possibly Etruscan) Amélie: ah-may-lee (hard-working) Thérese: tay-rez (summer/harvest) Valentine: vah-lahn-teen (strong)

ÉCOLE DES POUPÉES

Clara: klah-rah (bright/full of light) Ninette: nee-net (little girl ... from the Spanish Niña) Sidonie: see-duh-nee (from Sidon in Phoenicia) Hélène: ay-len (torch/moon) Clarisse: klah-reece (bright/full of light) Sophie: suh-fee (wise) Céline: say-leen (heavenly) Manon: mah-no (wished-for child) Fleurette: fluhr-rette (little flower) Mirabelle: me-rah-bell (wonderful) Marie: mah-ree (wished-for child) I hope you will be inspired to choose the perfect name for your bébé, mignonnette or French fashion doll, poupée, pronounced: bébé: bay-bay mignonnette: mee-nyah-nette poupée: pooh-pay One of my favorite lines in literature is found in The Velveteen Rabbit where it is stated that if a toy is loved well enough, it grows a soul. These wonderful old dolls do have such lovely souls! They deserve a name go with it! A huge thanks to Melanie Luther, Kathryn Clement, Laurie Baker, Donna Kaonis, Judy Fullmer and Wilda Judges for sharing these photos of their gorgeous dolls!

MAKE YOUR RESERVATION NOW!

Samy Odin, Ann Coleman and Margaret Gray Kincaid Welcome you for a winter session of

BEBE JUMEAU Study of Original Fashions Learn how to Appreciate the Authenticity and Historical Significance of the Jumeau Company

Hands-on examination of antique Jumeau Bébés and their wardrobes from the Musée de La Poupée-Paris and private U.S. collections

DECEMBER 24, 2014

to be Held at Margaret Gray Kincaid’s charming house, fully decorated for Christmas, in Baltimore, Maryland It all starts on Tuesday Evening with a welcome dinner. Seminars, workshops and programs on Wednesday and Thursday. All meals included with a Gala Dinner on Thursday night.

December Gaithersburg Show following Saturday and Sunday December 6-7

Free Admission with early entry to the show included Cost: $650 per person CONTACT: Margaret Kincaid 646-709-4340 or margaret.kincaid@gmail.com or write to 17 Elmwood Road, Baltimore Maryland 21210 ANTIQUE DOLL COLLECTOR

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Theriault’s Announces the Estate

Itinerant folk artists traveled from village to village in 19th century America, making their living by painting wall-hanging portraits of family members. It is possible that these same folk artists painted the flat-dimensional oil-painted canvas faces of dolls, which were then formed by mothers and fathers into actual play dolls, with simple stuffed cloth bodies and handmade costumes. In other cases, the family may have created the entire doll, with stitch-shaped and painted faces.

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hen the Blackler twins of Southern California entered an auction room, a sales room, or any marketplace in their quest for revered objects of past childhoods, heads turned. Their blonde bouncy ponytails, exuberant costumes, and wide beaming smiles drew one’s attention even before their enthusiastic zest to find and win another great treasure won you over completely. For more than 30 years, the prescient pair, Valerie and Diane Blackler (and in this case, one and one was way more than two) sought, gathered, cherished and then filled every nook and cranny of their California home with the dolls of American childhood. Call the collection “Americana, the 1800s”. Think folk art, think dolls that little girls carried across the plains during pioneering days, imagine cozy. And then, think big, because once they began collecting, it never stopped. Literally, thousands of dolls, teddy bears, and childhood folk art filled their home. The entire collection is now coming to auction

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Auction of The Blackler Collection

by Theriault’s with a cataloged estate auction on Sunday, October 5 and Monday, October 6, followed by a Discovery Day on Monday, October 6 at the Universal Hilton in Los Angeles, California. “The collection is immense, yet it is anything but casual. Carefully organized in every room of their home, it appeared at first to have many duplicates - more than 20 Martha Chase dolls, for example - but it has proven to be much more than that, for each doll is different, with variations of production, style or model”, said Florence Theriault, chief cataloger at Theriault’s. “Clearly, they quested with focus. Valerie and Diane Blackler were truly collectors with a vision”. Handmade and commercial cloth dolls including an outstanding collection of black cloth dolls, paper mache and porcelain dolls with lovingly sewn mother-made costumes, hundreds of wonderful early teddy bears and friends, carved wooden folk dolls, and a veritable stable

The extensive collection of black cloth folk dolls ranges from early and very rare oil-painted examples to those dolls with embroidered or pencil drawn features. The dolls are notable for original costumes and accessories, too.

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Dolls from American turn-of-the-century cottage doll industries include Alabama Babies, Sheppard Babies, Columbian Doll, Martha Chase, Julia Beecher and Gertrude Rollinson, among others. Teddy bears include numerous beloved examples of early Steiff models, as well as a delightful group of antiquecostumed 1930s teddy bears. The bears shown here are all early Steiff bears except for their friend “Peter” and a sample of the collection of early paper mache rolly dollies.

of wooden toy horses made the Blackler house their home. “In and of itself, this may be one of the greatest extant finds of early American cloth dolls”, said Stuart Holbrook, President of Theriault’s. The Blackler Collection auction will be preceded on Saturday, October 4, by a superb auction of antique dolls featuring the Marysville Doll Museum from the Pony Express Trail. Antique dolls of every genre ranging from superb French and German bisque dolls to a collection of rare W.P.A. dolls will be offered. 32

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Both auctions will be posted online at www.theriaults.com after September 10. Collectors are urged to attend the entire weekend to view what Holbrook has termed “a veritable museum of 19th century American childhood” and the opportunity to bring home a new treasure or two. For collectors who cannot attend, absentee, telephone and live online bidding is available the entire weekend except for Discovery Day lots. A two-volume catalog is available for $79 including priority mailing and after-auction prices realized. To order the catalog or for more information call Theriault’s at 800-638-0422 or email info@theriaults.com

Raggedy Ann dolls include rare early Volland models as well as examples from Molly-E, Georgene Novelties, and delightful handmade raggedy dolls in the folk art genre. A bounty of early Mickey Mouse cloth dolls includes a rare large early Steiff model. A stable of more than 50 toy horses includes carved wooden models, with rocking bases, standing, or pull toys.

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The Tender Years Deborah Varner 303-850-7800

queenbeev1@comcast.net • Member UFDC

NOW ACCEPTING

Layaways welcomed and consignments taken. Proud Sponsor of Vintage Vignettes

14” DEP, Incised. Bulging BR. PW. Eyes, DK. red lips and lush brows and lashes. Pierced ears with red earrings. Long blonde mohair curls. Superb body finish. Cotton Batiste dress with intricate sewing and covered buttons at back. Turned up sleeves. Drop waist bow in front. Br. French leather shoes. Old socks. Lace and Apricot silk bonnet. This doll has it all! $ 3,975.

18” Gorgeous and beautiful Fire C Steiner. Has almond shaped eye cut giving this bebe a unique and special look all her own. You won’t find a face like this anywhere. Mkd. Steiner on back of head. Lg. dimple in chin. Creamy white bisque with soft blushing at cheeks and under fly-away brow. Has pierced ears with blue earrings. Desirable Steiner banana fingers.. Wears vellum silk bow in honey blonde hair. Tulle floral dress with matching blue tulle bow at drop waist. Lg. collar with blue hand sewn piping on it and on ruffles on drop waist. Worth every cent, she is that beautiful. $ 7,975. 4” Parian with glazed china shoes and socks. Has superb modeling. Painted blue eyes. Dusty peach blush. Sweet lips. Intricate blonde hair. Curls at back of head. Fits nicely in a doll house. Orig. clothes. White faded hand sewn dress with skirt and shawl held together with button. White china socks and purple china shoes. Rare combination. Call soon. My small dolls are going quickly. $ 325.

5” Orsini ViVi. Large smile. Tons of lashes. Dk. eyes. Superbly modeled. Open mouth. Has upper teeth and tongue. Curved in lt. hand. Cupped rt. hand with pointer finger extended. Wears red gingham shift with white organdy collar. Long overthe-knee painted socks. Rare and desirable brown Mary Jane shoes. $ 2,475.

4 1/2” French Mignonette. Swivel neck and early peg strung. Bl. eyes. Blonde mohair wig. Lots of lashes. Soft coloring. Wears orig. red silk dress with cute little matching beret, also has a beige silk apron. Painted white socks. Painted double strap shoes with heels. This doll makes you smile. $ 1,225.

30” Incised on back of head DEP. All orig. and Mint. Deep blue paperweight eyes. Closed mouth with white tongue. Dark painted lips. Orig. platinum blonde mohair wig with curls and long hair. Wonderful bisque. Blush on cheeks and under brows. Fly-away brows. Large dimple in chin. A truly beautiful large doll that you will love to call your own. Original moss green silk dress with blue silk. piping down front of dress and on ruffles at bottom. Orig. vellum silk bow in hair. Old socks and orig. doll shoes. A steal at just $ 3, 200.

Rare color maroon straw hat with beige straw flower decoration in mint condition. Maroon matching ribbon to tie under chin. 4” inner diameter. $ 325. NOT PICTURED: 14” “ ANA “ SHARRED PASSIONS UFDC 2014 CONVENTION SOUVENIR DOLL. NRFB. UNTOUCHED. DONE BY DIANE EFFNER $ 445.

W W W . T H E T E N D E RY E A R S . N E T

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BOOK REVIEW

Ready For Play! The Story of Metal Head and All-Metal Dolls By Donilee Popham

K

ids will be kids as the saying goes. Dolls with metal heads would seem the perfect solution offering beauty and durability. Donilee Popham’s long awaited book on metal head and all metal dolls traces the evolution and actual manufacturing processes that produced these surprisingly attractive dolls. A French patent for metal head dolls was registered in 1857 and soon others followed in rapid succession. In 1876 the US entered the market with an all steel doll, later innovations included a talking mama device, walking dolls, and GiebelerFalk’s cast aluminum heads. By the early 1890’s German ingenuity had taken center stage, Buschow & Beck selling their popular Minerva dolls through Sears Roebuck & Co. Anti-German sentiment during World War I would end their dominance of their metal doll market. Well researched and including all the European and American manufacturers with their complete histories, the improvements and various innovations that took place, prodigious color photos, original advertisements, production photos and patent drawings, this is the definitive resource on the subject of metal dolls. ISBN: 978-0-9915277-0-0, Softcover, 177 pages, $35 plus $4 shipping Order from dkpopham@gmail.com or Donilee Popham, 721 14th Avenue, Coralville, Iowa 52241


Enjoy the beautiful coastal village of Camden, Maine located on the pristine Penobscot Bay. 49 Bay View Street, Camden, ME 04843 Sadly, Lucy’s Dollhouse will close its doors forever October 12, 2014. It has been so much fun and we have met some wonderful friends… thank you all! Cel 207-322-4851. Shop 207-236-4122 Fax 207-236-4377 email: lucysdollhouse49@roadrunner.com

Grace Putnam Bye Lo baby 13” tall $195. Pair of girl and boy Bye Lo 4” tall $495 pair.

Scottish doll 6” tall, bisque head, composition body, all original $395.

Large scale German kitchen set painted green (old) - 4 pieces... sideboard 5-1/2” tall x 6” wide $195 set.

German kitchen rack 3-1/2” wide $125. German egg cupboard 3-1/2” tall $75.

5 pieces 1920’s parlor set - handsewn upholstery sofa 5-3/4” long x 3-1/2” tall $165 set.

3 all bisque dolls 4-1/3” each $995 each.

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Il Museo della Bambola e del Giocattolo Collezione Borromeo (The Museum of Dolls and Toys of the Borromeo Collection) by Lynn Murray

O

ne cannot visit Northern Italy’s Lake Maggiore without being profoundly aware of the Dynasty of the Borromeo family. Admiring the vista from the summit of Mount Mottarone, it is easy to pick out the jewels in the crown. The Borromeo Islands and the Fortress across the lake at Angera, stand regally reminding us of their aristocratic past. The family has been powerful and influential in the region for seven hundred years. Perhaps the most famous of the ancestors is San Carlo Borromeo, born in 1538. He was the Cardinal Archbishop of Milan and considered to be one of the great reformers of the sixteenth century. As the Patron Saint of the lake, his statue towers over the town of Arona on the southern shore. He is the same San Carlo for whom the Mission San Carlo Borromeo in Carmel, California is named. In the fifteenth century, Vitaliano I, who was Treasurer to the Duke of Milan, acquired enormous tracts of land surrounding Lake Maggiore leading to the establishment of the Borromeo State. The strategic location between the Alps and Lombardy gave the dynasty even greater influence. The Borromeo legacy grew in strength not through military might, but through savvy business practices, discretion and diplomacy. Caring for and maintaining such a legacy remains a full-time occupation. Fortunately the current family members have been raised and educated with a strong desire to preserve the art and history that is pertinent to not only the family Borromeo, but to historians and collectors. In regards to protection, preservation and collection, the Principessa Bona Borromeo Arese takes the family lead. When she 36

ANTIQUE DOLL COLLECTOR

Arranged chronologically, the dolls and toys are displayed in glass cases through twelve rooms in the fortress.

Massive early paintings share the fortress rooms.

In every room there are large photographs of children contemporary to the dolls and toys in that room.

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Paintings and photographs collected by the Principessa Bona Borromeo complement her doll collection while illustrating vignettes of childhood life from the 18th century to modern day.

The Japanese dolls that were exhibited at the Paris Exposition in 1855 became popular in Europe. The museum has an exceptional collection of these early dolls.

Views of the Fortress Rocco Angera.

became part of the family as a bride, she was ďŹ lled with enthusiasm for renovating the palaces and gardens and restoring the collections of art and furniture, artifacts and treasures that were in disrepair. The eldest son of Principessa Bona Borromeo and Principe Gilberto VIII, Count Vitaliano XI, shares the role of estate management with his Mother. His younger brother, Frederico X, is engaged in business and industry with his Father. The family has adapted their summer residence to accommodate the crowds of tourists on their island. In fact, they regard the crowds as a sign of success, for it is the preservation of the legacy for the public that motivates the family Borromeo. The Principessa is a self-confessed collector. In 1988 the Museo della Bambola e del Giocattolo Collezione Borromeo (The Museum of Dolls and Toys) was founded.

Views from the fortress to Lake Maggiore below. (LM photo) ANTIQUE DOLL COLLECTOR

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38cm Jumeau “Bébé Incassable” with marked Jumeau body, ca. 1878.

85cm Bébé Bru, size 11 holding a large Polichinelle with F.G. head. For the doll scholar, there is a very interesting assortment of Bru bodies with various heads in the case with this spectacular Bébé.

40cm composition doll by Burgarella of Rome, circa 1925. All original, in original box. Seldom seen in North America, the museum has quite a comprehensive and very appealing selection of these Italian-made dolls with their unique body jointing and skillfully modeled and painted features.

Automaton of clown acrobats, French, ca. 1890.

From the Music collection, an automaton of a Jumeau lady playing the piano.

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60cm automaton gentleman with spy glass by Lambert, France, ca. 1890


45cm Huret fashion with jointed neck and wooden body, ca. 1868, standing with a marked Huret chair.

Famous Vichy automaton of Polichinelle serenading the moon.

68cm Spanish Lady by Lenci, offered in the 1926 catalogue (#163). Her original costume bears the cloth label “Lenci Made in Italy.” The company was founded in nearby Turin and Madam Scavini had her shop in Milan. Considering the region, the museum collection is surprisingly modest in its examples of Lenci and other fine Italian cloth dolls.

85cm Jumeau Bébé known as the Jumeau Triste. This size 16 example came from a Florentine family, dressed for Summer as she is, with her provenance. Ca.1879.

56cm automaton “Turkish Smoker” by Lambert, France, ca. 1890.

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40cm Bru Jne twins, size 4 marked heads and shoes, wearing original sailor costumes. Ca.1885. (LM photo)

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50cm English poured wax Pierroti-type dressed to represent Queen Victoria. (LM photo)

Large and very fine 18th century 70cm crêche figure representing Christ. (LM photo)

48cm Simon & Halbig character with intaglio eyes and open/closed mouth with painted teeth, marked only S&H//2 (LM photo)

47cm papier mâché lady with leather body and wooden limbs. Made in Germany, ca. 1820, this spectacular doll is made unusual by her ornate hairstyle, the quality of the painting and the addition of the painted pearl tiara. (LM photo)

One of the most appealing faces in the museum is this large early French poupée, possibly Barrois, dressed as a child. (LM photo)

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44cm English Pierottitype poured wax doll with cloth body, in original 1st Communion gown, ca. 1890.

Early unmarked Steiner bébé with bisque hips, lower legs and lower arms.(LM photo)

46cm poupée, the so-called Smiling Bru.(LM photo)

Originally on Isola Madre, the museum was relocated to its current home in the fortress, Rocco Angera, where the dolls and toys could be showcased to greater advantage. In twelve grand rooms of the fortress more than 1400 dolls are displayed encased in modern glass cases. The chronological arrangement of the dolls and playthings is done to intentionally relate doll-making to historic and industrial changes between the 17th Century and the 21st Century. Yet belying this calculated scholastic approach, there are vignettes of dolls with accessories, beloved teddies, toys spilling out of boxes and Schoenhut circus characters performing with joyful abandon. Fine miniature furniture, board games and ephemera intrigue visitors who are new to the world of playthings. In addition to the Borromeo Collection, a spectacular collection of French and German automata is now housed in the fortress museum. Collected by Robert Peschè and Gisele Brault Peschè of Tours, France, the automata are divided into three groups: Music, the Circus and Vices and Virtues. A video screen that shows the pieces in sound and motion accompanies each case of automata. The collection continues to evolve and grow through purchases and donations, ensuring that the museum will continue to attract visitors in the future. Having made three visits in the last year, the author highly recommends a visit to Rocco Angera. To enhance your visit, there is a comprehensive museum guide available in Italian and English, listing the identities of the dolls and toys and in the case of gifts, the names of donors. For information on future tours or for a virtual visit of this most important doll and toy museum, go to: www.tlcdolltours.com Photos courtesy of Il Museo della Bambola e del Giocattolo unless otherwise noted.


NEWS

Tynietoy Comes Home To Handicraft Club

T

he Handicraft Club invites the public to hear Susan Grimshaw, Tynietoy and miniaturist expert, to speak on Monday, September 29th at 5PM at the Handicraft Club, 42 College Street, Providence, RI. There is nominal donation for this program of $10 for the general public or $5 for students. Refreshments will be served. As seating is limited, please RSVP to Jackie at 401-831-5337. Tynietoy Background: In 1920 two Handicraft Club members, Marion Perkins and Amey Vernon started the The Tynietoy Furniture Company. The company made miniature furniture for dollhouses as well as dollhouses designed by Sydney Burleigh. The furniture was made and sold in the carriage house of the Handicraft Club. In the early years World War I veterans were hired to make some of the furniture from Marion Perkins’s designs and RISD (Rhode Island School of Design) students were commissioned to paint the furniture. Later, as the company expanded, it moved to larger quarters in downtown Providence. Tynietoy dollhouses are now highly sought after by miniaturists. It is with great pleasure and excitement that the Handicraft Club has recently acquired a Tynietoy Mansion/Manor house, garden and walkway as part of its history and the history of RI women entrepreneurs. Upcoming Events: Plans are afoot to offer workshops and speaker programs relating to the Tynietoy legacy, archiving the relevant documents at RISD that have come into the Club’s possession as well as preserving the memory of women members who embraced the value of handcrafted items. Because this dollhouse speaks to the Handicraft Club’s history, and in recognition of this heritage, the Club has established the Tynietoy Heritage Fund into which donations can be made for the purpose of furnishing and maintaining the Tynietoy house. Gifts to The Tynietoy Heritage Fund may be monetary or, if there is a Tynietoy item somewhere in your own collection, the Club would welcome it. All gifts are tax deductible to the extent allowed by law. To donate to the Tynietoy Heritage Fund, please go to www.handicraftclub.org or mail a check to Handicraft Club, attn: Tynietoy Heritage Fund, 42 College St, Providence, RI 02903.

Lynette Gross Selling a diverse array of unique and antique dolls Telephone (317) 844-6459 Email LynetteDolls@yahoo.com

Open 24 hours, 7 days a week. Visit my exclusive Ruby Lane shop Joan & Lynette Antique Dolls

www.joan-lynetteantiquedolls.rubylane.com

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We look forward to providing you with that special accessory for your precious Bébé Built with pride and love in the USA

This large screen has a shelf under the mirror that would serve well as a display for little mignottes or a perfume bottle collection.

Vintage Vignette is the purveyor of antique whimsies and fineries for your most precious Bébés and Lady Dolls.

Antique artwork dated 1896

623-206-3438

vintagevignette@hotmail.com 42

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Our antique-style dressing screens are one of a kind and we use only the finest materials: solid oak construction, double action brass hinges (which allows the screen to fold flat for travel), custom fretwork, vintage and antique fabrics/laces. They are available in any number of panels and range from 14” to 36”.

Special orders welcome - please allow 4 -6 weeks for delivery. We are also happy to work with customer fabrics/artwork…


William Blake Luce: Hingham Miniatures from the Arts & Crafts Period by Derin Bray

Fig. 1. Self-portrait of William B. Luce, ca. 1905. Courtesy of the John P. Richardson Photograph Collection, Hingham Historical Society Fig. 2. Unfinished miniature furniture, by William B. Luce and Stuart Luce, 1904-34. Courtesy of Hingham Historical Society

H

istorian John P. Richardson (1935–2011) spent a lifetime rummaging through attics, barns, and abandoned trash sites in search of early artifacts from his hometown of Hingham, Massachusetts. He hit the proverbial jackpot in 1977, when Mary Luce, a retired schoolteacher, invited him to purchase “odds and ends” from the studio of her late father-in-law. Much to Richardson’s amazement, the small building had stood largely undisturbed for over half century, and it still contained thousands of items owned by William Blake Luce (1860-1924), a prominent photographer and toymaker (fig.1). In addition to a large collection of finished and unfinished wooden toys (fig. 2), Richardson salvaged a group of glass-plate negatives, including more than twenty rare views of miniature furniture and dollhouses made and photographed by Luce. This extraordinary archive of

images and objects—never before seen by the public—has shed much-deserved light on one of New England’s most accomplished, yet largely forgotten, master craftsmen. William Luce was a restless artist and inventor. Before moving to the South Shore in 1897, he lived in Boston, where he worked as an illustrator for the popular children’s magazine the Youth’s Companion. In his spare time he practiced photography and tinkered with designs for electric fans, lamps, and other gadgets for which he received almost a dozen patents – only one of which achieved modest commercial success: a small snapshot “detective” camera manufactured by Perry Mason & Company in 1890. A few years later Luce pioneered the art and science of aerial kite photography. Although he selfpublished an instructional book on the topic and promoted it in trade journals, it never gained widespread appeal. ANTIQUE DOLL COLLECTOR

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Fig. 3. Portrait of George W. Fearing, by William B. Luce, 1904. Courtesy of the John P. Richardson Photograph Collection, Hingham Historical Society

The Society of Arts and Crafts, Hingham, offered the perfect venue to showcase Luce’s many talents. Founded in 1901, it sought to preserve and promote the old fashioned handcrafts of Hingham. Luce became an early advocate and, in 1904, staged several publicity photographs of the society’s leading members – most notably the veteran toymaker George W. Fearing (fig. 3). Luce’s striking portraits appeared in magazines and newspapers throughout the country, helping to reestablish Hingham as a major center of toymaking, an industry that had thrived there since the 1770s. Within a few years Luce began to make and exhibit toys of his own. A miniature paneled ice chest (figs. 4-7), complete with a tin interior and drainage pipe, represents some of his earliest work; the back is signed and dated 1908. Beneath the inscription Luce pasted a small circular label printed with his name and an engraving of the Old Ship Church – an ancient landmark that stood only a few hundred feet from his home and studio on Main Street. Miniature antique furniture accounted for most of his output. Signed pieces, of which only a few are known, include a work table and an Empire bureau in a dark stain (fig. 8). Luce stamped both items “W. B. LUCE, / HINGHAM MASS.” in blue ink on the interior of the drawers. The bureau also bears the official seal of the Society of Arts and Crafts, an indication that it was sold at one of the group’s many exhibitions held in Hingham, Boston, Detroit, Chicago, and other major American cities. Similar markings appear on Luce’s small splitspindle mirrors with faux-gilded surfaces. According

Fig. 4. Miniature work table, churn, ice chest, and bureau by William B. Luce, 1904-24. Table, churn, and ice chest courtesy of the Hersey family; bureau courtesy of Marilee Boyd Meyer 44

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to one contemporary, these versatile toys suited “lady’s chambers” as well as dollhouses. The upper tablets often featured hand-colored prints, probably of Luce’s own manufacture. An example stamped “LUCE & IVES CO. / Hingham, Mass.” was made around 1910 (fig. 9), during a brief partnership between the toymaker and a local salesman, August P. Ives. Wealthy families from all over the country purchased Luce’s extraordinary dollhouses. A timber-framed model with a fully furnished interior, as documented by a series of early photographs (figs. 10-11), confirms his status as a master artist and craftsman; it may be the same dollhouse he displayed at the society’s annual exhibition in 1915. A local newsman enthusiastically reported: “A home in the Black Forest is the theme of this year’s masterpiece. The picturesque wooden house with the long slanting roof is big enough nearly to cover the top of a small dining table. Despite the cute knocker and latch-string the exterior gives but little idea of the wonders of the interior. The marvels of an old German home, however, are easily seen, for sides and roof of the residence all lift to allow a peek within. In one of the living rooms is a bed with curtains, a vivid reminder of Jerome K. Jerome’s adventures in sleeplessness. On a carved table are beer mugs and a plate of pretzels. Spinning wheel and flax wheel attest to the persistence of domestic thrift. The wall paper has an aspect of old Nuremberg. This home of Teuton conservatism is lighted by real electric lamps.”

Fig. 5. Detail of ink stamp on work table.

Fig. 6. Detail of paper label on ice chest.

Fig. 7. Detail of paper label on bureau. Fig. 8. Miniature looking glass, by Luce & Ives Co., ca. 1910. Courtesy of Boston Children’s Museum Fig. 9. Detail of ink stamp on looking glass.

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Fig. 10. Germanic dollhouse, by William B. Luce, ca. 1915. Courtesy of Hingham Historical Society

Following Luce’s death in 1924, his son Stuart (b. 1888) took control of the studio, which had been rebranded “The Luce Specialty Shop: Makers of Old Colonial Toy Furniture.” It was probably during this later period that the shop produced a line of simple, often brightly painted chairs, tables, mirrors, bedsteads, and chests, many with floral decoration (fig. 12). Today these pieces are often mistaken as the work of German toymakers, but, in fact, the Luce shop produced them in great quantity, possibly for wholesale to major department stores. By 1934 Stuart closed the shop for good and took up work as a clerk. Without the creative guidance of his father and the support of the Society of Arts and Crafts, which had disbanded by this time, he found it difficult to earn a living making toys.

Fig. 11. Interior of Germanic dollhouse, by William B. Luce, ca. 1915. Courtesy of Hingham Historical Society

The exhibition Bucket Town: Four Centuries of Toymaking and Coopering in Hingham is on view at Old Sturbridge Village June 21 to January 18. Portions of this article have been adapted from the book Bucket Town: Woodenware & Wooden Toys of Hingham, Massachusetts, 1635-1945 by Derin Bray, published by the Hingham Historical Commission. Editor’s Note: Derin Bray is an art and antique dealer and consultant based in Portsmouth, New Hampshire.

Fig. 12. Set of miniature furniture, by William B. Luce and Stuart Luce, ca. 1920. Courtesy of New-York Historical Society 46

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SELL A DOLL IN THE EMPORIUM Purchase of an ad includes FREE internet ad on our website.

Send us a photo or a digital photo of your doll with a description and your check or credit card information. We do the rest!! Take advantage of this special forum; the cost is only $95 for a 2.4”w x 2.9”h ad space. Antique DOLL Collector, P.O. Box 239, Northport, NY 11768. Phone 1-888-800-2588. Email: antiquedoll@gmail.com

BABES FROM THE WOODS Faithful reproductions of hand carved Queen Annes and dolls by Izannah Walker. Kathy Patterson Ph. 705-489-1046 toysintheattic@ sympatico.ca

16 1/2” Rare Figure A Steiner with cafe-au-lait bisque is truly stunning. Original ethnic wig, chapeau, earrings, bisque flawless, original body with paper label in original untouched finish, along white her white painted fingernails, surely means she was sold at the most famous French Department Store, Au Nain Bleu. $6500.

Evelyn Phillips (914) 939-4455 poupees57@aol.com www.evelynphillipsdolls.com

www.babesfromthewoods.com JOIN US FOR A DOLL PLAY DAY WEEKEND!

LOFALLS DOLLS • Judy Lofall

FRIZELLBURG ANTIQUE STORE SEPTEMBER 13 and 14

e-mail: lofallsdolls@comcast.net Tel: 360.779.4926

at the

Member UFDC and NADDA

11 to 5

Loads of Fresh Merchandise! See Ad in the Classified Section for Details

K*R 117 - 18”, blue sleep eyes, brown mohair wig, closed mouth and perfect bisque. She has a nice composition body and old clothes, shoes and socks. $3600. Call 215-794-8164 or email alloyd@nni.com. Member NADDA and UFDC. Other photos and dolls may be seen at RubyLane.com/shops/anntiquedolls

SARA BERNSTEIN DOLLS

Laura Turner, proprietor, 1909 Old Taneytown Rd., Westminster, MD 21158. Open Thurs- Sun 11-5. Call us with your wants, we have an ever-changing inventory 410-848-0664 or 410-875-2850.

www.frizellburgantiques.com

Kathy Libraty’s ANTIQUE DOLLS

Email santiqbebe@aol.com

“Lori” Beautiful Baby by Swaine and CO, mold #232 $975

“Lady With a Past”

Historically inspired OOAK Art dolls by Theresa Merritt • Custom orders taken

www.ladywithapast.com dollmaker@bellsouth.net

732-536-4101 View Quality Dolls at affordable prices. 100’s of pictures and prices at my Ruby Lane Shop...

www.sarabernsteindolls.rubylane.com

28” ALL ORIGINAL Fre A Steiner (some hidden restoration to forehead) A BEAUTY $3900 30” INCREDIBLY STUNNING and chunky KR “Mein Liebling 117n $1950 10” SO RARE SIZE 0 PORTRAIT JUMEAU ALL ORIGINAL—WOW-- $6500 23” SO SAD POUTING SIMON & HALBIG CLOSED MOUTH 949 ALL ORIGINAL $1800

WWW.KATHYLIBRATYSDOLLS.COM

Phone: 718-859-0901 email: Libradolls@aol.com MEMBER: UFDC OR—Buy My Dolls on eBay where I begin most of my antique dolls for just $1—Search seller name kathylibraty.

8 MONTH LAYAWAY PLAN AVAILABLE

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Do You Have a Mystery Doll? A Search for a Family Dollhouse – Can You Help?

T

his dollhouse was originally made for my maternal grandmother, Thelma (Maestretti) Johnson, by her grandfather, Jacques Fetsch. My grandmother was an only child and enjoyed the dollhouse immensely. In my research of our family tree, I understand that Jacques would create model-sized versions of furniture he could craft so potential buyers could see his work. My mother said all the furniture in the dollhouse was crafted by Jacques as well. Jacques was a gifted cabinet and furniture maker in California in the late 1800s and early 1900s. He displayed his craftsmanship at several world’s fairs. My mother, Beverly (Johnson) Heyde, of Rochester, Indiana, and her twin sister, the late Shirley (Johnson) Glasson, were born and raised in California. Without their knowledge or approval, their father, William Johnson, concerned that the dollhouse was too large to store, is believed to have donated the dollhouse and contents to what was then the Palo Alto Convalescent Home for children sometime in the early 1950s. The convalescent home later became what is now the Stanford Children’s Hospital. In 2006, I was in contact with the hospital to see if anyone remembered the house. I sent them the same photos that appear here. The Art and Display committee chair of the hospital at that time said there was no evidence of the house when they conducted a thorough inventory in 1989. My contact then showed the photos to employees which were at the hospital prior to 1989 but no one had ever seen the dollhouse. We have one piece of furniture from the house – a dining room chair with leather trim. My mother moved to Indiana in 1956 and has always wondered what happened to the dollhouse from her childhood. She is 81 years old and her main interest is in finding out that the dollhouse still exists and is being enjoyed by its current owner. My mother is a quiet, lovely woman and rarely asks for anything. Yet, she has mentioned many times through the years how much it would mean to her to “find” the dollhouse. With the advent of the Internet and the availability of Google searching for dollhouse images, I am determined to find new avenues by which we can discover the whereabouts of the doll house. It would mean so much to my mother to know the dollhouse has been loved. Melinda (Heyde) Johnson If any of our readers have information please email Meilinda at pemgjohnson@comcast.net

I

have a black composition doll 12-13” tall. She is fixed except for arms that will move. I bought her at a doll show. She seems to have original clothes and shoes. She has holes in the bottom of her feet. The only markings I find is her name (Phyllis) on her back. I have looked in my doll books and have not found her. I hope someone might know her maker and the year. Thanks, Melodie MacLean Email Melodie at joemelmaclean2000@yahoo.com

Perhaps there is a doll in your collection that you and others have never seen before. Send us a high resolution photo and any information you have to antiquedoll@gmail.com (you may also send a print photo to Antique Doll Collector P.O. Box 39, East Petersburg, PA 17520). If you can identify a mystery doll, write to us at the address or email above. 48

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UFDC National Convention Saleroom…

A Shopper’s Paradise

A

Photos taken at the 2014 UFDC Convention in San Antonio, TX

ttendees felt like royalty upon entering the spacious Grand Ballroom at the J.W. Marriott San Antonio Hill Country Resort. Wide aisles were named for monarchs, life-size standees of famous kings and queens and lavish flower arrangements added to the elegance of the room. The 65th annual UFDC convention has come and gone, five full days packed with non-stop doll activities. As per our custom, we will be bringing you coverage of the competitive and special exhibits, but first a look at some of the wonderful dolls that were offered for sale, and possibly may still be!

A charming schoolhouse by Erma Mayer, Kathy’s and Terry’s Dolls, email: kathysandterrysdolls@comcast.net

Three gorgeous Bebes: a Bebe Jumeau $11,500, Bebe Jumeau with factory clothing and Depose mark, $16,500 and a First Series Portrait Jumeau, $19,500 offered by Samy Odin, Paris. Email: samy.odin@noos.fr

An exquisite Huret on a wood body. Valerie Fogel, Beautiful Bebes Antique Dolls, email: valerie@ beautifulbebes.com

Two Spirit Dolls, Indianapolis, IN, teach porcelain doll making and they are obviously good at it. Email: twospiritdolls@yahoo.com

All original Heubach, unmarked. Cat’s Cradle, Glen Rollins, email: glencrollins@ yahoo.com Carmel Doll Shop had an impressive double booth, Pacific Grove, CA, email: mnd@redshift.com

19-inch size 3 Bru Brevete, $18,850. Ashley’s Dolls, Whitsett, NC, email: ashleysdolls@ gmail.com

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Two lovely bebes, a Motherau and a R.D. Bebe, Rosalie Whyel and Shelley Helzer, Bellevue, WA, email: dollart@dollart.com

A magnificent 33-inch china by Schlaggenwald was offered by Sheila Needle, Oceanside, CA, email: dollwitch@cox.met

Joyce Kekatos, “Grandma’s Attic,” Bronx, NY, email: joycedolls@aol.com

Jay and Connie Lowe, Lancaster, PA, email: big.birds@comcast.net

The Kathe Kruse Doll Company traveled from Germany to attend the convention.

Sie C lever eye Steiner $5850 and 16 inch early Steiner, $5900. Marion Maus, Ellicott City, MD, email: mmausaantiques@gmail.com

Above: A sister company to Theriault’s auction, Florence and George offers gifts and collectibles for the doll collector. The Tender Years, Debbie Varner, email: queenbeev1@comcast.net

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Left: Nancy McCray, Cedar Rapids, IA. Email: nlmccray@q.com

Smiling Bru fashion, 19 inches. Betty Stepnowski, Doll Haven, email: dyannaprintz@ zoominternet.net


Becky Ourant, Village Doll Shop, Adamstown, PA, email: ourant@ptd.net

Phil May, Ocean Grove, NJ, email: dollmanofog@aol.com

Dorothy Drake, Crossroads, email: Dorothy@dolls4all.com A lovely all bisque with wardrobe, Inky Pinky Dolls, England, email: lynniejay@ blueyonder.co.uk Lynne’s doll business is named after Inky Pinky (below), a true diva.

Simonne fashion with trunk and wardrobe, Peggye Tombro, Warren, NJ. Email: ptombro@gmail.com

The Collectible Doll Company, Becky Decker, 800-566-6646.

Scott Antiques, Whitefish Bay, WI. Email: holliedaz@wi.rr.com Connie Lowe’s latest BJD creations. Connie Lowe, Lancaster, PA, email: big.birds@comcast.net

18-inch blonde china $2695. Sue Kallen, CA, email: suelkallen@yahoo.com

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A three-piece bedroom set with ormolu mounts and inlay, Sondra Krueger, email: sondkr@sondrakrueger.com

Two Portrait Fashions on the left and a Steiner type mystery fashion, Jackie Allington, email: nickandjackie@gmail.com

A bevy of beauties: P3D, Figure A Steiner, Series A Steiner and a Rabery and Delphieu. Rick Saxman, Valley Forge, PA, email: ricksax@earthlink.net Susan Sirkis has a new pattern CD entitled “La Mode Enfantine,” coming out September 1, email: ssirkis757@aol.com

Mein Liebling $3200, K*R 114 $6995 and K*R Marie $2195. Joan and Lynette Antique Dolls, email: joanlynettedolls@sbcglobal.net

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ANTIQUE DOLL COLLECTOR

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Sandy’s Dream Dolls, Houston, TX. Email: skay43@aol.com

Fritzi’s Antique Dolls, Fritzi Martinez, Yorksville, IL 60560, email: fritzisantiquedolls@comcast.net

Articulated scarecrow, an exciting new R. John Wright creation. The Toy Shoppe, Richmond, CA. www.thetoyshoppe.com

A factory original 28-inch Tete Jumeau made quite a statement. Lynn Murray and Marshall Martin, email: twosistersstudio@gmail.com or marshallmartin@earthlink.net


Doll artist Lee Feickert, The Little Ones, San Geronimo, CA, is known for her 12 inch and under antique reproductions. Email: lfeickert@comcast.net

A 21-inch Juneau fashion, $6,000. Nancy Smith, Natik, MA, email: nasdoll@comcast.net

A gorgeous Huret on Clement body, Valerie Fogel and Deanne Dodson, Beautiful Bebes Antique Dolls, email: Valerie@beautifulbebes.com

Jonathan Green, “Krahmer Puppen,� jonathangreenco.com

Block Letter FG $8950, Early EJ with original costume, $13,500 and Premiere Jumeau, $14,500. Margaret Kincaid, Baltimore, MD. Email: margaret.kincaid@gmail.com

A Japanese warrior $6750, offered by Alan Pate, specializing in fine Japanese ningyo, email: info@ antiquejapanesedolls.com

A great selection of Lenci dolls offered by Turn of the Century Antiques, email: toc@rare-dolls.com

An elaborate Parian was priced at $2500. Honey and Shars, Arizona, email: honeyandshars@yahoo.com

First Series Jumeau Portrait and E 8 J, Lofalls Dolls, Poulsbo, WA, email: lofallsdolls@comcast.net

This interesting black doll was given to a little girl in 1897. Margaret Benike, email: busybsantiques@embarqmail.com

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HAVE YOU SEEN THESE STOLEN DOLLS? Sold on the Internet. Please email owner at starvegut@aol.com

1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

FG Bride, All Original, sold $2007.77 Antique German Mechanical Bisque Circus Doll & Donkeys Pull Toy, sold $1900 1870 Rare Theroude Automaton Monkey, sold $5375 Rare All Original Bisque Character, sold $823.99 George Brown American Velocipede Clockwork Tricycle with Doll, sold $1000

6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11.

25” Eden Bebe, sold $999.50 Rare 12” Character D-4, sold $1225 Rare 18” Van Rosen, sold $8301 OIC Kestner Crying Baby, sold $1135 17” Kestner Bru-type, sold $1325 Slave Hand-Carved Figure, from a VA plantation, sold $2875

12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18.

12” Kestner Mechanical Sailor, sold $1671.79 26” S & H 1488, sold $3750 14” SFBJ clockwork – waves, flirty eyes, sold $507 12” Tete Jumeau Mechanical, sold $3077.77 K*R 117, doll, sold $1195.90 18” French Bebe, “10 B”, sold $3651 FG Pair, all original, sold $1712


Auction Gallery

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Theriault’s July 15 in San Antonio

t was wall-to-wall people for the Theriault auction preview in San Antonio, Tuesday morning, July 15 and they weren’t there for the air conditioning, although that didn’t hurt. It was a well rounded and as always, a beautifully displayed collection of French and German bisque dolls, along with some fun surprises and mystery dolls. It was the impressive dolls with sumptuous trousseaux that captivated the audience and brought some of the highest bids in the auction. Prices shown do not reflect the buyer’s premium. For additional prices visit theriaults.com and click on Proxibid.

On the right, Simon and Halbig’s 1358 character, 21 inches, wearing an antique costume, from the collection of the late Lucy Morgan, brought $20,000. In the center, Lambert’s “Magician with Double Cone Surprises,” 21 inches, brought $21,000. To its left, the “Smoking Turk,” also by Lambert, 23 inches, all original, sold for $37,400.The Huret from the Prevost era (under dome), 18 inches, in the original costume, $7500.

A lovely, early solid domed china, 17 inches, made for the French market with the original French pink kid body was sold with its labeled trunk and several handstitched couturier costumes and accessories for $16,500.

On the far right, one of Steiner’s rarest models, this Series B example wearing her antique gold costume, 23 inches, with socket head and a pronounced rounded facial shape, original body, realized $51,000. Kestner’s 221 Googly, size G, 14 inches, $5250 and a petite 221, 11 inches, $5000. A 16-inch poupee by Leontine Rohmer with swivel head, cup and saucer shoulder plate, original signed body and limbs, sold for $18,000. The Schmitt et Fils Bebe, 15 inches with trunk and trousseau, wearing the original dress, $11,000. ANTIQUE DOLL COLLECTOR

SEPTEMBER 2014

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An 18-inch A.T. by Thuillier, marked A 9 T, with original and wig, $31,000.

An exceptional Bru Bebe Modele with wooden body, 18 inches, c. 1879, brought $29,000. The 8-inch Tynie Baby, $1300.

The first lot in the auction, this handsome Gaultier soldier, 22 inches, wearing an antique regimental costume, complete with helmet, ribbons, medals and sword in its scabbard, sold for $14,500. A 19-inch cloth doll by Izannah Walker, c, 1800, $15,500.

A lovely 18-inch wood bodied poupee, with Dehors neck articulation, an extensive couturier trousseau (partly shown) and labeled trunk, from the original French estate, brought $36,000.

July 24 McMasters Harris Apple Tree Doll Auction in Newark, Ohio

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n 11-inch French closed mouth bebe, marked 4, antique human hair wig and marked Jumeau body sold for $4400. In the same auction, an 18-inch unmarked Jumeau wood-bodied fashion (hairline) brought $6000.

McMasters Harris Apple Tree Doll Auctions, 1625 West Church Street, Newark, OH 43055, 800-842-3526 www.mcmastersharris.com

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ANTIQUE DOLL COLLECTOR

SEPTEMBER 2014


Ashley’s Dolls & Antiquities

Billye Harris • 723 NC Hwy 61 South, Whitsett, NC 27377 • (336) 266-2608 Website: AshleysDolls.com • E-mail: AshleysDolls@gmail.com Visit us on Rubylane.com/shops/Ashleysdollsandantiquities • Generous Layaways Member UFDC and NADDA


Antique DOLL Collector October 2014 Vol. 17, No. 9


& LOWE Connie

Jay

P.O. Box 5206 Lancaster, PA 17606

FAX 717-396-1114 Email: big.birds@comcast.net Call Toll Free 1-888-JAY LOWE or (717) 396-9879 Always Looking to Buy Quality Dolls, Toys, Marklin Doll Carriages or Entire Estates Buy & Sell With Confidence

Member of UFDC & NADDA

An adorable 15” JDK 178 character child on a jointed German wood & composition body. Unfortunately she has a professional repair to the left side of her face, well done and not obvious until the head is lit. Priced accordingly $850 A fabulous 20” Tete Jumeau marked on rear of head “Tete Jumeau #9” and her jointed wrist composition body is marked as well. Dressed in an aqua knit outfit with matching shoes & socks, her bisque is peaches & cream, and she retains her original blonde mohair wig with a cork pate. $3850 A 12” flirty eyed papier mache googly on a cloth body in all original condition. Absolutely no paint touch up/repairs to the composition! $850 A large sized (12”) fired bisque “JUST ME” on the proper body with original clothing & wig. $1500 An all original 18” S&H 1249 mkd “SANTA” character child. Dressed in a marvelous Scottish outfit complete with his plaid shoulder drape. $850 An 18 1/2” Simon & Halbig 1329 Oriental character child. Attired in antique oriental clothing she has a tinted composition body as well as olive colored bisque... a great look and size!! $1500


Mary Ann Spinelli Nelling, Inc.

FINE ANTIQUE DOLLS AND ACCESSORIES

P.O. Box 4327, Burbank CA 91503 • e-mail: nellingdolls@gmail.com Cell: 818-738-4591 Home: 818-562-7839 • Member NADDA and UFDC BUYING & SELLING QUALITY DOLLS FOR OVER 21 YEARS

17 1/2” Huret china fashion w/ articulated wood body and antique dress from her period. Partial label on chest. $22,500.

Office Staff: Publication and Advertising: Keith Kaonis Editor-in-Chief: Donna C. Kaonis Administration Manager: Lorraine Moricone Phone: 1-888-800-2588 Art/Production: Lisa Ambrose Director/Social Media: Ellen Tsagris Contributors: Lynn Murray, Samy Odin, Andy Ourant Subscription Manager: Jim Lance Marketing: Penguin Communications Publications Director: Eric Protter Antique Doll Collector (ISSN 1096-8474) is published monthly by the Puffin Co., LLC, 15 Hillside Place, Northport, NY 11768 Phone: 1-631-261-4100

11 1/2” George III period English wooden, circa 1795, who has made it through time and play in very good shape! No repaint except her lips. $6200.

Periodicals postage paid at Northport, NY. and at additional mailing offices. Contents ©2014 Antique Doll Collector, all rights reserved. Postmaster: Send address changes to Antique Doll Collector, P.O. Box 239, Northport, NY 11768.

14” Early fashion in orig. enfantine outfit, orig. boots, pristine leather body w/ bisque arms and impeccable grooming. $6850.

Subscriptions: Send to Antique Doll Collector, P. O. Box 239, Northport, NY 11768. Phone: 1-888-800-2588 or 1-631-261-4100 Subscription Rates: One Year (Twelve Issues) $42.95; Two Years (Twenty-four Issues) $75.95. First class delivery in U.S. add $29 per year. Outside the U.S. add $30 per year. Foreign subscriptions must be paid in U.S. funds. Do not send cash. Credit cards accepted. Advertising and Editorial: Call 717-517-9217 or email antiquedoll@gmail.com Editorial Office (Send all catalogs and editorial to this address): Antique Doll Collector, P.O. Box 39, East Petersburg, PA 17520

SEE US ON THE WEB AT: http://www.antiquedollcollector.com

15 1/2” Paper mache in original multi-layered, multi-colored wool and cotton costume of Northern Europe, or some VERY cold location! $850.

email: AntiqueDoll@gmail.com

EXHIBITING: October 4 - Serendipity Doll and Toy Show, Arcadia CA, The Oak Tree Room (next to Coco’s) October 18 - Forever Young Doll Show and Sale, Pasadena CA, Pasadena Elks Lodge

Visit us at: www.maspinelli.com 4

published by the

ANTIQUE DOLL COLLECTOR

OCTOBER 2014

Antique Doll Collector is not responsible for any inaccuracies in advertisers’ content. An unsolicited manuscript must be accompanied by SASE. Antique Doll Collector assumes no responsibility for such material. All rights including translations are reserved by the publisher. Requests for permissions and reprints must be made in writing to Antique Doll Collector. ©2014 by the Puffin Co., LLC.

MOVING?

Important: We need your old address and your new. The Post Office does not forward magazines. Call 1-888-800-2588 or write to us at: P.O. Box 239, Northport, NY 11768.


Tel: 425.765.4010 Beautifulbebes@outlook.com For excellent service contact Beautiful Bebes when Selling or Consigning!

Magnificent Bru Jne 9 as Circle Dot This doll must have been kissed by the angels... Incredible cerulean blue spiral threaded eyes evenly set. Luscious pale peach tinted bisque, beautiful full rose washed lips. Superb long tailed mohair wig; a perfect compliment to brows & lavish lashes. Orig marked Bru shoes. Bébé has a pristine bisque head & shoulder plate; all fingers original & perfect. Additional pictures & details available on request. A magnificent Bébé that will hypnotize you and delight you. $23950

26” F12G Block Letter Luscious best describes this beauty! Huge blue paper weight eyes, delicately tinted cheeks and full lovely lips with a Bru-like hint of tongue.Excellent bisque. Gorgeous antique mohair wig and couture Bébé costume in plum , navy and gold. On quality French composition and wood body. Strikingly beautiful~ $6200

Member UFDC & NADDA

Little 11” Googly Oh, Boy! This little imp has no qualms about throwing a net around your heart and holding it captive! Adorable, excellent condition and so rare to find in such a sweet small cabinet size. How will he make magic in your doll room? $6375~

Tiny 8” Steiner Le Petite Parisienne A huge amount of gorgeous packed into a very petite package! This Bébé is a little stunner with her electric blue paper weight eyes fringed with lengthy lashes and multi-stroke sienna brows, looking just so slightly upward. Her serious little rosebud lips are perfectly shaped and tinted in coral.A perfect little package! $3775~

MEET US IN PERSON! Crossroads Doll & Teddy Bear Show October 11th-12th, Fairgrounds Puyallup, WA and at the Antique Doll Market at the Red Lion Hotel on November 2nd We will also be participating at the upcoming Rose Percy Event on November 1st at the Fairmount Hotel and will look forward to greeting all the registered attendees!

Sie C 9 Steiner with Lever Eyes Darling 25” Bebe with imploring huge blue eyes that sleep! The earliest example of the later ‘sleep eyed’ dolls by none other than the amazing inventor Mssr. Steiner and at this time during his partnering avec Mssr. Burgoine. Perfect pale bisque, signed in red w/ orig. purple cardboard pate. Orig body in orig finish, orig boots, fab orig dress and velvet cape and bonnet. $5800~


The Complete Guide to Antique, Vintage and Collectible Dolls

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THE INEZ GWIN AND AILENE FORD COLLECTIONS TO BE SOLD BY FRASHER’S NOVEMBER 1

October 2014 Volume 17, Number 9

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GREAT COLLECTORS THE CIRAOLO COLLECTION by Stuart Holbrook

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A VISIT WITH ANN MEEHAN PART 2 by Donna C. Kaonis We take a tour of two wonderful one-of-a-kind dolls’ houses.

About The Cover

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This exceedingly rare portrait-face model by Jumeau is from the Inez Gwin estate collection to be sold by Frasher’s in their November 1 auction in Kansas City. A wonderful circa 1880 model it is described in “The Jumeau Book,” page 232, as “an extremely rare portrait model poupée from the Jumeau firm, circa 1880, uniquely sculpted and unlike any other model”. Standing 30” tall on a uniquely designed and completely articulated manikin body, her rarity is rivaled only by her beauty and elegant presence. Inez Gwin was a dedicated supporter of U.F.D.C. and entered many of her dolls in the competitive exhibits at both regional and national conventions. This model won a first place ribbon from her appearance at the UFDC 21st annual exhibition in 1970 in Detroit and a ribbon from the 1973 convention in Louisville, Kentucky. Cover courtesy Frasher’s Doll Auctions

NATIONAL DOLL FESTIVAL SAN ANTONIO

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THE TLC GRAND TOUR... TOY WORLDS MUSEUM BASLE by Donna C. Kaonis Teddy bears and more at the largest toy and doll museum in Europe.

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2014 UFDC ANTIQUE COMPETITIVE EXHIBIT BLUE RIBBON WINNERS SAN ANTONIO, TEXAS Photographed at the 2014 United Federation of Doll Clubs National Convention

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News Auction Gallery Emporium Mystery Calendar Classified


1) Rare Miniature ‘Blue Roof‘ - 4”x6”x10” tall, with glass windows, original paper curtains, door opens, brilliant color. Rarest cabinet size! $895 2) 12” Dickensian Cloth Character unique hand painted portrait with lambswool hair, glass eyes, spectacles, walking stick ,expert tailoring with artist signed label. Mint. $195 3) 10” American Black ‘Homemade’ - hand sewn body & features, original clothes, beaded eyes, Sincerely old & sweet fun! $125 4) 10” Signed ‘Alice Bee’ Art Doll - with label - all original, hand painted face and tagged ‘Frida of Gutach in the Swartzwald’ $135 5) Domed Wax Head - ca 1830- with the authentic miniature antique oval glass dome and base, just 9” tall and only 3” deep. (see #34) $750 6) 30” Early Silk Face Babyland Rag hand painted on silk ca. 1895, in original mint classic ensemble with leather shoes all excellent and only $495 7) 12” Scarce ‘Vermont Wooden’ - 1880’s Mason Taylor type w/ pewter hands & feet (blue), fluid joints, & quaint orig. period clothes. $595 8) 12” Important ‘Alice in Wonderland’theatrical charm in this one of a kind artist made version w/ hand painted features, mohair wig, crepe paper clothes organdy apron, holding her miniature glass bottle labelled “Drink Me.” Unique and wonderful! $1200 9) Rare Googlie Characters!! (see # 27) 10) 7.5” Spooky Steiff Cat - clean with firm,upright tail, unusual in this larger size, with button! Boo! $225 11) 15” All Original Poured Wax - Lovely 1870’s English, haunting glass eyes, ivory complexion, ornate factory chemise, uncut wig, perfect limbs. $750 12) 18” Lady China ca. 1840 - graceful & slender ‘Covered Wagon’ with pink tone watery glaze, china limbs, fashionable heirloom clothes, mint. $295 13) Rare 6” Pre-1900 Kuhnlenz Mignonette - slender French limbs with socket head, blue glass eyes, mohair wig & fancy pert silk costume - a French export delicacy. $1200 14) 11” Neapolitan Creche - mysterious man, much character, drama and facial art, glass eyes, excellent paint, great jacket/ metal buttons - needs pants! Just $595 15) 9” Rare Mongoloid Creche important Neapolitan figure, glass eyes, perfect fingers. Rarified, important personality for the advanced creche. $750 16) 14” Hand Sewn Fabric Doll - with painted features, lambswool wig, classic American clothes w/ 3-additional fabric faces! All contained in the orig. sewing bag! $350 17) 19” Happy Folk Art Boy - authentic! Clever original clothes, Oversized comic hands w/ great fingers, artful mix of fabrics & facial embroidery, all clean, all American - the tops! $495 18) 12” Cabinet Size Piano - nothing more romantic than music by candlelight! Hinged lid lined w/ lithographed sheet music, only 7” deep, just $395

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19) 5” Devilish All Bisque Googly! - Really big eyed imp, rare socket head toddler, flawless quality, dressed for Halloween… horns to tail! $1200 20) Choice 7” Mint in Box w/ Label ‘South Sea Baby’ - This UFDC blue ribbon winner has it all - including the lid! Mint! $495 21, 22) The Perfect Multi-face Doll - Everything you seldom see in the same example! No cheek rubs, easily turned head by orig. knob and working pull-cord crier in a great body! All in a tidy 12” size with a short gown! (see # 33) $1495 23, 24) Rare 10” Brown Bebe Jumeau ‘Size 1’ - This super rare size made in 1907 has lovely quality color, rich paperweight eyes, Factory wig and Chemise beneath first owner original high style couture! Fabulous cabinet prize. $3000 25, 26) 18” Factory Dressed Simon Halbig ‘1009’ - Mint French export beauty, gorgeous color and glistening PW eyes, mint from factory wig/pate to side button leather boots, mint belted Factory Chemise, and undies, early jtd. body and finish. A classic French Trade beauty in a choice color! $1500 27 Rare Recknagel Googlies Scary pair!! Mold 72 & 73; The 7” fellow has orange hair, buggy intaglio eyes, watermelon grin and zany factory suit and 2-tone snake skin shoes! $1100 The other is 6.5” with upturned loopy eyes flipped out black molded curls. Max & Moritz gone nuts! (see #9) $850 28, 29) 9” Rare Brown Heubach Character - This very doll is shown in the Marie Tarnowska book “Rare Character Dolls” for a good reason! A rare exotique black with side glancing lively lidded eyes, molded tongue, very unusual contrasting molded black hair, plus Factory Original Costume! Blue Ribbon calibre! $1495 30) “Over the Knee” Black Stocking Halbigs - Scarce 3.5” size for these desirable Pre-1900 all bisques with socket heads, PW eyes, and original exquisite miniature costumes, complete w/ caps & great wigs! $1200 31) 4.5” Bare Foot All Bisque Boy- so unusual with a closed mouth, glass eyes, jointed arms & legs, Factory Original wig & clothes, quality & mint! $895 32) 5” Bare Foot All bisque Girl very special ‘Halbig’ with socket head, clo/mo, glass eyes, the early limbs w. little toes plus Factory Original wig & clothes! Mint $1600 33) Multi-face Doll - Shhhh The sleeping face (see #21) $1495

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(212) 787-7279 P.O. Box 1410 NY, NY 10023

Quality Antique Dolls by Mail matrixbymail@gmail.com

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34) Rare Wigged Wax Head ca. 1830 - Milliner style ornate,curled, braided and festooned, still in the unbelievable original set… including the feather! An exceptional museum class antiquity (see #5). $750

36) 11’ Jumeau Poupee in Heirloom Couture a petite ‘Size 2’ in bronzed rose silk gown with panels, pleats, tucks, matching filigree bag and matching chapeau above scarce auburn factory wig with cork pate, mint signed body. A regal cabinet size aristocrat. $2500

35) Important 1830’s Papier Mache - another rarity, a 9” Male Milliner’s with a wooden body, jointed at the elbows, shoulders, hips & knees, plus a never seen molded mache Top Hat! In his original heirloom clothing, a collectors prize! $2500

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37) French Bru Mannequin Head from the Margaret Woodbury Strong Museum comes this boyish Bru faced composition head 7” high & 16” cir. with PW eyes, lined with the French newspaper. From the shop window to your cabinet. $1200

40) 15” Neapolitan Creche Patrician portrait of an animated aristocratic woman with glass eyes intricate details of teeth and tongue and numerous carved ringlets, one mended foot beneath original garments just $595

39) Young and Handsome describes this 11” Neapolitan Gentleman - with brilliant, youthful facial artistry, glass eyes, vivid complexion and fine elegant clothes. $650

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38) Museum Class Wooden - This astounding and historic figure is a lithe 26” tall wonder with fluid joints allowing her to sit at a cabinet height of 13 inches. She is all original in classic puff sleeves w/ gauntlet forearms, plus her corset, corset cover, pantaloons, and hand sewn red laced shoes over her original carved ones. Bequeathed in excellent condition she features a most remarkable, sizable multi-color ribbed comb that sits like a crown high atop her lovely face which is further adorned by an ecstatic wealth of painted wisps and spit curls. Few such wooden dolls exist! $7500

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42) Heirloom Aristocratic Jumeau - a precious jewel (see #36)

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43) Important Glass Eye Parians - Quite the couple! made in 1870’s, married for years! Franklin Pierce at 19” features rarely seen glass eyes, captivating artwork and rich molded lustre collar. She, a Rare Socket Head Parian with glass eyes, molded ribbon encircles the hair, pc’d ears, and richly costumed elegance as seldom seen. From a private collection. $2000 each or both $3600

41) Companion French Mannequin Head - also from the Strong Museum he is 8.5” high & 19” cir. with dark PW eyes, side parted hair and manly features he embraces the premodernist aesthetic that was to come. Handsome, artful and compelling $895


Two ways to buy great dolls from us...

BECKY’S Back Room on

Located in Stoudtburg Village Open by appointment We welcome your visit 8 N. Village Circle P.O. Box 705 Adamstown, PA 19501

15” Russian Child $695

Three small Parians $595

View our dolls online at our exclusive shop:

BECKYSBACKROOM.RUBYLANE.COM 16” E7J Jumeau Bebe $6250

5” Orsini Didi $1500

7.75” China with wood body $2250

New dolls listed every week!

4” Happifats $250

17.5” Kley & Hahn Character $3250

Telephone: 717-484-1200 • Mobile: 610-662-5473 • Email: ourant@me.com

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ANTIQUE DOLL COLLECTOR

OCTOBER 2014


Gigi’s Dolls & Sherry’s Teddy Bears Inc. Allow Us To Help You Discover The Child Within You!

Schoenhut Maggie (9”) & Jiggs (7”), complete with rolling pin and corned beef & cabbage, dolls are in there original costumes, Maggie has some paint flakes, stringing loose $515.

23” Simon Halbig S 11 H 1009 DEP St, blue sleep eyes, blonde mohair wig (as is), wonderful high forehead, pierced ears $725. 12” Heubach Koppelsdorf 321 7/0 baby, blue sleep eyes, breather nose, antique clothing, cute baby $195.

11” CM FG Marotte on ivory whistle handle, 2 ½” shoulder head w/ blue PW eyes, pierced ears, all original silk and metal lace costume, great face, does not work $1250.

17 ½” All Original Miss Revlon in Cherry Dress #3777 w/ box & catalog, crisp dress, slip, nylons, black shoes, straw hat w/ flowers, pearl earrings, really pretty face $195. 19” Ideal Auburn Toni in original pink dress w/ white organdy overlay & panties, gold sandals, green blue sleep eyes, great facial coloring $165.

19 ½” S & H H X III Germany, Heinrich Handwerch, brown sleep eyes, original HH wig, vintage clothing, leather shoes, left hand repainted $495.

5” UNIS Paris 301 all original w/ label – Fabrication Francaise Eden Bebe, last of the Mignonnettes $150. 4” German blue glass eyed all bisque, all original in lederhosen & vest, mohair wig $310. 2 ½” French All Bisque in gray uniform, jointed head $225. 2 ½” French All Bisque in black felt suit & hat $225. 2 ½” French All Bisque red felt hat & brown shorts $195.

18 ½” Kestner 143, blue sleep eyes, original wig & plaster pate $650. 12” Kestner 143, blue sleep eyes, original HH wig, sweet size $625.

6 ½” x 5” 1950’s Ohio Arts Sheet Metal Buggy w/ metal wheels, plastic hood $49.95 4 ½” All Bisque Bye-lo all original clothes, sticker on chest, blue painted eyes $250 $250. Now $195. 20” Hertel Schwab & Co 150/11, brown sleep eyes, great molded o/c mouth, 5 piece compo baby body $295.

16” Platinum Blond Terri Lee in tagged sundress & overdress, nice painting, marked Terri Lee $225. 16” 1949 Painted Patent Pending Terri Lee w/ ash blond transitional wig, beautiful facial painting, original white & red striped dress & raincoat w/ hat $485. 16” Brunette Terri Lee in tagged sundress & overdress, nice painting, marked Terri Lee $225.

NASB Dolls in Boxes: RARE Family Series – Mammy and Baby #83, very minty clean, jointed arms & legs on both dolls, wrist tag $550. Margie Ann in Playsuit #78 w/ pudgy tummy, all original w/ booklet (no wrist tag), bright crisp blue playsuit, top of box as is $250. #112 A Dillar A Dollar a Ten O’clock Scholar, minty fresh w/ tag (off) & booklet $45. #115 Little Boy Blue w/ jointed arms & legs, no tags, chip on finger, box as is $95.

LAYAW AVAILA AY BLE

9” Lenci tagged Mascotte in beautiful white organdy dress w/ mint green & black felt trim, yellow felt hat w/ felt flower, pantalettes, felt shoes, blonde mohair wig, brown painted eyes $295. 14” Lenci Girl w/ Lucia face, tagged w/ 1939-41 tag, in green & yellow striped white dress w/ green felt trim, green hat w/ edelweiss, shoes, blonde braids, brown painted eyes $495.

9” Effanbee Butin Nose 1939 all original, some crazing, very sweet $165. 7 ½” Baby Sandy by Freundlich 1939-42, nice molding & coloring $185. 8 ½” Our Pet by AM – marked Trademark Our Pet Registered Germany, 10/0, on 5 piece toddler body, great personality, blue glass eyes $225. 8” Cameo Scootles compo, great expression, very faint crazing, redressed $295. 11” SH Parian like w/ molded hair, jewelry, black band, blue painted eyes, shoulder plate has had repair around neck & glued right shoulder $295.

13” Kestner 196, sweet size in original clothing, undergarments, shoes & socks, brown sleep eyes, inserts at brow for fur (worn), HH wig $395. 13” All original in factory dress & bonnet, shoes & socks, AM 2/0, brown sleep eyes, blonde mohair wig $150.

16 ½” Early English Sasha with tube, beautiful blue eyes, blonde variegated hair, light lips, small rub on upper lip $250. 11” Baby “Boy” all original in white dress & pants, w/ wrist tag, no box $110.

19 ½” Bruno Schmidt on toddler body, blue sleep eyes, HH wig, vintage clothing, leather shoes, BSW in heart, w/ Steiff woolie bird $650.

Ideal 1959-62 12” Shirley Temple Giftset #9520 in original box with doll in slip & pantie & 4 outfits – yellow coat & red hat, aqua & white PJ’s w/ slippers, red, white & blue dress, red & white top & blue skirt & shorts, (none are tagged but all are original to set), ST purse & extra dress, small spot on forehead, box top 1 side as is $295.

36” Ideal Shirley Temple in pink reproduction dress w/ script pin, jointed wrist body, nice hair, cheeks have a few rubs $650. 36” Ideal Shirley Temple in vintage dress w/ script pin (as is), few cheeks rubs, nice hair $650.

6029 N. Northwest Hwy. Chicago, IL 60631 • 773-594-1540 • (800-442-3655 orders only) • Fax 773- 594-1710 Open: Tues., Wed., Sat. 10 a.m. - 5 p.m., Thurs., Fri. 10 a.m. - 6 p.m. Closed Sun. & Mon. Near O’Hare, Park Ridge & Niles

Chicago’s finest selection of Antique, Modern and Collectible Dolls, Barbie, Gene, Alexander, Tonner, Fashion Royalty, Steiff, Dollhouses and Accessories. Member U.F.D.C. & NADDA • Worldwide Shipping

Contact us for Monthly Specials! Tour our shop at: www.gigisdolls.com & join us on Facebook


NEWS

“Minuscules”… The playful universe of pocket dolls

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More NEWS on page 59 14

ANTIQUE DOLL COLLECTOR

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Above: Simon & Halbig mignonnette, circa 1884 (18cm) Left: Mignonnette from La Poupée Modèle, original wardrobe, circa 1895/1905 (13cm)

Above left: French mignonnettes and their wardrobe, 1879 (13 cm) All photos © Jean Dalmard / Collection Musée de la Poupée-Paris

n honor of their 20th anniversary, the Musée de la Poupée is currently exhibiting pocket dolls from the last quarter of the 19th century, along with their miniature world including rooms, furniture, settings, clothes and other accessories. Pocket Dolls appeared on the market circa 1876, at the same time as the articulated bebe. The most requested models were entirely made of bisque, while cheaper ones were realized with semi-articulated composition bodies. These little dolls, which fit into a pocket, made in France and Germany, became children’s most beloved toys between the 1870 and 1914 wars. At first called miniature dolls, Fernand Sustrac received a patent in 1877 for the production of entirely articulated 14 cm tall dolls with ball joints at the elbows and, sometimes, at the knees. In 1879 some pocket dolls appeared in some Parisian department catalogues, made by Gaultier, Julien or Schmitt, among others. In August 1878 La Poupée Modèle launched a pocket doll, later named, in February 1880, “Mignonnette.” It was sold in the magazine until 1917 and it reached the peak of popularity at the beginning of the 20th century. In France, the main miniature doll maker was the porcelain maker François Gaultier, who worked until the end of the 19th century. His main German competitor was Simon & Halbig, who dominated the western market after Gaultier interrupted the production in 1899. Simon & Halbig’s mignonettes experienced a bigger success than Gaultier’s, what explains why they are commonly found in France. The 1912 SFBJ catalogue (Société Française de Fabrication de Bébés et Jouets) presented an extraordinary collection of “Lilliputiens” all bisque dolls, standing 6 cm, with historical, folk or carnival costumes. Germanmade, they were 3 to 3.5 cm tall, made by Carl Horn and recognizable with their entirely knitted costumes. The exhibit continues until January 24, 2015. For additional information: www.museedelapoupeeparis.com

Above: French mignonnette (13 cm), new outfit in antique box Left: Carl Horn minuscules, mid war period (3 to 3.5 cm)


SANDY’S DREAM DOLLS For a Houston adventure please visit our spacious location at

Thompson’s Antique Center of Texas

Texas’ largest antique center with over 50 antique dolls and accessories for sale.

Sandy Kralovetz Always Buying Dolls of Quality Member UFDC & NADDA

24” J.D.K. Bald head baby Brown eyes/ open mouth 5 piece baby body $950 20” J.D.K. 257 Open Mouth Brown Sleep eyes 5 Piece Baby Body $750 22” J.D.K. Bald head baby Open mouth Blue sleep eyes 5 Piece baby body $700

9950 Hempstead Road • 600 Northwest Mall • Houston, TX 77092 Call for doll information • 602.228.1829 • 281.339.0269 • skayk43@aol.com Mailing address: 9825 Moers Rd, Houston, Texas 77075

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ANTIQUE DOLL COLLECTOR

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The Inez Gwin and Ailene Ford Collections to be Sold by Frasher’s November 1

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or Inez Gwin it all began more than fifty years ago. Her daughter, Barbara Broberg, gives a glimpse into how that 58-year journey as a doll collector began and how it continued to grow. “My mother, Inez Gwin, started collecting her antique dolls around 1956. She started collecting them for me, her daughter. As time went by she became more involved in collecting them even as my interests in them were waning. I remember each year taking our vacations when the doll club had their conventions. We traveled all over the United States. My mother displayed her dolls and won many ribbons at these conventions. Daddy enjoyed attending as much as my mother. Daddy was extremely supportive of my mother’s interest in her dolls. On her birthday, Christmas, or anytime my mother saw a doll she wanted she would usually receive it from Daddy. My mother truly loved her dolls and made sure they were dressed appropriately for their period. She enjoyed setting them under the Christmas tree or setting up a tea party for them. The two upstairs bedrooms of our home were dedicated to the dolls. I hope their new owners will get as much enjoyment and pleasure from them as she did. My mother belonged to the United Federation of Doll Clubs and her local Kentucky Bluegrass Doll Club in Louisville, Kentucky. She served as Chairman of the Antique Competitive Exhibit for the UFDC for many years. She was a past president of her chapter and had made many life long friends in both organizations. She was also a collector of fine antique furniture and other collectibles and was very proud of all of her collections but mostly of her antique dolls. My mother passed away this year at the age of 95 and still belonged to her local club as a nonactive member.”

Bru Jne size 9 bebe from the Chevrot-era vies with all to steal the show.

The 28” Bru poupee is made even more desirable with fully-articulated patented wood body and swivel waist. 18

ANTIQUE DOLL COLLECTOR

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At 30” this early, fine quality china lady with beautiful blue glass eyes is most impressive.

Circa 1880 superb 23” French bebe by Schmitt et fils has signed body and wonderful artistic sculpting and facial painting.


Grand in size and rarity is the 32” pink-tinted china lady with 1840’s hair style and antique costume.

The Kammer and Reinhardt 116/A character toddler is just right to accompany the unusually large, 33” model of Kestner J.D.K. 260

A magnificent 30” circa 1850 china lady has exceedingly rare hair style and superior quality porcelain and facial painting.

All French and all in blue are a Bebe Jumeau Triste, 26” and a Figure A Steiner Bebe, 28”.

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or Ailene Ford collecting and costuming dolls has been her passion for many years. Certain faces were unforgettable and seemed to beckon to her over and over again as she amassed her collection. Her focus has been on dolls of larger size, and many, many examples are offered in the sale. Whether German or French, size mattered to Ailene. Her collection of piano babies is exceptional, and once again, size was important along with artistry and quality. Ailene’s talents as a seamstress led to many happy hours spent designing and sewing costumes for her dolls. It was indeed, a perfect fit. Ailene’s wish now is that her cherished dolls be offered at auction, finding homes with other collectors who will continue to care for and preserve them.

Two Simon & Halbig dolls; a fine closedmouth example of mold 939 joined by a seldom-seen mold 120 in all-original costume.

A Jumeau Premiere bebe with incredibly beautiful wrap-around eyes is indeed “unforgettable”.

From a collection of over 30 pieces, is this hard-to-find, 10” matched pair of Conta & Boehme piano babies with plate and cup. ANTIQUE DOLL COLLECTOR

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rasher’s will offer these two doll collections in a catalogued auction titled “My Unforgettable Ones” on November 1, 2014 in Kansas City. The sale will be held at KCI Expo Center and Holiday Inn Hotel with free shuttle service between the auction and KCI airport. Attendance at the live auction is the best way to bid on these lovely dolls. For those who cannot attend, absentee, telephone and live online bidding is available. An 80page color catalog is available for $43.00 including priority postage and after-sale prices realized. The auction will also be posted online at liveauctioneers.com. To order the catalog, or for more information, call Frasher’s at 816-625-3786 or email frasher@aol.com

French Bisque Bebe Bru known as Circle/ Dot Model with rare painted teeth. Circa 1880 in large 25” size with superblysculpted details.

ÉCOLE DES POUPÉES

MAKE YOUR RESERVATION NOW!

Samy Odin, Ann Coleman and Margaret Gray Kincaid Welcome you for a winter session of

BEBE JUMEAU Study of Original Fashions Learn how to Appreciate the Authenticity and Historical Significance of the Jumeau Company

Hands-on examination of antique Jumeau Bébés and their wardrobes from the Musée de La Poupée-Paris and private U.S. collections

DECEMBER 24, 2014

to be Held at Margaret Gray Kincaid’s charming house, fully decorated for Christmas, in Baltimore, Maryland It all starts on Tuesday Evening with a welcome dinner. Seminars, workshops and programs on Wednesday and Thursday. All meals included with a Gala Dinner on Thursday night.

December Gaithersburg Show following Saturday and Sunday December 6-7

Free Admission with early entry to the show included Cost: $650 per person CONTACT: Margaret Kincaid 646-709-4340 or margaret.kincaid@gmail.com or write to 17 Elmwood Road, Baltimore Maryland 21210 20

ANTIQUE DOLL COLLECTOR

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A sampling of the numerous large and life-size German and French characters from the Ford collection include the 26” SFBJ 251 toddler, 27” K * R 117n flirty-eye, and the 24” Kestner 260 baby with molded hair.


Visit my website: www.grandmasatticdolls.com

4” Kestner All Bisque Pouty W/ Bootines, mint pale bisque overall, incl. orig. early peg strung JDK body, “swivel neck”, br. glass eyes, orig. long mohair wig, orig. lacy dress, undies & a darling hat. Painted multi-strap bootines & an adorable pouty mouth. PRECIOUS early teeny all bisque!! $1975.

8” K * R 101 “Marie”, rare brown intaglio eyes, perfect bisque, orig. wig w/coiled braids, orig. dotted batiste dress, shoes, undies & slip plus Fr. ant. hat, orig. fully jointed K*R body, including elbows & knees. Absolutely ADORABLE in this teeny size!!! Only.... $1900. 7” K * R 114 “Hans”, blue intaglio eyes, perfect bisque, orig. mohair wig, adorable all “orig.” woolen sailor costume shoes & socks, orig. fully jointed K*R body incl. elbows & knees. darling size, GREAT pouty face. Great match w/big sister or all alone!!! Tiniest size made. Only....$1975.

13” Steiner Figure C Bebe, gorgeous blue p/w eyes, early mauve blush under brows, mint pale bisque, orig. mohair wig, orig. Steiner pate, FACTORY orig. pale aqua silk & lace dress, undies, socks, silk & lace matching hat ant. Fr. shoes. On orig. early str. wrist Steiner body w/earliest Cadeus mark. ABSOLUTELY STUNNING!!!! $6775.

Joyce Kekatos e-mail: joycedolls@aol.com I buy dolls and sell on consignment. 2137 Tomlinson Avenue, Bronx, NY 10461 home: 718-863-0373 cell: 917-859-2446

10” Series C Steiner Bebe, br. lever eyes, early mauve blush under brows, immaculate pale bisque, orig. skin wig, “FACTORY” 2 pc. silk & lace dress, undies, socks. hat & ant. shoes. Early orig. st. wrist Steiner body. Was mine for many years!!! First time up for sale!! Absolutey GORGEOUS!! $15,750.

7.5’’ S & H All Bisque, gorgeous pale bisque, “swivel neck” br. sl. eyes, orig. long mohair wig, darling ant. silk dress & Fr. ant. silk & lace hat. RARE peach stockings & multi strap bootines. Orig. S & H body, bisque is fabulous overall except one teeny fleck at top of chest, early peg strung. Nice large size & GORGEOUS!!! $3850.

Not Pictured: Several of the BEST R.John Wrights MIB

LAYAWAY AVAILABLE • Member UFDC & NADDA

We look forward to providing you with that special accessory for your precious Bébé Built with pride and love in the USA

This large screen has a shelf under the mirror that would serve well as a display for little mignottes or a perfume bottle collection.

Vintage Vignette is the purveyor of antique whimsies and fineries for your most precious Bébés and Lady Dolls.

Antique artwork dated 1896

623-206-3438

vintagevignette@hotmail.com

Our antique-style dressing screens are one of a kind and we use only the finest materials: solid oak construction, double action brass hinges (which allows the screen to fold flat for travel), custom fretwork, vintage and antique fabrics/laces. They are available in any number of panels and range from 14” to 36”.

Special orders welcome - please allow 4 -6 weeks for delivery. We are also happy to work with customer fabrics/artwork… ANTIQUE DOLL COLLECTOR

OCTOBER 2014

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GREAT COLLECTORS The Ciraolo Collection By Stuart Holbrook

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t was on Fran Ciraolo’s birthday in 1980 that her husband Chuck started it all. As he often recounts in his smiling soft spoken manner, “the most expensive doll I ever bought.” Well, not really, it was a Kestner 171 and was the product of a challenge put forth by Fran for him to find something for her birthday that did not involve jewelry. The next day Chuck happened upon a shop owned by Gloria Osborne, a San Diego doll dealer, and saw the perfect gift that did not involve jewels. So, he bought the doll on a whim, this Kestner, with no idea really as to why. Little did either know that this doll would inspire the creation of one of the great American collections of the past thirty years. “Chuck and Fran.” They are known as that, a couple that is truly linked in name and legend. You never do really see them apart. Collecting is done together. The smiles and laughter are shared experiences for all that know them or even those who just offer a fleeting “hello”. No need to use their last names, “Chuck and Fran” will suffice (say them together always) and all will know whom you are talking about. “Chuck and Fran” started in the early 1950’s when the two met amidst the boom of California and the 24

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opportunities that came forth in America after WWII. California was the center of it all and Chuck, a second generation native of the California Central Valley and, Fran, who had just arrived amidst the rush of the California boom, met and married and began their dream. But, first on their list was Nevada…a then dusty and barren state that is far from the boom we imagine now. Mid-century pioneers, Chuck and Fran set out for Reno to start their new life together. With just a small savings, an idea, and the willingness to jump forth together as a team, they started a small drive-in restaurant (think A&W) that was such a popular venue in American culture at the time. It grew to two, then three, and Chuck and Fran were working at a frenzied pace together to build their own “American Dream.” Here was the “Greatest Generation” at work creating the foundation for a future of American dreamers and doers. Chuck and Fran are the embodiment of what became a foundation in this nation of entrepreneurial spirit and hard work. It was not easy though. One should never underestimate the blood, sweat, and tears that went into this process. The hours were long and the work grueling. Their one luxury at the time was a Cadillac, the symbol of success in the American 50’s, one they would enjoy briefly driving to


work early in the morning and returning late at night. To this day they both drive a Cadillac. Fran, being the sentimental one, clings to her 1970’s model that she drives still. The two missed California though. The long hours were grueling and they longed for the sun, beaches, and lifestyle that lay on the other side of the Sierra range. So they sold their businesses, packed up their Cadillac, and left for the sunniest and happiest place they knew (so fitting for these two), San Diego. From there, with experience and money made in Reno, Chuck and Fran delved into a number of ventures that rewarded them further and was a product of the conservative and hard-working mentality of that time. Start businesses, build them, nurture them, and good things will come. Here they truly established their success, as well a beautiful home and a family that would join them in business over the years. The success they built though came from the simple formula of working together amidst trust and love and the one thing that has bound them for years, fun. They shared everything. Their home, family, businesses: it was never a singular task but a joint process and an adventure of sorts. Most importantly, it was always surrounded by laughter. When dolls came into their lives on that birthday in 1980 it created a whole new chapter in this American Dream. That one single Kestner, that one humble doll, would morph into a thousand dolls that created a vision that was singularly theirs. Not hers. Not his. Theirs. The Ciraolo collection was a mosaic of two tastes and a couple making choices together. What is so amazing about this collection is that not one single decision to choose a doll (well, except for the Kestner) was ever made alone. Two as one. Or, Twenty. Yes, this is how many Jumeau Triste’s they currently own. It is a doll for which they both share a complete love, and it is the defining model within their collection. Sure, there is an A. Marque, countless Bru and Thullier bebes and a bevy of every rare French doll you can imagine. But the Triste is, in the eyes of this enthusiastic couple, the most perfect doll. And really, who can argue as they describe it? Chuck and Fran will talk about the dreamy look of the Triste, the way its eyes speak to you, the link to the sculptor Carrier-Belleuse, that special nose, and the uniquely sculpted features. Who can dispute their taste for one of the most perfect dolls ever created? And, as they line her living room, all on display to compare, we see first hand how special these dolls really are. Chuck and Fran are easily the world’s caretaker of the Triste and will

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gladly serve to remind all of its significance in doll history. Fran also loves cats. That is, she LOVES them, a lot. Well, all animals in fact. She has even been known to feed a few coyotes that frequent her back yard in the hills overlooking San Diego. All are cherished. The dolls are similar. Why? Perhaps the only time you might see the two ever disagree is when Chuck thinks “we should weed out the first common dolls we bought” and Fran says “they are all a part of our family and have a story to tell in our collection.” Every collector can respect this. And, while one might wonder why an Armand Marseille would sit in a cabinet with Schmitt and A.T. bebes, it clearly makes sense in the way Fran tells it. The emotion of a story told complete is a powerful one indeed. Who Chuck and Fran are is mirrored in their dolls. Their personality is reflected in the humble approach that collecting is not for the ego but for the heart. They laugh at their mistakes. But don’t cast them aside. They give them a home. There is no weeding, just growing and enjoying the place that all of their dolls have amidst the happy life of a collector. Chuck and Fran love to travel as well. The world has been their playground of sorts in which dolls fit perfectly into the journey. When they first started collecting in the early 80’s the two decided to drive around America in a classic tale of “the hunt.” Thinking it a good way to meet people, explore towns they might never otherwise, they placed advertisements in papers and antique periodicals announcing their route and that they were “looking for old dolls.” From California to Florida they scoured the countryside and loaded their RV, meeting people along the way and learning something new about dolls in the process. And, as those who have crossed paths with them over the years have experienced, leaving a lasting and happy impression. They have and still do frequent Europe and are often found running from museum to museum and shop to shop. Friends throughout the world have been made in this manner and new dolls added to their collection. One story they love to recount concerns a cruise which docked in Copenhagen for nine hours. As others stayed close and enjoyed the city, they, instead, hopped a train to Billund, a three hour 26

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How can you just stop at one? Fran and Chuck own twenty lovely Jumeau Tristes, their favorite doll.

journey away, to visit the famous Lego Museum and its collection of antique dolls. Upon arriving they were met with a surprise. It had closed just a few weeks before with the contents scheduled for auction! What could only be thought of as a scripted comedy is that the very next summer, while in Vienna, they set aside a day to visit the Puppenmuseum Wien owned by Vaclav Sladky. It was, in fact, their main reason for wanting to be in Vienna as this charming museum had become a place of legend. They set off in the morning and found it. Closed. Again. The sign was gone and they asked around, being told at a clock shop next door that the museum had shut down recently and the contents were to be auctioned. The two laughed about it, telling everyone that they seemed to be the “curse of museums.” In the end though, Chuck and Fran got to see them both, one at an auction in Las Vegas and another at an auction in Newport Beach, CA. Not quite how they imagined but in this instant Chuck and Fran got the reward of actually buying pieces from them and meeting the

owners. They proudly show them in their collection today and recount the story to many about their “museum mis-adventures.” As collectors so well know, great collections are like museums. Chuck and Fran, who are unassuming and gracious, welcome people to enjoy their collecting passion and open their doors regularly for all collectors to see. As well, they are endlessly giving to community events, clubs, and organizations to educate and nurture new collectors. As they enter their 80’s, you can never get them to slow down. Still with boundless energy, an unstoppable spirit, and fortified with what is the greatest benefit to longevity and youth - a never-ending smile - Chuck and Fran will be an inspiration to new collectors for years to come. In the same way they look at people, the Bru bebe is as important as the Marseille doll, the Albert Marque doll just as beautiful as the doll that started it all, the Kestner 171. All have a gift. Together, they form the tapestry of a well-lived life. ANTIQUE DOLL COLLECTOR

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Carmel Doll Shop, Home of the Grovian Doll Museum, is pleased to announce its upcoming

Lunch, Listen and Learn Event

The Way r They Wea

Saturday, November 15, 2014 Our doors will open at 11:00 am

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egistered guests are invited to spend a memorable day at the Carmel Doll Shop when Michael Canadas, speaker for this entertaining and educational event, will share not only exquisite examples of dolls with their original wardrobes, but also exceptional doll costumes of many types. Many of the items that guests will be invited to view in the speciallycreated exhibit, are pieces in The Grovian’s private inventory, and are those which have not been publicly exhibited to date.

Michael Canadas and David Robinson will co-host an American-style high tea where attendees can expect the white glove treatment from the staff of Carmel Doll Shop. Warm scones with butter and jam, a wide variety of finger sandwiches, and an assortment of tasty sweets will be served.

The cost for this special event is $55 per registrant, and attendance will be limited to 36 guests only, so it is suggested that you sign up early. (A waiting list will be compiled after our 36 seats have filled.) Activities will take place at the home of Carmel Doll Shop: 213 Forest Avenue, Pacific Grove, California 93950

RESERVATION FOR

Lunch, Listen and Learn Event: The Way They Wear Please complete this order form and send with Credit Card information or Check made out to The Grovian Doll Museum. $55 Send to: Carmel Doll Shop 213 Forest Ave. Pacific Grove, CA 93950

NAME / PHONE ADDRESS

CITY, STATE, ZIP

CREDIT CARD INFORMATION: CARD#

3 DIGIT SECURITY CODE

EXP. DATE SIGNATURE


Auction Gallery

Preview: Important Doll Estate and Online Auction

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magine walking into a house packed floor to ceiling with antique dolls and toys! New discoveries being made every day… it’s a collector’s dream come true. In our next issue you’ll find complete details of this once-in-alifetime onsite estate sale to be held November 7 and 8 in Gilbert, Arizona followed by an online auction November 15 through the 22nd.

All major credit and debit cards accepted. Approximately two weeks prior to the onsite auction, photos will be available at estatesales.net For inquiries email: antiquedollsandtoys@gmail.com

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n August 30 a 19” Alexander Princess Margaret in court gown, made in 1953 only, sold for $1075 at Sweetbriar Auctions.

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adenburger Spielzeugauktion sold this circa 1840 doll in traditional costume for approximately $3650. The dollhouse kitchen, Zurich, Switzerland, brought approximately $5575 (dolls were sold separately.)

We would like to thank the following auction houses for their participation: Sweetbriar Auctions, P.O. Box 37, Earleville, MD 21919. www.sweetbriarauctions.com Ladenburger Spielzeugauktion GmbH Lustgartenstraße 6, D 68526 Ladenburg www.spielzeugauktion.de 30

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A Visit with Ann Meehan Part 2

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by Donna C. Kaonis

nn Meehan’s first important dolls’ house was purchased at Sotheby’s New York in 1978. She unknowingly sat next to Malcolm Forbes and asked him what he was there for. “I like boats,” he said. Quite an understatement for one of the leading collectors of the twentieth century! Both Mr. Forbes and Ann were successful that day although Ann had no idea of how she would pay for the house which cost $5500, a problem Mr. Forbes did not share. She took the contents of the dolls’ house with her, but since she was taking the shuttle from Manhattan back to Boston, she arranged to have the dolls’ house shipped. Ann was scheduled to give a final exam to her students at 7 pm and she barely managed to get on the plane in time. The pilot had just approached the plane as she was boarding and he kindly took her packages and put them in the cockpit! She made it to the classroom just as the bell rang. Following the test, she called Lucy Morgan and offered to take a significant discount off the price of a dolls’ house if Lucy would wire it overnight which she did. The Regency dolls’ house is over 6.5 feet tall. Four large rooms, each 24 inches high, 20 inches wide and 27 inches deep, and a center hallway allow ample space for its many treasures. Each side conveniently opens from the front to display a world in miniature.

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The ladies are about to take a break from their sewing. The wooden tuck comb holding the baby belonged to Peggy Shippen, Benedict Arnold’s wife. There are certain dolls we recognize instantly as dolls’ house dolls, but it also interesting to populate a house with china, parian, wood, papier mache and wax dolls as long as the scale is correct. The center hallway divides the four rooms and is a perfect space to display larger papier mache dolls.

“I definitely lived on the edge, but I feel that when you see that special dolls’ house, you have to buy it,” says Ann. That same house has changed hands a few times, and most recently sold for $30,000! We return to take a tour of Ann Meehan’s largest dolls’ house, which just cleared the front doors by a quarter of an inch! Purchased from Theriault’s, the Regency house as it is known, is circa 1820 and home to some amazing dolls, one in particular with outstanding provenance. The old note that came with this tuck comb wooden holding her baby, said “Peggy Shippen, 1780.” You will recognize Shippen’s married name… Mrs. Benedict Arnold! Peggy Shippen’s grandfather and uncle resided in Lancaster, PA where we can assume Peggy was a frequent visitor. The doll was sold by Pook & Pook, a PA auction house. A book about Shippen

A young jeune fille admires herself in the mirror. She is justifiably proud of her long blonde hair. She still enjoys playing with her dolls on occasion.

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The mistress of the house and the housekeeper are busy planning the evening’s meal.

by Allison Pataki, the daughter of the former NY governor, has been optioned for a movie and hopefully, we will all learn more about this likely accomplice to her husband’s treason. This stately mansion has four large rooms and a high ceiling center hallway that accommodates taller dolls, in this case two lovely papier mache dolls that are preparing to leave on a trip. Ann is searching for additional papier mache dolls to add to this setting. The high ceilings and large size rooms are filled with numerous French fashion doll accessories and more etuis. In the ladies’ bedroom, a young lady with a magnificent braided wig admires her reflection in the vanity. It’s a wonder she can move around the room, it is so full of tiny treasures! The canopy for the four-poster bed was copied from one Ann saw in the Victoria and Albert museum. The fabric was made in 1830 and was purchased at an antique show specializing in early textiles. The antique fabric was put on an elastic form so that were would be no nails. For the same reason, Ann does not electrify any of her dolls’ houses and instead keeps desk lights nearby for easier viewing. In another room we see three exceptional dolls, including Peggy Shippen’s tuck comb, preparing their afternoon tea. One of many complete sets of treenware rests on the table. The ladies often use this room for their sewing projects. Against the wall, a French, circa 1800 tall case clock which actually works (the mechanism is concealed in the back behind the wooden door). The bowl on top is early and is marked “Coalport.” There are some fine folk art paintings in this house… the family portrait over the fireplace in the dining room makes us long to know more about them. This room is in the process of being furnished, on a return visit we took another close-up which shows some new additions. Being a dolls’ house collector entails some of the same chores that home ownership entails…for example dusting and rearranging furniture and accessories make it a very interactive hobby (thankfully there are no dishes to wash).

The gentleman of the house often retreats to the dining room for some peace and quiet. The painting over the fireplace (see close-up) measures about 6 x 8 inches. It’s fascinating to imagine the family who posed for it. ANTIQUE DOLL COLLECTOR

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T

he next house was purchased at a Cape Cod, MA auction and dates from around 1880. It was built for the Russell family, residents of Duxbury, Massachusetts, by the son of a sea captain whose last name was Cushman. A sterling silver nameplate bearing the Russell name hangs over the front door. Three separate horizontal panels in the front remove to reveal nine rooms, three on each level. It is all original including wallpapers and sumptuous draperies… curtains frame each window with under shears and then gathered silk and satin draperies over that! Pocket doors and raised panel doors are unusual features which are seldom if ever seen in a dolls’ house. The stairs, made of cigar boxes, were constructed separately for the entrance to the house. In the music room a piano, similar to the example shown in our August issue, has tiny Dresden figures that move when the keys are pressed. The ebony upright Boulle piano on the right side of the music room came from the Fairie Dolls’ House and is circa 1780. The house and its contents were sold at a Withington auction in 1978 in Concord, NH. The Fairie Dolls’ House is illustrated in Vivien Greene’s book – English Dolls’ Houses from the Eighteenth and Nineteenth Centuries – on page 212. The piano and a parlor set are identified in the book on a separate page which says: “The furniture was given by Empress Eugenie.” Ormolu furnishings are in each room, but one room is especially resplendent. The mother has allowed two brother and sister pairs to play there provided they behave themselves. The embroidery stand between them, discovered at a sale 34

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The Sea Captain’s house built for the Russell children of Duxbury, MA boasts nine resplendent rooms. Below: This is a very musical family as evidenced by the piano and spinet. The rare ormolu baby carriage was a lovely and unexpected Christmas gift.


Four youngsters have promised to behave themselves. The embroidery stand in the foreground is exceptionally rare, although it was a fortuitous buy at only $100. The ormolu stand on the table holds family photos. Below: Who wouldn’t feel like royalty in this magnificent bedroom. A close-up of the rare dressing table is seen at left. The bustled lady has a sister in another room, both of whom have always been together. The vanity treen set is quite unusual and even includes a ring holder.

What woman would not feel glamorous applying her make-up at this ornate Boulle dressing table! Purchased from Ladenburger in Germany, its whimsical decoration features a variety of styles.

for “boy’s toys,” is quite rare and, in one of those auction moments we all deserve from time to time, purchased for only a hundred dollars. The upstairs bedrom is the perfect setting for a rare dressing table draped in green silk. It didn’t appear to be the type of dressing table or vanity that most of us are familiar with and Ann explained, “We normally think of a dressing table as having a mirror and legs below. But back in the 18th and 19th centuries, dressing tables came in a variety of styles and some had cabinet doors below and some were elaborately made with lace and silk draped from the top down to the sides. Dolls’ house furniture tends to be more whimsical in its construction by having additional ornamentation. We often find dolls’ house furniture to be of a combination of styles, such as the Neo-Gothic and some Rococo. The elegant dressing table in the Cushman House bedroom has several styles of furniture and is circa 1870. We see the base as Baroque and the mirror as Rococo. The top has some Gothic elements, but the piece on top is not a Gothic pinnacle but just a turned pin. The tassels are more Louis XVI. All of these styles were incorporated for a long period of time.” ANTIQUE DOLL COLLECTOR

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Left: All the ladies agree that the bustled gown is exceptionally beautiful. The original window treatments, which are different in each room, are comprised of three layers of silks and satins. Right: The teenage daughter has just finished writing her beau who has joined the army. Notice the matching pink ruffled lamps and the intricate soft metal chandelier. The lovely doll by Simon and Halbig has a swivel neck. The desk holds many accessories including a sterling silver checkbook purchased in London.

In the same room, a dolls’ house doll with an elaborate bustled gown is admiring her reflection in the vanity mirror. A complete treen vanity set including a ring holder contains everything she needs to stay beautiful. In the upstairs sitting room, we can view another doll in a formal gown with bustle and a rare glass-eyed doll with a bent arm. The two bustled ladies, an unusual variation for dolls’ house dolls, have always been together. Near the back is a cupboard filled with miniature Boulle wooden books; these were made in two sizes and are very difficult to find. It has often been said that a dolls’ house collector shares the passion of an interior decorator. Ann is very careful

It’s so hard to find good help these days, but these comely lads seem up to the job. The ornate mirrored sideboard in the back was found in Sweden. The wallpapers are all original, here in the dining room we seen an opulent pattern depicting colorful birds and bees. In this well-stocked kitchen the cook enjoys an Evans and Cartwright stove; the table and chairs are by Marklin.

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The liveried footman awaits instructions from the lady of the house. A bottle of champagne is chilling for an aperitif before dinner. The ormolu squirrel cage in the foreground is a rare piece. A spinet against the side wall provides more musical entertainment for family and guests.

to carry out a theme throughout a room – colors, the style of furniture and of course the correct period – in order to achieve an accurate representation of a particular era. Viewing her impressive dolls’ houses can be overwhelming to a new collector, but Ann strongly advises her customers to buy quality and to take their time. Over the years she has constantly upgraded so that the The master of the house has just collection today is not the same as it was fifteen years ago. returned from his daily constitutional. Next a tour of a magnificent Mystery house and a rare period home which Ann refers to as the Georgian house. Until next time!

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The Tender Years Deborah Varner 303-850-7800

queenbeev1@comcast.net • Member UFDC

Book Review

NOW ACCEPTING

Layaways welcomed and consignments taken. Proud Sponsor of Vintage Vignettes

9” K * R 101 Peter. Beautiful modeling of face. Blue eyes. Huge peach lips. Lt. BR. mohair wig. Wears Blue knickers. Old fashion white shirt with stand up collar. Blue matching jacket with four white buttons. Belt has white etching. Old white socks. Black leather shoes. Orig. body finish. $ 2,200.

13” Sonnenberg. CM. Bulging blue threaded eyes. Fabulous bisque. Creamy and right out of the mold. Black eyeliner. Blonde mohair wig. Wears eyelet and organdy Dress. Pale aqua at bodice. White leather boots. Antique pin at chest. Mint Straw hat with aqua silk in bow and lined in the same. Antique lace on hat. Gorgeous presentation hat. $ 3,150. 14” “ Shared Passions” Souvenir doll from 2014 UFDC Nationals. Never removed from box. Done by Diane Effner $ 375.

19” Tete Jumeau. Mint, possibly original hat and dress in beige. Beautiful and Stunning dark blue PW. eyes. Lots of long lashes. Superbly modeled. Full lips. Lots of long lashes. Pierced ears with red glass earrings. Platinum blonde mohair wig. Knitted old socks. Orig. Jumeau shoes with rosettes. Sm. firing mark to left of nose. Has flyaway brows. A BEAUTIFUL PRESENCE! A VERY SPECIAL LOOK! $ 9,550.

5” Early and rare Mignonnette. Excellent modeling. Pouty lips. Lt. Blue eyes. Swivel neck. Early peg strung. Bent and curling fingers. Wears orig. old socks. Old leather shoes that are melting into desirable bare feet. A very old doll. Possible orig. blue coat dress silk and lace. Lt. Blonde mohair wig. Matching hat to go with doll, but wears a mint blue straw hat with aqua silk bows. TAKE ME HOME LOOK. A WONDER FOR YOUR “LITTLES” COLLECTION $ 3,200. Adult brown and gold Cloche. Mint Condition. Bow on one side of hat. $95.

Rare and Very old children’s book. A “Raggedy Ann” book by Johnny Gruelle. Copyright 1929. $ 75.

Adult Pink silk and embroidered lace sleep cloche. Mint Condition. Small cut in silk. Wonderful piece to own. $ 95.

W W W . T H E T E N D E RY E A R S . N E T 38

ANTIQUE DOLL COLLECTOR

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Rønnaug Petterssen – The Artist and Her Dolls By Bodil Petterssen Meleney

B

odil Petterssen Meleney has written an informative and beautifully photographed book about the muchloved dolls created between 1934 and 1979 by her mother, Norwegian artist Rønnaug Petterssen. Boxes of material from her mother’s Atelier which closed in 1975, family photographs, newspaper clippings, interviews with individuals who knew her mother and her own recollections provide an intimate portrait of the artist. In 1934, using techniques for dollmaking that she had learned while living in Spain for a brief time, she set out to develop dolls with a distinctive Norwegian flavor. She began an intensive study of Norwegian costumes which is reflected in a wide variety of felt-faced dolls whose details are specific to various regions: souvenir dolls, character dolls, play dolls that were meant to be dressed and undressed, Sami dolls wearing the colorful detailed costumes specific to this Norwegian ethnic minority, plastic dolls, post war dolls including souvenir types, angels, sandmen, trolls, bears, rabbits and special commissions. Over 350 photographs from the author’s extensive collection along with dolls from private collections, notes on the rarest dolls, caring for them, and much more, add to this comprehensive look at this talented and immensely versatile artist. Soft cover, 187 pages. $45. Available from Amazon.com. Visit www.ronnaugpetterssen.com


PUBLIC AUCTION DOLLS, DOLLS, DOLLS (& Longaberger® Baskets)!

Saturday, November 8, 2014 Doll Auction Begins at 9:00 AM Basket Auction Begins at 10:00 AM Doors Open at 8:00 AM

Special Preview: Friday, November 7th from 12 to 7 PM French miniature schoolroom w/ animated teache