SAAMA (Student Annual Architecture Models + Artifacts) Online Exhibition 2020

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A DIGITAL PUBLICATION CREATED FOR THE DISPLAY OF ARCHITECTURAL STUDENT MODELS OF NORTH AMERICA

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DIGITAL EXHIBITION

ARTIFACT conceptual ARCHITECTURAL URBAN

KSU.ARCH CURATORIAL PRACTICES TEAM

The Student Annual Architecture Models + Artifacts

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Discliamer: The STUDENT ANNUAL ARCHITECTURAL MODELS AND ARTIFACTS curatorial team and digital exhibition do not own any of the images listed as a submission. All photographs showing physical models are property of the individuals named after each “SUBMITTED BY” and “OTHER CONTRIBUTOR(S)” text box in each respective page containing photographs and the page following immediately after. This publication, and any graphic logo artwork are property of the STUDENT ANNUAL ARCHITECTURAL MODELS AND ARTIFACTS curatorial team and digital exhibition while all photographs contain student work that we do not own. All submitted images have signatures from each respective owner allowing the STUDENT ANNUAL ARCHITECTURAL MODELS AND ARTIFACTS curatorial team and digital exhibition to display them in this document for the sole intent and purpose of displaying outstanding student work. Signatures of each student submission may be provided upon request


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a letter from the editor...

ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR ELIZABETH MARTINmalkinian Cataloguing more than 82 ideas for the design of our built environment, the student curatorial team set out to exhibit not only the importance of craft in terms of physical models in the design process, but also a visionary criticism of society. For the architecture student, ideal projects afford the sole occasion to rebuild the world often inspired by ecological challenges, social agency, or new notions of domesticity with a strong personal preference for certain forms. These projects test the pulse of the architecture students interests where image and reality might collide and inform our built world.


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a letter from the editor...

ANTHONY YAN 5TH YR ARCH. GRAD.

Hi everyone! I hope everyone is doing well during these trying times. I would like to take this time to just say thank you and congratulations to all who submitted. I think built models tell so much information and that we students always put so much time and effort into them. We should recognize those models that are truly unique and skillfully-crafted even after final reviews. I hope everyone viewing this digital publication sees the amazing work we do in North American Architecture Schools. It was an honor to jury for this publication and to see all the great work we stayed up all night doing. All those who submitted should be proud of the work they have put into these beautiful manifestations of ideas.


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a letter from the editor...

DIEGO VAZQUEZ 5TH YR ARCH. GRAD

There were many great projects submitted with a high level of detail and craft. The art of model making is a great skill set to have as an architecture student. The creation of models helps visualize projects and better communicate ideas. Some say that 3d virtual modeling and other new technologies are the reason physical models are becoming unnecessary or obsolete. Yet, I believe this not to always be true, as the interaction between the physical model and the user becomes tangible individuals can create a unique and personal experience. Physical models still hold great value in how people perceive a project, creating a dialog between the user and the project. So, I encourage you to keep creating and never stop building.


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a letter from the editor...

BREE CHAMBERS 5TH YR ARCH. GRAD.

A model is the three-dimensional representation of an architects design. The scale can vary based on the desired details. There are different types of models to communicate the idea of a space and create a tangible object perceivable from different angles. “Architecture is essentially an extension of nature into the man-made realm, providing the ground for perception and the horizon of experiencing and understanding the world. : Juhani Pallasmma, The Eyes of theSkin. The SAAMA recognized this publication as an opportunity to exhibit the variety of models from architecture students around the nation. The student’s works who have been chosen demonstrate quality craftsmanship and creativity. Thank you for being a part of showcasing exemplary architectural models.


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a letter from the editor...

shai’ nibbs 3rd yr ARCH. STUDENT Hello all, I hope you are well during these trying times. My name is Shai’ (pronounced like Shay) and I am a 3rd year architecture student at KSU. Throughout this process it has been awesome to see all of your amazing models and learn about the ideas behind them. I hope that this can be a continued venture to allow exhibition of wonderful student work and I hope you enjoy this display of creativity as much as we do!


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a letter from the editor...

JAMISON OWEN 5TH YR ARCH. GRAD.

The most significant architectural piece to bring to a jury is the model. Many hours and manual labor are put into these models with the purpose of providing a threedimensional representation of said proposed design. Architecture school is defined by its models and physical representation; without them the entire experience would be comparable to that of a drafter’s perspective. Lastly, the effort put behind the fabrication of a model is what embodies the narrative. “Architecture starts when you carefully put two bricks together. There it begins.” -Ludwig Mies van der Rohe


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a letter from the editor...

KAREN RIOS 5TH YR ARCH. GRAD

Architecture is the quintessential cross section between art and engineering - a concept best exemplified by the model. That is, beyond a mere idea or display of craft, a proper model equates a cultivated masterpiece. A model thereby becomes the three-dimensional representation of the process, the mind, and the heart. Specifically, a display of the beauty behind thought.


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TABLE OF CONTENTS

ARTIFACT

conceptual

pg. 14 - 45

pg. 46 - 85

Models that are ambiguous and conceptual in interpretation.

Models that are conceptual in interpretation.


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URBAN

pg. 86 - 171

pg. 172 - 185

Models of seemingly fully-designed buildings with little to no ambiguity in interpretation.

Models that are focused on multiple buildings.

The Student Annual Architecture Models + Artifacts

ARCHITECTURAL


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Submissions From: Christopher Brown, Isabella Rose Davies, Agrima Gupta, Liang Hu, Morgan Mansfield, Savannah McDougal, Luke McEachern, Jonathan Nurko Asbiel Samaniego, Nicole Touchstone, CJ WANG, Haozhou Zeng


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CATEGORY 01: ARTIFACT


Alternate Worlds

SUBMITTED BY: Christopher Brown Axonometric drawings come to life in physical modeling of texture, surface and interiority. The intrinsic properties of a cube and refraction physics create forced perspectives of the interior. A whole that can only be experienced through its many parts. Yet, you can hold, touch and feel it’s fragmented reality.

Pratt Institute - Brooklyn, NY

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Falling Cards

SUBMITTED BY: Isabella Rose Davies This model is built from a card module. The repetition of the cut and the folded card is used to create the module without any adhesives. The intention is to represent a vase-like object which seems to be falling apart into a downward spiral towards the viewer. The model is also intended to define space and movement.

Texas A&M - COLLEGE STATION , TX

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Cinema1

SUBMITTED BY: Agrima Gupta

The concept proposes multiple auditorium spaces pinwheeling around a central circulation access separating each stacked block for a different program in order to provide a floating effect for multiple open atriums. The curved corners allows to provide a continuous ribbonlike facade enhancing the corrugated texture to create interesting exterior shadows.

Pratt Institute - Brooklyn, NY

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Rust Lab

SUBMITTED BY: Liang Hu

The project is an environmental laboratory on an abandoned mining site. The rustication manifests the memory of the abandoned island and the people who left their homes, as well as the dying industry and the biomes which died with it.

Yale School of Architecture- New Haven, CT

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Cellulose Insulation as Structure

University at Buffalo - Buffalo, NY

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SUBMITTED BY: Morgan Mansfield

Architecture and function are often considered codependent in the design process, yet it is common that the lifespan of a building far exceeds that of its intended use. In this studio, we asked, does architecture have to be permanent? Using recycled and widely available building material – cellulose insulation – we designed paper structures that could eventually decay and contribute nutrients to their environment, instead of ending up in a landfill.

OTHER CONTRIBUTOR(S): Abby Peters Michael Hoover Craig Brozowski


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Card Void

SUBMITTED BY: Savannah McDougal This project utilized playing cards and was created by making a connection with one module that could be repeated and expanded upon to create a space. This design was inspired by the famous “Great Wave off Kanagawa” woodblock print, and mirrors the print’s juxtaposition of nature and man by contrasting organic and geometric forms. The juxtaposition of organic and geometric form can be seen in the orthogonal shape of the individual card modules, while variation in the angle of rotation in the connections of the modules allows for a more organic curvature of the overall space.

Texas A&M - COLLEGE STATION , TX

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Propagated Wave

SUBMITTED BY: Luke McEachern

Is it possible to utilize a three-way joint to support a structure independently? The primary module in this structure is a threeway joint consisting of two horizontal units and one four-pronged vertical unit. The goal of the design was to join the three pieces without an outside fastener in order to make the structure stronger. The module evolved into the current design to create a corner that is jointed into itself without additional fasteners. Adjusting the scale to larger modules proved constructive if lighter, more economical materials were desired. The solution to a stronger joint was to increase the scale.

Kennesaw State UNIVERSITY Marietta, gA

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Membrane Tensegrity

Washington University in St. Louis St. Louis, MO

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SUBMITTED BY: Jonathan Nurko

Tensegrity is a structural system which balances compression and tension forces. The research team developed a deployable tensegrity canopy with crossed PVC struts capped to a ripstop nylon membrane. The struts’ orientation, spacing, and length determine the form spatially. This lightweight and autonomous structure is efficient in material and installation.

OTHER CONTRIBUTOR(S): Anne Whitsel Francois Savignac


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The [Hydro-Gen] Cell_ A Hydroponic, Regenerative, Modular System for Optimized Vertical Farming

SUBMITTED BY: Asbiel Samaniego

In this research, the hydroponic-regenerative or [Hydro-Gen] Cell_ is envisioned as bio-mechanical hybrid machinery that, while designed to be used in mid-to high rise buildings it would address sustainable aspects such as food production, enhancement of air cleaning capacity, and reduction of energy consumption.

Kennesaw State UNIVERSITY Marietta, gA

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Solar Cell

Kennesaw State UNIVERSITY Marietta, gA

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SUBMITTED BY: Asbiel Samaniego

The overall intention was to develop a faรงade system, which adapts to sun path over time, harnesses solar energy through photovoltaic panels, and provides desired shading during the day. The fully functioning prototype was developed, which employs movable flaps inspired by flower behavior.

OTHER CONTRIBUTOR(S): Christian Ladefoged


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Sight Lines, An Abstract Living and Work Place

SUBMITTED BY: Nicole Touchstone

This slightly different stereotomic model has two sides of it fallen away and the center hollowed out before adding spaces to it. The concept was to create a visual experience in which from any point within the model the inhabitant could see both within and outside of the model.

University of Idaho- Moscow, ID

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Neon City

SUBMITTED BY: CJ WANG

The Neon City, in our close future, questions and speculates on a new typology for the shopping mall. It envisions a space which that is anti-web and online shopping and enhances visual contact, and to interrogate the online shopping issue that has caused the death of the physical shopping.

Columbia University - New York, NY

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: In Detail, Strange Connections and Other Puzzling Forms of Assembly 2D Puzzle

SCI-ARC - LOS ANGELES, CA

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SUBMITTED BY: Haozhou Zeng

This model begins by looking closely at 3-dimensional puzzles by hanayama. Hanayama Square Puzzle is transformed and reinterpreted into a new set of elements(that retain the key connective principles found in the original puzzle). The funny thing is that we create a misreading of a mechanical movement to the stair. The wall and stair steps have the same language, which means the wall has enough tolerance to fold the stair up into the wall. The scratch moment on materials also hint that. But the truth is the stair cannot be fold up but a misreading moment.

OTHER CONTRIBUTOR(S): Yiyang Sang


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: In Detail, Strange Connections and Other Puzzling Forms of Assembly Stairs

SCI-ARC - LOS ANGELES, CA

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SUBMITTED BY: Haozhou Zeng

This model begins by looking closely at 3-dimensional puzzles by hanayama. Hanayama Square Puzzle is transformed and reinterpreted into a new set of elements(that retain the key connective principles found in the original puzzle). The funny thing is that we create a misreading of a mechanical movement to the stair. The wall and stair steps have the same language, which means the wall has enough tolerance to fold the stair up into the wall. The scratch moment on materials also hint that. But the truth is the stair cannot be fold up but a misreading moment.

OTHER CONTRIBUTOR(S): Yiyang Sang


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: In Detail, Strange Connections & Other Puzzling Forms of Assembly 3D Puzzle

SUBMITTED BY: YIYANG SANG & HAOZHOU ZENG This model begins by looking closely at 3-dimensional puzzles by hanayama. Hanayama Square Puzzle is transformed and reinterpreted into a new set of elements(that retain the key connective principles found in the original puzzle). Assembly of the these sets of pieces requires rotation and perfect alignments of the stacking ‘claws’ which occurs through the development of the entire work. We also looked at ways to further make use of these inter-occlusion parts to allow them to move deeper into the object, for example considering the potential for the carved interior architectural spaces.

SCI-ARC - LOS ANGELES, CA

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Submissions From: Adrian Contreras, Leo Zhang, Marcelline Siu, Chuchu Qi, CJ WANG, Judy Zhang, Noah Shipley, Jonathan L. Ong Yuting Zhu, Daryl L Rowe, Jeremy Shigemitsu , Xin Liu, Sydney Medford, Caleb Lawrence, Colby Cox, Nicole Rodriguez, Jonathan Nurko


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CATEGORY 02: CONCEPTUAL


Instrument of the Florida Landscape

SUBMITTED BY: Adrian Contreras

The Florida landscape has a variety of ecotones and microclimates to study and depict. The instrument takes in information of the landscape and can portray physical studies such as light and shadow. The instrument is also put in a digital media to explore a perspective and a collaged site plan.

univ. of fl - Gainesville, fl

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tea swamp

univ. of Brit col - British columbia, CA

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submitted by: Marcelline Siu

Tea Swamp is an environmental context model showing the site of an ancient bog in present-day Vancouver that caused buckled streets and sinking houses due to its difficult building conditions. The aim was to make a physical exploded axonometric diagram that also expressed tangible qualities of the data we found.

OTHER CONTRIBUTOR(S): Parmida Asadirahmani


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Peat Construction

univ. of Brit col - British columbia, CA

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submitted by: Marcelline Siu

Peat Construction drew inspiration from ecological succession diagrams to show the site’s (Vancouver) history through stages connected by hinges. The model also folds back together to place emphasis on the site being read as a whole, and that its historical narrative is still very much a part of its current conditions.

OTHER CONTRIBUTOR(S): Parmida Asadirahmani


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Tensodiment

SUBMITTED BY: Chuchu qi

Floating inside the cube frame, the model itself is beyond the frame of “structure�- a juxtaposition of intentional and unintentional making on the same tread of thought. It is a symbiotic structure inside and out that influenced each other by different means and interpretations of tension, echoing the hierarchy that will be redefined repeatedly by the new structure.

washington univ. - St. louis., MO

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mama, i am home.

SUBMITTED BY: cj wang

The project documented 5 weeks ofurban-life plastic trash, and transform the fossil fuel by-product into sculpture by melting them. Thus, the Man-Made industrial objects gradually become unrecognizable, eventually returning into their original form. The project takes the form of photography, model, and book.

columbia univ. - new york, ny

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twisted canopy

SUBMITTED BY: judy zhang

As a surface exploration, this twisting, helical canopy focuses on the construction of a nondevelopable, doubly-curved surface. By decomposing the surface into units that consist of a curving metal panel, a glass web, a metal connector plane, and metal ribs, this surface was made ruled and constructible with flat materials.

univ. of Pennsylvania - Philadelphia, PA

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shuttle tower

SUBMITTED BY: noah shipley

The Shuttle Tower’s twisting curves emulate the fall of “shuttles” (delicately folded paper gliders) and is designed for both a “Shuttle Maker,” who conducts tests from the house’s top, and a curious public. Although now several years old, the paper model retains a compelling sense of movement, light, and structure.

rhode iseland school of design, Providence, RI

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xxx

SCI-ARC - LOS ANGELES, CA

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submitted by: jonathan l. ong

XXX aims to explore the part to whole relationship between two materials and the manipulated forms that they are tied to. As the naturalistic onyx and synthetic black metal begin to cross contaminate, they engage different modes of attention that extend the understanding of the object beyond its physical presence.

OTHER CONTRIBUTOR(S): Santiago Alvarez


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Vertical University of Mexico City

SUBMITTED BY: Yuting zhu

The vertical University explores the relationship between architecture and the city, deepening the understanding of the ways in which architecture can both inform, and be informed by, the city to which it intervenes. This is a way in which to explore urban form at a smaller scale that is untenable at the larger city-wide scale.

SCI-ARC - LOS ANGELES, CA

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Marta Spatial Experience

SUBMITTED BY: daryl l. rowe

As a method of studying and visualizing the spatial feeling of a given MARTA Train Station, this model was created to display this through the simple use of thread flowing around portals made of wooden dowels.

kennesaw state univ. - Mariettia, GA

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Aalto house study

univ. of Brit col - British columbia, CA

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submitted by: jeremy shigemitsu

This model studies a locus of circulation in the Aalto House. The vertical circulation begins from the living room and travels around the chimney through several spaces. The house’s passages, hallways, and stairs are intimate, adding a layer of mystery, anticipation, and delight as one navigates the architecture.

OTHER CONTRIBUTOR(S): lee-ann kam


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Cultura Centre for Gastronomy Concept

SUBMITTED BY: jeremy shigemitsu

This project advances a systematic solution to the cultural problem of nourishment, envisioning food as the biophysical and social heart of a sustainable urban community. The model explores ideas of being a beacon for the neighbourhood, both figuratively and literally. The model is made of wood, chipboard, and acrylic.

univ. of Brit col - British columbia, CA

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curiosities

SCI-ARC - LOS ANGELES, CA

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submitted by: xin liu

This model, Curiosities, contains two parts: frame and massing. The frames are acting as circulation cores. The massing involves a workflow from photogrammetry of building facades in Downtown LA, cutting and compositing in ZBrush, 3D printing with PLA materials, and spray painting with customized tape masks for precise color control.

OTHER CONTRIBUTOR(S): manying wang


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Casa de Vidro Analysis: Structural Hierarchy & Landscape

SUBMITTED BY: sydney medford

Casa de Vidro, designed by Lina Bo Bardi incorporates modern elements while reflecting the surrounding Brazilian Forest. This model analyzes the relationship between the structural hierarchy of a building, from the glass windows at the front to the increasingly enclosed space in back, and the permeability of the surrounding landscape.

washington univ. - St. louis., MO

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DROOPY TOWER

SCI-ARC - LOS ANGELES, CA

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SUBMITTED BY: leo zhang

The Droopy Tower aims to embody a contemporary museum as a vertical city. Storage floors and gallery spirals are connected by non-linear circulation. In between the envelope and spirals is the public space. The tower is a sculpture itself with the hanging “house”, challenging the typical conception of a museum.

OTHER CONTRIBUTOR(S): RINA ZHU


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Patterns of Pedestrian Movement

SUBMITTED BY: Caleb lawrence

Patterns of Pedestrian Movements aims to capture the inscrutability of the pedestrian movement. The straight paths show the desired construct behind defining normal pedestrian movement as seen in urban and architectural design while the subsequent flowing paths reflect the natural choices of pedestrians in movement that break these desired constructs.

kennesaw state univ. - Mariettia, GA

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Strasser House: ‘Plan of Volumes’

Texas A&M Univ., College Station, TX

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submitted by: colby cox

“Raumplan” has never been defined; however the concept has grown accordingly. Visualization in three dimensional space is necessary to comprehend complex elements displayed within Adolf Loos’ Strasser House. Spiraling circulation and use of split levels are two of the main elements emphasized within the model photos.

OTHER CONTRIBUTOR(S): Christian Martinez Garrett Redditt


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umbrella

SUBMITTED BY: nicole rodriguez

This conceptual model, “Umbrella”, targets the idea of enclosure in order to house 3 distinct nonprofit organizations within the project to create a safe space. Umbrella looks at programmatic needs and relationships to inform a mass that interacts with overhangs/shading to become an “umbrella” that everyone can be protected under.

kennesaw state univ. - Mariettia, GA

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The Nested Collective

SUBMITTED BY: jonathan nurko

To study the arrangement of apartment buildings, a u-shaped module inspired by the interlocking nature of Japanese joinery represents an idealized dwelling. When the modules slide, stack, or rotate during aggregation, volumes and voids form. By re-contextualizing these spatial patterns, the rhythm of balconies, units, and communal spaces become apparent.

washington univ. - St. louis., MO

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Submissions From: Jiahao Li, Lingjia Wang, Nancy Ai, Connor Slover , Nick Gochnour, Dustin Frye, Patrick Pineda, Heidi Flores, Ethan Boerner, Joey Anthony Alessio, Kelvin Hu, Liang Hu, Olivia Wideman, Joel Leon, Michael James Salois, Sonya Feinstein , Jonathan L. Ong, Yuting Zhu, Jose Merino, Daryl L Rowe, Eric Hughes, Ritzo Law, Lou Xiao, Leo Zhang, Joseph Andrew Leaming, Dhruvi Rajpopat, Juan Ignacio Gonzalez, John Denton Spraberry, Priyashi Galiawala, Devyanshi Arya, Elijah Montrell James, Phoebe Latham, Jonathan Levitske, Krystal Levitske, Jackson Rayne Bochat, Caleb Lawrence, Maria Ceban, Sarveswaran Ganapathy SP, Micah Rydberg, Trinity Templin, Diana Gil, Wentao Guo, Dalton Gibbons


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CATEGORY 03: ARCHITECTURAL


MUSEUM OF CALLIGRAPHY: NARRATIVE OF TIME SUBMITTED BY: JIAHAO LI

Aggregation of a certain geometry which is partially recognizable as the shape of round corners whether it was subtracted or addition to the core. The rotation of the geometries provide diversity of communication experiences between the residential and city. The contract of the massing and frame-like part to obtain a way of observing the space as from inside of the massing block to the framing part is changing, from negativity to positivity. Woven texture apply to the facade to create illusion of bumpness while merging the window system.

PRATT INSTITUTE - NEW YORK CITY, NY

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micro housing tower

SUBMITTED BY: lingjia wang

Micro housing is not just a problem with fitting builtin convertible furniture into a 350sqft unit Instead, it should provide that unique group of people with engaging and inspiring living experience. Such a building with a distinct personality can perfectly blend into Chinatown, an active and multicultural community.

SCI-ARC - LOS ANGELES, CA

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snug

SUBMITTED BY: nancy ai

What produces domestic life? This speculative residential project located in Boyle Heights defines domesticity and intimacy in its finest grain. What produces domestic life is the specificity in material, the resolution of those misalignment and textural differences, and its slightest imprints onto its surrounding - whether it’s physical or psychological.

SCI-ARC - LOS ANGELES, CA

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AFFORDABLE MIXED USE BUILDING

SUBMITTED BY: CONNOR SLOVER

The ground forms in the model were milled from extruded polystyrene with a 3-axis CNC mill, and painted white. The building was cut using a lasercutter, from 1/16” and 1/32” chipboard. Bricks and other details were etched in.

UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSSETTS AMHERST, MA

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SPLASH

SUBMITTED BY: Nick Gochnour

This bathhouse is at once an artificial landscape and an elevation of a private function from an urbanscape. Remaining inconspicuous in the city, the low-res mass floats on thick pylons, encasing a variety of highly articulated, yet functional, objects in a could-be typical Los Angeles rooftop.

SCI-ARC - LOS ANGELES, CA

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GLACIER

SUBMITTED BY: DUSTIN FRYE

Located in Chicago’s South Loop neighborhood, the project provides support for the neighborhood’s majority population - teens and young adults. This support takes shape as an interactive cultural center. A translucent rock climbing wall frames the city beyond and vertically connects interior spaces. More defined programs include study rooms, gathering places and a winter garden. Other areas support popup exhibits or become spaces to watch friends climb past. The project breaks the orthogonal mundanity of the context. A solar panel wall oriented perpendicular to the winter sun drives the multifaceted shape of the building. The project becomes a commentary on global warming. GLACIER is a place for users to exercise, study, meet, or lounge.

UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS - CHAMPAIGN. IL

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tower in a landscape

SUBMITTED BY: PATRICK PINEDA

This project is a tower building sited within rural Nebraska, acting as a foreign object in a landscape. Conceptually creating juxtaposition between building and site; as well as between programs, bungee jumping/ zip lining and hotel suites, creating an argument for infusing action adventure into the everyday.

UNIVERSITY OF nebraska - lincoln. ne

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GEODESIC SHELL

UNIVERSITY AT BUFFALO - BUFFALO, NY

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SUBMITTED BY: HEIDI FLORES

Geodesic Shell is a composite structure that provides immediate shelter for internally displaced people. Form-finding paper models, digital simulations, material analyzation and application optimized the flat-to-form structure. The final form is assembled as a lightweight, transportable shell that helps and improves the quality of life for those internally displaced.

OTHER CONTRIBUTOR(S): RANIA MOUSSE


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SILENT PAVILLION

SUBMITTED BY: ETHAN BOERNER

Isolated and remote, this pavilion resembles a monument emptied of specific meaning, subjected to the effects of time and the elements. It is at once open to, and closed off from, the surrounding landscape. What results is a neutral, silent space open to interpretation, contemplation, and respite.

UNIVERSITY OF nebraska - lincoln. ne

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EOL

SUBMITTED BY: Joey Anthony Alessio Detail is about the smaller moments in a space. Subtle, yet powerful, these are moments we can see, but often overlooked. Details have the power to create or change our perceptions of space, and have a significant impact on our ideas.

IOWA STATE UNIVERSITY- AMES, IA

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Idiorrhythmy

SUBMITTED BY: KELVIN HU

The structure suggests a form of vertical cohabitation between plants, water and humans. This composition is made of 5 vessel modules, each embracing an individual quality of its occupant. As these units are placed into an infinitely expandable system, relationships are created, generating complex i n t e r a c t i o n s .

PRATT INSTITUTE - NEW YORK CITY, NY

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ROULETTE

SUBMITTED BY: LIANG HU

Three clusters of programs are spatially organized in a similar way with a courtyard in each of them. The seemingly similar experience in each cluster is negotiated and sequenced by the central atrium, which provides the primary circulation loop for the building.

YALE SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE - NEW HAVEN, CT

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ASHEVILLE TRANSIT

SUBMITTED BY: OLIVIA WIDEMAN

‘Asheville Transit Station’ stemmed from the analysis of wood joinery and heavy timber structures. The purpose of this project was to take a current parking lot and revitalize it into a space that would take advantage of various transportation methods while still creating spaces for the community to enjoy.

CLEMSON UNIVERSITY- CLEMSON, SC

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POROSITY + DENSITY

SUBMITTED BY: JOEL LEON

This project consists on the design of two 21 story towers connected by a permeable skin used to enclose the structures. The sensual form of the skin gives a sinuous character to the building. The skin works as a “brise soleil” system that allows only a certain amount of light on certain areas, this is achieved by a subtle torsion on the skin creating porous views that allow the entrance of sunlight and more dense views that allow less sunlight to the interior.

WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY- ST. LOUIS, MISSOURI

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ASHEVILLE TRANSPORT CENTER

SUBMITTED BY: MICHAEL JAMES SALOIS The simple geometries of the design are heavily influenced by its location in the city of Asheville, NC, and the unique topography of the site. Each element is arranged so that it is able to serve multiple purposes. The philosophy of the design is to do the most with the least.

CLEMSON UNIVERSITY- CLEMSON, SC

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URBAN INCINERATOR CHUNK

PRATT INSTITUTE - NEW YORK CITY, NY

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SUBMITTED BY: SONYA FEINSTEIN

The Urban Incinerator and Public Baths project, located in Soho New York City, seeks to integrate public works and public life. Referencing geological typologies like mountain peaks and hot springs, the urban incinerator creates an iconic and uncanny urban mountain range in New York City.

OTHER CONTRIBUTOR(S): SOPHIA KOUNTAKIS


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TOPIARY

SUBMITTED BY: jonathan l. ong

Topiary challenges the notion of the tall building both programmatically and existentially. Unlike the snazzy skyscrapers that pop up every now and then, the project appears almost clumsy and inelegant. The absurd scale of the flowers accentuates artifice and temporality, defying the modernist regime and promoting an aggregate of perspectives.

SCI-ARC - LOS ANGELES, CA

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DISNEY STUDIO IN BURBANK

SCI-ARC - LOS ANGELES, CA

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SUBMITTED BY: YUTING ZHU

The project effectively inverts the internalized figure of a courtyard building, changing its stance to its surroundings. It also generates a series of highly productive architectural problems that are formal, spatial and legible. It attempts to challenge the reading of a single whole vs. two twins, existing as one and the other both.

OTHER CONTRIBUTOR(S): JIAYUE HE


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RECREATION

SUBMITTED BY: JOSE MERINO

The project was a proposal for an iteration of the park. The goal was to bring Nature into the park giving a reminiscing notion of natural landscape and trees. The model gives insight of horizontal and vertical movement. The model creates a story of endless possibilities for experience.

NEW JERSEY INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY NEWARK, NJ

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CONNECTED ENCLOSURE

SUBMITTED BY: JOSE MERINO

The project was a proposal for a new pier in Greenpoint Brooklyn. The goal of its design was to merge an art gallery with the ferry pick up point. The steel enclosure was an insight for its industrial past of Greenpoint, Brooklyn.

NEW JERSEY INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY NEWARK, NJ

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IMAI HOSPITAL DAYCARE CENTER

SUBMITTED BY: DARYL ROWE

Through the modeling of an assigned building precedent, an analysis of construction methodologies and structural systems was created in order to generate an iterated and modified structural system of our own.

KENNESAW STATE UNIVERSITY KENNESAW, GA

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JEFF BUSBY RESIDENCE

SUBMITTED BY: ERIC HUGHES

This single-family home is located within a wildlife reservation in Ackerman, MS. The private house surrounded by public land encourages a deeper study in how a home could potentially look and perform. This project challenges the typical home by encouraging socializing on top of the living spaces instead of within.

MISSISSIPPI STATE UNIVERSITY STARKVILLE, MS

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Holl synthesis

SUBMITTED BY: daryl l. rowe

This project is a synthesis of elements that an assigned architect uses in their projects. This section was created through the study of works by Steven Holl. The studied works included buildings with the following features: light wells, green spaces, concrete, facade paneling, etc. This project also displays an advanced thermal system that is used throughout many of Holl’s projects.

kennesaw state univ. - Mariettia, GA

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urban treehouse

SUBMITTED BY: ritzo law

Urban Treehouse involves the creation of a housing complex consisting of 150 units along with community spaces. The project investigates the development of an elevated modular building block system that frees up the ground and creates a series of continuous spaces to encourage i n t e r a c t i o n .

rhode iseland school of design, Providence, RI

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woven residential towers

SUBMITTED BY: lou xiao & leo zhang

The project is the aggregation of a certain geometry and the rotation of the geometries provides diverse communication experiences between the residential and city. The contract of different compositions creates variable ways of viewing space. The woven texture of the facade creates an illusion of bumpness while merging the window system.

SCI-ARC - LOS ANGELES, CA

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a case for settlement

SUBMITTED BY: jOSEPH andrew leaming Located in Brooklyn, the model’s concept critiques the high-rise residential tower with its problems of isolation and repetitive stacking. Inherently, the high-rise degrades any sense of individuality. The model promotes individuality while creating a shared public space underneath.

pratt inst. - brooklyn, ny

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montessori classroom

SUBMITTED BY: juan ignacia gonzalez

The Montessori classroom engages with nature using a suspended greenhouse to diffuse light below. The materiality changes to juxtapose the stereotomy of privacy and tectonics of openness. With the model walls opened, the experience of the space within showcases walls framing the exterior and responding to interior activity.

washington univ. - St. louis, MO

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chicago multi-family housing

SUBMITTED BY: john denton spraberry

In this proposal for Urban Housing, we were asked to consider the daily rituals and practices of a young professional living in the city and “The Architecture of the City� by Aldo Rossi to develop a manifesto and artifact to embody how one reflects, celebrates, revives, cleanses and nourishes.

mississippi st. univ. - starkville, ms

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artist residence member dis-member

SUBMITTED BY: priyashi galiawala Carved fragments of chairs speculated to create an architectural opportunity that lead to the design of an artist residence. Ground generated of speculated fragments, contours, undulations, free flowing curve blurs the boundaries between built structure and ground. Free flowing lines create a sense of connectivity between interior and exterior space.

pratt inst. - brooklyn, ny

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inhabiting ruins

SUBMITTED BY: devyanshi arya

Inhabiting Ruins uses the concepts of adaptive reuse to explore the future of Rome. The proposed lightweight timber structure unifies the fragmented ruins, creating a cultural center with views of the Colosseum.

rhode iseland school of design, Providence, RI

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transparency’s other

texas A&M univ. - college station, tx

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submitted by: pheobe latham

“The architectural plan is interpreted in many different forms, including the elaborate “Raumplan” by Adolf Loos. Threedimensional masses and walls aid in visualizing the complex circulation of Loos’ Tristan Tzara House. Uneven elevations on floors and two staircases are visible in the model, and support the characteristics of Loos’ plan.

OTHER CONTRIBUTOR(S): olga kedya stephani shupak


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e.u. research and COnvention center

SUBMITTED BY: caleb lawrence

The European Union Research & Convention Center is an educational facility in Germany that researches the future of food cultivation in Europe. It has experimental crop farms and gardens on the site. The building is a space for labs as well as a general convention center with a theater and break out spaces to showcase new findings in food cultivation and cooking practices.

kennesaw state univ. - Mariettia, GA

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museum of color

kennesaw state univ. - Mariettia, GA

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submitted by: caleb lawrence

Located in Atlanta, the museum effects on visitors emotions and studies how the interactions between person to person and person to building may change either the building itself or the emotions of the person. The design reflects the multiple paths that visitors may take as either the building manipulates their choices of movement or they allow their emotions to dictate their progression.

OTHER CONTRIBUTOR(S): jessica cervantes


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interactive facade

kennesaw state univ. - Mariettia, GA

154

submitted by: elijah montrell james We were tasked with making a facade that will have a play on both interior and exterior interaction. Using a series of studies we have created a facade that enhances lighting qualities, as well as collect water. The facade system is able to fulfill an engaging yet sustainable purpose through an attraction point creating changes along the X and Y axis of both size and angle.

OTHER CONTRIBUTOR(S): tobias lewis


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university station

SUBMITTED BY: maria ceban

The University Station was intended to be in the University of Hartford. Its goal was to create transport & introduce a more modern style to the campus. The design features a curved green roof, stretching to the platform on the other side. Interior lights adjust the brightness according to conditions and glazing with Low-E coating adds to its sustainability.

univ. of hartford - west hartford, ct

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craft center for textile

SUBMITTED BY: sarveswaran ganapathy sp The Raleigh is known for textiles. The idea was to explore the methods of using architecture to express and experience the fabric. The transition elements such as the entry portal and staircase are few of the potential points to intensify experience gradually before terminating at lantern studios on the upper level.

north carolina state univ. - raleigh, nc

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kindergarten primitive

SUBMITTED BY: micah rydberg

Imagine a space for unscheduled play where games are only limited by imagination, and exploration and learning occur without a rigid structure. A single ramp flows from exterior to interior, expanding the ‘classroom’ while simultaneously creating unique, child-size spaces. Model created using basswood, chipboard, and cardboard.

washington univ. - St. louis, MO

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abstract seeing

SUBMITTED BY: trinity templin

Via the exploration of abstraction and ground condition, this project showcases conditions of hierarchy & spatial sequencing, as both figure and ground are designed in relation to one another, and in relation to the surrounding grounds within the overall site. The concrete cube was designed with to understand volumes of space, including solid & void within a 3D composition.

texas A&M univ. - college station, tx

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amazon’s oasis

SUBMITTED BY: diana gil

This project was intended to become the next Amazon headquarters in Atlanta, Georgia. The main intent was to an office space and place where employees could rest and play to further work culture. It features a courtyard space and elevated pathway around the courtyard for visitors and employees to experience the space and the scenic city views of Midtown Atlanta.

kennesaw state univ. - Mariettia, GA

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water research center on Chain of rocks bridge

SUBMITTED BY: wentao guo

The proposal, accommodating a hostel and a research center, translates the conceptual idea from a water study documenting the flow of water around barriers. Re-imaging and metaphorizing the pier as a tree, the greenhouse, offering a spiral circulation to the research center, provides a cloth that can breath for the old pier at the 22 degree turning point.

washington univ. - St. louis, MO

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observatory

SUBMITTED BY: wentao guo

The observatory located in forest park in St. Louis circulates around the trees with a special effect of wind passing through. The model is entirely made of wood resonating the previous study of pattern.

washington univ. - St. louis, MO

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solid vs Void

SUBMITTED BY: dalton gibbons

These models explore the implementation of solids and perpendicular voids to create architectural promenade. This study manifested a concrete casting which was evolved into a conceptual building focusing on occupant circulation. The building was embedded into a site to create interesting moments of ground condition that complement the circulation.

texas A&M univ. - college station, tx

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Submissions From: Marcelline Siu, Yuting Zhu, Jeremy Shigemitsu, Joseph Andrew Leaming, Zachary Paul Martinez, Esther Zipori


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CATEGORY 04: URBAN


A “Stake� on the Waterfront

SUBMITTED BY: JOSEPH Andrew LeaMing Hastings-On-Hudson is a village roughly 20 miles north of Manhattan, lying on the shore of the Hudson River. Most of these villages have had prior industrial heritage which primarily occupies their water frontage. As industry has left they have re-purposed them into residential developments that outcast the villagers that have little public space to utilize. This summer camp center teaches through hands-on activities and projects within several learning spaces. Circulation and glazing cut into these spaces to provide the same effect for the public.

Pratt Institute - new York city , NY

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Figure-Ground Relations

Texas A&M University - College station, TX

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SUBMITTED BY: Zachary Paul Martinez This project is a collection of conceptual architectural models, each contained within an 18x18 inch square. Each square contains both a ground condition and a single abstract building model, with the goal of understanding the relationship between volumes and spaces in architecture. This submission focuses on three of these models.

OTHER CONTRIBUTOR(S): Tomas Hoyos Camryn Craven


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Roots

SUBMITTED BY: Jeremy Shigemitsu

Roots facilitates passing on the traditional knowledge and skill to the next generation of the Kwakiutl First Nations. Perhaps we can live in harmony with the earth by learning from indigenous groups who have done so from time immemorial. The model explores the program layout on the site.

UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA VANCOUVER, BC, CA

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RECOMPOSITION

SUBMITTED BY: MARCELLINE SIU

Recomposition depicts a conceptual proposal examining the life and death of a typical Vancouver neighbourhood. The two model “inserts” compare an archetypal single-family home layout to a densified, co m m u nit y-o rie n te d neighbourhood. A single structure can be resuscitated into new typologies, creating a self-sustaining space – a neighbourhood that decomposes and recomposes itself.

UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA VANCOUVER, BRITISH COLUMBIA - CANADA

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Olivetti Block-Chain Factories

SCI-ARC - LOS ANGELES, CA

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SUBMITTED BY: Yuting Zhu

BLOCK-CHAIN FACTORIES, is a dynamic ecosystem of hundreds of decentralized factories with signature Olivetti formal language which can re-configure and transform to meet rapid changing needs of cultural production. The original Olivettish buildings and new phygital surface feature, non-correlated stable buildings and potential flexible logistic system will contribute to our discourse on ‘seeing’ and ‘re-seeing’.

OTHER CONTRIBUTOR(S): Xin Liu


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Newark, Which Way Forward? Urban Frameworks and Future Scenarios for Newark’s Downtown

New Jersey Institute of Technology Newark, NJ

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SUBMITTED BY: Esther Zipori

Designed as an interchangeable and updatable model, the Downtown Newark Model is made of 114 tiles that can be swapped out and replaced. Using 3D printed objects that plug into the tiles and projections from above, the model serves as a tool to project and test different development proposals and urban visions.

OTHER CONTRIBUTOR(S):

Ali Abdulrahman Martin Amaro Mateo Aristizabal Natalia Bolivar Catherine Brito Julian Edgren

Disha Gajera Joseph Giambri Emily Gutierrez Melissa Nieves Eka Pramuditha Sean Rackowski Kaitlyn Staranka


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Thank you for all the great work and congratulations to all those who submitted. - The student curatorial team


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