Issuu on Google+

Saturday,

Vol. I.

50 long that

other

28 counties

meet

Ulster.

expressj on of a fulL·patri-oti.sm struggling

to

on a low g_round, bu,t t~at is the first fad

find jng

h/'ld in

the best towards

believing

it the'

means the

of goal,

tha<i it had, iou!ld

oxcressinz

.natiorral

b

J:'~

that

wo-rkand

it by repeatedly

and

repeats

tish

another sprung

banned

in

.but Ireuand+s whatever pl'ess 'Yhen

in

got short

shr-ift,

rioters

fee1ing

the

.

'or induged

the

baton

Iaw cooled

grievances

failed

off

underground,

tested -against

were

amended

t.

in

loffence

r amended,

had

seeking n

prison.

even

to

the

all thds

only

tended

to.

of J expression. lief, and stamped

j

fixedly

II

From the Outpost

on the Irish

stitutional times

in despondency,

verge

of exploscu,

To-day

when

tomed,

sneer

it

Politics cheap

were and

merely

reject

, prems

agitators

them, could

not

ally,

'but 'because

timent port

und

because

get

Ireland

and told so often,

!

tbe exstence

1 ings

of

admittedly looked

. cause

t.hey had

: only

that

reiterated

upon no

nation-

would

wrong. things

it it were

opinion,

national with new

supThey

bodies amusement

progrumme,

oft expressed

opinions

discontent,

And

part.

Nationality

someon the on.

country

almost

of what fai!e? ings

the

nature

to

year-,and

of' the

the

purt

repeat

of

of their

iby

the Act of

one ccuntrj'.

nurrrber

·Mr.

of Ulster's

waged

And

of a Contino

Balfour

writes

attitude

that

one of the, blood.est

ern times

to prevent

Soutb,

is making

he

to h':tory.

For

tain

in $UP-

wars

should

the formula,

But now

self,

that

the

scope

the

a

appeal

Amer.can

gospel

people

'of the- Mayflower,

sentiment

to war

the

mother

country

was

almost

purely

The sea divided

to England,

America'

were

vern the

be-

of

hood

force

ties

out

whole the

·by Ulster

to meet

them

28.

the

binds

Ireland's If four

afraid

of the British Irish

counties.

patriot.

final

there .

'of 32 are not

power

other

to

appeal

arbiter mnncoun-

fought

England.

itself.

for

Later

other

America

half as

to face the Empire, surely

This

there

aJ

for

half the

the

t~

sue,

men

and

may

have

the

sta.tesrnan

fought

disintegrntion

cited

'of

Ireland,

of others

Nation ad cause. point

But

l',ajsed by

that

and

can be

to support

the point Tory

that

to sup·

at is·

statesmen,

as ~fr. Red. to be de- ;

Irishmen

drilling

threat

of invasion

reason.

for

rea-

1

and

t

is

a nation

Its necessity

I

lies'

as' organised

humanity

it.

difference

·between

the

citizen and' the unbetween

wiped

citizens

the free.

out,

lan,

and to

of any country

may

on an absolute equality of legal But beyond toot the distinction The

will .ha"·e marked 'him weak

and

right

other

a National

fetter

him

whip

while

the

in.,

of manhood will :

as

mam

The

the

who

i.s to;

s1ave will never the

cease to assert the dignity make

the

dgnity

Volunteer,

ship and train

and

und s·ea.re.d one and left cowering,

and

the

to maintain

of history

has

been'

the

.and rule.

Eng.

!

U'l-

country there win exist free. slaves. TIle social distinctions , ,

guide

nation.

are hundreds

the

the

will sti ll exist.'

them A111e- that to go-

America, right

quoted with even more. force

plus

in

mark

the right

is only one lesson

an. English port

.as deep

went

econorni-

the

To Stand or Cower -

herent

a

and I

a suWci.ent)

were

Rule

the

:

of :roe National!

to disciplne.

alli.ed -over

from

Land .and though other ties allied r:ca

that

the descendants

in blood u.nd that

for

I

will;

W'OU ld be sti 11 a: g_l~ater

that

In every

to his-

nut

Even

if Home

.

JUS.

man ana the slave.

stand right.

revolutionary

J

It' is unlikely

in itself

ex~stence

movement.

and

to

Ireland

happen.

is not

Even

to

of Nntional

United Ireland

we are back ·to active the

question

deeper,

.

it.

upon

ever

1'e3.5O)1for the

arming.

con- :

it as the hiSt resource,

thai: will

son than

They

of .history

and disciplined

The

with

morals

it is forced

Vc lunteer

that' been I

not

or its leaders:

\VaT, .Natio.nalist

consider

that ster

.

the

cvil

of the

told, so often are

Active Service ism again,

may distort

lies the difference

further,

Ireland.

the Tory Party

armed

is absolutely

we are

it

"I am

and however tify

haNe

have existed for .a generation,

di'lions' that

appeal

Justifying Revolution.

cal.

of

of the constitutional

seeming

question

eveJ.-Y week

aggressi ve spirit.

product

not the paramount

consequently,

Jearn

in -any

submitting

even that sacrifice

to

started

armed

within.

But pushed

bas no need

(ar-e the

secession

and,

lesson that,

to, learn.

if it

make

:;_Ur. Balfour

opposite

Vo1:unteers

of mod-

_-

tory

that

phys.i.

sentiment.

The

America

means,

divided and:

lesson

world

Ireland

a dangerous analogy

countries

that America Wi)S justiin a bloody war to main-

its integrity,

meet,

presenCe

the

his

means anything, tied in inchdging

belief

of fashion in France

meetings

the current

of the passengers

politeal expression

another

sort

Frenchnnan

attend

the

to pre.

Jesson.

there

for

ingruined

one part

'Of attending

In.a.

that

physically

rfs

example

it points

in race

it is the

the

feated

0.£

Gould take

unanimity

the possibility

required.

fact

to preserve

Freeman or Slave

only

a Frenchman."

and

I the desirabil'ty 'of Home Thule. Nation. ality had been divorced from action for

very

believed,

very

was as if every every

Ire-

nation

to see the 'utility

precluded

asked

was

smi.led at

everybody

where

being

discontent of National

as an unnecessary

resolutions

Ireland

a~ld England

keep Ulster Government.

from

while

The

wishes

land

port

r!a,ss;~g

was so deeply that

us.

but

real

but

says

con.

in the

the

between

is 'tbe

-mond

weekly

persistence

the

This

teaches,

when

-beyond

force in 11'72 or passed

ental

the reo

'Of the

in' the people

Meet.

on

from

thiat

understanding

England

of "'.

.

the rela.

to go back to fundarnen. is here,

unity

Union by f-r'a'nd 'in 1800 does not make Ire-

more

'it ·ke.pt ever

to passive

portion

a clear

conquered

111

we will reap

whole

Acts

Ireland

that;

Q).1ly and alien

But

.'

gradual

in by the

told,

were

the

,a.gitation

we almost doubted

of nalio.nal

I almost

thought

So we were

themselves.

i

suo follow-

'A11S

; would even support wrong : to Injure

them

a

people that

that

it was

was a crass sen-

there

in the Irish anything

to

were

the

brute II

sea

when

'Ere the Awakening.

Ireland.

because pass

easier,

in~,

purpose in

be.

~

aceus-

resolutions

adopted

or

than

!

their

active

the

Ireland

land.

movement.

machined,

easy,

as

I

suited

'<It National

they'

So within

but

or to-morrow

it only been

E~gland

the

and

is justifiable

''I'he American

for

she

'

them But

for

Ireland

have

sometimes

sult of that nationa-l Home Hule Bill.

Patriotism have

tals. wich

<belief itself

'On, sometimes in sullen

hared

polticians

England

t)':::::1

active

English

and Jaws clouded

ther

scaffold,

mind.

of Parliament

of the question

not till

limits the stru"'O'le went on and

Of course

.•

they

National the

Ire-

and prejudice,

ti:oris between it is necessary

terpr.o-

and

kill

does not. want

in consttutiorial

So much has passion

usual

"Sometimes

went

forced'

Our Country

expiated to

. But

unity.

serving the real unity of Ireland, nat.onal .and geographical, not the fictitious and

the Bri.

Ireland must see to it that .. ' it t I tb 1 in a posr 'on 0. ruie ere a so.

cell,

,.

those ~\~'tJo protested

Ireland

UI.teL

to

civil war

sufficient

IS

'move-

but

'"

I tribunal,

and when

~hey had exhanrsted' themselves r.orised- GOI'I'~rnments. the laws

command

Government.

and

than

w'e:ght hnd ('0 be borne the popular ments were driverr

~r;.nal

riots,

'0.

of more

is that

it

One-eighth of the popu· says to the other seven-

that

to sup·

in

to

land the. will of tbe majority must rule. he If UJ.ster decides uJYon am uncol1:St~tuti'0l'\.al

countr-y the people would . to an11S, but iarms were

Ireand,

not be afraid this is ,putting

"Do ras I 'order or face roy r.fles;"

eights:

-to fight

In have

No doubt

of the situation. lation of Ireland

sentiment.

National Fixity.

should

Price, Id.

of

iteration

that

1914

_germ

very

we f<1il.ed·to realise

7,

March

freeman

be'

cannot

of his citizen.

h'ms·t)J.f to defend the rights different

from

the

slave.

Freemen's Rights

The Irish have riever been a slavish people, and hence it is thM from landsend to Iandsenrl Ireland is drilling and arming. We have awakened .to a con. sciousness of national duty, and the spi. r it that sltN11bered through the days of' pnssive politics has reasserted itself, mili. ~ ·tant an.d alert. No more mere lip ser- . vce ; rio more empty boasts. 'When the I future Ireland- decides she can carry cu t ; her decision. Her sons at last claim the rights of men and acknowledge the diu. ties of citizens, and in their hands her destiny is safe.


/

I

)

./

-The Influence Of Supply In War.

SA01ttre , l1A ll-e1t1eAnn

" IF HOME RULE IS KILLED."

"IRISH A

Monthly

Home

Rule

be absolutely regime."

An Irish Example. necessity

of

best results

from

ni se-d, but

he said,

of supply

alone,

The

irrespective

may

all

History

is replete

with

lus.ration

:

army

nearly

of

usuatly

defeated

and

entered

recognised for her

chief

city

fac:s

exercised

upon

Ih,e

supplies These tion,

;

and

and

without part

army

any

retreats

au

of

two

lack

influence

one

of

the

in

the

of

This

factor, and

clearly

seen

be

cited.

the

influence

Th;s

in

situa-

sufficient on

the

Napoleon

into

disastrous

annals

of

~f,any

others

of supply

cont·ention

is

which

quoted. been

since wars this

from

any

the

along

premay

campaign

by that

this'

j,.forage 'than

between

return

Campaign

in

Ireland

in

1689.

quently

when

decided

hostile

in

loyal to 'Yilliam HI., the remainder of the country adhering . to. the cause of J2mes II. On August 13, Scornberg with an army of 20,000 men landed at Ban.gor, and on the 17th occupied town and: Dublin, Duke were

of Berwick also small

Drogheda. mediate

with

Had

Soomberg upon

have

made

Dublin,

therefore

the

beginning

he

and

and

Owing camp

to

the

troops ; of

bad

proper

his

transport. out of

was

force

totally

A. lengthy

of

the

march

question.

September,

By

however,

sufficient country carts had been collected to enable him to commence the advance. Dundalk was reached on September 8, and ~e,re Scornberg went into an en-

damp

an army

the

of

absence very

his

of

wisely

entrench-

shortage

end been

lack of

unfortunate

food toll

Army.-·

Schomberg's

reduced' this

the

to

some

miserable

remnant

he

Belfast.

terminated

this

This

example

is,

deficiency instance

inglor ions

transport

prevented

Dublin,

and

second,

owing

proceed

oam-

compelled

ing

effected

i.he 'war Capt.

I

Dundalk.

lost

to

the

return and

army,

hut

coupled

money

sacrificed to

be

a resudt -of Ireland

prolonged

~11

"Territorial

\\'e

The

Effect

not

to

Gazette."

All

Newsagents.

month.

Price

One

Penny.

Irishmen Awake! AN MADE

IRISH IN

VOLUNTEER IRELAND.

BADGE

BJ;:J\UTIFULL

Y

pause

have

Will

for

Be

kept

arming

For

'0'£

reflections.

nearly

also

for the Ulster they

The real

had

Volunteers.

they

have

whether

other

name,

defeat

to

into

the hands positien

Rule,

if they

Beyond

Tha:

being,

Ulster

are unable

to

will re-

terms

the

"01.

on their

to them-

question

is whe.

ther The

Irish

National

Volunteer

'Yell

Organised

Throughout

The would

not

'Of Home Rule.

important

u.terance

effect

Ireland

that

will be absolutely tho old regime,

do i[ Home

sooner all and

sooner

Great

and

the

they

may

Ulster

Britain

this will

Volunteers.

expect.-Ir;sh

the

ungover-

brings

to the

Rule is defeated?

definitely,

lid5i

VOLUNTEERS!

WHEN

:j\,'brch straightaway agent and secure enlarged

YOU

G·E1'

i.

ORDER:

or

!"

to the nearest newsorder, the new and

A

GAELIC

THLET~.

'l'he only Journal in Ireland devoted exclusvelv t.o the Nauorial Pastirfies, and a firm supp-orter of the Volunteer. movement. . Best reports and expert criticisms of all G.A.A. matches, meetings, etc. Details of G"A.A. work throughout Ireland and the foreign provinces of the Association. PUBLISHED .

EVERY THURSDAY. Price 1d. .

Sample copy post free on receipt of post card. 1£ your newsagent cannot obtain the paper, send us the address 'Ot the nearest G.A.A. Club Secretary. Postal subscription rules-6s. 6d. pet vear ; 3s. 3d. per half year; Is. 8ci. pet quarter ; Is. for eight weeks (t631 order). Offices and Works: 30 UPPER

to be

Independent.

DUBLIN.

:O{lt~~

a':J~

The the

impressed

shown

ST.,

1:\'0 matter what g,ame is afoot, you may need a Bicycle .• You ca1not get a better or more serviceable machine than a "LUCANIA" or a "PIERCE" They're Irish, to-o: Everything for cyclists and motor-cyclistsa.t rock-bottom prices. Catalogues free on req nest. ~:~~'~ .. \

answer,

question

LIFFEY

War or ~ac~!

will the rest of

anempt ' is mad~

clearly

with

·IIIr Redmond's .... if Home Rule is

this questcn . \"'hat

front

Force

COU~ltl'Y.

11,1\'(,; a similar

opponents

!&

all

or any

agitation

sult in very ,<:,d vantageous selves.

soo,ner. or

attenton

their

to

of the

bluff

the action of the

arid even

they

is rather

be faced.

it be called

has focussed Home

but them.

W-1S

a c{n'i'ous one, but i-t is one that will

any

all the arms

The

The A.O.H. Badge) ."The ,H'ol1)L-R~:l"h"c Badge, in Green and Gold, 'ld. each,t post free. . " ~.

in-

Volunteers, that

effect, therefore,

ip~'vt!nt -arms coming

later

M.R!I.A

Obviously

to be to prevent

remembered

sel yes hcasted

prccla-

of arms

as a: bombshell

more

needed,

's

the importation

appeared

be

was

of meetings'

Gavernment

its purport arms

the

of ,;he

of Ir.sh, °Nati'onal

a ccuple

the

came

to be

however,

and. the proposal

After held

of the

Nationn.lism

formation

against

it must

oy F. J. Bigger,

old design

and

be stated

At length,

day awoke, for the

been

two years

was one of amuse-

111en in Irish

Volunteers, had

From

"DISMISS

At first the attitude

OJ1e 'Of contempt.

made

GOLD.

we.lJ.

Volunteers

,0.£ Ireland

me nf. , and ,it might

present

AND

T~E

is

few

on forming

them.

younger

GREEN

Electrical. it

a

gon.e further.

they

FINISltED.IN

s.ze,

Uleter Unonists have declared that on no .aecount will they accept Home Rude They

under

iridefirritely.v+

of each

MITCHEL

heard

of a corner

of its

connection,

nable

and

-

U'l-

will do if H-ome

four-fifth

In

not

caused

1st

and

until

'of what

.he agitation

Ireland

with

Publishsj

-

neglected

have

of Ireland

about

killed

uselessly,

wasted,

h.as been

Rule is rejected. Undoubtedly if. the h -opes 0 f f our-nn: fifth S 0 f th e I'ns h pe.op.e 1 are ,. th .1 h d" th d curing e year UllS~ e. to e ga oun a'S

de-

fighting

arrangements, be

to

to ibe

-the

hav-

the

transport

nullified

of

finally

Belfast

::-'Ioreover,

ut-

of the Horne

an aspect

carried.

of ob-

and

to

it

services

Artillery,

yet

In

than

medical

Steward

the' war.

further-

supplies

l:1UCh public

straight cause,

nothing.

lives,

marching

first

same

it

of. the

inefficient 8,000

by 'its the

to the impossibility

entirely

chances

in

EMMET

will do in the eV·erlltof Home

be.rig

demands;

supply.

the

and

was

COlly

to

excellent

-of

army

finishing

no

Cavalry

in

an

was,

from

the

ficiency

think,

influence

Schomberg's

in

on could

I

of the

'Ye see how

beth

Rule

unteers

illustration

1:1 p

important

lYe b a ve heard"

d-oubt,

paign,

t& secure

tresome,

Irish

7,000

best

present.

maticn

the

a "'heavy

of' November

the had to

exacted

this most

By

of

among

arrangements,

clothing,

force

Thus

situation out

sanitation,

warm

owing

the

and

medical

forage,

capital

to

do his

becomes

Nat.onalists

Oonse-

Cavalry,

broke

taining

terrrrinated

Cavalry

with

behind

the

sickness

Thirdly,

in

cope

compelled

country.

repetition

to Ireland

an im-

would

could

before Dundalk, Sohornby a mutinous and

remain

as was

/

war. C~lfo,rlul1::t\eJy la:c];in,&,:in

There

Newry

entered

resistance,

was

men.

in

his. intention,

all 'probability little

1,500

garrisons

advance

undoubtedly with

Belfast. Between this near Newry, lay the

more

merits.

divided

Ulster,

camps:

into two Korth, the

was

and

II.

arid

and with

in 16S9 was

forward

neighbourhood.

Infantry

to

method

therefore

[amss

Artillery

neason

To

rations

Artillery its

half-starved

the

transport

20,000, appeared berg, handicapped

retired Ir-eland

to

was

his and

and Navy,

was

advantageous

~xisting

Scornberg

Belfast

Army

feel-

no

of his

up t-o the

sailing

had

wanted

He

which,

what, the rest

ships and

adcpted..

addition

the

by

the

not

in lives from Schomberg's

be-

made to

He

length

section

most

question

ster Unionists

country

were

perhaps,

was

Rule

animals.

Jealousy

fact,

in

with.

and

he studying.

and

supplied

coast.

iru,;; existed and

began,

factor

retiring the

is tbe It opens

tered.

diffi-

Moreover,

while

no efforts

force

the

both

illustrating

has

that

will

in war is strengthened

examples

one may

in

could+be

campaion

be all powerful taking

Supply

however,

in every the

of

better

j

keep

sentence

no vtrans-

cleared

vehicles

the

and very' little

in Ulster.

had

extracrdinary-tbat

to

war-

a campaign,

example

supplies,

great

brought

Berwick,

IVhy a so palpably

most

upon

of

Schomberg,

of supply

was

influence the

influence,

sent and

the

its effect

Duke

the

fare.

War,

had

the

any

-

any concessions

agreement. over

of

must

to the force

EngLand,

of shelter.

interference

recorded

great'

lack

deminated

further

the

influence

Firstly,

secondly,

was

Club in London. but

TONE

the

of

Herne Rule by oon~ent, but the question be settled here and now. The first

and

but

a:s the guest

go any reasonable

and .should

men,

at

To have . advanced beyond Dundalk would have meant the severing of the' army Irorn its base of supplies. It seems

was

was b-eatert and

of the enemy, .to force

undertaking

fore

at

In

all.powerful

factors their

the

invaded

Russia

Then

operations.

two

in i1-

Russians

Moscow.

taken. an

with

men,

.rnanner

army

.port with it from

there,

supplies

and

triumph

the old

E Redmond,

'to

NATIONAL INDEPENDENOE As underst-ood by

wil'l

be as the pric-e paid For con-

must

sent

all

army

of food

coJl.ected

was to be ·0btained

Napolean, the

quantities

advance

up

The

a depot formed

of these

The

giving

advance.

from

been

its

oulty.

the

instances

million

He

conquered, her

a

during

factors,

To give a single

In 1812,

had

transporting

of supply alter

apparently

further

Adequate

forage

campaign.

support of ths fact.

F. ussia. Borodino

operations

or

a

Belfast.'

understood

other

to decide

course of. the

entire

upon

c.amp, of

drew its supplies

exerted

influence

of

be sufficient

trenched

under

Party,

agreement,

to secure

hopes

recog-

infiuenoe

is not sufficiently

or appreciated,

soldier

to get the

is generally

the enormous

the 'field

the

in order

him,

by the problem in

feeding

of war,

Irish

the N·a,tiOJ1.a1Liberal

made

'Ireland

ungovernable

leader of the

----<)--

in time

killed

So spoke Mr John

would,

The

js

devoted

Principle IRISH

well

Journal

----<)--

"If

FREE:E>OM."

what

Irish Cycle Depot RICHMOND

ST.,

S.C.R.,

DUBLIN,


THE IRISH VOLUNTEER ,

himself

THE MEN OF '82

3

marched

Rotunda

the

in his Volunteer

debated

at great

solved

<Now

By CAITLIN DE BRUN Miss Caitlin

in the article

de Brun

concludes

her

cal sketches

interest.ng

of some

be-

of the

men

of '82.

at the

Rotunda.

night,

16th

November,

motto Volunteers of the

reform 'purpose

to effect

Ir.sh. Parliam~nt.

For

a great

delegates lin,

determined

proposed

W1S

to

consist

member.

which

mons,

K ational

the House of Corn-

of Dublin

;

they

the country

billets

entertainng

cordiality."

guests

The

delegates

from their

Crowds

firing

nounced gates

Rotunda.

and

delegaces. dele-

Royal

Exchange

by 001. Edwards Brigade

Naton al Standard

borne

a captain

of

shoulders.

spective

unjforms;

foll,owed Volunteers

nurch

in their

green

the

composed

re-

riiJa.n.ds Another

special

b,y Dublin

carry-

air

al-

spec"ally

for

musicians

in

all might

,be ,accustomed'

to

-to the sa;me air.

It was .played

by

the

bands

chapJains

of

in the the

casso.cks,

·spe.ctiv.e cor.ps, process:.on,

and

ing of Heaven a wonderful multit'ude. wera borne

lery

0.£ infantry

their shoulders.

playing

1780~' so- that

aT)~

borne

.and othen the dele-

ibroad,

luded 'to (a n.a.rch

their

their

.battleaxes

l1'l'ott'ces and

"-ere \\io.rn across

all

the finest

two and two" w.th side arms,

ing '~:!'nners with

the

and

.after,

A battalion

a band- followed,

Ireland

of

came

on their

band

of

company

regiment,

-slung and bright

ga;es1

Pedder,

Grenadiers,

muskets with

Barristers'

Colonel

with the

pro-

with a band

of 'the

Grenadiers, headed- by

by.a

the

of Artillery,

Tandv,

A company

cav-

o.f Old,

commenced

commanded by Napper

211'en in _the

to. the

of ;h61 Rachdown

Liberty

surrounded

garl<lJnds ef

flung.

first. m.ov~me.nt of the

Co. Wicklow,

by

appeared

.an-

A ..tcop

succeeded'.

as

cannon

the

cession , the

by a' pro·

of .twenty-one

.a.lry, commanded court,

a·(- the

thronged

of lc.dies

passing

t~e

{rom

met

.and

immense

an

w.ndows

zed

r·egi.

"were

"The

hand;

respective

formed

to the

on had"

accompanied

houses

flowers

his

with

The

passed.

soldier

into

They

c-ession. a.t the

irrvt ations

_who could afford it v:ed

of honour

ments.

crowds

every

Exc ange, each

guard

in

their

his

h

says':in their

pressed:

every .householder

on No:

excelled

appeared

Volunteers;

numerous

Royal

Rotunda

~Barr .ngton

.everywhere, - forcing

they

sa-me' n11.1mber",of

formed

citizens

hospitality

in

to be held in Dub-

0'£ the

10'ih, 1783.

"T.he

of

foot,

pr-ocession).

differ-ent

ma.l'ched giving

each

with

effect

on

.the

Several

sta·nda.rds

'by the different aud

another

.,' - .

. -

to

the

on the;r efforts,

in

his reo

solemnity

as if invoking

cOllUlland<Jd bv

The

Iegime'l1'ts,

whioh

the

bless:

open

then

f,~:>rththy

Banisters'

our

jips

and cQltours'

corps

I)rigade

,

of horse of

artil-

Ca1.beck,

mouths

shall

·PT3.:·se!") esco.r:ted by the

Gorps in scarlet

and

gold·, the

bein

, man ;

appeared

cl-el·eagtes--the -Bishop An

'C<£ Bristol. ing.

He

had

something

amongst

of Derry

Englishman

peer of Engla·nd

of great been

those

Ear l

and

by 'b;rth,

weal.th

a curate

in "\Y.:d,es,-but gradually

a

and learn-

in

parish

-<I,

advancing

by the

force of his talents,

be reached

most dstinguished

place in the peerage.

the

intes.ed

struggl,e

. pendence,

him;

for

and

the people.

he had

her

had

shared'

the

and

inde-

affections a delegate

entered

'ng,

-finally

and

debate

until

took

the chair a1 the

hour

before

cuses

Lord

estly

by

the

of'know

ment

of

time,

the

Convention were of the

before zscemhled.

h.mself

some

t termined .

Charlemont

of dis-

by· six

beautiful attended

riages

containing

dressed knee

horses, his friends,

in purple

ments

his. cavalcade. to assist

tion

seat

of his 2dopted

country.

stopped

Parliament

lege Green, guard ded,

many

door

·1'0 see

what

sen.

Oatho.!'c

avow~

rivalry

on

of civil

and

them

·of a, plan

had

Flood

for

paraded,

But

ment,

aneL the

at

enel~ly

they

with

them

rig;bts should of violating

the

of

It was

carrLed

gr,eat IT1a'jority.

in

the

Flood,

by

of

who

independenoe B 'shop

dal'·e

abo·ve the

or gave

a-nswel'assert

their

mean

policy There

is in this i.sLand a class of ci;:z.ens

equally

and

r:.ghts

deter.

o·f others'.

-men

Conve.ntion

came

their

The

in,iinitely

mOl',e numerous

th:m ~hose who, h:we hithert·o

CO.n1l)l'0l1S.

'regi-

Bishop

rema:rkable

rise the

existng

Battali-on,

th~ir

those

delihe.

divisions

declared

in its ruins.

"G.entl-enned,

a -D2d ef-

to arms,

The

it to h'111 un,der arms

'l'hey

the follo.wing

Every

DeITY.

an addr,ess to the

Downhill.

abashed,

A Northern

ant! presented

be !buried

retig~ciLls

House

and'

of

beat

minat,i·o-n to snpport

"the

the

of the Ir:sh

Then

mies.on.

found

themselv·es.

r·espectabJe Reform

alarmed

w.th only .a sorry

1he 13:,11 of l{ight.s

Derry

was ch'O·

moved

of their

give

'1'0.

fo.r",ard

with the Bisl:;top -0£ Derry.

between

account

who. hav·e croillched

oppc'sed them under

the

iron

roc1 'of their oppr:es'sol's,. not from a·ny das-

a

t.ardly

who wa:; hi.l11self. a

from

any

of tjleir

uJlmaniy

indifference

shackles,

not

',0 tho un·

mcmb.e·r

of U).e COlTlJ'pt Pat;iiament,

ther

alienaJoJe rights of 1n·en, but fr·om ".pious of the. ConV'entlOn, were I1Om1l1a- dr-ead of wound " ng onr common country .'

\\ i,th other

members

ted to move COll1il11on~.

members,

"

WI),0

were

toge.

in;;ens:bility

also.

. the H ouse o·f the measure 111 It was pre.sented to the as·

semble<! -Parliament as the peti1i!on of a Convention of armed del·eg.ates. Flood

I

thr·ough whose

the hearts

a puls,e

fW

sl(les beat

of ltS'.' tyrants; men III at thIS momenL as h:gh

Ilberty:

is due the

appeal

to prorection.'

only people

and

for

a, t.me.

together

Charlemont

recommended

a tel11-p6ri~111gsystem

ullteers

the

Iad down

biogrephical

~a'n~d

for the

pally M'N·evin's·

r

their-

sketches

ground to be. It

Union.

when the'Yol.

arms.

I have

History,

and

was

lost their

opportunity

preparations

and Fall, lana.

to. come

This- Bill

As the Volunteers English

the Lord

the presentation

civil bodies.

the

kept

Bill to Parliament;

from

a:nd thro.ugh

DERRY

For used

thes.e princi.

Bar~ington's

Mooney's

History

AND MONAGHAN TEERS IN 1782.

0'£ Sat-

order:

(0.

mortified homes,

.:lmongst

sicJ:ed with CharJe·

Convent·i·on.

delegates,

::.eturn~d to their

rated.

'alS'o the

an

members

debate

became

the delegate

Volunteers

all the

-the Bishop

Grattan

mont and Flood fect on the

and

was

Lord 'Ch],rl-emont

called

some

in the

eye turned to the Bishop

1rshop"!

him

former

Cha.r.l.emont

a.dvoca~e

The

a11d the choice

The

liberty

'the wfls

urday. and

J.

Battalion,

Rise

yof

Ire-

to the' insults

body by

Governmerut

The

to the

while

live

I.ay between

for all,''

adoption

alighted thel'.e

Derry.

Though

liberty

the

moved

their

of the

astoun-

came

all; then

of Chulemont,

of a pr,e,s;dent of

scunded;

to a.llude

en d af thne \10 I'un t·,eers. I t bwas at>. tnU.!'nph s: E< ng I'rsnt, dIII D· I"icity a.nd a source of deep lor · .. d 1pstmg an sorrow to the Irish patriots.

in Col-

happening.

"L-ong

a.;:,semb]y

Earl

Bishop

was

and

shouted,

courtly

House

of Lords'Iwas

t-o them

to the Rotunda In the

On his way he

of the members

bowed

people

Conven-

{he 'Parliament

The trumpets

the House

Bishop

to {he

at the

upon

Ca~.

for it. .A delegate,

rose

Henry FIood detailed in ta ignified way the insulting reception of the Bill b the I~egls" . let ur e. . YLord •Af'ter some debating Ch ,,,,1' . Iemont .. t a cL''jo'1lrne d t.1.' . . ie C onventicn sine . ", '. .• die. IhJS marik~1:1 the beannins of the

joined

a salute, thousands of people

fired

cheered,

corps

he proceeded

his

in reforming

at the

'I'rum .

and detach-

Volunteer

Moore,

flung

composed

horses.

responsrble

tain

diamond

of honour,

Tbus

to take

made

He was sur-

h s approach,

from several

, Rotunda

The

with

'on splendid

pets announced

car-

magnificently

velvet,

by a guard

of light cavalry,

caparis-

'Of several

an.d shoe <buckles, etc.

round-ed

to

richiy

by a suite

oned,

mil,'

But, gentlemen

was an evil day for Ireland

to convince the people that he : • honour, but he. was weak and bigoted. No. Lukewarm Advocate of Their. The wicked English Minister, knowing Freedom this, had ft:ightened lilim by te,iLng him sat in an: o.pen landcu, drawn

Jha.t whatever course was adopted ,by t!te Oonv,ention or the VoluiHeer~ lie wsuld be

._

govern,

ag a.inst three

Volnnteers

force,

W26

He

the

gentle-

of human

Catholics.

animated

gin ,their wcs incapable

in the scale

1lil! of Rights'

of . glvmg

deLord

anew

community.eovei-

be a counterpoise

also rejected.

he acted'j

on

of the

Protestants

solely

'98 tha,t

not .at all reliable;

encroachments,

to exercise

for,

of a Reform

treat.

men 'Of

neces-

internal

of divided

amd allegiance This

busi-

Barringcou's

some

ac-

dishon-

the "

delegates from

at

and

of acting

must

of her whole

01 the rest;

of the

tbis / was 'an

commencing

the

,\Ve

appo.ntod

Ohai-lemont

Irelana

own

ther

'Of

to }i.oursel"V'es and SUl11111Qnyou 1Q consistency . Tyranny is not Govei'nJIl1enlj

Charle-

Convention

says

those

off foreign

lions of united

fer reform. Lord

of

dieman,d

their

l':ghts

ment,

decided

who.

one million

can never,

the petiten

12 -o.'cl:,ock. Barrington

men,

morn-

morning

when

come

is now

as irresist.ble

those

herself

the dearest

which

of Ireland.

t8' support

of a part

House

and

compel

to ward

tynanny

Iihsrty

upon

as well

more effectually

the

On . .he mont

force

was

Charta

rights

a~ail

their

he founded-

by a, restitution

sarily

whose

i:i:ves 'o:btained

the hour

fellow-citizens,

the

of

the

men

Bill 'Of Rights

poli-cy,

wi.ll

Sunday

.3.ga.ia3)~considering following

claims

adjourned

divi:ded.

lhe part of informer hs friends. .

for

Dublin

mor_n.:ng;

the

'&e.

deliber-

dec'sion

'DO

sound own

animates

Loss of their

gentlemen,

their

-

that

Ireland',

hazard

Magna

justice,

to Saturday

thee Monday

he is a writer

of

Up

Convention

ness

in

and

the

~

re-

which

any of

other- must

But,

for some days,

'I'he

continued

all

which

Parliamentary won

He was chosen

hs own district

at last the

of Irelcnd,

He had read the history greatly

until

"Vox populd

9

extraordinary

a mracle,

surrounding

Cou.\1seHor

and oar

buttons

lex est."

One like

had

Wlt;t 1-"bels on the can.nons mouths (on. which wa·s wr;tten th·eir :r;tletto, "Oh, Lord, send

their

011

suprema

this

Convention

Tbe~: met in the

vernber

a

the

with

when

associ.arion.

followed,

meeting

ating

,arriv,e.d at. The

debate

stiIl

and

'I'he

Con-

They

of the .petit'on

by adjournment

Convention

at

as

;11.e fir-st great

reo

on the

an armed

and furious

party

advocate.

It came from

ancestors

every

and treachery.

·an assault

on. the:"

too, citizen

opportunity

.and his

cause

the

House;

cs noble proudest

the other _in the

deceit

the consideration

continued

biographi-

tyranny,

sisted A \ong

W.15

constantly

another

Lieutenant

and

It

the

were

Green,

was

1.0 make

vemion

unif-orm.

th two _ assembles-c.cne

in Collegs

Lord

from

of Commons,

reporters

sttirig

The

low

and

between

for English

petition

Length in

passing Rotunda.

Biographical Sketch

the

House

dressed

messengers

--<>--

with

to the

whose

veins,l)ol:lI'S ,a tide 'Of as pu.re a blood,

and

Ballintemple -Soarl-et,

Forresters,

faced

VOLUN.

July

blue ,

12th,

Capt.

1779

Stewart.

Co~,er~ine V·0Iunteer-5-~01. Lieut.vCol. Canning, M.1Jor Dun.glvan Battalion, June .

R,chal'dsOn, Lyle. 14th, 1778_

Scarlet, faced Capt. Thomas

1 hos.

olack ;. Major Fannino b .

Bond,

Limavaddy Battalion, November 7tll:, ~. . 17 f7 =-Soanet-faced black; Co.l. James Hoyle .• Soc.ety

Volunteers

of Derry,

1778-Scarlet-.faoed Moore.

'blue;

Derr ykegiment c.Ool. Derry

Independent

Captain Derry

J.

F'usiliers,.

June

(First) faced'

Treacy; Lieut. }1ontgomeJ 71.'. Blue

R

Company'

14tb,

1778-Sca:r-Adju1a11t:.

Voluntee.rs,

. June',.

D2.wson;

Catpiain

A ..

Ensign

R_

V9Iunteers-Captacn-Lieut.

Captain

Wm.

Lecky.

Mona:ghan

Independie:nts

Monaghan

Ha1lgers,

-Scarlet ,faced \Ym. Forster. ·Monaghan

....

A Scott;

black;'

First

white;

January

.

Wm .. z:

Ferguson."

John

Volunteer

Lieut.

i\1J-gher,afelt 1773-Scarlet

Trine

17th,

Ferguson.

let faced 'b:ue; Henry Delap.

Moore;

March Captain

10th,

1780

Capta:n,Oolonel

Battalion-Colonel

J,

Mont~0l11ery. Velunteers could take a le'sson in disc!pline from the noble \'\'exford. lifeboat men, who, without -o,le moment's hesitation, went stra;.ght to their de::t.;hs at the call o,f duty last week.

"Their"s not to r·eason why, Tlleir's but t'V do and :die." This is the spir~t wh:ch makes ·gre:.tt sol. dersL Bonnacht dilis ;De ,ar anmanna. CAITLIN DE BRC:~.

_


THE

IRISH

VOLUNTEER

file. My orders, were, 'that they were to mrn-ch qu'etl.y ('0' the western' foot of the mountain; here the horses were 'to be left behind ,and the climl, made en foot the --0-'burghers keeping the same jorder ,as'that in which they had been riding. Should Comrades, stand, and we'n toast the land 'the English, however, discover . US before we reache.j the mountain,' we must then that lies in the Western Sea, j .storm it all together, <lind leave the horses Where the -cur lews cry 'neath the star-fit: wherever we had dismounted . .We suc~ded in corning to' th.e mounsky aRd the streamlets sing in glee, tam unobserved, and at once began the Where blaze of war seared plain and scaur --0--' climb. It was exactly two o'clock in t.he and vatley , town and hill , morning of December 25ih. 1901.' . When we hlld .gone up a.bout half-way we heard And we'll proudly boast e~er 'we 4ra;,n,' the the challenge of <II sentrytoast that she's true to Freedom still. . "HaLt; who goe.s there?" Then fQI· lowed a few shots. . ~ly command rang out ·through, the --<>-Oh! the tears she shed when the Wild night : "Burghers, storm!" The word was Geese fled away o'er the heaving' sea taken up by the burghers therneslves, and on" all .,:des one heard '''Storm! storm!" TO' win renown by plain and town 'neath In his st?ry of the Boer War the £.am'l thie temerity to. pursue them, they faced It was _a neverto.he-fprgotten. moment. the glittering Fleur-de-Lis ; ous ~er General, De. \Yet, re.latip.g one round at the first rise and suddenly con- Amidst the bullets, which we could hearBut the fame they won when their fights of his exper-iences. wr ites r-c-The English' fronted them. _The three (who were Kafwh·s·.'ing ubove <lind around us, the burgcolumn marched to .Harnsmlth .. It was firs), seeing that the tables were tm-nel, hers advanced to the. top calling out: were dime. to her sad heart brought·' t.me that I aceornplished sometli'ng fur. hnsti ly wheeled 'aronnd towards their camp.. . "S!~.o.rm,! storm!" TI,e mountan, 'howlie ease-ther, and I determined th:\t the next blow but before they could reach it one of their 'ever, We,S S'O-steep that it can scarcely I struck should be a heavy one. I there- number was caught .and shoot down. One be said that we stormed. it; it 'was much' Here's the faithful few who ' still steed fore retIred \0 the north-east of Bethlegun and the Maxirn-Nordenfeldt nQW fired more of a. climb. 'Often our feet skpped true-I gi~e yQU the Rapaprees ! hem, a~ .. concealed m~ :nen in th.e veldt U'plC"~ our two officers as long as- they were_ ~Iinder us, and we fell to the grouti~; but rounc'~ Tijgerkloof (WhICI.I was surted to', m sight, -and .hus we learnt that the. guns m. an insthnt we were ~IP a.gam and the plIrpose) whilst I made my plans, were plr oed on the h gh western point of d mbedi on and' on to .gam the sumrmt. Ah L co~ades mine, pledge the ' fighting Colonel Firman's brigade was' camped the mountain, from whch they (auld shoot . I think that after the sentry heard lIS three line that rose when the ~O'nTIan host between Bethlehem and Hurrsmith, at in .all directions. . or four minutes must haveelapsed before Eland's H.'i.verbridge, where he was build. Le~ me describe Crcerrkcp. On its ,\,es1. the troops, who wer·e lying a'~leep in their First erushed the .strand of our sacred mg the line 0'£. 'blockhouses between the ern SIde was a precuprce, on the north a)'ld tentsor on .the- veldt; were awakened and land on her calm, white" ·S'outhern two 'O,Wn3. Thic cam!? was so. well en- south a. steep descent, and ori tbe ea-st a could come out, ,because ~heir camp \\"1)5 -coast , trenched ~hat there' wa's. no possihi lity of gentle s.1.o!?ew~ich ran down to' the plan ab?u.t a hundred 'paces distant fr~m our stormmg It, and I knew that so long as from wh.clu Side should the attack take pam. of attack. . 'Spite ihe bloody roll of .the centuries ton Co.lonel Firman thought! was ·sti1.1in the pl'aoe ? SQme of the officers were of the Directly we reached the top, the that line has unconquered stood, neighbourhood he w?uld. not ?I.H'e to come 'Opinion that. this should take place on the dsafenirrg roar of a heavy fig,ht 'b_e:%a~,,3 nd out and g,ve me an opportunity of attackeast, where It was the least s.eep, but I las,ted frem. fifteen to twenty minutes. And it stands to-day, as it will fer aye, =s hl~. I. saw that a .ruse was nec-ess~.ry I' d~ffered from theni, for through our field- Sh~Jdy befo.:re :th S the Armstrong gun wth its front to the Saxon brood. to entice him out of hIS Fortress. With g.~.a;;·s.u.:;we oould. 'see that .the, walls of the. ·.~nd the Msxim-Nordenfeldt had. each fired this object in =«. I .s~t for Commandfort were so iifuilt that it W3;3 qu.te clear two shots, but they fired' .no more ; as we a,;t Jan Jacoh51:; with h.~s. fifty men from I the enemy had though'! that, should they reached the .top the gunners' were shot Then, comrades, stand-e-her-e's the Mother. Witzieshoek. "ben he joined me I con- be attacked.' -it would be from the east. down at their .gn·ns. After a short biUit Ia.nd, her valleys, hills and! streams, fided my secret to' him, and! ordered him The forts ~ere built ;n a semi-circle to- desperu:e struggle the Engl.ish ga.ve way, to .go' back 'with his fifty men, and to let wards that '5'iOO, and althoush this would or surrendered', and we tcok possession Her 's:lver tongue, so old, yet Y0Ung, her .. .Colonel F!nnan ~ee him doing so. ~e be '0.£ Iivtle importance once °the fight had o~ the Armstrong <and Maxim.Nordenfeldt. hopes and her shining dreams; also had Instrt1~('.'onS" to let ~some' of his begun (because the defenders had. only 1'0 We continued to fire. 011. the troops w~~ Here's the SOIlS .she nul' sst . who in veevel-?-t cornets' ride to the I,,-3ff,-I' kra·al.s, jump over the wall to find themselves still had retreated a short distance. . Agam which were dose to te EnglIsh- camp', 1Jl entrenched), still: it was to the advantage they gave w.ay and' took up another postgean.ce burst .on, the' foeman's ranks order to tell these Kaffirs that he :had had of the attackinsz oarty to. come from a sids tion a little further on, and so it went on of steelorders to come to. me 'with fifty men, but. where they w~,id not he expected. These for I~bou~ two th:lUsJ.:!!!.dpaces, and then that when he arrived I had commanded -reasons hrouzht me to the conclusion that the l~ngllsh took to flight. AS we had no .' Three shouts von a hill for the boys who.' him to return to his district, because I was the Englsh ~vould not be on the look-out horses w.th ·\lS and it was dark, we did still stand thick .in the bearna 'baogn:lil. g'Oing to march with my commando to for US from the west, and I therefore de- not pursue the fleeing enemy,. but reo Winburg. The following d'ay Colonel Fir- cictled to make the attack from this side, turned to .he camp. I he whole engageAN BEAR::"-iA BAOGHAIL, man's scouts were. .as might have been ex- the steep side of the mO'unta:n. But I ment lasted, so far as I could judge, for. pected, informed by the Kaffirs of what dd not then know how steep it really was. ubout an hour. I cannot say for certain, .~ they had heard from the burghers under On the western side there were four forts becu use I made no note of the· time. CQmmandant J'acobsz ; and. the day after close to each other. Each was sufficient - When the day began to dawn we brought -that is, the 22nd December'+Colonel t'O srive shelter .to about 25 men. To the the waggons and guns down the mounF'irman's column, about six to seven hunS'Olltll there were four forts, and to the tain, I sent them in the direct.on .o·f Langdren men strong, marched' from Elands east three. The top of the mountain W:\~ berg, to' the, we-st of Grcenkop. The en--<>-River to Tweenfontein, haH way between not more than three to four hundred paces emy lost about 116 dead and wounded .a.nd J::lands River and Tijgei-kloof. On the in diameter. T'O the east in a. hollow the 240 prisoners 2f \VaL Our loss was also Hon, Sam Hughes, Minister· of farm of Tweefonteiri :t.here was ~ mountain convoy was placed, 'and from every schanze he )lvy-14 dead and' 30 w'Ounde:i' Besides Militia Cavalary, says: -"I say i·ery called Greenkop-whLch has SlDce, for a. we co-uld rake- it with our fire. one Armstrong and one Maxun·No·rden. empha.t';oally t'ha,t .we oomplied in reas'On which win soon be a,pP'are!,t to' the I remained on the t.oP from wh:ch I feldt, our booty consisted of twenty wag· the ulSe of the obsoelte amrea.cLer, received the name of "Chr;s.tmas wa:s reconnoiterincy., and sent word t'O t.he gons, mostly 'ox-w,aggons, 31.gre.at quantity llliunition prescribed by thie British Qffice, Kop." I gave Commandant Jacobsz Qr.. commando, in th: afternoon o·f the 24th of rifle and gun ammuni·;ion. guns, tents, but we will not use their obsolete rifle." d{:rs to come to me with h:s fifiy men on Deoember to com.e to -a certain place at ·five hundred hQrses ahd mu,les, and one The Lee·Enifield 'was nQ longer r·egarded 91?-"ist~a:s Eve, but this time witn~he :.trict Tijgerk]oo~f, which they cO'll,ld do without waggon laden with, spirits, EO that t~e as a fir,st.c1ass weapon', th.e Ross ri,fle beregarded .as ,the 'best wea· .JllJunctJ.oni that he mus~ conceal hIS march beinJO' ,observe-d. I ·ordered them to re- bu,rghers, who were nQt a·verse to. thIS, ing universally PO!l1 of its kind in existence. The' aper· frQm the en~ly. I also called up Vcld't· mai; there nnt;1 n:ahtfall, and then to could now satisfy their. thirst. . . cornet BeuliJes, with his fifty men, from -advance with.in four" mites of Grcenkop, The. Slln had. ha-rdly risen wh¤<J! the ture .sight in question w.as a. V'aluable aid The f.ad of the ma"lter 'was, vVilge River, in the distd-ct 0'£ Ha·rrismith. to the north, where I would nTeet them. enemy opened fire from 'a mounta;:n' two ill sighting. declared, that the British Veldtcornet Beulc,es w.as a br.:l.ve man and This was crone. I found the commando .mil$'s to the norHl-ea·s"t '0'f Groenkop, where the Minister trU's.tw:o.rthy; 'he w'as shortly aft~",:a:ds at the appointed pl2ce, and. also G~ne,rn.1' '-there- W-iLS a little camp with. one gun. If War Office. was 'always, adDpting fads' to· coerce the as-promoted to the cQmmand of a dlVlSI'on Brand .and Commandant Karel 'C:oetzee, I st:U had had the 'l...ame·nil1nbers· as were and- it hiad' 'undertaken the objectionable ':' of the Hauism'th bur.ghers-. My jnten. who had come on a visit that day to my with me at tlfe storm:n,g 'of (;roenkop, then. soc;"ationl into making Let me say plainly, though' ,., tion was to ,attack ColoneJ Firman early c.ommm.dQ. They also '''<'ook part in the I could .also have taken this little camp. regulati.ons." .on Christmas lllo;ning. . a.t'la~k. My meJll consisted! of burg,her's But it was not teibe thought' ?f, fo~ some in all l,dnd.ness, t'O the British War o.ffice, is Two days preVIously I had, w:th Gene· .from General ·:\I:cbal Pr;:nsloo, Command'Of my men' haQ; been sent a·way With the that so tar as the Militia Department concerned, nO' Canadian rifleman will Tal PrinslDo and the Command'ant, recon· ants Hanna-nus' Botha. van Coller, Olivier, waggons, and the other·,---:}Vell, everyone ..If noitered the nei.ghbourhood. 'of Groenkop, Rautenbach. -K'Oen,' Jan' Jacobsznnd had a hor·se th3lt had been tak'en frQm the oo'Ve to' ,bow ·to its autocrat·ic rulings. our Ca.nadi·an on which C.olonel F-irman was. encamped. Mea1's, ill six hun.d;red men. Of th~ese E;nglish, and a.s. these horses were in the w~ a1:6 oblged. to abandon I appro<llched as ne·ar as Wlsslble to the I Ie>ft Qne hundred in charge 0'£ the Maxun. pmk of condlti.on for rap:d retreut, I rifle and use and obsolet.e weapon at the mOlllntain, but 'COuld only inspect it from Nordenfe~dt and the pack.horses. thQught it w:ser not to call upon the 'bur- decree of the War Office or retire from the contes~, we will retire. No Canadian the .west, no,rth and e'3:st, bu~ on the fol· "-e had not .a. single wa'!L~on with us; ghers' to att3lck. I ordered them, there· lowmg day I reconno,te,red. It also from every ma'l puj wruat he had with him on ~ore, to' gO' .b~ck after the w-aggons, and volunteer" will leave the shores of Canada' with any such yoke and handicap upon the SQuth. My <plan ~ makmg the attack h:,9 pack,)horse, for long we had made;t In the .evemng :,ve camped to the north __ early the . next llmrnmg W'a·~sOillewhn.t . a rule not to be hampeTed with waggons. ?f Bethlehem. l~rom he.re; on the follow. h'lID •." spOIlt by the fact that the E.nghs~ bad ,a~. Yet wheneve.!, we -picked- 'up reports of en. mg day,.I sent the. pnsoners of, W2iI ready, on the 21st D~celnber, qUItted the,.r gagements in' the camping places 'of the throllJgh Naa.uwpoort Into Basutoland. camp on the mountaIn. Thus they hed Ell'cyl.ish we 'repeatedly saw ihat they had f0i'~ dayS' in wich tlO en~rench themselves. tllk~ a Bo,er camp-and their greatest de· 'De 'Vet's History of the Boer War: ConFouHng-Tlul residue Idt 1.11the barrel "hllst we were rec.onnolter,ng the m.oun· light waS' to. say' that it was one of De stable 31nd 00. From Whelan and Son a:fter the charge has been ·fired' and tbe tam fr,o'n:- the .sot~th, \VIe saw, three zyorse- Wet'·s conv-oys. They C.ould not have been bUllet has passed through the r;fling. The Upper .Ol'mpnd Quay, 2s-:" 10d, , !Il~~ c~l1lng c.a.utlously out ~f camp, convoy.s of mine, .,becaus.e f'Or the last 15 removal of all fouling ,after shooting is nd1l1g. I.n ,a north-easterly :dlreC'-len, and months I had no waggon-c¥l1P with me. necessary jf the barrel i's to keep i·ts ac· thus glvmg us n~ ~hance 00 Jllter~ept the,;n. If a waggon-oamp was tl1.ken, .it could -only curacy. The 'Ordinary deposi.t of soot Commandant 01wlef .and Ca-pta'lJ'L P'Ot.gle. have been ·one cons:sting o.f women, who 'Or incompletely burnt mat'erial from the' ter now made a deto~r, so th.at they cou~ were flying in 'Order to escape ca.ptnJ'e b.y aXp'los:on .of the charge has no <l!pp~ecl. cut off the, '~IIl1·snspectin.gscouts from theJr the En,glish, and to avoi.d· being sent to ruble effect -on the ac'tu11 shooting of th,e. camp, .. and c.ould also get neare·r to th~ the concentration camps. Everywhere in rifle fr.om shot t.o shot, ibut any, SiUdden nl'Oumam themselves. I knew that by do· the St,a(e the women were taki.ng: to fLi,ght, or grad!JlaUy accumulating deposit either. LITTLE HOUSE in-g; So' ,they would dra.w the fire of t.he and the'r terror wfl.S inc·erased t.en·fold from the lead of_a .. 22 bullet or fr'Om the two guns·, which would tell me pl'ec:sely w]',en -the news came that m.any a wDman FOR DIG YAL:UE cupro.nickel .or other e\lve!o,pe of the -high. where Colonel. Firman's b'aittery st.ood. B~. ",n,t]; chiLd had found untimely graves in powe';' rifle bullet may cause 31 most be· IN CHANDLERY,. TOBACCO., fore thes·e off!cers could accomplish t~elr these camps'. w.ilderi'ng lack '0£ 'accul'!lCY, Meta.ll;c foul, CIGARETTES, ETC., pur.pose they were ob.served, and seemg T;hte troops whicb had not remained' with 'ing an be largely obviated· by the use 'Of IRISH' GOODS A SPEC1ALITY. th<llt ,they couldl. not cut off tbe thr,ee men, . the pack.horses now ad\1anced ±o\vard=s.the lubr~cants on -the 'bulJet, 'and hy keeping WEXFORI? STRE;ET,_ DUBLIN. they turned thel' horses ,and. galloped back. m.oun.t<llin. Each ·commando· was Oifdere.d the barrel a,bsol'lltely clean and free from Wp'en th~y saw that t.he th~'ee scouts had to' ride by itself, and to leave in single corr.osion from tl;te very first.

Slainte ~e hE,ireann

How Peasants Fight With De Wet a.t Tweefontein.

I

I

I I

OBSOl.ETE ·RIFLES.

all

.tre.

Don't Forget Larkin's


"-"--~

THE IRISH VOLUNTEER.

Progress of the. Movement. -~<...--

ix ....:"-<>--

KILKE:Kl'Y·

. . PUBLIC

,

MEETING

LINE.

TO.' BE

--<>-...,..

. HELD.

~fIr Deloughry. said tha;t' as they had appointed 'a' .: representative from each of the Clubs. and Societies represented at the iI_leetjiilg,' he thought there might be some ;gen<tJiern.an amongst the general public who would Iike to act on the sub (q:Jmmiitt,ee:' Hie would' slJig.g.est i~h1llt the nam~s. of Mr Claydon and Mr Warren be added to the committee. -Mr Claydon.c.I would. like to be on the Sjomm.ittee, but )[ don't represent .any.bedy yet. Town Olerk=You will act as an mdividua! representative 'on the eommittee, as },.fIr Deloughry has suggested? Mr Claydon-e-Yes. Thle names -of Messrs Claydon and Warren were then added to the subcommittee, whicli then sat for the purpose of making the necessary prelirnin-

On Wednesday night a meeting \~as held in. the Town Hall, Kilkenny, which was convened by the !.f.ayor, Councillor John Magennis,. to take steps ne~:s~'a·ry to .establish a City Branch, or. DIVIS10n, of the Irish 'National Volunteers, Although the meeting' was confined to reo ary arraogements, presentatives of the different clubs -and societies in tfie city, there was .a large attendance of the general public. Mr E O'Connell, Town Clerk, acted as CLADY; Co.. TYRo.NE. Secretary to the meeting. . The 'Mayor, who was moved to' the A meeting' was held- on _Tuesday, 24th chair -by Counciltor , P Deloughry, ex'February, 19[4, an the Hiberni<* Hall, plained the objects for which ~I;l me7tClady, Urney, 00. Tyrone, for the pur~rrg' was called; ana expressed: his satis- pcse of fbrnu.ng a coops 0'£ the Irish faction at the large attendance. He Volunteers. . The hall, which is l.arge extended hi-s hearty welcome to a repre-: and 'commodious, was packed vto oyersentative whom. he s-aw amongst them. -flowing. The follo,win,g members o-f the and who differed from the majority in Strabane corps ..journeyed to Glady to religious belief (loud applause), . Of assist in the formation. of a corps' in tbe course every rnember of the community, ".. "., ...· .J'\0 h ·n U:S.tTI((': 'miBS'&I!'~ ,rr o,m· '0."1"· . o.ons,,,, no matter what his creed, was welcome O'Callagher, .Michael O'Boyle, Samue to jo,in. Diver, Drill Instructor. On the motion Mr O'Connell read ,the list _of the 0-£ Nil!' '~1,'Gi1l (president Olady Division different Clubs ana Societies in' the city A 0. H, B .0. F), seconded by Mr P ao which invitations had been sent, to Casslan, Mr o.'Boyle was moved to the send a delegate to the meeting, and chair. . <" when he oame to -the Protestant Young The Chairman said he was taken un .. Men's Christian Association, he asked awares hy the honour conferred upon was there any representative from that him' by his being asked to- jpTeside over Society present, this magnificent meeting of -the men of Mr George Claydon, Secretary of the Cl ady. . He felt proud to see the Scciety, said his committee would not young rnen. of the Wist-riot there that have a· meeting rill next Wieck, but he night, ready 'as in the days of Rory the doubted if they would appoint a repreRapparee to- fight for the fatherland, sentative. As yet, he did not represent He (Mr Boyle)' said ];t was not for the any Association there ; but as the in, purpose of oratory he had come there, vitation, came' to him, he thought he but to do 'something of a more practical -might as well come thene. ' 'l:la,m~ly, to enroll Ithefcr ),oungt· It was stated that the reason why riature, men .in . the" Volunteer organisation. some of the. Clubs were not represenhe 'sard', had become a profes. ted, was. owing to the Iaot that tn.y did Oratory, The time had come net" have a meeting, and therefore had sion, in Ireland', 'were ennot an opportunity of appointing dele- for action. ' The Volunteers ,tir.ely norr-po'liticaj and entirely nongates. . . The following Clubs and Societies sectari an ; , they': sought to intimidate- no ODe; they sought only to' maintain their were represented :-. country's interests, He longed for the J am-es Stepbens )le.mori al Association day when Irishmen of every shade of -Messrs J B 0'1\ eill and :p Deloughry, opinion would have enrolled themselves T C. The men=of Olady wou-ld 4 0. H (City Divisionj=-Messrs T J a'S Volunteers. enrolment to·night that ~f:or,!n, P Bry;tn', H. Crotty and \V \Val· show by their they appreci,ated t.he k~ndnes's of t,hose k.er. who ·ca·ine to' assi,&t them. Continellit :Olub-Mmsrs '~ames' RYi.an Mr P ,Lenr\on, D· C, Clad-y, &econded P L G, and J,eremiah Davis. the vote of thansk. . - James St'ephens H C-l\fessrs James The Chairman said 011 behalf of his Dowling and l'a.trick Ryan. Irish National Foresters-~!essr.s· PatH commdes . and hom"elf tha.t he appreciated the 'kind "words which had been said BrEilll'l;an and. J ~fcSweeney. on their heh'a1f, hut the com;pliment Home Rule Club-Messrs Matthew m.ost would Gargan, John Lalor, Matt Darcy and which they would apprec,iate be to' see evtery maD! ,present enrolled Michael McCarthy. heme to.night- I(,applause). ,Ki(kellll1Y \VanpiperSl' B:and'--M-e·ssrs' The el1rol.rrlien1.- was rthen ;proceeded James l\:Iurphy, J Kelly and D Quigley. Continenil. 'H C-Messrrs. 1. Dowli.ng with' and when the r.oll was' tot,aUed it was found 'about 150 forms had been and W Finn. James Stephens Boy Scouts-Master J signed, 8. splendi-d record for the met;! by the banks' of th.e Finn. ,.,..,Drill In· Finn. Iltruc:bo,rs' \~O¤;rce'lappoin.ted ,and drilling M'anifesto of the Irish Volunteers. there. and· then. The Strabane The Mayor a'sk'ed the Town. Cjerk to started bOy3 . .prqmised to bring their Company r·ead the mani£esto o.f the Ihsh Volun· teers, which set .forth the obj.¤-cts of the of VolunteerS' to· Clody on a route march meeit·ing., M.r .o'Connell oth~n' read 'the at an early date. Manife,sto, which., ,,,as greeted: w_ith ap, plause. . Election of Su;b-Committee. NEW Ro.SS. 'Mr Deloughty. proposed that arrange· ment.;; be made to have the ll'I.ovement Things· are proceedin.g) apace in New launched at a pu-blio meetin:g, and that Ross; drill and route marches take a small 'sub,commi.ttee· he appointed.to pJ.ae'e r,egularly; s1.gnaHing practice and work. UD tb:e details· and Mr P Byrne drm· is the oll'der of the day. seconded. the p:ropositiom, which was ambukmce .A:rrang~n;ents iue now oompIeted for the passel! nnanimously. A. repre.s·entative fronr each of the holdil1lg of a public meeting next month. clubs and soci·eties re.pr.es'en.ted at the Mr M J Judge, ,Dubl,il1, has· p'l'omised meeting, was appointed. to aict .on ,the to attend. ~ sub,com_m.ittee and on the ,pxooposition of ,M:r Deloughry, "the Ma-Y'!1li[{ Aid No,wlan ·,BEt,TURBET. aµd the 'Town Clel:k were added to the C'omm'iittee. o.n the suggestion of. the A move is on ~foot to start a branch of l\fay.or, it was d¤<l.ided -. 'that the~ Town in Be1turbret and' some Clerk n.egotiate with the2 Clubs not reo the Volunteers 'men have off.eJ)ed ,their serp]'e.~ented. inviting 1he.m' to a,ppoint a ex,military vices as drill in~'tructors~ etc. AI,ready de.1eg·a.te (.0 act on, tlle sub·com.mittee. men have signified The :Mayor said the mell'e fa·;;t of invito hl!ndr.eds 'Of young their intent.ion of joining. The ]3iaMalion ing the Clubs and Scoi.eties to -appoillt ~legate$ Ion 1h;e isub,!oommittee, Id~dn'11 is eXjJ)eoted to iclude mem.bers of Gaelic -societies ITlJean that -they were going to exc.lud-e footba.ll- clubs and ,all National and the queMi'on of equipment will be anybod~ not he'lo'nging to any organisa. tion, and who would wis.h t6 act and taken. uE at' On"e. b~ a ,he].p 'on the Committee. . ~ In r,eply to lI1r John Lalor, the Town Clerk ,said he h'3;d l1i01 sent an invi,ta· STRABAKE A1\-D DISTRICT. t~on to the G A A, bnl be hill.d sent al'l ilUvita!ion to the different hurling and The above Club is mak:ng fine headw{lY f·ootball cJ.ubs in tIre city. and tecruhs of promis:ng kind! continue t'o

t

p~)Ur in. Drill instruction take pll)ce four nights each week under eight competent military instructor's, and mnder these coho d.tions the ¤.ompany is progressing better than could have been expected' Wednesday ~saw 100. men at.the different d'rill exercises <lind so enticing is 'same that, "the boys" hllVe givfen up all amusements to endeaVOUt" to promote the proficiency and strength of their corps, though only two months have elapsed since the initial start thirty men were selected after a severe test, .and promoced as first-class recr uits (or picked, men) these are well versed i.n the musketry exercises and after 1.1, fortnight wIl be on the footing of instructors .hemselves, "as they will be specially trained. Strabane is the centre of a district in which the Volunteer strength is as follow': Strabane, 100 members; CJa. dy, 150; Clonleigh,-lOO; S'on Mills, 120;Cloughear; 120. Total strength, 600, all within a iudius of three miles. In the town of Strabane it is expected, at the rate the recruits are -being enrolled, the memo bership will reach, 200 in ten days' time. As no public meeting or enrclment has been held yet the growth of the movement hcs he.en, most encouxaging In the start there were many critics; to-qa.y the mnjor:ty 'Of them are enrolled, and they are '..the most enthusiastic members. Arrange. ments are 'being made for a publ'c meeting at an earl y dare.

or

MEETING

THE

Co.Mi.\fITTEE.

A'meeting of tbe committee wa-s held on Wednesday night in the Rooney Hall, J\1:r John Hoba-n' -presidin, "Al-so. '!?resentMessrs J Hughes, P '~'fonnel1y, J M'Gol'Tan, H Dupree, l' Concannon, T J Loftus, U DC; ?I J Snort, and A Ryan, secretfuv .: Sa.Isfactory progress was i-eported as regards drill and the number of recnu its joining. The weekly contributions were handed 'ever by collectors to treasurer. A deputation was appointed to W2,'t on M03t- Rev Dr. Higgins, D D, to get, if possible, .he "use of the Concert Hall for drill during the Lent, as it will not 'be otherwise eng~l.ged. It was decded to hold a Church Parade on St. I'atrick's Day. None but efficient members of the corps will be allowed to 'participate.

~ LIVERPo.OL. A meeting of representations of the various Irish societies in Liverpool was held for the purpose of arranging pre· liminaries on last Friday: A Representation Committee was elected' and they will proceed to the organisation of companics- without delay. The following societies are .represented-e-Ir'ish National Foresters, United Irish League, Wolfe Tcne Clubs;' G A A, Gaelic League and the Catholie Defence Association. The Provisional SiC.e-cretary is Sean MaG Cu inn, 4 Jacks'on street.

~ 'MONAGHAN

co. RPS.

The weekly dnill pracnice of the Monaghan Volunteers .are held in St Macar'(<lin's Hall ,0)1: Thursday. miglits. There has been a further enrolment of rnem-> bers, 1fr Patrick 'Vhel'an, J ]5, said thesr drill instructor had, got appointmeres .iru , other districts, and they were agreeable to his accepting them. They would have' a march on Thursday night. )fl!' J Woods, dr-ill instructor, said he had been .dri.ll instructor fOI twenty y,eal'S and. he had never met a smarter body of men than he had drilled that night. Officers were (appointed' to take charge of the different companies.

~ WEST

U:MEIUCK. TlW Volunteer movement in. Drumcollogher is making rapid progress, The recouits, under the capable instructorship. of Yl,r Miuiris 0. Cadhla have gone through ·all the. elementary pads of dr ill, <lind are now at sq uad and section driHi.n;g. Semaphore 'si,gna,11ing, which was started last week, .is also a very in. teresting feature of the movement. An energetic .comrn ittee ar-e making arrangements- for a grand route march on St. Patrick's Day, Cathal de Ball acts as hon sec,

ANNA. LIMERICK

Co.RPS .

--<>~-

,At a largely attended meeting under the presidency of 'Mr Edward Conlan it was unanimouslv decided to start a corps of the Nati,0,n!3.1Volunteers and a committee was. appointed.i--B MacMahon, Sec.

SPLENDID ASSEMBLY. Eight companies at the Limerick Corps, formed. into, sixteen half com" panies, together with several squ.ads Ot recruits, drilled: under. their respective, Drill Instructo·rs at tbe spapious en. closed new DriJ.l Hall on Sunday. At the close the men drilled in Bat.talion Iluder the oommand ()f· Uentenant Holl la.nd a.nd conlS.idering the spaoe availArrange.me.nts .are now being made !-o able for such a large n'trmiber 'and thehold an op~ air meeting with the object ..sho[it time the troop,s are at wo·rk the evo,lutions we're ca:rried. out splendidly, of sta:rt:ng the Ir.ish Volunteers in Blarney. A.s it was the first a;ssembly of the vari· Already about 30 names have been han· ous companies, specil.atoil's were admit. ded in, and tbe CCirk Provisonal Commit· co,n:course of citizens tee have kjndly 'cftiered :an assistance pos· ted and a vast availed of the privilege. . sible. His w'.or'S1hi.p·,the Mayor (AId o.'Dono. van), CO'll:ll!s-iJ.19r o.'CaILaghan and Mr l{obert Gi.bs'on ad.~ressed the men and CASTLEBAR, s-o.ngrat,\llated them on their discipline and ,earl1lestness. _ }{hhe:' is every indication that the Yol,' Companies will assembl.e agail1~ ull'teer<m,ovement is going to be a success onTheThursd.ay night. in Castlebar, 'j.udging by the large num· .bel' enlisted and the enthusiasm shown by ~ them. 'The Urban -Council yard was a.gJa;n . the rendezvous on Sunday., . and despite the severe and inclement day 120 recruits I undenvent a two-hours' cour.se of drill, -0-ing, and splendid progr'ess was made, so Histwkus-Yes, ,that illu.sh·,ation is as much so indeed that the Ins·tl"uctor in . his add ress to them i1 t the close said the much lik·e a '98 pe.asant a's your ]Jl!ental fixing is like Solonts. progress made had really aston"shed bim, a,nd that at two exercises they were as ad· 1'. D. B.-There .is always a point ,anced as 'nar.y s,oldi,ers he knew w('-re af w:here exped~,el1-()Y 1l1l:ust give way. to ter four months' tra.ini.ng At the close princi ptI,e. Y'o<u h'a:\"e reached it and of the instrnciion ther'e \\'as a parade, and gone a bit on the other side. a rea.!ly ,fine display made, a·n~d one" we are sure that .will tend to- dnl w hundreds of Macro·om.-T:"ak,e a hol1day even if recnu·its to tbe ranks,. the whol,e world is to 'burst up in consequence. ~o.TICE TO .C'ASTLEBAR Oo.RPS.

.

I

HAND

GRENADES.

Celt.-l'ivow auy,thing about the mat. The Castlebnr Battalion Irish Volun. ter. j\,either do yuo. teers w:ll .assemble at 3 p.m. on Sunday next in the Urban Council yard for train. Private H.-"'bv should not an Ining in squad oom.pany illnd baH·aEon driT!. structm do it, It;s' .p-art of his. business, Aftenvards an sec(i·ons will thke part in a route march. J.. T., G.alway.-Don(t hold us resporr· . lflstructo,rs Tracey, Dupree, Worthing. s·i!>le. Every man has some cranJ(iness, ton, Bl':nfdow, and Dunne are requested He speci'l.lis,ed in go,inO' the whoI-e way to .be in aH·end'ance at 2.45 o!clock to take towards happiness. '" cba'rge of companies A, B, C, '0, and'K A new squ3d will ibe formed for all reo G. A. A.-There i·s a good deal in your cruits to j'oin and an Instructor a.ppoin. sumgesti,on, bQlt to do it efficien~ly you ted, shc'Il'ld take ev,ery uni.t into your conn,M. J, ;SHo.RT, d<e,nJoe,,o·therwi.se the" l'eal driving force ..}Vo:u1d fall ouL Officer Commanding Battali~n.


6

THE IRISH -VOLUNTEER.

Tuam Meeting THREE HUNDRED AND FIFTY RECRUITS. A largely attended meeting was held in the Town Hall, Tuam, on Sunday week for vhe purpose of inaugurating a branch' of the Irish National" Volunteers, and speeches were delivered by Messrs G 1\i,{)o.JJs, B .A, solicitor ; B Cusack, Galway, and T Sloyan, Tuarn. On the preposition of Mr T M'Hugh, seconded' by _Vir W Sit0 ckwell , the chair was taken by Dr T B Costello, who" m opening the prcceedings, said they all knew the ob.ects of t-he meeting. Corps of the Volu~'beers were being fo-rmed thrcueho.ut Ireland, and some of the peopl.~ of Tuam thought . that they should fall ito, Line, A preliminary meeting W;lS held a few weeks ago and . a s:nl3.1l committee was appointed, who \vere anxious t-o, aid the movement, and a notice convening the public meeting was issued, They were there that day, not to discuss' the question of sro..r'..ing the Volunteer nuoverrsent, {illS that had 'already been considered, but they were g·aI.hexed that dav to see how far they could push on the movement applause). :I1n: '''m Langley, Secretary (pro tem) read the Iollowi ng lenter from Colonel Man.rice Moore, Moore Hall, Co Mayo, wih;;.oh 1s;tuted-"Every day I .spent in Ireland since the Volunteer movement '~1as .inaugurened, . showed mel Ihow popul.ar it was and what g-re.a.t things can be effected by it. It IS the first time the Irish people have had: an op· portunity to, 'Put themselves in a position to defend the soil of Ireland and the ,101bitS of the .people for more than 100 y.;ar.s; and it would be criminal if they neglected j,t. Every little town wil l seen have its company and every barc.ny its battalion, and every city its ~bri. gade, till the Irish National Volunteers wil.l f-orm an army to be reckoned with, But Let discipline and implicit obedience to superiors he enforced, or the army will be worse than useless. Let ~ve~yone he discreet, and glv,e no opportunrty for our objects to be mJsrep~e.s'e'l1(::ed. Heroic and high-flowing, lpr0<l111SeSand pledges are not necessary; we can lea.\,: these to others, but let us act quietly and steadfastly. The Volunteer movernent of 1778 embraced men 0'£ all. par· ties and' religions, and accomplished much foil' Ireland. We aI-50 hold out our hands ,~o ·,aI-! Nationalists 'and Undoniscs, because all Irishmen are g.o.ing to be Nation.aliscs in the future. I unay add that every day I hav.e been in J.-:o,ndon sh?ws, me the ne-c.es.s,ty for SihOW1l1go,ur SIrll"_,enty to, the :"orld, oand that we <we wllmng to. srucnfice s'omejfrJin.g of our person!al oomfmts for the national \velfare. Good·luck to the Tuall; c,omp'any" (}\'ppl.a.u's.e). J\ir G I\tiooUs, B A, Ga.lway, address· ed t.1w mee,tin,6' and: .referrea to the f.e~rs en,t.ertained by some people regardmg the mov,emtent, of _ wh.Lch they wer.e chary inasmuoh as th·ey thougiht lt wonld be in opposition to the pnnClples of the Irish Pa.rt{ He (speakoer) r,ead e}Ctract& fr·om a speech made by ·,VIiI' T.obn E Rec!.mond, who, in t,he House of Commons, sta.ted th.at if the. pre.eent Home RuLe BiJI did not jYa~, and If a UniOl1,ist Go'V'e,rnlThen'ic:ame mto po·w,er, the <)-cLrninistraltion of Ireland by t.hat Government .w:oulclJ, be r,enetered ]~lI?OS· si'ble' .~.ppJml.se). . Ho.w, llifr.. Nwolls as~e;d,,, could lour-fifths ,of the In~h jYeo· pLe fa!"e up <,.rms an,d r,ender. su,ch !<ov. &.D,ment of their. connt,ry impos,slble, unl,ess organised in' a body such as the Irish National VoLun>teeros? Mr Nic.olls also quo,ted' from a speech dlelive.red by MI' J P Farnell, M P, Longford, who had taken his QWll part in the oattle drivin,g agitation thM won rlle grazing lq.nds for ~the .people of th.aJt county. The Irish. N,ational VoJunteers were started in Dn·blin, wher,e they were reo pl'esentative c·f e'V'ery phase o,f Irish !'Ja. fonaLitv, and the Se,c.ret-aries of the Committee 1h.a.t cal[ed the iOrelimilllary meeting were Mr A KetUe, thoe vet.eran Land Leaguer, and M'r E'oan' MrucNe.ill, Vtice-Pr.e,sident, :o.nd, he' Mr Ni·oo-lls) mio-,h,t 'say, the founder of the Ga,elic J.e~.gue, and' t.he Irish. Na!iol).alis,t move· men,t, as r,ep!'esented <by; lI1r Ke>ttle j.oaned· tOg':ether in s'tal1ting _;:'tlhe Vo,lun· leers (a.ppla,;lse). They haa only to. read the ,pa.pers to kJl'o,w thJrut it is absoJutely essential .toot :there shou'Ld be SUdl a mov,ement, to Qop,e with <lIny dificulties

\

that might come before the country in the present crisis, when the 'Home Rule BiH is before Parliament, and when they saw that certain gentlemen in the North are organised. There was a considerable following in the North, and they were organised to crush ·the aspirations of the Irish people (groans). Force would have to be 'met by force so that they could show that Irishmen were able ,to settle their differences between tll.e'm£!zlves, without asking the English army t-o settle them (applause}. There was also external danger whi soh necessitated an army of Irish National Volunteer's. They all knew that the .pchtical conditions on .the Continent of Europe were far from b-eing satisfactory. They all had observed with feverish anxiety the r-3.03 hE{t:\veen two great na-ti-o.n.s-· England and Germ:myin the building of war-ships. Proceeding, Mr Nicolls compared the present attitude of Gesmany to a huge boulder rolling down the mountain, and with Eng·' land as its block, .i its sweep forn atic nal supremacy. When that boulder did come, either one or the other of the two _co·untries should go under. They all knew that if England fell, Ireland would have to go down with it. If Ireland had an army of its own it could put up a fight, and' when England, which was only G miles from them, could not sue: ceed in conquering "them in seven hundred years, how could a nation one thousand miles away hope f01: success (applause). Mr Nicolls, having referred to the absolute necesscty for discipline and r-egnlar drilling in the Volunteers, went 0111 to say that in pcliticse they all knew that nothing was certain. The Liberal Government was p!,edged< to Home Rule for Ireland> and! were sincere ill. that pledge , but they did not knowbut that they l11right be turned out of office on a snap division or some other emergency. If the Liberals were turned .out of office, a Unicnrst govern-> ment would COO1:lJe into office, and what he would S3.y to cthem, and it was the opinion of every Nationalist;' is' that they should make the government of Ire-land 'by that party impossible. If the people were thoroughly organised, they could Sweep the Last Vestige of English Government Out of the Conntry. (Aipplause). Then they should: be pre. ,pared to do so' If by any chance the Home Rule Bill did' not become Jaw. How could Carson and Campbell when they came to be law . advisers of 0e Umiomist Government, Ip,rose.c.ute Irish Nationalists for what they had been doing and telline' the people of the North to do for theO past five years? I-n con. elusion Mr Nicolls pointed out uhat 111 the Vohm teer movement non.!' were wantiriz except those who were prepared to oar~y out the mstruciions, and observe the ddscipline o~ the orgarusa. tion'., They did not want any ,that mig±ut be -caught by the glamo.ur of a new movem.en,t, hut thore who. we<re p.re. pared to endure any hardships that mi,gh.t he o{)casio'ned in their oh5eHance of <the ipriIlJCip!es of t,he orgarusatio-n (ap. plause). Mr Cusack, Galway, D~lOt spoke, and, in. the course of a vigo,mu~ sp0ech, said it was hut a short tiine . si:n¤e ~.e· Vo,lunteer.s were inaugurated in Ath. enry. He (Mr Cusack) did not h:1Jppen to hel'0n.a' to C:onnacht, but should have heen very pleased ~o -be bwn west of the Shannon. Co-l1ll'acht, mo.re tban any other provi,c'e, had s,uff'ered ve.ry se. v,erely at the hauds of Engla.nd; notwiths~anding that, she was no~v §oing to be· the first to mganise and' .pr,evenot not. only Connaught but th,e ;rest of Ireln.na from· suff'erin.g in the future (applause). Every man, lIfr Cu~'ack proceeded, had a perfect right to, the use of arms to de. fend his home and country. That right had heen den.~ed· Iris·hmen for mn,ny years. Continuing, the speaker made a vi§oll'oUS appeal for the support 0'£ the obdecJtis o·f the meeting, and alluded to ,the historic associati-ons wi.th Iri.sh na. ti'onality in the past o,f ·.t~ Tuam peo!plc'. They, he said, 'St00d .;within the shn.dow of the greatest Irishman of the last cel1. tury;' John of T-uam (app!au·se), who ·tried to fight against the in.£lux of Ellglj.~h spirits. and ideias in.to this oountry, and tried to fight the English system of education, which had made the,m s~aves and ignorant. If they bad. ·UG.t that sys. tern of education in their country" there would be no need for organising the Volunteers, for th'ev would have been free' long ago (a,pplallse). Referring to the a.l1guments pu.t forward .against the Vo'lun,teer movement, Mil' Cl1s.aok said it was pointed out hat Irela)ld was to.o smaLl to establish an army for warfare, hut he emphasised the fae! that the

n.oerf~(iCb\3Jers):-I(,ept 250,OCP ~hoU<*l1d, Engllsh and Irish soldiers at hay. There were other easons why jhey should have all aJrmy of'Volunteers. A Home Rule Bill tor Ireland, almost completed, was expected to rpass in une. Bu t twice before the cup had' been dashed from the ;jps of Ireland, 'and it was quite possible that the cup might be dashed ag aiu , but if such happened, and if they were organised, they would 'take a better cup that even was that one (ap(pt.allSe)·,~ Thene' was !SltjU lan-cJ<thcl[':Jie2i·' son for the existence of the Irish National Volunteers, and that was the establishrnent of. an" Iris.h, Parliernent. They knew that in former days Sir Jonah P CIrring'ton , the member for Tuam in the old Irish Parliament, said "Ire· land lost her independence, because she nllowed her Volunteers to disband" (applause). That should not happen u nder the new order of things, whioh. they expected in. this country , they should not happen under bhe . new "order of things, which they expected in this country; they should have a trained body of men. If they hadl 100,000 trained men, it would be impossible for any Government to' take aw,ay Home Rule .from them (aplPlause). They were going to have Horne Rule, and they meant to hold it (applause). They. had been fighting English law and so-called EngJish justice. They .knew what they meant for Ireland-packed' juries, etc. H they got Home Rule, the laws would he made by their own people; they should be prepared to. obey them, and ·they could not do that withput discipline, and they could not get better discipline than in the Voluteer army (applause). Mr Cusaok ',also dwelt 0111the necessity of Volunteers from the social standpoint, and mid it was up to. the men of Tuam, as ·the second town in !the .county to. isu!P'po-rt irhe movement. which had, met with such unanimous support ill the other parts of Corinacht. Mr John Burke, T C, proposed a resolution that the meeting approve of the establishment of the National Volunteers in TU::Lm. . Mr T Sloyarr, in an eloquent address, seconded the resolutio, which was pa,s,sed u11oanU110.usly.. I hree . hundred and; fifty names ,,:,ere handed m at the close o.f. the meeting, and fhe first muster 9£ the company was fixed for Sunday, 1st Much, at Mr T S.loyan's yard, Bishop sltreet.,

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RIFLEME·N Y'our eyes:ght you

do not

Clearly your

call eyes

Glasses E.

J.

and

KEARNEY,

is most

(Late

If

important.

the

target

on

mt'.

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cards

will

Volunteer

test Field

Telescopes. Sight

Testing

-

/

26~27 Essex

!

see free.

PATRICK'S AMBULANCE I ASSOOIATION, _ 121 St. Stephen's Green, Dublin.

Quay;

Manager

at

Opt:cian

.Dµblifi.

Volunteers! ! ! ADV.ERTISE

Meetings

Your

Cah:lI's.)

us

~{EETING VOLU'NT'EE·RS!

35 & 36 CAPEL

STREET,.

DUBLIN.

To ensure a good shave before going to drill 0, march buy a' good Razor. I give you a mon!h's trial,

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Your

Th~ Irish Volunteer. Let

Members cif ··V·ar·ous Companies meet accidentally when .buying the:r RAZOH.S &, POCI~ET CUT-. LERY at

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do All C1asses of . Printing. We waiting to turn' out. We' have Machines order. No disappointing delays .. , your SPECIAL .

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65 M;icl(l!e Abbey

order

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Street,

D!!blin.


VOLUNl'EER.

o

A

Indian Nationality

v

;.:

---<>--

A Parallel with. Ireland. The following is 'contributed by dian Nationalist, who is amazed amount of Lberty England ",enrds' land._ No Indian is allowed to carry .a, weapon.

Btl r~uth (2, Nicolls. --~ When. people :J1i::;s Ruth, C. Nicolls in the following article .,µuT,sues the theme which she ably discussed in a P<l!st issue. She pleads fOT patrioti-sm in, every depart-. menc of liie, and fW .a., hlll,er~ recogni .. , .tion 'Of the -duties -dt-i~erisliip.

ing ~cople, ana

of

have lived

an

ther minds

the.r

in a: state

about

more

glorious

our- Volunteers

adopt

and <country?" dard

could

.rallying-cry than

Under

Erin's

_may be

fight

danger.

and

under

that

country!" all,

given

supreme

more,

wold make

for no created , 'bold

thing

of that

sanctuary

of our

-toe alone

may

But

love

deeds the

can

of

the

of

Crea-

fie are to prove The

noblest.

G;.1J.Dmsupon

It is not

young;

of

the

.may

the old youth;

fin.d- the

the

treasure

poor

in their

gold cannot

secret

lives that

buy,- the

the rich

armies

that

tho Cl'Y "For God and country" ~ . . . ber women and little children ranks ; never

is

str-onger

when

than

Tempests Seem

true

as

and

to Threaten

the

"patri-otism" OJ:

of trial,

'p~:esent its

triumph,

are

other

triotism,

I

be

country God's

know

as the' most

Eri'n!'

down

regard -spot

t-o

no

green

as these

of

us

there

has

the

at the mo-

last

time

of "home"

kis.s the soil of Erin

as t~ey passed

of ,the actual

to·day;

the

of that

emi.

means

the heart-throb-half which

tihe

bunch

io:v,

Irish of must

languages

themselves

Business sciences

mas.

acquired,

that

half pain

exile presses to his

shamrock

that

no.'t require

bas ].and.

the ex·

ra.tcble in

]n such

ernment

when of , them

their

and

effect,

such

a measure

to the ill i-

India

deliberately,

up

securely

the interests

aims

away

them.

.

Lord

while

best at

interests

of

true cost

of

without

sedition,

interpreted

.at

heart

Britain

un-

India.

trials,

the meaning,

of which

helow ; ordinances

for suppression

1:0

publc

meetings of

and

school

boys

and corruption

are the order

and th 0, er

, they must

as

have no place

Volunteers

OUT

our

in

land

are

from

her

thank but

inv:isible and

God, Erin's

visible

foes,

enemies.

'can

to each

do our part in

social

Ireland's

life

a shining lamp

Ire,

111

prepared

light

is

to the world,

on}y burn

with

its

fullest brightness wben elad~ of her sons and daughters does their 'part in tend-

it.

/'

Sons

and

received

our

spotted

from-,- our

device Shall

be the shame of infidelity

t-o Ireland?

6f fr~edom

most

sacred

name

wealth,

of its

the people

. levies heavv

that

Sir

in

Britsh

to the

colonies,

and

lreJand,

The

sight

Government

of t·h·e'

to 'I,ndian

for

and by

by

past.

'of India help

in reo

'order,

them;" and

which

the

as

it

gagging

the

suppress.ng

the

and by' deporting and re-trying men af-

ter being

and: set free,

by

acquitted

punishment .

them,

.and in-

'and

brought

,forth

a bye-word My

are

act'Ually an - ihd':g.

force

in

of

built

with

to

the

gov.

all

those

well-being

civilized on th.s

opinion,

sort

of

and

s.nce

of evil foun-

all its destructive

developed,

dians is the worst paid posts" is sed,ition. vYould there be any more I preposterous

of civilized

appeal

is to try and remove :p-is crisis

the'

dafion,

final

interested

en Empire

In-

_._.*

chiefs

peace

in

publc meetings, men without tr.als,

that

'it

employs

by methods

well known in

. humanity

that 'it pays higJ;- sala-

Englishmen

chiefs

W<:l'o6

erriment.

to

that

jts con-

the help and co-operation

Indian

have become

the'

Indian~

under

going to the ex-

ycur readers may have seen, The? the economic drain, .",'bnormal, as it is and the consequent 'l}1·eva· lenlce' of famine -and, pestilence

and- heS impoverit allows

of

'by d.nt of or-

nant iprotest from the leader wrter of_a Dublin da:ly newspaper which, perhaps,

is foreign,

that 'it drains

It is

Besides Oipp~essing ,

of irrvokng

murdering

taxes on the people and spends

them en the army, r.es

a delusive

tendencies external

,ap.-.

pearance, must fall ~o pieoes. and involve wor-ld-wide d saster- 111 its nun., _

.;...

..----

~THE VOICE

p~ObA1t\1 , tlA h-etreAnn.

bas never it

alter

its

0.'\ exchange

country

'May

He,

destiny

childr@n of Erin,

who

Scamples advice

end,' our

st'anrlal'd

God and

~ver Coun-

C, NICOLLS.

~ElevatiollThe angie at which the muzzLe of the rifl:e po):nls abov,e the line of sight 1n order to" countera'ct the pull of g-ra.vity on !he b'ullet.

supplied. Pipes,

Buckles, of

given

Stockings,

N atione l free.

Costume

Only

Cloth

OF FREED'OM

Drums, Shoes, lent

and

Manufac-

IriSh

A selection of the best articles tha t , 'have appeared in' "Irish Freedom" ill the past three years.

Cash .Trade.

D c1.iet1tsll, An 'Cu1tWBe bea:5

of Chris-

may

Requisites Standards,

ture Stocked.

has

k-e.ep us s·afe

Pipers' colours)

Brooches,

for the

in th'ese days. of infi,Clelity a"d w'orldiness, the

All (all

o.f "self"?

us to the splendid

ti,an~ and

of dragging

dawning,

of our

tri vi al moHo

till

country ished

un-

-Shall "we, in the new now

May God forbid!

that,

the Government selfioh,

proud

to God or of dis-

will not serve,"

the glorious

tailed

its

ideal, to the cry of the reb-el

angels-"W,e petty,

and

;

say that

.,~, we have

safe

forefathers

1'0

or pro·

sullied. ours

in the mire era

battle-standard

"F-or -GoG! and 'Country"

yet 'been

Ioyalty

of Erin!

daughters

:5

amid, therefore,

it might

of ,the people

are directly

fiictinzo c-apital

free .sp"ri-t '

Th.e late

dJY.

that

of beto .a)ien

favour.

slavery

force.

brute

Press

Herbert Risely, who was in charge of the measure explained to. the Council that. ~.' . . , . . . what he ~eant by sedition in India, '·th3l,

be ill-treated

already,

of the

one-sixth

in forced

understands

prosecu-

for their

as

tent

storing

of pub.

spirit,

the threat

ever' form

it is unscrupulously

'turnin.g

as is

by _Risely.

of cornpla.int

trol,

the

R'sely is given

by Sir Herbert

which

keeping

of the

prosecutions

are that

ask the people- of

to under

a 'Providential

Even

Imdari Government

the present

d,ep01:tations

.he ~.!as

is

is

test and

the people

in far-

they

·in the 'P'ass~ng of

a word

gansed

way

Hardinge

of India

in

the world

to make

in every

pro-pounded

take without srnply

to the

in order to more.

as champion

colon-es

Gov-

and, part iare

and! to keep

of

if

for lif.e to svccumb

oggressiorr

folly

of the

governed,

it.s. best

hold

now posng

for

whnt

ing deported

all

the integr.ty

C<7ipac:tjes paralysed

under

befol',e

a st,',te as this

of the

cuhrly

as

Act

shor-t, the intention

bl.nd

seem diarnetr ically opposed

slaves

In

cause

when

interests

"s·~d'h~u.s

di-

become

of keeping

tble Empire real

any

trials

to come. withn the meaning'?!-

found

to happen

to apprehend

they are in most cases,

2.S

without

between

they

talkrig

are depor-ted

go

wonder-

p'os,~i'bilities tl}at lie

men.

tions and

the

.,around us, however much worldliness . th . I J'f f sin may creep iruto e SOCJa 1 eo.

in

tar to find bim in a foreign

Our patriotism

hearts.

as

a.1so passionate

so,il beneath

-with

deep

brain'S

studied,

the bear the old devic,:;-"For 10v'e try" ! RUTH our £eet; it ·ex·

'101e of O{lr country

plains

the

or

to the

ll1 thJ.t....leg·acy li·es the I'lecret

a·bstralct whioh

traveHed

over

or knelt to

slave· trader

patriotism

and 'tend.er·

lips

a

by evic-

the sacr.ed threshold

of_ Irish

been

'heritage,

~.equeathed for

is

so clear,

f.orefathers

stepped

grant-sh'ip!

in. all

are

an imperishable

garugwa,y o,f the

his

to us, no sunshine

transported

they

pa-

Irish, it

us,

beautiful

of heart-hunger

and

not

by

children's

be

connect-en

and finally

doubtedly

has

life

jng

To

no' raindrops

Hut then,

legacy

quicksand,

;

true patriot-what-

is so exquisitely

handed

ment

not. every

wide creation;

gnass

,ted

on

his' natiOJ.'l.alitY~1Ust

so radiant,

in

with

oontemptible

na.tio.ns, understand

wsuld seem that ever

wavers itself

patriotism

'commercial

fighting

rock of love.

~he solid

'What

that

concerns

is merely

foundations

upon

that

her

much dishonesty

commercial time

our '"

and ~v.ery one pf us must

Motherland

as

rect

Tbey

of despondency,

cease

pe·ople, innocent

paralysed,

stunted.

wh-1,t is going

They

ior

a brood-

Love of Independence,

defend

Annihilation!

The so-called

of

o

t

ccuntrres

Persecution

battle well if

Hold Her Place Among Nations of the World.

.to may 'show

of country

the

the'

of our destiny

'(''Pon their

However

man's

rally

behind

l1'eo-Je,ot.e.c1· Ireland

must

a

be

next.

.he

'side

tered, foreign our country

land;

of Failure With

well,

to

Irish.

be

. May

can num. .' In their

love

not

methods

of renewed

possess- -it have

who

worthy

practical

must

open

be foughit,' and fought and

gifts to

wealthy, of those who can bear arms; its existence is not dependent upon st;lwess.. In its healthy, - soul-stirring enthusiasm, .

office,

our

world's

the

in

of life must

claim its inspiration.

'prerogative

and

they

it must

counter and in drawing-rooms,

His blessing

when

be the career

inner

Christians with

women

thres-

-

some

workshop

in every good,

the

where

of ',country,

man ; and

In

reign.'

,

whatever

of

of being

that

pass

'iE is one of -God's greatest

upon

up;

class

must

the ideal and

sur-

at school

them as the ye.ars advance, .<eriously prepared for.

it,' a sacrilege,

may

hearts,

men

grew

-every

Children

,

in time of

be an inspiration

Irish

useful

of Holies,

Holy

it must

them

alone

everyday

permeate

before

Him

the

must

of life,

have

of

It

walk God"

love

in placid,

if it is to be. strong

society,

"For

foil." to

the

.bearing

human soul : to allow our country to ·usurp. it would make- OUT patrioism a rnir'aie-µay,

flourish

sons .and daughters,

of life than

above

it rnuet

its existenoe

<,

roundings

same -proud device? and

of strife to maintain

stan-

battle

first

God

citement

nobler

the

God

this-"For

what

the

"For

could

In. the Ire-

what is meant by sediin ' vVay of explaining ticn thanrthis , and it is in. ths light that

enough

betome

faculties

ing fatalistically What

long

like in Indi~ they become

slavgry

an at in drill

/11 g

b.c-tle

"'" IRISH-MADE

.-

C.o.l1'c::t.e.o.ll,Co. 5

.

Jliti

BOOTS

FOR

CARLOW

011

'OJlUltlt _,..

i

The following articles:

are the title of a few_ of the

-

I MEN

AND ment.

, AH.MS:

IRELAND

OPEN

LETTER

B_oots~

WHAT

FREES-THE

MA'DE ON THE HANb~EwN PRINCIPLE. SMARTEST AND BEST. - SEE THAT THE NAME

GoverneYJCap]ow IS STAMPED ON EVERY BOOT, AND DON'TACCEPT.SUBSTiTUTES.

THE IRISH ETC., ETG.

Feni·an

KING

Mo've-

GEORGE.

BRAVE,

VOLUNTE-EES,

One l1Under and Seven pence;

THE

TO

The

. fifty-four postage,

pages. Price 2d. extra.

ORDER NOW! MANAGER, "IRISH FREEDOM," • 5 .Findlater Place, .01}blin.


THE IRISH VOLUNTEER.

. ,. . ••

•••••••••••••••••••••

co.ming

• • Irish f Boy Scouts i NatIonal Guard ~..... : -. ~

· 9 ~

--0----

:

Executive Notes

.Organizing Notes.

.

on ord

Executive was held February; Mr M Staff-

of the

Sunday,

5th

Some

pr-esiding.

very

business

was

adoption

of the Balrnoral

with the

transacted

kilt;

ination

for

also

cap,

the

officers

important

including

be held

p) is being

of officershi

by .a sub-committee, known

i.n a

-

form

is

few

davs. "

now

Guardsmen

ready

are

uniforms

and

out made

Guard

for

purchasers;

to

The

above

through new

Inchicore

members

-deci ded 'take

and

took

that

place

held

a

part.

during

half

a

,the

number has

been

marches

will

corning

field wo.-k· from this are

!be!l'S

requested

4,espective 'part

'in.

. Bugle

of

M

ary

Hand

under

held: at Camden

Murray.

An

Sergeant

night.

All

election

. took

4ft

place

tur-e at No.6

The the'

above

first

time

acts proceeds

form

fund.

strides

This

and

branch

of officers

hope

in Co. ,\Yexford and

dancing, 6th

The

above at

the

.Quay,

and'

ber. of

recruits,

officers

have

and

have

secured

hope

free

to camp

All

information

O'Kelly,

at

farnham. v.

All

desirous

Edward . hatl

Luke,

street,

of

in

a unigreat

of same

day,

15th

0-0

history.

.

GALWAY. secured a

'Wood

large

num-

the. squad place

enough Ross

in

of field

members

Whit

addressed

selves

just

the

rooms

.already . created

impression

by

and discipline,

and

nights

great

reflects

out

in its

himself

with

scouts

will be

the

Mr

Dru-

uniform

and

foot whereby

1)11

in full

regalia

all

on St.

Day,

boys, turned

drill. orr

previous

knives 'and that

any

week

Wednesday

Saturday

and

haversacks town

number

might of

during

the

and

with

fueir

looked

a

have

week.

A

of,

A

been

en-

subscription

opened to enable

has beerr

uniforms,

etc,

the belts,

Sluagh

be proud

recruits

what

and

the up

it has been splendidly

will be Rath.

Half

Company

A

B.

Referee,

P.

of

having

boys to' the

responded

5 Black-

Adjutant.

.DO YOU F&EL \YEi~K, De-pressed, , or run down? -CAHILL'S Al{O·· l'IIATIC QUINIKE AND mON TONIC will ton.e you U?, steady YOtH' nerves, improve your appetite, enrich your blood. For summer lassitude, for Neuralgia. Try a 'bottle, Is. and 2s.; postage, 40. Made only. by ARTHUR J. CAHILL, The Na. tional Chemist, 82A Lower Dorset St., Du],lin.

proved

at

further

will be. held and

on

Band

• Ireland

.a·nd armed

on Saturday

Semaphore

in

to its place

schools,

Cambridge

Road,

March,

at 8.~'l3''P

in the recent

the

Wexford

coast.

men,

the

lifeboat

supreme the call the

hood's

that

sake falter

'Oil the

their

families

J

full

ther

umber

in

a frail

abonut

52,

and

are

Already applications

and

craft

hinged

could

.and buffet

But life-and

a,1I that

to them,

The

story

Long

ere

children

breast

men

now

to in life

but it appealed

in vain.

is wel.l known.

it has 'been told

in' every

as another tribute _ sons. It W3JS the very

heroic

of

the

volunteer

while

Irela~d.

can

heroes

who

sacrifice

stranger,

wild

or not.

the world

to Irelends flowering

the

cling

of

whe-

upon

the rocks

of the disaster ill

country

boast

spirit,

of such

their

it i.s surely.

and

peasant

lives

an enrnest

for

the

that

the

hearts of her sons are true, and that no' . sacrifice would be too great which the Motherl~nd

might

ask of th~m.

movement

is growing

day.

every

a week has passed ,s:J1Ce the first

meeting

in

From

National

Dublin,

and

in

but

new

different

corps

":parts

of

Cork to Done~l.1 Irelands

Army

drilled,

is being

Ireland

recruited

may

of her sons who have

well

hastened

and'

be proud to [oin the

ranks. And' from couragng

every reports

corps of

spirit and

come

the

most

enspr it

splendid

of self'-secr ifice is

obedience

that

army.

In many

'are in progress

~u.:t the

demonstration,

great

\l,ncL

invalu, quarters

for 10'~11 reo

N atiorial

las great

review

a's were 'Such

in the days 'of the old

views

and from 'that day Ireland a new 5'0.111.

'he lrishVolunteer

The

Irish. Army

behoves it.

the nation

In

many

a,t'

re~

Volunteers,

will h ave iound

65

MIDDLE

ABBEY

sn{EE"f',

purpose

DUBLIN.

other

the Ll.th

now they are

is in existence, to equip

districts

\Yhile

responded

support

corps

'Of, b1'1.ying umiforms, essent also

and it

and

collections

in Ijlid. of local

been made

the

have. for the

rifles,

and

response

is

to in m"~·n'ydistricts

there is a feeling that jthe collection. should ~1ARCH'

be a National

7, 1914.

people army. dom, Slaves may be. brave tive bravery. cause

slavery

fib.re

of their

They has

beings

SOI'·t

risk

ingrained

of pun.shmerit

bravery

with a may

into the

obedience for

of thn.t .sort is

of nega-

much and

bevery

of It is but

one.

Ireland

It is the duty to support

a smalL price

of the

Ireland's

to pny for free-

even if it were ten time~ bigger

Ireland

can' well afford to p"'y it.

Ireland

cannot

afford

Rather

not to support

her

Volunteers.

the

disobedience. but

a poor

Hang Fire-The retarded cornbusicn of the explosive ill the cartridge. Ha:ng fire is usually attributed to a "weak C3P, hut rnay vbe due -to bad. loading of the cartwhich acts from "a consciousness of 'right ridge .or to some defect in the explosive, irrespective of reward or punishment, an.cL A similar effect can be obtained w.th a striker ~'Ctuated by 11D unduly' weak spring. 'th)1,t is the kind' that an Irish Volunteer thing, many

Tipperary

order.

realised

'Vives,

sea breakers

views,

Sun.

lTI •

wo-rking

that

not for man-

Clontarf is the great goal ahead with corps everywhere. It will be an imposing

at

Tipperary in

the

answering

might

almost,

arrarigernents

But

scouts

fisher-

made

with- souls

but

of off

depended! Ib,pon ;them, the very existence

generously

Alec· in

Humble

volunteers

of duty

danger

able in a citizen

Telegrophy, given

disaster

s),crifi_98, . cheerfully

displayed-a

'On

. boy

Brunswick

Special and

the

wilh_ the 'bravery

is ringing

discipline

certainty

The

206 Great

amongst

should<be

in . the

signalling.

will. be

Staff,

them "that

world?

Volunteers

.seer·etary,

street.

cir-

Fridays

notice.

\\'oodcraft

Assistant

Thorncastle 0.11

3 p.m.

The

f~

never

meets

R-oom, Road,

at

the mem-

climatic

-Pipers

afternoons

in the official organ

And

to

5 p.lTI.,

are

Band

8 p.m., until

at

that

Cambridge

p.m.

classes

Band

·Mi·4·. Abbey

Mattei- not intended

ac-

Rathfarn-

Padhraig

Bugle

Volunteer,"

and

of sleet,

via

by ~ unfavourable in

"Irish Dublin.

CO!?::. 1 ' .

t~e

gale

Ring&en;d

The

Edito-r, street,

to the'

the -mouJJ.

showers

Fianna

meetings

via 'Dun·

across

home

of all

Cam-

Robinson

and

more

the

Schools,

Morse

'Of grit

south-westerly

and

cumstances.

ture

"men schools, under

fixtures

and

be sent as ~H'ly as possible

all the' them-

we proceeded

by chilling'

daunted

the

Sun-

proved

Balfe

once of

on

in which

10 a.m,

arr iving, "in

hers

day

and

Taisec

Kilmashogue,

str,eet,

with

at

Reports

Headquarters

held

Ard

to Ticknoek,

ham>

was

is wanted

in a strong

to

C

of the

The

should

the force lines?

of the coun-

such

to.

addressed,

Leaving

tains

Mondays

street,

right

appealed

in large "numbers

up

'On these

fav-

'On these

Ofedit.ol1J

all in the

.and so confident that it stepped at once from

the he~ot nations

powers

to dare

to its belief

his-

to the

a very

equipped

The

their good conduct

the turn

is a movement

publicaton

test

drum

week.

Battalions

Battalion, General

Left

participated

for Ireland."

companied

spacious

Theatre,

communicate 4th

from

that

diffiof ths

spirit

don bt the success

was so true

the

out the

'Who Can doubt

recruited

who could

Ireland.

51. Endas,

Company

who

-r'aoi:sec R

forming

have

the

LEAGUE.

at

February,

members

music

in pipe

4 Mainguard

should Dublin,

Half

'~<\n endurance

8.40

Guard

marching

and

evening.

of an army

Scarcely

League 'match

next

Teams,

Right

both

be

Adjutant,

D'str ict Secre-

lVI'Inally.

for

Galway. the

'I'he next Hurling played Sunday

'Of

first

to the

I:IURLl_!'JG

Road,

New to

THE

mand

to have

in

nights

Sunday

in

the thinking

surmounted

\i.-lire .prepared

hav·e been. formed'

bridge

under

boys

on

classes on every

patriotism,

of right.

great

places

enrolled and

classes

War ,I present

the

Flanna Padraigh

staged

charge

Court

language Schools

E. Martin.

to take their

has

The

.and Friday

tory

to procure

of learning

apply

tary, Lieut.

J

a fine work-

and Irish

squad

should

at fee,

is making

BATTALION,

premises

work

Leis

Irish

can

a drama

have in

to be able

Tuesday

list

~~

go towards

in the town and

illJg .squad

join

entrance

have

to

success.

army

be

of men who iliad thought

Volunteer

try

large

'boy desirous

Pipes

the

Orderly, must be

in Loughrea

four

Any

LOUGr-IREA.

Battalion

street at 8 o'clock

Harcourt

2d.

'3th BATTALIOX,

will be held in fu-

street

THE, BAND.

Tempor-

to

height;

subscriptions,

the in-

unqualified'

rolled

'On Tuesday

wishing

Lins in

2d. ; - weekly

all

cause

to

on the

for

have, full information from Murphy. Intending members least

course

on Saturday supervision

personal

members

Practically

50.

the

diffdoulties are no·:" surmounted, and it rests "wi.th the boys and parents o·f the town to make the movement an

The

'On Wednesdays.

wish to enroll

practice the

in

Cashel

their

notify

they

he

itial

company.

The Cadet Corps Class a..n.nounced to be

a lack in the

should

of the squads

:aft~rnoon

in

as any slackness

lVIemb.ers

'adju,tant

or

will

Half

NOTICE.

months

up

will cause

of a week

but

in that

Leader

would

.a.ii.d with the true

provided:

so all me!D-

tum

to

squads

of members

'Squad.

out,

B to be Section

Righ

to any

it

culties,

started,

Patrick's

0'£

O'Connor

of

-around' the vicinity of 'Drumcondra and -distnicts, and it has been decided to carry 'On

Commanding.

More,

been

march-out

It of

P.

Company

TONE)

a large

series

)lIl.F.1-'.,

could oppose

force world.

'of

the

Street.

branch

and

problem

ourable

PROMQ'l'IONS.

(WOLFE

5 Blackball

language

bravery

classes.

secure their

as possible.

BATTALION

fcir,.·· admission.

Irish

history are now working very successfully, hut the First Aid class has not yet

there

Corporal 4th

night

drill,

March+Companies

(Signed),

uni-

The

requested

as soon

drafted

wiJ.l be

every for

who in the -as· han, their dnill rnstructor, has, knocked semble at Harold's Gross for ,?"eneral route short time at his disposal march to Rathfarnham, FaJ.1 in 1 p.m. aU the ., rough edges off his youthful Full -un-forrn. Rations to be carried. charges. One of the scouts has already

Sth

Sunday,

in the month of August, so that ample time is given no those qualifying for positions

Orders

of exam-

s to

on page 161

Dublin Battalion

the

in

classes,

are held in the National

-: Continued

to be worn

subjects

(which

:

••• ••••••••••••••••••••• •

A meeting

The

though it is bravery that has won a battle. The rCil;!' bravery is that


PAGE

OFFICIAL

-----:.;x::;,.--

INSTRUCTIONS ~

Reports,

/-'

For forming

County Organisation

.Cornrnittee

--<>-\

2ND BATTALION,

Companies

Headquarters, DUBLIN,

1. . nothing

Local

secretari es and

quested

to keep

in

the Secretaries

organisers

constant

information

as

movement

are

touch

of the Provisional

te-e, a!ld to keep them to

fully

the

in their

..... _ .. Study tlw vvnstltutlOn an d see th a.t . . . . .' . IS done that infringes It'.

~I :f:;~!ii:i~

"',_.

Commit-

progress

respective

af competent men

0

ex-military

3. Invite <all 'Organisations of ana· tional tendency .to take part, and see that no one is excluded from becoming a Vol· un teer 'on the broad bas.s laid dmvn in the Constitution.

reo with

supplied

. the services Utilise all

2. Secure instructor. possible.

206 Gt. Brunswick-st. ..

with

of

4. Secure a committee as possible representative

that is as far of all sections of Irishmen, and combat any idea that the Volunteers are to enable anyone section of Irishmen to secure a. political ad. v,antage oyer other section.

the

districts.

any.

Provisional Constitution.

5. Let everyone clarly understand that the aim of the Volunteer's is to secure and maintain the rights common to the whole people of Ireland. 6. After ·tl1l8 fioregoirtg p,oin\ts have been made clear to everybody, then enroll 'the 'men who are willing to serve.

7.

--<)--

Objects of the Irish Volunteers 1. To and

maint an tho rights libe rties common to all the people of secure

and

Ireland. 2.

To train,

a body

discipline,

of Irish

Follow

ganisaticn

arm

Volunteers

and

equip

the

above

for

purpose,

3. T~ unite for this purpose Irshmen of every creed and of every party and

the

laid

mittea.

system

down

of

by the

. .

I I

'-'.

military Central

.orOom·

I

r.

9.

Each

member

must

purchase

1. Until stiru_ted

2.

the general shall

ber

of

as

fully

will

Committees,

The

and

of

and

has

all

direct

otber

a~d \ each with

the

District to enforce

of

.powers

Company

men,

Central

power

methods

's'ha11 be the and

direst

locakities,

and

purposes

unit

shall the

for

The

affiliate

the

District,

County

uniform

and possesses to ths end.

tration

authorise

Committee sh all define

of the

Committees, discipline,

and

where

respective

direction

to

Volunteer

which

in their

Central

the, powers

of local

Committee,

warrant,

subject to the Committee.

taken

the

Proviscnal,

the movement

~ee.

of

Pro is on al of

County

cers

system

government

The

be

working, necessary

of

adminis-

an

CUlmA~T

11. No Volunteer Company can be allowed ilo take ·any. action that )$ not in accordance' with. the Oonstitubiori"

Central

sharl

Cornm.it-

AHAMID,

A col"'iJ's has ramtararnid and; taken up. with . thee-young men. will 'commence

Keep

in frequent and regular C01)1· with the General Secretaries, who will be ready to advise and assist in every way possible.

O.

ATHEN.RY.

Company-Captain,

2.; Colour-Sergeant,

gsants, 4; Corporals, 8; Buglers or Drumme,.:-s; 2; PIOneer, 1. Tlltal, 10.

1;

Privates, signallers,

A Battilion-Tto be such cofpariies, under Colonel, asssted by 'as may be considered

composed of eight the command of a such Staff' Officers necessary.

ATTENTION!

/,

of V olunteer G01R" mterested, thro!u"G..

iI

~

I

~ECT\ION

COMM'ANDERS.

I

DUBLIN

men,

1; Ser· 56; 4;

,ru.,.. issued br . ti G' on "om-

rangisa

been established at CUI'· Section Oommanders are now supplied the movement has been i WIth. books for the punposs of checking admir-able euthu'siasm by [ the attendance '0'1 men under their com. of. the district., Drilling I.nand and they are. urger I to .see .that fll1medlately.. i the latter attend with (l'egnl~nty.

MO~DAYFirst

Battalion, Company A, Gaelic League Hall, Blackhall street. First Battalion, Company B, Foresters' Ha.ll, 41 Parnell square. Second Battalion, Company A, Students' Corps. Third Bgttalion, Company A, 41 York street. .Fourth Battalion, Company A, Larkfield, K imrn age TO ad. _

be composed of two such the control of a Sergeant.

'of a·.

Secretaries arid other,'

0 -

WHEN AND WHERE TO DRILL

A Company-To be composed of four such sections, d iv.ded permanently into two half.cornpauies, two Sections eacb, to be called Right and Left HaH Oom· parries, respectively, each nuder the cornmand of a Lieutenant, the whole to, be commanded by a Captain. Attached to the Oompany two buglers or drummers, one proneer, one colour .sergeant, four signallers-78 of a 11 ranks. Details

t

J

The Volunteers shall be divided for mlitary pu,rposes into squads, sections, half companies, companies, battalions and regiments, '(he various units enumerated above to be com posed as f611ows-

Lieutenants,

enquiries oun y

.. to

municaton

A Seotfon-To Squads, under

.e

I

,10. Each military company should affiliate direct with the Central Committee until such time as local authorities can be org anised ; and the Central Committee .will gve the companies the assistance in their power.

A Squa-d- To be composed of eight one of whom will act as Corporal.

t

'F,orroation at the Dun Emer Ha.ll, Hard· PIFLE A.ND EQUIPMENT FUl\'D wacke street, for the advantage 'of the jl '_ 1 ,. _, "selected men" who turn it into prac. .. .' {Ijce '(\,t the Saturday massed drill at: This f~n:cj, h~s now been opened and Kimma e, I on . all S-Ides Volunteers are handing 111 g ~ . thel'r contributions for the v.ery neces, sary purpose of ·equi.pping and arming . BALLINASLOE. . a, thBm~elves. The .uniformiDig. of . t~. Ballinesloe has taken up Volunteering Dublin B.arta·lions has 'be.en ..p)laced m with a businesslike -euthusiasm that the hands of 13. -capable committee and it might well be imitated. In St. joseph's is h~d to:wet this work c»)mpleted College alone a full ·Oomp·a.n:y has been without further delay. enrolled anddrilled, The Ballinasloe ' •. district is now 'bein.g organised 'b:y I cap-I able men .

his

of 79 offi-

Company

3rd

. CO.MP'AI'-iY

followi.nz th CO

oa

mittee panles

~

. . " BAT'IALlON,

The Chief Instructor coruinueel his lectures 4tn 'Battalion Drill and Extended

uniform and his rifle, a·nd may be aided in this either by public subscription or by any surplus of the Comeany funds after other expenses -h ave been met.

12.

<The ord'< er

NOT.1C2,

i

Companies

shall

a representative

formation

5.

Irish

in. a large num-

steps

c'rcumstancse

4,

Volunteer formed

places,

general Force.

3.

of the

on by the Pro-

Committee.

been

creat~

direction

be carried

As soon

have

body is con-

a representative

Volunteers vis 'onal

RULES.

H.IPORTAXT

I

class. PROVISIONAL

B.

h. A' • . ~ . out t e country. ...,U immediate answer This company meets at 41 York street.T . , 'Attendance of this 'COmpany has i111- IS requested r-sproved. Temporary squad and section 1. (a) What units have begll.n te I commanders w~re chosen;. '~ectlon ;books I drill; (b) What the size of such. units have been wrrtten up. The ntl·e and i '. • T" " equipment fund has b.een opened! at this . are , (e) "h:,her there 1, a!_) adequate hall. A successful march' out to the Dr ibl Hall , (d) Whether an, ex-army music of the pipes was successfully carman is available for drilfing ; (e) The ried oat, Notice is drawn t'O the fact no..me and address with' which' to 00001.that this company wjH meet next Thursday at Kimmage. This .is the last municate. change >(3.-£ venue that it will be neces. 2. (a) Any centre where there is a sary to report from this forward in' c-onreaso nable chance 0'£ beg,inn.ing the nectioa '0th this company. Company Volunteers ,but where a start h<lj? not C will aL~6 meet at Kirnmage on the yet been made; (b) What facilities. there same In.ight. The Chief \1nstTl1ct'Or will are; (e) W:ftJa.t help, by meeting or otherattend. . wise, can be given in order that a, start can be made at once. 5. - The names and addresses of any COLLEGE VOLUNTEER CORPS. old -army men in the CO'llntry who are Owin,g to lack of a:qcorumo_da;t;ion' willing to dr-ill Volunteers. elsewhere the ·C V C met at 41 Parnell Square on Monday week where they had the advanta-ge of drilling along with the Coy. B, Ist Battalion, II... fuKIMMAGE. hue they will meet ron Wednesdays at 41' York street. All Urriversity students Owing to the 'bad weather las; Saturshould immediately enrol. day the massed drill had <to be abandoned. MUSketry lP;J!acti,oe was engaged ~ t Gil '-'under ico,ver." 'Arnangememts, are I being rnade to secure ample space f01' THEORY LECTURE. parade5 o,~ the north side of the city,

8. The members must pay a small weekly contribution sufficient to defray such expenses as rent, nayment of instructors, where necessary, etc.

I r

CO.)1PANY

This Company continues to keep up to the high standard it has continued to set from the beginning, the drill being carried out with remarkable effioieney. Drill' Centre, 25 Parnell Square.

TUESDAY-

j

I

I

Second Battalion, Company B,~ Gaelic . Hall, Richmond roa-d, Fairview. Third. Battalion, Company B, T'ar a street Baths .. Fourth. Battalion, Company B, 34, Lower Camden street.

I

WEDNESDAY... ,S'econd Battalion, ! League Hall, !

Oompany

25 Parnell

Gaelic C, square.

Support our AdvertIsers.-

THURSDAYFirst Battalion, Company I', 41 Parnell square. Third Battalion, Company ':, ~: :iork street. Thrd Battalion, Company D, Sandymount Green. / Fourth Battalion, Company CJ 34 Lower Camden street. FRIDAYSecond Battalion, Company D, 25 Par • nell square. Fourth Battalion, Company D, Larkfield, Kirnmage. SATU[{DAYFirst Battalion, Company D, Gaelic League Ha·ll, Blackh all street. l'iote-All above drills start at 8 o'clock ~.m. _ sex DAY !IlORXI'\"G, at 11 o'c1ockFirst Battalion, ·Company E, Gaelie League Hall, 25 Parnell square. Theory Lecture, Hardwicke st. Ha.ll, Wednesday, at 8 o'clock, for "selected. "rnen" only. Afternoon drills at Kimmage, Larkfield, Wednesdays and Saturdays at 3.30 o'clock. All Volunteers C3Jl--. attend.


THE IRISH VOLUNTEER and

gold

tuni:.

faoturers

Volunteer Music.

cellent

cloth

The

',hcr belt,

--<>--

for

tunic

making" the

the may

should

also

a large

skirt

of the

c~not

the

They

wrist

is to be pr'ef,erred,) or o;.:dinary collar 111i1Y be wide,

AN PIOB MHOR AND ·PIPE BANDS. .

seen;

.

p.ping

as a ;distind

Iea-

\\'·e are also manufacturing

i

of Irish

drums

aCC¤SS0ry o-f GoelJc League and: ~l,ei!.ll andi material. As for standards, the -work has beoome an instituv : best of them are made 'of the finest of Ul.

tur_e. and Volunteer

Lon. is now

freely

ad~tted<

on all hands.

I

ster

damask,

bearing

old

Gaelic

badges,

the

but

of

Gael

let rivalry

When

the

tunic

is .heavily

cross-

may

the

eff~c:

of .one

....,

.

or

loosely

worn,

caught

up or worn

tight

aJ

behind,

across

have the

frorit,

The knee should

pipers

regiments,'

b~;t aU are

for one

services

cause,

and

will' 'be 'do1ubly

b"

material prefer

all

b..., well shown should

that

not'

Some

'¤lthers plaiting

kilt._ The stockings

and honest.'

at .plea.

ample.

hetteF.

all.

dean

fighting

by so. doing; their

By

as possible,

or-both.

or ornamented

should

heart.

the breast

on eithervsboulder

fuller

plain

be

It sh'Ou:1d,be caught

brooch

kilt

should

flowing

freely

Highlanders.

in it-the

mantle,

army

n~t .

the ,true c

an.d the Gael, that they

different

lead

bit.

rivalry,

as keen

.he -rernembered

laced,

The -brat,

at

he

ment.

in front. is very

having

let it be,' at [east,

Let it ra lwaye

corn-

be any

and' certainly'

interest means

pipers

or black

by 'anyone

are out' for Ireland

opening

should

underst-ood,

"orria-

The war

The

neck well

'of generul

appreciated,

needlework

It may be fringed sure.'

I

That'hi~

leaWing the

amongst

matter blood,

have

i.1 large

--<>--

,

shape.

or bad 'be

feeling there

can

like

By Fr"ancis Joseph Bigger.

"

(which

it

it also

tive.

--<)--

sleeves

is

but that

merit,

tun.:c

a Gaelic

is a good deal of individual.'

bands

terness,

The

at

there

and' pers·onal

'br-ol1ze buckle.

so ornamented.

he wide

~

with 13, lea.

be worked. be

. may either

That uy and

be belted

having

pattern

manuex-

most

pipers,

should

Around

are many

'There

in Ireland

round ..

below

be plain

the

horne.

spun, well folded 'below the knee. Halftongue. Gaelic i The bronze spears, or brass haloerts :t.Ra1 brogues 'Or' shoes should be worn, rand in no cas" boots, unless cross-Iaeed ones surmount them, are forged, and bn tiered costume,- created quite a sonsation whercovering the calf. As for head gear,. in out in Ireland. Bronze brooches and ever they went. When I first met these bucklescand spears are cast in. our own the case of boys arid ysung men, the hair pipefs :.li,ey could pipe 501ue tunes, but should be exposed, and wo-rn fflirly 'long were ",ery shy 'Vi the kilt. It took over land, so it w.ll he seen that every effort this is the correct Gaelic -of over the bmw. twelve months assiduous coaxing 01'0 in- is being made for the encouragement way, and, at the same time, the most hish' industry do;'n to the very details. duce theai to put on the Filleadh· Beag. healrhy , every effort should 'be rn ade to 'The three essentials 'of a p.pers costumx When they did so, th~e;Y'were the proud adhere to i't. When thi,s cannot be done boys. It was the first plunge that fright. a: large, round, flat cap may be worn, en sd them ; once that was over, only plea .. cauglh:t up with aJ Ibrooch. Feathers' or· sure ensued, ,/ .plants may be caught in' the brooch, A Wherever (h'e O'N-eill Pipers werit f-or heroic. head gear is a round felt sku.ll . several years they left the seeds of ,a new cap, of a metal colour, with. birds' wings band Ibb.-indi them ; not only aid they do at the sides fastened ,ith discs. that, but they sent, from their n;q_m:ber, Staadn.rds should be simple <lind plain, pipers to different ,pilklces to found and

.ago since

It is' only a' few" years

'Of Armagh,

O'Ne11l Pipers,

train

hands

of the

and

national

and

motto~s·

in

the

old

in full

encourage

the

not

wearing

time,

in

ibut, the

to be held' in

Ireland

Pipers'

Dublin',

at 'the

it is hoped,

be

fringed

I

this

or -I_lain, and not

to be surmounted able.

;:he setting

ever-present, pattern

scarcity

costume dea.lt

with

of cohesion

amdi irritat.on

continually'

making

the

right

continually;

rivalry , arid

v

There

piob,\l'Re

stiri1,ulated

national

ouflook

on

to widen

the

tic lines.

"I'ake

'.

just 'one rule,

patrio.

-,

are

for healthy

will be

the

These

kilt,

the

tunic

are varied

).holL1<gh fundamentally I

for instance,

be

no desire

of colour,

and! the similar.

amonzst

mantle.

a-ndJ design,

in colour

There

can

Gaels for uniforrnity

0

/"

'or detail

of cut,

or orrmrnent.

I

and

it is worth

rowed:

notin~,

"All members

be Gaelic tional

speakers

"oongue.':

f.o~ it will 'be enof pipe blinds

or students

There

could

m~st

the

standard

association,

all

cases,

as possible,

I

These

I

rnent on -harp brooch,

of. the Na- ,'Ve

can

want

be no heal- : military

tume

will, follow

standards

the

Gaelic

music:

the nntional

musc,

will fly i~ honour

he

as

v~ried

no drab

as

Celtic

orria-

missal or hligh cross.

sameness

regularity

blue,

cosr , What

and. Ga<:t:c: here ! of all three, -: ted.

red,

of colour

of design.

white,

endless

now pipe.making

indiustry; ;'11

we have

future,

"Deanra

the

was' not an Ir:,sh

These

Wha~ striking

in Eirinn."

They

~nd a purple

or are

ems,

purple

Dublin

and'

Be],fast 'on

ja

large

scal,e, j hearer

are'

can ,be effec.

with. a crimson or la s·affron kilt

and a blay brat, hmic

'or black

or two

00-1·

and gTeen, or, for- a s'Ondard

I

in

gold.

j

brat,

kilt. ,'Uld -br<lit and wh:te

a·r:e n-ow made

costume

blends

1"ake a n:r'een kilt

wlth a red tunic

be bl1d

crimson, of

.....

tun:c

mad·e. it one,' $0 that, i:Je~t ,popes can

black,

varieties

I

Until

dearly

i'n the Clause we have

OUI: Irish

Volunteers

with local pipe bands, exists possible

all so

at heart.

should

found

should

same.

·J:{elpto marching

be given by pipers

co-operate

and where The

no band.

greatest

anq drilling

con

and pipe bands,

stand-

clan, or land

as possible,

every-

and in ali cases

~be 3rtsb \l)oIunt~ers.

in Ire---<)-

it,

however,

stood,

that

perfect

national

or !lpearsmaIi,.

white

ki11

·a~ab"rat

be

neither

costumes they

under-

distinctly

splendid

standard

nor

are of .any great

account

when

enhance

good: music .. Bad pipin.g and ;\10·

verily drumming

do

not

be

to don

allowed

support

are inexcusable,

no mat.

the national

u.nt 1 he is proficient.

at his

costume

pipes.

Let

there be no mistake about

tpis-good

:pip.

ing must

all band

corn-

petitions

come 'at

first.

least

In per'

5(')

'oenf must

be

25 per' cent for drumming,. and 20 pel' cent for general appeargiven

for

ance.

By this

piping,

cun eas.Iy

of piping.

seen the

big

to hold

it is even arguable, increases

~

THe

too

when

i}11.

dirum must much

..

Hurrah!

hurrah! for the longed-for The dawn at last appears, And in the Iight of morning br:ght Are the Ir.eh Volunteers. /

day,

anti

No piper shoul.j

ter how fine the ra:ment.

not be allowed

work.

The

I 'apprec:'at¤d

as should! also the

a's far

heme

h.Eireann

to

holding

be made at home, or ·as near

should

portance

intends

'Or a might

bearer,

some local

tiling

th ier 'or hcnester rule than that. It shows' garsa. Take the col-ou-rs most to be comclearly the lines on. which Pioba.ri na J. mendezt-s-Green saffron , purple ) blay , • , will follow the lanQ:uage,

'or the

Spearmen

mpright.

or historic

Let

were genesal

a desre

way cry.

spears

Dhearg

the -Sun'burst,

'Or

bronze

'n')ay have should he

land.

want

Gaelic lines.

~vi1l he insreased 0PPOl·tunities

Harp,

have

at control, on

like Lamh

lud·.should

In

ques-

instances,

i~roads

on proper

the

They ground

hand' name.

proficiency.

piping

Feao dubh,

th~ir

Piobairi na h-Eireann. ", now fully at-j work, will direct, organise and influence' I Irish

it,

suitable

all these

and, /:;ldided to all, in many

pr-ogr·ess .and

the

most

reqlU~rements;

tions had. to be

in-

tunes;

of money;

'0'£ Gaelic

modern

reliable

of Gaelic

upon

'.'Talk hes.de

and -are, consider-

The want of competent,

structors;

ter

were,

six

c-olour, with ia :?i"!,ple device or

Gaelic motto ha dl, and JjiRve yet,

more. than

one hight

pear ance. that

• They damask,

feet square. tassels, The

motto

difficulties

·painted.

lnen or

of

seven cords or

s~m.l11er-, w-i~lreveal, not only. their nun:' ber, ·but then' quality 'Of plaYl'llg and ap·

The

over

made

0'1'

Cornomdh,

or

elaborate

should how man.y p:pers'

known

axe fiour ishing

present

devices

costume.

I,t- is scarcely

Fands

the:

Ireland, Ireland's awake again, All \hmUlgh the land one hears The .tramp of feet, the llJPlfch of men Of the Irish Volunteers. The Nation's 1011g and 100I;ld rapel Is answered by a cheer, From rril] .and vale, and mountain By 'the ~rish Volunteer.

dell

"Tihe Hope to Ireland's eyes has con{eAn gone that lonesome fei'll:- -, Wjth skirl 'of pipe and roll of drum Of the Irish Volunteer.

s.

0 CONNGHAU,;-AIGH,'

sway,

p.pe proficiency

th~ 'big drum. may

diminish

or

Gauge-A small instrument used in the accessing of sm3.I1·bore rifle targets to de· tel"mine the value of the shot hole. The. ard ,<:Levice,or motto n'pon them. L'ong, gauge may take the f-orni of a s·elf·centr· of the bright strd.1l1wrs should! 'float frOlll the ing plu.g with a lip the. diameter I bullet u.sed, or a trailisparent she e<t , prefer· .pipes. We c.annot ·ha~'e too" much co.]'O'tll' ably o·f cell-uloid!, ',on which tRe sooring and effeet. circles of the tar~et are d'!1uwn; even

disappear.

pa;i..nted th~ local

lhe

drums

colours,'

should

be

~v1th the stand.

,


11 l

Epilepsy.c..Petisht uters a cry and 'fails'; he is at first rgd andtblue, and after about half a minut·e there 'is general twitching of all limbs, n.nd muscles of the face. He may bite hrs 'tongue and throw hs ihnbs eJbout.· Frothy sali va often streaked with blood appears round the mouth. The twitching ceases after about- a minute and n· half, and t]:le :pa<::ent lies in ja COl1dtion of insens.b ility for some time. Apoplcxy.c-vPatient become's' more -or less rapdly .unconscious, breathing is l:'r poured l"d nosy, and there is u sually puffing out of the cheeks. The pup'Is are unequal, often the limbs' on 'one side appear much more helpless than on the other. The patient cannot be roused. Sun.stroke.c-, Vary in degree. (1) Simple exhr.usti on and prostraton of muscular power, usually OC. i'!Ul's' ,pifter ,¤".eir:,l1on. The 13k:n' ;5 cold, pale, clammy. Pulse frequent and teeble. Death may take 'Place from heart failure. . (3) A condition of asphyxia may come on na.prdly, and occurs: especial. ly after' exposure to drect sun rays. \. The symptoms ar "eunconsciousness, clammy skin, and feeble pulse. Death may take' place from heart failure. Ooncusaion.sc.Symptorns. depend' on severity of the injury. At first there 'is a ~ collapsed cond.ton, then a more 0'1' SPRAINS. les_J; complete loss, of consciousness. After considerable' experience" of Ambul-: ;kin pale, and extremities cold. ReCause.-The cause of a sprain is the ance Glass work, I .a:11-1' convinced that .one sp.ration is shallow. If he has fracoverstretching of the ligaments of a 'joint of the greatest. difticul'cies which Ihe 'hetured the base of h s skull there may or of the tendons .in its neghboucaocd. _ -be bleed.ng from the nose, mouth and ginner has (0 contend w. th: is 'the mase.ars. After a varying time (up to Signs. tery of the" technical "'nariteii of the v,;ri. several hours) patient becomes semious parts of the body ; ·th:s being so, conscious, moans, and frequently voThe uSt.~11.sgnes, of a sprain are . I shall endea·vo,\U·to. explain the meaning mits. Pulse is fuller tand skn qS warm Severe pain and swel ling j and he passes into, a drowsy condiof each word as it occurs. Inability to use a jont. tion, from which lie can be roused Mainly of G~ee1( or Latin orig:n, with difficulty. May be very irritTreatment, are stra:nge. and- wholly unfamiliar to--the ahler Drunkenness.e=Patient is more or less average person who' meets them either in To treat a sprain _keep the injured part helpless. Face flushed or very palthe text-book or at 'the lecture for the first quiet. Put ~n cold cornpressjn ,he shape I'd. Skin Gold and clalnmy. If able of wet cloths or handkeroh. efs for as l,ong time, . to spe i.k, he is incoherent. Strong cs they relieve the pain, but when they smell of alcohol. " The 'following. list. of prefixes and _tel" I: cense to g've reli-ef, apply hot fomentaPoison (opiumj.c=Unconsclcusness Pupils tions. minat'o'~'s ~il1',be found useful~ very conn-ected. Breathing deep and Subsequently, rubbing' and massage of slow face at first flushed', later pale. the joint will often be of great use, but I, Ab, from or away, as in, Abduction (ab shculd never be undertaken At first may be - aroused with drffiexcept under culty. Smell of laudanum. and duco). medical advice,

Treatment.

FIRST AI.D

By. VIRST

AIDER.

they

Ad. 't~- or towards, as, in Adduction, Ante, before, as in' Anterior. I An.t\,: against; .as.' in : Antidote. The usual signs of rupture are ¥: swell, B's, bi, two, as iB, Biceps. ing or protrusion ether in the groin or Ex,.,o.Jlt, as ..•in. 'Exp.raaion. ,in it s.rnmed iate neghbourhood which • Epi, UJpon, as in Epiglottis -, generally appears suddenly ofter a wrench or strain, In, in as in Inspiration. In; not, as rn Innominate. Treatment, .,.: Inter, between, Intercostal, ~Mefu; b~yon<J, ll:S in M~tacarpus.. The protrusion. should, if .possi·ble, be P~.);.<aJ"er, behind, as l? p<:stel'lor. replaced by laymg' the patient on his Peri', round, abour; Pel'lcar~:i1um. back, and placng a support beneath his Sub; under, as m_ Subclavian. . . buttocks, so as to ru.ise the plevis. The F<;Jrma? form ?r sh a.J?¤ , as In pis.form. thighs should then. be slghtly bent toOrd, like, as III Hyoid. wards the abd'smon, Gentle pressure will Haefna or haemo at the beginning of .then. sometin;es effect a return of the pr?a word refers to' blood' as "im Haemorr-> 'i:rns:on to .J'ls natural pIOslt,:on, bout If . . '.: . ths r-esult '5 .not at once attained, o~no hage, bleeding , Haemoptysis, sp.tting of account persi st in the attempt. _ blood, e{c. Medical aid should be obtained witb Oeps at the end of .a, word refers 10 the lenst possible delay, and if obtariable head (from' Caput) or origin, as' in Bi. within a few hours it would b~ advisable ceps (bi and ceps) ; Triceps (tri -and ceps), to refrain fro many 'attemps al"redlUct:on, etc.' unless the man who renders first aid' i~., r:Li~ important to learn the name, shape specially skilled in the matter. and position of each of the principal bones; apart froms.this kriowledge being applied INSENSIBILITY. to the first-aid treatment of fracture, the main arteries ·aTe cal.!ed after ·them and The following liable shoW'S the ch:ef protected by: .them. causes of insensibility and the ust\l31 s';gns Mlany 'of..:the' nam'e.s applied to the bones and symptoms: by thie old AnatomiS:!s a.re derived fwm a \ fanci·ed )'esell1:b,Ia;n.oe~to s-orri~ wel1-kno~vn Sl10ck . from Loss of Blood, etc.-(l) If object~. FOf·:.'i.nstan<:e, th·e 'Clav:C!e. (pro. external bleeding, evidence shown by notincea Klav.ikl) is so ca.lled fr'om its presence of blood. sU'PPoseq .'Shape like an anc:ent ~ey; Lafin (2) If internal bleeding, blood may be C1avis .a. key. Os Coccyx (ko~-siks) from col.!ghed nil' if from the lungs, or h3.ving: a curve somewhat Jike a cuckoo's vomited. (browni$h. in colour) if beak.' Odonto:d (·o·d.on-t.oid) .process·, -tooth. haemorrhage lis from the, stomach. like. The 'Proj.ecting upper part ·of the Pa:tient pale and collapsed, extre·axis iru fr'ont, ·on wh:ch the head moves mit'·es cold .and clammy, perspilllition hOUL si)ie tQ si,d_~._ .' , • • .'. on forehead,. Breai_hing short and Ln o.der to intelligently understand the rapid. PUlse very small and frequent principles wh:ch ll!IlderJie first-jlid, it is If s'8mi-conscious, will complain' that neces.sary to know something of Anatomy hie cannot\ ,~oo pl1opeitly. Restless (the structure) and & Physiology (the movement ·of hands, p'cking at functicns of the body); this bl'l3.nch of the t.hings with lfis fingers. subject, however, is trea~ed in a very ele· Fa;nting.--Pa·t:er,tt beoomes plle, fueling mentaT:Y man.ner, the pract~ca'l .p.art being .of naus,e3., perspi.rat'on .~ppears on the kJept pri.n-c:'P31ly in vi,ew. f9reliead, vision becomes dim, respi. The course of study begins with the rat:on' somewh3!l: hurried, and patient Skeleton, or bony framew.oTk. round about UlS'u,ally sowly s:nks dow'n on to the !J.lld upon w!J_ich the whole body' is built. gl:·ound, wheue he' . lies motion}ess. The introduc-ioJ.'y.·lecture is ·of a di~ourP"upils 2r,e dilated. Pulse 1).1 first a.Jsory· 'na:tt.:n:e, pointmg <Jut ·t.he a;ms and most imperceptible, frequen and v,ery objects cl First Aid and its limitations; small; a.nd as patient rec.overs volume of the necessity and importance of this increases and ooour ..returns. If fa.'nt. knowledge, a.nd generaHy giving ',a rough ing is caused by an external. or in.outline of the human 'body. T,bis js fo1. t,ernal haemorrru3.ge, convulsions may lowed by a dletailed descri'I?tron of the s'upervene. bony ~st~m.

I

",;

General Princples

of Treatment.

_Th.e following are the genel'l11 principles of treatment: Lay pat;ent on his back; If there ils a wound, arzest bleeding; Send for med .cal aid, Undo any tight clothing round the neck or waist. Keep bytanders from CrQ'A'<I:ng round the patient, and allow him to, hnve plenty of Iresh air. . If the patient's face is pale, keep his head low; if his face. is flushed, raise the head slightly on. a folded coat or rug. Do not give stimulants, because there run.y be a ruptured blood-vessel; .and consequent haemorrhage inside, the skull, !IS i.n -aipoplexy and 'some cases of. concussion in which case, if ,brandy_,,)s given, the heart is stimulated to beat more strongly, and consequently more blood is poured into the injured vessel. In the case of epilepsy, keep the patient from injuring himself, . 'by restraining his limbs nrid place a @ag, such as a piece of -stick-' wrapped 'in a handkerchief, 'between the teeth in order to prevent him from -b'fng 'his tongue. ,1)n ~ the 'Case of (sunst.rokle, carry the patient into the shade, douche the head and back of th.e neck with cold water.. Do not give, s\imulaDt~. In oases of apoplexy or C9nCLl.ssi-on, ap· ply cold wllter to the hea:d and hot· water to (he feet. • In the caSe ·of a dru;nken fit, lay the patient on h:s side, not on his back, slig4tly raise the head! and remove any tiO[M ,clothing. Indu~ vomiting by t'ckIL~g the back of the throat ,:vith ;a feather. BURNS

:AND

SOALDS.

Rub briskly with cold water or snow. Do not let the patient go into a. ~VaJ'lU atmospbere or near a fire until the frost. bitten pnrt has been thorcughny thawed, POISONING. S·g:ns.-The person suddenly becomes ill, having previously been. apparently healthy. 'rhe ympto:l1S usually come .on immediately after some food' or drink has been sw.a.llowed. • ,

Treatment. Send for medical a'-d at once. If 111.0 ptien;t il, c\")n~c:Ollsl, a.Jways gil·.e ll'llt pIenty 0:£ milk, !JtI1d if you Can 9htilin them, raw egg,: The reason for th:.s is that the po'son in th'e stom~c}l may he enclCl5'ed in the -clot fonned by the ;11 ilk, and the wbole mass may then- 00 got rd of by a'll emetic: . ./' If the lips and. mouth ave not stained or burned-which would .be evidence that a caustic poison h<1d been slval!oweQgiv·e after milk or eggs an emetic, such 'cos a tab),es'poonful of salt ISr mustard in a: tum1bler of warm water , or, if these are not ob:aina-b,le, i.nduce v~miting by ... tickJ'ng . the ~b ick - of the throat with a feather. - Then gil'e more raw eggs, milk and plenty of strong tea. _ If the lips and mouth are burn,ed,. do not give an emetic or induce vomiting, be. cause the injured and burned, guJI.et might be rl.1pt·ured by the exertion of vomit;ng, but give plenty of eggs, _milk or sa:lad oil, ~In all cases. of poison, if the pat'ent is l'est!ess and excihble endeavour to k!eep him quiet, but on no account let hi m go to sleep. :

SNAKE·BITE. The following snake. bite:

are

the

usual

'signs ,

Faintness, d'fficulty of breath.ing; . Two srnal] punctured wounds are sible at the seat of, injury.

of

vi-

Treatment. j Tie a handkerChief ;li111b a'bove the bite, heart.

\

tightfy around between it and

the the

'Give the patient plenty of brandy Of whatever other stimulant you can obtain, Cut the flesh round the bite freely, and squeeze as :gltwht blood as possible out of the .y·ound.

If any permanganate of potash jf ob. tainable, rub some crystals well into the wound. This treatment has recently been very well - reported' on, and in 'a, COuntry where snakes abound a small box . of these crystals may be carried with ad/vantage. If the patient (should cease to breathe, induc., respiration by artificial methods ,as already described under, head"Drowning."

.of

CHOKING. U ·the a.ir .passage is obstructed by a piece of meat or foreign body, suffoca, tion • may ensue. To prevent th.s, open tbe mouth., pass the forefinger right to the back of the throat and attempt to, dis)od'ge the obstructing body, or thump the ·back hard between the shoulders whilst the head is b;nt well forward and . th'!) mouth open, . Foreign

·Body

in tbe Ear.

If an insect ge·!1s·into the ea-r passage, fill tbe ear with olive 'oil, O'f, failing that" .... ww:,er, wben the --insect will float, and m.ay lle removed. Never syringe- or probe

the ear'. If a .pea

.

other s:rnilar body gets i;nto the .ear, cI'o, not on. any acco·unt ta.ttempt to 'get it by probing with a sharp instrumeut. Seek medical assis~ance a,t once. Oil'

Treatment.

In Ule ca£c

0·£ burns land scalds, I'¤mo\"e -the d(}th.rIlg gently, by cutting up the sleeves, .etc., taking care not to pull any c1o.thing off. Protect the burned part from the air by coverilllg it with oj and flour or 'c·otton wool. A burned perl50n is very li,ahle to suffer from shock; ac· c.ordingly, if b,;s face is pale and c·old, keep th,,' head low· and g~ye him hot drinks, such as t¤t3 or cocoa:.

FRUST ·BHE. . Signs.- The aff·ected !portion-usually the nose, ears, fingers Of' toes-hec·omes blu~ a'll.d tingles, later -on, becoming white and num!b.

Effectiv.e Z~e (Mus..ketry)~Tbe area swept by the best 50 per ,cent of shots. Error -of the Day-The com-bt:ned effects. of. tel11p~rature and barometr:c pressure on the elevation.' . Erosion-The action -o·f the e:l(tr~mely hot .O'ases of combustion on the interior walls'" of the barrel. Erosion or. gas cut. ting always takes place; ,but the evil done by it can be much reduced by al'wayS using in t·be rifle tbe cartridi!;"e for whic4 it is· chambered a'nd' Iby keepmg the har. reI perfectly dean.


'Vit~

the

modern

use

attention -

'..j".:

{,

the

--<::>--:-:-

offering

(Letters

ijjtertded

'.

for

By tile riarne

and

these

.

when

'~olumns

~

accompanied

addr:Ss

of sender,'

not

necessarily

fbi- publication. Corr esponare requested to be as c."oncise as

. delits

possible.

Letters

heading

'voice

appear.ng

under

the opinions

only

this

by the Dritis·ii

ades.

As to equipment,

'on drill bandolier

and

Orders in Gaelic S.ai.ghduir

Soingi l : writes-It

me to £,ee two coknnns coll;.mand

in

your

commendable unteers

the compani,es

the '". estern great extent' members. tend

now

seaboard, composed

Irish

words

towards

the

_words

of command

def;at

the second

first

is

the

greenish.

tint.

portant

along

point

bottle

May of

Ii.st

a

you

fawn;'

committee

person

publish.

to

clothed

commands

0'l!r soil when

A few members should

have

Irish,

others

-rnatters. averse

6f'

using

and

carefu lly

may

Gaelic in

Miller's

translated

article

in

Iished.

All _lists of

present

shculd,

full

not

be

chased

as

sutable

be

Kent

cyoling

Cl'OPS and peculiar

class

the

a

in

many

.:the colour,

Irsh

is

to give

The of

all

Here

. It •. will

ills.

and

swamp

corps

of

a

will

question. whim

a

any

I

Tory for

:So tell" S"r<l.'M

m.\ 11ol''Ooc,,1' -00'0

.:.1.(; "M

reo -o e t>",te

Lercero

"II b,t" erLe r"'"

5.'eLc,\cc)

detachahls,

''Occ""S'' (no t 11.t-,c

it

are

Would

ll1~n el~'Ployment worked pl thread.

member

of

of

6<':

Ir

,h",.t

SI"\n'O,,

"quick ~arch," " (;te"cco(;"r·" 5"e-O,tse.

!

I'll'"

ill

a

the

e'l'ce"cc

le

"rig~t

min·'·.,trative

."""reo

$0

easily

lost;

'I

give

our

if th.e badges were It' would, 'be costly fer

turn,"

1c., 6 oe,,\' ""." S"l'ul' be"s te,te,-o 'Oe (;,\:I1C a 11-,\'C '1<1

. ments,

~"I' "11 C0101)elle CtIl'Oeo<':,,-61M h-0I''Ou,ste

i

EM-Q,L5e ::;0 mol' te"re le l'P'OII",'O "" !:h',soil'l:e j',,1l 5"LL'tMCC Fe,n.·--mlre,

the

regiment

the

bat~alil)ll

W.;I". dee,piy'

mi'ggcstion"

o~ ';i;Je question

teer u.ri.iio;Ill·~\·hieh .appoared i3s,u6 cf the ,'If the fighting

"Irish

force

are meant (when requ:red

0

lians, ranks

of

broad.

humbly the

all

!!

they have confidence and .men cannot have

Dut not great

have

an

they idea

to.o much tbing.

g.ood 'shots,

that-

the

offi-

should

be

civi.

Men in !·~e .anywhere, if

~hem,

drill"

of it:. . ShDoting

j.s the

the

have

Volunteers

a little

I ',~Jso strOll,gly

with a strap,

50 that

'it: while

I

suggest below the

in inclement and the puttee

ill··warm

w~ather

writers

i.n the leaf 01' rim. .(l1'L

l~.rg(!

I from

to .be a real

I tree

then ever,y·l

t'01l

aim';llg

behind or .comer of

mark,

favol1r

1he

man

firiJlg

'Or ro,un'CI COVel' such

as a:

of a -buiLding,

t'his hea.d.ge~r

a large

POl'.

would. be" exposed.

..

_Don't

he~itate!

"

,Write

-now

,

to

H. HOLAHAN & CO ;

I

QUAY, USHER'S Telephone, 2921, Dublin:'

DUBLIN.

I

* * * ***. *** '*** ***

10

\

<.

0 bt1e1te.Am.A1n

.

r ~ mAC . SON , J U D G E & ,.,.' A3U

lead

62 NTH.

Oham.

"THE

~

(

(

"Sligo

to

Lei·Off_ The act of rno'Ving the tri.g. ger to l'elease the. 'strik 'nig pi.n and fire the cartridge.. A smoo\h I·et·off tha·t moves the trigger and nO ,other 'part cf the ri1le is absol'lI.tely necessary for good shDoting. The beginner is usually told te squ~ze the. ~rigger slowly, but proba,bly few of the best s.hcts dO' so. Const3<tlt pra.ctice g''',es 'Such C01]1·mand .over the finger tJ1at it can be moved decided·ly and quietly just suff!ciently to rel.ease t.lle spear frcm tbe bent without affecti.ng the rest of the hand or the ri.fle in the miI!'llt-est degr~. Small. bore (m'niature) practice is a. fine school fbr "Iet.off," as in .th:s .kin<! of shooting the utmcst nicety of ·finger acdon i~ reo q'liired for success.

The~' offer, 100, as a

Jinks

brought it could

of

for the' a man

them.-London pion."

SIOllCb or "Do'l~gal" hat; the,e hats have only. one d'sad"antage, t:hat is being so

in last 'II·-eek's

?lay,or

Cor.

and

that l'nce , 'wea,ther

be loosened· so :ll.s t'o ha,n.g ?ve-r the puttoo thus ·<!:dmitting air. many

of

'be

drill,

*** ***

to' Fence!

4U'

of e1ementary

Let and

in. their officers, full oonfidence in ,eleat

88!

Conroy.

.. ." _ Sinzle St:cks with ' basket hand.cuards '" 1 "d. r p . . post free b S. i) .. pe aIr,. ·v~ • Manufactured from Irish.gr.own willows, 'by Irish Labour, .

.

the

annually, anythl]'lIg-go

STREET) 'Ctitter,

VOLUNTEER,S

Learn

Mr

with

suggest

O'~:n~1ISt.'

HE~!{Y

and

.

and. '. their

'as· Captain-General.l

Volunteers

elected WIll do

should

daylight

U~r.

CO~ROY/

of Lynch

******

Real, live their arms

of. tl:te calibre

by' tl,e.harp.

of the Y')lun·ll"rge

'·'OIUll('cer."

\'olunteer.s

of

for

when

surlll'cun~ed

I noti.ce that rMlllY!

ibe number

,,;-o,uld be sufficient

L co'uld 'be fas·tencd

l i'n '(he

and

to which

he

:the

laughed

O'F

P.

of PATTERNS

had

whether

tb.ey will .be invilldble. Lucky Sligo Volunt,eers tha,t they have

o,;er

jn~eresl·e.u

be.longs;

county

reg;.

and

purp~se?; w.hi!'e cn the coll.·u the name "Ir:sh "'0Iu:ilteer5" could be work·ed aald

Uniforms. i

1he nam..e'O£ the

would.

cers

'in Sbigo

Late

Iorce" o·f Irish

Ha! ha! carrying

w111 ha.ve· offi,;;er-s up1ess

b<J,tfalions and

favo'lir the. puttee; and br('eches- be' worn fitted

e1l111S tli U"·{h\lll. Ht'I1l.; Cj',\OO 5tl"",,,e nl 111",Lle, Uu1)·.e,\(;, ,\C<l.,\'\'

23/1/,14·

,pllInposes companies

10 be. ·l',n,ked. up in'

d ..illing

-

Chief

he

. .

and

C.

the gallery

;o·f lpo,likleJ [met we

forces sufficient, Inish Volunteers, MazOll' of

'Oe,,"c"I' 'OiOt'M'\' each. CO~Jpa:!lY to have it; own disti;ct(,~e '1.),\ Se,\11 tlu,-oe' badge made; and us for service- and .ad-

bu,,(;(\,\,l,o

How

latter woo

handful

srtuation.

in ACCtit2Cy.

SELECTION

(COHNER'

national

asked

about

a

National

. whether

Volunteers," a

the

von q~(\n,s.".-o 1 rln cOIl,sn",," 1:.1 rPlt!"O

National thought

results-

L. DOYLE,

Volun-

every

gloated,

SJ'LENDrD

over-

Ulster

million

Ireland

information

solution

soon

formation

settle

How

Secretary.

the

the

quarter

Volunteers

that

S~t;~factjei\.

eriS'u't¤S .Oonfidell(;~.

There is a.bsolutely nodoubt that Jot! win . get it, if you plate, your order, in cur hands.

is the

Volunteers.

shadow

give

that

VAL UE-'------~--~---;:...-

being besdes

STREE'!'

WANT·

that

.TAIL01HNG . CUTTING

$"e-Ollse ue mn , 5"" .;\Till'''r ni l'\lU'I' "" ".Oj1·ou,;ste Ce(\'OI1"oett "5 6,sL,,0,(; e'lte""11

a's

YOU

CUSAOK.

the

best

DAME

'FAILO;a,~N(l

useful

etc., which

"5"'1111 "c 'Ce"r C"'~'\1111"'" h 6It'Ott!;ste ce"I'!;

be'ng

STREET,

to the Volunteer

Irish

textures,

'h'

EtC:

DUBLIN.

The Solution.

believe

regarded

former

~ FOWNES'

reo

~

I

.:"ppeari'14S at

be

Bandoliers, Sporraps, Rifles)

the

some

.Birrell said he hadi no. information, .. that the Government considered

think,.

Value.

of her.

worn for drill purposes by. the British sol. as .dier could not be improved on. . The mere. 'Suggest.:o-lls and no Caelic words · tu.rned! down col larjI prefer to' the 'Stand. should be used until authority has been UIJ. 'on~, 2!S..the 'former admits mor-e air, -. given- and they. are published in this and 1.n.cold weather could be turned up. '.. .' paper. A ,0, .stlll,Ctive .ba-dge for each county r·egi. ment could be 'worked in thread on the ... \ 6"11·\,-t;,\ bU1'1)eM 11.6,sL,\0(; "I' bun shon lder , strap, '0r, .a, Ibrass 'badge affixed, I

'Wonderful

List.

MATERIALS

teers,

be ~he !5:i.l;1e f.or tt h e ,~vhol.e {orce; it be · should be .a-lso uhe same cut; .and. -I think re-pub· that for the -jacket, the one at present

£9.

John Lawler & Son,

and

Volunteers

'ba>ale formation,

pur.

it sholl}ld

i ()

cost

~

a good rifle,

JbHN

and

ar-

Rifle £4;

Puttees,

col-

I f.'.gree with' Mr

Price.

Haversacks,

to .a

rcads..

our

Get

article 'for

.a.ll that

will be Dr service

with

;Iso

o

Knives- (each)

~

..

should

and the terror

I hope

on

capes;

it conceal:s

Sheath

M'~1-1lnliche.rMagaaine

Th~ above

a scout heart

w-ould be

very hmd

be

h:sh.made

foes.

movement.

to the

.

o

be of the and

sheet,

to make. the

in

grasses.

C3-I1

be the

set of straps. for caTTY,

h-ope of -our country

seen

dose

also

wear.

whatever

quired

I hope

to soil and

and

for hard that

iT

besides,

of material

c;hea.ply(

hand.

hints 'on drill.

and

mud

and

a steady

Later

might

and

words

till-ed,

and

220

Telescope, cost, £3 3s., only .. ... 1 1 Life Preservers, Is. 4d., 25., 25. 6d::,- and 4s~"each.

be O'ver·esti,

material. suitable

of amrnuniton,

plenty

or

is a drab

standing

bogs;

Th'~

Milkir's

if

meals

. Pistol,

of puTe water'

uniform,

with,a,

s. dr 110

....;

Automat';;

as 'to be

Should

ing COlt or waterproof

prefer

.and it harmonises

·of our

dust

;.uTrou.nd.

would

in this colour

tree,

of our

heather

in-

rnight

~lr

or

the

cominandsi

A beginning'

~h3 words Mr

with

whom

our

of

of military

confer

the

fixed. -

with

a committee knowledge

knowledge

some

s·:;·on . as ticle

some

the country

such

thorough might

to

made

of

a

They

structors

all over

I

viz ...

'be hard

as is generally

see, . especially

building

to be used

other

.eoa,ts "and

ing and from other sources a set of Gaelic

irn-

them,

I suggest

such

shower-proof

very

as the

of rainproof

equipment;

parad-

kh"ki.

B'ut the colour

I suggest

are

the ir

thqugh : personally

,-4ark

one

they would

service

the greeyl.t;nted

English

colour

cool{ng

re,cogiiise'.froin

ings.,

will

same

be made

havers-ack.

e Rifle

~ll'litaiy

army's

should'

constructed

,as the matter

The

vocabul-

'or best dress

to . recommend'

that on active

mated,

any thing-

rniltary

D6,::h have

'of command

and swiftly

in

very. serviceable

ge3ted,.

to

object.

formation

known

which aree tc· a of . Irish-speaking

will surely

to select

in. no way approaching

colours were sug-. one gr.eY,,·th,,' other khaki with a

Two

~ighly

forming

object.

,the 'immediate from

It

wh.at is

of

Caelicise the Irish VolIt i.s essential to keep

to

g,enerally.

Gaelic

paper.

words

and

like

ary as "ceremonial," ing.

rejoices

of Irish

tical

for

-that will not taint

so

be

British

water

co a force in the field cannot

them should- be prac-

Drowning .32' 15 ehots

the

in

The

easily cleaned, connected,';vith

par·

article

such

as is used

EQUIPMEN'N;.

'.22 Bore

German

but for durabIity it .a. webbing' material,

water:,

thing

as that

no better

a's the

made of a material

writers.)

tar-

suggest

hies

soldier

~ MiLitARY

carrying ammunition, should be made.of equipm_erut.

of the

i

importance.

devised

CO·~IR~DES' !

it makes

possible

on -the same

worn

could , he

soldier,

sm~Uest

get of tbe greatest

other gre,a,te:!,

1'iven to the train.

of the

of the

and

'also -the

tha:t is bei.ng

a calt' modelled' w.Il 'only be inserted

gl-asses

.and

oi the eyes

ing I

of field

aplanoes,

CHURCH

CIRCULAR

ROAD,

WANT}~D 10,000

MARK

19

! TO

VOLU~TtEJ~S

LOUGHLIN'S

IRISH

DUBLIN.

O:S<LY GEN'UINE IRISH SHe.JP FITTE.RS" AND SCHOOL' FURNITURE 'MANUF AC'1;URERS.

IRISH

BUY

TRADE

OUTFITTING.

OUTFITTING Parliament

H~ADQUARTERS Street,

DUBLIN,


Emmet Commemoration Concert

PUBLIC MEETINOS. -

..

will be and next

A public nleetiJlg wil] be held on tomorrow (Thursday evemng) in the City Hall at the instance of the ~'ayor, Mr Chris Magennis, who . will preside, for <the /PIlr.p!O!se of' ·iElnr.olli!ltg; )Voluntee<rs.:· The meeting will be addressed by Mr Thomas MacDolllagh,· "'1 A, of University Conege, Dublin, member' of the Provisional Oommiuee, who will explain the objects and details of the organisation.

~

As will be seen from our advertising columns, the Emmet-Commemoration Conoert to be held in the Rotunda on March 14th, promises to be a great"sucoess. A really 'fine programme has been arranged and some of the best talent in Ireland will contribute. The proceeds will be devoted to the Wolfe Tone Memorial Fund.

A public meeting ,will be held in Waterford: Ci.ty··· on . S,unday next, 8th inst, for ,the purpose 'of establishing, the Volunteer movement oil. a firm basis in tbat important centre .. Sir. Roger Ga:sernent ·and. the O'Rahilly, members of the Provisional Committee, ;"Viljlf (.~t¤iJlJ:.1 'to explain the objects of fhe" movement and to .give necessary deteails as to organising a corps, Arrangements for an extensi.on enrolment.' 0-£ ,Vodunteer;~ '-have ~.':l ',p1aced in capable hands. .Everything points t,9' a most successful meeting. .

JldUUUStmtnts •.

OR Sale-Greener lconverted) aperture sight; and a Mauser; what offers. Box 141, this office.

Rifle; cheap;

Sal·e-Full Set in Splendid coudition 20 Volumes with Oak Case "The International Library of Famous Literature"; splendid opportunity. What offers. Box 143 this office,

"FOR

BRAY,.

CO~

WIOKLOW;

of the

ANTED-Two unframed pictures"Meeting ot ·the Volunteers in College Green." Must be in good condition; state price and where to be see.n. Box 144.

LIVERPOOL. A meeting of .the ,r.epresen,tadveSI of :lJ1l the Irish Societies i'i} Liverpool was held on Thursday, 19th ult, for the pur. pose of arranging .a general meeting for Fr.iday, 27th, with the object' of establishing -a corps of Volunteers. Mr Jas J Quinn acts as .S¤<:retary pro tern.

""X!AN'TED

a Tent and Camping l'l' good condition ; state where be seen. Box 145. .

Outfit; it can

W'

. rock

ANTED-Second-hand Irish Cycle; must be cheap; Lucania or Shampreferred. Box 149.

MANORHAMIL

TON.

...,.,..,.......-

BOOKS

FOR

SALE.

in

~

- Bf:N'iYORAN,

History of Our Own Times, by j'ustiD McCarthy, beautifully illustrated, in 7 volumes. Irish American History, by Canon

O'Hanlon.

._,., . .,~. CO:- DONEGAL.

It is expected ~-h'at Bundoran will fall into line ,nexil. week. The mat-ter has already -tka:wrn considere.ble attention and,. a :public 'meeti ng : to establish a Volunteer: Go,r,'p~ wi Il be held : shortly. '~

Volunteers, .keep a file of your, official paper. -Write to the office (or back numbers. .

.

.

History of The Catholic Church, by Rev J. McCaffery. Cromwell In Ireland, by J. P. -Rushe, Every Man His Own Lawyer. Religious Houses of Great Britain, by Steele. All of above are perfectly new .and beautifully bound. Can be seen at The Echo Office, Enniscorthy,

advertisers, "The Irish

and when Volunteer."

or-

T

HERE IS' A CHEAP AND EFFECTIVE WAY 'OF ADVERTISING THE MOVEMENT.

n.r.t,

Rule"

A.O.H,

Badges,

and 'other

'very

suitable

stock

badges

at similar

for Demonstration 30 UPPER

Bring your We turn out

p.rinting ·anything

orders from

thorough

ef retiring,

in ·the

art

of

the

ill the

every.

for

of

should: 2s, 6d;

to the Gaelic firm a visiting cards to

rates .. Also

read

and let us a newspaper,

STREET, develop

country,

'barricades,

.successfully

this:

b:ook;

Jd.

extra;

resist ..

publiShed 522

pages.,

ORMaND

QUAY.

r"

~~

;:=:~=:=::====-===

..,i

DUBLIN. ;: ;; a.; = =-=

:=::=:=

~1··

'

-

,

.

.

Doo.'t Hesitate to Shoot

..i

:

Straight to

· ·• · ·

: .GLEESON: & CO., ••:. For Your : Tailoring .and, Ou~fitting' :• ' :

. .•

.

.

,

And every .Irish 'Article of ear

:

w··

~,

+

Gleeson & Co:, _

:

: .

• .. ~ ~

<:'

.II.

. Irish Goods Only, : Upper O'Connell St., DUBLIN. -.

'...,

.'

••

(& ••••••••••

-

~~

••

••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• :

WOLF.E

TONE

. Emmet ROU~D

+' •

:

ROTUNDA,

COMMITTItE.

Celebration

WEDNESDAY,'

MARCH

tbe management of MESSRS, J, T. JAMESO~

Under

i ..Concert,

~ :

MEMORIAl:

Anniversary

ROOM,

....

:

.

.:.

:

,

4th,

-

1914,

:

& SON,

Drama; Lecture- and Pictures·._

. An excellent .and unique Programme. The "Very best artistes.. Special selection of suitable pic~ure.s, arrangedunder the personal supervis~on 'of :Mr .. Jameson. A truly -National Programme to commemorate the birth of Robert Emmet. The proceeds, for the Wo.lfe Tone Monument, .

i • :_. • •

..•...•......••..•.................•.•...: bel"6, eme

:

rOR "'5

f

C~~~t; 111 -6Ult)4R. .

-

Company

,

,

1

~0,.:

:

'MICHAEL'S

(Irish Volunteers) I, the undersigned, desire to be enroll-ed in the Irish Volunteers, formed to secure and maintain the' rights and liberties corn, mon to all the people of Ireland without distinction of creed, class, or politics.

_ALL.

CAPS At

Is. od" 2s. 5d,

. lld.,

3s 8d HATS,

ALL

lOs 5d. BOOTS,

ONE

PRICE:

NHCHAEL'S,

"We

.

Address .. , City

Ward

Date .•. DUBLIN. yOUJI'

77 TAI,BOT 2275 "~I •• , •••.

, .••

or Township

ideas,

',,"

....

,.,

10'

,.,

".

STREET,

DUI3I,T~,

.~ ..

,

Want

Committees. LIFFEY

the

'!lJ1ectingl of

_Footage.

War

of hedge and ditch

use

.b\rid·gEI3! and

Irish 'Volunteer

o'f li.g.lit

~T;ar.

Boer

knowledge

training

destroying

lOs. Gd. and now offered well bound and printed,

Name

Write at once for sample badges with wording "The Irish Volunteers." Made of stiff cardboard, pretty shamrock pattern, and complete with patent fasteners. H catches the eye at once, and is suitable for weal" in coat lapel. Retail, 1d. each, one dozen or upwards post free. Whclesale rates on application. I.N.F,

a w~o1:e 'flood of

6~tA1S n.e, l1t~1tteAnn Support our dering mention

ATTENTION

Home

throws features.

make an efficient Volunteer force, cap,a~le even a superior .one of regllJar soldiers; ,.,

~ .-r

which

important

Mark,smashi!1!

·..••......... i

:

~hat a. poros (l·f the Irish Volunteers will 'he established this i.n1por1tan't· ·r.;entre immedi,ately. Arc rangements for' a public meetinghave already. been taken in hands.

It. 18 expected

interest,

!h~,mp?t

rapidity

l!§:==22===~=

:.

-;'-

and

17 UPPEv:t

_:.

W· W

~

consummate

WHELAN &~ SON,

: •

iAN:T.ED lin Cork, Large Hall or Shed, suitable for drilling; state yearly rent and full purchase price. Box 142, ·this office.

-~~'

\.

W

ILL Sell first-class Lee· Enfield ; complete; and Boer bandolier; no reasonable offer refused. "Emigrant," this office.

in

Therefore at

•:l., ••:

V

of tactics

iru warfare,

Oy Wanted. for couple of days weekly as messenger; must be able to write Irish names and addresses , 'apply in own handwriting; letters - only, to" Box 147; Irish Volunteer ·Office.

F

work

this·:-·"Good

will ing

B

T

A public meeting in support." Volunteer movement was maugurated at Bnay last week, ~~ange.men.ts for the formation of companies and for dJril-ling same have 'been taken up. The 0011" tiguous districts ate being organised,

Boer

training

leaving Dublin would DVERTISER recommend quiet, oomfortoble apartme~ts ; . ver.r.. moderate terms; South side .. 140, this office. .

iWO Sets of Warpipes -wanted ; secondAt a meatID!]; held' in Boyle on Sun. , hand; must be cheap. Immediate. day, 2200 .irnst, it w~ decided. to 'call 14:3, this office. a public meeting for Sunday, 8th ,M:a;rch Arrangements for' a - big assembly are OLUNTEER desires post in Dublin. now in bands. - The meetini will .be ad-: Book-keeping and type- writing ; modressed by ~1F.M J Jrudge of the Dubderate sala.y. "Sean," C~Q Irish Volunteer. Jiin Committee, .'.

~

a.

_,

Zhe J4ilitarl 1:esson 01 the

A

W-:\ TERFORD.

is on

is

Prtl'ata

..

,De Wet's· jltsl:~:of BOtr:War.

--0-.---,The following- :public meetings held durireg the course of this weeks: r-r., KIL;KENN'Y.

.'

II

•••••

first Aid :

-,-

0.

(These forms can be sent to the "Irish Volunteer." .Office, 65 Middle Abbey St., Dublin). • HEADQUARTER'S ADDRESS: 206 GREAT BRUNSWICK' ST, DUBLIN.

See this issue of The Volunteer ..


.'

._._,tH~

JRISH -VO~v~rEER

.. ¥

~,.

cocr{"ict ship), Jou:rnal"

Progress

vice

Big Meeting at Boyle

flourished -, Gaelic

--<)--

ENTI-lUSIASTIO

as 'Irish

PROCEEDINGS:.

t.

.. _

--<>--'. 911 Monday

We and

Irsh

Boy~,e, to take. initial Naticnal

,a:

attendarrce.,

was

big

tt-J

D;~:ne

see

gla'd to

10 suppor-t

ment.

Th is

LtJe defence in which

sad he

at such 'Short'

Volunteer

move-

country,

and. the all

over,

showed

that

the

moment

was

opportu

They

bad

Sir' 'E·dward

Carson

fbr ,_h~m there

It hot

Voill'rlteers,

,0£ ::\or,h

::N"ationa-i'sts

from

O'Neill-

he

like

"Who And

glorious

for,

as

~nen who

be" no

knew

J~oscolUmon

the.'

for

a

\·v ..da)'.

people,

you

hand,"

died

for

satisfied

of

osopby

if the

sol-

done." have" had

Ireland people to

Brother "Mr

d: ed on

such

'

corps

the

on

(Loud

and .phil'j

a

Rev.

w.th

in

H

J

great ward

G.alway,

to

means

ihe

by the

Gaelic

unteer

movement Father

the meeting

had

willing

St.

ntai'k

display

and

is suggested.

to/co-operate

should'

witlu the

Enniscorthy

to the

next County

.Delegates

Committee-meeting that date also,

will be summoned:

for

.

~

New Ross

an

made

work

League,

to

in

to for-

in his power.'

great

He

accomplished which

c.:

Clyne,

the Vol.

Devine

C., also addressed

ing

a monster

for

St. Patrick's

'appointed and

w.Il

to he called

no-

give

for

arrang-

to b-~ called

demonstration

the

excellent

progress.

had

rooms,

Day.

, where

various via

South

of

the

John

i-; also

the

ambulance a ladies'

-Com-

Austin

With

in

ambulance referenc;

to

-arrangements for'

are

the'

forma-

corps,

A

,vim

of which

Lessons of Irish History

Present," A.

will

Butler

be

delivered

ar an 'early

by.

date.

mit tee " held 'On ':>.-1-onday'las1 it was .deid d '. b f d 1" Arrarszements ·a,1'e being' made for the to prmt a Hum er 0 ·eo aration '" .' , for them that they "";" f 1.. d'· ibi d d .. oro anisation of. a public meeting at which d h orms an ave them istri ute ul"lng... to • . . 01' sectarian tA-axe rI p t 1'" , trres . I'his Ts no political re- movement w.'Ih' ent husi usiasm. . several prominent' speakers WIll atten.d, A goodly nurn b ,er 0 f t 1rem ._ movemonz ; it effects -,he Orangeman 'Of the week. . -' . the date of which will be announced later. been signed and the oom· . .of have already MI:. Rowan sai.d with !iiI. C. H. the North 2S much as the H bernian rnittee is hopeful- that before the next (he South, East 'and \\'est. Devine he' was 'instrumental in .. meetirig of the c-ommittee rnembersship c.iH ng th.·-J. meeting .togeth;,r. It "What mat.er that at different 'shrines we roll will 'be well LLp to three hundred .. \\-'.3S for those presen t to, say' whether pray unto one God, Cashel is still in the unique position' of they approved of tbe objects of the Vol. A meeting of the Granard Corps of the 'What matter that .at different times our being the first town in gallant. Tip. unteer movement or not, and if they. did Irish N atiorial Volunteers' was held. on . f~!hers won t'he ~Od; 1-0 form, a corps of the Irish Volunteers. so, all l.hat remained for them to do that Sunday, Mr John. Ledwith, U.C., pzesidierit In fortu ne end .in fame we're 'bound by b p Tip and fall into line'! night was to presiding. The following members 'Of the appoint a committee tha.t stronger links than steel, _ great

many

.. ,,' coutd

years,

. promise

and

he

thought

he

. I womanhood: would!... ) ._..

to

o-ces

enrich

other

and

Mr.

taken

and

the 'first

"The

'and

and'

is

ambulance

of lectures,

Past

. North . street

completed

speedily of

and

on:

work,

reo .

Park

interest

going

on went

_::rhey-then

instruction,

drill

and

to Barrett's

street,

Bullet

Cross

'they halted

Keen

signalling

series

Provisional

week

the drill

'the

evolutions,

street.

be entitled' a meeting

from

to

and marched

I)eing

Cashel

efficient

are making

\Vednesday

march

'98 fame-on

home

tion

they

On

a route

each week,

'Of their

SOllt1~_ str:eet ~to the iThree

formed

the

direction

M~. T. Lalor,

.instructor,

the Irishtown

secre-

four ..nights

drills

under

through was

Volunteers,

to the

of a meeting

and

Gate-of

at length.

H

The' corps

they

'owed its. existence.

tce

At

days'.

a, special

communicate

Secretary.

of the

sad he 'vas anxious

it by every

a

spoke

ti1.e movement

and

Rev.

finnl

few

~.

Conlon,

strides

Galway,

the

in a

past in Enniscortby

Out~~de, Corps

Father

resolution

Ferns,

strOl1.g_\ de~.i:~~ to

Day

formed.

is

manhood

is

Patrick's

from..

arranged

a for-

he

earth

P)t'(ot=Sl11

There

he

able -speech.

in vain?

God's

and.

to

kindly

glory

Arrangements were also O'iob~e lor a route week \0 Scarawalshfrom

march. on Sunday details

on Sun-

Mr.

by

\:1 march

the

"until.it

proposed

Boyle,

supported

aloft

done."

Cox seconded.

J'ames

Murray.

\

never

a

of

'history

naise

sheds

that

party

in Enniscorthy

28th.

~nniscorit'hy

better

a

Where

of our

Edwin,

resolution

the

be serfs?

our boasted flower

such

Have

and

'

mal

singers,

the speaker,

applause).

tary

hand,

we have.

only

the use

bloody

world as

the

the

never

in the

are

are

glory. on 2'yrone

record-

we

I,

the sun ; .

had

Are

and

sun,

of sight.

make

will

as men had

referred

Another

stCl{;k-kingly

aloft

'who

who

said

out

and

June

as

CO:unty Wexford

in

will he -witnessed diay,

Castle, \vias·

at Johnstown

,e,"D

'sight

'sl1lggjested

better

brotherhood

that will "vVe

old Boyle

Mr

such

1\0 people

a:

ear;~

it paled

shed

a, change

a real

bloody

.Mr

Hou li-

On!:)[ those

solder

1'-1 ised

UnU

be

would

H·e said

Irish

diers

to

tbing

Dubhe!

the

As chief

ne - fOT such one

over

the

Ni

My G.od! what

descended

way

up

queen.

SPO); on

point,

W.1S

taken

were

of Kathleen.

games

.ceme

West,

iriSh

own nat.onal

have spent a few nights in G~elic circles can say" Dub]in, to lilY mind, .s tbe bright-

it hac! been

to

own

h~s

espec.a.l ly in 'tbe

thankful

their

dance

. the.r

corps-

and

'iil·Qv'ell1etit.

sing

There

a.

t{J form

present

of the

to

their

a. movement- organised of creed or class 'ioi

was

should',

han;

the

wi thon t distinction

and

and play

to meet

Hall,

(presiding)

notice-

songs

and \

itt St. Patrick's V01i1rK.eers.

so many

girls

The

Dublin

ohancs

.:3.

and

under / the banner

eo!

!Ill'

boys

own

. dances,

League. tip

a pub-

steps

of Hie Irish

GaeliC

cleaned.

for-get. class

hear).

Move-

Christians,

will

.manhood'

the

'gets

dancers, better

ad·

the -van ; don't

develop

(hear,

only

driIJed

;ud;";~

"Jail

Volunteer'

procession

~workers, -.

strife,

My

into,

of 1782,

most .horrible

lVJ-itcnell's

the

get

be better

men.

9t-11 inst,

11:gilt, tile

washeld'

lie meet'ng

their

.

the

Irish boys ,and!'girls

gave

~,

tke League

is, st~rt

till the

better'

~s

(applause).

Hoyle;

,\Ve will

pales

.

shows

in

wait

"

world,

to you

ment

The Movement

a.nd it is the

ill. this

hell

coun-

c" ,e

'~"

/

Granard

I

a rrangements for a public 'j·(\n.d neither can be safe to be held in the. near fu-. ' the others' weal."

""ould make deJnonstration ture.

Suppose

:Jir C {-I Devine said Dublin ted,

'before

and

he

the earth

knew

Dublin

sad

saw,

lined

mile

ou ts.de

up

nnd

for

tish

wOl1Jan-t.be

wh.at ?

in

'1''0 .hel:r most

'Briti:,b

young

men this

was

a young

who

h,d

lllall

g'ven

Tone

Dubl'n

his

rott.en.

"nut,"

;;~y to

themselves

Ni Houlihan

that

will

give

nobIer

back tile

to

fer than ·tel l.isten-ilS ,.Jlt',-e.r listen-to the artistes

o'f a

ca.1l was came country

Brit'sh

answered.

into

'D::

exist,ence; any

othe.!·,

it be startrig AlI Irish

and

gills

who

to

at the

. o·f soldier

stock.

Dublin, that,

and

llIp in

stop

21st L'lnCel' ;'ot

gO'od, chap

lha-t";hey

held

in Enniscorthy

again>

night,

it was

a s'old:el',

saw the h'&h

street

and

just

loved

h'm

for

nlLlsic and

rhythm

'in his st.ep and

very

of h:s

body.

"if who

of Irelund and

hal!."

sway

the Irish

old

men

a·nd

they

see,

as they

couple

of tl;0usa~d

shoukl of' the

wen't day;

be 'ma:'ching that

Emmet,

G.aelic

League

the Shears

and others

110

society-

in this

for

·ou.r· old

lil(e Kathleen,

'was

which

condemned

how

wome'l1, will,

d':ed. -for-the John

to a hviLl,g hell

ideals ·~fitcheJ1,

(a British

Sunday,

Doyle,

and

day

-o,thers-.

fer.ed for the best for the

Indian ",ere

Grand

ings

A

·of

.was

~hen

are

. jVlod:el Oounty.

pe

to

's,ection and

nQ"ys'

funds

N0't sinoe

('o·nI.

will the

were

Joe

Tier-

'ivi\]J. the

Flo;ci,

and- ,~f. J. Drum.

the

8'-,30,

Abheylara

re

praotice

Corps and

the

marcli·ed. mori.astery

by

the

Friday

over

200·

in Abbey·

some

Brass stirring

It has been sugg,ested 'club

to assist

CONTINlJE'D

'Of

in

U1C.

to

rais'ing

?-nd outfitting

IT.latter will

meeting

as-

Gjanard

Granar<:j

discoursed

The

tJ;l.~

instruc:'

on the ~ven·

Thursday,

for the 'orga\lising

a special

wit~ drill

instruction

music.

c;orps.

The _Secs_

on- 'committee.

On _. SunoilY

a dramatic

paraon' Tues-

of the ·Grabard

accompanied which

also

communicate

the historic

National

paJ'3Uel

thai.: the take _part

manhood

lara, J3and, form

Brigad,e

which

drilled

after

str.ol1g'to

for adults

sw~ngillg,

at

to

of W,ednesda)l,

lOilllt- company

practic·e.

P

at 3 p.m.,

f'OT drill weeJc

of-

Halpin;

James

repres,entatioll

last

also

c..

'were directed-to-hold

members.

s'embled

in

Se,µm\Js'

L D

Fagan,

James

Fridays, in

and

'The

28th.

a"lso d·ec~dea, upon.

Re:v:ew

of. the

tion

of th counlty

next_ dealt ·with. It is expected val";ous ('owns and villages will i.n the

G·rand

a,

com:petifons

pct;ticms_~con~B-ed''1o

a display

Wm -

June

Prizes

.club

and instructors

Volunteers

deter·

roe'

O'Connor

des on Sundays ordered

-and

B.

U C;

It was arran-red that committee meet on first Sunday' in each month at 12.30 p.m.

an'd

Rafter,

drilled.

of 'other

Creegan,

were

best di:spI.ay 'Of semaphore

A number as

Orr,

Volu.n~-eers the·

J

P Gilereest,

days

hoM

!by Messl'S .. James

.te.,

ours·elv<:!s to attain

chi.ef,

l:ned

bar,

2.

dec·:.dedl to on

den,

movement

·df Mr.

:-;-:M.essrs.

Geraghty,

Cawley,

ney,

and .is sup-

ellthusi,a.tm

'prKlgr2.1TIlne fOor

. SHah

Lord' Edward,

was

of the

mnrching

for a C'oupJ'e of IJob

\\"13 w+ll be- gi\":ng

the ideals

(he.;lJ',

it

EnnisC'orthy a

the

·On the 'Suggestion

11."a1'). We

\'0111 n;eers

th,~ Cill'rli<ClI Hills

gr·eatest

Revi.ew

in th,e

G'cd!

the

'1

the

Rbyce

up when

'across

His

nly

'with

at

was

that

Tuesday

me·n in many·_centres

by the young

girls

there

Voluri-

on

ported

mina.tion.

will stand

to 'Iive

girls,

hecause

reported

W.exfo-rd

progress

of

being

said

he,

hut

the

il,; n:B:·kin.g exc~He:nt

girls watch'a

British

The and,

teers,

Llnt;l he got out Q·f sight,

soldier,

Nat'iorial

have a Cromhad-wouldn't

clean

the

County

Irish

of

love

I often

of 'the

Committee

alld sa'd that lnen

A1 a meeting

John

secs., Edward

--<)--

impossible),

the old g.ame all over

boys

ARRANGED.

present

H: Durkan, P. Masterson, P Cad-

Kellet',

a·ny

as" I said b("fo'["'e, ·.and I am a an ''becanse, we are Iew ma,p of. ve_ry few 1V0-rds )lal.lghter),

life

irish hOys outpouri.ngs musc(j

is not.

REVIEW

were U C; John:

. Kiernan,

--<>--

Eng.

by

committee Columb,

Wexford 'O~l:

Supposng

·the other n.f'tion same "as E~gl;)nd

Bri ..

'on !her throne, fo.r

wouldrit well the

~~

111

any

deva;i

to-morrow'

nat 01:\ (which

e_ver

we wil.l put

youth

work

a

the few Rooney,

spoke

that

01

time

a' do::_en young

Ka',hken son)el.hil1g

were

He

in 1898,

h1')a1'.)

other

- couldn't

.a nd

come

of Irish

thjlt

young

Houlihan.

~He even

we

pur'e

to-morrow,

overcome

was

sound, but ,

wit.i;;.c!rew her forces

Zulus (Hear;

Theatre,

Amongst n.:tmed ,\Till.

meeting

was

there

stop.

of

land

a. degraded

There

Ireland

bunch country?

half

Lyr:c

at that

on

OL~t of

EnglaJ<d

I often

c'ountJ'y""":sirig:ng

song.

must

K.athJ.een .Ni \\'olfe

spot

time.

degraded

in Dublin

sa·id

.a rotten

old

in

was star-

procession

the

om - h8autifl.ll

immoral

will

what

was fit that

manhood

clHsed

lived

League

speaker, the flower

the

long

he had

the Gael:c

that

'01"

he decided

of at

{,'{J111111it(ee.

'ON- PAGE

15.

furnish ..of

th~

\''Olun~eerls

Support our a<lyertisers, and when ·(}r_ dlering mention' "The Irjsh: V.olunteer.'!


15

THE IRISH VOLUNtEER.

.progr~ss of the

Mov~ment. OO::\,TE\UED

FROM

PAGE

14.

• siastic, well attended and orderly, and I was 'Of the opinion I knew the Irish coni SUCCE~SFUL MEETIN~ IN munity here to a man· but Sunday's meetDUNDALK. ing of my r-egiment ~ave me a surprise, --<>-and surely with earnest men of such 'SEYERAL HUNDREDS ENROLLED. physique and calibre to defend her, the " --0old Motherland' cannot be said, even in 'On Sunday week a meeting was held those days of Anglicisation, to. be poor, 'in the Young Ireland, Athletic Grounds, lowly or, unprotected, lV.!Ieeting was held .Dundalk, for the purpose of establishing under the presidency of M'f J' M'Lough.a corps of the Irish National Volunteers ln, Renfrew, and- the organising cornOn the motion oLNIr P Toner, President mittee was able to report 'progress all .A 0 H (Board of Erin), seconded, by J.\1r a'lo.ng the Jine. Certain sections of our ,0. Gl)all't, President A 0 H (John Hoyle fel iow countrymen. are still,. however, 'O'Reilly), the chair was taken by Mr H hanging loack, and a lot of them, I be:OolnEIII:iord, town clerk. lieve, know in their hearts our movement The Chairman explained the objects 'o~ is right and necessary, but will not al'the meeting, and read the following exlow themselves to be persuaded so =even 'tracts from the manifesto issued by the by their own better selves, Ibut we have :promoters of the movementnot despaired of them yet, and for this "To drill, to learn the use of arms, to reason : Irishmen hae now for the first .acqu ire tbe habit of concerted and dis- time in over- a hundred years the oppor·ciplined action, to forrn a citizen anny tunity of arming and ::earning the use .from a population now .at the mercy of of .arms, and the hot blood of our dead almost any organised aggression-this, he- and gone wari-.or sires will surge S'O in yond .all doubt, is.a, programme that ap- their veins. as <they see things militant." .pe~ls to .all Ireland, but especially to mater-ialise that .tlaey must sooer or young Ireland. Later "fall in" in their places amongst "The object proposed for the Irish Vol· the manhood of Erin, and' that is now -unteers is to secure and maintain the assuredly in the ranks of the Irish Vol. rghts and liberties common to all the unteers . .people of Ireland. Their duties wi-ll be defensve and protective, and they will .not contemplate either aggr.ession or do- MEETING I~ NAVAN TO ORGAKISE .mination. Their ranks are open to al( A LOCAL FORCE. .able-bod.ed .Irishmen, without distinction .of creed, politics, or social grade. Means -wil! be found! ,(Thereby Irishmen unable to .serve as .ordinary Volunteers will be enA large meetirio- W2S held i)l the Forabled to aid the Volunteer forces in va- esters' Ha·ll, Kav';:'} on Sunday week. Mr rri ous sapacites. There will al:so be work C Quinn, D C, p;es:ded, and Professor ~for women to do, and there are s~gns that Mac Neill .and Mr .l\-I J Judge were pre·.the WOllen of Ireland, true to their reo sent. "cord, are especie llv enthusiastic for the The Chairman having thanked those .sucoess of the .Irish VOl,unteers.. We' pro- present for electing him to the positron, :!l0s'e for the \' olunteers organrsetion the said he regretted verv much the n eces''Wildest nossble basis'. 'Vithout any other sty that had arisen 'for the hcldng of ~associatio'n or classification the Volunteers such a meeting, but the mcn of Ireland 'will be enrolled acording to the district would be the veriest slaves .and absolu·· in which they lve. As soon .as it is found tely indifferent to the bet in~rests of their :feasible, the district sections' will 'be called country were thev to remain inactive at ·.upon to join in making provis'on for thc the present t:me ~nd Ul1der the condit'ons :gen,eral administration and discipline and toration of her rights (applause). It was :for united. co·operation. The Provisional s:ld to thin:k that after more tha,n 10 years 'Comm'ttee which has acted u_p !-o th.e pre- which Ireland was struggling for the res· 'sent will con:t!nue to offer its services un· of bitter tria and suffering in the struggle ;-til an elective body is formed to replace to w:n back the legislative independence it. A propol'ti'on of t;me spare.d, not from 0.£ t'heir C'onntry, that just as Engl~.nd was 'work, but from pleasure and recreation, a about to ·perform an a_.:;to,f repai·tltion fO.r ',voluntary adoption Q£ d'scipl'ne, a pur· past wrongs, instead o,f turning to' enjoy pose firmly and st.eadily canied through, the ll1terest ,and weH·being 'h£ thei COUll· '!Will renew ,the vitaJ'ty 'Of the nation. Even try, they must turn to f:;tce a most ,bitter that degr'ee of s·elf.discipl'ne will bring en.emy ·of th'eir cause. It was not a tyranback to every town. vilhO"e and country. n'cal or fo'reign invader they had to face, side a consciousn.e~s thathas lona been but it was their own' kith and kin. It was forbidden them-the sense of freem-:n who Irishmen 'who were being prepared in have ·fitted t.hemselv,es to defend the cau~e most costly a'lld expensive fa,h~on to at· of fr.~edom. Inth. e name of. Ka_.'.ional unity, ta~k the~r fellow.countrymen ill their h~n. of j\i.at!onal d'gmty, of Nattonal .and 111- esc efforls to up.1lft theIr countl-y ~'PdividuaJ liberty, o·f ma:nly citizenship, wo pIa use). It was a \'ery strange thll1g that 1 appeal to our CO"llntrymen to recogn'se and these men had bee 1 allowed to Import arms .accept without hes'tati'bl1 the oppo,rtunity <l:nd ammun.:tioI_l into the c':Juntry;. that that has been gr::mted them (·0 join the they '.\-ere be:.ng allowed to dl"ll! wlth'out ran.ks c·f the Irish Volunteers and to :ua·ke any effort bel11g made on the part of the the movement now begun not unwol;thy of Government. to stop it. _'Were ·such work The historic title which it has adopted."· carned on 111 ,1\ie'ith, Wexford, Oork or NIr P I'hfghe:s ,deJ:vered a short add.r,ess, Du.b1111It WOUld not ha:ve been very long stating that at t.he meeting a.t wh:ch it unlIl a l'<:~gulra army would bave been wns decided to es;ablish the Kationa-l.Vol· s·ent to th~se plstr:cts to crush the people unt@,ers in town they had r·epre·sentatives (ap'plaus~). But here. bec~use t.hesii men of every Kational organisat'on, in town were aC,t:l1g to destroy the lllterests·. 'Of Ire· present. :J11: P Toner also spoke in sup. land ·2nd 'prevent her from ach:c:v1!1g the port of tbe movement. Entrance fees were freedom that then received ·and s·ever;).l hundred men Wolfe Tone Fought for and Robert .enrolled_ Emm-ct Bled For,

they need not expect tbe smallest particle of persecution 'or injustice from the hands of their Cathol.c fellow-countrymen (applause). For example, let them take the Co. Meath, one of th.e greatest Catholic eounties in Ireland, what injustice have they meted out? How did they act witlo. regard to public representation both, in Parl iament and 'Otherwise? 'MeaJth, a great Oatholic and Nationalist ci.unty, had never considered the r'el~ion of a: man so long as he was- true to the cause of Irish liberty. . They had elected the son of the great Henry Grattan, elected an honest Presbyterian from Hfe North, "Honest John Martin," in preference to a member of one of the most infiuential Cl¢l-olic families in Mea~h. Had they not elected the immortal Charles Stewart Parnell. (cheers), old Mr Mel'g,e, a-nd the present Pierce O'Mahony? That showed it was Ireland and Irish liberty they thought of, and not of bigotry. Therefore, in f:l.Ce 'Of the way things were going at present .Ir ish Catholics were standing tIP and saying they were prepared to fight for their country as their forefathers had done, and that no sacrifice would prevent them from carrying it through, as. a proof of the feeling that existed in the hearts of Catholic people in Ireland towards their Protestant fellow-oountrymen , let there be a meeting heM in any part of Ireland, no matter how co-ld or iadifferem the people may be, if the speaker desired to asousa their feeling's and enthusicsm all he had 10 do was to mention the name 'Of Robert Emmet. He hoped the start made in Navan in re''fprd to the establishment of Volunteer Corps would meet wth the response it deserved, and' that as it had 'bee'n in the past it would be in the future, the men 0'£ Meath would not be behind in carrying on the stcuggle for the freedom of their country ·(applause) . lI'I:r L Clarke, secretary of the movemerit, read a'l,ettel' from Mr John Sweet. man r,emrefting hs inab.Iity to attend, and wishing the movement in Navan every success.

I

I

I I

~

.FIRS.T REGDIEKT,

, .

--0--

GLASGOW.

the English G()\'ernment were quietly and calmly standing 'by .and allmv'ng them I (appla·lU;e). They pr·etended they were ! afraid o£ persecution and o£ injustice' being meted out to them ,by tbeir C·ltJ1.O'hc fello,w-countrymen under Home R.ule. He d'd not. heliev,e there W.II.S a single one 'of thos·e 1°l'ofe-stants and Pr·esbyt,erians be· I heved anyth ing of the k' nd. Those m~n I must know tbe his·torv o£ Ireland, and that

,I

The Secretary of, th~ Glas.gow Reg!.' -;nl;e;lt, ,a well known GaeJ, wntes-I am, reSIdent In. Gl:asg:ow now gomg on for -twenty. y-ea~s, and I ha·ve attended n"ot a ;few Il-:sh gathermgs III that tllue, enthu-

I

'J

.

.

PROFESSOR

y[~I\-CNEILL

Who 'was received with applause, said thm business that brought them together WI., real business. 'I'her object was not to have speeches ·but· to have deeds coming out of it. TIle Irish Volunteer organisa .. tion was to come out 0'£ it. Commenced only before Christmas, it was to be established through the lleng,th and: hreadth of Ireland, and it would' be expected that every young man fit to be drilled and armed in the service of his country would come forward like a marl, and take h.s place In the ranks of the Volainteers, 'fhat was the demand their country was making at the present moment. As the chairman had said, the opportunity had come from the .actou taken by the ~e,Q1)1,ein the North-East corner of Ulster.' They ha:d be,en the inst)'uments in the hands of Pro:v'denoe wit.h the object of giving the people. 0'£ Ireland an oppoJ:tuni.ty they bad nole had since :the Act clf Union. Now it was poss;ble for Ir'shuV'..l1 to come fo·r. ward and- tak'e 1hejr standi ,as free m.en a·l1d citizens 'Of tbeir countr:v t'O s'ec!l1,re 2..nd pl',eserve for all .fut·Ul"e time

under aIaw that wasno law, but tyranny P (Applause.) The object of the movement was not to attack ,any other- country. Sines; St. P.atrjck had brought !)1e_light of Christianiiy among Irishmen they had never been the aggressors against any other riatien, nor carr'ied war into' any 'otlier coumtry. Still less was the 6:bj-e,e;tto. domineer 'over any section of their' fellow-country. . men. The minority was- not in any danger .at all of tyranny, oppression or dornination hom the majority. On the ccntrary, the Volumteers were prepared: to stand up for their, civil and: religious Lb· erty in ·the same way as they would stand up for ther own. He would not like to be acquainted with the ma.n who would refuse to come forward and help in the movement.

It Was the Duty Train

of Young

Themselves

-Men. to

in Military

Training ,/

and use of arms. He hoped no one in Navan would he coward onongh 1.0 refuse. In any defensive force they must have discipline and oragnisation. If anyone did 11-0:[ intend to accept that discipb.ne and organisation :h.ey ba,d better stay outsde They would be of no use to the force end very Iitt].~ use ~t.o their country (applause.) 'I'he movement, once it got into full swing, would he ·absolu.tely impossible to suppress arid no Government would venture to U1'l· dertake to do so. They could not deny Ir-ishsuen the rights of free c.tizens. It would create a scandal all over the British Empire and- in face·o.f .th.e whole world. Irishmen were stronger than t.hey h ad been led to believe, and -if they" acted in a united manner it would. be very hard and impossible to suppress them (applause). The movemerst was Iaid down. on .such lines that no one need. hesitate to come in. It was not laid down on q:Jo· Iitical lines to force one mem out and -aJ. low another to come in. It w-as a: per· fectly open organ'sation. The whole Vol. urrteer o;rgani:sa:ti.on would he under the control of the National Governrnerrt vof Ireland (applause). He appealed to those who wished to ioin t~. han.d In their .llI:lmeS at once, and told these wbo were dO!UI.Jt . fu.l to go home ,and .thirik the matter over and wait for a while (ar~h.~·se.) ·:HR. ::.\1. J. JUDGE

next addressed the meeting, and sad (Ile:v had not come there to preach revolution against England. For the first time since -th~ days of King James II. the peopls of Ireland were f',xmi:ng companies and bat. talions on perfectly loyal and constitutiorial g'fo1md". The people of Il'e~'and were d'l'.]!:in.g and arming "for the purpose of preserving Tights and her liberties ~5' a nation (applause). 'I'he Irish leaders had accept.ed a IP,erasure of Home Rule from tt.:ee-fourths o£ the EngJish pepple. As a_.meaSll.re of jU5tice and reparation they acoept-ed it also, and they were de· termined .3. sm~ll s,ect:on of their own cc:u:ntrymen 'wonLd: not put a stop to its passing into. la"w. A gulf had heen crea· ted in the 'N0'r~.hJ.of Irel,and betw·e·en Ca· tho!i,cs a!lld P·roteGt ants , an,d the Volun· te"ps were o,ut to hr;dge that ,;:ulf. They wanted to ,put 2.Th end to· r,eligious bi,_l2;o:l.ry._ Speaking w':Ih £eelw,g" Mr J'lidge staid he ,. (Applan·se.) That would not be don·ehad. g.e,en what wa.s called, in 1he 'Vest of could n,ot 'be done"':"by only -talking about It w'as the it. Nor co,ulcli ihe 'work ,be entrusted to I:reland an A'merican "ia:ke. emigra.ti.on fr:om the sh.ores 'Of Il'e18,nd of any hamds except the hands of I,rishrnen He tl1emselVie-s. If g:v,en oVier to· others wha.t the '<b-est of her 'Sons and dauf¥1ters. had seen the tears shed ,by the :p1l,rents as had happened: before W'cuJd happen aga.in, the time would n0't be long unrtil it wa_.s th,e ch'ldren leave th.em, candenmec1 to live taken from them again. Ireland was seu,?, . as exiles in Afnerica -or the more d~stant Th·a;t would end when ip'os·edi -to b;e a" fr.ee country. As a m ::titer s'hol'es of Austral'a. of fa·ct, i,t V·j·.'!S nO' s'~ch thrng. S~r E O:J.r- they had' built I!.P I'L new and prosperOl1s lr.ehnd in whicl1 tll-ere wouLd be homes &on a:ppealec1! to the British -Consti·tut'on,' a.nd lj,y,e,lihc·ods £,or the childre.n. By jom. and pTot.e.sted -aga.inst the ptlople .of tbis the:v would aid the country bein.g deprived -Q·fthe .bene,fits ·of ing the Volunteers g~,and work - They wDuld help to cl1lli. the co,nstitu-t:.on. The peopLe of Ireland neve.r .had: thde ,benefits. Tl:1e Bl'ih.,h COJII· yate -the 'pJa'ns of M0A.th and p1a6e 0111 the ranches con,t,en;.ed to·'ler·5 ,flllid .hear a.s the:v st:tution nev,er was i 111 opera.tioTh in' Irela.nd. Although supposed to- be on all passed t.he jovous rompi.ngs of the toiJ,er's The organio.atioll equality with Englishmen, Scotsmen and childr.en .(applan-:.e). "'.'~s open'10 mea, or! all p~::Lss'esand. creecls \V.elshm~n, ~'et they were 'not so. On the other s:-cle 'of the Ohannel a DV.ll1 was al- with:::llt respeet to 'what society they be· long,ea. As a Hihnman he bore ames· lowed the rights a·nd liberties of :J. citizen. h wa,s the:r and could di'ill and C31""'Y arms; but in s~<:;:e to his brothe.r H'hs. duty 'Of e\'ery true Irishman, to Ir-eian1 tjpt was not a] lo\\;ed' up to the pr.e,en.t.. Tiley had to 1'" down in slo.yery Join- th~ Ranks o£ tbe \'phlllteers. and 'S'lIIhmit (0 an ·open and. 'puhlic insult. In eye,ry fr·ee country ill the w.orld· the peo· ,';0 resolntio'l1! w·Ol1ld·be 1)1£';00 to.d;)_~, but ple were a,llolVed to drill .Hpd oarry arms a.1l who wished could. h."nd in their names. in c,efcnoc of .tllir co.untry. To 12:0 bad Mr M'Entp.g,.grurt s'a,;-c1tliat if Carson to the time .of the Jews. They were under the Roman Empir,e, yet they were al- and his ·cr·ew by the:r brag 'and crow were fr·ol11 g:ving Ir,e.land lowed ·~o c.ury arms as .c'O\lld'he seen "from aMe to force Enghnd the Natio·!1lrtl Volun:teers ma.ny r,eferenoes in the Bible', There W::IS .rue'c jllS! rights, \:J.Eling at the hack of l\1,r John R,cdmond noth'11g to prevent them asg.ert~'I1g their righits as ~rishmen, and the only qu,es-tion and the Irish Pm:ty wo,uJd pfO-vid1e a: we'!· pon ,st.l'ol1g·er than wha,t the -Grangcmen ""a's, w.er,e they going to ,be free IrisJ1men o,r were t.hey content to l1e d~owil as sla:\"e·s or the Tory P?-r~ h~c1 (applause). i

rue,'


16

_"_ ----

.:.+ • ...

__ ._. _ ---"_.

IRISH

._- - __

/•••••• '••~.~ ••••••••••

Sco-uts

_

80)!

. ~.

THE

.....-.z::: ....... !-_._-,..

--.

, 0-

!

:

'..

._

, •. •

~

.'

_

---

Belfast District

KIO!I'th. The .boys

rally round the Eireann with

:

Organizing Noles.

.-.------.--~-

The old patriotic fiercely, as ever in

:_

~

,:

......

:

Their

manly

of

Belfant.

as II ~.onght i'l!! the It was not

adherence

continue

to

I

to

Na ¥ianna. enthusiasm.

of

margi~

the

prineiples

of Xationalisrn The members

players

-.---

01

18 p0tuts

hem~:

spirit burns. the heart of

standard unabated

!nantDw'

'.

I:

VOLUNTEER"

.-. '_"'- .....J....

_\. .••

3 _points,

the

10. The

"to

1

score:

game was

Y~ry spir ited m~n~er the. fault o.f the William

altd_ Orr

'a,

that

Nelson's

came

out

the

vis.;

tors. The fOl.J~owing is now the. 'order; of the teams In the League-EIre Og

I Pipers,.

Sluaighte

I j

Nelson!

'Or.r,

CIano

would! be: hard "to excel. n~ Bhfiann, Clann, R'uadbr~lgh T and I• • work w~thr unselfiseh zeal'I" olfe Tone. It IS heard III Nelson • •• c • circles that- the Nelsons are determined : .,.,•••• ~.................................... for the welfare of the -Sluaighte, and .. ... .' ._. . . to secure tbe Victory III the final. The • ev'er" obstacle In ,the path 0·£ the Flanna' . . , t everv live Irish boy- ...vlories in. We shall III "B" east If . lS . ~vercomii ith. t111daurei . . ,\,\,J. -th.,e·d pipers, on the other hand, are keeping' , have to shut down the works soon for a .. quiet land Grg·ani:sin~ a, fighting team i ~ '. . . ;p.ersev,er,ance. ...... Surxiay week last we had 3. general route short time as we are carryang out some A. h I h' '.' \\'11 th fthe isamfe determination. Which . ., . new sc e.me .or t e re·o.tgamsau.oD. I ' _ march to. Rathfarnham , and' the day was extensive repairs and decorat;ons. ,;<, e ·In· , '- B If SI ht .' . II f team will win remains to 'be seen. . • . .' . o,t the east uag te, ,pu:mclpa y rom very bad indeed ; nevertheless we -had ..3; tend rnakins the plaoe somewhat h:ke the . . d"h' ,_ . Attendanoe.s+The attendance of memo " : , .". . . " -a;n econom~c stan ·POlO.t, (,as 'ue·en In. , fine t-ctTn OUC, notably from Dolphin s Mansion HOU!5·e· that's th ida. We are . • d T'-' h ~'di f bel'S at classes and drills of late has,. , ., .. , . augurate . ureug "lie ~11!elUt1ll -Q . . _ .' Barn, Rathmines, and. ·ahe nor-t h tside. lockinz forward- to .another match ill the tho h ·t·:I.. d t h 1-. on the whole, been good, but there are i . • •• , . '" . ,s' sc ,eme ~ ~ 'LLOP~ 0 ave )Joys . . · Camden street warrrors d:dn t make much Hur linz Leazue. Of course the Barn team f II . ed f '-._ th Just a few bovs who do not mind whe, .,',. '0 0 " . u Y ,eq11lpp ()I' the -sttmrner .mon. S, ~ . · of 'a show. \\ e couldn .t get through w.th beart 11S but they were a ·o:t small and h L f h 1h td t ther they abseat ·themselves a night or , w en iP enty 0 ea t v, ou 001' SCOU . the hur l.nz match owing to the condition 0'0" under our legs. Shine d;.dn't turn k :1.1 b . dld-' TV '11 two., It rnight be .well here to mention' 0> .:;:, '" ....... .' .' wor 'WL' e J'fi u ge In. IUS \VI ... . ; cf (he ground, hut the teams were III great 'Cut either on the occasion, h m of the big hId .. ti that under the new scheme boys of this . .. ' ~ • pro·v,e a w (Ye50me an invrgora m.g .. . . i form. \\ e don"; understand boys absentfeather are to attend ,at .the-- .c b a·n,Q'e, an d.h "e BI.ac,I moun..alD, " . hich1 class WIll 110t be tolerated, they will . . .. Members W 1><; . .• in« themselves from 'Jil'arade because it ITo1l on Sunda.v mOJnin~ for march to . . '" th icinrt f th F' h d ,'eith.er attend or clear out. o . . ."]." J ].~ Il1 .e V1C1l11 y 0' e 'lann-a eao'. , ." haapens . to ram 'some. Ra in 0·1' no r a..n .St . Endas 11.30. t '11 a d b nda t Iacilities Promotions.c.R 0 COn11-1Can, ~ , quaD ·ers, Wl all'or a u ])j .v11 I. ... • . . o·f Sluagh .

Batta lion Notes

'1'

¥

1, ~ .

the, should 'report themselves at headHATI.I}IIKE.. S OO'IP [\ r \"-V B quarters and then rt w il] .be .at t.he dIS· , . ~ ... .. I cr etion of .th.e officer in command to order 'We had a good turn. out at Rathfarn'. "I' I .he parade off or eo <70 ahead. c;..ene.rallv· ham Sunday week That's right, lads; t• - ,.. v

· when ..

the .._.

.'

weaf h eris inclement .

we don't

rain ,

."

or 11'0rain ~.

I~ eader

CassidvJ has

ap·

: ,,~-' ",., ahead .exoept when absolutely neces. · sary. Ojir officers have every considera-

pointed En.listed ::VIa.n Eustace to act as .•. -' • Corporal with Corporal Norris. A per·

and everv care IItion for the smaller hovs, ". : is taken to see that th~y fare all. right and I are not nealecied. ·Go:no' on his round of , .'" "'. _ ; :nspection last w;eek the ASSIstant Balta.

manent

r

-'

, lion Inspect.or to I.

h ad reason

to call at.te>ltIon

.

the

2IPplOinlment will

he made soon. . . Programme will bs as usual dllnng; the ek Route march on Sunday we . " ~ " . COMPANY B (RIGHT HALF). • DOLPHIK'S BARI\.

untidy appearc.nce of some memo . COJmn" on pa;rad-e. ~ow w.e are sur· . 1" "'. The aHend·a,n<re cont;llues to' be, weI. up ' pris-ed ·that such ,', thmg should be. Every. . . -. 1 (I I" 1 Id t k 'ct' b' t-o t.he mark. ,ana recrmts ale commg a on", · FIanP.:a lOY S1<1V11 .a·e a pn e m emg " . . '11 thO regu.1arly. '\"e a·re l:ookUlg f·orwald to' our · neat and smart. e W1 see to 1S '. .' . inst . 1 f h" f J k t r next hurl-eng matcH wh:en_~ve lIne up aga I very clo&$.)' or t·e Ulture, so '00 O·U. . .d 'T. ~.-,.: nd 1 h d' 'P,aooy Holeha.n.s tea,m on the n.orth 51 e. LJntlulJ.ness a care :e.s3,nes:s go . a'l1l)]1' . . . d . d bb' ". Of couroe we me",n to WIll too. All memo hand Wlt.hl row y15.m an ' ;fa: .e. ne . O· _ I. . bers are reminded 'Of tile BattalIon rder, I won:, have a,nv of that. TJ}e ASSIstant .... l' I -... for Sund.ay next. It ~s hoped. we \V;l have r Inspect.QQ· has no·w defimte IJlstructlOns to P I . .' every member ·on pa.rade. Cerpor::tl . pa\' partlcular atbent:on to thIS. . ,. I - ~ O'Connor has been' .appolllced Leader hele.

I

a "",,'Olfe TOD.e, promoted to Lieutenant. .sc·h e m e w,'11 effect ' . c, • t . . th ki Parade Orders.e+Sluaighte Nelson and gr'ea ,aaYl.ng lJl .' ,e ,~,1or 1l1:g eXipenSeS,! . . , hich '11 b d tat '. '" 01'1' _at. Wi llowbank on Wednesday and W 1,' WI ,e -ev O e 0 equ1.panen" -. I' ti . Thursday at 8 p.m.; Sluaighte Wolfe sue h -as un1iform .orms an d 0th••er sc.ou.rng . . .' B u t w h a t IS . more lm.por· . t TOlle and Clann. Ruadhraigh at 11 VIC·' essentia. IS, . Wi'Jl .l'mi'k.... ,,,"e vanous ' Sluai Street, on Monday and Thudsday. ant It uaJ.ght e toria tozether

.•

'

_

':-e

HALF).

tru;;t he Will glve

a good

,acoo-unt 'of

h1l11self. \Ye bave

very good

ne.ws for the mem·

bers of the Left Half- this week. secured

new centl'131 :premises

which

we oo,uld, nQt wish

few weeks

'''shook''

i

way.

an)' h:rrm.

we were "on

How.ever,

·now with· a membe;8hip TJle

; 11'0W I I

outlook

hum

total

i .th·ng

US

much

more.

br,'g.hter

recr'u;t

up

to

in a company

is some·

up to 60.

present

abl& to. tell you

arrange

too meet "(her·e.

~ tor ·of "The

\',olunteel'~

I 'am not

what

nights

at we

tain time, biurt: you

so I have will

We have

Ii Company. the route

t

the

week,

t\\'-o· or three

don't];

The .poor ke

the

in

this

Printed

absent

from .It

too.

went hack into the

",old

by

Half.

after .sun.

Corpa.r,aI5 (?)

stormy,

and

week.

HALF).

pr,etty certain

r-ainedr a little and they burrow.

or Friday

was initiated

in the

consideratile

time

e

There

offic0rs' and

the d;ffere.n't units. t,,'e lecture, tised

in

and

giving

special

age ;pensioners"

wild weather ):he North

tha·t Wexforq

agd

PublisbiD.g

by

Mr

Kelson

aftel'

con,test

secured.

th .. laurels

".

semble

l'

at

"lllowbank

. on as·,

_

at

I

11.4;;> a.m.

I I

i

P

' I WHAT

THE

AR.:\1!'<,r -. -,

I

OFFERS ..

....

a.

and for op· the cup

by

stub?orn the very

.,J

i

I

I

lVICDeVitt.lshilling

very

.

not much. to be sure (I mean what YOUI . • ha.ve to pay) bUit the t-ralninO' is the thin.g. ''''._ . Come .and see for yourselves: Be-thel . . . man' hve the man; jo:n Ireland's young , . _ . I arm~', the Flan.na. ''''e don't offer yeu ai I don't

l Jo;n

for want

yO'tll' b'ody

an~,

souL

to keep you a.~a.J-nst jour

Wei Will.,

lI

now.

.~===::=;;~=~==:=~=~====:~:::==:=======:=~:==~;;====:===;==:~ As we understand it is difficult to procure our paper regularly in some of the more distant places, and as other readers d~sire to receive the paper at the. earliest possible moment, we will ··make arrangements to despatch direct to. s~bscribers on an early post each Wednesday fnorn-

E·m·

from

were prac·

etc.,

as

foil." Leaders,

wen Cor·

Manager, ·'The Irish Volunteer," . 65 Middle Abbey. Street, Dublin. Please find enclosed s~:,~~:value : . for which please send me-paper direct for . Signed, weeks.

({

COUNE-'lL.

A meeting o·f the Dublin Distr;ct Ooun. cil of the Fianna wai;, heLd en Vlednesday. Tn.we was a full attendance. Q Arrange. ments wel'e made for U"e Hurllllg League matches,. Mtaj.or Loneragn reported be had given permission 10 th'ree members of Comp_a·ny A .('0 ab-~en1 from parade on SUD· day, 1st. It was decided to increase Ule number of SOOtLtSin ,a section from 10 to 12, not including of ,c.ourse two Cmpbral5 .and a. L·eader. The matter of opening a v.i_gor-o.u,srecruiting an.d organising oam· paign wa's discuss'ed <J.t lteng.th, and seve· ral schemes ado:pt,ed. After routine' busi. nes'5 the meeting adjourned for a week. Prin!ing

1

day nights 8. .' Ocrders.--c;.itl11eral Route March ~ ~ .. ::,unday, loth M.arcb. SI'l1aglhte

_

Sluagh

( DISTRICT

34

~

_.'

kind-I;)' .. presented

{Ie·

etc.

- DUBLIN

Li.ellt,enant

Vi ,l!Je Nelson. a rousiua fight " whi'oh would h:tve the privil,ea.e of . ". ., '" . ,POSlllig th,e E,re 00' PIpers' Olub lD "" final for the J.,eague trophy-the

\Va,s ~n instruc·

the men'l'bers

instruction

at

Thurs-]

and

I

-.

Ma,jor Lon.

supernuma.ries

comn{ands,

by

FJlalllI!a some

when S1.ua1,o-hte '=' vVilliam On had

was .a full attend·

There

'O'Neill

on Wednesday

Harc'o.uil.".tstreet,

pl',esiding.

anCe of

held

Shane Wednesday

of Sluao'h WlllIe Ne]soD, IS-, If .... au want to know wh·at the a.my: ~ . J now near completIon .. The senll-final offers ca.J:l to 41 Parnell squar·e or an.v of . J I was played on Sunday, 22nd February, the Fianna Hans in the city. The Ip::ty is'

CADE'l' CORPS.

class was

r

on

sharp.

MacHemy,

ap.plying

it

Sluagh

street,

~,

"L,eagUie whiob

Belfa~t

ago

8 p.m.;

Benyo

.,

...

w.as a

n.ight

at

0

.'. Hurlma

S.port-The

...................................................

n.ot time to fiIjd out;

a few d'odgers

march.

ergan

porals,

A (RIGHT

I day when wehad

!.ast a:t No.

is -a v·ery ser;ous

hea:r dur'ng

Tha:fs

nIE The nrst

as

we will give full 'Partic'n.La.rs next COMPANY

do so by

bond. HU

I'I~ ll, Inch;co·re.

You see the 'Edi.

man and; must hav·e th:s copy' in by a cer·

can

on a.ny )londay met

and' there

Any b'o),s in the district

S'TOIU13 of joining

company

·about 60; we must g,et 50, or rather

we mu~t recruit

attelo1-ded Ja.3,t night,

fine parade.

now .to make

instea·d_ Qf a hal:f compa,ny.

n.umber.

der

for some long time.

ourselves

and

40; in a:

·of about

::\ow, lra.ds, get~ YOtLl'coats off:

, a ·oompa,ny

! The

do

to ha.ve milch

thaal it ha,s been

i ·s;ren.gth.

.

the

r·ocks" ;

it didn't

is cerl·ruin]y

It rema,;.ns w;th

.thin.gs

the

W~e got ·int·o our new premises

, few weeiks we hope I

tham

For

After some disoq~a.n;sation consequent ·upon local con.ditions, we are now fairly i.n ot.her words, we had! ·no han, and. la well 'on the.r·oad to p"osper:ty aga.in. Cap· half company wi1Jwut ,a hall is in a pretty ta,in. 'Collb-nt and the Oompany Cornman.

, past

I

better

for.

HAL F) .

CmU'ANY 13 (LEFT I:\'CHICORE.

We h:olve

a closer

."

I

CO}'IP A::\Y A (LEFT

.In

."A iti -" fit ble summer is n exci Illig all," pro' a th.e,t.ef~re, anticipated, and if the Fi arma . • Ita . t fl' th III D·e st IS no more su;:;cess u III ,e f' h . h b . th • "t uture t ·an irl: as een III . e pas" 1 'II t b 'h f It f -h .'0 _ \Vl no·_· e e au e ' oy".

bM'S

r

I I

Th e re·or-ganlsa . ti,on

.co"

for tb~

. O!\E 'YEAR H.~LF",YEAR

. .............................................

"~~.T~~:,, ,,, ~~ .'"

...

...

3

Date........................

3

.

!

I

t~~~:~;::~~~~~:~~~i~~r:::::;~

PrQprie1ors,

0'[

"The tnllh~VOig'g!eer/'

Mi~dle

AlJbey

S~reet,

Dub~


The Irish Volunteer, Volume 1 - Number 5