Page 1


CONTENTS Pattern flip pages 1–47 Levels 48 Standard form 49 Introduction 50 Tips on designing 52 How to use this book 53 You will need 54 Colour palette 56 Sizing 58 Tails 60 Colour patterns 62 Gallery 66

Gallery formulae 84 Technicals 86 The stitches 88 Adding details 92 Stuffing and sewing 93 Order of sewing 94 Sewing on eyes 95 Subtle details 95 About the author 96 Thank you 96 Suppliers 97


INTRODUCTION Edward’s Crochet Imaginarium is a very unusual pattern book. Rather than giving you a fixed number of projects, patterns and their accompanying instructions, it provides the building blocks, technical tuition and inspiration to enable you to make an almost infinite number of unique projects. My crochet collections have always been designed around a shared standard form. In both my previous Edward’s Menagerie collections, I designed and played with a basic shape shared by all the projects, each with additions, alterations and tweaks. I had always hoped that parents and grandparents, aunts and uncles would interact with the pattern books and the child, allowing them to lead and choose the projects. With Edward’s Crochet Imaginarium I hope to take that idea even further and encourage creativity, discussion and inspiration so a young mind can mix and match shape, colour and pattern to make the companion of their dreams.

This book is made to be shared. Share the projects as you choose them, share the projects as you make them, and, most importantly, share your project once you have finished it. Even if I were to crochet only from these flip pages for the rest of my life, I would never be able to realise all the possibilities it holds. I am also limited by my own creative powers, and I know that some of you will take these patterns far beyond my imagination. #edsflipbook will become an exciting place for us all to share our choices, visions and resulting creations. Have fun!

But as much as this book and format is for the child to influence the making process, it is written to spark excitement in the adult who is making the creature. Whether crocheting for a newborn, for a teenager heading to university, or simply for someone you know who needs cheering up, I hope there is something in here to bring a smile to everyone’s face. I would like to think that this unique format can spark debates between friends about the preferred shape of spikes, chats with colleagues over coffee breaks about the merits of spots versus stripes, and perhaps even a conversation with the stranger looking over your shoulder on the train fascinated by the flipping pages and balls of coloured yarn.

51


INTRODUCTION Edward’s Crochet Imaginarium is a very unusual pattern book. Rather than giving you a fixed number of projects, patterns and their accompanying instructions, it provides the building blocks, technical tuition and inspiration to enable you to make an almost infinite number of unique projects. My crochet collections have always been designed around a shared standard form. In both my previous Edward’s Menagerie collections, I designed and played with a basic shape shared by all the projects, each with additions, alterations and tweaks. I had always hoped that parents and grandparents, aunts and uncles would interact with the pattern books and the child, allowing them to lead and choose the projects. With Edward’s Crochet Imaginarium I hope to take that idea even further and encourage creativity, discussion and inspiration so a young mind can mix and match shape, colour and pattern to make the companion of their dreams.

This book is made to be shared. Share the projects as you choose them, share the projects as you make them, and, most importantly, share your project once you have finished it. Even if I were to crochet only from these flip pages for the rest of my life, I would never be able to realise all the possibilities it holds. I am also limited by my own creative powers, and I know that some of you will take these patterns far beyond my imagination. #edsflipbook will become an exciting place for us all to share our choices, visions and resulting creations. Have fun!

But as much as this book and format is for the child to influence the making process, it is written to spark excitement in the adult who is making the creature. Whether crocheting for a newborn, for a teenager heading to university, or simply for someone you know who needs cheering up, I hope there is something in here to bring a smile to everyone’s face. I would like to think that this unique format can spark debates between friends about the preferred shape of spikes, chats with colleagues over coffee breaks about the merits of spots versus stripes, and perhaps even a conversation with the stranger looking over your shoulder on the train fascinated by the flipping pages and balls of coloured yarn.

51


TIPS ON DESIGNING

HOW TO USE THIS BOOK This mix-and-match flip book lets you design and create your own unique crochet creatures. Browse through the HEADS (H), ARMS (A) and FEET (F) to select your shapes, choose your size and colours or COLOUR PATTERNS (P), and then start to make your project from the top down.

FIRST DESIGN YOUR MONSTER

THEN START MAKING

Look at the GALLERY (see page 66) for inspiration, then flip through the pages to choose your favourite HEADS (H), ARMS (A) and FEET (F). You might want to sketch something first. Look at #edsflipbook if you are having trouble visualising.

If you’re a beginner, look at the TECHNICALS first to learn the stitches (see page 86).

Pick your colour or colour combinations and design details such as spots and stripes (see page 62). Add a TAIL (see page 60) too if you’d like one. Pick your size of monster – there is a choice of four sizes (see page 58).

All the monsters share a standard head and body, which we call the STANDARD FORM (see page 49). Make this first, then make your chosen HEAD (H), ARMS (A), and FEET (F). You will stuff the parts as you work. To keep each pattern simple and concise, I have omitted the finishing, stuffing and sewing instructions for each individual part as these are common to all. These details can be found in the STUFFING AND SEWING section (see page 93). Refer to this if you are in anyway unsure about how to complete a part or the full monster. For those of you familiar with my other designs, you will be able to dive head-first into creating your own monsters without concern about skill level. In this book it is often adding the ‘patterns’ to the shapes that makes them more or less difficult. For example, any LEVEL ONE shape could be transformed into a LEVEL THREE project with the addition of spots.

We all have slightly different processes for how we choose our next project. Some will enjoy making the monsters by working to the exact instructions given in the gallery pages of this book. Others will instantly start to modify by changing the colours as they work through the project. I enjoy the process of planning a design before I start to crochet. For those who feel comfortable sketching the shape of your monster, it’s really exciting to invite the recipient of a project to colour it in themselves. You’ll be surprised how easy it is to use this book to work out exactly how to make the monster living in their imagination! 52

53


TIPS ON DESIGNING

HOW TO USE THIS BOOK This mix-and-match flip book lets you design and create your own unique crochet creatures. Browse through the HEADS (H), ARMS (A) and FEET (F) to select your shapes, choose your size and colours or COLOUR PATTERNS (P), and then start to make your project from the top down.

FIRST DESIGN YOUR MONSTER

THEN START MAKING

Look at the GALLERY (see page 66) for inspiration, then flip through the pages to choose your favourite HEADS (H), ARMS (A) and FEET (F). You might want to sketch something first. Look at #edsflipbook if you are having trouble visualising.

If you’re a beginner, look at the TECHNICALS first to learn the stitches (see page 86).

Pick your colour or colour combinations and design details such as spots and stripes (see page 62). Add a TAIL (see page 60) too if you’d like one. Pick your size of monster – there is a choice of four sizes (see page 58).

All the monsters share a standard head and body, which we call the STANDARD FORM (see page 49). Make this first, then make your chosen HEAD (H), ARMS (A), and FEET (F). You will stuff the parts as you work. To keep each pattern simple and concise, I have omitted the finishing, stuffing and sewing instructions for each individual part as these are common to all. These details can be found in the STUFFING AND SEWING section (see page 93). Refer to this if you are in anyway unsure about how to complete a part or the full monster. For those of you familiar with my other designs, you will be able to dive head-first into creating your own monsters without concern about skill level. In this book it is often adding the ‘patterns’ to the shapes that makes them more or less difficult. For example, any LEVEL ONE shape could be transformed into a LEVEL THREE project with the addition of spots.

We all have slightly different processes for how we choose our next project. Some will enjoy making the monsters by working to the exact instructions given in the gallery pages of this book. Others will instantly start to modify by changing the colours as they work through the project. I enjoy the process of planning a design before I start to crochet. For those who feel comfortable sketching the shape of your monster, it’s really exciting to invite the recipient of a project to colour it in themselves. You’ll be surprised how easy it is to use this book to work out exactly how to make the monster living in their imagination! 52

53


H:1

Ch8 and sl st to join into a circle Rnds 1–8 dc (8 rnds) Rnd 9 (dc2, dc2tog) twice (6) Rnd 10 (dc1, dc2tog) twice (4) Rnd 11 (dc2tog) twice (2) Stuff horns and sew into position

H:1 A:1

Ch12 and sl st to join into a circle Rnds 1–20 dc (20 rnds) Rnd 21 dc6, (dc2 into next st) 6 times (18) Rnd 22 dc6, (dc1, dc2 into next st) 6 times (24) Rnds 23–26 dc (4 rnds) Rnd 27 (dc2, dc2tog) 6 times (18) Rnd 28 (dc1, dc2tog) 6 times (12) Rnd 29 (dc2tog) 6 times (6) Stuff hand, fold top flat and sew closed

A:1

F:1

Ch12 and sl st to join into a circle Rnds 1–22 dc (22 rnds) Rnd 23 dc6, (dc2 into next st) 6 times (18) Rnd 24 dc6, (dc1, dc2 into next st) 6 times (24) Rnds 25–28 dc (4 rnds) Rnd 29 (dc2, dc2tog) 6 times (18) Rnd 30 (dc1, dc2tog) 6 times (12) Rnd 31 (dc2tog) 6 times (6) Stuff foot, fold top flat and sew closed

F:1


H:10

Ch15 and sl st to join into a circle

Rnd 5 dc

Rnd 1 dc

Rnd 6 (dc1, dc2tog) 3 times (6)

Rnd 2 (dc3, dc2tog) 3 times (12)

Rnd 7 dc

Rnd 3 dc

Rnd 8 (dc2tog) 3 times (3)

Rnd 4 (dc2, dc2tog) 3 times (9)

Stuff and sew into position

H:10 A:10

Ch12 and sl st to join into a circle

Rnds 1–3 dc (3 rnds)

Rnds 1–20 dc (20 rnds)

Rnd 4 (dc2tog) 5 times (5)

Rnd 21 (dc1, dc2 into next st) 6 times (18)

Rnd 5 dc

Rnd 22 (dc2, dc2 into next) 6 times (24)

Rnd 6 (dc2tog), dc3 (4)

Rnd 23 (dc3, dc2 into next) 6 times (30)

Rnd 7 (dc2tog) twice (2)

Split into three 10-st rnds (see page 90) and

Stuff hands, fold top flat and sew closed

work each as follows:

A:10

F:10

Ch12 and sl st to join into a circle

Rnd 30 dc4 (incomplete rnd)

Rnds 1–20 dc (20 rnds)

Split into four 6-st rnds (see page 90) and

Rnd 21 sl st 6, dc6

work each as follows:

Rnd 22 sl st 6, dc6

Rnds 1–4 dc (4 rnds)

Rnd 23 (dc1, dc2 into next st) 6 times (18)

Rnd 5 (dc2tog) 3 times (3)

Rnd 24 (dc2, dc2 into next st) 6 times (24)

Stuff feet, fold top flat and sew closed

Rnds 25–29 dc (5 rnds)

F:10


H:17

Once head is stuffed and finished, work ch18 sl st spines all over head from the centre outwards in a spiral (see page 92)

H:17 A:17

Ch12 and sl st to join into a circle

Stuff hand, fold top flat and sew closed

Rnds 1–20 dc (20 rnds)

Once hand is stuffed and finished, work

Rnd 21 dc6, (dc2 into next st) 6 times (18)

ch9 sl st spines all over hand from the

Rnds 22–25 dc (4 rnds)

centre outwards in a spiral (see page 92)

Rnd 26 (dc1, dc2tog) 6 times (12) Rnd 27 (dc2tog) 6 times (6)

A:17

F:17

Ch12 and sl st to join into a circle

Split into four 6-st rnds (see page 90) and

Rnds 1–22 dc (22 rnds)

work each as follows:

Rnd 23 sl st 6, dc6

Rnds 1–5 dc (5 rnds)

Rnd 24 sl st 6, dc6

Rnd 6 dc2tog, dc2, dc2tog (4)

Rnd 25 (dc1, dc2 into next st) 6 times (18)

Rnd 7 (dc2tog) twice (2)

Rnds 26–28 dc (3 rnds)

Stuff feet, fold top flat and sew closed

Rnd 29 (dc2, dc2 into next st) 6 times (24) Rnd 30 dc3 (incomplete rnd)

F:17


H:23

A:23

Stuff head, sew on eyes and then, looking

as follows:

straight onto the face, mark the central st on

Rnd 1 (dc3, dc2tog) 4 times (16)

top of the head between the eyes.

Rnd 2 dc

Count 15 sts clockwise away from marked

Rnd 3 (dc2, dc2tog) 4 times (12)

st then sl st traverse 30 sts along that round,

Rnd 4 dc

over the top of the head turn and sl st traverse

Rnd 5 (dc2, dc2tog) 3 times (9)

30 sts along the round behind, back to where

Rnd 6 dc

you began to make a 60-st root (see page 91)

Rnd 7 (dc1, dc2tog) 3 times (6)

Rnds 1–6 dc (6 rnds)

Rnd 8 dc

Split into three 20-st rnds and work each

Rnd 9 (dc2tog) 3 times (3)

Ch12 and sl st to join into a circle

Split into two 5-st rnds (see page 90) and

Rnds 1–20 dc (20 rnds)

work each as follows:

Ch4 and sl st to other side of rnd

Rnd 1 dc2 into next st, dc4 (6)

This 4-st ch plus 6 sts of the leg rnd form a

Rnd 2 dc2 into next st, dc5 (7)

foundation ch that you will work both side of

Rnd 3 dc2 into next st, dc6 (8)

to create rnds that split off in both directions

Rnds 4–8 dc (5 rnds)

at 90-degree angles from the leg

Rnd 9 (dc2tog) 4 times (4)

Work 10 sts either side of the chain in a

Rnd 10 (dc2tog) twice (2)

10-st rnd as follows:

Stuff hands, fold top flat and sew closed

Rnds 1–3 dc (3 rnds)

F:23

H:23

A:23

Ch15 and sl st to join into a circle

work each as follows:

Rnds 1–12 dc (12 rnds)

Rnds 1–4 dc (4 rnds)

Rnd 13 (dc3, dc2tog) 3 times (12)

Rnd 5 dc5, dc2 into next st (7)

Rnds 14–15 dc (2 rnds)

Rnd 6 dc

Rnd 16 (dc2, dc2tog) 3 times (9)

Rnd 7 dc6, dc2 into next (8)

Rnds 17–22 dc (6 rnds)

Rnd 8 dc

Rnd 23 dc7, dc2tog (8)

Rnd 9 (dc2tog) 4 times (4)

Rnds 24–27 dc (4 rnds)

Rnd 10 dc

Rnd 28 (dc2 into next st) 8 times (16)

Rnd 11 (dc2tog) twice (2)

Rnd 29 (dc 7, dc2 into next st) twice (18)

Complete with fourth back claw as example

Split into three 6-st rnds (see page 90) and

on page 91

F:23


GALLERY The next few pages are here to inspire you, and I have had a lot of fun starting to mix and match the shapes, colours and patterns in this book. This is really just the beginning and I look forward to seeing every new creation that is made and shared on #edsflipbook. At the end of this section, on page 84, you will find how I have written the formulae to explain which parts of this book I have followed. HEADS (H) are numbered, as are the ARMS (A), LEGS (L), TAILS (T) and any PATTERN (P) choice. When sharing your projects be sure to explain how you made them with a similar formula so others can be inspired by you and your creations.

66

67


GALLERY The next few pages are here to inspire you, and I have had a lot of fun starting to mix and match the shapes, colours and patterns in this book. This is really just the beginning and I look forward to seeing every new creation that is made and shared on #edsflipbook. At the end of this section, on page 84, you will find how I have written the formulae to explain which parts of this book I have followed. HEADS (H) are numbered, as are the ARMS (A), LEGS (L), TAILS (T) and any PATTERN (P) choice. When sharing your projects be sure to explain how you made them with a similar formula so others can be inspired by you and your creations.

66

67


1

3

2

4

5 DYLAN

68

Fell to Earth from space some time in the 1980s

Obviously Dylan is this monster’s Earth name,

and has never looked back up. Having developed

as his other one is impossible to pronounce

a taste for old mobile phone batteries he very

and contains three alphabets’ worth of letters.

rarely finds himself short of a meal, and over

Presumably the rest of his kind are out there

the last twenty years has dug a very impressive

somewhere, flying through space and time and

network of tunnels under his local town popping

maybe one day they’ll come back for him, but

up into every technology shop going.

until then he’s very happy living amongst us. 69


1

3

2

4

5 DYLAN

68

Fell to Earth from space some time in the 1980s

Obviously Dylan is this monster’s Earth name,

and has never looked back up. Having developed

as his other one is impossible to pronounce

a taste for old mobile phone batteries he very

and contains three alphabets’ worth of letters.

rarely finds himself short of a meal, and over

Presumably the rest of his kind are out there

the last twenty years has dug a very impressive

somewhere, flying through space and time and

network of tunnels under his local town popping

maybe one day they’ll come back for him, but

up into every technology shop going.

until then he’s very happy living amongst us. 69


7

8

9

10

6 JOSH

70

Once got caught in a crab net, tipped into a yellow

guard their deep-sea city. Never again has Josh

sandcastle bucket, and had to do his very best sea

ventured too far from the mother-of-pearl gates.

sponge impression to get thrown back into a rock

As much as the warm, shallow baths full of tasty

pool. Best friends with the octopi, Josh’s kind have

sea urchins were appealing, he’s decided there’s

spent centuries as loyal servants to mermaids

no snack in the sea worth getting that close to

and have worked hard to protect their secrets and

the sun for. 71


7

8

9

10

6 JOSH

70

Once got caught in a crab net, tipped into a yellow

guard their deep-sea city. Never again has Josh

sandcastle bucket, and had to do his very best sea

ventured too far from the mother-of-pearl gates.

sponge impression to get thrown back into a rock

As much as the warm, shallow baths full of tasty

pool. Best friends with the octopi, Josh’s kind have

sea urchins were appealing, he’s decided there’s

spent centuries as loyal servants to mermaids

no snack in the sea worth getting that close to

and have worked hard to protect their secrets and

the sun for. 71


THANK YOU

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Kerry Lord is the founder and creative director behind the TOFT luxury yarn brand. Kerry and her company have been a loud voice in the UK craft revival years since 2006. She lives with her young family in Leamington Spa, Warwickshire. www.toftuk.com @ToftAlpacaShop #edsflipbook

First published in the United Kingdom in 2016 by Pavilion 1 Gower Street London WC1E 6HD Copyright © Pavilion Books Company Ltd 2016 Text and pattern/project copyright © Kerry Lord 2016 All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be copied, displayed, extracted, reproduced, utilised, stored in a retrieval system or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical or otherwise including but not limited to photocopying, recording, or scanning without the prior written permission of the publishers. The patterns contained in this book and the items created from them are for personal use only. Commercial use of either the patterns or items made from them is strictly prohibited.

96

Putting together Edward’s Crochet Imaginarium has taken far more planning and sampling than any project I have embarked upon before. As a result I am indebted to my hardworking team of makers and their imaginations and enthusiasm, which kept them hooking into the early hours at least once. With special thanks and a round of applause to Natasha Jackson and Emily Steeden and their tireless right hands. For their contributions and motivational feedback: Emma Brown, Caroline Corner, Joanna Mann, Julia Ruffles, Harriet Hart, Monica Yau and Rebecca Durrington. Of course, once again I should acknowledge the ever-inspirational growing mind and vocabulary of my son, Edward. For this, my third book, my husband has been given a promotion to chief yarn ‘snipper’ – not a role to be taken lightly when you consider we completed close on 100 monsters each with at least four limbs!

PUBLISHERS’ THANKS

With thanks to Kristy Noble for her brilliant photography, amazing attention to detail, and tweezer skills. Thanks also to Rachel Atkinson for her crochet expertise and an eagle eye.

The author and publisher have made every effort to ensure that all the instructions in the book are accurate and safe, and therefore cannot accept liability for any resulting injury, damage or loss to persons or property, however it may arise. It is the responsibility of the reader to ensure that any toys made using these patterns are safe for young childrem. ISBN 978-1-91090-458-9 A CIP catalogue record for this book is available from the British Library. 10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1 Reproduction by [Repro house] Printed and bound by [Printer] This book can be ordered direct from the publisher at www.pavilionbooks.com


Edward’s Crochet IMAGINARIUM

Ever taken time to think about what the creatures at the bottom of your garden might look like, or visualised the disheveled hairstyle of the sock monster who lives in your washing machine? A crochet pattern book like no other, Edward's Crochet Imaginarium provides an almost infinite number of basic and challenging projects to inspire and instruct both beginner and advanced crafters. Ignite your creativity with this interactive flip-book that will keep you, your hook and your imagination busy for years to come.

Kerry Lord

1 standard form x 23 heads x 23 arms x 23 feet x 6 tails x 4 sizes x 6 stitch patterns x 17 colours x 100s of modifications =

over a million easy-to-make monsters! Show For help videos and materials used in this book visit: www.toftuk.com

Show us your creations #edsflipbook

UK £14.99 US $17.95 Can $21.95

www.pavilionbooks.com

Edward’s Crochet

Kerry Lord

IMAGINARIUM Flip the pages to make over a million mix-and-match monsters

Edward's Crochet Imaginarium sampler  

A crochet pattern book like no other, Edward’s Crochet Imaginarium by Kerry Lord provides an almost infinite number of projects, from basic...