GCCCD 2015-16 Annual report online version

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OPENING DOORS

2016-17 Annual Report to the Community


Ahmad Aljanabi Grossmont College

Jovonda Reina Cuyamaca College

Ahmad Aljanabi grew up amid bombings and rocket fire when he lived in Iraq. He thrived at Grossmont College and is transferring to San Diego State University.

Jovonda Reina shuffled from one family to the next as a foster child. After finding a home at Cuyamaca College, she was their commencement speaker, and now attends San Diego State University.

Sandra Navarro Grossmont College

Moises Morales Cuyamaca College

A course in costume construction at Grossmont College led to a degree from the college, a theater fellowship, and acceptance at San Diego State University.

Moises Morales didn’t let cerebral palsy keep him from excelling as a business administration major at Cuyamaca College or playing with the U.S. Paralympic National Soccer Team.



A note from the Chancellor

For thousands of Grossmont and Cuyamaca College students and graduates, education is the key that opens doors to a new career, a better life, and a deeper understanding of our world. We encourage our students to unlock their potential and keep an open mind as they expand their horizons through the opportunities we offer at our colleges. In the 2016-17 academic year, we accelerated our efforts to provide access to higher education for even more students through our work with the East County Education Alliance.

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We’re working with our high school partners to help ensure that their graduates are prepared for college when they walk through our doors by promoting a college-going culture in East County. We also are taking steps to help our students succeed at Grossmont and Cuyamaca colleges. Instead of a one-size-fits-all education, Grossmont and Cuyamaca colleges are providing assistance and services to our students based on their individual backgrounds and needs. Our colleges are guiding students along the path of their educational journey, removing

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barriers so they can efficiently reach their goals and open the door to the next chapter in their lives. I invite you to browse through this report to learn more about the many exciting initiatives underway at our colleges. Please feel free to contact me if you’d like to learn more about supporting Grossmont and Cuyamaca colleges. My door is always open. Cheers,


Grossmont-Cuyamaca Community College District Governing Board Left to right: Greg Barr, Debbie Justeson, Board President Bill Garrett, Elena Adams, Edwin Hiel

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Economic Impact & Budget A 2016 study by Economic Modeling Specialists, Inc. showed the GrossmontCuyamaca Community College District generates more than $1 billion in increased economic activity each year in San Diego County, providing jobs to thousands and improving the lives of many more. The study analyzed spending by the college district on operations and payroll, the economic benefits to students for the investment in their education, the benefit to taxpayers and the region as the result of a bettereducated workforce, and a decrease in costs for healthcare, crime and unemployment. The study showed that the district’s nearly 2,000 employees, thousands of educational purchases, and other operations, have a $151.7 million impact on the San Diego County economy. Spending by students has a $54 million economic impact, while thousands of Grossmont and Cuyamaca College alumni contribute more than $836 million to the economy.

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East County's economy receives more than $99.4 million per year due to the college district's operations.

Students get a 15.4 percent return on their educational investment, recovering all of their costs within 10 years.

Over the course of a working lifetime, a graduate of Grossmont or Cuyamaca colleges earns almost $560,000 more than someone with a high school diploma.

$560,000

Higher earnings by Grossmont and Cuyamaca college students and increases in state income expand California's tax base by $87.2 million each year.

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$87.2 M


Expenditures

Funds Available

The $283 million budget for 2016-17 allowed the District to offer more than 2,400 classes, hire 60 additional faculty and staff, and provide funding for programs that support workforce development and student success. The budget provided operating funds to serve about 30,000 students at Grossmont and Cuyamaca colleges, and allocated for enrollment growth that allowed the colleges to serve the equivalent of 325 additional full-time students.

Expenditures

Funds Available Other Funds Other Funds

Other Outgo Other Outgo

3.2% 3.2%

8.2% 8.2%

Academic Academic Salaries Salaries

20% 20%

General Fund Fund General Restricted Restricted

Capital Outlay Capital Outlay

26%26%

General Fund General Fund Unrestricted Unrestricted

$283,105,800 $283,105,800

18% 18%

46% 46%

$283,105,800 $283,105,800

Employee Employee Benefits Benefits

11% 11%

Capital Capital OutlayOutlay Projects Projects

3.8%3.8%

Classified Classified Salaries Salaries

Prop V Funds Prop V Funds

21%21%

Operating Operating Expenses Expenses

29% 29%

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11% 11%

Supplies & Supplies & Materials Materials

2.8% 2.8%

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Grossmont College As part of its commitment to providing an exceptional learning environment for a diverse student body, Grossmont College focused on these goals during the 2016-17 academic year that will continue to be guideposts for the college in the years to come. Outreach: A high-quality outreach program connects potential students to the college, beginning from the first connection and extending to enrollment in classes. To expand its outreach, Grossmont College established a student ambassadors program; held workshops with more than 1,800 potential students; and hired a community liaison to connect with the growing Arabic-speaking population in East County. Engagement: Students who participate in campus activities are more likely to stay connected and complete their education. More than 500 Grossmont College students participated in community service activities, and student organizations that serve African-American, Latino and immigrant and refugee students grew this year. Retention: A committed, high-standards approach keeps students on track for success in achieving their educational goals. As an accelerated alternative to remedial English classes, Grossmont College created classes that provide extra tutoring and services to students who need them. Over 300 faculty members also signed a pledge to take steps to support their students by connecting them to campus resources, and offering just-in-time support to students.

Bob and Laura Duggan, longtime supporters of the theater program, donate a $20,000 matching grant for the Theatre Arts Summer Conservatory.

2016

JULY

Pathways to Success Academy brings college classes to the Las Colinas Detention and Re-entry Facility. The joint pilot program provides college credits, tutoring and financial aid information to the first class of inmates who pass all their classes.

AUGUST

DECEMBER

Grossmont College wins Chet DeVore Award for having the most successful intercollegiate athletic program in the Pacific Coast Athletic Conference.

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Grossmont College moves forward with development of a drone technology program, holding a well-attended workshop to gauge interest.

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FEBRUARY


June 2017

Grossmont College baseball team wins its first state championship, beating defending champion Santa Rosa Junior College 10-6 at the California Community College Athletic Association Baseball championship. Grossmont College became the first San Diego-area community college team to earn a state title.

“Hospital Day” brings together more than 100 students from four health disciplines to simulate patient care in the college’s Health and Sciences Complex.

MAY Black History Month included a presentation by the NFL’s first starting African-American quarterback, Marlin Briscoe.

A refurbished and expanded air-conditioning plant that reduces campus-wide energy usage by up to 70 percent was the center of attention at a ribbon-cutting.

2017

JUNE Yukari Naono wins Grossmont College’s first state individual singles title in the women’s badminton championships. The state doubles title was also won by Naono and teammate Rebekah Leslie. Grossmont - Cuyamaca Community College District

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Cuyamaca College Following a year-long planning process, Cuyamaca College developed goals that will carry out its mission of serving a diverse community of students who seek to benefit from the college’s wide range of educational programs and services. Accelerated Basic Skills in Math, English, and English as a Second Language: Cuyamaca College has been a statewide leader in offering accelerated classes, providing additional support to students who need it, instead of requiring students to take remedial courses that often discourage them from completing their education. In these accelerated classes, 66 percent of students completed a college-level math class in their first semester – nearly seven times higher than with traditional courses. Guided Student Pathways: Students are provided with a clear structure that lays out the steps they need to take to reach their educational goals, increasing the number of students who complete a degree or certificate or transfer to a four-year university and closing achievement gaps. Cuyamaca College was one of 20 California community colleges selected for a project aimed at developing model pathways to boost student success and equity. Student Validation and Engagement: Cuyamaca College is committed to creating a learning environment that validates students’ social and cultural realities, both in and out of the classroom, therefore facilitating a sense of connection and belonging. The college advanced this commitment through its on-going Diversity Dialogue series, Standing Together: Open Forum Series and cultural competence institutes for students, faculty and staff. Ninety staff and faculty members completed training and were certified in teaching men of color.

Cuyamaca College ornamental horticulture students excel in the National Collegiate Landscape Competition in which 750 students from 61 colleges and universities compete in dozens of categories. The students finished in second through sixth place in their first national tournament.

2016

NOVEMBER

MARCH

The El Cajon Elks Lodge 1812 honor Cuyamaca College vets with a barbecue during Veterans Week.

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More than 3,000 people attended the 24th Annual Spring Garden and Butterfly Festival, a popular event sponsored by Cuyamaca College, the Water Conservation Garden and the Heritage of the Americas Museum.


Following a yearlong planning process, Cuyamaca College developed its goals for 2016-17 and beyond that will carry out its mission of serving a diverse community of students who seek to benefit from the college’s wide range of educational programs and services. Accelerated Basic Skills in Math, English, and English as a Second Language: Cuyamaca College has been a statewide leader in offering accelerated classes, providing additional support to students who need it, instead of requiring unprepared students to take remedial courses that often discourage them from completing their education. As a result of these efforts, 66 percent of Cuyamaca College’s students completed a college-level math class in their first semester – nearly seven times higher than before. Guided Student Pathways: Students are provided with a clear structure that lays out the steps they need to take to reach their educational goal, increasing the number of students who complete a degree or certificate or transfer to a four-year university. Cuyamaca College was one of 20 California community colleges selected for a project aimed at developing structured pathways to boost student success. Student Validation and Engagement: By providing a meaningful connection and sense of campus community, students will feel validated and engage in activities that encourage them to continue their studies. Cuyamaca College offered in ASSET cultural competence Students exceltraining in the Ford Program. It’s made for students,

July 2017

possible with strong industry support.

Cuyamaca College is selected as one of 20 California model community colleges to participate in the Guided Pathways Project to develop structured pathways that lead students to graduation and transfer.

APRIL

Cuyamaca College announces a partnership with Valley City State University to provide a baccalaureate program in elementary education starting in the fall. The college also offers baccalaureate programs in Child Development and Organizational Management through a partnership with Point Loma Nazarene University.

2017

MAY Under the direction of economics professor emeritus Anthony Zambelli, the Economic Education Center at Cuyamaca College celebrates its 10th year of financial literacy programs for teachers and students throughout the region. Grossmont - Cuyamaca Community College District

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Grossmont and Cuyamaca colleges open their doors to all students, regardless of who they are or where they come from.

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We provide access to higher education so that students have a gateway to their dreams of success.

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Evan’s story Evan Esparza is a living example of the difference that community college can make. Going to college didn’t occur to Evan when he was attending Steele Canyon High School in Spring Valley and working as a custodian to earn some extra money. When Evan graduated from high school, he didn’t have the grades to be accepted at a four-year university.

He decided to give Cuyamaca College a try - and ended up transforming his life. The college was a natural choice for Evan, a Jamul resident, because his brother graduated from there, while his sister graduated from Grossmont College. He was active in the college’s student government association and became vice president of Cuyamaca’s chapter of the Phi

I’m so glad there is a Higher Edge Promise to help those who otherwise might not have an opportunity to attend college. Going to college transformed my life.


Theta Kappa Honor Society for community college students. Evan decided to run for student trustee at the urging of his good friend Jocelyn Estrada, who had served as Cuyamaca College’s student representative the previous year. He was elected in his freshman year as Cuyamaca College’s student trustee on the college district’s Governing Board, and was reelected his second year.

In the spotlight as trustee, Evan grew from a shy introvert uncomfortable with public speaking to a strong advocate for his fellow students with Governing Board members and state and federal legislators. “Accessible campus resources and the sense of community paved the way for me to discover who I was,” Evan said. “The array of support eased the struggle and allowed me to focus on academics.”

“The value of Cuyamaca College was that it gave him a clearer vision and a commitment to success,” he added. Evan began attending the University of California at Berkeley in the fall, and hopes to pursue a law career. “I couldn’t have done it without Cuyamaca College,” he said.


About Higher Edge Promise The Higher Edge Promise is a college and career readiness program that provides successful transitions between high school and college or careers by helping students gain the skills, knowledge, and expertise needed for their future success. Students completing the Higher Edge Promise earn their first 30 units at Grossmont or Cuyamaca college for free. The Higher Edge Promise offers Grossmont Union High School District graduates, beginning with the graduating class of 2019, a free year at Grossmont and Cuyamaca colleges. It is motivating more students to continue education and training after high school, which is essential to maintaining a vital workforce. The Higher Edge Promise is more than just a scholarship for a free year at college. Students who seek a Higher Edge Promise Scholarship will participate in events and activities that will encourage them to attend college and prepare them for the rigor of college academics. The Higher Edge Promise grew out of the East County Education Alliance, a partnership between the Grossmont-Cuyamaca Community College District and the Grossmont Union High School District. Representatives from the two districts work together to provide a more seamless transition for students from high school to college and to encourage more students to see college as part of their future.

The Higher Edge Promise by the Numbers

40%

5,000 Approximate number of graduates each year from East County high schools

Percentage of East County high school graduates who currently don’t continue on to college or career training

Amount needed for an endowment to support the Higher Edge Promise in perpetuity

$15 MILLION

Number of Grossmont Union High School District high schools served by the Higher Edge Promise

Annual fees for a full-time student at Grossmont or Cuyamaca colleges

$1,400 $7,400 $13,500

Tuition and fees at San Diego State University

Tuition and fees at UC San Diego


Promise Fridays, a way to introduce high school students to the programs and services offered at Grossmont and Cuyamaca colleges.

For more information and to support our campaign, visit HigherEdgePromise.org


Student Demographics Enrollment

Gender

Grossmont

26,385

Full-time: 44% Part-time: 56%

Grossmont

1,112

American Indian <1% Filipino 3% Asian 5%

Ethnicity

599

44%

14,626

Full-time: 42% Part-time: 58%

Cuyamaca

56%

Cuyamaca

Veterans

Age

Not reported 1%

White 42% Hispanic 34%

30%

17%

220

3,232

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1,381

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1,601

0

Cuyamaca

5% >5

9

-4

30

9

Cuyamaca

2,363

-2

Certificates

Grossmont

25

4

-2

20

9

Pacific Islander <1%

13%

Two or more 8%

Degrees 869

13

<1

Black 6%

35%


Student stories

Carolyn Fisher Grossmont College “I was a classic re-entry student. I wondered what people would think about me being older, but it was not an issue. Everybody made clear that Grossmont College was my home and I belonged there.” She graduated with a 4.0 grade point average and earned three associate degrees. “Education is something that nobody can ever take away from you,” she said.

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Districtwide Grants & Recognitions Several millions of dollars in state and federal grants were awarded to Grossmont and Cuyamaca colleges and the college district in 2016 and 2017, including:

GRANTS • Grossmont and Cuyamaca colleges, along with other community colleges in San Diego and Imperial counties, are sharing $6.6 million in regional funding from the state’s Strong Workforce Program for career technical education programs. • The Grossmont Healthcare District approved an $82,000 grant for Grossmont College’s allied health programs. • Grossmont and Cuyamaca colleges were selected to share a $2 million grant for the Basic Skills Partnership Pilot Project, a regional approach to readying students for successful starts at San Diego State University and California State University San Marcos.

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• A San Diego Workforce Partnership grant of $45,000 made it possible for the district’s Corporate College department to offer an environmental health and safety technician certificate program to nearly 40 unemployed and underemployed students, opening the doors to entry-level jobs as materials handlers, hazardous waste technicians, EHS technicians and more. • Cuyamaca College was awarded a fiveyear, federal grant of nearly $6 million to boost the number of science, technology, engineering and mathematics graduates who transfer to California’s public universities. • Grossmont College was awarded a $410,000 state grant for an outreach program preparing high school students and adult learners for apprenticeships. The centerpiece of the program is a Pre-Apprentice Mobile (PAM) Lab for use at career fairs, high schools and adult schools.

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Cuyamaca College received a nearly $260,000 grant to bolster its new viticulture apprenticeship program and cover the cost of a installing a two-acre vineyard on campus.

RECOGNITIONS • A Higher Education Excellence in Diversity (HEED) award, a national honor recognizing institutions’ outstanding commitment to diversity and inclusion. The district received an award in 2014 from Insight into Diversity magazine, the oldest diversity-focused publication in higher education. • The District’s Marketing and Communications Department received a 2017 Paragon from the National Council for Marketing and Public Relations for its 2015-16 Annual Report to the Community: In Their Own Words. The first-place honor is the only national award for marketing and communications excellence in community and technical colleges. • Four instructors from Grossmont and Cuyamaca colleges and an administrator from the college district received a national award recognizing community college teaching

and leadership. Grossmont College art history professor Marion de Koning, and Administration of Justice instructor Shaun Donelson; Cuyamaca College English instructor Lauren Halsted and math instructor Terrie Nichols; and the district’s director of Campus and Parking Services Nicole Conklin were presented with the John and Suanne Roueche Excellence Awards from the League for Innovation in the Community College. The four instructors were also selected by their colleges’ Academic Senates as the academic year’s outstanding and distinguished faculty members.

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Commencement at Grossmont and Cuyamaca colleges was one for the record books. Beating a record set just a year ago, Grossmont and Cuyamaca colleges awarded 4,833 degrees and certificates to the class of 2017, a 13 percent increase over 2016.

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Commencement Cuyamaca College’s Fadya Basha is a 74 year-old Iraqi immigrant who was the oldest graduate at the college’s 2017 commencement, where about 650 graduates were awarded 1,089 degrees and certificates. After her husband died, Basha moved from Iraq to El Cajon in 2009 to escape the ravages of war. Basha, who received her degree from College President Julianna Barnes, earned an associate degree in Arabic Studies and Communication and Language Arts, with honors. “You have to always grow. You should always be learning,” she said.

Student speaker Danielle P. Santana, an honors graduate who earned an associate degree in Child Development, gave an emotional speech at Grossmont College’s 56th annual commencement. With many students receiving multiple credentials, 1,581 graduates earned 3,744 degrees and certificates. Santana plans to transfer to Point Loma Nazarene University to pursue a bachelor’s in Integrated Studies with an emphasis in education. The East County native – the first in her family to earn a college degree – has her sights set on teaching young children, a passion she discovered during her first semester at the college.

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California Coast Credit Union: Giving Back Through Education California Coast Credit Union has had strong ties with education since it was founded by San Diego Unified School District educators in 1929. The credit union, which now serves more than 150,000 members in San Diego and Riverside counties, plays an integral role supporting Grossmont and Cuyamaca colleges and their students.“It’s always been important to us to stay true to our roots,” said Robert Scheid, manager of community and public relations for the credit union. “We have a great partnership with Grossmont and Cuyamaca colleges, and we share a commitment to education.” The credit union sponsors four scholarships each year for Grossmont and Cuyamaca students to help ease some of the expenses of attending college. Cal Coast has also been an enthusiastic supporter of GradFest, an annual celebration for recent Grossmont and Cuyamaca College graduates, and AlumniFest, an annual event tied with a San Diego Gulls hockey game to recognize community college alumni throughout San Diego and Imperial counties. Cal Coast also holds financial literacy workshops at Grossmont and Cuyamaca colleges to teach students some of the basic skills they need in handling their personal budgets – everything from balancing a checkbook to interpreting credit scores or financing a car. The credit union also hosts the Cal Coast Financial Education Center during the week at Grossmont College so students can ask questions and get information about dealing with their finances. “We have the knowledge and expertise to help students better understand their finances,” Scheid said. “It’s our way of giving back to the community.”


The Foundation More than $150,000 in scholarships were awarded to Grossmont and Cuyamaca College students during the 2016-17 academic year by the Foundation for Grossmont & Cuyamaca Colleges, which supports students and programs at the two colleges. The scholarships came from a variety of sources, including private donors who want to honor a deceased family member or colleague; philanthropic businesses that want to assist college students with their education; or college departments that want to serve their students.

Recent graduates of Grossmont and Cuyamaca colleges and their guests were feted at GradFest, a cruise on the Hornblower yacht hosted by the foundation. All community college graduates in the region were celebrated at AlumniFest, a tailgate party and San Diego Gulls hockey game sponsored by the foundation to build alumni support. Chancellor’s Circle donors make unrestricted gifts that are used to support student programs and initiatives at the colleges. Donors receive benefits that include passes to performing arts and athletic events, recognition at scholarship events, and an annual dinner honoring their contributions to the college district.

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Thanks to our donors Our sincere thanks to the many donors who have given generously to the Foundation for Grossmont & Cuyamaca Colleges in 2016. The money raised is used for scholarships and programs that benefit students at both colleges. To learn more about the Foundation or to donate, visit foundation.gcccd.edu. Over $1,000

Chancellor’s Circle Over $10,000

Barona Resort & Casino The John Norman Datto Trust Dan Hemberger

$5,000 - $9,999

Sam Ciccati Coastline Food Services Corp dba Wendy’s Bill & Judy Garrett Sycuan Band of the Kumeyaay Nation

$2,500 - $4,999

Sahar Abushaban California Coast Credit Union East County Schools Federal Credit Union Bessy Glaske Cindy L. Miles

$1,000 - $2,499 Sara Suter Pauline Burcham Dean & Sharon Colli Michael Copenhaver Nabil Abu-Ghazaleh Stan & Darlene Flandi Julianna Barnes Sue Rearic John Valencia Sigma Theta Tau Gamma Gamma Chapter Monica Zech Toni Cleveland Jan Ford Scott Herrin $500 - $999 Elizabeth Barrow Jim & Brenda Custeau John Eppstein Cynthia Rittershofer Marlene Ruiz 21

AFT Guild, Local 1931 Alliances, LLC Melinda Anderson Janet Arnold Margaret Barnett Barnes & Noble College Booksellers, LLC. Natasha Bowman Sydney Brown Pauline Burcham Brad Daluiso Disney Robert & Laura Duggan Beth & Aaron Duggan Esponsor Now Inc. Fidelity Charitable Fischbeck & Oberndorfer Foundation for California Community Colleges Friends of East County Arts Grossmont College Financial Aid Scott Highfill Hornblower Cruises & Events Suda House iHeartRadio Anne Krueger Mary Leslie Linvio, Inc. George & Karen Longstreth Jack Nadel Ron & Lisa Oberndorfer Ofield Family Trust Otto Family Foundation Mark Pressnall Professional Women In Insurance Raven Helicopters San Diego Christian College San Diego Gulls Ice Hockey Club San Diego Insurance Adjusters San Diego Padres Arleen Satele SeaWorld Linda Shaw Robert & Linda Snider Southern California Plumeria Society Sprouts Scott Thayer The San Diego Foundation Randall Tweed The Women’s Foundation of California

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Under $1,000

Joan Ahrens Kate Alder Kristine Alessio Gabi Aliyev Nadia Almaguer Sheryl Ashley Gifford Asimos Bonita Golf Course Andrew & Breanna Baer Kamala Balasubramanian Lauraine Baldwin Rhonda J. Bauerlein Brent & Kimberley Baxter Mary-Sonja Beasley Blue Coast Consulting, LLC Wayne Branker Christopher Branton Patty Branton Sydney Brown Nathan & Ann-Marie Bryan Nancy Buck Marvelyn Bucky C3 Fitness Humbert & Angela Cabrera James Canady Juliana Cardenas Luis Castro Jason & Heather Cavazos Mario Chacon Charles & Patricia Charter Randall Clark Martha Clavelle Club Pacific Volleyball Club Laurance Coons Sally Cox Jonathan Crick Kathleen Cudahy Spencer & Jennifer Danks Stephen Davis Marion J. De Koning J Denney Cheryl Detwiler Anthony Ding Timothy & Barbara Doonan Tyree Dorward Lisa Drake Ann Drinkwalter Ann Durham Herb Eckardt & Mary Kay Rosinski Phillip Scott Eckert

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El Cajon Elks Lodge #1812 Ekatala Della Elliott Bob Evans Craig Everett Ernest Ewin Expressions Dance & Movement Enid Farrell Barbara Felix Tim Flood Erich Foeckler Theresa Yvette Ford Randee Friedman Joyce Fries Raymond Funk Marsha Gable Sonia Gahlhoff Barbara Gallego Pamela Garrett Thomas & Tange Gavin Mark Geisel Janet C. Gelb Nina Gibson Lisa Gibson Matthew & Susannah Giezentaner Barbara Gilchriest Barbara Gillespie Angelica Gish Michael Golden Louis Goldich Susan Gonda Laura Gordon Roger & Ann Graham Teresa Greenhalgh Manjit Grewal Ryan Griffith Megan L. Haber Roger & Beverly Haines Anne Hancock Marsha Harris W. Noel Haskins-Hafer Kimberlee Hedrick Edwin Hiel Betty Hennessy Dawn Heuft John W. & Joanne Higgins Leslie Oralee Holder Andrew Dickson & Karen Hollis Eugene Hubbard Tiffany Hungerford Susan Hunter Tate Hurvitz Jamie Lynn Ivers Linda Jensen Sue Jensen Jimbo’s John’s Automotive Care Lori J. Johnson Rita Juhasz Debbie Justeson Suzanne Kennedy Susan Knight Jonathan Kropp K’s Handbags Accessories and More Ralph & Tracy Kuss Jeff & Chris Lashment Robert Lauritzen J. Richard Lawrence Ledesmas Food

Mimi Lee Beth Leighton Rich Lewis Helen Liesberg Lolita’s Restaurants, Inc. Pearl Lopez Barbara Loveless Paul & Laurie Lovell Eric Lund Lyft Jane Lytle Lisa Maloy Sandra Mapp Mildred S. McAuley Tracy McDonald Brian P. & Ann A. McDonald Nancy McIntyre Catherine Melick Abdul & Patsy Mohamed Gabi Aliyev Eugenia Lu Montoya Mount Miguel Covenant Village James Mulvaney Jessica Murguia Betsy Murton-Mendoza Christina Naumanuf Bruce & Iris Nelson Patricia Nelson Erin Newkirk Myron & Kathryn Newland Gwen Nix Richard & Marilyn Nolan Robert Nolan Northrop Grumman Thomas W. & Susan Oertel Bonnie Oliverio On-Camera Audiences, Inc On the Border Joseph A. Orate Irene Palacios Martha Pat Palma Margo Parks Scott Patterson Tina Perez Michael Perez Marimix Genie Montoya San Diego Metropolitan Transit System Frances Pierce Frances L. Pierce Alexis Popko Eric Preibisius Lucy Price Quality Home Infusion Nadia Almaguer Ramirez Natalie Ray Rebel Soccer League Michael Reese Ray Reyes Reginald Reyes Susan M. Richardson Brian Rickel Bonnie Ripley Charles & Barbara Rizzo Denise Robertson William Roder Rosenbach Company, Inc. Rotary Club Of La Mesa Hossna Sadat Qais Sako

Lauren Sambrano San Diego Gas & Electric San Diego Association of Insurance Professionals San Diego Wine Company Thomas & Rosemarie Scanlan Lori Schick John & Eileen Schmitz Denise Schulmeyer Ronald & Francine Selim Malia Serrano Karl Sherlock Ryan Shumaker William & Sheila Siegel David & Shawn Skillin Ronald Smith Nancy S. Smith Veronica Smith Robert & Linda Snider Julio Soto Patricia Stanley Aaron Starck Kerrie-Ann Stidum Steele Canyon Golf Club Stone Brewing Co. Stuart Terry Auto Repair Chris Tarman Kay Van Tassell Sosha Thomas Leann Thompson Scott & Elaine Thornton Jeanenne Tietge Paula Tillery Jo Ann Tooley Dennis & Sandia Tuttle Under Armour Lauren Vaknin Diana Vance Katrina VanderWoude Sara Varghese Viejas Band of Kumeyaay Indians Tribal Council Mike Weinberg Kari Anne Wergeland Peter White Brenda Williams Valeri Wilson Wintergardens Smog & Tune Dianne Woodson Yelp Anthony Zambelli Myra Zimmerman

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OPENING DOORS

Governing Board Members Elena Adams Greg Barr Bill Garrett Edwin Hiel Debbie Justeson

Chancellor

Cindy L. Miles

Grossmont College President Nabil Abu-Ghazaleh

Cuyamaca College President Julianna Barnes

Vice Chancellors Tim Corcoran Sue Rearic John Valencia

8800 Grossmont College Drive El Cajon, CA 92020-1799 | (619) 644-7010 | gcccd.edu