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I came I saw I sewed

This booklet contains a masterplan and planting design for a new housing area in Kongens Lyngby called TrongĂĽrden, using embroidery as main media, and a discussion of how art and craft can be used in a contemporary technical landscape project. 1


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Master Thesis in Landscape Architecture Department of Geoscience and natural resource management Faculty v Science in collaboration with Sweco 30 ECTS Author: AnnaMia Lindblom czl518 Supervisior: Rikke Munck Petersen Date: 01.03.19 - 02.09.19

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Acknowledgements

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Tack till Rikke Munck Petersen(KU) for your courage, inspiration and support to get me out of my comfort zone and explore new things. Tack till Rikke Hedegaard Jeppersen (Sweco) & Marie Lene Aalund Balle (Sweco) for your support and sharing of your knowledge. Tack till My beloved family and friends for always being there through good and bad days.

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Abstract

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In this master thesis I have explored different ways that we can work as landscape architects. I have used a mix of media such as embroidery, photography, model, hand drawings and technical drawings to create new landscape designs for the engineer firm Sweco.

Piet Oudolf is a contemporary landscape designer who uses the ideology from the Arts and Crafts Movement. Oudolf creates landscape design that appears close to natural successions and looks at plants as individuals but also together as groups. I have made a field study of “Perennparken�, a park in Stockholm designed by Piet Oudolf, to get inspiration and learn from him. By using embroidery as a tool and working model I have developed a design proposal for a technical project.

Holism is a philosophy that states that every small part is connected, and dependent on each other, in order to create the bigger picture (Holtug 2017). Architects work more and more digitally and does this mean that we are missing something according to holism? Could a mix of media in a design project be a way to get more holistic results, and by doing that, give a more sustainable solution?

The purpose with this master thesis is not to be conservative and implying that we should go back and work only analogue. It should be understood as an antipole to digitalism, and as a reminder that the values of nature and aesthetics are important for the quality of life, given that humans are living organisms and part of the ecosystem as well.

The project embeds a methodological exploration as well as a historical research about the Arts and Crafts Movement. This movement was started as a critique against the industrial revolution at the time and this is comparable to the digital revolution that we are facing today. My conclusion is that the Arts and Crafts Movement’s ideas about nature and aesthetics and different working methods are still relevant today even though the progression started 120 years ago.

Hopefully this thesis can inspire collaboration between architects and engineers, and show that working with mixed media can be done while continue to use all benefits of the computer.

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List of contents

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Project structure, process and investigations P. 12 - 13

Project frame

P. 14 - 41

The Arts and Crafts Movement through history Site and assignment Metamethod

Registration, analysis & concept

P. 42 - 75

Registration #1 Embriodery notation map Masterplan strategy concept Registration #2 Embriodery notations Analysis and concept for planting design

Design process

P. 76 - 99

Hand sketch, sewing, Autocad, Embriodery Field study, plants and Piet Oudolf

Design propoasal

P. 100 - 141

Masterplan 1:10 000 Planting plan 1:500 Section A_a Section B_b Plantinglist and section Planting embirodery and plan

Discussion P. 142 - 145

Reflection P. 146 - 149

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Notes P. 150 - 151


Project structure and process The different colors are showing the different phases and the structure of the project. The dotted line is showing the process, meaning that the process is not linear, it is a procedure where I have gone back and forth through the different phases for learning and exploring new things that will end up in a design proposal.

Project frame

Registration, analysis & concepts

Structure

Investigations and mixed media Parallel with exploring a mix of media I have made investigations of Arts and Crafts through history and field trips to Perennparken in Stockholm which is designed by Piet Oudolf.

Production in mixed media

Investigations

March

April

Research about art and craft through history

May

Study trip to Perennpakren in Stockholm

Study trip to Perennparken in Stockholm

Photo registration #1

Embriodery notation map

Photo registration #2 Embridoery notation map/ conceptmodel Embirodery serial vision

Embriodery sketch

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Design process

Design propoasal

Process

June

July

Study trip to Perennparken in Stockholm

August

Study trip to Perennparken in Stockholm Piet Oudolf studies

Conclusion: Insperation and methodes to develope a planting list and planitng expression for the design proposal.

Design proposal in mix of media

Design in Autocad

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Project frame

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William Morris

Alphonse Muncha

Roberto Burle Marx

Bauhaus

Piet Oudolf

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Project frame The value of aesthetics and nature might be more important than ever since we are in a time were productivity and digitalism shape the world we live in. The working media and production of contemporary landscape architecture tend to get more and more digital and homogeneous, even though we know that we need to make projects that are sustainable, both for the environment and for people to live in. Sometimes modern projects get critique for not fitting in to its context or have a lack of human scale. The reason for that could be because of the way we work today. We might be missing some important aspects of landscape architecture such as history, context and the dynamic and aesthetics of nature, by working mostly digitally and separeted from the site by the computer screen. (Karberg, Bramsen & Houkjær 2019)

goes too fast for humans to coop with, and as a reminder of the importance of nature and aesthetics for the quality of life. (Karberg, Bramsen & Houkjær 2019)

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120 years ago the social movement Arts and Crafts started in England as a critique against industrialism and how things were produced during this time. However many of these thoughts keeps coming back repeatedly through history, as a critique when the development of society

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The landscape architecture profession has the pleasure to work with both nature and esthetics. Aesthetics is here understood as the expression of objects using all senses and how it makes sense to its context, not a personal meaning of what is beautiful or not.(Karberg, Bramsen & Houkjær 2019) William Morris, Alphonse Mucha, The school of Bauhaus, Roberto Burle Marx and the contemporary landscape designer Piet Oudolf are some designers and artists through history that I have used as inspiration and investigation to create a project frame for my project. What they have in common is their way of using art and craft in their design work and by observing and value botanical objects in detail and together as a combination that creates a pattern. Could there way of working give a more aesthetic and holistic result that also is more sustainable? (Karberg, Bramsen & Houkjær 2019)


The Arts and Crafts movement through history In this section I have looked closer into the Arts and Crafts movement to get inspiration on how to work with mixed media and how the tactile experience can be useful in a design process.

As a contrast to urbanization and people living in cities, Morris used natural motives such as classical English plants; nature elements that could be found in the country side but where not that common in cities. He painted regular plants individually and put them together in a bigger pattern, the result being a aesthetic pattern of nature. He is mostly famous for his flowering wall papers that were produced and sold for a reasonable prize, because he argued that beauty should be available for everybody, not only the wealthy since he strongly believed that aesthetics and nature were important for peoples living conditions.

The industrialism got its breakthrough in the 1800th century in England. With new machineries it was suddenly possible to mass produce and this created many new jobs. A huge amount of people moved in to cities to work in the new factories. It changed people’s life dramatically and even though more people got the chance to work, the health and life quality for the working class was a disaster. This was the starting point of the social movement Arts and Crafts in England, founded by William Morris (1834-1896). (Karberg, Bramsen & Houkjær 2019)

William Morris was a multi designer who used different medias such as painting, embroidery, textile, printing and writing. The embroideries Morris created were inspired by the Middle Ages and he used nature coloured textiles. Often females in his studio were making the embroideries out of silk wires. (Karberg, Bramsen & Houkjær 2019)

William Morris was a designer, artist and author that lived in England during this time. He came from a wealthy family but were critical to the change of society. With inspiration from the author John Ruskin who were one of the first ones to criticize the harsh working conditions of his time, William Morris successfully started the Arts and Crafts movement. Both Morris and Ruskin felt a strong resistance to mass production and with inspiration from Gothic and oriental style, Morris developed a new aesthetic style and a way to produce that were closer to handcraft than mass production. (Karberg, Bramsen & Houkjær 2019)

In the same time similar styles were developed in Europe. In France it was called Art Nouveau and was founded by the Czech artist Alphonse Mucha, who in the end of 18th century changed the street view of Paris with his 1:1 posters of female figures with botanical objects. The artists of Art Nouveau wanted to create art with a sensual expression. Art Nouveau were inspired by the German composer Richard Wagner (1813-1883) that combined music, scenography and drama to touch all senses. Wagner inspired and encouraged architects and artist to do the same. The aim was to combine media such as music, painting,

Arts and Crafts were a socialistic movement as well, where Morris questioned the way people were working in a monotonous way in the factories and how it affected their quality of life.

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sculpture and architecture, and in that way increase the quality of life for the average person.

In the early 19th century Walter Groupies (1883 – 1969) started the school Bauhaus with the similar philosophy as Arts and Crafts in England, but in a new style epoc; modernism. Groupies wanted to create a design school that looked at painting, sculpture and architecture as one single thing and work with all creative and artistic media in designing everything from furniture, buildings to textiles and lamps. Bauhaus became a huge success and Groupies educated many talented designers. Bauhaus had a textile workshop at the school, where only women where aloud to work. Their textiles were a great success.(Droste, 2019)

Mucha’s work was revoulutionary because he experimented with Photography in the process of making a poster. He photographed his models and did his painting after the photograph and thus did not need the women to be present while painting. This saved him money and also allowed him a higher production than in the earlier days. As Morris, Mucha also worshipped botanical objects and created new botanical patterns by painting plants in detail and putting them together into a bigger picture (Gether, Høbolt & Jalving, 2018)

John Ruskin

William Morris

Richard Wagner

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Aplhonse Mucha

Walter Groupies


Landscape architecture and Arts and Crafts Two examples of landscape architects that use Arts and Crafts as inspiration in their works are Roberto Burle Marx (1909-1994) and the contemporary landscape designer Piet Oudolf (1944 -).

You could argue that the way Burle Marx is thinking about landscape architecture is in a holistic approach, where he looks at city planning in the bigger scale, how cities are related, but also in detail in terms of flora and graphical expressions. According to Burle Marx art could be a working tool for landscape architects and a way of thinking and express life. (Burle Marx 2018)

Roberto Burle Marx was a modernistic artist and landscape architect from Brazil. He used painting and textile art as an important tool when he shaped city spaces. Many of his projects has a graphical expression where you clearly see the connection to his art works. Burle Marx mentions in one of his lectures some concerns about the development of landscape architecture. He claims that the present progression of urbanization is at the highest speed of all time. With new digital techniques and aids city planning happens at a too high speed at the cost of the human touch and spirit in the design. He says: “that we as planners and landscape architects need to understand the relationship between our aesthetic experiences and the social and historical context of our time”. (Burle Marx 2018)

Art integrates with life; it is a way of thinking and of acting

He also says that the landscape architect’s work consists of considering cities’ history, its relation to other cities, popular open spaces and its pros and negatives. The role as a landscape architect is being an organiser of city space, emphasize its beauty and mark out solutions with a scientific knowledge about ecology and flora. (Burle Marx 2018) He discusses contemporary art and urbanism separately to make it easier to understand but he argues that these are not two separated worlds, nevertheless it is often how they get represented.

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One relevant contemporary landscape designer that are using the Arts and Crafts approach in planting design is the Dutch landscape designer Piet Oudolf. He has become famous for his way to design with plants with inspiration from natural successions and by studying their natural habitats, he has developed a characteristic way to design landscapes that has a natural and aesthetic expression through all seasons.

an Arts and Crafts painter that had to change media to landscape design because she developped problems with her eyesight (Jekyll & Weaver 1981). Planting by blocks gives a clear expression and the different species are divided from each other. It is a controlled expression and do not resemble how plants would grow in a natural habitats. In the book by Oudolf Burle Marx is also mentioned as an important landscape designer who developed landscape design in a modernistic context. The modernistic expression did though simplify plantings and in the 1970s a more ecological approach to plants were developed and used. This was done for example by professor Richard Hansen of Weihenstephan, who studied plant communities and used that in landscape design.(Oudolt & Kingsbury 2013, pp. 29)

In his designs he looks at plants as individuals that have an architecture and a special character but also how they appear together as groups and in combination with other plants. The result is almost like a painting, were the different heights, colours and textures of the plants brings a depth and unity to the landscape. He also values how plants changes through the year and select plants that for example have a sculptural shape during winter, to make designs that are interesting all year around. (Oudolf & Kingsbury 2013, pp. 29)

By inspiration from these former landscape designers Oudolf has developed his own way of designing with plants. (Oudolf & Kingsbury 2013, pp. 29)

His way of designing with plants is comparable to the way Morris and Mucha created patterns of botanical objects. The result is a flower pattern that has a clear unity and expression, though the media they are using are different.

I have studied his principals in this project and used them in a concrete way in my own design proposal for my site; Trongården. I have also made a field study where I have visited “Perennparken” in Stockholm which is designed by Piet Oudolf. This will be explained on page 82 - 95 in the design process section.

In the book “Planting: A new perspective”, p. 29, Oudolf explains the development of planting design through history and how it had its starting point with Arts and Crafts: the English planting designer Gertrude Jekyll (1843-1932) developed a planting style where perennials are planted in blocks. Jekyll was originally

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Time line

Changes of society Arts and Crafts Landscape designers

1900

2000 Richard Hansen (1912 - 2001 )

Gertude Jekyll (1843-1932) Bauhaus

Industrial revolution (1760 - 1840)

Modernism

Climate changes

Roberto Burle Marx (1909 - 1994)

Digital revolution Piet Odoulf (1944 - )

Arts and Crafts movement William Morris (1834 -1896)

A time line showing big changes of society and the development of Arts and Crafts, and how it has affected landscape architecture through history.

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I find a lot of inspiration from all these movements in my project, both in the way of thinking concerning the value of nature and aesthetics for the quality of life, and how a mix of media can help you to express different dimensions, but also in the way the Arts and Crafts movement studied plants in detail and then put them togther to a bigger picture, which could be a way to understand holism. I would also like to discuss and refer to the school of Bauhaus, that had the philosophy of looking at architecture, art and sculpture as one single thing. Here I would like to point out the differences between building architecture and landscape architecture by the materials we are designing with; buildings are made of harsh material such as wood, stone or bricks, it has a sculptural shape and it is stiff. Landscape architects are working with plants, water and soil, organic materials that are dynamic and changes over the year but also through time. But most relevant here; plants and vegetation have a texture, it can for example be soft, hard or sticky. Plants have natural colours with different nuances and the colours changes through the year. Piet Oudolf explains how plants have an architecture by looking at them induvially, but when you put them together in groups the plants gets different structures as well. One way to express all these dimensions of plants that I have found during my landscape architecture studies is by using wires to sew them, this is called: embroidery. I will explain closer about embroidery and how I use it as a metamethod in this master thesis on page 41.

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Holism and sustainablity This project is mostly a practical project where I have focused on exploration and experimentation of working with different media and reflection of my own process through the different phases. I have not studied or gotten any deeper into the theoretical parts of holism and ecology.

Holism is a philosphy in ecology meaning that every small part is important and should be understood as they are all depended and connected to each other, that together creates the bigger picture. In an ecological and sustainable approach the human nature also is a part of the bigger picture and in a etical point of view should not be seen as something outside the ecosystem. One of the 17 UN goals is about sustainable cities and communities; UN goal number 11: Make cities inclusive, safe, resilient and sustainable. We need to work and think in a more holistic way to get more sustainable cities, cities that add a higher life quality for people living in it. One question is therefor: What does this mean to the design phase and the way we work as landscape architects? Today engineers and architects often work separately with different working methods and the technical side gets separated from the artistic methods, even though you could argue that the different methods say the same things just in different ways. Donna Haraway, professor at University of California says in her book about ecology; Playing String Figures with Companion Species: Staying with the Trouble: “It means something which media we use to create new media, and it means something which story we tell to tell new stories.�

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�

It means something which media we use to create new media, and it means something which story we tell to tell new stories.

�

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Site and assignment

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Hjortekær

I got the assignment from Sweco; Department of water and energy, that are working with the storm water management of a new housing area in Trongården. The storm water solution Sweco has proposed is landscape based and it means that the landscape proposal has potential to be recreational as well. Arkitema has designed the architecture of the new housing area.

Trongården

Trongården is the name of the site that Sweco is working with. Trongården is a part of a bigger area called Hjortekær. 27


Municipality of Lyngby-Taarbæk Trongården is located in the municipality of Lyngby-Taarbæk, Kongens Lyngby. Hjortekær is the name of the area that is located between DTU and Dyrehaven.

Kongens Lyngby

1 km

2 km

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DTU

Hjortekær

Dyrehaven

Trongården

1:30 000

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Proposal by Arkitema On the westside of Dyrehaven, next to Helsingørmotorvej a new housing area called Trongården will be built. It is an area of the total size of approximately 80 000 m2 (almost the same size as Ørestedsparken in Copenhagen) and will be 17 blocks of 1-3 floor chain houses made of lightyellow brick stones and some of the houses has green roofs as a climate value. Arkitema have designed the architecture.

The proposal is to build a new main road that have a S shape. This will be the entrance to the new high school on the west side and the leading road to smaller paths that leads to the houses. Between the houses there will be green spaces shifted by pavement spaces. To reduce the noise from the highway there is placed a soundproof wall that will be covered by vegetation. (Arkitema 2018)

Green elements between the houses shifting between pavement areas.

The housing area are located next to Helsingørmotorvej

Pictures from: https://trongården.dk

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Plan over the new housing area

Helsingørmotorvej

New high school

Green spaces left for Sweco to make a storm water solution

New main road

Existing houses

Soundproof wall covered with vegetation

Green roofs

Klampenborgvej

30 m

1:1000

60 m

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Technical solution by Sweco Sweco have the assignment to design a storm water solution for this area. On the east side of the houses, next to TrongĂĽrdsparkvej there is a stripe of green space left over where Sweco have come with the solution of placing sediment bassins and storm water boxes. The landscape here has potential to be more than just a technical construction, it can also be a recreative area and add qualities to the site. In the green stripes between the houses Sweco has decided to put rain water gardens that can transport the rain water from the surrounding roofs. On the west side close to the new high school are some space left as well for a sediment basin.

The plants that can grow in the sediment bassin are plants that can handle both moisture and salt. Plants that normally grow close to coast areas and oceans are recommended. The slope of the basin should not be more than 1:5 in order to avoid that the construction of the soil collapsing.(Sweco). Rain garden is a slope with plants that help to soak in rain and roof water. With the right selection of plants, a rain garden can add biodiversity to an area. Storm water boxes are placed under the soil surface and can handle rain water. They can be placed both under roads and under green areas.

A sediment bassin is an excavation that can store rain water and water from roads. This means that polluted and salted water during winter times will be led to the bassin. The water level of the bassin is dynamic, but it needs to have a permanent water level in order to let the sediments sink into the ground. Every 10th year the bassin will be emptied and maintained. This is a way to keep track of the polluted sediments, so they are not accidentally lead into to the drinking water. To make the drain easier the sediment bassin should also entail a smaller bassin that is called forth bassin. This is where most of the sediments are collected. By adding plants in the basin, the technical solution gives the area a recreational quality.

Three storm water solutions:

Sediment bassin Rain gardens Perennial beds over storm water boxes

Drawing from: Sweco

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Techincal drawing from Sweco department of Water & energy, showing the pipes and landscape design for handeling rain water.

1:1000 30 m

60 m

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Future plans for the context area The Technical University of Denmark (DTU) is positioned on the west side of Helsingørmotorvej and is in a constant development and this will change the area of Hjortkær. DTU campus have in 2018 published a strategy guideline for future developments of the university area. DTU is famous for its characteristic landscape identity made up by the long tree alleys that create long axes from north to south and west to east. In the strategy plan for future development of the DTU area it is said that the landscape should stand as an contrast to the homogenious architecture. Because of the closeness to Trongården the future development of the DTU area will affect the area. (DTU Campus service 2018)

In he future the DTU area will expand to the east into the area of Hjortkær. Dyrehaven has sold off 140 000 km2 of their land to Novozymes, a biotechnical company. The plan for this area is to build a new science center that is named Novozymes Innovation. Vilhelm Lauritzen are the architects behind and GHB have designed the landscape. The plan is to make a nature park with focus on keeping the existing landscape qualities of the area. (GHB 2019)

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DTU Campus Dyrehaven

New science center and landscape park

TrongĂĽrden

1:10 000 35


My assignment and demarcation

Research question This project has been done by using a mix of media, embirodery being one of the main media with the reseacrh questions that has driven the project:

My task is to come up with a recreative landscape design for the area using plants. I have used the same technical solutions as Sweco and placed the three constructions on the equal places as the original proposal. However, I have not investigated deeper into the technical issues other than supervision from my colleagues at Sweco, and by that adapted my design ideas and selection of plants from their requirements. I have not calculated the exact water volumes in the shapes of the sediment bassins, other than designed them in a size close to the proposal from Sweco.

Can technical drawings and embroidery in combination be a way to explore statics and dynamics, materialities and immaterialities, physical and abstract readings of a project? Can the way to understand and design a new housing area in Lyngby with plants be affected by the working method and media?

I have analysed and studied the entire area of HjortekĂŚr, not only the site within the contract borders. This has lead me to a master strategy for HjortekĂŚr based on analysis from my registrations of the area.

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Definitions of different media in landscape architecture. In the field of landscape architecture, we work with different media. From registration to a concrete design proposal there are different ways to work. Professionally it often goes down to a more digital way of working and the technical drawing is often what a project ends up with. Here are some definitions of the different media:

Photo is a way to registration a site and help to remember how it looked like in the design phase. In photoshop photos can be manipulated and showing design ideas for the site. Drawing is often used in notations and designing. It is important to be able to show ideas to others but also to yourself as an architect. The drawing is also forming the spaces.

The technical drawing is a flat computer drawing showing the actual situation and design proposal in a very concrete way. Pragmatic circumstances such as terrain, roads and houses are being shown in the technical drawing in a stylistic way. The technical drawing is important in communication with engineers and builders that will make the project to reality.

Model is a physical sculpture showing the situation and the design. It should all be in scale and in 3D. It makes the spatial dimensions more clear compare to drawings and photo that are in 2D. The media I am adding: Embroidery is a way to draw in 3 D. Using embroidery in landscape architecture could be a tool for to desiging with plants and show colours, textures and combination.

Understanding landscape architecture is also understand immaterial such as history of a site, atmosphere and bodily experiences. Other media in the field can help to do so, both in registration, understanding and communication.

Embroidery might also be a way to transform the impressions and experiences after a registration of a site, since the way of working is slow and conscious.

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Landscape architecture is also about making something fit into an already existing context...

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Made by artist Celia Pym

... just like mending the holes in an old sweater.

Pictures from: Wellesley - Smith Claire (2015)

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Metamethod

Here is one example of an embroidery map, the wooden circle is the embroidery frame.

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What is embroidery and why do I use it Embroidery is an old handcraft where you use a thread to sew detailed decorations. You could say you are drawing with a thread and making a drawing 3 D since the thread has another surface then a paper. The threads I am using is made of cotton and can be found in different colours. They are bind together in 6 thinner threads and by separate them you can experiment with different thickness of the stiches and different expressions, I normally use 1-3 threads. It is important that the fabric is spanned so it does not get fold, to do that you use an embroidery frame that is a circle shaped frame that you install on the fabric. The frame helps you also to focusing while you are working, can be comparable to a loupe.

where I reflect on the work or the site, and then continue the sewing. I started sewing taking a course on my second year of landscape architecture studies. I was trying to draw a special landscape situation, but I was not satisfied by the result using just a pen. I had some yarn laying on my table and saw that the colour of the yarn was almost identic with the plants I would like to try to express. So, I tried to sew it and the result gave me more to the understanding of the site situation then a drawing. There was something with the fabric and the plants that were connected. There was also something in the sewing process that made me more mindful and connected to the site I was working with. Sewing is a way to step in to the map or site and revisit it.

I prefer to sew out of intuition, meaning that I don’t draw on the fabric and sew after, I just start to sew and by using my senses instead of thinking the motive appears on the fabric. It is a mindful session and while sewing I try to reimaging/picture the site or landscape I have visit or are creating. Colours and different stiches is helping to re-express the site.

In every step of this project I have used embroidery as a metamethod. So in every section in this booklet I will reflect on the sewing process, how and why I used it and what came out of it.

When I sew, I think of it as a drawing. The stiches of the embroidery compare to lines on a drawing but pops out of the fabric and the “embroidery drawing� gets a surface with different textures that you can physically feel, just as plants. The sewing has a depth, not only visually but also by touching it. I take some small breaks (often when I must change thread) while I am sewing and sense the sewing with my hands to feel how I should continue the sewing. You could say that the small break is a pause

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Registration, analysis & concept

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One example of a situationist counter map by Guy Debor and Asger Jørn 1957, created by drifting around in Paris after the second world war.

Pictures from: ((Morris & Voice, 2015)

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Registration, analysis & concept The registration method is similar to the way the Situationisterne drifted around cities in the 60’s.

I started the project with excursions and photo registrations of the site. It was early in March and I did not know much about the area except from the name and the technical plan that had gotten from Sweco. I biked to the site two different times and with several assignments. The purpose was to get the landscape identities of the site and its context under my skin, that later would lead to findings that is the foundation for my concept and design proposal. While at the site, I was strolling or biking around out of intuition. This type of registration method is comparable to the way the situationists (1957 – 1972) made maps of urban situations by drifting around intuitive and not by calculating (Morris & Voice, 2015). Here in a landscape context and instead of using collage technique, embroidery in combination with drawings has been used.

” ”

Back home again I used the embroidery as a notation and reimagination tool, the sewing and registration in collaboration, works to collect the experience and memory of the sight, it is a way to make the registration/understanding process physical, meaning that when I take the time to sew I also slow down the whole process of getting to know a site and its a way to work in a more conscious way. What I get out of it, other than learning, is a physical product in form of an embroidery drawing/map that is useful later in the design process. After an excursion I got many impressions from the site both physically and intellectually. One way to express and conclude the pressions is to use my hands by sewing, because there are many things I know in my hands. In that way the method is more aesthetic then computer drawing since the approach is more sensual than intellectual, and as mentioned before aesthetics here is about using all senses in the expression.

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Photo registration #1 04.03.19 Discover the different landscape identites of the area that is around the site.

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The biking route:

14. 13.

12.

16.

ĂŚr

sv

DTU

ej

15.

ort

Dyrehaven

6.7. 9. 8. TrongrĂĽden

Hj

5.

ek

11. 10. 4.

3. Hjortedam

Klampenborgvej 2.

1. Odrup mose

1:30 000 1 km

2 km

The numbers on the map is refering to the pictures on next page.

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1.

2.

3.

4.

5.

6.

7.

8.

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9.

10.

11.

12.

13.

14.

15.

16.

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Hjortedam

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The purpose of this excursion was to make a registration of the contexts of Trongården in the bigger scale, focusing on the different landscape identities in the area.

in to this area gave another spatial experience were birds were singing and biodiversity were rich. On the other side of the area stood 10 horses on the field. School children were passing by, going home from Trongårds skolen (10).

On the way to Trongården I past a wet area and dramatic terrain with old beech forest. I made my first stop on Klampenborgvej and took a picture of Odrup Mose (picture 1 & 2), located as a wetland valley between the terrain and beech forest. The road where dividing the landscape in two parts. I continued biking and the road crooked and became steeper, I where surrounded by big beech trees and steep terrain (3). After biking through the forest, the landscape opened again and 1-2 housing blocks where on my right side and a sign that said Trongården. I turn right and into the street Trongårdsparken. Biked down hill though a plane alley and reached my site destination, a flat open landscape with high grass and the highway and high houses as background (4).

West of the highway I biked to DTU were long axes of trees were planted, almost like a highway of trees. An enormous wall of brick stone inframed the campus and big pillow trees in the same orange colour were planted inside of the wall and they were pointing up to the sky (13, 14) Biking on Hjortkærsvej I found on the east side an old fort that is called Fortuna fort that use to be a military area build 1920 (15). The fort where leading to Dyrehaven and I stepped in to a enormous beech forest with 300 years old trees where time stood still and no buildings, cars or humans where in site. Back home again I made an embroidery map that worked as a notation and a map of the different landscapes. It took me three full days to sew the map and while doing that I reflected on the excursion and the impressions of the area. In this process I learned a lot about the area and got it under my skin, since I have had sewed it. The map is in 1:10 000 and by using different colours of the thread I try to express the different vegetations. The light green colour is for beech trees that symbolize Dyrehaven that is a huge monoculture that lies close to Trongården. Today the area of Trongården is a field of high grass and north of it his horse marks with short grass. By using one thread and longer stiches I sewed the high grass and gave it an identity on the map.

I came to a beautiful alley of Plane trees that stood clear aligned on the street with, they had an orange coloured stem this day, that got more significant on a rainy day.(7) I noticed that more plane trees were planted in the area and it gave the area special identity that could be associated with street views of the south of Europe or America. (6) In the corner of Trongårdsvej and Hjortkærvej were a giant white circled shaped water tower that appears almost like a space station then a water tower (9). The landscape around the water tower differed from its context. High and wild trees grove there and covered almost the water tower. Pioneer spices such as pine trees and birch. Steeping

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Big field with short grass

Alley trees in long axes at DTU

DTU

HjortkĂŚr

Dyrehaven

Site

Monocultural beech forest

High grass

Plane tree alley

Embroidery notation map Orginally in 1:10 000 Scaled down here 52


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Ho

rs

Trongårdsskolan

rds

rdspark Trongå

SITE

vej

en

en Trongå

Trongå

rdspark

rdspark

en

ngå

ken

Helsing

Tro

Trongårdspar

ørmoto

rvej

Water tower

Trongårdsparken

Klampenborgvej

Hvidegårdsparken Hvidegårdsparken

Hvidegårdsparken

Hvidegårdsparken Hvidegård

Hvidegårdsparken

Hvidegårdsparken

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es


ve j ær s tk Hj or

Dyrehaven

Dyrehavengård

ej

sv

rd

ej

on

Tr

Trongårdsv

Photo registration #2 26.03.19 Discover the lansdscape and plants of the context area with special focus on the private gardens close to Trongården.

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1:4000


1.

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9.

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13.

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One of the Plane tree alleys at TrongĂĽrdsparken

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The second registration I started by walking from the Fortuna hotel (2) that is located by the entrance of Dyrehaven (3). On the vest side of Dyrehaven is a road named Trongårdsvej, I decided to discover that path and see if it was leading to my site. During the stroll I passed a copse with Beech trees (6) and old big houses with wooden details in different pastel colours (5), probably built in the early 19th century. I met different animals; chickens that where left loose, dog walkers with their dogs and horses that belonged to Dyrehaven gård (7). The area were calm and it felt like I suddenly were on the country side of Denmark.

here and listen to the birds singing and observed the tower. It was made of wood and not higher then a tree. Wild vegetation such as ivy were growing up on the wooden tower (8) After crossing Hjortekærsvej I came to the newer housing area of Trongården that was built in the 40’s. On my right side I had the big water tower that I seen on my earlier visit (9), and on my left side were only 1 floored brick houses (10 – 15). I noticed a change in scale, they were low and almost hidden by private bushes and trees. It was hard to orientate in the area even though the houses were not identic. I stepped in to the housing area and walk around observing discretely the different vegetations such as taxus bushes and trees, cypres bushes and birch trees on the private gardens. Again, I noticed how the plane trees stood out from the rest of the area with their sculptural shape pointing up to the sky and characteristic stem.

The road was crooked, and it made me curious of what would come on the other side of the bend. None of the houses were similar and it was exciting to explore this area. I past Dyrehavengård that was an old white building with horses connected to the house. Then I passed an older wooden water tower. I took a slight pause

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Serial vision embriodery Back home I started to sew again. This time I made two embroideries, one abstract serial vision where I expressed by sewing notations from the path I walked on Trongürdsvej from Dyrehaven to the newer housing area. By doing this I could note the changes of scale and atmosphere I had noticed during my stroll. I did this all out of intuition and in abstraction, meaning that I didn’t draw on the fabric before I started to sew. I let the needle and the touch of my hand decide where to put the needle. It gave me a freer mindful access to my experience of the site. I where sewing from my body not from my head and doing that by using the haptic asset and penetrate the needle through the fabric. Afterwards I took a pen to complete on some spots and draw some words on the fabric.

Process photos of the serial vision, I was looking at pitcures for help to remeber.

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Site

The way I walked

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Notations New time area: built in the 40’s, a clear shift in scale from the east side, houses are very similar, hard to oriantate

Country side qulities, silent big scaled houses in differen dog walkers, free chickens w around and horses at Dyreha

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area with nt colors, walking avengĂĽrd.

Walking direction through the registration

Fortunen Hotel in the entrance of the forest of Dyrehaven, gigant 300 years old trees with brown stems. A different scale from the rest of the area.

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Serial vision drawing After the embroided serial vision I did a drawing where I pointed out the abstract notations and drawed them in a more concrete way, this to point out exactly what I saw on the stroll. The drawing is supposed to make the embroidery easier to understand and by looking at the colours the embroidery can be translated to the drawing.

Water tower

Leading to site

Big house from 40’s houses of Trongürden, 1 floor orange bricks

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Old water tower

Big house with wooden details DyrehavengĂĽrd

TrongĂĽrds

vej

m early 19th century

Fortunen hotel in the entrance to the forest of Dyrehaven 65


Concept model embroidery The other embroidery I did after this registration was a plan view in 1:2000 of the housing area on TrongĂĽrdsparken. I tried to sew the small-scale houses and their garden. This was more about getting the area under my skin, just at the first map I sewed the big scale. Here I took the chance to experiment with a combination of medias. I painted the roads with acryl colours and a pen and sewed the houses and vegetation. When I was finished with sewing the expression of the importance of the plane trees were missing in the embroidery. So by putting the fabric on a piece of wood and glue model trees the embroidery turned into a concept model where it got clearer how the plane trees are identity given to the site and are leading into the new housing area (my site).

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Process of the concept model. The finished concept model can be seen on the next

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ej gør mo torv

dsparke Trongår

Trong

årdsp

SITE

n

arken

Hel sin

v

Klampenborgvej

Conceptmodel showing the housing area next to the site and the plane alleys.

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Trongår n

dsparke

n

dsparke

Trongår

Trongårdsvej

Trongårdsparken

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kæ sve

rte

Hjo

Water tower


Analysis and conclusions The second registration made it clear to me that the site of Trongården consist a lot of cultural history that has been disappereaed in the development of the area, and the only thing that remains are the names on the streets; “Trongårdsvej” and “Trongårdsparken”.

valued landscape identities with big landscape tracks; DTU and Dyrehaven. DTU is famous for its long tree alleys and Dyrehaven is an enormous monoculture, also with long axes. What is interesting about Hjortekær is that it is the same size as both these areas and it has its own landscape identities when you look at the existing plane tree alleys. However, what I observed while working, was that none of these identities and the history of the area has been noticed in the professional world and the proposal from Arkitema looks like a low scale housing area that is anonymous and can be built anywhere.

I tried to figure out what “Trongården” was. Where is the farm from the name? I asked my colleagues at Sweco but nobody really knew, and the earliest historical maps I could find were from 1800s and on that map are there no farm at the site. I contacted the municipality of Lyngby Taarbak and got the answer that there was a farm in 1778 but it got sold to Dyrehavengård. The name Trongården remains from a tumulus named “Trunhøj” that used to be at the area, but no remains of the yard or the tumulus can be found today. (Wahl P, 1992)

Around the site Trongården are different landmarks as well, in forms of big scaled volumes: the water tower, the Erimtage Castle for example. These volumes work as landmarks. Could a landmark in form of a big scaled volume add a landmark to Hjortekær? Maybe a landmark that gives back the history to the site.

In the 1940s the modernistic housing blocks where built and the plane trees were planted, and the streets got its name “Trongårdsparken” but there is no existing park in the area.

Therefor this project consist a masterplan strategy for the area of Hjortekær and a design proposal for Trongården. The concept is to give the history back to the site and give the area places that fits is existing names.

Looking at the findings from the first registration the area of Hjortekær is located between two characteristic and high

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The history of Trongården

1778 It has not been possible to find a map of Trongården but there was a farm named Trongården and a tumulus named Trunhøj.

1842 -1899 The yard was sold to Dyrehavengård and removed.

1953 -1971

1953 -1971 The new housing are built and plane trees were planted at the area of Trongården and gave the streets the name “Trongårdsparken”.

Målforhold Dato © Styrelsen for Dataforsyning og Effektivisering

1:10000 20-03-2019

Signaturforklaring

Topogr. kort 1953-1976

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Masterplan strategy concept for Hjortekær The concept for the master strategy is to plant more plane tree allyes through the whole of Hjortekærsvej and on the roads that goes across. Some of these roads are connection roads between DTU and Dyrehaven. The role of the landscape strategy for Hjortekær is to be the link between the old and new. Without a masterplan for this area it seems like the urban development will divide the area into different fragments and it might loose its cultural history identy that has a high value. To add a landmark to the area in form of a volume the proposal is to place a big tumulus in the left over green space between Helsingørmotorvej and Klampenborgvej. This is in the entrance of Hjortekær and side by side by Trongården. In that way the new tumulus can be a landmark that communicates that you are entering the area of Hjortekær. The trees on the tumulus should be plane trees to highlight the landscape identity of the area. The tumulus will be named “Tronhøj” referring to its history.

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Eksisitng landmark and volume, Erimatge slotet

The tree axes of DTU

New plane tree alleys

The monoculture of Dyehaven

Eksisitng landmark and volume, water tower

TrongĂĽrden

Eksisiting plane tree alleys

New landmark: adding a tumulus as landmark and volume to the landscape.

Masterplan stratedgy concept mixed media: drawing and embridoery. The drawing is exisiting and the sewing is the proposal. The drawings in the circles are landmarks volumes, both existing and the proposal.

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Concept for the planting design of Trong책rden The concept for the planting design of Trong책rden is to look at the whole area as a park that should be valued for not only the people living in the new housing area but also worth to visit by people living close to the area. The park will be named Trong책rdsparken. In the shaping of planting beds, I have look at the shape of a tumulus that is a circle and work with a circle morphology for the planting beds. The trees that will be planted are mainly plane trees that will be placed in rows along the park, in that way continue the existing plane tree structures. Trong책rdsparken will be are connected to the new landscape park (GHB)north of the site as well.

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Circle shaped perennialbeds

Plane trees in rows

Tronhøj

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The morphology of a tumulus A tumulus is a landscape element from the middle ages and can be found at many places around the world. It is a small hill that is a graveyard and often has trees on top of it. With insperation from the circular shape of the tumulus I have developed the morpholgy of the planting beds in TrongĂĽrdsparken.

Example of a Tumulus

Plan view

Circle shape

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First sketch, exploring how the circle shape can be connected to each other.

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Design process

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Embriodery as a tool to communicate and explore different planting expression.

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Design process In the design process I have gone back and forth between different media to investigate different aspects of the design.

In the design process I have used several types of media to study and try out different things in the design. After deciding on a concept for the design I started by sketching circles connected to each other with a pen on tracing paper. Then I went over to sewing again, in that way I was slowing one idea down, meaning that I looked closer to one idea and saw how I could develop that specific idea instead of doing a brainstorm with plenty ideas. I painted the new housing area in scale 1:500 on a fabric, then I sewed a similar circle pattern on the spaces between the houses. By different threads and stiches, I tried to figure out which surface should be used in forms of vegetation, for example cut grass, perennials or trees. The first idea was to place smaller circle shaped hills in the area, inspired by a tumulus. However, that idea changed since that

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would also add a small-scale design, which I had found that from the analysis was not what the area needed. So, by scaling the circle patterns up and working with bigger shapes in the area that could work as a contrast to the small chain houses that are already in a small scale. Now I got to the point where sewing were too time consuming for further development and definition of the design. So, by scanning the embroidery sketch and open it in Autocad the next drawings of the design were made. Here to use the benefits from a computer in terms of being able to scale up and down and try different things fast, but all with the starting point from a handmade sketch. By drawing the pattern from the embriodery sketch in Autocad and triyng to transform the pattern to spaces the design where developed. The computer program is useful in deciding size and to draw more precis.


After a while I got frustrated again to work on the computer since the drawing is totally flat and it is hard to understand the different surfaces. I felt diconnected to the shapes and missed to feeling of having it in my hands. I printed out the computer drawing and drew it in hand again, to define surfaces and feel the shapes in my hand. Then I got back to the computer to finish the design in computer. The change of media helped me get further with the design by going back and forth between digital and handwork and try out different shapes. After a while a design proposal came was developed. According to me, there is always a challenge in the step when you need to transform an abstract idea to a concrete design, but the to start with the abstraction is helpful for your creativity and then looking at the physical and technical restrictions is a way to shape the abstract idea to a concrete design. So after shifting in medias I looked up technical restrictions, such as steepness of the sediment basin, where to put rain gardens etc, and that helped me to make the design concrete. In the detailing phase, deciding the expression of plants I used Piet Oudolf as field study in combination with embroidery as a help to understand and try out different plant expressions it terms of colour and texture combination.

Hand skecth, connecting circles

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Plane trees

Cut grass Perennial beds

Embridoery sketch, working with surfaces

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Working with embriodery, Autocad and hand drawings

2. Scale up the pattern in Autocad.

1. Scan in embirodery and open it in Autocad and draw the shapes by computer.

4. Zoom in and out to define areas.

3. Transform the abstract pattern to concrete landscape spaces.

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5. Print out the Autocad drawing and draw surfaces in hand.

6. Explore the shape by hand again.

7. Go back to Autocad to make the design concrete by looking in to technical restrictions.

8. The design proposal in Autocad.

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Field study

During the project I have looked closer into how Piet Oudolf uses plants in his design by reading the book “Planting: and new perspective” written by Piet Oudolf and Noel Kingsbury. I have also done a field trip to “Perennparken” in Stockholm four times from March to July for inspiration and to experience an example of a planting design by Piet Oudolf and how the planting expression and experience changes through different months. After studying the planting plan and plant list from the Perennparken I have gotten inspiration and a better understanding of how to create a design with plants and getting a similar expression as Piet Oudolf’s, but also with help from the embroidery I could create my own expression of a planting design.

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Example of a natural sucession at Bispebjerg, Copenhagen

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Plant principales from Piet Oudolf In the book it is described how a planting design can be planted by blocks or by a mix, for example by seeds. It is also possibly to get a mixed expression by using block planting by selecting few species and repeat them in a certain pattern. To get the mix of plants right, wether you plant in block or by seed, you need to think about the architecture of the plants. (Read more on page 92 - 94)

distinguish from the rest of the plants. It’s important that they are visually interesting until autumn as a minimum. Companion plants are used for colour or foliage color. They are planted to create a structural interest and need to have in interesting structure from early in the season, but after mid-summer they should be formless. Ground-cover plants should take up 50% of the mix and can include Geophytes or bulbs. They are used to make the garden interesting throughout the year. The individual plant does not have to be interesting all through the year, but the mix of ground plants must be interesting thoughout the year. Using plants that have a sculpture shaped flush can be a way make sure this is optained. (Oudolf & Kingsbury 2013)

He categorizes plants in the design by different structural elements that creates a coherency. It structural plants, companion plants, ground cover plants. Structure plants should only be 5-15 % of the mix and their purpose is to add a visually interesting feature. It can be more than just the colour, it can be the height or that they have a clear identity that

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Oudolf describes that the planting vision today is to make a design with an expression that is close to natural habitats, and in that way the planting design is more sustainable and need less maintainance. To succeed with that you should consider these elements in the design: - A Mixture: Natural plant communities are often mixtures of wildflower and grasses, not orderly organized as in traditionally gardens. - Diversity: a great diversity of species is often seen in the natural habitats. - Complexity: the number of species is complexed. - Change: their appearance changes through the year. - Coherence: even though the plants grove in a complex way it is a clear coherence among the plants. It gives a sense of unity. - Coherence: even though the plants grow in a complex way there should be a clear coherence it is a clear coherence among the plants as it creates a sense of unity. - Distinction: Some plants must distinct themselves (structure plants) from the mass to create a graphical unity and quality that sets them apart from the mass. That way the mass and the structure plants

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Block planting

Mix of planting be seed

By using structural plants; characteristic plants, a planting design can get a graphic expression.

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Embriodery and plantning expressions I have used this field study and investgation as insperation to create a planting design for TrongĂĽrden. Here I have used embroidery as a tool to develop and communcate a plant combination expression and pattern. Instead of only use abstract symbols on a plan I used the benefits from the

wire and used different colours and stiches that imitates the plants closer to how they look and appear. By that method it is easier to understand and communicate the expression of the planting design, the result is almost like a visualisation, section and plan combined.

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Photo from the book “Plantning a new perspective”

Translate a planting expression to an embriodery To learn how to translate a plantning expression to an embirodery I started with trying to sew one of the pictures from the book by Oudolf. During this process I explored how I could use the wire and mix with different color combinations and thickness to get a expression close to nature. This investagation has been usful for my outforming of the planting design for Trongården that can be read in the design proposal section. 92


Embriodery translation of the photo.

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Planting strategy in Perennparken On the plan of Perennparken Oudolf have placed different plant combination at different areas of the planting beds. So, when you walk through the park the experience and expression of the plants are shifting and it makes it exciting to walk around in the park.

using the amount of structural plants, combination plants and groundcover plants as mentioned above. So, in the design proposal for TrongĂĽrden I have created different plan combinations and put them on different spaces in the planting bed. (Oudolf & Kingsbury 2013)

The combination of plants is by using the principle of

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Plant list from Perennparken

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March:

April:

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June:

July:

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Architecture of Perennials

A

B

C

D

E

F

G

H

I

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Linear basal leaves (A,B) Called by botanist monocotyledons. Are plants with linear leaves that arise from the base of the plant. The leaves can work as a strcutural element in its own. Exapmle of plant: Iris, Liriope and

Dierama

Broad basal leaves (C,D,E) Useful ground cover plants, since they have leaves that arises from ground level and cover ground. Example of plants: Helleborus, Hosta and Epimedium

Emergents -

lower stem leaves predominant, strong stem

(F,G)

The leaves are on the base of the plant and flowers grows on an upright stem. Can add a graphical effect when flowering, in combination with lower plants can be used as strucutral plants. Example of plants: Verbascum, Digitalis and Cephalaria.

Leafy mounds -

lower stem leaves predominant, weak stem

(G,H,I)

These plants form them self after their enviorment and in that way can be seen as formless. They are useful as filler plants. Their flowers can be used to add a graphical caulity to the design by the color of their flowers, but not used as a graphical structural plant. Example of plants: Gernaium, Astrantia and Alchemilla.

Uprights -

erect stem with mulitiple stem leaves

(J)

Flowers in the late summer. Can be used as structral plants since they are tall, flower late and look good for a longer time of the season. How ever, their stems often can appear bare since the leaves on the lower part of the stem dies before the flower season is over, they should be planted with compact filler plants. Example of plants: Amsonia, Artemesia lactiflora and Campanula latifolia.

Stem mounds (K)

arching or procumbent, mutliple stems with stem leaves

Plants which have a clear shape and works as a strucutral plant in a group. With multiple stem and stem leaves the eye notice the plant for its overall structure. Example of plants: Savlia, Aster amellus and Calamintha centaurea.

Branching -

divided stems

(L)

Plants with branching stems, can almost appear as bushes. Example of plants: Lythrum, Euphoribia cyparrisias and Persicaria amplexicaulis.

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Grasses

Cespitose

Mat

Turf

Cespitose Form tight clumps, they have a clear shape with thin leaves that are reching out from its base. Example of plants: Molinia caerulea and Sporobolus heterolepis

Mat grasses Spread easily and form a dense mat. Example of plants: Carex, Calamagrostis and Miscanthus.

Turf Running stems going sideways. But for making lawns but not so good as decoration plant.

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Piet Oudolf

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Picture showing Tronhøj as a landmark while driving in to the area of HjortekÌr.

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Design propoasal One masterplan stratedgy for Hjortekær and one plantingplan for Trongården.

Masterplan stratedy

The perennial beds and path have a circled and organic expression, the trees are planted in rows as a contrast and creates rhythm and structure along the park

The goal with the design for the masterplan stratedy is to strengthen the identity of Hjortkær (where Trongården is a part of) and increase the big landscape tracks. The role of this area is to be the link between the culture historical of Dyrehaven and the modern science center of DTU. The concept for the masterplan is to add Plane trees alley along Hjortkæsvej and on the roads that goes across from Hjortekærvej and Helsingørmotovej. To add a landmark to the area a tumulus will be put on the left over green space next to the crossroad between KLampenborgvej and Helsingørmotorevej. The tumulus is a hill with plane trees that is called Tronhøj, by doing that the site gets back its history.

” ”

By using planting principles by Piet Oudolf the planting beds will get a united expression. The morphology and shapes are circled shaped perennial beds where a curved path goes through the perennials. Walk inside a perennial bed where different combinations of perennials are planted to the experience of the plants are changing as you walk through the park. One of the circle shapes is a plaza named Trongårdspladsen, is one special place worth visiting for people living in the area but also those living around the area. In Trongårdspladsen will there be planted other trees then plane trees to create a special spatial experience in this area. Groups of Cherry trees and Gingko trees on the west side and conifer trees on the right side. These trees have a characteristic expression through different seasons.

Concept for Planting plan of Trongården The concept for the planting plan in the new housing are of Trongården is to look at the whole area as a park. Rows of plane trees will be planted to follow the exisitng tree structures.

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Picture showing the new plane tree alleys driving on one of the roads that goes across HjortekÌrvej and Helsingørmotorvej.

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Landscape strategy for HjortekĂŚr

The seiwng is the stratedy and the drawing is the exisiting landscape tracks.

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Tree axes of DTU

New plane trees

Eksisting plane trees

Trongürden New tumulus; Tronhøj

Media: Ink, akryl and embriodery

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Monoculture of Dyrehaven

Masterplan stratedy for Hjortekær Comments to the masterplan: This plan is showing the tree different landscape identities of DTU, Hjortekær and Dyrehaven. The orange trees are added plane trees and the brown circle is Tronhøj. The trees sewed with orange and brown tread is existing plane trees. This plan was made with a mix of drawing, painting and embroidery. The idea was to sew the vegetation and landscape, the elements that has a soft surface, and draw the houses and road that have a hard and static surface.

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TrongĂĽrdsparken

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Concept TrongĂĽrdsparken

Circle shaped perennialbeds

Plane trees in rows

Tronhøj

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Plan: Trongürdsparken Comments to the plan: This plan was made with a combination of drawing and embroidery. The sewing on the plan is what I am adding in the design. The plan was first drawn in Autocad and then transformed by drawing on fabric. This is its real size. This plan was made in an experimental way, meaning that I didn’t know how it would turn out. It is very big and that was not so practical while sewing. It took long time to sew all the details and, in the end, I was really in a hurry and had to stress the last sewing. I think that is visible on the result. I didn’t have time to try things out and find out how to show things, I just had to sew things. So, the process is very visible on this plan. If I had more time I would like to make the expression more united and neater.

Media: Ink and embriodery, the sewing is showing tvegetation 112


Rain gardens

a

Green roofs

Sediment basi n

Sediment basi n

Perennial beds

B b TrongĂĽrdsplads

en

Water rill Eksisitng plan e trees

A

Plane trees in rows

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Perennialbed with steel edge

TrongĂĽrdsparken, gravel stone on the ground and benches

Double height

8 m

16 m

Section A_a Long section of whole of the east part of TrongĂĽrdsparken, the trees on the section is shown when they have their most interesting time, meaning that the section is showing the trees in different seasons. The gingko trees will be yellow in the autumn and the cherry trees will be pink in the spring time. 114


Sediment basin

Main road for the new housing area

s

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TrongĂĽrdspladsen

Section B_b 1:500 double height

10 m

50 m

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Sediment basins Two sediment basins will be placed on the west and north side of the park. Their main function is to store street water. There will be both a permanent water surface and a more dynamic water level. The plants that grow here need to be able to handle both dry and moister and salt. The trees around this area are not plane trees, its pioneer species such as pine trees and birch trees inspired form the planting of the water tower. Species that can be found at the existing water tower. They are planted to make a connection with the watertower and the park, and to add biodiversity close to the water, which Plane trees are not so good for.

118


30 m

60 m

119


Sediment bassin A

TECHNICAL QUALITY Lenght (cm)

Species Armeria maritima

Crambe maritima

Carex grayi

15 - 20

80

50

Deschampsia cespitosa

40 - 60

Iris pseudacorus

50 - 120

Lupinus polyphyllus ’Fraülein’

stk/m2

80

Resistence to dry

Resistence to salt

X

X

X

X

6

?

Resistence to moisture

?

X

X

X

X

5

X

X

X

1,5 m

1 m

0,5 m Sediments 120


AESTHETIC QUALITY Function

Architecture

Spring

Summer

Autumn

Companion plant

Ground covering plant

Companion plant

Companion plant

Companion plant

Structural plant

Permenant water level

121

Winter look


A, Sediment Bassin

Planting expression from May to Septemeber 122


123


Overview of plantingbeds The different combinations of plantings are placed along the path. The embroidery is to show the different experiences and expressions.

30 m

60 m

124


9. B C

C B

8. DB

B

D

7. D B

6. C

5.

B

B

D

C B

4. D C

B

3. B

2.

1.

D

C

C

B

C B

B

D

C

CB

125

D

C D

C

C


Planting over storm water boxes B

TECHNICAL QUALITY

Species Achillea millefolium “Terracotta”

Alchemilla mollis

Lenght (cm)

stk/m2

Resistence to dry

Resistence to salt

50 - 70

7

X

X

40

7

X

Echinops ritro “Veitchs Blue”

80

8

X

X

Penistem alopecurioides

80

3

X

X

Salvia X superbra “Caradonna”

70

9

X

X

Seslaria autumnalis

40

6

X

Bulbs Iris reticulata ”Harmony”

10

50-100

X

Scilla

10

50-100

X

1 m

0,5 m

Storm water boxer under soil 126

Resistence to moisture


AESTHETIC QUALITY Function

Architecture

Spring

Summer

Companion plant

Ground covering plant

Structural plant

Companion plant

Companion plant

Ground covering plant

Storm water boxer under soil 127

Autumn

Winter look


B. Planting bed over storm water boxes

Planting expression from July to Septemeber

128


Planting expression from November to February

129


Planting over storm water boxes C

TECHNICAL QUALITY

Species Achillea millefolium “Terracotta” Achillea millefolium

Lenght (cm)

stk/m2

Resistence to dry

Resistence to salt

50 - 70

7

X

X

50 - 100

7

X

X

Alchemilla mollis

40

7

X

Lavendula angustifolia ”Peter Pan”

30

9

X

Penistem alopecurioides

80

3

X

Seslaria autumnalis

40

6

X

Bulbs Iris reticulata ”Harmony”

10

50-100

X

Scilla

10

50-100

X

1 m

0,5 m

Storm water boxer under soil 130

X

Resistence to moisture


AESTHETIC QUALITY Function

Architecture

Spring

Summer

Companion plant

Companion plant

Ground covering plant

Ground covering plant

Companion plant

Ground covering plant

Storm water boxer under soil 131

Autumn

Winter look


Planting over storm water boxes D

TECHNICAL QUALITY

Species Achillea millefolium

Lynchnis coronaria

Lenght (cm)

stk/m2

Resistence to dry

Resistence to salt

50 - 70

7

X

X

80

6

X

Penistem alopecurioides

80

3

X

X

Salvia X superbra “Caradonna”

70

9

X

X

Seslaria autumnalis

40

6

X

Bulbs Iris reticulata ”Harmony”

10

50-100

X

Scilla

10

50-100

X

1 m

0,5 m

Storm water boxer under soil 132

Resistence to moisture


AESTHETIC QUALITY Function

Architecture

Spring

Summer

Companion plant

Ground covering plant

Companion plant

Companion plant

Ground covering plant

Storm water boxer under soil 133

Autumn

Winter look


C. Planting bed over storm water boxes

Planting expression from July to Septemeber

134


D. Planting bed over storm water boxes

Planting expression from July to Septemeber

135


Spring expression for planting combination B,C & D

Planting expression spring 136


137


Rain gardens

138


30 m

60 m

139


Planting rain garden E Species Ammophila arenaria

Armeria maritima

TECHNICAL QUALITY Resistence to moisture

Lenght (cm)

stk/m2

Resistence to dry

Resistence to salt

70 - 100

9 - 12

X

X

X

9

X

X

X

20

Campanula rotundifolia

60

9

X

X

X

Leymus arenarius

60

9

X

X

X

Phalaris arundinaceae

100

3

X

1 m

0,5 m

140

X

X


AESTHETIC QUALITY Function

Architecture

Spring

Summer

Companion plant

Structural plant

Structural plant

Companion plant

Ground covering plant

141

Autumn

Winter look


E. Rain gardens

Planting expression July to septemeber 142


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Discussion

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I have used embroidery in a mix of media for different phases and purposes of this thesis. In the registration phase the embroidery was used as a phenomenological tool, where I let the bodily experience from the site be expressed in a conscious and aesthetic way. With the help of drawing and writing on the fabric (e.g. the serial vision from the registration) the abstraction got concretized and I notated specific impressions and aspects. The masterplan strategy concept drawing from the registration, is a collage put together by hand drawings and embroidery, where the embroidery works as a communication tool, where I have sewed the idea for the design proposal and drawn the existing aspects and findings. In the proposal of the planting design, the embroidery works as a visualisation of the experience and expression of the plants through different seasons.

to embroidery and hand drawing to finish the proposal plan and concept drawing. The embroidery in combination with hand drawing helped me to qualify the design and understand what I have been drawing in Autocad. While sewing the plants I physically connected them to the fabric, so you can compare it to when you plant the trees in the soil. Since the embroidery has a 3d effect I could get a spatial impression of the position of the trees as well. With help from different colours of the thread I could try out different atmospheres and characters of the specific tree species. Comparing this to the drawing in Autocad where you simply by a click can copy trees. These trees are often represented as a circle symbol, making the landscape you draw flat and without any texture. That is one of the main differences from working on the computer; you are always separated from your work with the digital surface. You are working with clicking and the lines you draw are stiff and hard and have no surface. You are working with nature and organic elements but express them in an artificial and geometric way that is quite far from reality, even more abstract than an embroidery or a hand drawing.

In the design phase the embroidery was a sketch tool, and with combination of hand drawing and Autocad the design transformed from idea to a concrete design. Autocad helped concretize the design, but it was a challenge for me not to go too much into detail and loose the overview of the concept and the design. I tended to over design in Autocad, since you easily can zoom in and design in detail, this was during a time where I only worked in Autocad to try to finish the design. There is also a limitation of the shaping in Autocad, the lines you draw can easily be stiff and hard to control since you form them by clicking on the mouse, but the benefit from that is that you can easily copy the line and calculate its length and area, which is a longer process if you work analogue. So, after drawing in Autocad to make the dimensions realistic and put the design elements in the right positions I went back

In the making of the planting design in detail, the embroidery was used to try out different plant combination, colours, visualize their texture and how they look together in groups. The embroidery also work as a communication tool, because it has another dimension, as oppose to photos and drawings, since it has a textured surface you can touch. It works both optical and haptic (you can touch it), horizontal (as a model), vertical as a picture, compared to a 2D planting plan that often has symbols of the plants.

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Sewing was not only a production method, it was also a reflection method for me. After reading about Piet Oudolf, I took a break from the reading and tried to translate my readings into embroideries. You can compare this to take notes while reading, but here I used my haptic sense, I believe it helped me to understand and learn more about the aesthetics of plants. It also helped me to develop my graphical eye and learn how to see things in detail. When you sew you are precise where to put the needle in the fabric. It is very detailed work, but at the same time you can always take a step back and look at the work from a distance, zoom in and out. Compared to a computer you don’t have a stiff frame around the work. Working without a stiff computer frame is much more liberating and I think that is helpful in the process when you want to try different things and understand a site from several perspectives.

will become unique, just as the plants in reality. While creating the site plan you have another experience as oppose to drawing on the computer. You can sit comfortably in a chair and peacefully get a result that is physical. So, referring to William Morris that I investigated in the project frame, how we feel when we work have an impact on the result, and our lives. Today stress and physical injuries are common in the architectural profession, and that might be an effect of the monotonous way of working in front of only the computer. So, a mix of media can also be more sustainable in terms of health and working conditions in the architectural profession, that historically has been a profession close to art and craft. When you change media, you change working positions and perspectives understand the project in new ways.

You might think that sewing take much longer time then drawing on computer, the answer from me is no, at least. On a computer you have enormous amount of ways to express a site. You can choose any colour you want, any line thickness and different software. Deciding how to express a plan can be time consuming, but the computer software do have different tools, that can speed up the process, e.g. copy and pasting elements and programmed hatches. When you sew you have fewer options, but it also gives you options that can add value to your design. By using a variation of colours and thickness of the tread, you can easily make a hatch on a map that get an expression that is more alive, than a hatch from for example illustrator. Since every line on the fabric is made by hand, every line and shape

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147


Reflection

148


Rreferring to the quote from Donna Haraway “It means something which media we use to create new media”, that is what I have tried to explore and understand in this project. The presentation of the site I got from Sweco was a 2D drawing with a lot of technical information. It does not say anything about the context or landscape character of the site.

had to figure it out myself. What I learned from that, is to trust my own abilities and take my own creative intuitions seriously. Furthermore, I became more conscious of the different media and how I could use them. Before this project I had the tendency to put media into separated boxes and was unable to understand them as connected elements, and how they could show the same things in several ways. Now I understand media more as one bigger tool that always can be combined and by doing so they can communicate, explore and help me and hopefully others to understand more aspects of a design project. In that way I feel freer while working and designing, also when I draw things on the computer.

While doing registrations I found out that it would be beneficial for the site of Hjortekær to get a masterplan strategy to not lose its landscape identity in the future. This could be because of the media I used in the registration. If I had only stayed at the office and focused on the technical drawing I wouldn’t have gotten the knowledge about all the other aspects of the site; such as context, history, atmosphere and identities, and the design might have ended up totally different, that could be more far from its context. So, in that perspective I believe it is important which media we use to create new media, and which story we use to tell new stories (Haraway, 2016).

In some phases of the process I got so many new ideas of how to use embroidery in a mix of media that it was a challenge for me to produce them. I felt like the process escalated and I just had to follow the process, it was hard to control. I also might need to learn how to control the creative process when I work professionally. I must learn how long time it takes to produce things since I got very busy in the end and had to work long hours to finish my work. However, I experienced that every time I sewed, I learned something new and explored something new, that was valuable and developed the design, and this might not have happened with too much control of the process.

One challenge of this project was the process and working method have been experimental. I didn’t know how the result would end up other than I knew that I wanted to come up with a design proposal for Trongården. It made me a bit nervous during the process since things that I thought would work did not work at all and vice versa.

Another challenge with working with an aesthetic approach is that the result of the work is affected of how you feel while working. For example those time I had to sew while I was stressed and in a hurry the result of the embroidery appeared stressed and not as conscious and aesthetic as I would like it to be. That made this working method vulnerable

The graphical expression differs a lot from my fellow students as well, compare to those who works only digitally. I had to let go of control and just trust my own intuition and the media I was using. That was a challenge for me, since I could not look at other projects and copy their methods or style, I

149


in situations when you need to mass-produce or produce things fast. Analogue work can also make the workload double, you must scan in your work to use it in the computer or if you want to send it to others, that is not so effective. But one the other side, to explore planting combination or make notations from registration the analogue working method is more effective and direct then the computer, since you work direct form your hand to paper or fabric, instead of starting up the computer, find out which program to use and in which style to express it.

digitally. For example, to try out some specific ideas can be done with an embroidery, drawing or other creative media in an office. I also hope that this project can inspire and point out that the aesthetic side of a technical landscape project is important as well, in terms of for example sustainability. We need to create environments that are pleasing for people to live in, for the quality of life, as William Morris claims.

One idea of how I could continue this way of working is to study and create planting combinations and make a catalogue with the embroidery expression, that could show and add the aesthetic layer of a technical project, that firms like Sweco practically could use in their work. The embroidery could be a way for Sweco to show that their landscape solutions is not only technical but also aesthetic and can be valuable for the spatial quality of their solutions. One other idea of using this method that I did not try out during this project is how embroidery or mix of media can integrate with user groups and actors of a site. For example, could a start-up meeting with the future residents of the site, include working together using different medias to find keys to a design proposal that fits the user’s needs. I hope this investigation has opened up for some new tools and perspectives for the designing and understanding of landscape architecture that has a closer expression and connection to nature and aesthetics. Hopefully this project can inspire future work to look at landscape architecture in a perspective of different media, even though the main work media might still be

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Notes

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Books: Burle Marx R. (2018). Roberto Burle Marx Lectures: Landscape as Art and Urbanism. - :Lars Müller Publishers Droste M. (2019). Bauhaus. Bauhaus-archiv berlin. Berlin: Taschen Bibliotheca Unversialis Gether C, Høbolt S & Jalving C. (2018). Alphonse Mucha. Ishøj: Arken museum for moderne kunst Haraway Donna. (2016). Playing String Figures with Companion Species: Staying with the Trouble. -: Duke University Press Jekyll G & Weaver L. (1912). Arts and crafts gardens. Suffolk: Country Life Karberg A, Bramsen M & Houkjær U. (2019). William Morris. Al magt til skønheden! Denmark: Nivaagaards Malerisamling og forfatterne Oudolf P & Kingsbury N. (2013). Planting: A new perspective. Portland: Timber Press, Inc. Schul Jane. (2015). Hvilken plante hvor. Politikens hus Wahl Peter. (1992) Vejnavne i Lyngby- Taarbak kommune. Historisk selskab for Lyngby Taarbak kommune Wellesley-Smith Claire. (2015). Slow Stich. Bastford Articles: Borup Nørlov I, 2018, Strategisk Campus plan DTU Lyngby Campus, Transforming DTU Ingold Tim, 2017, Surface visions, Theory, Culture & Society Web: Nils Holtug, holisme i Den Store Danske, Gyldendal, 20170827, http:// denstoredanske.dk/index.php?sideId=92382 (20190829) Dee Morris & Stephen Voice, 2019, Jacket2 , URL: https://jacket2.org/ commentary/avant-garde-iii-situationist-maps-take-two (20190813) Arkitema, 2019, https://arkitema.com/da/arkitektur/ bolig/trongaarden#!https://arkitema.com/da/arkitektur/ bolig*!sword:trong%C3%A5rden (20190830) GHB, 2019, https://www.ghb-landskab.dk/projekter/vicinity (20190830) Pictures and photos: All drawings or photos are taken and created by me unless otherwise stated.

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Profile for annamialindblom

I came I saw I sewed  

Master thesis in Landscape architecture from University of Copenhagen 2019, 30 eats

I came I saw I sewed  

Master thesis in Landscape architecture from University of Copenhagen 2019, 30 eats

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