Handbook of information for the colonies and India /issued by the British India and Queensland Agenc

Page 1

TEN

THOUSAND

COPIES

DISTRIBUTED


H a n d b o o k of i n f o r m a t i o n for the colonies a n d I n d i a / issued by the British India & Queensland Agency Company Limited, Brisbane. 1899.


e^S .^ti ..^ti

..it*. *

1

BURNS, PHlLP * CO., Ltd. Australian

Merchants.

Impurters of

EUROPEAN

and E A S T E R N PRODUCE.

SHIPPING

and INSURANCE AGENTS.

"

a

HEAD ID

BRIDGE

OFFICE:

STREET,

SYDNEY.

B R A N C H E S :

Brisbane, Bowen, Townsville, Charters Towers, Cairns, Cooktown, Thursday Island, Normanton ; and at Port Moresby and Saniarai, British New Guinea. Kremantle, Esperance, and Geraldton, W . A . A G E N C I E S :

London, Calcutta,

Agents for the following

N e w Y o r k , Hongkong, Singapore, and Yokohama.

Lines of Steamers : —

A.U.S.N. CO., Ltd.—The Queensland Ports, Melbourne, West Australia, New Caledonia, and Fiji. BRITISH INDIA S.N. CO.—Regular Line to and from India. CANADIAN A U S T R A L I A N STEAMSHIP CO. CANADIAN PACIFIC R A I L W A Y . Q U E E N S L A N D L I N E OF S T E A M E R S . — F r o m Queensland London, v i a Batavia.

Ports to

NIPPON Y U S E N KAISHA. -To and from China and Japan. GREAT NORTHERN R A I L W A Y CO.'S S T E A M E R S . — F r o m Hongkong to Seattle, via Honolulu, connecting with Great Northern Railway. NEW GUINEA MAIL LINE.—Cooktown to all New Guinea Ports. MOGUL S.S. CO., Limited.—Sydney to London. McILWRAITH, Australia.

McEACHARN

& CO.'S S T E A M E R S . — T o

Western

NEW GUINEA, SOLOMON ISLANDS, AND N E W BRITAIN STEAM SERVICE. SUYA, STONE, AND NORFOLK ISLANDS, N E W H E B R I D E S GROUP Two Monthly Services. US' Intending Passengers coastwise to the Pacific Islands, J a v a , Singapore, India, China, Japan, Canada, and Europe should call for information concerning above routes before booking.

HANDBOOKS

OF INFORMATION,

i c

ON

APPLICATION.

BURNS, PHILP « Co., LTD., .10 Bridge Street, SYDNEY. '•>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>w

\p


>>>:OXOXO:':O>:O>XO>>»KWK«:O:«*

Brisbane

<2ity a n d

(Thomas Bryce &

Co.)

ADELAIDE STREET, Opposite Gaiety Theatre. Local Contractors to the Government for the Delivery of Post and Railway Parcels.

Suburban

P R R e E L D E L I V E R Y .

CUSTOMS, C A R R Y I N G , A N D

FORWARDING

AGENTS.

CITY AND NEAR SUBURBS. -Rate. 3d. per 28 lbs. Deliveries Daily at 1.30 and 6 p.m.;

Saturdays 1.30 and 4

p.m.

DISTANT SUBURBS.—Double Rates. Coorparoo—M6ndays and Thursdays. Yeerongpilly, Tennyson, Yeronga, Rocklea, Fairfield, T a r i n g a , and Indooroopilly—Tuesdays and Fridays. South Kulimba, Morningside, Norman Park, N'undah—Wednesdays and Saturdays. Ashgrove, Enoggera, and I thaca—Thursdays. Uulky Parcels in proportion to weight charged by measurement. Special Kates for heavy cases. A complete plant maintained for the removal of machinery .and for heavy cartage. Steamers met on arrival by the Company's representative and baggage taken charge of. FURNITURE REMOVAL A SPECIALITY.

GOODS AND

BAGGAGE STORED.

Representatives of_

E b b w Vale C o l l i e r y Situated at Dinmore, near Ipswich. Depots: Leichhardt Street, N o r t h B r i s b a n e ; Stanley Street, South Brisbane. Suppliers to the principal shipping, manufacturing, and other Companies.

T H E

CITY

A N D

S U B U R B A N -

I 6 E Distributing

Qo.

MUSGRAVE W H A R F P U R E ICE distributed by special carts throughout city and all suburbs daily. Suppliers to alt the principal shipping companies in the city. Ice packed specially for transit by rail or sea, journeys from one day to ten days. Ice guaranteed made from pure distilled water only, and its use for sanitary, medicinal, and as a household commodity is perfectly uninjurious.

T H O M A S B R Y C E & CO., Adelaide Street, Brisbane. TELEPHONE

— - —

._

212.

IB?


V-'3i.it«..Jtj..*t*..»t*.x

BRABANT &

I m p o r t e r s , ^Merchants a n d

Station Supplies, Wire and Woolpacks, Flour, Sc., always in stock. AGENTS

CO.,^

Commission

Agents.

FOR -Eastern Counties Fire Insurance Co., Limited. Straits Insurance Co. (Marine). Messageries Maritime Co., French Line of Steamers.

AGENTS IN QUEENSLAND FOR

Bass ft Co., Bulk Ale and Stout. Buchanan's Scotch Whisky.

Barnes ft Co., Preserves, &c.

M. R. Foster a Sons, Guinness' Stout and

Imperial

Bass' Ale.

London,

Oilmen's

Manufacturing

Stores,

Co., S y d n e y -

Uncle Toby's R o l l e d Oats, Ship Brand Oatmeal and Cornflour, Rumford's Blue, Groats, Rice, Starch, B a k i n g Powder, and C u r r y Powder. R. S. Hudson's Extract of Soap. W a r a t a h Queensland Cheese.

Blood, Wolfe & Co., Bass' Ale and G u i n ness' Stout. B. ft E . Perrier, Chalons, Champagne. Moet'S D r y Imperial Champagne.

Irroy, Champagne.

Nobel's

A.

YYOn ft Co., Grollet Castle Brandy, in qr. casks, flasks, and half flasks. Mitchell ft Co., of Belfast, Limited, Irish Whisky, in bulk, bottles, flasks and jars. V . D. Clarets, quarts and pints.

Explosives

Co.,

L t d . , Glasgow,

Dynamite, Detonators, & c W . A. Ross ft Co., R o y a l Belfast Ginger Ale.

Inverness Pale Ale, qts. and pts., bottled by Ihlsrs & Bell.

J . Walker ft Sons, " K i m a r n o c k W h i s k y "

Joseph ft John Vickers ft Co., Limited,

Thorn ft Cameron, Glasgow, B u l k and Case Whisky.

E . Davey ft Sons, Adelaide Flour.

Victoria Distillery, London.

Blankenheym ft Nolet's K e y Geneva.

Harrison's K a n g a r o o Brand Adelaide Flour.

Apollinaris Water Co., London. Heumann's Starch, papers and boxes. Perry Davis' Pain Killer.

F. W . Cosens, Jerez de la Frontera, Sherries. W. ft J . Graham, Oporto, Forts.

The

Associated Vineyard Cultivators'

Sunlight Soap. Mallo Cigars.

Co., Cognac. Stegert ft Sons, Angostura Bitters, T r i n i d a d .

The undersigned are prepared to indent on liberal terms, through their London House, all classes of English and Foreign Merchandise, and to make CASH ADVANCES on Colonial Produce consigned to them for Sale in the London Market,

BRABANT &

CO.,

7 6

A N D

AND

8 6

7 8

C H A R L O T T E

ST.,

L E A D E N H A L L ST.,

B R I S B A N E ; L O N D O N ,

E C .

\rV. R. B l a c k , Colliery proprietor and Coal Contractor, Petrie's B i g h t , B R I S B A N E .

A G E N T

The

FOR—The

W a l l o o n C o l l i e r y , Eclipse C o l l i e r y , and Waterstown Colliery.

products of these mines are unequalled for steam and gas purposes.

STEAM LAUNCHES

AND L I G H T E R S

available at all times.

b a r g e S t o c k s of G r a v e l , S a n d a n d 131ue fVletal always on

A G E N T

FOR—The

hand, at

DEPOT,

PETRIE'S

CELEBRATED

BIGHT.

ECLIPSE COKE.

This Coke is supplied to all the leading Foundries throughout

>>>:*>>>:»:o:»>>>:»:»>:»:.:*:»>>>:»:.:0^

QUEENSLAND.


HANDBOOK OF

INFORMATION FOR

The Colonies and India ISSUED

British

BY

T H E

India & Queensland Company

Agency

Limited,

BRISBANE.

AUSTRALASIAN

UNITED

STEAM

QUEENSLAND BRITISH

INDIA

STEAM

DUCAL TURN BULL,

MARTIN

NEW UNION

AND

LONDON THE

NORTH

A.

A.

&

COMPANY

(SHIRE

LINE OF

COMPANY

OF

ROUTE

LIMITED.

EUROPE

AND

COMPANY

STEAMERS).

LIMITED.

NEW ZEALAND TO

CORPORATION

MORTGAGE

PARKER

LIMITED.

STEAMERS.

COMPANY

COMPANY &

COMPANY

STEAMERS.

NAVIGATION

LINE OF

ASSURANCE

QUEENSLAND

HUDDART,

OF

Z E A L A N D SHIPPING

STEAMSHIP

(INTERCOLONIAL

&

NAVIGATION

LINE

vi&

LIMITED SAN

FRANCISCO).

(MARINE).

INVESTMENT PROPRIETARY

COMPANY LIMITED.

1899-1900. •SO*-, BRISBANE: WATSON,

FERGUSON 1899.

&

CO.,

PRINTERS.

LIMITED,


CONTENTS. PAGES.

Concise Directory

...

...

...

• ...

...

...

3-5

Press Notices

...

...

...

...

..;

...

.-•

7, 8

Introduction

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

11

...

...

...

...

13

...

...

23-78

Navigation ... ...

83-109

S u m m a r y of Events d u r i n g 1898

F i v e T h o u s a n d Miles on the Australian Coast Services of the Australasian U n i t e d Company, L t d . ... ... ...

Steam ...

(Including Fleet, Agencies, Lines of Services—Nos. I to 8, Time Tables, Schedules of Passage Rates, Average Passages, Table of Distances, Ports of Call, Information and General Regulations.)

Services of the Queensland Line of Steamers

...

... 111-115

(Including Agencies, Fleet, Passage Money to all Ports, and Tables of Distances.)

Services of the B r i t i s h India Steam N a v i g a t i o n C o m p a n y , L t d . 117-131 (Including Fleet, Lines of Services—Nos. I to 20, and Additional Services, Tables of Distances, Passage Rates i n Indian Currency—Calcutta to Bombay viA Ports.)

Australasian Tariffs ... ... ... ... ... ... 133-158 Postal, Money Order, and Telegraphic Information of the Colonies ... ... ... .. ... ••• . . . 159-172 General Section of Advertisements ... .. ... ... i . - x x v i . ILLUSTRATIONS

A N D PAGES

O F

R E F E R E N C E .

PAGE. A.U.S.N.

Co.

BRISBANE "ARAMAC" "

S A L O O N , l>etween 20

ARAWATTA "

bananas

,

...30

ALBANY

22

BALLARAT BENDIGO

...

between

BOWEN BRISBANE BRISBANE

R I V E R , opposite

BUNDABERG BURKETOWN CAIRNS CARDWELL CHARTERS

TOWERS

LUCINDA MACKAY

51

POINT ..

MARYBOROUGH

34 32 24 36 36 55 46 48 50 69 62 61 59 66

COOKTOWN

35 95 95 37 95 96

MELBOURNE

33

MOURILYAN

H A R B O U R ..

NEW

CALEDONIA

NEW

GUINEA

NEWCASTLE P E R T H , W . A U S T R A L I A ..

W . A .

...27

GERALDTON, Q

Chart I.—-Combined Services

96

ROCKHAMITON

97 97 98 98 98

"ROCKTON,

>°5 24 99 3 ° 99 61 100

...

26

PORT DOUGLAS

SYDNEY

52 opposite

S. S.

...

THURSDAY

38

ISLAND

39

TOWNSVILLE WATERFALL WEEPING

GULLY,

ROCK,

"WODONGA,"

CHARTS. ... ...

53 60 54 •9 34 61

100 99 101 LOI

102 102 71 103 77 44 3 68 ! ° 3 28 104 64 104 54 104 26 40 105 67 106 57 106 i o

NORMANTON

73 I O I

FIJI FREMANTLE GERALDTON,

81 21

discharging

... l>etween

ADELAIDE

PAGE. GLADSTONE

OFFICES,

...

MAROON

opposite 50 42 opposite 20

N.S.W.

S.S.

...between pages 8 a n d 9

Chart II.—Sketch M a p of Queensland and New South Wales, showing A . U . S . N . and Q . L . of S. Services ... ... ... ... facing page 78 (Also Freezing, Boiling Down, and Meat Preserving

Works.)

Chart III.—General Services of the British India Steam Navigation C o , Ltd., and the British India Associated Steamers, Ltd. , & c , between pages n o & i l l The above Charts also show the principal Goldfiekls in Australia.


CONCISE D I R E C T O R Y .

QUEENSLAND. BRISBANE. Page.

Aberdare Go-operative Colliery, John Davis, Agent ...

Baldwin, Howard, Wholesale Poulterer

...

...

..

...

...

xviii.

...

...

...

xv.

Baynes Brothers xix. Belle Vue Hotel ; Mrs. Zahel, proprietress Leaflet following page 48 Biggs & Morcom, Limited, General Printers and Bookbinders ... ... xvi. Black, W . R . , C o a l Contractor Facing title page Brabant & C o , , Importers and Merchants ... ... .. Facing title page Brisbane Fish and Agency C o . , L t d . ... ... ... ... ... ... xix. Brisbane Newspaper Company, Courier, Observer, and Queen•slander ... xiv. British India and Queensland Agency Co., L t d . ... 84 City and Suburban Parcel Delivery Go. ... ... Opposite inside front cover Denham Bros., Produce and Grain Merchants ... ... ... ... xvii. Elliott Bros., Limited ... Leaflet facing page 46 Fish Steam Laundry, George Fish, Manager Facing page 80 Helidon Spa Water C o . , / E r a t e d Water Manufacturers ... 82 Herga, A . , Chronometer, Watch, and Clock Maker ... ... ... ... xvi. H o p Sam & C o ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... .. xv. Howard, E . A . , Printer, &c 82 Howes, Bros., & C o . , Produce Merchants ... ... ... ... ... xix. Hutton, J . C . , & C o . , Bacon Curers, &c. ... ... ... ... ... 80 Knights, Chas., Picture Frame M a k e r . . . ... ... ... ... ... xvi. Knowles & C o . , Wholesale Fruiterers and Commission Agents ... ... xvi. London Assurance Corporation ... ... ... ... Facing inside back cover Magdalen Asylum Laundry ... ... .. .. ... ... ... xv. Maher, W i n . , Baker ... ... ... ... ... ... Inside back cover Martin, R. & C o . , Ship Chandlers and Coach Ironmongers ... .. .. xvii. Mines, H . E . , Wholesale Tinsmith, Ship Plumber, &c. ... ... ... xvii. Muling, G . , " K i o s k , " Botanical Gardens ... Back of Chart I., facing page 8 National Hotel ... ... .:. ... ... ... Leaflet following page 48 New Zealand Shipping C o . , L t d . ... ... Back of Chart III., facing page n o North Queensland Mortgage and Investment C o . , L t d . ... ... ... 116 Outridge Printing C o . , Limited ... ... xvii. Perkins & C o . , Brewers, Importers, Wine and Spirit Merchants ... ... xv. Potts, Paul & Sargant, Ship Chandlers... ... ... ... Leaflet facing title page Queensland National Bank, L t d . ... ... .. ... ... ... 79 The Telegraph Newspaper C o . : The Telegraph and The Week .. ... xvi. Turnbull, Martin & Co. ... ... no Watson Brothers ... 132 Watson, Ferguson & C o . , Wholesale and Retail Stationers etc., etc. ... 10 West Australian Steam Navigation Co. and Ocean Steamship Co. Facing page xxvi. MARYBOROUGH.

Queensland Smelting C o . , L t d . ; G o l d , Silver, Lead, and other ores treated

xx.

BUNDABERG.

Grand Hotel, F r e d . Colman, Manager Royal H o t e l , J . S. Davidson, Proprietor

... ..

... ...

.. ...

. . ..

... ...

xxi. xxi.

... ... ... ...

xxiii. xxii. xxi. xxi.

ROCKHAMI'TON.

Littler & Bruce, Engineers Morning Bulletin and The Capricornian Newspaper Co. ... ... Reid, Walter, & C o . , L t d . , Merchants, Shipping and General Agents Wynne, F . , Baker


4

Concise

Directory.

MACKAY.

Paxton, VV. H . , & C o . , Merchants, Shipping and General Agents

xxiv.

TOWNSVII.I.E.

Brand ft Drybrough, Engineers, &c. Johnson ft Castling, Butchers

...

CHARTERS

...

...

...

...

...

xxiii. xxv.

TOWERS.

Exchange Hotel, R. Collins, Proprietor

158

CAIRNS.

Kuranda Hotel (Barron Falls), M r s . A . Remilton, Proprietress Sun W o T i y PORT

xxv. xxvi.

DOUGLAS.

Walsh & C o . , Merchants and Importers

...

Inside back cover

A h K u m , T . , Fruit and Provision Dealer F'ooks, W . , Family and Shipping Butcher Great Northern H o t e l , Harcus and Whitehead, Proprietors.. Romano, A . , Laundry

xxvi. xxvi. 82 xxvi.

COOKTOWN.

NEW

SOUTH

WALES.

SYDNEY.

Balchin, W . & C o xiii. Blackwood, J . , & Son, Machinery and Indiarubber Merchants ... ... viii. Booth, J. & C o . , T i m b e r Merchants xi. Bullivants' Australian C o . , L t d . ... ... ... xiii. Burns, Philp & C o . , L t d . , General Merchants and S h i p p i n g ! I i d e front cover Agents / Buttel, William, Butcher x. Cameron, A fat Connell, J . , & C o . (Usher's Whisky) vii. Daily Telegraph Newspaper C o . ... ... xii. Docker, W . ft C o . , Limited xii. D y n o n , John, Son & C o . , China, Glass, and Earthenware Importers ... x. Fisher & Sons, Yacht and Boat Builders ... ... ... ... ... xi. Grainger, T . L . , Marine Surveyor and Compass Adjuster ... .. vii. Heyde, Todman & C o . , Importers and Wholesale Tobacconists ... xi. Hopkins & Lipscombe, F'ruit Merchants ... ... ... ... ••• ix. Hordern Bros., Importers and General Drapers, &c., &c. ... ... ... viii. Hotel Metropole Back of Chart I., facing page 9 Langdon, H . J . & C o . , Agents for Mackie & Co.'s Whisky... Leaflet opp. title page Mort's Dock and Engineering C o . , Limited ... ... ... ... ... xiii. North Queensland Insurance C o . , L t d . . . . ... Back of Chart III., facing page i l l Penfold, W . C . Stationers ... ... ... ... viii. Playfah, Thomas, Butcher ... ... xii. Smith & Kopsen, Ship Chandlers ... .. ... ... ... ... vii. Stanley & Co., Wholesale and Retail Market Gardeners, Fruiterers, &c. ... ix. Sutton & C o . , Agents Victory Tobacco... ... ... ... ... ... xiii. Victorian Railways ... ... ... ... ... ... opposite page 33 n s


Concise

Directory.

5

NEWCASTLE.

Dalgety & C o . , W o o l Merchants, Shipping and Insurance Brokers...

...

xiv.

VICTORIA. MELBOURNE.

Bacchus Marsh Concentrated Milk C o . , L t d . ... Brooks, H e n r y & C o . ... ... ... ... .... Burke, E . & J Cameron, W . , " T w o Seas" Tobacco ... ... ... Chateau Tahbilk Proprietary Limited ... ... Coulsen, H a y & C o . , Packet H o p Merchants... ... Foster's Lager Beer ... H i l l , J . & Sops ... ... ... ... ... ... Indiarubber, Guttapercha, and Telegraph Works C o . , L t d Miller, J . & C o . , Proprietary, Limited ... ... Peacock & Smith, Coppersmiths, &c. ... ... ... Stooke, V . , Shipping Butcher ... ... ... .. Watson & Paterson, Merchants ... ... W o o d & C o . , Provision Merchants ...

SOUTH

... ...

... ...

...

iii. is. ii. ... ... ... vii. ... ... ... vi. .. ... ... vi. Leaflet facing page 35 ... ... ... iii. ... vi. ... ... ... ii. ... ... ... iv. ... ... ... iv. ... .. ... vi. ... v.

AUSTRALIA.

ADELAIDE.

Griffith, C . K . , Baker

iii.

WESTERN AUSTRALIA. FREMANTLE.

Banfurd, J . V

.'

i.


NOTE

T h i s Handbook

ON

TWELFTH

of Information, of

EDITON.

which

10,000 copies

are

annually distributed, is now issued for the twelfth time by the B r i t i s h India and Queensland A g e n c y C o m p a n y , L i m i t e d , Brisbane. It has become a standard book of reference i n Australasia, not only i n commercial circles, but

also amongst

the

general

ana

travelling public. C o n t a i n i n g as it does a description of the 5,000 miles r u n taken by the A . U . S . N . steamers from W e s t e r n A u s t r a l i a to the

extreme

north of Queensland, as well as notes on N e w Caledonia, F i j i , and N e w G u i n e a , i n t e n d i n g passengers w i l l find

i n it m u c h

useful

information, together w i t h some t h i r t y - e i g h t views of ports called at by the steamers, and places of interest reached therefrom. T h e demand for the H a n d b o o k has i n past years exceeded the supply, and the Publishers issue it again w i t h every confidence that it w i l l be as k i n d l y received and appreciated as heretofore.


PRESS

NOTICES

O N E L E V E N T H

EDITION,

1898-99.

T H E B R I S B A N E C O U R I E R , Wednesday, fitly 20, 1S9S.•-" T h e publication, which has become a standard book of reference in commercial circles, is, as usual, carefully compiled and well printed, with numerous illustrations." T H E S Y D N E Y M O R N I N G H E R A L D , Friday, fitly ij, 1S9S.—" T h e publication, which is already widlely known, gives a mass of valuable information concerning Australia and its coast." R O C K H A M P T O N B U L L E T I N , fitly 19, 189S.—"There is a chatty account of a trip along the Australian coast. . . . Reflects the highest credit on the compilers and the great company which issues it." T H E D A I L Y T E L E G R A P H , Sydney, Friday, fitly IJ, 1898.—" It is profusely illustrated with views of ports called at by the steamers, and places of interest reached therefrom." T H E T E L E G R A P H , Brisbane, Tuesday, July 12, 1898.—" reference, is of the utmost service to those who travel."

A s a standard book of

T H E M A C K A Y S T A N D A R D , Friday, fitly 29, 1898.—"The particulars given of the different ports of call being reliable, and the illustrations of high artistic merit." Wellington,

T H E N E W ZEALAND TIMES, ingly well got up."

September 10, 1808.—"

It is exceed-

T H E C E Y L O N I N D E P E N D E N T , Tuesday, September 27, I8Q8.—"It cannot but prove most instructive and useful, as it contains a fund of information contained in a clear, succinct and interesting way." WELLINGTON

EVENING

POST,

Wednesday,

September

7,

1898.—"

Is one of

the best publications available. The article " Five Thousand Miles on the Australian Coast," is brimful of information and well illustrated." T H E C E Y L O N S T A N D A R D , Saturday, well printed and splendidly illustrated." T H E TIMES illustrated."

Monday,

OF CEYLON,

September September

24, 1898.—"

T h e book is

26, 1898.—" It is profusely

T H E C E Y L O N O B S E R V E R , Saturday, September 24, 1898.—" There are useful charts, well-executed engravings, and a concise directory included in this handbook." MORNING H E R A L D , Fremantk, surpasses all previous issues."

is."

E V E N I N G S T A R , Boulder

City,

W.A., W.A.—"A

August,

/ ^ . — "Latest

edition

remarkably interesting volume it

T H E O T A G O D A I L Y T I M E S , Saturday, September 3, 1898.—" T h e compilation of the tariffs of the various columns is a special feature, which must have involved much time and trouble." POVERTY BAY HERALD, grows in volume and in value." THE

September

Tuesday,

GREYMOUTH EVENING

13, 1808.—"

STAR

September AND

THE

WESTPORT

BRUNNERTON

ADVOCATE,

yearly Tuesday,

Contains a mass of useful information."

N E L S O N E V E N I N G M A I L , Wednesday, hand-book is got up in an attractive style." T H E WANGANUI creditably got u p . "

13, 1898.—" W h i c h

HERALD, TIMES

AND

September

Wednesday, EVENING

28, 1898.—"

September STAR,

A s usual, the

14, /89S.—"

Saturday,

October

1,

Is very 1898.—

" There are also a number of useful charts." and

T H E C O L O N I S T , Nelson, Wednesday, October 19, 1898.—" Valuable statistical other information completes a very handy book of reference."


Press

Notices

on Eleventh

HAWKK'S B A V HKRAI.D, interesting particulars."

Tuesday,

Edition,

September

D A I L Y T E L E G R A P H , September 13, 1898. printed and got up ; is profusely illustrated." THE

SOUTH

AUSTRALIAN

BULLETIN,

18Q8-Q9.

13, /89S.—" "As

in

September

Contains a mass of

former years it is well 24,

1898.—"A

book

of

interesting reading very prettily illustrated." L A U N C E S T O N D A I L Y T E L E G R A P H , Septembei 3, 1898.—"The book written and well illustrated, and is altogether a creditable production." T H E A U S T R A L S T A R , Brisbane, information." T H E A R M I D A L E EXPRESS, that is instructive and useful."

August

6, 1898. — " Is packed with interesting

September

7nestiay,

13, 1898.—"

L A U N C E S T O N E X A M I N E R , September 3, 189S.—" ports of call is written in an interesting style." T H E W A L C H A W I T N E S S , Saturday, best hand-books issued in the colony."

is ably

It contains much

T h e description of the various

September

3,

T H E M E R C U R Y , Hobart, Thursday, August 23, amounts to a book of travel in Australia and the Pacific

1898.

' It is one of the

1898.— ' T h e Islands."

work

really

T H E M A I I T . A N D D A I L Y M E R C U R Y , Friday, September 2, 1898. — " Presents an extremely welcome fund of knowledge necessary for the tourist and interesting to the public at large." T H E N O R T H - W E S T P O S T , Thursday, September 1, 1898.—"One would almost take it to lie a species of ' enquire within upon everything' in this part of the world." T H E MERCURY, printed, and bound."

Tuesday,

July

26, 1898.—"Is,

as

usual,

well

compiled,

T H E E M U B A Y T I M E S , Tuesday, August 30, 1898.— " A s a work of reference and as a travellers' guide, and a variety of other information is given which cannot but result in bringing more prominently before the O l d W o r l d the wealth and greatness of the Australian colonies." T H E G A R D E N A N D F I E L D , Adelaide, August, beautifully printed, anil handsomely illustrated." QUEENTON ling public."

ADVERTISER,

August

13,

1S98.-

T H E A U S T R A L I A N , Friday, fuly 29, 1S98.— friend to whom we turn to for information." A U S T R A L I S C I I E Z E I T U N G , August, is much that is highly interesting."

1898.—"

1S9S.—"

It is well arranged,

Is a great l>oon to the travelIt

has

become

a sort of old

T o those who do not travel there

R O C K H A M I ' T O N R E C O R D , fuly 21, 1S9S.—"As an office-table work is invaluable, and the compilers are to be congratulated."

reference

the

T H E B U N D A B E R G M A I L , August, 1898.—"The present publication will fully maintain the popularity of this useful work of reference." Q U E E N S L A N D T I M E S , Ipswich, July 19, 1S9S. — " T h e details of such an enormous range give the intending passenger an excellent idea of what he may see." T H E C H A R L E V I I . I . E T I M E S , Saturday, July 23, 1898.—"This issue of this highly interesting and useful compilation."

is the eleventh

T H E Q U E E N S L A N D S P O R T S M A N , Wednesday, fuly 20, 1898. — " A n excellent medium for bringing the resources of this vast island continent under the notice of British investors and others."


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I N T R O D U C T I O N .

presenting to our friends the Twelfth E d i t i o n of this Handbook, which records another and most eventful year's progress, we wish to thank them for the gratifying reception accorded to our last year's issue. W e have carefully revised and brought up to date the statistical and other information now presented ; and, in addition to the subjects dealt w i t h in former years, have incorporated a summary of the principal events of public interest which have occurred during the past year, in Australia, the old country, and other parts of the world. Let us glance at what has come to pass during 1898, not only in our own continent, but in other parts of the globe as well, and trace the movements of " high events" involving issues of the utmost importance for the whole world. A U S T R A L I A . — T h e question of Australian Federation was referred to b y us last year. Since then the feeling in favour of Federation has advanced by leaps and bounds in all the colonies. A n Australian National patriotic spirit has burst into flame, and it is not at all unlikely that, before another year passes, Federation will,in spite of some inevitable opposition,have become an accomplished fact. Federation should mean peace, progress, and prosperity, as the artificial barriers, which at present hamper intercourse and trade, w i l l be swept away for ever, and the poet's dream of a golden age brought perceptibly nearer, T h e n none was for the party; T h e n all were for the State; T h e n the great man helped the poor, A n d the poor man loved the great.

For Australia the " brave days" are not in the past, but in the future. " T h e best is yet to be." A F R I C A . — I n Africa the great victories of the allied British and Egyptian arms under the Sirdar over the forces of the Khalifa, first at the Atbara, and then at Omdurman, have utterly destroyed the malignant power of the Dervishes,


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rehabilitated British prestige, and given an impetus to civilization which cannot fail to have a tremendous and far-reaching effect. F r o m the " Dark Continent" the darkness is rapidly passing away. Light and a new life are in store for Africa. Look at a map of Africa showing the British Colonies and the zones of British influence, as recently attained, and you will appreciate how potent the power of Britain now is, and how overwhelming it must shortly become in that great Continent. Already the telegraph line reaches 2000 miles north of Cape T o w n . The thoroughfare for"freedom and her train" (of the iron horse)which Britain is now making from the Cape to Cairo will follow the wires. It is indeed a great undertaking which is now blossoming into success. A t such a time as this the founders of our Empire in Africa ought not to be forgotten. Our kinsmen who made possible the present position of Britain in Africa, the men who obtained concessions from the Sultan of Zanzibar, and who formed the British Imperial East African Company, lavishing time and means and life in opening up and developing the " Dark Continent." A M E R I C A . — T u r n i n g from Africa to America we see how rapidly events have moved. The old American " Munro doctrine" has fared badly, and our kinsmen over the sea have taken a hand in the administration of lands outside their own continent, and have actively interfered in the affairs of the former Spanish possessions of Cuba and Manila. A s the result of the Spanish-American W a r , our cousins have had vividly brought home to them the value of the friendship of the British nation, but for which their operations against Spain would have been seriously hampered. A n Anglo-American Alliance, which but three short years ago would have been regarded merely as a " poet's dream" and most unlikely, is now a living question ; now there is in existence a strong Anglo-American League embracing amongst its members the best and most influential men on both sides of the Atlantic. The object of this League is to give practical effect to the consideration " that the peoples of " the British Empire and of rite U n i t e d States of America are " closely allied in blood, inherit the same literature and laws, " hold the same principles of self-government, recognise the " same ideals of freedom and humanity in the guidance of their " national policy, and are drawn together by strong common " interests in all parts of the w o r l d , " by making everj effort i n the interests of civizilation and peace to secure the most cordial co-operation between the two nations. r

Since the war with Spain, our American kinsfolk have decided very largely to strengthen their already strong navy.


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A t present " Britannia rules the waves," but, given an A n g l o American Alliance, the sea supremacy of the English-speaking peoples would be simply overwhelming, as no possible combination would be able to stand against us. A S I A . — I n China the past year has been most eventful. T h e China-Japanese war had discovered to the Powers of Europe the weakness of the old Chinese Empire ; and in the beginning of last year the announcement was made that Germany had obtained from China, Kiao-Chao and the territory around it on a 99 years' lease together with sovereign rights. This " conveyance" to Germany was quickly followed by the Russian occupation of Port Arthur and Ta-lien-Wan. N o t to be left behind, Great Britain followed suit by obtaining the concession of W e i H a i - W e i , and making it an important naval base. Endless disputes have occurred between the Powers in connection with the negotiations with the Chinese Government as to railway concessions, and who should have control of same. The picture of the past year shows the breaking up of old China and the European Powers picking up the pieces. It is a remarkable thing that the discovery of the utter impotence of China to manage her own affairs, and the portioning out of her ports and territories to the Powers, should have arisen so quickly o'er the world's horizon. The tremendous import of this great crisis in the F a r East cannot be over-rated. A t present we cannot realise its effect. A n ancient civilization hoary with age —thousands of years old—has become spent. Its decaying life is giving place to the robust and vigorous life of the nations of the West. E U R O P E . — A remarkable event during the past year, and the only one to which we can now refer, was the issue of the circular, " by order of the Czar," inviting all the Powers to a conference, called to promote the maintenance of peace. Whilst kindly received by most of the Powers, these proposals of the Czar are generally considered impracticable.

SUMMARY

OF

T H E PRINCIPAL EVENTS, DURING

&c,

1898.

JANUARY.

1. Second Test Cricket M a t c h , England v. Australia, plaved at Melbourne. W o n by Australia by an innings and 55 runs. 2. L i H u n g Chang, the veteran Chinese statesman, who had been deposed from office, recalled to power.


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5. Announcement made that Germany had obtained KiaoChao and the adjacent territory on a 99 years' lease from China and a transference of all Sovereign rights. 6. Serious recrudesence at Bombay of the Bubonic plague, which has caused terrible mortality in India during the last few years. 7. A Paris newspaper, La Siecle, published the text of the indictment under which Captain Dreyfus was brought to trial in 1894.

11. Tenders for N e w South Wales loan of ^ 1 , 5 0 0 , 0 0 0 opened in London. Total amount tendered, £3,908,400. Average price obtained, £ 1 0 0 8s 4 d . 12. Intercolonial Cricket match. N e w South Wales beat South Australia at Adelaide by 216 runs. 14. Tenders for Western Australia 3 per cent loan of £1,000,000 opened in L o n d o n . Amount tendered, .£2,891,000. Average price, £ 9 6 6s 4 d . 16. Death of the Right H o n . C. P. Villiers, " Father" of the House of Commons and the first advocate of Free Trade. Age, 9519. T h i r d Test Cricket M a t c h , England v. Australia, played at Adelaide. W o n by Australia by an innings and 13 runs. 20. T h i r d Session of Federal Convention opened i n M e l bourne. 25. Intercolonial Cricket M a t c h , Victoria v. Tasmania, played at Melbourne. W o n by Tasmania by 72 runs. 31. The great Engineers' strike i n the U n i t e d Kingdom ended by a resumption of work after nearly 30 weeks' idleness. FEBRUARY.

2. Fourth Test Cricket M a t c h , England v. Australia, played at Melbourne. W o n by Australia by 8 wickets. 2. Terrible bush fires in Gippsland (Victoria). Bush fires also very severe about this time in N e w Zealand and Tasmania. 11. Cricket M a t c h , N e w South Wales v. England, played at Sydney. W o n by the former by 239 runs. 11. The Chinese Government granted to Great Britain the right to extend the Burmah R a i l w a y to Yunnan. 15. The United States Warship, " M a i n e , " which arrived at Havana on 25th January, to protect American residents, was sunk by an explosion, believed to have been caused by a mine ; 270 lives were lost.


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15. Intercolonial Cricket M a t c h , Victoria v. South Australia, played at Melbourne. W o n by Victoria by 26 runs. 22. Intercolonial Cricket M a t c h , N e w South Wales v. South Australia, played at Sydney. W o n by South Australia by 295 runs. 23. The trial of M . Zola, for libelling military officers in connection with the Dreyfus case, ended on the fifteenth day in the condemnation of the writer to one year's imprisonment, and a fine of 3000 francs. 25. Colonel Picquart, having been subjected to a secret i n quisition at the fortress of M o n t Valerien, in connection with the Dreyfus case, was accused af forgery and was retired from the French A r m y . 26. Attempted assassination of the K i n g of Greece in the outskirts of Athens. MARCH.

2. Fifth Test M a t c h , Australia v. England, played at Sydney. W o n by Australia by 6 wickets. 5. Klondyke gold rush in full swing. A . U . S . N . Co.'s s.s. Cape Otzvay sailed from Sydney for Vancouver with 160 passengers. 9. Serious plague riots in Bombay. 13. Sir Horace Tozer, K . C . M . G . , left Brisbane for L o n d o n , as the N e w Agent General for Queensland. 15. Cricket M a t c h , England v. Victoria, played at Melbourne. W o n by the former by 7 wickets. 15. Death of Sir H e n r y Bessemer, inventor of the Bessemer process for the conversion of cast iron into cast steel. Age, 85. 16. The Federal Constitution B i l l finally adopted by the Federal Convention in Melbourne. 17. Death Age, 65, 20. Death the Legislative of the colony.

of Sir W . L . Dobson, Chief Justice of Tasmania, of Sir A r t h u r H . Palmer, K . C . M . G . , President of Council of Queensland, and Lieutenant-Governor Age, 79.

22. Explosion at the Dudley Colliery, Newcastle, N e w South Wales. 15 lives lost. 23. Cricket M a t c h , England v. South Australia, played at Adelaide. D r a w n in favour of the latter. 23. Cricket match, University v. Essendon, played in M e l bourne. Notable for the record score of 1094 runs in one innings.


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24. R.M.S. China stranded at Azalea Point, Perim. subsequent!}- floated and taken home for repairs.

Was

26. Oxford and Cambridge boat race. W o n by Oxford. This completing the ninth year's win in succession. 28. Port Arthur and Ta-lien-Wan handed over by China to Russia " on lease." APRIL.

1. Indian Frontier troubles terminated by the Sakka Khels giving in and paying the full fine and giving up all the rifles demanded. Sir W i l l i a m Lockhart, on 13th M a r c h , had given them their final choice of peace or war. 2. The judgment in the Zola trial quashed on appeal. 4. Great industrial disturbance caused by strike of the South Wales ( U . K . ) coal m i n e r s ; nearly 100,000 men thrown out of work. 5. M r . Balfour stated in the House of Commons that Great Britain had obtained from China a lease of W e i - H a i - W e i , in order to restore the balance of power which had been disturbed by Russia's acquisition of P o r t A r t h u r . 8. Battle of the Atbara. The Sirdar, General Kitchener, with an Anglo-Egyptian force, attacked the Khalifa's forces commanded by the E m i r M a h m o u d , utterly defeated them, and captured their leader. 12. Resignation of Sir H u g h Nelson, Premier of Queensland, after five years in office. 16. The independence of the Republic of Cuba recognised by the United States Senate. 20. President M ' K i n l e y sent an ultimatum to the Spanish Government regarding the situation in Cuba, and the Spanish Minister at Washington asked for his passport. 20. Cape T o w n connected by telegraph with Blantyre, British Central Africa, an approximate distance of 2000 miles, thus completing a section of the intended line from the Cape to Cairo. 22. The American blockade of Cuba commenced. 24. The Regular A r m y of the U n i t e d States increased to 61,000 men, and a call made for 125,000 volunteers. 24. The first shot in the W a r between America and Spain fired by the Spaniards at the entrance to Havana Harbour. MAY.

1. United States squadron, under Commodore Dewey, completely destroyed Spanish Fleet, at M a n i l a .


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I. Great famine riots in Italy about this time necessitating stringent repressive measures in Milan and many of the provincial towns. 5. Prince H e n r y of Prussia, as representing the German Emperor's " mailed fist," arrived with a squadron at Kiao-Chao, the concession of which the Germans had obtained from China. 8. U n i t e d States House of Representatives appropriated 10,000,000 for National Defence. I I . Departure of Victorian Rifle Team for England, to compete at Bizley for the Kolapore Cup. (Won by Victoria the previous year). 12. San Juan de Puerto Rico bombarded by the U n i t e d States ships. 19. The Right H o n . W i l l i a m Ewart Gladstone died at Hawarden Castle, at the age of 88. H e was buried at Westminster Abbey on 28th M a y . M r . Gladstone was four times Prime Minister of Great Britain. 19. A d m i r a l Cervera, with a Spanish Fleet, arrived at Santiago de Cuba, having out-manceuvred the U n i t e d States vessels which tried to intercept him. 19. Great Federation Meeting, in Melbourne T o w n H a l l , of Representatives from the Victorian Municipalities. 22. M r . E d w a r d Bellamy, author of " L o o k i n g Backward," and a well-known socialistic writer, died. Age, 4 8 . 24. W e i - H a i - W e i evacuated by the Japanese, and occupied by a British force. 25. The U n i t e d States called for 75,0^0 volunteers. 30. Agreement signed at Washington with regard to modus operandi for settling outstanding differences between Great Britain, Canada, and America. JUNE.

3. The Federal Constitution poll taken in Victoria, N e w South Wales and Tasmania. It failed to obtain the requisite majority (80,000) i n N e w South Wales. The number of affirmative votes polled was 70,990. In Victoria the final numbers were : — F o r , 1 0 0 , 5 2 0 ; against, 22,089. Majority, 78,431. In Tasmania it was adopted by a majority of 10,596, the numbers being :—Ayes, 13,496 ; noes, 2,900. 3. The Merrimac sunk by Lieutenant Hobson, of the U n i t e d States N a v y , at the entrance to Santiago Harbour, in order to block the channel and prevent egress of Cervera's Fleet. Hobson and his men were taken prisoners.


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3. Samuel Plimsoll, the " Sailor's F r i e n d , " died. Age, 74. H e was the advocate of the principle of the compulsory loadline of vessels, which was ultimately adopted in 1874, d is known as the " Plimsoll mark." a R

4. The Federal Constitution poll held i n South Australia. The B i l l was accepted by a majority of 18,483, the numbers being :—Ayes, 35,803 ; noes, 17,320." 15. Kalgoorlie Kanowna R a i l w a y taken over by the Government of West Australia. 17. Death of Sir E d w a r d Burne-Jones, the great painter. Age, 65. JULY.

1. Santiago de Cuba attacked by the American troops, and the outworks occupied after severe fighting. 3. Admiral Cervera's squadron, which had been lying at Santiago Harbour since 19th M a y , steamed out into the open, with the result that it was destroyed by the American Fleet. 4. La Burgoyne, French steamer, collided with the British ship Cromartyshire in the Atlantic and sunk. 500 lives lost; only one woman saved. 13. The Anglo-American League formed, at a meeting held at Stafford House. 15. Kolapore Challenge Cup Competition, at Bizley, won by Guernsey, 744 points. Victoria, second, 741 points. 15. Death of the H o n . Sir Francis D i l l o n Bell, K . C . M . G . , formerly Speaker of X e w Zealand House of Representatives. Age, 75. 17. Santiago de Cuba surrendered to the Americans after three days' negotiations. 21. Opening of X e w M a r k e t Buildings, Sydney. 26. Tenders for W . A . loan of £1,000,000 at 3 per cent, .£94 minimum, opened in L o n d o n . O n l y £550,000 subscribed. 26. French Ambassador, at Washington, sued for peace on behalf of Spain. 27. General Election in X e w South Wales resulted in a small majority for the Government. 30. Prince Bismarck, the Great Imperial Chancellor of Germany, died. Age 83. 30. A Sugar Bounties Conference of the Powers was held at Brussels during this month for the purpose of negotiating for the abolition of Bounties. Austria and Hungary, Germany,


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19

Belgium and H o l l a n d were willing to abolish their bounties, but owing to the opposition of France and Russia the negotiations were rendered fruitless. AUGUST.

1. British goods admitted into Canada at a reduction of 25 per cent under the rate of admission of goods from other countries. O f the Australian colonies this applies to N e w South Wales only, the other Australian tariffs being antagonistic to Canada. Where Canadian goods are admitted duty free, Canada reciprocates by allowing 25 per cent off her tariff. 12. The preliminaries of peace agreed to between the U n i t e d States and Spain. 12. H a w a i i annexed by the U n i t e d States. 13. M a n i l a surrendered to the Americans. 20. Conference of Premiers of N e w South Wales, Victoria, and Queensland, in Sydney, regarding N e w Guinea, Pacific Cable, & c . 22. The Southern Cross left L o n d o n with grevink-Newnes Antarctic Expedition on board.

the- Borch-

22. Death of Malietoa, K i n g of Samoa. 23. Conference opened, at Quebec, between Great Britain and the U n i t e d States, under the Chairmanship of the late L o r d Herschell, formerly L o r d Chancellor of England. (A British Commission had been appointed to confer with a U n i t e d States of America Commission for the purpose of arriving at a settlement of the disputes with regard to the N o r t h Atlantic Fisheries and other matters.) 24. B y order of the Czar a circular was handed to the representatives of the Foreign Powers, to the effect that " the maintenance of general peace, and a possible reduction of the excessive armaments, which weigh upon all nations, present themselves, in the existing condition of the whole world, as the ideal towards which the endeavours of all governments should be directed," and inviting the powers to a conference on the subject. 30. Dreyfus case. Lieutenant-Colonel Henry, Chief of the Secret Intelligence Branch of the French A r m v , confessed having committed forgery. H e committed suicide the same night. 30. The Queen of the Netherlands, having reached the of 18, commenced to reign without a Regent."

age


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SEPTEMBER.

1. A n agreement signed between the coal-owners and miners in South Wales ( U . K . ) bringing to a close the great dispute as to the sliding scale of wages—a dispute which had lasted five months, and had brought unspeakable misery and loss to all classes of the community. 2. Battle of Omdurman. General (afterwards L o r d ) Kitchener, with 25,000 British and Egyptian troops, annihilated the Khalifa's army of 50,000 and captured Khartoum. The enemy lost about 11,000 killed, and 16,000 wounded. 6. Serious disturbances at Candia, Crete ; 20 men of a H i g h land regiment killed, and man}- wounded, and hundreds of Christian inhabitants massacred by the Mahommedans. The result was that the Turkish Government was compelled by the Powers to withdraw all their troops from Crete. 8. The Sirdar, with a small force, started down the Blue Nile for Fashoda and Sobat. 10. The Empress of Austria assassinated by an anarchist at Geneva. 11. A disastrous hurricane swept over the West Indian Islands about this time, causing enormous damage in Barbados, St. Vincent, and St. Lucia. The L o r d M a y o r of L o n d o n opened a Relief F u n d at the Mansion House, and £43,600 was collected within three months. The British Government also gave considerable financial assistance. 19. Death of the Right H o n . Sir George Grey, K . C . B . , formerly Governor of South Australia and the Cape, and twice of X e w Zealand. Age, 86. Was buried at St. Paul's Cathedral. 21. L o r d Kitchener reached Fashoda and found Major Marchand there w i t h a small French force. The French Government declined, for some time, to withdraw from Fashoda, and war very nearly resulted, but they eventually gave i n . 21. Empress Dowager of China, mother of the late Emperor, took charge of the Government, attended a Cabinet meeting, and issued instructions that all edicts should receive her approval before being issued. 27. Death of the H o n . Thomas Joseph Byrnes, Premier of Queensland. Age, 38. 27. M . Brisson, the French Premier, authorised a revision of the trial of Dreyfus, and appointed the Cour de Cassiation to make the necessary enquiries and examine documents. A judicial commission, which was previously ordered to report upon the case, was equally divided on the p o i n t ; half the members being in favour of revision and half against.


A.U.S N

CO.'S

STEAMER

"WODONGA."



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29. Death of H e r Majesty the Queen of Denmark, mother of H e r R o y a l Highness the Princess of Wales. 29. Sir T . F o w e l l B u x t o n , Governor of South Australia, left for England on six months' holiday. Subsequently resigned. OCTOBER.

4. L o r d Charles Beresford arrived at Shanghai on a commercial mission to China. 7. Spanish-American Peace Commission opened its deliberations in Paris. 7. O w i n g to fear of disturbances, a combined British, Russian, and German guard arrived at P e k i n to protect the legations. 15. Terrible accident at the Caulfield Cup race, Victoria. Seven horses f a l l ; one jockey killed and three injured. 18. A r r i v a l of the German Emperor and Empress at Constantinople on their w a y to the H o l y L a n d . 21. Death of Sir H e n r y Barclav, ex-Governor of Victoria Age, 8 3 . 22. L o r d Brassey, Governor of Victoria, arrived back after a visit to England. 23. D r . Mueller, scientist, died at Vienna from disease contracted whilst experimenting with bubonic baccilli. 25. Political crisis i n France over the Dreyfus case. The (Brisson) M i n i s t r y resigned ; M . Dupuy undertook the formation of a new Cabinet. r

27. The German Imperial party landed at Haifa, Palestine. 31. L a d y M a r t i n , better k n o w n as Helen Faucit, the great actress of the middle of the century, died. Age, 8 2 . NOVEMBER.

2. Melbourne Cup won by The Grafter. 12. T h e German Imperial party sailed from Beyrout, i n Syria, for Germany. 17. Orders issued for enrolment of 1000 Chinese for service at W a i - H e i - W e i under British officers. 17. Intercolonial Cricket M a t c h — V i c t o r i a defeated South Australia, at Adelaide, b y 296 runs. 25. International Conference met at Rome for the suppression of Anarchism. 30. L o r d Kitchener started a scheme for the establishment of a Gordon M e m o r i a l School at Khartoum, and asked for £100,000, which was over subscribed.

c


22

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United Steam Navigation

Ccmpany,

Limited.

DECEMBER.

3. Death of the H o n . James T y s o n , M . L . C . , the millionairepastoralist, at Darling D o w n s . Age, 8 1 . 7. The E a r l of Hopetoun appointed L o r d Chamberlain. 10. The Austral W h e e l Race of 2 miles, at Melbourne, won by J . S. Finnigan. H e had 220 yards' start. T i m e , 4 minutes, 30 seconds. 30,000 spectators. 10. Treaty of peace signed between America and Spain—the Phillipines ceded b y the latter in return for payment of 20,000,000 dols., and Cuba to be governed as an American protectorate. 11. Death of W i l l i a m Black the eminent novelist.

Age, 57.

12. Intercolonial Cricket M a t c h , N e w South Wales v. Tasmania, played at Sydney. W o n b y N e w South Wales b y one innings and 487 runs. 12. Death of Sir W i l l i a m Jenner, Bart., the eminent physician. Discovered the difference between typhus and typhoid fever. 20. Prince George of Greece (who was appointed b y the Powers as H i g h Commissioner of Crete) landed at Canea. 21. Intercolonial Cricket M a t c h , South Australia v. N e w South Wales, played at Adelaide. W o n by South Australia by 57 runs. 25. Letter Postage of i d . per half-ounce inaugurated between the U n i t e d K i n g d o m and India, and most of the British colonies and protectorates throughout the world. The Australian colonies would not, however, adopt it. 27. Intercolonial Cricket M a t c h , Victoria v. N e w South Wales, played at Melbourne. W o n b y Victoria by 190 runs. 30. L o r d Curzon, the successor to L o r d E l g i n as Viceroy of India, landed at Bombay. 31. Death of D r . Augustus Mueller of Yackandandah, V i c toria, who introduced the strychnine cure for snake-bite. 31. Experiments have been made throughout the year in Great Britain in wireless telegraphy with most wonderful results.


ALBANY.


Australasian

United Steam Navigation

WESTERN

Company, Limited.

23

AUSTRALIA.

Since the publication of our last article upon Western Australia, the colony which, during the previous six years, had been advancing by leaps and bounds in a way very little short of marvellous, has been passing through what may be called a transition stage. The years of boom have passed. N o w the condition of things is healthier, and the steady and satisfactory development of all the material industries of the colony is the order of the day. The gold output which, i n 1897, was 674,993028.

had

increased

in

1898

to

1,050,184023.,

the value of which is put down at ^"3,990,698, and present indications point to an even greater increase in 1899, and the outlook for this industry is more promising than ever. The export of wool, i n 1898, was 10,196,306 lbs., and the value of timber exported was £"358,000, and pearl shell .£78,784. W h e n referring to the industries of the colony we must not omit to mention the valuable discoveries of coal on the Collie River, large quantities of w h i c h are being used by the Government for railway purposes. The liberal land laws, which, undoubtedly, offer great inducement to bona-fide settlers of the farming class, have proved so inviting that in the past year a large area of land has been selected, and settlement of the agricultural lands is rapidly progressing. The great scheme of harbour construction, at Fremantle, has now reached such a stage of completion that large steamers of a gross tonnage of 10,000 tons have frequently berthed w i t h out difficulty, at the South Quay, within the Swan River, and the A . S . U . N . Company's fine passenger steamers Paroo, Pilbarra, Waroonga, Bulimba, etc., which trade at regular intervals to the Eastern colonies, are to be seen berthed there. A further step has been taken in the scheme to supply the goldfields of Coolgardie and Kalgoorlie w i t h water, which we referred to in our last issue, and tenders have now been let for the supply of the pipes. It is worth repeating here that this water scheme is estimated to involve the already authorised expenditure of £"2,500,000, and is designed to pump at the rate of 2,500,000 gallons daily from the Helena River near Perth, a distance of nearly 4 0 0 miles across the flat interior to M o u n t Burgess, the highest point on the centre of the goldfields area. The preliminary work in connection w i t h the scheme, the building of the great reservoir across the Helena River, at Mundaring, is now being rapidly pushed forward.


24

Australasian

United Steam Navigation

Company,

Limited.

The Coolgardie E x h i b i t i o n , which was also referred to in our last Handbook, w i l l soon be an accomplished fact, and w i l l , doubtless, attract many visitors to this great gold centre. A t this stage we w i l l be content to close our summary of the later progressive history of the colony, and to accompany our voyagers to the various chief ports of call along its 2000 miles of coast. The first glimpse of the shores of Western Australia, on the intercolonial route Westward, is obtained at ALBANY. connecting w i t h the well-known goldfields of Coolgardie and Kalgoorlie, and the capital of the colony, b y direct daily trains ; and w i t h Bremer, Esperance, Israelite Bay, and Eucla, on the east coast, by weekhy steam service. A l b a n y deserves more than a passing notice, for, besides being the first Australian port of call for the Ocean M a i l Steamers, it boasts of one of the finest harbours i n the w o r l d , surrounded b y scenery the magnificence of which is unsurpassed. Albany is also the sanatorium of the c o l o n y ; crowds of people from the goldfields and the capital visit it during the summer months to enjoy the cool and invigorating climate. The town is about 74 years old, having been settled in 1825 ; is situated on the north side of Princess R o y a l Harbour, K i n g George's Sound, and is distant about 340 miles from Perth. The population exceeds 4,000 souls. A large and expanding trade is being carried on in the export of K a r r i and Jarrah Timber. Almost every week full cargoes are being shipped away to South America and South Africa, and to the H o m e and Continental markets. The total quantity exported for the 12months ending 31st December, 1898, was 50,000 tons, besides w h i c h 10,000 tons were sent away b y rail to the goldfields and P e r t h , making i n all a grand output for the year of 60,000 tons. A t the present time upwards of 1000 men are engaged in the great industry of cutting and hewing this timber, and if, as is anticipated, the trade continues to increase, employment w i l l be found for a large number of others. The port of A l b a n y is w e l l k n o w n as a coaling station. FREMANTLE, the chief port of the colony, is reached after about thirty hours' steam from the Southern port. Sometimes calls are made at the prettily situated intermediate ports of Vasse and Bunbury, which latter are the natural outlets of a great area of fine agricultural and timbered country. A r r i v i n g at Fremantle the steamer, as a rule, enters the river and takes up a berth on the southern side, where 7000 feet of wharfage accommodation has


F R E M A N T L E .


Australasian

United Steam Navigation

Company, Limited.

25

already been provided. The old pier, which runs nearly a mile out, in front of the central portion of the port, is now little used except for sailing vessels, and for steamers, when, as occasionally happens, all the river berths are occupied. A brief outline of the great scheme of harbour construction at Fremantle w i l l not be out of place here, for already the works have enabled the immense cargo and passenger traffic of the port to be conducted with facility and dispatch. The two breakwaters which guard the river mouth are the most important section of the work. The Northern or longer breakwater extends from Rous H e a d , a distance of 3,450 feet, and the South mole from Arthur's H e a d , nearly 2000 feet. T h e quantities of stone used i n the construction of the moles are, respectively, 835,457 l 348,957 yards, and the respective costs were, ÂŁ102,138 and ÂŁ47,998. The stability of these structures has been thoroughly tested by more than one of the N . W . gales which are met with here during the winter months. a n (

O f great importance, also, is the enormous task of shattering the R o c k y Bar, which, a few years ago, effectually blocked the river mouth, and the operations of the dredges. B y the time this Handbook is in general circulation, there will be, within the river, a channel averaging 30 ft deep, w i t h sufficient room to swing a ship easily. The t o w n of Fremantle, which carries a population of from 17,000 to 20,000 persons, is prettily situated on a small promontory, and covers a number of picturesque hill-sides. Although its chief importance arises from its great shipping trade, yet several important manufactories play their part i n supplementing the general briskness of the port ; and, with keen perception, the principal firms i n the Eastern Colonies have established Western headquarters at Fremantle. The streets of the port are narrow ; they are, however, well made and cleanly ; and the principal thoroughfare, H i g h Street, is paved with the enduring Jarrah timber, which is one of the most valuable of this rich colony's assets. Fremantle, as a place of residence, has established a reputation for healthiness, but the growing demand for town lots for business purposes has led to the pretty, and now well-populated, suburban towns of P l y m p t o n , Richmond, and Beaconsfield springing into existence within the last three years. During the year 1898, 622 vessels entered and cleared the port, and, at all the wharves, there is a continual bustle going on ; and the visitor cannot help being struck w i t h the air of general prosperity in the busy business town of Fremantle. There are many pleasant resorts in the vicinity, notable among these being the country spots on the lower reaches of the Swan River, at East Fremantle, Point Walter, Preston Point, and


26

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Rocky B a y . T o these beautiful localities excursionists hurry upon holidays, and there make merry. The town has also an esplanade of about half a mile i n length, which affords an excellent promenade along the South beach in summer months. F r o m Fremantle the great railway systems of the colony i n directly radiate, and the passenger m a y book here for all the extremes of railway travelling, viz :—Menzies via Coolgardie and Kalgoorlie, Cue via Geraldton, A l b a n y via the Eastern agricultural centres, and Vasse via Bunbury. PERTH. F r o m Fremantle, a run of 1\\ miles brings the visitor to Perth, the capital of the colony. T h e city may be reached from the port either b y river, rail, or road. If time is not an object the former is preferable, for a pleasant journey may be made by a river steamer in an hour and a half. The railway service, especially concerning express trains, is very creditable for a narrow gauge line, while the cyclist may delight himself by a road journey which w i l l afford h i m perhaps the best views of a l l in the scapes of sea, river, and forest to be met w i t h on the way. The road to P e r t h is dotted w i t h small towns and private residences of the better-to-do class, and there is an ever varying series of subjects for comment. If first impressions count as the most lasting and best then let the visitor first view Perth from the river. There is to be seen an admirable admixture of the pre-progressive and the progressive ages which are so nearly allied in the span allotted to their existence. The bold heights of M o u n t E l i z a on the left, and the lower wooded flats of South P e r t h in which the budding village roofs are rapidly supplanting the, until recently, undisturbed serenity of the scene, are strikingly picturesque in contrast. The noble fronts of the buildings of the last three years i n St. George's Terrace form a centre ground which speaks of the present day activity. It is estimated that P e r t h at the present time, w i t h her large and semi-detached suburbs, has a population of fully 35,000 persons. L i k e many other cities i n Australia the planning of the city of Perth has not been the best. There is an absence of uniformity both in the length and i n the width of the streets, which, in the city's present developing stage, is not pleasing, though one has hardly time i n the general bustle of the place to pay attention to such remediable defects. St. George's Terrace is the " C o l l i n s Street" of P e r t h ; here are the principal Banks, Insurance and Newspaper Offices. The General Post and Telegraph Offices occupy a central position and are finely designed. Government House, w i t h its quaint turrets, peeps from amongst its surroundings of semi-


A.U.S.N. LEAVING

FREMANTLE JETTY

CO.'S WITH

S.S. 340

" R O C K T O N PASSENGERS,

" IN

DECEMBER,

1896.


Australasian

United Steam Navigation

Company, Limited.

27

tropical foliage at the lower end, while on the hill, at the other extreme, the dome of the new Observatory forms a striking monument to the progress of the city. The M i n t is also an imposing structure, and vies with the architectural refinement of the public buildings. T h e Central Railway Station is a very busy one. Heavy goods trains are continually passing from Fremantle to the goldfields, and, when the enormous import trade of the colony is considered, it w i l l be realised that the goods branch of the R a i l w a y Department is under no small strain in keeping up supplies to the thousands of the mining population i n the interior. Perth has reason to be proud of its Newspaper Press. T h e two morning dailies are very much up to date, and the traveller can have no better instructors. There are half-a-dozen society papers. P e r t h possesses an excellent Racecourse, situated only a half-hour's run from the city, near the Guildford R o a d . The improvements to the course of late years have cost many thousands of pounds; but the W . A . T u r f Club m a y w e l l be proud of the result of this expenditure. There is a beautiful lawn, a spacious stand, and a hundred and one accessories, w h i c h add comfort to excitement at the popular meetings of the club. M a n y delightful retreats for visitors are readily accessible to the tourist from the capital. There are pic-nic points on the Swan and Canning Rivers, the beautiful boating sheets of P e r t h and M e l v i l l e waters, and Fresh Water Bay, where those w h o love the water can never tire of monotonous surroundings. Other points of vantage are the Serpentine Falls on the South-western R a i l w a y , and the heights of the Darling Range, from w h i c h magnificent views of the Swan V a l l e y are obtainable. GERALDTON, w h i c h is 210 miles north of Fremantle, and is at present the terminal port of the A . U . S . N . Co.'s steamers on the West Australian coast. Geraldton is the seaport of a very large area of country, including the Yalgoo, Murchison, and Peak H i l l goldfields. H i t h e r t o these fields have not been " fashionable," so to speak, but those who did settle there have had no reason to complain, and the official returns published from time to time indicate a slow but steady influx of population. T h e gold exported from Geraldton in 1894 was 5 >6°5 ounces; and i n 1898 reached n 6 , 3 5 6 o z s . : T h e Customs revenue of the port has increased from £ 2 7 , 3 8 6 in T893 to £"49,954. These figures will give some idea of the progress which Geraldton has been and is making. A s a natural I


28

Australasian

United

Steam Navigation

Company,

Limited.

harbour Champion B a y (as Geraldton was formerly known) is second only to A l b a n y , and by recent additions to the main jetty, w h i c h is n o w 1,000 feet long, large steamers like the Waroonga, Bnlimba, and Rockton have no difficulty in berthing alongside and discharging their cargoes direct into the railway trucks. The t o w n is w e l l laid out, and there are some fine substantial buildings to be seen in the principal thoroughfare, Marine Terrace. The population is about 3,000 souls, and w i t h the surrounding districts numbers over 6,000. Geraldton is n o w in communication b y rail with Cue, distant 260 miles. Parliament has also authorised the extension of the line from Cue to Nannine, and w i t h the greater facilities thus provided these fields should develop much more rapidly. F r o m Cue there is a weekly coach service out as far as Lawler's, which is a most promising field, and further out still many parties are to be found doing exceedingly w e l l . It is a recognised fact that but a small area of these vast fields has as yet been nrospected, and the opinion is held by many that great discoveries w i l l yet be made and that there are undoubtedly great possibilities before the district.

SOUTH

AUSTRALIA.

is the province w h i c h binds all five of the colonies on the continent together, for its boundaries run the full length of three of them on the east, and abut against that of the L a n d of G o l d on the west. It stretches also from ocean to ocean, its extreme length w i t h the N o r t h e r n Territory being about 2,000 miles and its breadth 650 miles. The area of South Australia proper, which extends to the 26th parallel, is 380,070 square miles, while the Northern Territory, which was first settled in 1864, contains 523,620 square miles. It w i l l be seen, therefore, that there is plenty of room for expansion, as the population of the province is but 360,000, of w h o m about 150,000 are gathered together within the metropolitan area. South Australia has not had the advantages which have drawn immigrants from all over the w o r l d to the other colonies. There has been no rush after gold such as that which filled Victoria w i t h a sturdy and self-reliant people more than forty years ago, or like that which is now rushing up the population of Western Australia until it bids fair to take rank w i t h the other nations of the South. N e i t h e r have there been discovered large areas of coal and silver bearing country as i n N e w South Wales, or even such reliable goldfields as those w h i c h keep Queensland


P E R T H


Australasian

United Steam Navigation

Company, Limited.

29

busy. W o o l , wheat, and copper have been the chief staples of South Australia, and her growth, while substantial, has been remarkably steady. Fluctuations in price do not trouble the successful gold miner, but the quotations for copper, wheat, and wool are as changeable as the barometer, so that to a very great extent in times past South Australia has been dependent upon the condition of outside markets for her prosperity or depression. Latterly, however, because of the big interest she possesses in the B r o k e n H i l l trade, and as a result of the profitable commercial relations which have sprung up w i t h the gold miners of the West, there has been less anxiety manifested as to foreign prices. The population, w h i c h on J u l y 1st, 1898, numbered 361,483, cultivates nearly 3,000,000 acres of land, and last year exported goods to the value of £"6,513,347, or £"18 6s. 8d. per head, while the imports the same year were £"6,444,238, or £ 1 8 2s. i o d . per head. T h e chief exports are wool, wheat, and minerals, the totals b e i n g : Breadstuff's, 22,530 tons ; wool, 35,126,643 lbs.; and minerals £^258,576 i n value, a l l for 1898. In 1896 the wool export was at the highest point reached in ten years ; but the biggest figures for wheat were i n 1891, when the export reached 304,818 tons. Minerals were highest i n 1889, when the total value was £390,932. T a x a t i o n is not heavy, for the rate per head in 1898 was only £2 8s. i d . ; and school fees need not be paid by the people, for all the primary State schools are free, and are very excellent schools. There are i n the colony 14,447 miles of telegraph wires, and 1,724 miles of railway lines. T h e Government own the waterworks also i n various parts of the colony, and the revenue from t h e m last year was £"107,510. T h e public revenue for last year was .£2,566,611, and the expenditure £2,598,939. There is a public debt of £"24,408,535, most of which has been expended i n building railways, waterworks, telegraphs, wharves, jetties, lighthouses, and other works of development, w h i c h return a satisfactory revenue to the State, and also indirectly are a very large factor in the progress of the people. T h e leading industries are w o o l and wheat growing, mining, wine making, dairying, and manufactures. T h e land laws are framed w i t h a view to placing people on the land i n the easiest possible way. O f the total area of the colony, exclusive of the Northern Territory, only 7,243,290 acres have been sold, and 694,405 acres are held on credit and granted b y way of endowment; 108,274,445 acres are leased for pastoral purposes, yielding an annual rent of £"52,777, while 14,997,475 acres are leased for other purposes at an annual rent of £"100,174. A n additional 3^ million acres are also occupied for pastoral purposes at a rental equal to £"1,162 per annum, but the occupation is only temporary and can be terminated at short notice.

i)


30

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United Steam Navigation

Company,

Limited.

T h e remaining portion of the vast area of the colony is at present unoccupied. T h e number of sheep, cattle, and horses in the colony at the date of latest returns was: Sheep, 5,032,541; cattle, 274,255; and horses, 164,820. ADELAIDE, the capital of South Australia, was so named after the consort of K i n g W i l l i a m I V . , and its site was selected by Colonel L i g h t on December 29th, 1836. It is situated on a plain midway between the sea and the M o u n t L o f t y Ranges on the east and north, while the elevation is sufficiently great to allow of the completion of that excellent system of deep drainage which renders it the cleanest and most healthy city in the Southern Hemisphere. T h r o u g h its centre flows the R i v e r Torrens, and by the construction of a weir near the western boundary a splendid sheet of water has been thrown back to beautify the prospect, and to give facilities for boating and other aquatic sports. Adelaide and N o r t h Adelaide, which lie on either side of the Torrens L a k e , are surrounded as w e l l as divided from each other b y belts of park lands half a mile wide. These parks are for the most part carefully tended and planted w i t h handsome trees, thus giving a greater charm to a city which in its natural state was most beautiful of situation. Whichever way one looks glimpses of green refresh the eye, for the principal thoroughfares of the metropolis are ornamented by well-chosen trees, while in the spring the appearance and the encircling hills is lovely. Beyond the belt of park lands lie the suburbs of Adelaide. There are five handsome bridges across the Torrens, and every suburb is connected w i t h the city either b y trams or trains. Adelaide has many breathing places in which its citizens may enjoy a veritable rus in urbe. K i n g W i l l i a m Street, which is laid out from north to south, is 132 feet wide, the footpaths on either side being 20 feet i n w i d t h . In the very centre of the city this runs into Victoria Square, a picturesque enclosure embellished by statues and abounding in grass}' lawns and w i t h umbrageous avenues. Wakefield and Grote Streets bisect the city in the opposite direction, their w i d t h being exactly the same as that of K i n g W i l l i a m Street, on each side of which the same thoroughfares have different names. In the centre of each of the quarters into which the city is divided b y these broad streets is another square, one being named after Sir J o h n Hindmarsh, the first G o v e r n o r ; a second after Sir James Hurtle Fisher ( H u r t l e Square), the first Commissioner of the South Australian Company ; a third after M r . W . W . W h i t m o r e , M . P . , one of the founders of the colony ; and the fourth after Colonel L i g h t , whose body is buried under a handsome


G E R A L D T O N


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United Steam Navigation

Company, Limited.

31

monument within its limits. H u t t Street, which runs parallel w i t h K i n g W i l l i a m Street, about half a mile to the east, is the same width as the central avenues of traffic; while N o r t h , West, South, and East Terraces are also spacious thoroughfares. In the heart of N o r t h Adelaide is situate Wellington Square, which was so named in honour of the conqueror of Waterloo, who took a deep interest in the passage of the Imperial A c t under which South Australia was founded. The principal business of Adelaide is done in K i n g W i l l i a m Street and in those streets which cross it between N o r t h Terrace and Victoria Square ; but recently the southern half of the city has been rapidly growing in importance. N o r t h Adelaide is for the most part a residential area, while the suburbs mingle business and domesticity together. In K i n g W i l l i a m Street are built the head offices of all the banking institutions of the metropolis, the chief insurance offices, the T o w n H a l l , the Post Office (with a tower 158 feet high), the old and new Government offices, the Police Court, the L o c a l Court, the Supreme Court, and the Glenelg Railway Station. O n N o r t h Terrace are the Government Railway Station, Parliament Houses, the viceregal residence, the Adelaide Club, the Public L i b r a r y , Museum, and A r t Gallery, the University, the Jubilee E x h i b i t i o n Building, and the Hospital. The chief open-air resorts in Adelaide are the Botanical Gardens, of 40 acres, on N o r t h Terrace, with their splendid palm-houses, their w e l l arranged Museum of Economic Botany, and their fragrant display of bright flowers ; the Botanic P a r k , 84 acres i n extent; the Zoological Gardens, which contain the best collection of w i l d animals in Australia ; the Adelaide Oval, where the chief cricket and football matches are played ; the R o t u n d a and the Torrens L a k e ; the cemetery on West Terrace ; and the Agricultural Show Grounds at the rear of the E x h i b i t i o n . The principal seaside holiday resorts are Brighton, Hallett's Cove, Glenelg (six miles distant), H e n l e y Beach, the Grange, the Semaphore, and Largs Bay, most of which can be reached b y railway within an hour ; while the N a t i o n a l P a r k , Belair, the T h o r n d o n Park Reservoir, the H a p p y V a l l e y and H o p e V a l l e y Reservoirs, Waterfall G u l l y , Norton's Summit, and the H i l l s are all within easy distance by train, coach, or private conveyance. Objects of interest to which the visitor from the adjacent colonies is always welcome are the Parliament Houses, the T o w n H a l l with its 145 feet tower, the Post and Telegraph Offices and Telephone Exchange, the Observatory on West Terrace, the Public L i b r a r y , the Institute Reading R o o m , the A r t Gallery, the National Museum, the Adelaide H o s p i t a l , the School of Mines and Industries, and the Chamber of Manufactures, all of which are on N o r t h Terrace ; the Children's


32

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Steam Navigation

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Hospital, N o r t h Adelaide ; the Young Men's Christian Association building i n Grenfell Street; Industrial School for the Blind, N o r t h Adelaide ; the Bushman's Club, Whitmore Square; the Arcade i n Rundle Street, Our Boys' Institute in Wakefield Street, the M a r k e t s on East Terrace and in Grote Street, and the Trades H a l l in the latter thoroughfare. The places or amusement are the Theatre R o y a l and the Cyclorama i n H i n d l e y Street, the Bijou Theatre i n K i n g W i l l i a m Street, the Albert H a l l i n Pirie Street, and the Central and Victoria H a l l s in Grenfell Street. Churches of all denominations abound in the city and suburbs. Adelaide is the centre of many religious, philanthropic, musical, literary, political, scientific, and patriotic societies, and, as everywhere else in Australia, its residents go in largely for sport. B u t though athletics are liberally patronised, education is not neglected. T h e magnificent system of primary public instruction has already been mentioned, and there are also splendidly equipped and most successful colleges, such as St. Peter's, Prince Alfred, Whinham's and W a y Colleges, leading up to the University, w h i c h has schools of L a w , Medicine, Music, A r t s , and Science. There are also facilities for special instruction i n mining, agriculture, viticulture, and other practical subjects at the School of Mines and Industries, and at the Roseworthy Agricultural College. Recently, too, farm schools have been established i n Adelaide and the country. T h e climate of the city, although hot days are frequent in the summer, is most enjoyable, and the death rate is exceedingly low. The land i n the vicinity is very fruitful, and orchards and vineyards are remarkably prolific, while the gardens are always gay w i t h flowers. E v e r y cottager appears to be an expert horticulturist, for nowhere else in Australia are flowers so plentiful as in Adelaide. T h e population of Adelaide proper is about 42,000, while w i t h its ring of suburbs the number is brought up to 150,000. Leaving P o r t Adelaide b y steamer the coast line is closely followed, which, however, possesses no special feature until the borders of the Victorian colony are reached, whence pleasant and varied scenery is met w i t h a l l along up to P o r t P h i l l i p Heads, which are strongly fortified on either side. H e r e a strange patch of waters is met w i t h , called " T h e R i p , " which at times is very a w k w a r d to get through, especially when wind and tide are at variance. I n 1838 the authorities in D o w n i n g Street had a proposition under serious consideration of throwing a bridge from P o r t P h i l l i p Heads to V a n Dieman's L a n d . O n l y a distance of 160 miles ! Such was the geographical knowledge of Victoria 60 years ago; and even now it is no uncommon thing for friends i n Europe to ask one about to reside in Melbourne to be sure and call on an acquaintance in Brisbane, Christchurch, or H o b a r t .


ADELAIDE.


Railways.

Victorian

Summer Excursions SEASIDE

and

GIPPSLAND

LAKES.

From loth November, 1899, till 30th April, 1900, Seaside Excursion Tickets at Holiday Excursion Fares will be issued at the principal stations to Geelong, Queenscliff, Dean's Marsh, Forrest, Timboon, Portland, Warrnambool, Port Fairy, Frankston, Hastings, Bittern, Mornington, Stony Point, Sale, Bairnsdale, Foster, Toora, Welshpool, Alberton, or Port Albert, and combined railway and steamboat tickets for the Gippsland Lakes. The tickets will be available for return for three months, and the journey may be broken at Melbourne for three days going and returning. Purchasers of Seaside tickets to Queenscliff or to Warrnambool and Port Fairy (via Penshurst) and Port Fairy (via Terang), may make Drysdale, or Marcus H i l l or Koroit respectively their destination instead. For full particulars see posters at aU stations.

MOUNTAINOUS

DISTRICT EXCURSION

TICKETS.

These tickets will be issued at Melbourne to stations as under on days shown, commencing 18th November :— Second Eeturn.

First Return.

TO.

s.

22 29 34 37 39 40 43 26

TOONGABBIE BRIAGOLONG BEECHWOBTH YACKANDANDAH BRIGHT HUON LANE TALLANGATTA MANSFIELD

D.

8.

2 1 10 3 8 6 0 5

14 19 23 24 26 26 28 17

D.

10 5 3 11 5 11 10 7

To Mansfield, Beechworth, Yackandandah, Bright, Huon Lane, and Tallangatta by all trains on Fridays and Saturdays, available for return till the Saturday in the second week foUowing their issue. Holders of Bright tickets may terminate their journey at, or commence their return journey from, any station Myrtleford to Bright inclusive. Melbourne to Beechworth and Bright tickets are available for return from Bairnsdale or Sale. To Toongabbie and Briagolong by all trains on Fridays and Saturdays from Prince's Bridge, Richmond, South Yarra, Toorak, and Caulfield, available for return till the Saturday in following week. Toongabbie tickets are available for return from Traralgon, latter station to stamp tickets. These tickets will also be issued by all trains daily from Warrnambool, Port Fairy, and Portland to Beechworth and Bright at the following fares :— To

BEECHWOETH.

To

BRIQHT.

FROM.

1st Return.

WARRNAMBOOL PORT F A I R Y PORTLAND

s.

68 72 85

D.

1 4 0

2nd Return.

S.

45 48 56

D.

5 0 10

1st Return.

s.

72 77 89

D.

11 2 10

2nd Return.

s.

48 51 60

D.

8 5 3


Tickets will be available for two months. The journey cannot be broken on any of these tickets, except on those issued at Warrnambool, Port Fairy, and Portland, holders of which may break their journey at Melbourne (but not elsewhere) for three days both going and returning, and before the return journey is commenced they must be presented at the Booking Office to be stamped, and no tickets will be recognised unless they have been first so stamped.

COMBINED

RAIL

AND

COACH

TICKETS.

During the Summer months Combined K a i l and Coach Tickets are issued at Melbourne to popular Seaside and Mountain Resorts. F u l l particulars in the Book T i m e Tables, which can be obtained at the principal stations. Price 3d.

COMBINED

RAIL

AND

MELBOURNE

STEAMER

and

TICKETS.

QUEENSCLIFF.

During the Summer months Combined Rail and Boat First Class Return Tickets between Melbourne and Queenscliff are issued in connection with the P.S.S. Hygeia and Ozone at 7s. 6d. each. Melbourne and Queenscliff issue these tickets on Fridays and Saturdays; and Messrs. Huddart Parker & Co. and the Bay Excursion Co. on Saturdays and Sundays. Tickets are available for return till the following Monday. Passengers going by rail return by steamer, and vice versa. The journey cannot be broken.

MELBOURNE

and M O R N I N G T O N .

During the Summer months Combined Rail and Boat First Class Return Tickets are issued in connection with the pleasure steamers Hygeia and Ozone at 6s. 6d. each. The tickets are issued at Prince's Bridge on Fridays and Saturdays, and by Messrs. Huddart, Parker &, Co. and the Bay Excursion Company on Saturdays and Sundays. They are available for return till the following Monday. Passengers going by rail return by steamer, and vice versa. The journey cannot be broken.

COWES

and

SAN

REMO.

Combined Rail and Steamer Tickets to Cowes and San Remo, via Stony Point, are issued at Melbourne, Geelong, Ballarat, and Bendigo at the following fares:— To

To

COWES.

SAN REMO.

FROM.

1st Return.

2nd Return.

1st Return.

2nd Return.

MELBOURNE

10

s.

D.

s.

D.

0

14

6

12

O

GEELONG

19

6

14

0

23

6

18

0

25

6

18

0

29

6

22

0

31

0

22

0

35

0

26

0

...

BALLARAT BENDIGO

...

6

8

s.

S.

D.

Tickets will also be issued from Cowes and San Remo to Melbourne at the same fares as are charged from Melbourne. These tickets will be available for return for three months. Passengers from and to Melbourne cannot break the journey. Passengers from Geelong, Ballarat, and Bendigo may break the journey at Melbourne for three days both going and returning, b u t may not break at any other station. Geelong, Ballarat, and Bendigo tickets must be presented at the Booking Office, Stony Point, to be stamped before starting on return journey, and no ticket will be recognised unless so stamped.

R.

G.

KENT, SECBETABT.


Australasian

United Steam Navigation

Company, Limiied.

33

After entering the Heads, Queenscliff comes into view ; it is certainly one of the best watering-places of Melbourne, being at once a clean, convenient, and cheerful seaside resort, w i t h first-class hotels. Continuing up the bay, Portarlington is passed, so famed for its production of onions. M o s t of the country around is well adapted for agriculture, and the people have not been slow in recognising the fact, for it is all well worked ; it is undulating and shelves almost imperceptibly to the bay. Some distance to the west is Geelong, snugly sheltered at the end of a bay. The approaches to it have recently been greatly improved, thus enabling steamers of deep draught to berth at the wharves. Here the products are principally w o o l and agricultural produce. Geelong is a neat little place, well situated on highish cliffs, which gradually slope down at right angles to the shore of Corio B a y — t h u s allowing the line from the principal pier to ran right up into the main street—only to rise again where the spacious park and gardens of 180 acres now come into v i e w — a truly delightful spot, whence the splendid scenery of the Bay, w i t h the opposite shore in the far background, can be thoroughly appreciated. W e pass Williamstown on the left, and, obtaining pratique, steam slowly up the Yarra. O n the right we see Port M e l bourne Pier, where all the ocean-going steamers are now berthed—this suburban district having supplanted W i l l i a m s t o w n by its closer proximity to the city. Continuing up the r i v e r — here neither broad nor beautiful, but always busy—we come to miles of wharfage, with coasting craft of all descriptions becoming more numerous, and soon find ourselves alongside the Company's fine wharf in MELBOURNE. The city proper lies on the north side of the river Y a r r a . Its chief streets are well laid out. T h e principal street is named after Lieut.-Governor Collins, of old colonial fame. It is easy to remember the order of the cross streets, for, beginning with Spencer Street, we have K i n g , W i l l i a m , Queen, and E l i z a beth as cross streets to Collins Street. A l l the main streets of Melbourne are 99 feet wide. The heart of Melbourne lies within a square, bounded by Bourke and Collins Streets on the N o r t h and South respectively, and Swanston Street on the East, and Elizabeth Street on the West. This is popularly known as the " B l o c k , " and every afternoon the elite of the city promenade here. A notable feature of the city is the number of magnificent buildings, on which ornamentation has been lavished and much money spent. The great height of several of these buildings is most striking.


34

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United Steam Navigation

Company,

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The cable tramway system, affording communication to all suburbs from the city proper, is an admirable one. The cars, silent and swift, pass even few minutes, and a r e a great i m provement on the old horse cars. The smooth blocked tramway tracks are par excellence the paradise of cyclists, the devotees of the wheel taking full advantage of them. -

The immediate suburbs of Melbourne are: West M e l bourne, East Melbourne, Jolimont, and C a r l t o n ; and then we have an inner ring of independent suburbs, such as Fitzroy, Collingwood, Richmond, Prahran, South Melbourne, Port M e l bourne, and N o r t h Melbourne. Melbourne stands a city within a city, but there is yet an outer circle of suburbs, such as Williamstown, Footscray, Essendon, Brunswick, Coburg, Northcote, Preston, Heidelberg, K e w , H a w t h o r n , Camberwell, Toorak, Waldern, St. K i l d a , Caulfield, Elsternwick, Brighton—although we can merely name these which must be considered as part of Greater Melbourne, with its population of 465,000. The law of gravitation—that like draws like—holds good in city life as elsewhere, so that whilst at the east end of Collins Street the big brass plates of eminent doctors stare at y o u from every house, the west end is found to contain the offices of the steam shipping companies, and amongst them, at N o . 493, the handsome offices of the A . U . S . N . Co., are prominent. Then y o u find other clusters. The lawyers throng in Chancery Lane and Temple Court, in quarters convenient to the L a w Courts, a chaste edifice in William Street. Eastwards, again, you find the citizens of the Flowery L a n d , the Chinese residents of Melbourne, congregated in Little Bourke Street, about Celestial Avenue. Visitors will notice that each of the principal streets has, running parallel to it, on the north side, a narrower street of the same name prefixed by the word " L i t t l e . " These " L i t t l e " streets were intended by the surveyors of Melbourne to have been rights of way, but such is the enhanced value of property that what was intended for the dustman has now become most valuable frontages. The theatres of Melbourne are unsurpassed in Australia. There are the Princess in Spring Street; Bijou, R o y a l , and Opera House in Bourke Street; and Alexandra in Exhibition Street. The T o w n H a l l is one of the most striking buildings in Melbourne. It is centrally situated, and is largely used for conceit purposes, etc. A fine organ occupies the whole of the north end of the building, and recitals, free to everybody, are given every Thursday afternoon.

. ^ __ ===

==

=====

___ _^ =

=


COLLINS

STREET,

MELBOURNE


PARLIAMENT

HOUSE,

MELBOURNE.


S.S. , " A R A W A T T A "

DISCHARGING

BANANAS,

MELBOURNE.


Australasian

United Steam Navigation

Company, Limited.

35

The principal hotels are Menzies' in Bourke and W i l l i a m Streets, Scott's and the Federal in Collins Street. There are several coffee palaces, viz., the Grand in Spring Street, the Victoria in Collins Street, the Melbourne in Bourke Street, at all of which excellent accommodation may be obtained. Just beyond the L a w Courts stands the R o y a l M i n t , and here the visitor may find much of interest. The Melbourne M i n t is noted for the excellence of the coins it turns out, and much outside business is done in consequence, such as the minting of medallions for exhibition purposes, & c . Inside everything is in spick and span order, as is usually the case with Government institutions. The visitor may, on presentation of an order (obtained from the M i n t itself), inspect the establishment and view the whole process of manufacturing gold coins—from the refining of the precious metal, through the alloying, drawing, rolling, stamping, & c , to the weighing and finishing. The Post Office, at the intersection of Elizabeth and B o u r k e Streets, is also well worthy of a visit. Here one may see the intricacies of the postal system, where time is money, and everything is carried out with great regularity and order at a high rate of speed, affording quick communication w i t h all parts of the world. The Houses of Parliament, a noble structure at the top of Bourke Street, must not be overlooked. The handsome exterior is only exceeded in beauty by the magnificent interior, with its frescoed walls and ceilings. Just behind the Houses of Parliament are the Treasury Buildings, where the various Government Departments may be found in full activity. A n y information regarding the industries, resources, manufactures, etc., of the colony may be obtained here on application. The principal cathedrals and churches in the city of M e l bourne, including St. Paul's, St. Patrick's, Scots' Church, Independent Church, & c , are all stately buildings, and should not fail to be seen. If the visitor has time, a call should be paid to the Pentridge Stockade, the large penal establishment of the colony, which is situated at Coburg, and covers a vast piece of ground. Turning to more pleasing sources of interest, the N a t i o n a l Picture Gallery, in Swanston Street, with its attendant Technical Museum and Public Library, must be inspected b y all who desire an intimate acquaintance with Melbourne. T h e Gallery contains many beautiful subjects, too numerous to detail, but paramount amongst them may be mentioned A l m a Tadema's " Vintage Festival," Orchardson's " F i r s t C l o u d , " Waterhouse's " Ulysses and the Sirens," Long's " A Question of Property and " Esther," and Marcus Stone's " Peacemaker," for most of which large sums have been paid.

E


36

Australasian

United

Steam Navigation

Company,

Limited.

The chief items of interest in the Museum are exhibits relating to mining, and an immense fund of valuable information is here stored for the prospector and mining investor. The L i b r a r y is well stocked with books on almost every conceivable subject, and it is a most valuable and important institution. It contains a free lending department, a circulating library without expense to the readers. The Melbourne University, situated in Carlton, should also be visited. It stands in a large piece of ground, with a beautiful lake. T h e University was incorporated by A c t of Parliament, 1853. The building was commenced 3rd July, 1854, and opened 3rd October, 1855. It takes a high rank among kindred institutions. It contains, amongst its buildings, the Clarke Buildings, costing £\ 1,000, erected at the expense of the late Sir W . J . Clarke and his brother, M r . J . Clarke. The Ormond College, named after the late Sir Francis Ormond, who contributed £41,780 out of its ultimate cost, £"75,000; and the University H a l l (Wilson H a l l ) , named after Sir Samuel Wilson, who defrayed its entire cost, £40,000. The Natural H i s t o r y Museum is well worth inspection. It is a fact to be remembered, that this institution, when inaugurated, had a roll of one dozen students, but has since turned out over 4,000 graduates, some of whom, at the present time, hold the highest places in the scientific world. The E x h i b i t i o n Building, an immense structure, stands out prominently above all other buildings, its grand cupola being visible nearly all over Melbourne, and is particularly noticeable on entering the river. There is an Aquarium here which should be seen, the collection of marine animals and fishes being very fine. There are few places so highly favoured in the matter of public parks as the C i t y of the South. A beneficent Government has wisely provided a profusion of these mighty " lungs," affording ample breathing space in and around Melbourne. In the Zoological Gardens, at R o y a l Park, you can, for a modest sixpence, see one of the finest collections of wild animals in the world. The Botanical Gardens, at South Yarra, are unsurpassed i n Australia, and the noble edifice of Government House, w i t h its large grounds adjoining the Gardens, makes a most enchanting bit of scenery, forming the subject of many an artistic sketch. The Melbourne Observatory, possessing one of the finest telescopes in the world, is situated at the South-West corner of the Domain and Gardens. The sporting proclivities of the public are indicated by the number of racecourses. There is Flemington, where the annual


BALLARAT.


HKN'DH',0.


Australasian

United Steam Navigation

Cow/>any, Limited.

37

racing carnival is held, when near and far from all parts the people come flocking to look at the Cup, all, of course, animated by the patriotic and laudable ambition to improve the breed of horses. There are also racecourses in the suburbs, notably Caulfield, Epsom, Mentone, Moonee Valley, and others too numerous to mention. A t Cup time, H . M . warships, both imperial and auxiliary, find it convenient to extend their guardian care to Port Phillip. Melbourne has no beautiful harbour of which to boast, in fact she has not been well favoured in this respect ; but what was lacking in nature has been, to a great extent, overcome b y the genius and enterprise of the citizens, who, under the regime of the Harbour Trust, have converted the swampy embouchures of the Yarra into a noble river,, with miles of wharfage accommodation for the world's commerce. Education has not been neglected. Apart from the Melbourne University, referred to elsewhere, Victoria has four great public schools, viz :^ScOtch College, Wesley College, Church of England Grammar School, and the Geelong Grammar School. Besides the " public" schools, there are many equally good Colleges, amongst which may be named the University H i g h School, St. Patrick's College, St. Francis Xavier's College, Presbyterian Ladies' College, etc., etc. Education is free, secular, and compulsory ; and the State schools are most imposing buildings in many places. Victorians are determined to give the young hopefuls a fair start in life. F r o m Melbourne many delightful trips can be made to coast and country. The watering-places near the H e a d s — Sorrento and Queenscliffe, & c . — a r e easily accessible; whilst Fern Tree G u l l y , Dandenong, Healsville, Lilydale, U p p e r Y a r r a Valley, Yarra Glen, Macedon, Woodend, Y a n Yean, & c , are all most interesting places and well worth a visit. There is one feature of Melbourne and its vicinity which may be specially mentioned. This is the good roads which abound ; in fact, these are to be found right through the colony. The country is fairly level, of which cyclists take full advantage. Bicycles may be hired at reasonable rates at any of the city depots, and easy riding for miles around is available for a l l cycling enthusiasts. Ladies are found awheel, even 100 miles out of the city. The mining metropolis is Ballarat, 75 miles from M e l bourne, and is aptly termed the Golden C i t y . Ballarat is the largest inland city in Australia. The largest nugget ever found on Ballarat was the Welcome, at B a k e r y H i l l , at a depth of 180 feet, in 1858. This mass of gold weighed 2,217 ounces 16 dwts., and was valued at about £"9,000. T h e n next to it in size was one found in 1853 in the Canadian G u l l y ,


38

Australasian

United Steam Navigation

Company,

Limited.

a run famous for nuggets, no less than six being taken out of it in one year. This one weighed 1,619 ounces n dwts. T h e L a d y H o t h a m , in 1854, weighed 1,177 ounces 17 dwts. T h e largest nugget ever found, so far as records go, was discovered on the surface at M o u n t Moliagul, near Dunolly, in 1869. It weighed 2,280 ounces. L a k e Wendouree and the Botanical Gardens of Ballarat are objects of surpassing interest. T h e lake is an ornamental sheet of water, the shores of which are fringed with gardens and plantations. T h e Botanic Gardens contain twelve marble statues, purchased at Carrara, by M r . Thomas Stoddart, a wealthy speculator, and were the first erected in the Gardens. They cost over £2000. Since their erection several other statues have been added by means of a bequest left by M r . J . Russell Thomson, one of the pioneers of Ballarat, who left what remained of his fortune (about £4,000) to be invested in statuary for the Gardens. One group, " T h e Flight from Pompeii," perhaps the finest statuary south of the line, has been lavishly praised b y the highest European critics, and the sculptor, Benzoni, refused an offer of £4000 for it. A colossal statue of Sir W i l l i a m Wallace, executed in the colony by Percival B a l l , and the Claxton Memorial, are the latest additions. A few general figures regarding the productions of Victoria may be of interest to the visitor, who, if he desires, can easily study the subject fully in the Government reports and other books of statistics. Victoria had for the year ending M a r c h 1898, the following area under cultivation :—Wheat, 1,657,450 acres; oats, 294,183 acres; potatoes, 44,197 acres; hay, 580,000 acres. T h e gross produce of the same being—Wheat, 10,580,217 bushels; oats, 4,809,479 bushels ; potatoes, 67,296 tons ; hay, 659,635 tons ; which gives an average produce per acre of : Wheat, 6.38 bushels ; oats, 16.25 bushels ; potatoes, 1.52 tons ; hay, 1.14 tons. T h e time of the wheat harvest varies in different parts of the colon} , but the average time when the harvest begins is December 1st, and the average time when it ends January 27th. Besides the above crops the colony produces barley, maize, rye, peas and beans, turnips, mangel wurzel, beet, carrots and onions, grass and clover seed, hops, and tobacco ; also a large quantity of fruit, such as apples, peaches, apricots, & c , & c . There are 27,701 acres under cultivation for vines, yielding for the 1897-8 season 601,053 cwt. grapes. The wine made during the same season is 1,919,389 gallons; raisins, 1,482,236^5; currants, 51,746lbs. T h e estimated population of the colony on the 31st December, 1898, was 1,175,500. -


LAVENDER

BAY,

SYDNEY


Austialasian

United Steam Navigation

Company, Limited.

39

Leaving b y steamer for Sydney, we pass Brighton, M o r n i n g ton, Dromana, and other popular watering-places on our left; we come again into the R i p and out into the Pacific Ocean. Heading in a south-easterly direction we pass through Bass Straits and round Wilson's Promontory, which is the southernmost point of Australia. The islands, of which there are many in this vicinity, swarm w i t h seals. W e n o w shape a course for Cape H o w e and thence to Sydney Heads, before reaching which lovers of costal scenery can enjoy to the full the most magnificent of panoramic views, especially along the Illawarra district, where the little town of Wollongong lies snugly in between the hills, presenting a cultivated and altogether unique appearance. T w o bold and precipitous points of land denote the Heads, which are only one mile apart. A lighthouse, w i t h a very powerful electric light showing to a distance of 22 miles, is situated on the South H e a d . Port Jackson may be admitted to have one or two rivals, but it may reasonably be doubted whether any other harbour in the w o r l d is its superior either for natural beauty or for safe anchorage. The geographical position of the harbour is such that it was selected by the A d m i r a l t y as the headquarters of the British fiaval forces in Australian and Pacific waters. It is almost like visiting fairyland to sail down this magnificent harbour on a bright sunny day—and as this is " sunny N e w South Wales', such days are common enough. The sight is bewildering as the great expanse of waters of Port Jackson comes into view, and as the scenery all around gradually unfolds itself. So indented w i t h bays and harbours within harbours is P o r t Jackson that the foreshores positively extend to 100 miles. It matters little how long a man lives in Sydney, it is seldom that he is able to explore or casually visit even one-half of the charming resorts formed by the innumerable bays, creeks, beaches, headlands, and islands of " our harbour." T h e gently rising ground surrounding the bay is generally green w i t h vegetation and brightened with mansions, villas, and cottages. H a l f an hour's delightful run up the harbour brings us to the Company's wharf, and we are soon in a hansom on our way to one of the first-rate hotels in SYDNEY. In proportion and importance Sydney is a city well in keeping w i t h its noble entrance gate and gloriously picturesque approach. The visitor, still warm w i t h admiration excited b y the natural beauties of the harbour and the handsome mansions crowning the heights, dotting the slopes, and even i n some cases with the deep blue waters of the harbour lapping their


40

Australasian

United Steam Navigation

Company,

Limited.

very foundations, has his attention diverted to the more solid and impressive evidences of commercial and industrial development presented b y the huge piles of buildings lining the foreshores and extending away back on every hand as far as the eye can reach. That we are at the threshold of a great city is clearly manifest long before we set foot on shore, and we are to some extent prepared for the further experiences which await us in this, the cradle of the Australian nation. In general appearance Sydney presents a marked contrast to the other capital cities of Australia. When the city was laid o u t — i t can scarcely be said to have been planned—no one could have had the faintest conception of what was in the womb of the future, and as the settlement expanded it was apparently considered sufficient for all purposes present and to come to tollow the tracks made through the original scrub, as the contour of the country or as primary convenience suggested. One of the consequences of this go-as-you-please proceeding is that some of the principal streets are narrow and irregular, and in distinct contrast in this respect to the chess-board exactness with which some of the other Australian cities have been laid out. M u c h has been done of recent years to widen narrow and to straighten crooked thoroughfares, and also to cut down some of the steep hills which have operated to divert traffic from the most direct routes. There are still, however, plenty of curves and twists and hills and dales to lend variety, if not charm, to a peregrination of the city. Notwithstanding, Sydney possesses several fine wide thoroughfares which would do credit to any city in the world. L o n g lines of handsome business premises grace the principal streets, and the numerous huge stores and warehouses abutting on the water frontages, although, perhaps, not presenting an}- striking architectural features, appeal w i t h considerable force to those who have an eye to the strictly utilitarian aspect of affairs. Sydney, of all the cities of Australia, has availed itself to the fullest extent of the facilities for street paving afforded by the abundant supplies of hardwood blocks available close at hand, and all the principal streets have splendidly laid hard clean roadways. One result of this wise provision is that the streets are remarkably free from the dirt and dust arising from heavy traffic in narrow city thoroughfares under other circumstances. Sydney has many fine public buildings and institutions which are well worthy of notice, but it is not to our purpose to mention more than one or two of these. First, perhaps, comes the T o w n H a l l with its fine Centennial H a l l , erected, as the name implies, in commemoration of the centenary of the colony in 1887. This is a fine group of buildings, the T o w n H a l l having a specially ornate facade, while the Centennial is a


WYNYARD

SQUARE,

SYDNEY.


Australasian

United Steam Navigation

Company, Limited.

41

beautiful hall—the largest in the colonies—with the largest organ in the world, upon which recitals are given by a talented organist with a high European reputation. The Post Office is the most imposing of Sydney public buildings ; the tower, one of the highest in Australia, is open to visitors, and commands a view of the city and surroundings such as is unattainable from anj other point. Other noteworthy public buildings are the Lands Department, a very extensive block ; the Colonial Secretary's Offices, and the Technical Schools. Parliament House is an old-fashioned structure, and as soon as the circumstances of the colony permit it is to be replaced with a building more worthy of the dignity of the Legislature. The A r t Gallery (in the Domain) is also devoid of interest from an exterior aspect, but it contains a very fine collection of pictures, of which the Sydney folk are justly proud. There are many other noble edifices not strictly of a public character which are well worth attention, but space will not permit of special reference to them here. r

Apart from such impressions as may be conveyed by what is to be seen from the harbour, a visitor to Sydney cannot long fail to grasp the fact that the pastoral industry is the mainstay of the commerce of the country, of which Sydney is the great shipping and trading depot. W o o l , skins, hides, and all the other associated products of pastoral industry are in evidence, in more senses than one, in the streets and on the wharves, and the most imposing of the huge stores before mentioned as adjacent to the wharves are wool warehouses, where the great staple product of the colony is stored and dumped prior to passing into the holds of the many fine steamers and sailing vessels waiting for it. A few words about the pastoral industry of the colony may not be amiss here. It was not long aftei the first settlers established themselves in the neighbourhood of Sydney that the eminent suitability of the country for sheep breeding was (recognised, but, owing to the difficulties in the way of importing suitable stock, the first few years in the history of Australian settlement passed without any appreciable progress having been made. B y 1795, however, just over 100 years ago, the matter of sheep breeding was beginning to take a hold upon the attention of the people, and although the primary object in view was to provide meat for the colonists, the importance of growing good fleeces was not lost sight of. One of the first of the early settlers to realise the possibilities that lay before them in connection with wool growing was Captain Macarthur, an officer of the N e w South Wales Corps, who had, in the year above mentioned, accumulated a flock of 1,000. Macarthur was really the first man to enter into sheep breeding in the colony in a systematic way, and he was so


42 Australasian

United Steam Navigation

Company,

Limited.

impressed with the necessity of improving the quality of his fleece and producing wool which shciuld command attention in the markets of the world that he incurred considerable expense in importing sheep from the Cape, where he was fortunate enough to secure three rams and five ewes of very fine Spanish breed, which had been presented by the K i n g of Spain to the Dutch Government. These precious animals reached the colony in 1797, and from that date Macarthur went steadily on improving his flock, and in a few years obtained such fine fleeces as commanded the read}' appreciation of English manufacturers. Samuel Marsden, the first colonial chaplain, was another of those who got on to the right track, and early in 1806 he secured from England some merino sheep from the Royal farms at Windsor to improve the breed in the colony. Thus were the foundations laid of the great wool-growing industry of Australasia, which has now reached such proportions that the colonies possess upwards of 100,000,000, sheep, and produce upwards of 625,000,000 lbs. of wool annually. The importance of the position occupied by N e w South Wales in this connection is plain when it is stated that this colony alone possesses upwards of 41,000,000, or nearly half the total number of sheep in the whole of the colonies, and exports a correspondingly large share of the wool. A s a matter of fact, the wool export of N e w South Wales rose from 80,000 lbs. in 1819 to 306,824,358 lbs. in 1896, though it fell to 280,948,406 lbs. in 1898 owing to drought. The product of the wool-growing industry now represents an annual value of ÂŁ9,457,535- This includes, however, large quantities of Queensland wool, which is sent to the Southern capital for sale or shipment. The greater part of the vast area of country which pours its wealth into Sydney is of course occupied for pastoral purposes, but still agriculture is not neglected, and the total area returned as under cultivation during 1898 was 2,195,669 acres. The area alienated or in process of alienation amounts to 45,698,348 acres, and the area under lease for pastoral purposes is 122,828,335 acres. The importance of Sydney as a shipping centre may be gathered from the fact that the value of the inward and outward trade amounts to ÂŁ39,995,203 per annum, and a comparison with the principal ports of Great Britain shows that in point of value of trade Sydney is exceeded onlv bv L o n d o n , Liverpool, and H u l l . Having diverted attention for the moment from the city itself to an explanation of the principal foundation upon which its prosperity rests, we may turn again to some of the leading features of the capital, which after all may prove more attractive than dry statistics. Sydney has been so liberally endowed with parks and reserves of one kind and another that no one


WEEPING

ROCK,

WENTWORTH

FALLS,

BLUE

MOUNTAINS,

N.S.W.


Australasian

United Steam Navigation

Company Limited.

43

in the city need be at any time beyond three to five minutes' walk from a well-planted and grassed space. The extent to which provision has been made in this direction is brought home to the mind by the statement that more than 776 acres in all, or one-fourth of the whole area of the city proper, has been so appropriated. The principal of these reserves is the Botanic Gardens, which, w i t h Government House grounds, and what is k n o w n as " t h e Domain " (a very large park), occupies one of the most charming sites to be found on the shores of a harbour rich in the picturesque. These reserves overlook that portion of the harbour k n o w n as F a r m Cove, where the warships have their moorings, and only the most attractive features of shipping of a great port are here presented—the grime and dirt and unsavouriness being restricted to the upper parts of the harbour. The other principal parks are H y d e Park (right in the heart of the city), Belmore Park, Cook Park, and outside the city proper are the Centennial Park (a noble gift to the citizens in commemoration of the centenary of the colony in 1887), covering 780 acres, and representing an expenditure to date of upwards of a quarter of a million of money ; Moore Park, and Victoria Park (which adjoins the University grounds). Besides these are the National Park, w i t h an area of 36,320 acres, and the Kurringgai Chase, another similarly extensive reservation for national recreation purposes. The former park is situated 18 miles southward from the city, and the latter about 30 miles to the northward, both having been dedicated "with a full appreciation of their specially picturesque features and varied resources from the point of view of the pleasure seeker. In other ways probably few people are better off than the citizens of Sydney for many and varied opportunities of spending their leisure time profitably and pleasantly away from the toil and moil of the city. It is safe to say that there are hundreds of charming retreats presenting features specially attractive to pleasure seekers within easy reach by train or boat; and in the matter of boating or fishing alone the waters of H a c k i n g River, George's River, Botany Bay, Narrabeen Lake, Hawkesbury River, L a k e Macquarie, and other places, to say nothing of the extensively ramifying harbour itself, afford unbounded facilities. So far as the meaning of the word " history " is understood in Australia, Sydney and the towns in the immediate neighbourhood are the richest in the colonies. Captain Cook, in his famous voyage in the Endeavour, discovered Botany Bay, and made an entrance there on 28th A p r i l , 1770, but he did nothing of importance beyond hoisting the U n i o n Jack and taking formal possession of the territory for the British C r o w n . H e then sailed northward—and although he saw and named Port


44

Australasian

United Steam Navigation

Company,

Limited.

Jackson he did not apparently enter i t — a n d kept on until he came to an anchor in Moreton Bay. It was not until seventeen years later that Captain Phillip, R . N . , was placed in charge of an expedition sent out for the purpose of establishing a colony in the new country reported upon so favourably by Cook. The fleet arrived in Botany B a y in January, 1788, but Captain Phillip was so little impressed w i t h the suitableness of that place for the establishment of his settlement that he set out to explore the coast, and his satisfaction may be imagined when, within nine miles, the boats entered what proved to be one of the finest harbours in the world, w i t h ample fresh water supplies to be obtained on shore and plenty of good timber. A t Sydney Cove, the site now k n o w n as Circular Quay, where all the great ocean liners are provided w i t h berths, Captain P h i l l i p established his first camp, and from Sydney was directed the whole of the energies of the first settlers of the colony. A s the colonists penetrated inland, Parramatta, L i v e r p o o l , and Windsor became established as subsidiary centres of trade and industry, and all these o l d towns whose history now spans a century are well worth a visit from those for w h o m matters bearing upon the early history of Australian settlement have any interest. A m o n g the resorts adjacent to Sydney most favoured by visitors are the Blue Mountains, w h i c h are widely celebrated for the grandeur of their scenery, i n this respect excelling any easily accessible mountain scenery in Australia. The principal sights in the mountains are to be reached from M o u n t Victoria, Blackheath, Katoomba, and W e n t w o r t h Falls, and the farfamed Jenolan Caves are also amongst the attractions of the Mountains. The Hawkesbury R i v e r trip is a favourite one, and specially attractive to people to w h o m imposing river scenery is a novelty. There are also a hundred and one other places within easy reach, at which a pleasant day or two may be spent, and any odd hours may be employed in visiting such places as M a n l y Beach, Coogee B a y , Bondi (all w i t h open beaches), or Watson's B a y , w i t h its grand outlook from the South Head Cliffs, over the Pacific, on the one hand, and back over the harbour, towards the city, on the other. NEWCASTLE,

N.S.W.,

is situated at the mouth of the H u n t e r River, some 60 miles north of Sydney, and is the second city of importance in the colony. Its population, including suburbs, consists of about 60,000 souls, supported chiefly by the production of coal, which is exported in large quantities to almost all parts of the globe. Newcastle is regarded as the great coal emporium of the Southern Hemisphere, and is justly entitled to this distinction


NEWCASTLE,

VIEW

FROM

NOBBY'S.


Australasian

United Steam Navigation

Company, Limited.

43

from the extent of the operations in this commodity. During the year 1898 no less than 2,485,394 tons coal and 9,644 tons coke were shipped to foreign and intercolonial ports, and 1,433 vessels visited this port, representing a gross tonnage of 1,803,960, which w i l l give some idea of its importance. The harbour in ordinary weather is not difficult of access, and vessels drawing up to 23 feet 6 inches may enter and depart safely. The wharfage accommodation for the discharging of cargo is about one and a quarter mile long, and for loading between two and three miles, and the latter is being extended from time to time. T o facilitate the shipment of coal twelve large hydraulic cranes and three steam cranes are constantly engaged, and, should occasion demand, any one of the former can load up to 100 tons per hour. A n important addition to the loading appliances is now being made in the shape of three movable cranes. W h e n erected, these cranes will move from one hatch to another as may be required; the ship w i l l not need to shift at all during the loading operations; this will mean a considerable saving of time and labor. A number of powerful electric arc lights, one of the finest installations in the w o r l d , have been erected on the loading wharf, which enable operations to be carried on at night quite as expeditiously as in daytime. The city is also lighted similarly, and presents an attractive sight at night when viewed from the harbour. Besides the coal trade, a large business is done in wool and frozen meat. During the course of last year 46,126 bales of wool, 13,521 head of cattle, 48,432 sheep, 81,256 cwts. of frozen meats were shipped, the export value of which would amount to £711,775, and, adding roughly the value of coal and coke, the totals represent no less than the magnificent sum ot ^1,569,973The city and harbour are protected from hostile attacks by two forts—one on Allan's H i l l ( F o r t Scratchley) and the other on Shepherd's H i l l — h e a v y breech-loading guns of the most modern type being mounted there. Leaving the city and travelling southward by rail or coach for about 12 miles, the visitor finds himself on the shores of L a k e Macquarie, a magnificent inland sea, joined to the Pacific Ocean by a narrow channel three miles long. T h e lake itself has a shore circumference of 360 miles, and is one continuation of land-locked harbours surrounded b y hills of moderate size, thickly wooded and covered by native ferns and flora. Several of the leading citizens of Newcastle have country residences on its shores, and in the near future, when its charms become more generally known, it w i l l no doubt become one of the leading holiday resorts, as apart from its splendid scenery, a most enjoyable time can be spent shooting, fishing, and bathing. T o the


46

Australasian

United Steam Navigation

Company,

Limited.

north of Newcastle, about 20 miles, is P o r t Stephens, a beautiful land-locked harbour, abounding in fish, and a famous resort for sportsmen. Leaving Newcastle, we leave N e w South Wales as far as the larger steamers are concerned, for the ports between here and Brisbane—important though they be i n providing an outlet for the products (sugar, dairy produce, & c ) of the fertile coastal districts of N e w South Wales—are only available for small steamers, which convey those products to Sydney. About 30 hours after leaving Newcastle, the trip between which port and Brisbane is usually a very pleasant one, the track lying near enough to the land to afford a good view of the principal points on the way, we round Cape M o r e t o n and enter Moreton B a y . L i k e Melbourne, Brisbane is situated some distance from the sea, and it w ill be about four hours after passing the Cape before we reach the city. The residents of Brisbane are very fond of the B a y , and if we happen to be entering the port on a holiday we shall find it dotted w i t h sailing vessels and small steamers crowded w i t h passengers enjoying the fresh breezes or witnessing the various exciting events of a regatta. A s we come up the river we notice on our right the works of the Queensland M e a t E x p o r t Co., which shipped last year, among other products, over 12,000 tons of frozen meat to Europe. O n the opposite side, higher up the river, may be seen the Queensport works of Messrs. Baynes Bros., who ship large quantities of tinned meat to Europe and elsewhere; and near t o w n the large refinery of the Colonial Sugar Co., an adjunct to similar establishments in the Southern colonies. W h e n we come higher up the picturesque winding river to the residential portion of the city the eye is delighted with the foliage of the trees and b y the gardens decked out w i t h flowers, in which the residents take so much pride. T h e river itself takes about an hour and a half to negotiate after entering it, and we land at length at the A . U . S . N . Company's wharf, situated in the centre of the town, and find ourselves on T

Q U E E N S L A N D soil.

BRISBANE alone will not give the tourist much idea of Queensland as a whole, for in this vast colon}-, w h i c h comprises 668,497 square miles of country, being 1,300 miles long and 900 miles broad, we find, as we might w e l l expect to do, a great diversity in climate as well as in products. It has been said, and we believe with truth, that in Queensland can be grown anything, whether suitable to temperate or tropical climates, and this is being verified year b y year b y the efforts of acclimatisation societies and of individuals who are endeavouring to increase


BRISBANE.


QUEEN

STREET,

BRISBANE.


Australasian

United Steam Navigation

Company, Limited.

47

products available either for home consumption or export. The chief articles at present on which the wealth of Queensland is based are sheep, cattle, and gold, while among the agricultural productions sugar holds far and away the supreme place. Y o u see evidence of what the country produces as soon as y o u set foot on the Brisbane wharves. In one place are huge stacks of neat bags of sugar ; in another piles of bales of wool and sheepskins ; in another stacks of cased meats, diversified by casks of tallow and bundles of hides. But to show the various articles produced in the colony, we must refer the reader to the following list of exports during 1898 : — G o l d , dust and bars .£2,855,781 Hides and skins ... ... ... 466,265 Meat, preserved and frozen ... 1,159,374 Sugar, raw and refined 1,329,876 Tallow 328,53! T i n , ore and smelted Z ^? Wool 3,018,098 Pearl-shell and beche-de-mer ... 113,994 Other articles ... 1,552,337 These total £'10,856,127, while the imports reached .£6,007,266 sterling. T h e total estimated yield from the various goldfields of the colony up to 1898 has been 12,924,581 ounces, valued at £44,491,607, and for 1898 alone there was an increase of 112,120 ounces over 1897. 1

1

Brisbane is not a mining centre, and those who wish to see the gold and other mines of the colony must visit G y m p i e , Eidsvold, Mount Morgan, Charters Towers, Herberton, Croydon, Georgetown, and other districts, which we w i l l describe later when we come to the ports whence their output is shipped, but the other commodities which pass through Brisbane give employment to a large population. I n connection with mining, however, the coal trade must b y no means be overlooked. Ipswich, 24 miles from the capital b y rail, is the centre of the industry; and the railway wharf, situated only a short distance above the wharves where the A . U . S . N . Company's steamers lie, presents a busy scene, long trains of coal-laden trucks discharging their contents into steamers and punts. The coal produced in Queensland i n 1898 amounted to 407,934 tons. It is of very good quality, and little other coal is used in the colony, though at present the export trade in the article is but limited. The city of Brisbane is not laid out w i t h such wide streets as Melbourne and Adelaide, but compares in this respect very favourably w i t h Sydney. It has been said that there is not much to be seen in Brisbane, but the visitor w i l l find the Houses of Parliament, Government Offices, Picture Gallery,


48

Australasian

United Steam Navigation

Company,

Limited.

School of A r t s , Gymnasium, the Museums, the Grammar and State Schools, and other institutions well worth a visit. The splendid electric tram service affords comfortable means of transit in the city, and rapid access to the principal suburbs. W e strongly recommend a tour of the Museums, of which there are three—the General Museum in W i l l i a m Street, the Geological at the corner of Queen and George Streets, and the Technological Museum in W i l l i a m Street attached to the Department of Agriculture. A mere casual inspection cannot fail to convince the visitor that the resources of the colony are very large, and if his tastes or business pursuits lie in the direction of ethnology, natural history, the pastoral industry, mining or agriculture, he w i l l find enough to occupy him for many a long hour, and make h i m determine to visit the districts, whence the numberless object lessons have been brought, at the earliest possible opportunity. When visiting the Houses of Parliament, it w i l l be well to go through the adjoining Botanical Gardens, which are very prettily laid out, and, having a long frontage to the River, form a pleasant promenade for pedestrians and a good road for cyclists. In addition to these Gardens there are the Acclimatisation Grounds at Bowen Park, the curator of which is only too delighted to display his treasures to visitors; and there are numerous parks about the city where a quiet hour may be very pleasantly spent under the shade of the beautiful trees. Brisbane is provided with two theatres and an opera house, besides the Centennial H a l l and other places where concerts can be held, and the visitor should not lose any opportunity that offers of hearing the large organ in the E x h i b i t i o n Building. If fond of horse-racing, cricket, football, or other sports, he w i l l find ample opportunities of witnessing or sharing in them, and the River affords unrivalled facilities for rowing, sailing, or fishing. W h e n he gets tired of Brisbane itself he should select one of the numerous railway lines which w i l l take him in a comparatively short time far into the country, or else to one of the pleasant watering-places, such as Sandgate, Cleveland, and Southport, which dot the shores of the Bay. Other wateringplaces, such as H u m p y b o n g , Redcliff, and Caloundra are reached by small steamers. The visitor w i l l wish to see where the wool and other products, shipped away from here, come from, and it w i l l be well, therefore, for h i m to take a run by rail to Toowoomba, W a r w i c k , and other places on the D a r l i n g Downs, situated from 1,400 to 2,000 feet above sea level. H e will there find a very different climate to Brisbane, and in the winter w i l l be glad of clothes as warm as people are accustomed to wear in the mother country at that season. A month could be put in




Australasian

United Steam Navigation

Company, Limited

40,

very well on the Downs if the visitor has provided himself w i t h introductions to the various station owners. The Downs have in the past been utilised more particularly as pastoral country, but agriculture seems likely to be pre-eminent in the near future ; and when the visitor sees what has been accomplished already in the way of growing wheat, grapes, and fruit of various kinds, he will be convinced that much more can be done, and satisfied that all that is required to develop this fertile country indefinitely is a large and industrious population, which, to judge from recent progress, it seems likely to have in the near future. The Government is doing its best to encourage settlement, and particulars of the conditions on which land may be taken up are readily supplied by the Departments of L a n d and Agriculture in the colony or by the Agent-General in L o n d o n . After thoroughly doing the Downs we return to Brisbane and embark for our next p o r t — M a r y b o r o u g h — 1 8 0 miles distant. Leaving in the evening we wake up to find ourselves in smooth water, about ten hours after starting from Brisbane, for the steamer has by that time crossed Wide B a y Bar, and we are in the quiet waters of Sandy Straits, bounded on our right by the huge extent of Frazer Island. W e proceed along the Straits until we reach the mouth of the M a r y River, up which we steam, and land in Maryborough about sixteen hours after leaving Brisbane. MARYBOROUGH is situated about 25 miles from the mouth of the M a r y R i v e r , which is daily being rendered more easy of navigation b y our energetic Harbour Board. It may almost be called the Birmingham of the colony, possessing as it does foundries, sawmills, & c , that w i l l compare favourably with any in the Australasian colonies, while the coal mines in the vicinity of the town are also an important factor in its prosperity, their output being shipped to all the principal ports north of Maryborough. The production of the mines during 1898 was about 80,000 tons, valued at £35,000. The Yengarie Sugar Refinery, nine miles from town by rail, has been long established on the banks of the M a r y River, and more recently the M o u n t Bauple Refinery and the Maryborough Sugar Factory have helped to swell the already large output of sugar from the District. The far-famed Isis Scrub, which only a few years ago was virgin forest, but has now been transformed into miles of rolling sugar-land under full cultivation, lies midway between Maryborough and Bundaberg, and has numerous large sugar mills—that of the Colonial Sugar Co., at Childers, being one of the largest in the world. The works of


50

Australasian

United Steam Navigation

Company,

Limited.

the Queensland Smelting Co., L t d . , are situated at Aldershot, on the railway, about six miles from town, where ores of every description from all parts of the colonies are treated by the latest scientific methods. The smelting capacity is over 2,000 tons per month, and lately a bullion and lead refinery has been added, thus enabling the company to place their o w n brand of pig lead on the market. This company exported gold, silver and lead to the value of £"44,000 during 1898. Maryborough has been the port for the Gympie goldfield since its discovery 32 years ago, and within its district there are also the Eidsvold and Paradise goldfields, and the Biggenden bismuth mines, considerable trade being done w i t h these places. Gympie, being only two and a half hours from Maryborough by rail, must certainly be visited. This field was discovered in 1866, and has since then yielded 2,311,832 ounces of gold. A t present the output is not so phenomenal as has been the case i n past years ; the y i e l d in 1898 was, however, 105,472 ounces, value £ 395,520, and prospects are extremely encouraging in many directions. A m o n g the Maryborough institutions worthy of special mention are the commodious Hospital and Grammar Schools, which are beautifully situated i n large ornamental grounds. The School of Arts and Museum is a most creditable and successful institution, and w e l l worthy a visit. T h e flourishing suburb ot Tinana is connected with Maryborough by the Lamington Bridge, a large structure composed entirely of concrete, the only bridge of the kind in the colonies. Pialba, one of the most attractive watering-places in Queensland, and the centre of a considerable farming and sugar planting area, is connected w i t h Maryborough b y rail, a boon that is largely availed of. The value of imports during 1898 from beyond the colony was £"164,194, and exports £"98,200, i n addition to which the shipments to ports within the colony, not including articles transmitted by rail, amounted to .£123,579, of which timber contributed .£56,571, machinery £13,749, and coal £"35,000. Ninety-two miles on up the coast we reach the entrance to the Burnett River, and proceeding up some nine miles reach BUNDABERG. Although comparatively young, Bundaberg has made such rapid progress that to-day she takes her place as one of the leading coast towns of the colony. The population of the town and immediate district is about 15,000. Sugar manufacturing is the leading industry here, and no visitor to Bundaberg should leave the district without making himself


WATERFALL

GULLY,

MAROON.


MARYBOROUGH.


Australasian

United Steam Navigation

Company, Limited.

51

acquainted w i t h one or more of the large plantations, several of which are within easy reach of the town, and w i t h their owners by w h o m he w i l l be most hospitably received. M a n y of the mills are built on a very extensive scale, w i t h a l l the latest appliances for minimising the cost of production. The Millaquin and Yengarie Sugar Co. have a large refinery on the river bank close to the town, and they not only manufacture sugar and golden syrup from juice supplied by numbers of crushing mills, but are also large buyers of raw sugars for refining purposes. Owing to the severe drought, which existed during the first half of 1897, the output of sugar from Bundaberg for the 1897-98 season was a poor one—only amounting to 15,627 tons ; but it is a matter for congratulation that the season just closed (1898-99) is a record one, the total output amounting to 41,485 tons. The ensuing season, 1899-1900, gives every indication of being as satisfactory, and it is estimated that the output will reach fully 38,000 tons. Although sugar growing and manufacturing are the principal they are by no means the only industries upon which Bundaberg depends. Amongst others may be mentioned the Bundaberg Foundry Co.'s extensive works, also the various sawmills, gas and soap works, & c . The Bundaberg Co-operative D a i r y Co., whose premises are situated on the river bank near the Burnett Bridge, commenced operations last year, and are now exporting butter to the old country. In connection with this industry there are no less than 20 Creameries at work in the district. Bundaberg is the port for the mining towns of M o u n t P e r r y and Eidsvold. The rising price of copper has been the means of most of the M o u n t Perry works being reopened, besides those at Cannindah, from which mines a considerable quantity has been exported, and the goldfields of E i d s v o l d are being steadily developed. The value of imports into B u n daberg during 1898 amounted to £93,754, and exports £466,123. Passing down the river and out again through Burnett Heads, a pleasant trip of 100 miles brings us to our next stopping place, GLADSTONE, situated on the shores of Port Curtis, numbering a population of over 4,000 in the town and district. It is principally noted for its splendid harbour. T h e entrance is good, and deep water obtains to the wharves. M i n i n g and pastoral are the chief pursuits followed in the district. Meat-freezing works are in operation, fitted up w i t h the latest and most approved machinery, capable of treating one hundred bullocks, or


£2

Australasian

United Steam Navigation

Company,

Limited.

equivalent in sheep, per diem. I n 1898 an extract plant was added. Coal exists i n large quantities some distance from the port, but cannot at present be profitably worked owing to want of communication. Large copper lodes are known to exist, and a large area has been taken up by an influential syndicate at Glassford Creek. Imports for 1898 amounted to £"10,737, while the exports reached £127,365, including gold to the value of £"12,697. The imports and exports for the previous year were £11,033 and £102,218 respectively. In and out among islands again for 45 miles, still bound in a northerly direction until Curtis Island is passed, when now steering a westerly course for 55 miles across Keppel Bay and up the Fitzroy River, we reach

ROCKHA

MP

TON,

which-derives its commercial importance as the principal town in Central Queensland, and the second in the colony, through being the shipping port of the Central district, which comprises some of the finest agricultural and pastoral land in the colony. The Central R a i l w a y extends in a direct line west, 424 miles to the present terminus, Longreach. Branches from Emerald northerly to Clermont, and south to Springsure. The downward traffic on the line for the year 1898 was as follows :—100,699 bales of w o o l , 142,487 sheep, 7,382 head of cattle, also large consignments of tallow, hides, sheep skins, etc. The goods trucked from Rockhampton inland during the same period amounted to 43,384 tons. It is in contemplation to extend the Central line i n a westerly direction, probably from Longreach, thereby tapping further highly productive country, the output from which w i l l still further increase the importance of Rockhampton as a shipping port. The extension of the grazing farm system, which has been adopted for some years past, has been the means of closer settlement on western lands and consequent increase of trade. Railway communication is now completed from X o r t h Rockhampton w i t h Broadmount (near the mouth of the river 26 miles from town by rail), where steamers of heavy tonnage should be able to berth alongside a substantial wharf erected by the Government. T h e central system w i l l be connected with the Broadmount line on completion of the railway bridge across the Fitzroy River, and this work is expected to be completed b y the end of 1899. Rockhampton is the port of entry for M o u n t Morgan, included in which is the celebrated gold mine of that name,


BUNDABERG.


i;i.Al>5T0NE-


Australasian

United Steam Navigation

Company, Limited.

53

which is perhaps the most wonderful hitherto discovered, as since the formation of the company in 1886 up till the end of 1898, 961,977 tons of ore have been treated, yielding 1,875,668 ozs. of high-class gold, and the sum of £4,879,166 has been distributed in dividends to shareholders. These splendid results have, a recent English magazine states, been derived from " a little hill covering but five acres." Of course, the mountain itself is of considerable area, having originally formed portion of a 640 acre selection ; but our English contemporary is not so very far out, for the area of the open cut workings of the mount is a little under seven acres, and the area from which payable stone has been taken at all parts, not including what is known as the Sugar Loaf, is a little over ten acres. The new West W o r k s have been recently completed, and the output considerably increased in consequence. T h e railway from Kabra, on the Central line, to M o u n t Morgan, giving this communication with Rockhampton, was opened for traffic in November, 1898. It has ahead} proved a great convenience to residents of the Mount, as well as to visitors, who come from all parts of the world to inspect the famous mountain. -

The Lake's Creek Meat W o r k s , situated on the north bank ot the river about lour miles from town, are also a source of considerable profit to the city, but their operations during 1898 did not come up to the standard of previous years owing to dry weather, tick plague, & c . The following were the principal exports from Rockhampton in 1898 :-221,324 ozs. gold valued at £900,000, 108,120 bales wool, 4,620,730 lbs. preserved meat, 7,342,041 lbs. frozen meat, 198,229 lbs. meat extract, 3,930 tons tallow, 92,651 hides, 4,280 bales sheepskins, 1,200 bales marsupial skins, the total value of which amounted to £2,434,287, an increase of £302,632 over 1897 figures. T h e imports during the twelve months ending 31st December, 1898, reached £623,061, but this does not include goods received coastwise of an approximate value of £207,637. The revenue collected at the port of Rockhampton amounted to £187,162. The sights in the vicinity of the town are E m u Park (connected by rail), 28 miles distant, and Yeppoon, another seaside resort, which necessitates a short journey of eight miles by coach from Tanby, on the E m u Park line. The country around Yeppoon is specially adapted for agriculture ; and the Yeppoon Sugar Plantation is about four miles from the township. There are two sets of caves—Olsen's and Johansen's—both w i t h i n pleasant driving distance, which would well repay a visit, the formation of them being unique in its grandeur, and they are said by travellers to be almost equal to the Jenolan in N e w


54

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Ccmpany,

Limited.

South Wales. In common w i t h other Queensland towns, Rockhampton possesses fine Botanical Gardens, but they are unfortunately some distance from the town, thus militating against their attraction to visitors. M a k i n g another start, we are once more threading our way amongst many an island of emerald green, when, after a run of 80 miles, the entrance to Port B o w e n is passed ; this must not be identified w i t h B o w e n , which is over 200 miles to the north. T h e coast line hence is very much broken all the way up to Torres Straits, a distance of over 1,000 miles; and since the route now lies w i t h i n that series of ocean breakwaters, the Great Barrier Reef, those who ordinarily suffer from mal de mer generally experience a comfortable trip through smooth water, combined w i t h glimpses of captivating scenery all along. Steaming on past the Percy and Northumberland Islands, we come into sight of R o u n d Top and F l a t T o p Islands, and drop anchor within a mile of the latter. About an hour's run up the Pioneer R i v e r in one of the Company's tenders discloses a flat but very fertile district, and brings us to MACK

AY.

The town itself, the white roofs of which can be seen from the anchorage at F l a t Top, possesses but few attractions for the visitor. It has about it, however, a bustling, thriving appearance, which commends it to the commercial traveller. It is the surrounding district, w i t h its fertile soil, its equable climate, and assured rainfall, that is at the same time the glory and the reason for the existence of the town of Mackay. In the district " S u g a r " is king, for this is the premier sugargrowing district of Queensland. Giant strides have been made within the last few years. Hundreds of farmers have come from other districts and from other colonies and founded new homes here, and the older residents declare that at least one half of the people they now meet there are strangers to them. M a c k a y is the home par excellence of the Central Sugar M i l l system, which has made such a change for the better in the prospects of agricultural enterprise in the tropics, and which promises to completely revolutionise the business of sugar growing and manufacture i n this country. It is specially notable that while other districts claim that their lands are richer, and their crops heavier, there are no portions of the colony where anything like so high a price is given to the farmer for his cane as at M a c k a y . In 1898 the production of sugar was equal to 33,000 tons, of a value of not less than a quarter of a million sterling. R a i l w a y extension is anticipated which w i l l open up new areas for cane growing; and no district


ROCKHAMPTON.


Austtalasian

United Steam Navigation

Company,

Limited.

in the colony offers such admirable opportunities for practical farmers to invest as this favoured one. The imports for 1898 were £"108,921, and the exports were £382,873, of w h i c h £"296,840 were for sugar, in addition to which raw sugar valued at £48,641 was sent to refineries in Queensland. While the whole energy of the place is being devoted to one industry, there are many others which would be equally profitable only waiting development. Tropical plants of all sorts thrive luxuriantly, and the cultivation of coffee is likely to be an important industry i n the near future. T h e district of M a c k a y presents many features of great interest to the traveller. F o r lovers of scenery there are some of the prettiest spots to be found anywhere in Queensland, while the busy scenes at the huge sugar mills, where quite an army of men are employed, are a revelation to those who have never seen a modern sugar estate. Shortly after leaving the Pioneer River, and clearing F l a t Top, quite a network of islands is threaded, for no sooner are some passed than others come into view, and so on for 60 miles, until Whitsunday Passage is entered. In naming this locality, Captain Cook perpetuated the time of its discovery. The grandeur and loveliness of the scenery presented here can hardly be surpassed, even if equalled, on the Australian coast. Islands, high and low, large and small, some well timbered, others with grassy slopes fringed with white sand or protected by rocks, coral islets, shining like gems in the sun, w i t h the colour of the water varying from a bright green to a dark blue, clear as crystal and calm as a millpond, together go to make up a really enchanting scene. Proceeding some 40 miles, P o r t Denison is reached, and BOWEN is sighted lying snugly at the northern end, and may be w i t h safety termed the sanatorium of N o r t h Queensland, as its beautiful climate attracts many visitors from other centres who are fond of a healthy resort and plenty of sea bathing. T h e harbour (surrounded by hills and mountains, rising to a height of 3,500 feet) is not only beautiful to look at but safe to enter at all times by the largest vessels afloat. It has two entrances— the north, about a mile wide, formed by the north side of Stone Island, and N o r t h Head, on which is placed a lighthouse 90 feet above sea level. The south entrance is three miles wide between St. Thomas and south end of Stone Island. This town commanded the trade of the far western interior until the extension of the Central Railway in 1875. T h e district of which Bowen is the port at present contains an area of about 10,000 square miles. The population of town and district


56

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is about 3,400. The jetty is over half a mile long, and forms a pleasant promenade. T h e harbour has been greatly improved, in order to increase the facilities of the shipping trade. Large ocean vessels of 10,000 tons burden, which come here for frozen meat, can w i t h safety moor alongside the jetty, as there is 22 feet of water at low spring tides, w i t h a rise of about 9 feet. O n the visit of the Australian Squadron to Northern Queensland, the w hole of the war ships were anchored in line w i t h i n a quarter of a mile from the landing stage. r

T

The town is delightfully situated on rising ground, and the beautiful M o r e t o n B a y fig trees grow luxuriantly, giving grateful shade in many of the streets. The State Schools and Hospital are built on high ground, whence a comprehensive view can be obtained—on the one hand the Pacific Ocean with its islands, and on the other P o r t Denison, which appears as a lake amid the hills ; indeed, the tout ensemble at this point will well repay the walk. T h e pleasant sandy beach of the harbour makes a beautiful resort for visitors, and the Botanical Gardens w i t h its large bush-house is also well worthy of inspection. The imports for 1898 were valued at £24,091, and the exports at £230,906, the chief items of the latter being frozen meat, tallow, hides, and thousands of cases of fruit, consisting of mangoes, oranges, pineapples, lemons, passion fruit, & c . During the last few j-ears there have been shipments of horses to India. The district is rich in gold, silver, bismuth, copper, and c o a l ; but capital is required for their development. -., -The B o wen Meat W o r k s , six miles from town, treat large numbers of cattle. These are sent to the home markets in the shape of frozen meat, meat extract, and bye-products. There are also two other boiling-down establishments, viz., the Kingston and the D o n , both of which are almost constantly employed in reducing the surplus stock of the district to merchantable products. There is also a large area of excellent sugar land along the coast, and a m i l l , capable of manufacturing 4,000 tons of sugar in a season, is in operation near the Proserpine River, 40 miles south from B o w e n . The railway at present extends 48 miles to Wangaratta Creek, whence a coach runs twice a week to the R e i d River Railway Station on the Northern line, 52 miles distant, traversing the Burdekin sugar district en route. Coaches also run weekly to the Proserpine sugar district, the Normanby goldfield, and the Bowen River, where there is a rich pastoral district, 70 miles from town.


BOWEN

JETTY.


TOWNSVILLE.


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57

A run of about 100 miles takes us past three very distinct promontories—Capes Upstart, Bowling Green, and Cleveland ; when sharply rounding the last mentioned we are soon under the lee of Magnetic Island, w i t h our next halting-place prettily situated at the foot of Castle H i l l . Tenders come alongside to take passengers ashore, and in twenty minutes we land at

TOWNSVILLE, the growing town that has sprung up so rapidly since Captain Towns, of Sydney, landed in 1859. A view of the town from the bay presents a very pleasing picture ; the slopes on either side of Castle H i l l , w i t h its rugged and precipitous cliffs fronting the bay, rise from houses which nestle at their bases, and two smaller hills at the east are being steadily covered w i t h picturesque little residences half hidden in the dark green foliage of trees and semi-tropical shrubs. This is the first place of importance we have reached in Queensland which is situated on the very shores of the Pacific, a most decided boon, especially in the summer, to its inhabitants of 15,000, when the sea breezes, blowing directly on the town, come up w i t h regularity every morning. A pleasant walk of half an hour along the hard sandy shore brings one close to the Botanical Gardens, or Queen's Park. Here indeed is an enviable spot: the picture of a home country garden, w i t h tropical foliage to boot. It is kept exceedingly trim. The adjoining paddock of 75 acres is open to all for cricket and football. Inside the gardens are two bush-houses, where the plants are arranged to the best advantage; in fact, the fernery is the daintiest to be seen anywhere. A kiosk for the band stands i n the centre of the lawn, and there are many shady nooks under the sheltering trees where one can rest w i t h comfort. This is also the favourite resort of tennis players, for whose pleasure there are a number of courts. Alongside the paddock is the Grammar School, one of the finest buildings north of Brisbane, w i t h accommodation for forty boarders; and at present some necessary extensions are being made to suit growing requirements. The school has established, and is maintaining, a high standard, both for education and moral training. Immediately at the back rises Castle H i l l , most abruptly, nearly 1,000 feet, and one is well repaid for the hour's climb to its summit, which is now seen to be divided into three heads— the " T w o Sisters," with the gardens, at their base, overlooking Cleveland B a y w i t h Magnetic Island in the distance, and the third head commands an unequalled view of the country to the west towards the Range, with its ever varying lines of light


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and shade. The sandy reach of the mainland shore is broken by Kissing Point with its masked fortifications, only, however, to continue in a northerly direction towards the P a l m Islands, 40 miles distant. Altogether, the scene from here is not only extensive but really enchanting. T h e water supply of the town is of excellent quality and practically inexhaustible. The climate, as in most parts of Queensland, is in winter very pleasant, say from M a y to September. It is healthy, and cases of malarial fever are of rare occurrence. A bath on the shores of the bay affords a refreshing dip that can now be enjoyed without apprehension of sharks. Townsville is the centre of commerce for N o r t h Queensland, as a glance at statistics will show. The exports during 1898 totalled £2,616,511, the principal of which were—gold £1,302,226, wool £654,163, meat £259,740, and tallow £88,911 ; while the imports for the same period amounted to £876,175. The Queensland Meat Export and Agency Co.'s works have been doubled; the Burdekin River Meat Preserving Co.'s works at Sellheim, on the Burdekin River, are now in full swing, thus making the active meat preserving companies in this district to read as follow : — N o r t h Queensland Meat E x p o r t Co., L t d . ; Queensland Meat Export and Agency Co., L t d . ; the Torrens Creek Meat Works, the Burdekin R i v e r Meat Preserving Co. The harbour is now under the control of a Harbour Board, in whose hands rests the power for further enhancing the present facilities for berthing ships. The breakwater, usually spoken of as the " eastern jetty," is over a mile in length, and allows large vessels to lie alongside in safety, and dredging is being steadily pursued to obtain a uniform depth of 22 feet at low water spring tides. The Harbour Board recently purchased additional dredging plant, and the harbour is now being rapidly deepened. A comprehensive scheme is at present under the Board's consideration for enlarging and deepening Ross Creek, so as to allow the large coastal steamers to come right up to the town wharves ; at present only small ships can do this. During the year (1898) 1,217 intercolonial and foreigngoing vessels, representing a total tonnage of 681,808 tons, entered the port. The town is the seat of the Protestant Bishopric of N o r t h Queensland, and possesses a Cathedral, which, though in use, is not yet completed. T h e Roman Catholic Church has laid the foundation of what promises to be one of the most imposing sacred edifices in Queensland. T h e town is also the residence of the Judge of the N o r t h e r n Supreme Court. The School of A r t s is a roomy, well-ventilated building, the readingroom of which is furnished w i t h all the best high-class literature of the day, and the hall w i t h its excellent stage accommodation is a favourite with the dramatic fraternity.


CHARTERS

TOWERS.


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A number of concert halls are to be found in various parts of the town for the amusement of the public ; and musical and literary societies are on the increase. The Hospital, which is built on an eminence overlooking the bay, has earned a name through the length and breadth of the land for its efficient work. T h e visitor w i l l wish to see some of the sources of the prosperity of this part of the colony, and accordingly a trip b y rail of 82 miles must certainly be taken to CHARTERS

TOWERS,

a large and important township, situated on the northern spurs of the Towers Mountains, 1,000 feet above sea level, and the leading goldfield of Queensland. After a somewhat uninteresting railway journey, the visitor finds himself in a centre of activity, w hich is certainly not exceeded, if even equalled, in any part of the colony. The substantial character of the t o w n bears evidence to the confidence of its inhabitants in a continuance of the prosperity which it undoubtedly enjoys—in fact, it is this confidence which has made the place what it is, for during a time of depression considerable expenditure was incurred i n deep-sinking, thereby bringing to light the fact of the existence of the precious metal in payable quantities at very great depths, gold being now worked as far down as 2,552 feet below the surface at the Brilliant Deep-Levels Mine. Charters Towers occupies at present the enviable position of being the premier goldfield of Australasia. The output for 1898 was 453,093 ounces, valued at £1,138,179, the largest contributing companies being Brilliant and St. George United, Brilliant, D a y D a w n Block, Wyndham, Kelly's Queen Block, Victoria, Victoria Queen. The total value of gold won to the end of 1898 was £14,248,913. A l l the most modern appliances are in use on this progressive field, and the cyanide and pyrites works extract from the tailings the greater part of the gold that cannot be obtained by the ordinary process. The town is lit by gas. The electric light is also installed, and supplies many of the business houses in the t w o principal streets. Water is also laid on to all parts of the town, the supply being pumped from the river Burdekin, some eight miles distant. The main streets, Mosman and G i l l , contain many splendid buildings, and no less than eight of the chief banking institutions of Australia have branches in the towm. T h e Theatre R o y a l is a fine building, capable of seating some 1,200 persons. r


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The t o w n possesses one of the finest racecourses in Queensland, and few communities are better patrons of sport than the Towers people. The terminus of the northern railway, which passes through Charters Towers, is Corfield, 80 miles beyond H u g h e n d e n — the latter place being still the depot for the large quantity of wool produced in the enormous extent of country around. A n d when the final section of the railway extension is completed, Winton and the immense district, of w h i c h that town is the centre, w i l l have direct communication, b y rail, with Townsv i l l e — a boon which w i l l be greatly appreciated by everybody concerned. Returning to that port, we w i l l proceed in the small but comfortable s.s. Palmer, so as not to miss the enchanting coastal scenery w h i c h obtains Irom Townsville to Cairns. Steaming out of Ross Creek, and crossing Cleveland Bay, a beeline is made for the P a l m Islands, whence, taking a sharp turn to the west for 10 miles, we moor alongside the jetty at LUCINDA

POINT,

about 11 miles south of the mouth of the Herbert River. F r o m the end of the jetty a tramway runs 15 miles inland to Ingham, thus saving the tedious journey b y boat up the Herbert. This line is shortly to be extended from the present terminus, Ingham, to the Stone River, some 17 miles further inland. There is also a movement on foot to extend the line to the Kangaroo H i l l s , as a rich tin lode has been discovered there. The sugar, w h i c h formerly was brought down the Herbert River in punts to Dungeness, and shipped there, is now conveyed over the tram line, and shipped at the jetty. T h e imports of the district for 1898 were valued at £"21,004, d exports, the bulk of which was sugar produced by three mills, at £171,757. T h e value of a further quantity of goods produced in the district, but removed coastwise, amounted to £"24,910. The number of vessels entered inwards and outwards for the year was 550, representing a tonnage of 96,786. Casting off, we immediately enter Hinchinbrook Channel, which for natural beauty and picturesque scenery cannot be excelled in Australia. T h e waters here swarm w i t h fish, and w i l d fowl are plentiful. The course through the channel is by no means direct; now running parallel with a narrow neck of brush-covered land, where the island and mainland overlap, we turn sharp at right angles to find ourselves inside what is to all appearance a translucent placid lake, a r )

t

n

e




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61

adorned with islands, and reflecting on its bosom the image of towering heights, dashing waterfalls, and wooded headlands which encircle it. O n we go, but still no exit is visible ; n o w the shore is only just ahead; it looks as if we must be aground directly, when smartly rounding a promontory, a narrow opening appears through which we sail to another superb lake similar in character to the one just astern. These lovely sea lakes are formed by points of land from Hinchinbrook Island and the mainland interlacing. Twenty-five miles are thus pleasantly passed, when one of the finest and most beautiful harbours in the colony now comes into view. R o c k i n g h a m Bay was the making of CAR

DWELL,

which nestles naturally at the base of the woody range, b y which it is so w e l l protected. Founded in 1863, it was a place of considerable importance owing to the fact of its being the nearest port on the coast to the G u l f of Carpentaria, but since then greater facilities have rendered other places more convenient. O n its excellent soil much fruit is grown, while the cocoanut and candlewood palm, w i t h fig trees and bananas, nourish luxuriantly. Industry is represented by the meat works. The population of the district is 3,435- It was from here that Kennedy's expedition took its final departure for the N o r t h early in June, 1848. Hence a run of seven hours up the bay, past Dunk Island, brings us to MOURILYAN

HARBOUR.

L o o k e d at from the ocean, one would think there was not room enough to pass through such an awkward, narrow, and w i l d entrance, w i t h precipitous rocks on both sides, and i n the centre, too, one rears its black head to bar the way ; but still the channel is 80 feet wide. If this be our first visit, we enter w i t h our hearts in our mouths—it is next door to shooting a rapid. Once inside the lovely harbour, overshadowed by welltimbered hills, we are soon made fast to the wharf, and various are the nationalities employed in discharging and receiving the cargo, which eventually goes to the sugar plantations, some miles distant. F r o m here there are but 15 miles to steam, through calm water and in view of many a charming scene, before reaching GERALDTON, on the Johnstone River, which exported goods to the value of ,£110,019, and imported goods valued at £"11,429 during 1898.

1


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The principal resources of the district are the sugar-cane, export 8,978 tons; bananas, export 376,668 bunches; and gold, export 1,562 ozs. Geraldton is situated in the midst of most beautiful tropical scenery, and in one of the most fertile districts in Australia. Towalla goldfields are slowly forging ahead, and will no doubt attract a large amount of capital when once it becomes known to investors. Jordan is a new field about 35 miles from Geraldton, on the road to Herberton. It is at present carrying 180 men, who are all doing well w i t h alluvial gold. Several good reefs have been found. It is proposed to connect Geraldton and Herberton at an early date by a light railway ; and there is little doubt that, when this is accomplished, Geraldton w i l l , in a few years, become a larger and prosperous town. T h e first 17 miles of this line are now under construction. It is a settled thing that a Central M i l l will be established on the north branch of the Johnstone. The population numbers 1,500 white, 1,400 coloured. Another short trip of 50 miles, 'still hugging the shore, brings us to CAIRNS, a town which promises to become of paramount importance in the history of N o r t h Queensland. It lies almost flush with the water's edge, yet safe from spring tide or cyclonic disturbance, so sheltered is it by the surrounding hills and the protecting Barrier Reef. It is situated on the delta, at the mouth of an inlet which extends some nine miles inland, and which has an average width of at least half a mile, w i t h a depth of from 30 to 60 feet at l o w w a t e r — a harbourage wherein the whole of the Australian shipping could be secure from wind and weather. L a i d out i n wide level streets, those fronting the bay, shaded by the foliage of great native fig trees, the town presents a picturesque appearance. A s regards climate, the inconvenience of the few hot months of summer is counterbalanced by the delicious softness of the midwinter. H a v i n g a population of 7,000 in the district, Cairns imported for 1898 goods, w i t h a total value of £91,333 ; the exports for the same period having a value of £193,210, the principal of which were : fruit, £"44,877; sugar, £90,826 ; gold dust and bars, £20,391 ; t i n (smelted) £11,180 ; tin (ore) £10,797. The immediate back country along the inlet and down the Mulgrave River, extending in a s.s. westerly direction from the port, is of high quality for sugar-growing, or indeed for the culture of almost every tropical product, the lower lands giving immense returns in bananas, the drier returning excellent


4*

PORT

DOUGLAS.


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63

proofs of the suitability of the soil for sugar, while the high slopes of the mountains, which shelter the whole, have been proved to be of the first quality for coffee-growing. Southward down the Mulgrave River, thence up the Russell R i v e r for miles lie thousands of acres of deep rich soil, while to the west and north-westerly again, towards Freshwater Creek, and over to the Barron River, is a tract of most fertile country whence myriads of bunches of bananas reach the port. The Mulgrave and Southern District is served by a so-called tramway, which, to all intents and purposes, is a railway of Government gauge, owned and managed b y the Cairns Divisional Board. This line has at present a length of 15 miles, and, now that the bridge over the Mulgrave is completed, w i l l shortly be extended a further two miles, to serve the A l o o m b a country. T h e Government R a i l w a y line from the port travels north-westerly across Freshwater, and ascends the steep declivities of the Barron River by devious paths, here sidling along the face of the mountain, there crossing streams on slender spider bridges, anon rushing into tunnels through the razorbacked steeps, which form the gorge by w h i c h the highlands are reached. A t a distance of 20 miles are the famous Barron Falls, which the line passes, metaphorically speaking, at arm's length. It is a marvellously beautiful sight to watch the foaming masses of water plunging headlong, here a sheer w a l l of m i l k y white, there a broken roaring cascade, while thin clouds of heaven-tossed spray lightly veil the far w a l l and foliaged mountain steep. Indeed the whole journey to Kuranda (21 miles from Cairns), may truly be said to possess an infinite and varying charm for the lover of scenery. T o those who prefer the sea scape, it is a revelation to gaze down ere the falls are reached on the low lands, green with crops and pastures, beyond which lies the shining bay gleaming in the sun. Once at Kuranda, we may be said to have left the seaboard. H e r e coffee flourishes, the elevation (1,000 feet) being suitable for this culture. F r o m Kuranda the traveller proceeds b y various stages to Biloohra, where the line crosses the Barron. T h e Barron Meat Company, L i m i t e d , have taken their stand here, and have a Boiling D o w n and Meat Preserving W o r k s capable of treating 100 bullocks per diem. Six miles further and Mareeba is reached, the present terminus, 4 6 miles from port. T h e trip by coach from Mareeba to Herberton, a run of about seven hours, is w e l l worth taking, the road for a portion of the distance passing through some splendid scrub land, a good deal of which is under cultivation. The bracing climate of Herberton w i l l probably induce the visitor to spend a few days in this interesting township, the centre of the t i n mining industry.


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The Chillagoe Proprietary Company, L i m i t e d , are commencing to construct a railway, which, starting from Mareeba, w i l l extend westward a further distance of 95 miles, passing near the Hodgkinson Goldfield to the north, the Atherton farming district, and wonderful timber reserves to the south, drawing traffic from, and increasing enterprise in the Herberton, Watsonville, and Irvinebank t i n fields further west again, and finally landing in the very heart of the copper, silver, lead, lime, and iron bearing district of Chillagoe, the extent of which is but feebly guessed at as yet. Suffice it to say that men skilled in such matters have found in its riches a sufficient inducement to expend the enormous amount of capital required to construct such a railway. W h i l s t on this topic, we must not neglect to refer to the marvellous limestone caves at Chillagoe. The visitor w i l l find enough to w e l l repay the trouble of a trip. Picture to yourself a labyrinth of vast passages, the walls and roof studded w i t h all the fantastic shapes in which nature revels in such dark solitudes, w i t h limestone for her medium, and all on a gigantic scale, a l l stupendous, here and there the corridor opens into some vast chamber, hung w i t h stalactites supported b y giant pillars, polished and tinted, fretted and niched, adorned w i t h pilaster and cornice, a buried cathedral. A w a y to the south-west from the port lies the Russell Goldfields, an alluvial field, the y i e l d from which last year (1898) amounted to 2,204 ounces, having a value of ÂŁ8,611. Apart from the value of this part of the district, from its auriferous nature, it has a distinct and separate value in the richness of the scrub lands, and the extraordinary variety of its valuable timbers. It is not difficult to prophesy that this and the country w i t h w h i c h it directly marches, the Atherton U p p e r Barron L a n d , a tract extending southward to Ingham, a distance of 100 miles, w i l l become the home of many thousands of settlers, and that at no very distant date. O n l y a matter of 35 miles intervene between Cairns and our next port of call, the picturesquely situated town of

PORT

DOUGLAS.

In approaching this place the steamer passes in good view of the Low Isles, i n charge of the lighthouse on which is Captain Owens, the discoverer of the tow n, in 1877. A bold but handsome headland hides the township from the mariner's view, and serves the purpose of protecting the town from harm " when the stormy winds do blow." Port Douglas, from being a place w i t h a past, is now recognised as a place w i t h a near future. A Central Sugar M i l l has been erected at the r

r


COOKTOWN.


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Mossman, the output of which, last season, was 3,760 tons of sugar, and it is estimated there w i l l be between 48,000 and 50,000 tons of cane to crush this season. Several thousands of acres have been made to y i e l d up their richness in the form of cane of unequalled quality. The neighbouring settlements of Saltwater, Daintree, and Bailey's Creek have also gone in for sugar cultivation. O n the latter place yields of 60 tons to the acre have been obtained, w i t h a density of 14. This is a result unequalled before i n the colony, and there being such vast areas of land fit for cultivation, an effort is being made to procure a m i l l for that district also. It does not need a very sanguine traveller to see in a few years' time several mills where there is now only one, and the whole of the district smiling w i t h a contented and prosperous yeomanry. Closer to the town, also, the land is remarkably fertile, champion prizes having been obtained for sugar-cane from the M o w b r a y and rice from the Four-mile. The cultivation of coffee has been undertaken b y a goodly proportion of the landowners w i t h excellent results, and corn, English potatoes, and other farm products have been proved to thrive. In climate, it is always cause for wonder that the port is so cool. W h i l e those in the temperate South are sweltering in the hundreds, the residents of P o r t Douglas rejoice in the pleasant warmth of the eighties. The cause is that the town being built on a peninsula only three quarters of a mile across, the winds are almost i n variably off the sea, and the ranges flanking the western side of the town protect it from the winds from that quarter. In fruit products, the purely tropical varieties grow to perfection, mangoes, granadillas, oranges, lemons, pineapples, guavas, shaddocks, & c , being the principal exports. A s regards scenery, the principal beauty spot of the town is the fine semi-circular southern beach, a magnificent stretch of hard sand. This is the playground of the place, horse races and other sports being held there. Cassowary Creek is a regular fair}- glen, palms, ferns, and vines forming a vast scrub, the tall trees being covered w i t h orchids of rare kinds. O n the Daintree it is wilder and more majestic, the mountains and river taking the thoughts back to the old country, while the coast range flanking the Mossman reminds one of Scotia's rugged heights. Weighing anchor again, the steamer makes its way northward, passing the Daintree, Bailey's Creek, and the Bloomfield River. Proceeding some 25 miles along a rugged and somewhat inhospitable looking shore, Cape Tribulation is rounded, which speaks for itself of the difficulties encountered b y Captain Cook, especially when he had put his ship ashore here t o examine a leak. N o w passing the bay where Captain Cook spent a weary time, as che name he gave it indicates, we have


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Company,

Limited.

but 25 miles to travel, before M o u n t Cook, 1,450 feet high, is sighted, and rounding Grassy H i l l , 500 feet hi^h, on which there is a lighthouse and signal station, we find ourselves at COOKTOWN, which is situated at the mouth of the Endeavour River, where in 1770 Captain Cook was enabled to safely beach and repair his damaged vessel, a handsome monument now marking the spot. The town is pleasantly and healthfully situated on a small peninsula between the Pacific Ocean and the Endeavour River, and therefore enjoys a much milder climate than inland towns in a similar latitude. Cooktown owes its original prosperity to the discovery of the famous Palmer goldfield, which, during the first four and a half years of its working, gave the phenomenal yield of 839,000 ounces of gold. The field has since been almost deserted, but there are still man}- rich reefs which only require capital for their development. Another goldfield is located at the Starcke River, about 60 miles from Cooktown, and there are other alluvial fields further northward at the R o c k y and Chester Rivers, each giving employment to a small number of miners. A t M a y t o w n and Limestone a few reefs are being profitably worked. About 175 miles northward is the Coen, a mining township where many fine and permanent reefs are being developed. A n impetus has been given within the last three months to the T i n M i n i n g industry, owing to a substantial rise in the market, it is, therefore, expected that the output w i l l be greatly increased. Although the beche-de-mer industry has declined, Cooktown is still recognised as the chief market and port of export for the fish in the north. There are some good agricultural lands at the Endeavour, Bloomfield, and M T v o r Rivers, admirably adapted to the cultivation of sugar, but no great efforts have been made to establish an industry in this direction. The district is noted for the quality of its mangoes, oranges, and other tropical fruits, large quantities being exported during the season. Cooktown is the natural port for N e w Guinea. A subsidised mail service (the s.s. Moresby) calling here every six weeks, connecting with P o r t Moresby and Samarai. The schooner Ivanhoe and other vessels trade at regular intervals to Samarai and adjacent islands, thus affording frequent communication with the Possession.


THURSDAY

ISLAND.


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The total imports of the port during 1898 amounted to £"53,648, exports £85,534, among the latter being : Queensland gold, 11,286 ounces, valued at £"36,712; N e w Guinea gold, 7,355 ounces, valued at £"25,228; beche-de-mer, 29 tons, valued at £2,519. M a n y pleasant drives can be taken in the surrounding country, notably, one to the A n n a n bridge, a magnificent structure spanning the Annan river, and erected by Government at an outlay of £"17,000. Leaving Cooktown, we almost immediately start on a most intricate course among islands, reefs, and coral islets. T h e sea is as calm as a m i l l pond and as clear as crystal, while it vies w i t h the opal i n variety and brilliancy of colour. H a v i n g proceeded some 120 miles, we come within hail of the Channel Rock Lightship at Pipon Islands, while 80 miles further on, opposite a w i l d looking shore, we slow down near the Clermont Lightship, where a boat soon comes alongside to get letters and exchange exquisite shells of all shapes and sizes collected from the coral reefs, for tobacco, periodicals, and indeed anything that offers. Another run of 80 miles brings us to W e y m o u t h Bar. Twenty-five miles hence, still threading our way among dangers seen and unseen, Piper Island Lightship comes into sight off Temple Bay, whence rounding Cape Grenville and taking a final run of 80 miles on the east coast, we approach A l b a n y Pass—a deep-water channel between Albany Island and the mainland. This is the finest piece of coastal scenery in N o r t h Queensland. Steep inclines, of which Osnaburgh H e a d on the mainland forms a prominent feature, protect the channel on either side, while bold points of land and rocks fringing the shores w i t h charming little bays here and there, up whose sandy beaches bright wavelets ripple, add their beauty to the grandeur of the scene. The pass is in some parts but 500 yards wide, while the whole length is not more than four miles. Hence keeping a more westerly course for some 25 miles, we reach THURSDAY

ISLAND,

and moor alongside the substantial Government jetty, completed i n M a r c h , 1893, at a cost of £"41,318. This town, called after the island, which has a circumference of but a few miles, is a very picturesque little place, pleasingly situated, and from the hills at the back a panoramic view of a number of islands is obtained. The population of this, together w i t h adjacent islands, is some 2,000, who busy themselves principally w i t h pearl-shell and beche-de-mer fisheries, in which over 200 boats are engaged. The exports for 1898


68

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were valued at ÂŁ128,046, pearl-shell contributing ÂŁ109,401 to this amount, while the imports showed a value of ÂŁ60,342. The importance of this place from a strategic point of view has been recognised b y the Imperial as well as Colonial authorities, and it is strongly fortified, and the presence of a permanent garrison gives the island a prestige not to be gainsaid. After paying a visit to the School of Arts, which now embodies the old Museum, and then taking a stroll round the military road which almost circumvents the Island, we return on board and are off. L y i n g i n a south-east direction is Possession Island, in Endeavour Straits. Here Captain Cook, in the name of K i n g George III., took possession of the " whole eastern coast from lat. 38 deg. to this place, lat. 10^ deg. S., with all the bays, harbours, rivers, and islands situated upon i t . " W i t h three volleys of small arms, fired alike from the shore and the ship, the ceremony was complete. A gold-mining claim has been taken up on this island, and a five-head battery erected. H o r n Island, a mile or so away from Thursday Island, has also a five-head battery and a number of gold miners at work. G o l d may contribute shortly to the advancement of Thursday Island and district. Eighteen miles from Thursday Island we pass Booby Island, where provisions were formerly stored in a cave for any shipwrecked crew. A good lighthouse is here. Hence a monotonous run of about 400 miles brings us to our next anchorage, some twelve miles from the mouth of the N o r m a n River. A channel has been partly cut through the bar, which, when completed, w i l l enable vessels to come up to a point within 18 miles by rail of N o r m a n t o n , the permanent survey for which line has been made. A t the proposed terminus, Port N o r m a n ton, there is deep water right up to the river bank, and ample room for a large fleet of vessels. O w i n g to the peculiar position of this port, there is only one tide in twenty-four hours, and during the south-east monsoons it not infrequently happens there is no tide for three or four days. NORMANTON is situated about 50 miles from the mouth of the Norman River, on low ironstone ridges, the site being an excellent one and in every way suitable for an extensive town. Vital statistics prove the t o w n to be healthy, which is at variance with the general opinion in the South. The population is about 1,200; a few years ago it was about 1,400, but the attractions of the Croydon and Georgetown goldfields have reduced it. The Croydon and Georgetown goldfields to the east, the Cloncurry gold and copper deposits to the south, and the vast


NORMANTON.


J

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United Steam Navigation

Company, Limited.

69

area of pastoral country stocked with cattle and sheep tend to make Normanton a town of importance. A l l that is needed is railway communication to Georgetown and Cloncurry, the dredging of the bar at the mouth of the river, and river improvements. 1898 shows an export trade worth £154,539, while imports were worth £38,244 A large boiling down and meat preserving establishment provides an outlet for surplus stock, but is not working at the present time. The railway to Croydon, opened in 1891, w i l l in time be extended to Georgetown. The distance from Croydon (100 miles) is covered by a weekly coach service, and the tourist, especially if combining business with pleasure, should not omit to pay that important district a visit. The yield of the Croydon goldfield for 1898 was 55,275 ounces, valued at £110,876, and that of Georgetown for the same period was 21,679 ounces, valued at £58,507. BURKETOWN. This, the terminal port in the north for this line of steamers, is situated about 30 miles from the mouth of the Albert R i v e r . The township had for some time a very chequered existence, but the great pastoral country, of which it is the port, m a y eventually lead to its occupying a prominent position. There is fortnightly communication with the South b y means of the A . U . S . N . Co.'s steamers, which anchor at the mouth of the Albert River, passengers being conveyed to town by tender. During 1898 the imports were valued at £3,205, and the exports at £17,518, in which wool, £15,630, tallow, £ 1 8 3 , hides, £337, bone dust and manure, £692, and silver ore, £546, are included. T h e cultivation of vegetables for the N o r m a n t o n and Thursday Island markets is carried on about four miles from town, and English potatoes of excellent quality are also produced, though at present not in sufficient quantities for export. As regards local industries, the Boiling D o w n and Meat Extract W o r k s are well worth a visit. Leaving Queensland, we will follow the Company's operations in other parts of the Pacific.


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NOUMEA,

NEW

CALEDONIA.


Australasian

United Stea?n Navigation

T h e Pacific NEW

Company, Limited.

71

Islands.

CALEDONIA.

T o anyone seeking a complete change of scene as well as of climate, there is no place in the Pacific better connected w i t h the Australian Continent than the French settlement of N e w Caledonia. The island, one of the most considerable in the Western Pacific, was discovered by Captain Cook in 1774, and was formally taken possession of by the French on the 24th of September, 1853. T h e mainland is peopled by a native race of Melanesian and Polynesian origin. The kanaka of N e w Caledonia is both physically and intellectually superior to the native of the N e w Hebrides and adjacent group. H e lives in tribal villages, in huts thatched with palm leaves in the shape of a bee-hive. H i s food consists of yams, taro, manioc, sugarcane, bananas, and cocoanuts. The N e w Caledonian native gives implicit obedience to his chief, and, like the Fijians, prefers to work for the Government, chiefly in the police. T h e last census, 20th February, 1898, gives 18,891 as resident in N e w Caledonia and 11,413 in the L o y a l t y Islands; there are only 700 out of the total 30,304 who are engaged. Native immigrants are 1,800 from the N e w Hebrides, 800 Tonkinois and Annamites, and 200 Javanese. Noumea, the capital of the colony, is situated in the south-west part of the island. It possesses a fine, well-sheltered harbour, and extensive stone wharves permit vessels to come alongside and discharge. The town is well laid out with wide streets, most of them being lined with shad}' trees. The houses are mostly of one story. A public garden and square is situated in the middle of the town. The convict band of forty performers plays three times a week in the above square, called " L a Place des Cocotiers." This " Place" is prettily planted with cocoanut trees and the " flamboyant," a species of acacia, which in the months of December and January blossoms forth into flaming red flowers, lending a great charm to the surrounding landscape. The public buildings which most strike the eye are the hospital, the flour m i l l , the barracks, and the cathedral; the latter, built of stone, on a commanding elevation, is a remarkably


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handsome structure, and forms a land-mark to ships entering the harbour. The town is well lit with gas, and there is a plentiful supply of good water. The market opens every morning at 5 o'clock and is over b y 8, everything being sold in open stalls, and during the three hours the " P l a c e du M a r c h e ' is a very busy and noisy spot, and is well worth a visit. One striking feature of the " Marche " is that all fish sold must, by municipal enactment, be alive, and it is not the least interesting of the matutinal promenade to watch the fishmongers diving their arms up to the elbow in the huge tubs on wheels, in which the fish are confined in salt water, to bring forth some finny prisoner for the purchaser's inspection. There are some fine drives in the neighbourhood of Noumea, the " Pont des Frangais," " L a Coulee," and the " Dumbea," and, in the opposite direction, the drive to the beach at " Anse V a t a . " N o u m e a is well supplied with carriages, and the tariff is moderate. N e w Caledonia is, owing to its natural conformation, more of a mineral than a pastoral or agricultural country. Nevertheless there are some fine coffee estates on the island, the N e w Caledonian coffee being much run after in France, and, if well looked after, a coffee plantation can be made remunerative. Indeed, coffee planting has taken such rapid strides that a steady immigration from France has set in during the last two years. This immigration is very much protected and encouraged by the H o m e Government, whose policy is to settle free people on the land and abolish gradually the penal element. Besides coffee, maize, lucerne, rice, and other produce are largely grown. Cattle and sheep do not thrive owing to the poor nature of the pasture. Notwithstanding the heavy tax of ÂŁ2 per head, cattle from Australia continue to be imported in sufficiently large numbers. Most of the islandgrown cattle are absorbed by the meat preserving works at Ouaco, on the west coast. This company has an extensive contract with the French W a r Office. Steamers leave Noumea for the east and west coasts every week, carrying mails and passengers, and are back in time to meet the outgoing mail for Europe and Australia. The steamers on this line are new and commodious, electric lit, and are an improvement on those of the late contract, which has just expired. T h e trip round the island is a most charming one, and takes eight days to accomplish. The steaming is all inside the reef in smooth water, and the vessel anchors every night. N i c k e l ore, although the chief mineral product, is being gradually superseded b y chrome ore, of which about 1,000 to 1,500 tons are shipped per month. The falling off in the export of nickel ore is due chiefiV to over-production, but



Australasian

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during the year under review it has again taken the lead, over 100,000 tons having been exported during the year by the N i c k e l Company alone from Ihio on the east coast. T h e population of the island consists of a free white population of, say, 10,595 (1898) including 4,963 males, 4,401 females, and 1,231 military. The penal element consists of the convicts, 6,000—Uteris, about 4,000, and 1,000 rilegues. The last named are not felons, but people who are exiled for ever from France as recidivistes or habitual petty thieves. T h e y are interned on the Isle o f Pines, about 140 miles south-east of the mainland. The Australian holiday seeker who has a few weeks to spare cannot do better than make a trip to this colony by the A . U . S . N . Company's monthly steamer from Sydney. The voyage occupies four days. T h e semi-tropical climate and scenery, the French style of living, the open cafes and boulevards, and principally the variety of people and colour that meets his eye—Tonquinese, Japs, Kanakas, and Arabs, each i n his national costume—form a sight which he cannot find elsewhere at so short a distance from his home.

FIJI. T h e A . U . S . N . Company have a regular service from Sydney with F i j i , via N e w Caledonia; the distance from Sydney to Suva, the capital, being 1,733 miles. The Fiji Islands have been a British possession since the year 1874, when they were presented to Great Britian by K i n g Cakobau. During the sixties a large influx of settlers, principally from Victoria and N e w South Wales, took place. The cultivation of cotton was started on a large scale by the new arrivals, as, owing to the war in the U n i t e d States, that article was commanding an exceptionally high price. W i t h the cessation of hostilities, however, the value of cotton fell so low as not to leave a margin o f profit over the cost of production, and many were the ruined homesteads i n consequence. Since then, cotton has only been grown by the natives, and then only on a small scale. In the centre of V i t i L e v u , the principal island, on which the capital is situated, the climate is bracing; and at the station of Nadarivatu there is a Government Sanatorium. The climate here is very temperate; in fact, when the thermometer in the capital has been 95 i n the shade, the average registered in the hills has been between 70 and 8 0 ; visitors being very glad to have fires lit in the houses, an unusual event in these sunny isles. T h e scenery on the route from Nadarivatu, via the R e w a River, has been declared by old and experienced travellers t o equal the beauties of the show spots at the summer resorts i n 0

0


74

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the Australasian Colonies. A project is on foot to lay a light railway through the island, so that this splendid and fertile land, which has hitherto been practically a terra incognita, may be thrown open to the w o r l d . U n t i l the last year or two persons were not allowed, without special permission from the Governor, to travel in the interior of V i t i L e v u , owing to the lawless character of the inhabitants ; but this restriction has now been withdrawn, and visitors can roam at will over any portion of the island. The population of the group now numbers some 120,000, of which 101,000 are Fijians, 3,000 Europeans, and about 10,000 Indian Immigrants. Numbers of the last named are brought yearly from India to work on the sugar plantations, as the native Fijian is not suitable for the work, and, moreover, is not partial to continued steady employment, and cannot be depended upon. The Indians, after they have served five years under indenture, are free to work where they like in the colony. Some return to India, their return passage being paid by the Government; but the majority remain, anfl when they have saved a few pounds, either purchase or lease a small allotment, and commence planting cane or fruit, or start small dairy farms or vegetable gardens. The natives are now practically all Christians, and the Wesleyan Mission is endeavouring to evangelise the large number of Indian Immigrants. A Roman Catholic Cathedral is now in course of construction in Suva, and w i l l probably be completed in three or four years. It is being built of N . S. Wales stone, and the cost is estimated at over ÂŁ30,000. A month or two can be spent very pleasantly by any traveller in visiting the various points of interest in the group. A t Suva there are very good hotels. Three or four small rivers run into Suva harbour, and afford excellent resorts for pic-nics. There are fine bathing spots in nearly all the streams, the water being deliciously cool, even on the hottest day ; while those whose tastes lie in the direction of tropical foliage and ferns will find enough to satisfy them in the beautiful scenery along the rivers. There are several small islets in the harbour and its vicinity where the day can be spent. The waters teem with fish, although they are somewhat difficult to catch, and in season good shooting can be had in the ranges along the coast. There are Botanical Gardens situated inside the Government House D o m a i n . One or two native towns are in the vicinity of Suva, but to see the Fijian in his true character one must go further afield. The water supply of the capital is obtained from the heads of the Tamavna River, and conveyed by pipes, a distance of some five miles, to the town.



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In L e v u k a , another port of call of the A . U . S . N , steamer, there are good hotels and many pleasure resorts. T h e baths there are well worth visiting, and no tourist should miss a swim in their cool waters. The water supply of Levuka is also obtained from one of the mountain streams. E v e n in the driest weather the flow has never failed at both places, and is an immense advantage over former days, when people were dependent on the rainfall, and in the dry season were often without this necessity of life. T w o steam launches run daily between Suva and the R e w a River, the largest stream in Fiji. B y this means visitors are afforded an excellent opportunity of inspecting the large sugar and banana plantations which line the banks for some twenty miles or more, and also the large mills of the Colonial Sugar Refining Company at Nausori. A distillery is connected w i t h the establishment, and yearly exports many thousands of gallons of spirits. F r o m Nausori an excellent day's excursion can be obtained b y walking over the hills at the back of the estate to the native town of N a Mata. F r o m here canoes can be obtained, and a half-hour's paddling will bring one to the celebrated Island of Bau, which was in the old days, before British rule, the native capital of Fiji and the seat of the Government of K i n g Cakobau. Ratu Epeli, the son of the old king, and the chief representative of the old monarchy, resides on the island and is always pleased to see visitors. Roads are now being opened up over V i t i L e v u , and one from Suva to R e w a is now passable by vehicles. Tourists can therefore drive over to R e w a — a distance of eight miles or s o — through most lovely mountain scenery and virgin forest land to the cultivated lands on the Rewa River. Lunch can be had at Waimanu H o t e l , and after an inspection of the Nausori Sugar M i l l , return to Suva by steam launch in the afternoon. A steam launch also runs daily to the N a v n a River, where the Fiji Sugar Company carry on operations. Regular communication has also been started between Suva and L e v u k a , and a small steamer now runs twice weekly between the two ports. She proceeds inside the reef the whole way, portion of" the journey being through the Rewa River, so that a smooth passage is assured. In addition to this, the oceangoing steamers call at both places, so that one need have no fear of being detained at either town longer than desired. The A . U . S . N . Co.'s steamers touch at Suva first, thence they proceed to Levuka, thence return to Suva, and then proceed to Naitonitoni, Navua, Rovadrau, Cuvu, L i k u r i , and N a d i , and thence direct to Sydney. A t the ports from Suva onward, they load up bananas for S y d n e y ; and six days are generally spent in the group.


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A m o n g the points of interest to travellers, besides the various sugar centres of Rewa, B a , Labasa, and Penang, are the Government Sanatorium of Nadarivatu, the Island of Bau, the hot springs at Savu Savu on Vanna L e v u , and the caves on the Yasawa Islands. Some of these caves, by the way, can only be reached by diving under water into them. Once inside, however, the visitor is w e l l repaid for his trouble. Those who do not care to dive alone can always find natives ready to convey them down on their backs. Many attempts have from time to time been made to produce tobacco in the group of the H o m e markets, and a large company has now started operations in V i t i L e v u . The export of bananas, which, owing to disease and other causes decreased of late years, commenced to revive in 1897, i is now rapidly increasing. M a n y hundreds of acres have been planted with this succulent fruit, and a very large area has been put in cultivation by the natives. The output for 1898 reached 361,000 bunches and 25,000 cases. Rice is being cultivated to a small extent, principally by Indian settlers, but hopes are entertained that this cereal w i l l be planted on a large scale in the near future. T h e cultivaion of tea is confined to one plantation only ; but, now that a duty of 6d. per lb. has been levied on the imported article, the consumption of the local product has largely increased, and the plantation is a paying concern. Coffee was grown to some extent in former years, but the disease came and completely ruined the plantations and their unfortunate owners. A small experimental plantation (a few acres only in extent at present), has been started on the Island of Nagara, a few miles from Suva. The beans are of very good quality, and the owner states that as yet there are no signs of the dreaded disease. F o r years past many parties have prospected various parts of the group in search of precious metals. Gold has been found in several spots, but the prospect has not been sufficiently encouraging to warrant the finders going further into the matter. Prospectors are also very shy of devoting much time or money to the project, as they have no guarantee that they will reap the full benefit of their finds. There is no M i n i n g A c t here; and by the conditions of the C r o w n Grants, the Crown reserve to themselves all minerals and precious metals, etc. The total exports of the colony in 1898 amounted to ÂŁ534,105, and the imports to ÂŁ234,850. The export of sugar in 1898 was 34,156 tons, valued at ÂŁ409,884, and for the present season it is estimated the output w i l l still further increase. A market has been opened in America for sugar, and 1,000 tons were exported to that country during 1898. a n (


TRADING

CANOE,

BRITISH

NEW

GUINEA.


Australasian

United Steam Navigation

British

New

Company, Limited.

77

Guinea.

Steady progress has been made in the development of the possession during the last twelve months ; and the natives are daily becoming more civilised, although there have been isolated troubles which necessitated strong measures being taken by the Lieutenant-Governor. H i s Excellency is assisted in the work of administration by able resident magistrates and other officers; and the operations of the missionary societies help materially to make the people realise the blessings of law and order. A few items from the Lieutenant-Governor's reports, to which we are greatly indebted, will prove of general interest. H e records that a wharf, alongside of which is 19 feet of water at low tide, has been built at Samarai; also that the total number of vessels (all British) entered inwards from beyond the colony during the year ending 30th June, 1898, the latest date up to which statistics are available, was 92, representing 13,642 tons ; and the total number cleared outwards for foreign ports, 76, of 12,909 tons. The revenue of the colony for the year was ÂŁ"10,280, which shows a decrease of ^378 compared with the previous year, owing to large imports, which were due in M a y , not arriving until J u l y . W e mentioned the excitement over the gold finds. Unfortunately, a large number of the prospectors were unsuccessful, many died, and others returned to Australia, having suffered terribly from fever; but prospecting is still going on, and as the country gets more opened up, it is confidently expected that important discoveries w i l l be made. The export of gold for the year 1897-8, which includes the output at Woodlark and Sudest islands, was 6,830 ounces, valued at ÂŁ"25,612 ; but it is certain that considerably over this quantity was won, although not declared at the Custom House. A m o n g the other important exports were pearl-shell, 104 tons, valued at ÂŁ"8,468 ; nearly all of this was obtained in the eastern waters of the possession, the central and western waters


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producing only 14 and 15 tons respectively. T h e copra exported was 312 tons, valued at £2,425. India-rubber w i l l , i t is probable, become the principal export from the possession. F o r the year under review, the quantity exported was 15 tons, valued at £3,683, as against only three tons for the year ending June, 1896. T h e value of sandal-wood exported was £2,940, an increase of £ 6 1 7 over the previous year. Beche-de-mer, 37 tons, valued at £3,395, also showing an increase of £2,379 over the same period. Other items of export worthy of mention are pearls, £500, turtle-shell, £294, birds, £710, natural history specimens, £ 945, and sago, ^ 4 8 0 , the other articles exported were not important. So far the country has not attracted many tourists, but as it gets opened up, and the hills, where a most bracing climate can be enjoyed, are available for residence, it w i l l , we believe, be a favourite resort for visitors.



Advertisement.

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THE QUEENSLAND NATIONAL BANK,LIMITED. Incorporated under " T h e Companies Act, 1863.' HANKERS

S U B S C R I B E D C A P I T A L P A I D - U P C A P I T A L LESS A M O U N T P A I D - U P R E S E R V E

TO THK GOVERNMENT

QUEENSLAND.

£800,000 O N

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B U L C O C K ,

Chairman. J A M E S M I L N E , F. L O R D , ESQ.,

AUDITORS : F.I.A.V. | G E O .

ESQ.,

MESSRS.

SOLICITORS : F L O W E R &

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H U T T O N ,

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GENERAL MANAGER : W A L T E R V A R D O N R A L S T O N . CHIEF A L E X .

INSPECTOR: S T E U A R T .

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LOCAL DIRECTORS: SIR E D W Y N S. D A W E S , K.C.M.G. HON. V1CARY G I B B S , M . P . R. M . S T E W A R T , ESQ.

I

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L I M I T E D .

STREET.

ALBION, ALLORA, BARCALDINE, BEAUDESERT, BLACKALL, BOONAH, BUNDABERG, B U R K E T O W N , CAIRNS, CHARLEVILLE, CHARTERS TOWERS, CLIFTON, CLONCURRY, COOKTOWN, CROYDON, C U N N A M U L L A , DALBY, FORTIT U D E VALLEY, GERALDTON, GYMPIE, HALIFAX, H E R B E R T O N , H U G H E N D E N , INGHAM, IPSWICH, ISISFORD, LAIDLEY, LONGREACH, MACKAY, MARYBOROUGH, MOUNT MORGAN, MUTTABURRA, NORMANTON, PITTSWORTH, PORT DOUGLAS, RAVENSWOOD, R O C K H A M P T O N , ROMA, SANDGATE, SOUTH BRISBANE, THARGOMINDAH, THURSDAY ISLAND, TOOWOOMBA, TOWNSVILLE, WARWICK, WINTON. A G E N T S : V I C T O R I A , S O U T H A U S T R A L I A , A N D W E S T E R N A U S T R A L I A — T h e National Bank of Australasia Limited ; N E W Z E A L A N D — B a n k of New Zealand ; T A S M A N I A — T h e Bank of Australasia. S C O T L A N D — R o y a l Bank of S c o t l a n d : British Linen Company Bank. I R E L A N D — U l s t e r Bank, Limited. N E W Y O R K — M e s s r s . Laidlaw ft C o . S A N F R A N C I S C O — B a n k of California. CHINA A N D T H E E A S T — H o n g k o n g and Shanghai Banking Corporation; Chartered Bank of India, Australia and C h i n a ; T h e Mercantile Bank of India Limited.

THE

QUEENSLAND NATIONAL BANK, LIMITED,

Grants Drafts on its Branches and Agents; negotiates Bills against W o o l , Tallow, Hides, Copper, T i n , & c , & o ; purchases and advances on G o l d ; discounts Commercial P a p e r ; makes advances on approved security; receives Deposits, and allows Interest thereon according to .arrangement; and transacts all other usual Banking business.


so

Advertisements.

T E L E P H O N E No. 2078.

FISH STEHM LAUNDRY,

Stanley

Street,

SOUTH BRISBANE (Close to Victoria

Bridge).

The Most Complete Establishment m the Southern Hemisphere. .Special A t t e n t i o n to Tourists and Travellers. Urgent Executed i n a F e w H o u r s . S h i p p i n g , H o t e l , a n d F a m i l y dryman. L a u i u l r y m a n to P r i n c i p a l Steamship Lines.

Work Laun-

Goods Galled for and Delivered. GEO.

FISH, MANAGER.

T E L E P H O N E No. 2078.

GIVE

Tj-ilS

BR/\ND

A

TRI/\U

Richest, Mildest, and

Best.

R o m a Street, BRISBANE.

SEND

FOR PRICE

LIST

BUTTER,

BACON,

AND CHEESE.


Jlustralasian ~ United Steam Navigation Qompany cCimiicd.

HE/\D

Mary

Street,

OFFICES-

BRISBANE.


Advertisements.

82

P R I N T E R , ADELAIDE

STREET

(near

St.),

Purv«yor to

A . U . S J i - C»., LM.

Wharf

B O O K B I N D E R , PAPER

R U L E R ,

A C C O U N T R U B B E R

BRISBANE.

Helidon S p a Water.

B O O K AND S T A M P

• •

M A N U F A C T U R E R

Telephone No. 1203.

Factory: North Quay, Brisbane. \

MK.

PRIMROSE, SECRETARY,

HELIDON DEAR

T E C H N I C A L C O L L E G E LABORATORY, H A R R I S S T R E E T , S Y D N E Y , 4th Dec, i&

S P A M I N E R A L W A T E R CO.

S I R , — I h e following is Analysis of the Sample of your Mineral

Water left with me : — Chloride of Sodium Carbonate of Sodium ... Carbonate of L i t h i u m ... Carbonate of Calcium ... Carbonate of Magnesium Silica ... Organic Matter ... Oxide of Iron and A l u m i n a Total

Grains i>?r Gal. 2.99 21.214 2.68 7.35 3-39 0.29 Traces Traces

T h i s water contains more lithia than any 1 of the European spa waters, except that from

the Murquelle

at Baden

Baden,

which contains lithia as chloride, and it i> also much richer in carbonate of sodium, though Birresborn, in Prussia, and Bilin. in Bohemia, approach it.

228.84

T h i s water would be used as an antacid and diuretic, the latter effect being due to

Total Solids on evaporation

the lithia.

T h e difference, 4.17, being Carbonic A c i d driven off on ignition.

I remain, yours truly, W I L L . A.

GREAT

J^ORTHERfi

Family and Comrqercial BILLIARD, S A M P L E

BATH,

AND

ROOMS.

HARCUS

D I X O N , F.I.C., F.C.S

PRIVATE R O O M S

Hotel,

&. W H I T E H E A D ,

SUITES

FOR

O F

FAMILIES

COOKTOWN.

P R O P R I E T O R S .

^4V



Advertisement.

54

BRITISH

INDIA AND

Q U E E N S L A N D A C E N ( V CO.,

A.U.S.N. CO.'S STEAMER '* WODONGA

Managing Agents for

Australasian United Steam Navigation Company Limited. Agents for

British India Associated Steamers Limited (Queensland Line). British India Steam Navigation Company Limited. Ducal Line of Steamers. Turnbull. Martin & Company (Shire Line of Steamers). New Zealand Shipping Company Limited. Union Steamship Company of New Zealand Limited— (Intercolonial and A . & A. Route to Europe via San Francisco). London Assurance Corporation (Marine). The North Queensland Mortgage and Investment Co. Ltd. Huddart, Parker & Co. Proprietary, L t d .

MARY

STREET,

BRISBANE.


Australasian

United

Steam Navigation

Australasian Sham

Navigation

Company, Limited.

knifed Qompany, JSimitcd.

ESTABLISHED

1839.

F L E E T .

NAME.

*PAROO •PILBARRA •WAROONGA •BULIMBA •WODONGA *ARAMAC •ARAWATTA •CINTRA •ROCKTON •WARREGO •BARCOO *MARANOA BIRKSGATE VICTORIA QUIRAING EURIMBLA KATOOMBA ELAMANG YARALLA PALMER TALDORA DOLPHIN DUGONG PORPOISE... MANLY REDBANK HORNET WASP BELLS GUNGA ATLAS HERCULES

Tonnage.

H.P.

2665 2665

1800 1800 2000 2000 330O 3000 3000 2000 2000 2200 2500 2400 1300 600 I1O0

2510 2341 2114 2114 '979 1971 1552 1505 1505 1458 1250 1166 1055 1006 946 482 267

S.

MEDI.EV

BANKS

M.

M.

G.

SAVAGE

OSBORNE

1.

E.

MEABURN

|.

E.

BUTCHER

F.

G.

W.

R.

W.

C.

L E E FLEETWOOD THOMSON

G.

KING

J.

GRAHL

C.

E.

SAUNDERS

C.

A.

THORPE

T.

LAW

J.

WATT.

220 IOO

\V. A.

5° 5° 30 5° 25

JOHNSTON

EATON J.

CLARK

J- Steam Tenders at Rockhampton

100

Steam Tender at

Normanton

j- Steam Tenders at Mackay Steam Lighter at Brisbane I Steam Tenders at Sydney Hulk at Cooktown H u l k at Fremantle

34i 1257 400 350

15.

900 900 300 450

•3' 116

89 79 55 20

!. J.

IOOO

232

no

COMMANDER.

|

Lighters at

Normanton

* These Steamers are fitted throughout with the Electric L i g h t .

85


86

Australasian

United

Steam Navigation

Company,

Limited.

A G E N C I E S . BRISBANE

:

M A N A G I N G

A G E N T S .

West Australia. ALBANY... ESI'ERANCE

...

...

...

...

...

FREMANTLE GERALDTON

Geo. W i l l s & C o . Burns, Philp & C o . , L t d . A . U . S . N . Co. ( D . Hamilton, Manager). Burns, Philp & C o . , L t d .

South Australia. ADELAIDE

B . W . Macdonald. Victoria.

MELBOURNE

A . U . S . N . Co.,

GEELONG

Huddart, Parker & Co.

PORTARLINGTON

Ltd.

Huddart, Parker & Co. Hew South Wales.

SYDNEY

Burns, Philp & C o . , L t d .

NEWCASTLE

Tasmania.

Dalgety & Co.,

Ltd.

C . E . Knight 4 C o . Tasmanian W o o l Growers' Agency Co., Ltd. T h e River D o n Trading C o . , L t d . W i l l i a m Jones.

HOBART LAUNCESTON F O R M BY B U R N I E (Emu Bay)

New Caledonia. T . Johnston.

NOUMEA

Fiji. D. D.

LEVUKA... SUVA

Calder. Calder.

Queensland. BOWEN BROADSOUND BUNDABERG BURKETOWN CAIRNS COOKTOWN GLADSTONE MACKAY MARYBOROUGH NORMANTON PORT

DOUGLAS

ROCKHAMPTON TOWNSVILLE THURSDAY

ISLAND

...

CARDWELL

D U N G E N E S S (Lucinda) MOURILYAN GERALDTON

HARBOUR

Frederick Watson. M . M'Grade. P. Ridley. Affleck, Rendall, Synutt & C o . , L t d . Burns, Philp & C o . , L t d . K . Macdonald. A . U . S . N . Co., Ltd. W . H . Paxton & Co. H . M . Ramsay. Burns, Philp & C o . , L t d . Walsh & C o . Walter Reid & C o . , L t d . Burns, Philp & C o . , L t d . Burns, Philp & C o . , L t d .


Australasian

United Steam Navigation

COMPANY'S

Company,

Limited.

87

SERVICES.

LINE

No. 1.

M E L B O U R N E and COOKTOWN (MAIL LINE)—Once a Week (without transhipment).

C a l l i n g at Sydney, Brisbane (tranship for B u n d a b e r g and G l a d stone), K e p p e l B a y (forRockhampton), F l a t T o p (for Mackay), B o w e n , T o w n s v i l l e (tranship for Geraldton, & c ) , Cairns, and P o r t Douglas.

LINE

No. 2.

SYDNEY and ROCKHAMPTON—Weekly.

Via Brisbane and Maryborough Northwards, and Bundaberg, and Brisbane Southwards.

LINE

Gladstone,

No. 3.

BRISBANE and ROCKHAMPTON—Weekly.

Via Bundaberg and Gladstone Northwards, and B u n d a b e r g and M a r y b o r o u g h Southwards.

LINE

No. 4.

SYDNEY and B U R K E T O W N L I N E — A s inducement offers.

C a l l i n g at Brisbane, Townsville, Cooktown, T h u r s d a y Island, and N o r m a n t o n Northwards, and N o r m a n t o n , T h u r s d a y Island, C o o k t o w n , Cairns, Townsville, Keppel B a y (for Rockhampton), and Brisbane Southwards.

LINE

No. 5.

T O W N S Y I L L E , DUNGENESS, C A R D W E L L , MOURILYAN HARBOUR, GERALDTON, and CAIRNS—Weekly.

LINE

No. 6.

LINE

No. 7.

SYDNEY, N E W CALEDONIA, and FIJI—Monthly.

SYDNEY and WEST AUSTRALIAN LINE—Weekly.

C a l l i n g at Melbourne, Adelaide, A l b a n y , Fremantle, and G e r a l d ton. (Passengers and cargo booked through to North-west A u s t r a l i a n ports.)

LINE

No. 8.

BRISBANE and TOWNSYILLE—Weekly.

C a l l i n g at Gladstone, Mackay, Bowen, T o w n s v i l l e , and same ports Southwards, by Express M a i l Steamer, " B a r c o o , " every F r i d a y , 8 a.m.; Gladstone—Saturday, noon. SAILING T A B L E

DAYS, O F

A V E R A G E

see pages

88

DISTANCES, 93. PASSAGES,

94.

and

89.


88

Australasian

United

Sttuim Navigation

Company,

Limited.

INTERCOLONIAL AND COASTAL SERVICES. Steamers w i l l be despatched (weather and unforeseen circumstances permitting), as under : —

Dep. Arr. Dep. Arr. Dep. Arr. Dep. Arr. Dep. Arr. Dep. Arr. Dep. Arr. Dep. Arr. Dep. Arr. Dep. Arr. Arr. Dep. Dep. Arr. Dep. Arr. Dep. Arr. /"TOWNSVILLE Dep. k D U N G E N E S S (Lucinda) 1 Arr. Dep. Arr. ... A > CARDWELL Dep. Arr. 1 M O U R I L Y A N H A R B O U R j Dep. Arr. G E R A L D T O N , Q . ... / Dep. .CAIRNS Arr. Townsville Dep. Cairns Arr. Do Dep. Port Douglas Arr. Do. Dep. Cooktown Arr. Do Dep. Thursday Island Arr. Do. Dep. Normancon ( N O R M A N B A R ) .. Arr. • Do. Dep. Burketown ( A L B E R T B A R ) 1 Arr.

Geraldton, W.A Fremantle Do Albany Do Adelaide Do Melbourne Do Sydney Do Brisbane Do Maryborough ... Do Bundaberg Do. Gladstone Do. Rockhampton Wharf Keppel Bay Do Broadsound Mackay (Flat Top) Do Bowen Do Townsville

Melbourne and Cooktown Weekly Line, and Sydney 10 liurketown, as Inducement Offers.

11R1SHANE TOWNSVll LINE.

BRISBAN E ROCKHAM 1 LINE.

AND

Weekly.

Weekly.

Weekly.

Saturday Monday Tuesday Thursday Saturday

B O SSL

O

H

o fi J 91 B 7 -i'

» a

o B B

Jj 1

G 3

I fa*

...

= z

Weekly.

SYDNEY L

y. si < 2

WKST AUSTRAL]

PORTS.

Arrival ind Departure

NORTHWARD: <

J

a ? <K

< r

2 s

w

W

2

£ 0 X

Weekly.

Friday Sunday Fri. 8 a.m. Saturday Tuesday Wednesday Wednesday SundayMonday Sat.9.3oa.m. Monday Sat. noon Tuesday Tuesday Thursday

Sunday Sunday Occasionally. Sun.8-3oa.m Monday Monday Su. 9 . 3 0 a.m. Tuesday Sun.6.30 p.m Tuesday Su. 7.30 p.m. l'.l..-l!.L\ Mon. 4 a.m. Tues.3 8 a.p.m. Wed. m. Wed. 5 a.m. Wed. io a.m. Wed. 30a.rn Wed. 140 . p.m. Wed. 5 p.m. Wed. 7 p.m. Wed. 8 p.m. Thurs. 6 a.m. Wednesday Thursday Thursday Thursday Thursday Friday


Australasian

United

Steam Navigation

Companv, Limited. 8a.

INTERCOLONIAL AND COASTAL SERVICES. Steamers will be despatched (weather and unforeseen circumstances permitting), as under :—

Burketown ( A I . K K K T B A R ) ... Normanton ( N O R M A N B A R ) . . . Do Thursday Island Do Cooktown Do Port Douglas Do Cairns Do Townsville /"CAIRNS GERALDTON, Q....

j

MOURILVAN

|

CARDWELL

HARBOUR ...

i

D U N G E N E S S (I.ucinda) | ^TOWNSVILLE

Townsville Bowen Do Mackay (Flat Top) Do Broadsound Rockhampton W h a r f Keppel Bay Do Gladstone Do Bundaberg Do Maryborough Do Brisbane Do Sydney Do Melbourne Do Adelaide Do Albany Do Fremantle (FOR P E R T H ) Do Geraldton, W . A

Dep. Arr. Dep. Arr. Dep. Arr. Dep. Arr. Dep. Arr. Dep. Arr. Dep. Arr. Dep. Arr. Dep. Arr. Dep. Arr. Dep. Arr., Dep. Arr. I). .. Arr. Dep. Dep. Dep. Arr. Dep. Arr. Dep. Arr. Dep. Arr. Dep. Arr. Dep. Arr. Dep. Arr. Dep Arr. Dep. Arr. Dep. Arr. Dep. Air.

*; 0 Z. J

3 <s •f

~r. 0 v 1

a O rt f >>

mJ 9 v av • c

"D

M •3

z

a

3*

•X

B R I S B A N E LINE

Weekly.

Saturday Saturday Saturday Saturday Saturday Sunday Tlmrs. n> a.m. Thurs. 7 p.m. Friday 5 p.m. Friday 7 p.m. Friday 8 p.m. Sat. 5 a.m. Sat. 6 a.m. Sat. 9 a.m. Sat.10. 30 a.m. Sat. 6. i<> p.m. Monday Monday Monday Tuesday Tuesday Occasionally

M o n . 5 p.m. T u . 1.35 a.m. Tues. 3 a.m. Tues. noon Tues. r p.m. Friday

Wed'sday

Wednesday Wednesday*

n

£

Weekly.

ROCKHAMPTON

Weekly.

AND

BRISBANE A N D TOWNSVILLE LINE.

Weekly.

ROCKHAMPTON

Cooktown a n d Melbourne W e e k l y Line, and Burketown to Sydney as I n d u c e m e n t Offers.

Weekly.

j SYDNEY LINE.

S Y D N E Y AND WEST AUSTRALIAN LINE.

SOUTHWARD:

...

W . 9 . 3 0 a.m. W e d . 11 a. m.

::: Thursday Friday Sunday

Friday Friday Saturday Sunday

Monday Tuesday Thursday

Thursday Thursday Friday Friday Friday

Tuesday Thursday

* Tender leaves Rockhampton W h a r f at 9 p.m. Tuesday. Tenders are employed at the various anchorages to convey passengers and baggage free of charge. T h e steamers will be despatched, i f possible, as above described, but the Company do not bind themselves in any w a y to this or any other time-table. NEW

CALEDONIA AND FIJI SERVICE.

T h e steamer " Birksgate" leaves Sydney every' 28 days for N o u m e a ( X e w Caledonia), Suva and L e v u k a (Fiji Islands). BROADSOUND SERVICES. Tenders are despatched from Rockhampton and/or M a c k a y at intervals as occasion demands.


AUSTRALASIAN

UNITED

STEAM

NAVIGATION

S A L O O N

RATES

OF P A S S A G E

MONEY

COMPANY,

LIMITED.

S I N G L E .

BETWEEN

A L L PORTS

(subject to fluctuation).

ADELAIDE 2 4 6 6 6 8 8 9 9 9 10 II II II II II 11 12

IO O

o o 0 0 10 0 15 0 0 0 0 0 10 0 10 0 10 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 10 0 OO

'5 5 16 i s 0 18 10 0 0

MELBOURNE. 2 10 0 S Y D N E Y 4 5 5 6 6 8 8 8 9 10 10 10 10 10 10 11 13 15 16

10 0 0 0 6 0 10 0 10 0 10 0 10 0 10 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 10 0 0 0 10 0 0 0 10 0

3

0 0 BRISBANE. 0 16 0 M A R Y B O R O U G H .

3 3 5 5 7 7 7 8 8 8 8 8 8 9 9 T2 13

15 15 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 10 0 0 0 10 0 10 0 10 0 10 0 10 0 0 0 10 0 15 O 10 O

15

5 0

0

0 2 2 4 4 5 5 6 6 6 6 6 7 7 10 13 13

16 0 0 0 0 0 10 0 10 0 0 0 10 0 10 0 10 0 10 0 10 0 10 0 0 0 10 0 10 0 O O IO O

0 0 0 4 4 4 5 6 6 6 6 6 6 7 9 11 12

io 0 16 0 16 0 0 0 0 0 10 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 10 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 15 0

RUNDABJ 0 0 4 4 4 5

16 0 T6 0 0 0 0 0 | 10 0 | 0 0

(iLADSTONE. RoCKHAMI'TON.

1 in o BftOADSOUND.

2 0 0 2 15 o

6

0 0 ' 6 0 0 ; 6 0 0 6 0 0 6 0 0 i 6 10 0 1

7 9 0 0 11 0 0 12 15 0 0

0

4 15 o 5 10 o 8 0 0 ]«. 5 o 12 o 1

1 15

4

5 °

4 4 4 4

5 1 5 I 5 0 5 0 0

0

4 *5 ° 5 10 o 8 0 0 in 5 o

o o

MACKAY,

3 7 ° . 7 6 3 7 6 3 7 6, 3 7 6 j 4 0 0

15 o

0

4 15 ° 8 0 0 10 12

5 o 1 O O ;

TOWNSVILLE. DUN<;ENESS. 1 o o RDWELL. 0 15 o C A_______ I 10 o 1 o o j o 12 6 M O U R I L Y A N . I 10 o GERALDTON, Q. 0 12 6 I 10 o o o 7 6 ^"17 6 ~ , C A I R N S . 1 0 1 10 o 5 5 o 0 0 1 15 0 0 17 6 P O R T D O U G L A S . 3 2 O O o o 1 COOKTOWN. 1 2 IO O 1 9 2 0 0 0 17 ft 10 o ' 5 0 5 0 10 o , ' T H U R S D A Y I. 0 0 3 15 0 o o 5 10 0 j 5 3 10 O o o o 4 15 3~IO O j N O R M A N T O N . 6 0 0 0 0 6 15 0 5 o 5 io 7 7 io o ! 5 o 5 o 8 15 0 8 10 0 7 10 0 o o 7 5 o o 9 5 ° o o j I T O W N .

i 10 o ' 5 0

O O 10 o TO O 5

°

1

0

5 o o 2 2 61 BURKE.

Children, under 2 years, Free ; between 2 and 5 years, Quarter Fare ; between 5 and 12 years, H a l f Fare. S c h o l a r s — 2 0 per cent, to be allowed off full faies. N o allowance off children's fares. School T e a c h e r s — A n allowance of 10 per cent, to be made to teachers Travelling during vacation only. Female Servants, travelling with their employers, may travel in Saloon at Steerage Fares. C l e r g y m e n , Theatrical Artists, Commercial Travellers, Pressmen, Sisters of Mercy, Salvation A r m y Officers (and Football, R o w i n g , Shooting, or other Clubs, if in parties of not less than 10) to be allowed 2 0 per cent, reduction on Saloon Passage M o n e y only. N o discounts allowed off passage money other than those herein sped fied. Commercial travellers allowed 4 0 cubic feet of Luggage ; and other passengers—Saloon, 20 feet ; Steerage, 10 feet, Free.


AUSTRALASIAN

UNITED

STEAM

NAVIGATION

S A L O O N

RATES

OF P A S S A G E

MONEY

COMPANY,

LIMITED.

R E T U R N .

BETWEEN

A L L PORTS (subject to fluctuation).

ADELAIDE. ^

0

0

7

'3 • 13 • 16 10 0 16 10 o 15 15 O 16 10 o 18 I 16

iS 18 17 19

10 o 26 10 o

24

MELBOURNE. SYDNEY.

7 IO 0 B O 8 15 0 1 0 19 TO 19 0 M O 0 M O 11 M 5 15 O 0 16 1 0 0 16 10 0 16 10 0 16 xo 0 «5 0 0 17 0 0 *7 10 0 21 5 0 »3 5 0 27 5 0

0 0 1 ' 1 • 1 ' 1 "'.'-I. 0 0 1 4O MAHVHOKOlliH. 6 5 0 1 5 0 OI50 B U N O A H K R G . 8 0 0 3 0 0 I 4 0 X 4 O 1I.AIIST1 8 0 0 3 0 0 I 4 O I 4 O O 15 O R O C K H A M P T O N . BKOADSOUND. XX 10 0 8 0 0 O 2 IO O 7OO 7 0 0 33 O M AOK AY, 8 0 0 IX 10 0 7OO 7OO 5 O5O0 3 0 0 33 010 0 o BOWBM. 8150 7 '5 0 5 0 '3 5 0 7 15 O TowNSYII.LK. 5 5 0 2 IO O jiJ o o 4 5 0 »4 0 0 9 TO O 8 10 0 8 TO O 6 0 0 15 O j D U N G E N E S S . 5 IO o o o 3 0 0 6 0 0 9 10 0 6 TO O M 0 0 IO TO O 9 10 0 5 ;CARI)WF.[.I.. 6 10 o o o 2 IO O 6 0 0 3 0 0 6 10 0 M 0 0 IO TO O 9 TO O 9 10 0 6 10 o o o 2 TO O 2 0 0 t o o Moi'HILVAN. 6 0 0 3 0 0 4 0 0 IO TO O 9 TO 0 9 TO O 6 10 0 0126 GERALDTON 6 10 o o o 2 TO O 2 0 0 6 0 0 1 0 0 3 0 0 9 10 0 6 10 0 M 0 0 IO IO O 9 10 0 TO o 6 0 0 o o 2 IO O 2 0 0 I 10 o C A I R N S . 2 0 0 2 0 0 3 0 0 i 0 0 IO TO O 9 10 0 9 10 0 6 10 0 6 PORT DOUGLAS. 6 10 o o o 3 0 0 6 15 o 3 10 o 1 10 o 3 TO o 3 10 o 3 15 3 15 o 15 0 0 II O O 10 0 0 10 0 0 7 10 0 7 io o o o 3 TO o 2 0 0 5 0 0 1 10 o C O O K T O W N . 4 0 0 4 5O 4 5 o m 0 0 12 15 O II 0 0 II 0 0 9 TO O 9 10 o 8 0 0 4 10 0 THURSDAY I. II o o 8 10 o 8 T O o 5 ' 5 ° 8 5 0 6 5 0 7150 5 0 0 9150 19 0 0 L6 O O 14 0 0 14 0 0 14 O O 14 o o 14 o o 9 15 o NORMANTON. 21 5 20 5 O 1 8 0 0 18 0 0 17 O O T7 o o 17 o o 14 TO O 13 10 o 13 TO O 12 15 O 1 15 o 12 IO o 12 O O TO TO O 9 15 ° 9 5 0 68 00 00 3 1 5 0 B U R I C E 2 0 o o 12 15 o 15 10 o 15 O O 13 IO O 18 5 0 16 o o 16 o o 15 15 o 15 »5 » 5 0 0 24 O O 21 O O 21 O O 20 O O 17 15 O 20 o o T O W N 5 6

0

T

1

0

0

0

Children under I years, Free ; between 2 and 5 years, Quarter Fare ; between 5 and 12 years, H a l f Fare. Scholars—20 per cent, to be allowed off full fares. N o allowance off children's fares. School T e a c h e r s — A n allowance of 10 per cent, to be made to Teachers travelling during vacation only. Female Servants, travelling with their employers, may travel in Saloon at Steerage Fares. Clergymen, Theatrical Artists. Commercial Travellers, Pressmen, Sisters of Mercy, Salvation A r m y Officers (and Footl>all, Rowing, Shooting or other Clubs, if in parties of not less than 10) to he allowed 2 0 per cent, reduction on Saloon Passage Money only. N o discounts allowed off passage money other than those herein specified. Commercial Travellers allowed 40 cubic feet of Luggage ; and other Passengers—Saloon, 2 0 feet ; Steerage, 10 feet, Free.


to

AUSTRALASIAN

UNITED

STEAM

NAVIGATION

COMPANY,

LIMITED.

STEERAGE.

RATES

OP P A S S A G E

MONEY

BETWEEN

A L L PORTS (subject to fluctuation).

ADELAIDE. MELBOURNE.

X o 2 O 3 '5 5 3 3 5 3 15 3 «5 O 5 a 5 o 5 5 XO N O 6 O 6 O 6 O 'I O 6 O 6 5

o

I

Q O

2

o

a

o o

3 3 4 4

O

O O

o

O O O O O O 0

7 »5 O 8 5 o 8 *5 O

2

4 4 5 5 5 5 5 5 6 7 7 8

O 6 IO IO O

O O

o

O O O 5 O 5 O IO o 15 O 5 O 5 O 5 O 5 O 5 O IO O O O O O IO o O O

o

SYDNEY X

O O X IO O X XO O 3 O O 2 O O 3 IO O 3 IO O 15 0 10 10 10 10 10 4 IO 0 5 6 5 6 15

3 4 4 4 4 4 4

7

0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

0 0 5 0

BRISBANE. MARYBOROUGH. . 1 0 0 " BUNDABERG. 0 10 C) 7 O 1 0 0 IO o 1 0 0 10 o 2 10 O 5 o 2 10 O 5 O 2 15 O IO O 3 0 0 15 O 3 10 O 5 O 3 IO O 5 O 3 10 O 5 O 5 o 3 10 O 5 O 3 10 O 4 O O 4 IO o 5 10 O 6 10 O 7 O O

10 O O O O O o O 10 O

R O C K H A M I-TON BHOADSOUND. X 0 0 I 5 0 0 17 6 M A C K A Y . O 15 0 B()\\ K N . 3 0 0 X IO 0 3 3 3 2 3

a 3 3 5 5

6

0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 O

5 »5 »5 '5 15 15 5 *5 0 IO

X 7 2 3 3 3

15 IO 10 IO 10 10

0 0 0 0 0 0

a

15 5 0 10 0

0 0 0 0 0

3 5 5

6

I I I I I I I 2

O IO 10 IO IO IO 15 IO

O 0 0 0 0 0 0 O

4 5

5 ° 0 0

6

0 0

I 0 I 5 X 5 X S I 5 X 5 I 10 a 0

0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

0

3 10 4 15 0 5 10 0

ToWNSVILLK. DuNGKNKSs. O I O O O 0 O 0

15 15 15 15

O I oxoo O O 12 6 O O 12 6 O

1 5 O 1 150 3 IO O

1

4 15 O ; 5 10 O :

ICARDWBLL. 7 7 17 10 15 O 5 a

6 6 6 O O O 0 o

MOURILYAN. G E R A L D T O N , Q. 0 5 0 CAIRNS. o 12 6 0 10 o o 12 6 1 5 O 1 3 6 o 17 6 I IO O 1 7 6 3 15 O 2 2 6 2 12 6 4 O O 3 7 6 4 O O 5 0 0 4 5 0 4 15 0

C h i l d r e n , under 2 years, Free ; between 2 and 5 years, Quarter Fare ; between 5 and 12 years, H a l f Fare.

PORT O 2 3 4

DOUGLAS.

13 6

|COOKTO

0 0 1 1 5 0 ,

HURSDAY

I.

15 O [ N O R M A N T O N . 5 0 3 o o 5 o IBURKKO O 3 15 O 1 1 1 0 O I T O W N


Australasian

United

Steam

TABLE

Navigation

Company,

Limited.

93

OF DISTANCES.

MELBOURNE

AND B U R K E T O W N .

ITOWNSVILI.E. ijjo I C A I R N S . PORT 363 I 2 6 0

DOL'CU.AS. COOKTOWN. THURSDAY ISLAND. 'NORMANTON. T3FIBU R K E T O W X

SYDNEY

AND R O C K H A M P T O N

LINE.

SYDNEY. 510 " B R I S B A N K . MARYBOROUGH. 180

690

BRISBANE

782

272

cfi

882

372

192

982

472

292

1BUNDABERG. I

O

O

GLADSTONE.

200

100

SYDNEY

to B U N D A B E R G

Direct...

...

...

210 miles

B R I S B A N E to M A C K A Y (via Sandy Straits)

...

TOWNSYILLE,

R O C K H A M I T O X .

'.540 '-733

JOHNSTONE BRANCH

RIVER,

to K I J I (Suva) to F I J I . . .

A N D CAIRNS

LINE.

TOWNSVILLE. Dl'NGENEss 1 Luanda). ICARDWELI.. "MOURILYAN. "GERALDTON. g~GOONDI. 63

WEST

AUSTRALIAN

55HCAIRNS

SERVICES.

S Y D N E Y . 564 1072

MELBOURNE. I

1,063 mile's

SYDNEY NOUMEA

500 , ,

to N O U M E A

B R I S B A N E to F I J I . . .

SO8 [ A D E L A I D E .

2090

1526

1018 I A L B A N Y .

2450

1886

1378 I

360 [ F R E M A N T L E .

2670

2106

1598

580

220 G E R A L D T O N .

73°

„ »


94

Australasian

AVERAGE

United

Steam Navigation

PASSAGES

t<>

MELBOURNE

NOUMEA

,

K I J I (direct)

FIJI

,

SYDNEY

SYDNEY

,,

N . C ...

,

MARYBOROUGH BUNDABERG

,,

GLADSTONE

,,

ROCKHAMPTON

BRISBANE

,,

ROCKHAMITON

,,

M A C K A Y ...

MACKAY

,,

BOWEN

,,

...

(direct)

TOWNSVILLE

,,

(direct)

CARDWELL

CARDWELL

.

MOURILYAN GERALDTON

MOI'RII.YAN

.

GERALDTON

.

TOWNSVILLE

,

,,

CAIRNS

.

PORT

.

TOWNSVILLE

,

COOKTOWN

.

T H U R S D A Y IS. NORMANTON

..

10 ,, 12

,,

CAIRNS

9

..

32

36

9

JO

..

9

IO

.,

65 „ 72

(direct) DOUGLAS

...

COOKTOWN

8

3

H

5 ..

6

.,

2 „

3

>.

7

..

6„

...

THURSDAY

13 2h

15 „

3

»

6 „

7

••

(direct)

22 „ 25

ISLAND

45 » 48

,.

NORMANTON

4S„

.

BURKETOWN

7

SYDNEY

M

II

IO

DiNGF.NESs (Lucinda) 7 „

.

DOUGLAS

16 „ 18

15 » 17

DUNGENESS

PORT

...

IO ,,

BUNDABERG GLADSTONE

.

7

40 to 46 hours

,

(Lucinda)

»

(direct)

MARYBOROUGH

,

5 days /

BRISBANE

.

4 „

about 3_J2 days

BRISBANE

BOWEN

50 hours

46,,

NOUMEA,

BRISBANE

40 to 45 hours

SYDNEY ,

STEAMERS

Ports:—

MELBOURNE

SYDNEY

TOWNSVILLE

Limited.

B Y T H E A.U.S.N. CO.'S

Between the following ADELAIDE

Company,

MELBOURNE ADELAIDE

50

>,

8

.,

>•

40 ,, 45

>•

46,,

MELBOURNE

..

ADELAIDE

..

ALBANY

about 5% day

ALBANY

.,

FREMANTLE

48 hours

FREMANTLE

,,

GERALDTON

20


Australasian

United Steam Navigation

Company, Limited.

95

A D E L A I D E (Capital of S o u t h A u s t r a l i a ) . — L a t . 34 57' S. L o n g . 0

138'38'E. P o r t for B r o k e n H i l l S i l v e r M i n e s . P o p . (including suburbs), 150,000. H o t e l s — Y o r k , U n i t e d Service C l u b , S o u t h A u s t r a l i a n C l u b , and Prince A l f r e d . A n c h o r a g e — A l o n g s i d e wharf at P o r t Adelaide, 7 miles Derail from the city. Company's Services from this P o r t : — T o Melbourne, Sydney, and all F i j i a n and Queensland ports, every week by W e s t A u s t r a l i a n liners. T o A l b a n y , Fremantle, and Geraldton, W . A . , every week. Agent—B.

\V. Macdonald, 15 Currie Street.

A L B A N Y (West A u s t r a l i a ) . — L a t . 35 2 ' S . 0

L o n g . 117

0

54' K .

Pop., over 4,000. H o t e l s — R o y a l George and Freemasons'. Anchorage—Alongside

wharf.

Company's Services f r o m this Port : — T o Adelaide, Melbourne, Sydney, and all F i j i a n and Queensland ports, every week. T o Fremantle and Geraldton, W . A . , every week. Agents—George

W i l l s & Co.

B O W E N (Queensland).—E. coast of A u s t r a l i a .

L a t . 20° 1' S. L o n g . 148 16' E . Pop., i n c l u d i n g district (estimated), 3.40°H o t e l s — N o r t h Australian, Cook's, and U n i o n . A n c h o r a g e — A l o n g s i d e jetty, half a mile from town. 0

Company's Services from this Port : — T o Townsville, Cairns, P o r t Douglas, and C o o k t o w n , every Tuesday. T o T o w n s v i l l e , every Sunday 7.30 a.m. T o T h u r s d a y Island, N o r m a n t o n , and B u r k e t o w n . Cargo service w i l l r u n at regular intervals, and passengers' steamers when inducement offers. T o Dungeness(Lucinda), Cardwell, M o u r i l y a n Harbour, G e r a l d ton, and Cairns, every Tuesday (transhipping at Townsville). T o Mackay, R o c k h a m p t o n , Brisbane, Sydney, Melbourne, A d e laide, and West Australian ports, every M o n d a y (midnight). T o Gladstone, Bundaberg, and Maryborough (with transhipment at Rockhampton), every M o n d a y (midnight). T o M a c k a y , Gladstone, B r sbane, every Tuesday, 3 a.m. T o N o u m e a (New Caledonia) and F i j i , m o n t h l y (from Sydney). T o Tasmanian and N e w Zealand ports, weekly (from Sydney). Agent—F.

Watson.


96

Australasian

United Steam Navigation

Company,

Limited.

BRISBANE

(Capital of Q u e e n s l a n d ) . — A . U . S . N . Coy.'s Head Office i n A u s t r a l i a . P o r t for the famous D a r l i n g Downs. L a t . 27° 30' S. L o n g . 150 20' E . P o p . , 110,000. Seasons—September to M a r c h , hot ; M a r c h to September cool and bright. C l u b s — Q u e e n s l a n d and Johnsonian, &c. H o t e l s — I m p e r i a l , Belle V u e , L e n n o n ' s , Gresham, G r a n d , &c. A n c h o r a g e — A l o n g s i d e wharf. Company's Services from this P o r t : — Adelaide, every Tuesday and . Friday. T o A l b a n y , Fremantle, Geraldton, and other W e s t A u s t r a l i a n ports (transhipping at Sydney), every Tuesday and F r i d a y . T o N e w Caledonia and F i j i (transhipping at Sydney), monthly. T o all Tasmanian and N e w Zealand ports (with transhipment at Sydney), every Tuesday and F r i d a y . T o M a r y b o r o u g h , every Tuesday. T o Gladstone, every Tuesday and F r i d a y . T o Gladstone, M a c k a y , B o w e n , T o w n s v i l l e (with transhipment at T o w n s v i l l e to L u c i n d a ) every F r i d a y , 8 a.m. T o R o c k h a m p t o n wharf, every Tuesday and Saturday. T o R o c k h a m p t o n (Keppel Bay), M a c k a y (Flat Top), Bowen, Cairns, and P o r t Douglas, every Saturday. T o Townsville and C o o k t o w n , every Saturday. T o Dungeness (Lucinda), Cardwell, M o u r i l y a n Harbour, and Geraldton (with transhipment at Townsville), every F r i d a y and Saturday. T o T h u r s d a y Island, N o r m a n t o n , and B u r k e t o w n . Cargo service will r u n at regular intervals, and passengers' steamers when inducement offers. T o Broadsound, occasionally. Managing Agents—The B r i t i s h I n d i a and Queensland Agency Company, L i m i t e d , M a r y Street 0

B U N D A B E R G . — S i t u a t e d on the B u r n e t t R i v e r . Large sugar district. L a t . 24 52' S. L o n g . 152 22' E . Pop. (including district), 15,000. H o t e l s — R o y a l , G r a n d , and C u s t o m House. A n c h o r a g e — A l o n g s i d e wharf. Company's Services from this P o r t : — T o M a r y b o r o u g h , every T h u r s d a y . To Brisbane, Sydney, Melbourne, Adelaide, and West A u s t r a l i a n ports, every T h u r s d a y and S u n d a y (transhipping, at Brisbane or Svdney). T o N o u m e a (New Caledonia) and F i j i , m o n t h l y (from Sydney). T o Tasmanian and N e w Zealand ports, weekly (from Sydney). T o Gladstone and R o c k h a m p t o n wharf, every M o n d a y . T o M a c k a y , Bowen, T o w n s v i l l e , Dungeness (Lucinda), Cardwell, M o u r i l y a n H a r b o u r , Geraldton, Cairns, P o r t Douglas, and C o o k t o w n (with transhipment at Rockhampton), every Monday. 0

0


Australasian

B U N D A B E K G —

United

Steam Navigation

Company, Limited,

qy

Continued.

T o T h u r s d a y Island, N o r m a n t o n , and B u r k e t o w n , as inducement offers. Agent—Peter

Ridley.

B U R K E T O W N . — Situated

on the A l b e r t R i v e r , G u l f of Carpentaria. P o r t for the Bower B i r d goldfield. Lat. 17° 45' S. L o n g . 139° 34' E . Pop., 300. H o t e l s — A l b e r t and Commercial. A n c h o r a g e — A t Bar ; passengers and their luggage conveyed to town by steam tender, tides permitting ; otherwise to T r u g a n i n i landing, 4 miles from there.

Company's Services from this P o r t : — T o N o r m a n t o n , Thursday Island, C o o k t o w n , P o r t Douglas, Cairns, Townsville, Dungeness (Lucinda), Cardwell, M o u r i l y a n , Geraldton, B o w e n , Mackay, Rockhampton, Gladstone, B u n d a berg, M a r y b o r o u g h , Brisbane, Sydney, Melbourne, A d e l a i d e , Fremantle, Geraldton, and other W e s t A u s t r a l i a n ports. Cargo service w i l l run at regular intervals, and passengers' steamers when inducement offers. T o N o u m e a (New Caledonia) and F i j i , m o n t h l y (from Sydney). T o Tasmanian and New Zealand ports, weekly (from Sydney). Agents—Affleck,

Rendall, Synott & Co., L t d .

C A I R N S . — S i t u a t e d on the shores of T r i n i t y B a y . P o r t for the B a r r o n Falls, the Herberton and Chillagoe Mineral Fields, and Mareeba Goldfields. L a t . 16 56' S. L o n g . 145" 49' E . P o p . (including district), 7,000. H o t e l s — C a i r n s and R a i l w a y . A n c h o r a g e — A l o n g s i d e wharf. 0

Company's Services from this P o r t : — T o Townsville, Bowen, M a c k a y (Flat Top), R o c k h a m p t o n (Keppel Bay), Brisbane, Sydney, Melbourne, Adelaide, A l bany, Fremantle, Geraldton, and other W e s t A u s t r a l i a n ports, every Saturday. T o Geraldton, M o u r i l y a n , Cardwell, and Dungeness (Lucinda), every Wednesday. T o N o u m e a (New Caledonia) and F i j i , m o n t h l y (from Sydney). T o Tasmanian and New Zealand ports, weekly (from Sydney). T o P o r t Douglas and C o o k t o w n , every Thursday. T o T h u r s d a y Island, N o r m a n t o n , and B u r k e t o w n . Cargo service w i l l r u n at regular intervals, and passengers' steamers when inducement offers. Agents—Burns,

P h i l p & Co., L t d .


98

Australasian

United Steam Navigation

CARDWELL.—Situated L a t . 18° 16' S. district), 3,435. Hotel—Marine.

Company,

Limited.

on the shores of R o c k i n g h a m B a y . L o n g . 146 4' E . P o p . (including 0

Company's Services from this P o r t : — T o M o u r i l y a n and G e r a l d t o n , every Tuesday. T o Dungeness (Lucinda) and T o w n s v i l l e , every F r i d a y . T o B o w e n , M a c k a y (Flat T o p ) , R o c k h a m p t o n (Keppel Bay), Gladstone, Bundaberg, M a r y b o r o u g h , Brisbane, Sydney, M e l bourne, Adelaide, A l b a n y , Fremantle, Geraldton, and other W e s t A u s t r a l i a n ports, every F r i d a y . T o N o u m e a ( N e w Caledonia) and F i j i , monthly (from Sydney). T o Tasmanian and N e w Zealand ports, weekly (from Sydney). T o Cairns, every Wednesday. T o P o r t Douglas and Cooktown (with transhipment at Cairns), every Tuesday. T o T h u r s d a y Island, N o r m a n t o n , a n d B u r k e t o w n (with transhipment at Cairns). Cargo service w i l l r u n at regular intervals, and passengers' steamers when inducement offers. Agents—Burns, P h i l p & Co., L t d . , Townsville.

CHARTERS TOWERS.—The

leading goldfield of Queensland, connected by rail w i t h T o w n s v i l l e ; distance, 82 miles. P o p . , 22,000. H o t e l s — E x c e l s i o r and Exchange.

Agents—Burns,

P h i l p & Co., L t d .

C O O K T O W N . — S i t u a t e d at the m o u t h of the Endeavour R i v e r . Port for the P a l m e r goldfields. T r a r . i h i p p i n g P o r t for N e w G u i n e a . L a t . 15 18' S. L o n g . 145 25' E . P o p . (including district), 5,000. Hotels—Great Northern, &c. A n c h o r a g e — A l o n g s i d e wharf. 0

0

Company's Services from this P o r t : — T o Port Douglas, Cairns, T o w n s v i l l e , Bowen, M a c k a y (Flat Top), R o c k h a m p t o n (Keppel B a y ) , Brisbane, Sydney, M e l bourne, Adelaide, A l b a n y , Fremantle, Geraldton, and other West Australian ports, every Saturday. T o Dungeness (Lucinda). Cardwell, M o u r i l y a n , and Geraldton (with transhipment at Cairns or Townsville), every Saturday. T o Gladstone, Bundaberg, and M a r y b o r o u g h (with transhipment at Rockhampton), every Saturday. T o N o u m e a (New Caledonia) and F i j i , m o n t h l y (from Sydney). T o Tasmanian and N e w Zealand ports, weekly (from Sydney). T o T h u r s d a y Island, N o r m a n t o n . a n d B u r k e t o w n . Cargo service w i l l r u n at regular intervals, and passengers' steamers when inducement offers. Agent—K. Macdonald.


Australasian

United Steam Navigation

Company, Limited.

99

D U N G E N E S S (Lucinda).

A t the mouth of the Herbert R i v e r . P o r t for the town of Ingham. W i t h a population of 2,500. L a t . i 8 ° 3 i ' S . L o n g . 146° 2 0 ' E . Hotel—Marine. A n c h o r a g e — A l o n g s i d e wharf ( L u c i n d a Point). Company's Services from tbis P o r t : — T o Cardwell, M o u r i l y a n , Geraldton, and Cairns, every M o n d a y . T o T o w n s v i l l e , every F r i d a y . T o P o r t Douglas and Cooktown (with transhipment at Cairns), every M o n d a y . T o T h u r s d a y Island, N o r m a n t o n , and B u r k e t o w n (with transhipment at Cairns). Cargo service w i l l r u n at regular intervals, and passengers' steamers when inducement offers. T o B o w e n , M a c k a y (Flat Top), R o c k h a m p t o n (Keppel Bay), Gladstone, Bundaberg, Maryborough, Brisbane, Sydney, M e l bourne, Adelaide, A l b a n y , Fremantle, Geraldton, and other West A u s t r a l i a n ports (with transhipment at Townsville), every F r i d a y . T o N o u m e a (New Caledonia) and F i j i , m o n t h l y (from Sydney). T o Tasmanian and New Zealand ports, weekly (from Sydney). Agents—Burns,

P h i l p & Co., L t d . , T o w n s v i l l e .

F R E M A N T L E . — F o r P E R T H , capital of West A u s t r a l i a , Port for Coolgardie goldfield. L a t . 32" 4' S. L o n g . 115" 46' 30" E . Pop., 17,000 to 20,000 (estimated). Hotels—Cleopatra and Federal. Anchorage—-Alongside wharf. Company's Services from this P o r t : — T o A l b a n y , Adelaide, Melbourne, and Sydney (transhipping for Brisbane and all Queensland ports), every week. T o N o u m e a (New Caledonia) and F i j i , m o n t h l y (from Sydney). T o Tasmanian and New Zealand ports, weekly (from Sydney). T o Geraldton, W . A . , occasionally. Agents—A.U.S.N. Manager.

Co., Ltd.—Offices : Cliff 3 t . ; D a v i d H a m i l t o n ,

G E R A L D T O N (West Australia).

Port for M u r c h i s o n goldfield. L a t . 2 8 46' S. L o n g . 114° 38' E. Pop., i n c l u d i n g district, 6,000. H o t e l s — C l u b and Geraldton. A n c h o r a g e — A l o n g s i d e Jetty. Company's Services from this P o r t : — T o Fremantle, A l b a n y , Adelaide, Melbourne, and S y d n e y (trans h i p p i n g for Queensland ports), every week. T o N o u m e a (New Caledonia) and F i j i , m o n t h l y (from S y d n e y ) . T o Tasmanian and N e w Zealand ports, weekly (from Sydney). 0

Agents—Burns,

P h i l p & Co., L t d .


ioo

Australasian

United Steam Navigation

Company,

Limited.

G E R A L D T O N (Queensland).—Situated on the Johnstone R i v e r .

Sugar district. L a t . I / ° 3 2 ' S . L o n g . 146 3' E . P o p . : 1,000 white, 1,400 Chinese, Kanakas, Cingalese, and Javanese. H o t e l s — R o y a l i E x c h a n g e , P r i n c e of Wales, and Johnstone River. A n c h o r a g e — A l o n g s i d e wharf. 0

Company's Services from this P o r t : — T o M o u r i l y a n , C a r d w e l l , Dungeness (Lucinda), and Townsville, every T h u r s d a y . T o Cairns, every Tuesday. T o P o r t Douglas and C o o k t o w n (with transhipment at Cairns), every Tuesday. T o T h u r s d a y Island, N o r m a n t o n , and Burketown (with transhipment at Cairns). Cargo service w i l l r u n at regular intervals, and passengers' steamers when inducement offers. T o B o w e n , M a c k a y (Flat Top), R o c k h a m p t o n (Keppel Bay), Gladstone, Bundaberg, M a r y b o r o u g h , Brisbane, Sydney, M e l bourne, Adelaide, A l b a n y , Fremantle, Geraldton, and other West A u s t r a l i a n ports (with transhipment at Townsville, every T h u r s d a y . T o N o u m e a (New Caledonia) and F i j i , m o n t h l y (from Sydney). T o Tasmanian and N e w Zealand ports, weekly (from Sydney). Agents—Burns, P h i l p & Co., L t d . , T o w n s v i l l e . Local Agents—Armstrong & Co., L t d .

G L A D S T O N E . — L a t . 23° 51' S. L o n g . 151° 17' E . Pop. (including district), 4,000. H o t e l s — M e t r o p o l i t a n , C o m m e r c i a l , B l u e B e l l , and R a i l w a y . A n c h o r a g e — A l o n g s i d e wharf. Company's Services from this P o r t : — T o Brisbane direct, every Wednesday, 11 a.m. T o R o c k h a m p t o n wharf, every Tuesday. T o Bundaberg, every F r i d a y . T o M a r y b o r o u g h fvia R o c k h a m p t o n ) , every Tuesday. T o Brisbane, Sydney, Melbourne, and Adelaide (transhipping at Sydney), every F r i d a y . T o A l b a n y , Fremantle, Geraldton, and other West A u s t r a l i a n ports (transhipping at Sydney), every F r i d a y . T o Noumea ( X e w Caledonia) and F i j i , m o n t h l y (from Sydney). T o Tasmanian and N e w Zealand ports, weekly (from Sydney). T o M a c k a y , Bowen, T o w n s v i l l e , Dungeness (Lucinda), Cardwell, M o u r i l y a n , G e r a l d t o n , Cairns, P o r t Douglas, and Cooktown (with transhipment at R o c k h a m p t o n ) , every Thursday and Saturday. T o T h u r s d a y Island, N o r m a n t o n , and B u r k e t o w n (with transhipment at Brisbane). Cargo service w i l l r u n at regular intervals, and passengers' steamers'when inducement offers Agents—A.U.S.N. Co., L t d .


Australasian

United

Steam Navigation

LEVUEA

Company, Limited.

101

( F i j i ) . — L a t . 17 45' S. L o n g . 178 4 7 ' W . H o t e l s — P l a n t e r s ' C l u b and R o y a l . A n c h o r a g e — A l o n g s i d e wharf. C o m p a n y ' s Services f r o m this P o r t : — T o S u v a , Sydney, Melbourne, Adelaide, A l b a n y , F r e m a n t l e , Geraldton, and other W e s t A u s t r a l i a n ports, and all Queensland ports, four weekly. Agent—D. Calder. 0

0

M A C E A Y . — S i t u a t e d on the Pioneer R i v e r . Large sugar district. L a t . 2 1 7' S. L o n g . 149 13' E . Pop., i n c l u d i n g district 11,000. H o t e l s — P r i n c e of Wales, Imperial, and D i m m o c k ' s . A n c h o r a g e — F l a t T o p Island, 6 miles from town. Steam tenders convey mails and passengers to town free of charg e Company's Services f r o m this P o r t : — T o B o w e n , Townsville, Cairns, P o r t Douglas, and C o o k t o w n , every M o n d a y . T o B o w e n and Townsville, every Sunday and M o n d a y . T o T h u r s d a y Island, N o r m a n t o n , and B u r k e t o w n . Cargo service w i l l r u n at regular intervals, and passengers' steamers when inducement offers T o Dungeness (Lucinda), Cardwell, M o u r i l y a n , and Geraldton (with transhipment at Townsville), every Sunday and M o n d a y . T o Broadsound, occasionally. T o R o c k h a m p t o n (Keppel Bay), Brisbane, Sydney, and M e l bourne, every Tuesday. T o Adelaide, A l b a n y , Fremantle, Geraldton, and other W e s t A u s t r a l i a n ports (with transhipment at Sydney), every Tuesday. T o Gladstone, Bundaberg, and Maryborough (with transhipment at R o c k h a m p t o n ) , every Tuesday. T o N o u m e a (New Caledonia) and F i j i , m o n t h l y (from S y d n e y ) . T o Tasmanian and New Zealand ports, weekly (from S y d n e y ) . Agents—-W. H . Paxton & Co. 0

0

M A R Y B O R O U G H . — S i t u a t e d on the M a r y R i v e r . P o r t for G y m p i e goldfield. L a t . 25 33' S. L o n g . 152 44' E . Pop., 10,000; district, 11,700. H o t e l s — C u s t o m House, R o y a l , and G r a n d . A n c h o r a g e — A l o n g s i d e wharf. Company's Services f r o m this P o r t : — T o R o c k h a m p t o n , every Wednesday. T o Bundaberg, every F r i d a y (via Brisbane). T o Brisbane, every F r i d a y . T o Gladstone, every Wednesday (via Rockhampton). T o Sydney, Melbourne, and Adelaide (transhipping at Brisbane), every F r i d a y . T o A l b a n y , Fremantle, Geraldton, and other W e s t A u s t r a l i a n ports (transhipping at Brisbane), every F r i d a y . T o N o u m e a (New Caledonia) and F i j i , m o n t h l y (from Sydney). 0

0


102 Australasian

United Steam Navigation

Company,

Limited.

MARYBOROUGH—Continued.

T o Tasmanian and N e w Zealand ports, weekly (from Sydney). T o Mackay (Flat Top), B o w e n , T o w n s v i l l e , Dungeness (Lucinda), Cardwell, M o u r i l y a n , G e r a l d t o n , Cairns, P o r t Douglas, and C o o k t o w n (transhipping at R o c k h a m p t o n ) , every Wednesday. T o T h u r s d a y Island, N o r m a n t o n , and B u r k e t o w n (with transhipment at Brisbane),. Cargo service w i l l r u n at regular intervals, and passengers' steamers when inducement offers. Agent—H. M . Ramsay.

M E L B O U R N E (Capital of V i c t o r i a ) . — S i t u a t e d on the R i v e r Y a r r a Y a r r a . L a t . 3 7 49' S. L o n g . 144 58' E . Pop., 1897 (including suburbs), 580,000. H o t e l s — M e n z i e s ' and Scott's. Coffee Palaces—Grand, V i c t o r i a , and M e l b o u r n e . B e r t h — Q u e e n ' s W h a r f , foot of Spencer Street. Company's Services from this P o r t : — T o Adelaide, weekly by W e s t A u s t r a l i a n liners. T o A l b a n y , Fremantle, G e r a l d t o n , and other W e s t Australian ports, weekly. T o Sydney, Brisbane, R o c k h a m p t o n (Keppel Bay), M a c k a y (Flat Top), Bowen, T o w n s v i l l e , Cairns, Port Douglas, and Cooktown, every Tuesday and Saturday. T o T h u r s d a y Island, N o r m a n t o n , and B u r k e t o w n , as inducement offers. T o Dungeness (Lucinda), Cardwell, M o u r i l y a n , and Geraldton (with transhipment at Townsville), every Saturday. T o M a r y b o r o u g h , Bundaberg, and Gladstone, every Saturday. T o N o u m e a (New Caledonia) and F i j i , m o n t h l y (from Sydney). T o Tasmanian and N e w Zealand ports, weekly (from Sydney). Agents—A.U S . N . Co., L t d , 493 Collins Street. 0

M O U R I L Y A N H A R B O U R . — S u g a r port.

0

Lat. i 7 ° 3 6 ' S . L o n g . 146 8' E . A n c h o r a g e — A l o n g s i d e wharf. Company's Services from this P o r t : — T o Geraldton and Cairns, every Tuesday. T o Cardwell, Dungeness (Lucinda), and Townsville, every Thursday. T o P o r t Douglas and C o o k t o w n (with transhipment at Cairns), every Tuesday. T o T h u r s d a y Island, N o r m a n t o n , and B u r k e t o w n (with transhipment at Cairns). Cargo service w i l l run at regular intervals, and passengers' steamers when inducement offers. T o B o w e n , M a c k a y , (Flat Top), R o c k h a m p t o n (Keppel Bay), Gladstone, Bundaberg, M a r y b o r o u g h , Brisbane, Sydney, Melbourne, and A d e l a i d e (with transhipment at Townsville), every T h u r s d a y . 0


Australasian

M O U R I L Y A N '

United

Steam Navigation

Company, Limited.

103

H A R B O U B - C « / / ™ , - , / .

To A l b a n y , Fremantle, Geraldton, and other W e s t A u s t r a l i a n ports (with transhipment at Townsville and Sydney), every Thursday. T o N o u m e a ( N e w Caledonia) and F i j i , m o n t h l y (from Sydney). T o Tasmanian and N e w Zealand ports, weekly (from Sydney). . Igents—Burns. P h i l p & Co., L t d . , Townsville. N E W C A S T L E . — S i t u a t e d at the m o u t h of the H u n t e r R i v e r , N.S W . T h e great coal e m p o r i u m of the Southern Hemisphere. L a t . 3 2 55' S. L o n g . 15 1° 40' F . P o p . (including suburbs), 60,000. H o t e l s — G r e a t N o r t h e r n , C r i t e r i o n , and Centennial. A n c h o r a g e — A l o n g s i d e wharf, or i n stream. T h e Company's steamers call at this port when inducement offers. Agents— Dalgety & Co., L t d . 0

N O R M A N T O N . — S i t u a t e d on the N o r m a n R i v e r . P o r t for the C r o y d o n , Etheridge, and Bower B i r d goldfields. Lat. 17 45' S. L o n g . 141° 5' E . Pop., 600. H o t e l s — H e l y ' s and Queen's. A n c h o r a g e — O f f K i m b e r l e y , 60 miles from t o w n . Mails and passengers conveyed by steam tender to town free of charge. Company's Services from this Port : — T o B u r k e t o w n , as inducement offers. To Thursday Island, Cooktown, P o r t Douglas, Cairns, Townsville, Bowen, M a c k a y (Flat T o p ) , R o c k h a m p t o n (Keppel Bay), Brisbane, Sydney, Melbourne, Adelaide, A l b a n y , Fremantle, Geraldton, and other W e s t A u s t r a l i a n ports, as inducement offers. T o Dungeness (Lucinda), Cardwell, M o u r i l y a n , Geraldton, a n d C a i r n s (with transhipment at Townsville). Cargo service w i l l run at regular intervals, and passengers' steamers when inducement offers. T o Gladstone, Bundaberg, and Maryborough (with transhipment at Rockhampton), as inducement offers. T o N o u m e a ( N e w Caledonia) and F i j i , m o n t h l y (from Sydney). T o Tasmanian and N e w Zealand ports, weakly (from Sydney). Ascents—Burns, P h i l n & Co.. L t d . 0

N O U M E A (Capital of N e w Caledonia) — L i t . 2 2 29' S.

Long 166° 28 E . Pop. of the i s l a n d : C i v i l and m i l i t a r y . 10,000; convicts, 11,000; Native pop., i n c l u d i n g LoyaltyIslands a n d Isle of Pines, 40,750. Hotels—Sebastopol and Commerce. A n c h o r a g e — A l o n g s i d e wharf. Company's Services from this Port : — T o S u v a and L e v u k a (Fiji Islands), four weekly. T o a l l A u s t r a l i a n ports (via Fiji), four weekly. Agent—T. Johnston. 0


icq.

Australasian

I'nited Steam Navigation

Company,

Limited.

P E R T H (Capital of W e s t e r n A u s t r a l i a ) . — L a t . 31 52' S.

Long. 116° E . 12 miles b y r a i l from Fremantle. Pop. (including suburbs) 35,000. H o t e l s — G o v e r n o r B r o o m e , S h a m r o c k , R o y a l , and M e t r o pole. Agent—D. H a m i l t o n , St. George's Terrace. 0

F O R T D O U G L A S . — E a s t coast of Australia.

Lat. 16° 28' S. L o n g . 145 29' E . Sugar District. P o p . (including district), about 1,000. H o t e l s — Exchange, C o m m e r c i a l , and Court House. A n c h o r a g e — 4 0 0 yards from the shore. M a i l s and passengers landed i n boats free of charge. Company's Services from this P o r t : — T o Cooktown, every T h u r s d a y . T o T h u r s d a y Island, N o r m a n t o n , and B u r k e t o w n (transhipping at Cooktown). Cargo service w i l l r u n at regular intervals, and passengers' steamers when inducement offers. T o Cairns, Townsville, B o w e n , M a c k a y (Flat Top), R o c k h a m p ton (Keppel Bay), Brisbane, Sydney, and Melbourne, every Saturday. T o Dungeness (Lucinda), C a r d w e l l , M o u r i l y a n , and Geraldton (with transhipment at Townsville), every Saturday. T o Gladstone, Bundaberg, and M a r y b o r o u g h (with transhipment at R o c k h a m p t o n ) , every Saturday. T o Adelaide (transhipping at Sydney), every Saturday. T o A l b a n y , Fremantle, G e r a l d t o n , and other W e s t A u s t r a l i a n ports (transhipping at Sydney), every Saturday. T o N o u m e a (New Caledonia) and F i j i , m o n t h l y (from Sydney). T o Tasmanian and New- Zealand ports, weekly (from Sydney). Agents—Walsh & Co. 0

R O C K H A M P T O N . — O n the F i t z r o y R i v e r , Queensland, east coast of A u s t r a l i a . Port for the world-famed M o u n t M o r g a n gold m i n e . L a t . 2 3 2 5 ' S . L o n g . 150° 2 5 ' E . Pop., 17,250. H o t e l s — C r i t e r i o n and L e i c h h a r d t . A n c h o r a g e — A l o n g s i d e wharf and at K e p p e l Bay, 40 miles from R o c k h a m p t o n . Steam tender conveys passengers and luggage to the city free of charge. Company's Services from this P o r t : — T o M a c k a y (Flat Top), B o w e n , T o w n s v i l l e , Cairns. P o r t D o u g las, Cooktown, every S u n d a y . T o T h u r s d a y Island, N o r m a n t o n , and B u r k e t o w n (transhipping at C o o k t o w n ) . Cargo service w i l l r u n at regular intervals, and passengers' steamers when inducement offers. T o Broadsound, occasionally, as inducement offers. T o Dungeness, (Lucinda), Cardwell, M o u r i l y a n , and Geraldton (with transhipment at Townsville), every Sunday. 0


Australasian

United

Steam Navigation

Company, Limited.

105

E 0 C K H A M P T 0 1 T - C O T / W « I / .

T o Brisbane and Sydney, every Wednesday and F r i d a y . T o Gladstone, every F r i d a y . T o Bundaberg, every F r i d a y . T o M a r y b o r o u g h , every Wednesday. T o Melbourne, every Tuesday. T o Adelaide (transhipping at Melbourne), every Tuesday. T o A l b a n y , Fremantle, Geraldton, and other W e s t A u s t r a l i a n ports (transhipping at Sydney), every Tuesday and F r i d a y . T o N o u m e a (New Caledonia) and F i j i , m o n t h l y (from Sydney). T o Tasmanian and New Zealand ports, weekly (from Sydney.) Agents—Walter R e i d & Co., L t d .

SUVA

(Capital F i j i Islands).—Lat. 18 7' S. L o n g . 178 25' E . P o p . of the F i j i a n G r o u p numbers some 120,000. H o t e l s — S t u r t ' s , Club, and Suva. A n c h o r a g e — A l o n g s i d e wharf. Company's Services from this P o r t : — T o Levuka, monthly. T o Sydney and all other A u s t r a l i a n ports, m o n t h l y . Agent—D. Calder. 0

SYDNEY

0

(Capital of N e w South Wales). — P o p . , (including suburbs), 410,000. L a t . 3 3 ° 5 i ' S . L o n g . 151" 11' E . Seasons—September to M a r c h , warm ; M a r c h to September, cool and bright, nights cold. H o t e l s — A u s t r a l i a , Metropole, Grosvenor ; and G r a n d Central Coffee Palace. A n c h o r a g e — A l o n g s i d e wharf. Company's Services from this P o r t : — T o Melbourne, every Tuesday and Saturday. T o Adelaide, weekly. T o A l b a n y , Fremantle, Geraldton, and other W e s t A u s t r a l i a n ports, weekly. T o Brisbane and R o c k h a m p t o n , every Tuesday and F r i d a y . T o M a r y b o r o u g h , every F r i d a y . T o Bundaberg and Gladstone, every Tuesday. T o Brisbane, R o c k h a m p t o n (Keppel Bay), M a c k a y (Flat Top), Bowen, Townsville, Cairns, P o r t Douglas, and C o o k t o w n , every Tuesday. T o T h u r s d a y Island, N o r m a n t o n , and B u r k e t o w n . Cargo service w i l l r u n at regular intervals, and passengers' steamers when inducement offers. T o Dungeness (Lucinda), Cardwell, M o u r i l y a n , and Geraldton (with transhipment at Townsville), every Tuesday. T o N o u m e a (New Caledonia), L e v u k a and S u v a (Fiji Islands), every 28 days. Agents—Burns,

P h i l p & Co., L t d . , 10 Bridge Street.


lo6

Australasian

United Steam Navigation

Company,

Limited.

I S L A N D . — N . W . of Cape Y o r k , in Torres Straits. Headquarters of the Torres Straits Pearl Fishery. L a t . io° 33' S. L o n g . 142° 10' E. P o p . (inc l u d i n g adjacent islands), 35,000. H o t e l s - ^ G r a n d and Metropole. A n c h o r a g e — A l o n g s i d e jetty. Company's Services from this P o r t : — To N o r m a n t o n and B u r k e t o w n . Cargo service w i l l r u n at regular intervals, and passengers' steamers when inducement offers. T o Cooktown, P o r t Douglas, Cairns, Townsville, Bowen, M a c k a y (Flat Top), R o c k h a m p t o n (Keppel Bay), Brisbane, Sydney, and Melbourne. Cargo service will r u n at regular intervals, and passengers' steamers when inducement offers. T o Dungeness (Lucinda), Cardwell, M o u r i l y a n , and G t r a l d t o n , (with transhipment at Cairns). Cargo service w i l l r u n at regular intervals, and passengers' steamers when inducement offers. T o Gladstone, Bundaberg, and M a r y b o r o u g h (with transhipment at R o c k h a m p t o n ) . Cargo service w i l l run at regular intervals, and passengers' steamers when inducement offers. T o Sydney, Melbourne, Adelaide, A l b a n y , Fremantle, Geraldton, and other W e s t A u s t r a l i a n ports. Cargo service will run at regular intervals, and passengers' steamers when inducement offers. T o N o u m e a (New Caledonia) and F i j i , m o n t h l y (from Sydney. T o Tasmanian and N e w Zealand ports, weekly (from Sydney). Agents—-Burns, P h i l p & Co., L t d . THURSDAY

T O W N S V I L L E . — S i t u a t e d on Cleveland B a y . P o r t for Charters Towers goldfield and B u r d e k i n sugar districts. L a t . 19° 20' S. L o n g . 140 40' E . Pop., 13,000. H o t e l s — Q u e e n ' s , C r i t e r i o n , and Imperial. A n c h o r a g e — G o o d ; two miles from the t o w n . Passengers and their luggage conveyed to town by steam ter.der free of charge. T i m e occupied, 20 minutes. Company's Services from this P o r t : — T o Cairns, P o r t Douglas, and C o o k t o w n , every Wednesday. T o Dungeness (Lucinda), Cardwell, M o u r i l y a n , Geraldton, and Cairns, every M o n d a y . T o Thursday Island, N o r m a n t o n , and B u r k e t o w n (without transhipment). Cargo service w i l l r u n at regular intervals, and passengers' steamers when inducement offers. T o B o w e n , M a c k a y (Flat Top), R o c k h a m p t o n (Keppel Bay), Brisbane, Sydney, Melbourne, Adelaide, A l b a n y , Fremantle, Geraldton, and other W e s t A u s t r a l i a n ports, every Monday. T o Gladstone, Bundaberg, and M a r y b o r o u g h (with transhipment at R o c k h a m p t o n ) , every M o n d a y . T o Noumea (New Caledonia) and F i j i , m o n t h l y (from Sydney). T o Tasmanian and N e w Zealand ports, weekly (from Sydney). Agents—Burns, P h i l p & Co., L t d . 0


Australasian

United

Steam Navigation

Company,

Limited.

107

AND GENERAL Passengers. T h e Company's steamers carry first and second class passengers, and the fares include table and attendance, bedding, linen, cabin furniture, baths, &c. Wines liquors, tobacco, & c , can l>e had on board at moderate prices. gers are not allowed to take on board their own wines and spirits.

Passen-

T h e lowest fares are charged, and excursion passages are issued by certain steamers from time to time. Each of the steamers carries a stewardess, whose attendance charge.

is given free of

Passengers are allowed to break the voyage at any intermediate proceed by a following steamer in which there may be accommodation.

port, and

The ladies' saloon and its appurtenances are exclusively appropriated to the use of lady passengers ; each cabin is reserved for the exclusive use of its occupants. Smoking is prohibited in the saloons, cabins, or between decks, and is permitted only on such parts of the deck where it may not inconvenience other passengers. A s it is the Company's desire to study the comfort and convenience of the travelling public as far as practicable, any communication to Head Office at Brisbane, embodying suggestions in that direction, will receive attention, and any wellgrounded complaints will be promptly inquired into.

Letters and Telegrams. Letters posted and telegrams sent to meet passengers at ports of call should 1* addressed to the care of the A . U . S . N . Co.'s Agents at the respective ports. To facilitate deliver) on Iniard the steamer, it is advisable to state in which class the passenger is travelling. It is recommended that an address lie written on the flap of envelope notifying where the letter may be returned or forwarder! in case it misses the steamer. Booking

Rules.

A l l passage money is payable in advance. Passengers not emliarking after engaging passage are liable to forfeit the full amount of passage money paid. In case, however, of a passenger being unavoidably prevented from availing of a passage at the period for which it was taken, a transfer to a subsequent steamer can be effected on notice lieing given, without forfeiture, and accommixiation will be allotted as similar as circumstances will permit. N o berth or cabin is to be occupied by a passenger without application to the agent on shore, and it is to be understood that a passenger occupying a cabin, of two or more berths, on the departure of the vessel (unless he shall have paid an additional sum for its exclusive occupation) is not to object to the vacant berth or l>erths being filler! at the intermediate ports, if required. A cabin containing two tierths can be reserved for one passenger on paying the reserved rate of 50 per cent, additional fare.


io8

Australasian

United

Steam Navigation

Company,

Limited.

It is advisable that all arrangements as to tickets should be completed l>efore embarking. T h e other terms on which tickets are issued by the Company's steamers are endorsed on each ticket, and these are commended to the attention of passengers.

Saloon Regulations. The following are the meal hours on board the Company's steamers : — S a l o o n — Breakfast, 8.30 a.m., except when steamers make an early arrival in port, when Breakfast will be served at 8 a.m. ; Lunch, I p.m. ; Dinner, 6 p.m. Second Class —Breakfast, 7.30 a.m. ; Dinner, noon ; T e a , 5 p . m . T h e dressing licll is rung half an hour before saloon breakfast and dinner. Lights in the saloon are extinguished at 10.30 p . m . , and in the state rooms at 11 p.m. T h e l»r opens at 7 a.m., and closes at 10.30 p.m. at sea.

Through Tickets. Passengers Iwoked to and from coast ports, at through rates, are transferred with their loggage from one steamer to another by the Company, without extra charge ; but ifdetained at the transhipping port waiting for a steamer, they must pay their own expenses.

Return Tickets. Return tickets are issued at reduced rates, and are available for six months from date of issue.

Horses, Dogs, &c. Horses, dogs, other animals, and birds are carried on deck, by special arrangement only, at shipper's risk. Dogs, birds, or pet animals of any kind will not be allowed in the saloon or state rooms under any circumstances. Food has to be supplied by the sender or owner, unless specially arranged otherwise. Bicycles cannot 1 « carried as passengers' luggage, but will be charged special rates. Dogs must be placed in charge of the chief officer on board. Children. Children under two years of age, free ; no berth provided. five years, quarter fare : between five and twelve years, half fare.

Between two and

Servants. Servants travelling with their employers may travel in saloon at second class fare, but are not allowed to sit at table with the other passengers.

Deck Passages. Asiatics and Polynesians are carried on deck at special rates.

Baggage. Each first class adult passenger is allowed 20 cubic feet of personal baggage free. Second class and servants, 10 cubic feet; children paying half fare, half this space. Commercial travellers are allowed 40 cubic feet. Extra luggage charged according to rates of freight. Deck chairs received and placed on board at owner's risk. Passengers who may miss any baggage on arrival at their destination are recommended to apply, -without delay, to the Company's Agents, giving full particulars, in writing.


Australasian

United Steam Navigation

Company Limited.

109

Baggage is carried at the passenger's risk and under the passenger's sole responsibility. T h e Company will not be responsible for any loss, damage, or injury w hatsoever of or to the person, or of or to any luggage, property, goods, effects, articles, matters, or things belonging to or carried by or with any passenger, whether the same shall arise from, or be occasioned by, the act of G o d , of the Queen's enemies, dangers of the sea, rivers, or navigation, collision, jettison, fire, thefts, or robl>eries, whether by persons in the employment of the Company or by others, accidents to or by machinery, boilers, or steam, accidents by sea or land, unskilful, improper, or careless navigation, or any other acts, defaults, or negligence of the Company s Agents, servants, or employes of any kind whatsoever. T h e attention of passengers by the Company's steamers is requested to the undermentioned regulations in reference to baggage; much trouble and loss are occasionally caused by their neglect or non-observance. A l l l>aggage should be packed in leather portmanteaux or trunks, marked with the owner's name and port of destination in paint in full, and fastened securely with case locks (padlocks and leather straps being liable to damage or removal). Canvas covers to the packages of l>aggage are not recommended, as they are frequently removed and lead to the loss of the package. T h e baggage of passengers must contain their personal effects only. Specie, jewels, plate, and other valuables are to be specially declared Company's booking agents, or to the officer in charge of the luggage, and paid thereon.

lo the freight

A n y infringement of these regulations will subject the packages to detention for freight by the Company's Agents or Custom House authorities. Caution.—Goods of a Dangerous

Nature.

T h e Company will not receive on any of their vessels any luggage or goods of a dangerous or damaging nature. If any such goods be shipped without notice, the shippers or passengers will not only be liable to the penalties imposed by statute, but also for all damages sustained in consequence of such shipment. Observance of t h e G e n e r a l

Regulations.

Passengers must comply with the regulations established on board the steamers for the general comfort and safety. General Conditions. T h e Company's vessels are at liberty to deviate for any purpose and in any manner and to any extent. A l l passengers are required to notice that the Company is not liable for detention or delay to passengers, nor for loss of or injury to the person arising from any cause whatsoever. Passengers will have to defray their own expenses for hotels, &c, in the event of detention, or while awaiting transhipment to another steamer, and in all cases of quarantine pay 6s. per day saloon and 3s. per day steerage for their maintenance during the detention of the steamer. The Dates in the Time Tables are subject to Alterations or Omissions as may be found necessary. Passengers are requested to consult the daily newspapers for latest information. T h e Passage Tickets are personal, and cannot be authorisation of the Company.

transferred

without

the


Advertisement.

I 10

Turnbull

LONDON, GLASGOW, and

Martin I <2o. DUNEDIN, N.Z. t

Owners of the

<FXFIRST

G L A S S REG. TONNAGE.

STEAMER.

BANFFSHIRE

...

5.5

BUTESHIRE

...

5.574

PERTHSHIRE

...

. M O R A Y S H I R E ...

R E G U L A R

'

20

REG. TONNAGE.

STEAMER.

NAIRNSHIRE

...

FIFESHIRE ELDERSLIE

5,<>72 5,5oo

...

2,761

5,576

SAILINGS

T o and from

/ J V H E

S T E A M E R S . X ^

LONDON,

AUSTRALIA,

and

N E W ZEALAND.

above vessels, some o f w h i c h are the largest i n the A u s -

tralian trade, are fitted i n the most improved manner for

the carriage of F r o z e n Meat, D a i r y Produce, and General Cargo, at Moderate Rates of F r e i g h t .

Splendid

AccommodationFor a limited number of Saloon Passengers at Reduced

Fares.

FOR FURTHER PARTICULARS AI'PI.Y TO

THE BRITISH INDIA AND QUEENSLAND ACENCY CO., LTD., AGENTS, MARY

STREET,

B R I S B A N E .


Advertisement.

I New Zealand Shipping I Company, Ltd.

N e w

Z e a l a n d and

L o n d o n ,

Calling at-

R o y a l

M a i l .

Monte Video, Rio de Janeiro, Teneriffe. and Plymouth.

rx STEAMKK.

F L E E T , TONS.

KSK STEAMER.

TONS.

7,000

W A I K A T O

6,127

T E K O A

4,050

E I M U T A K A

4,515

O T A R A M A

3,808

K A I K O U R A

4,507

W A I M A T E

6,688

F A F A N T J I R U A H I N E

R A K A I A

...

...

T O N G A R I R O

...

W A K A N U I

...

4,766

6,688

F A F A R O A

4,163

W H A K A T A N E

7,000 ...

6,600

6,600

Leave New Zealand every Fourth Thursday for London. All

are

modern

vessels, built

of steel expreissly

and owned in the

for

the

Colonial

Trade,

Colony.

*• A S S E N G E R Accommodation is replete with every convenience, and the Dietary arrangements unsurpassed, fresh provisions being carried in a frozen state.

T h e homeward passages have hitherto been remarkably

quick, averaging thirty-six to forty days.

By this route the heat of the R e d Sea is

avoided, and the magnificent scenery of New Zealand, Monte Video, R i o , and Teneriffe is a great and enjoyable attraction.

8PECIAL FOR

F U R T H E R PARTICULARS

RETURN

TICKETS.

A P P L Y TO

The British India & Queensland Agency Co., L t d . , Agents in Queensland.


Urn

I

lure

I

ntD

LINES

\

DOITED BLUE

RED

LINE

DOTTED

BRITISH 4

BRITISH -

BLUE

INDIA S T E A M

NAVIGATION

B R I T I S H INDIA A S S O C I A T E D INDIA

AUSTRALASIAN THE CASTLE

Coy's

LINE, CALCUTTA

UNITED STEAM

MAIL

CO.

STEAMERS.

PACKETS

TO

NAVIGATION

CO.

AUSTRALIA. COMPANY

LTD.


.

Idrertisemeut.

THE

North Queensland Insurance Co. Ltd. I R

MA

RINK.

Authorised Capital. £250.000 ;

Subscribed Capital £114.000.

3M?

HEAD

OFFICE,

DIRECTORS

JAMES BURNS, J O H N S E E , M . L . A . , I.

SYDNEY.

:

Chairman.

M A C P H K R R O N , A. F O R S Y T H , K. U. W A L E V .

GENERAL MANACER :

SECRETARY :

CHARLES DANVERS. BRANCHES

Townsville Brisbane Rockhampton Maryborough All North Q'land Ports

Newcastle, N.S.W. Melbourne Adelaide Perth Bundalnrg

T. I. W A I T E R S . AND

ACENCIES:

Fiji Invercargill Noumea Boml»ay Auckland Calcutta Wellington Timor Christchurch Madras Dunedin Colombo Hongkong Vancouva.

I Iobarl launceston London New York Manilla II iogo


..ill

ti

ill- -mill

'It' .iidii -Jlii -"Ii' ..nil' .-ilii .-dii .-ill' .xilir ..olh ...ill

ti, ..nil. ..nil. .-ill. .-ilii .Hi':.

lijiii.

QUEENSLAND ,[111

iii^i.

,.in l|p"-il|lIi^TiprTI]lirr-^]^Tj^i|||ii.

line i||||n i|||in

n|(ii" i|(|in ij|||i' i|[|in

irp^"C>J))

X

e r ^ >

STEALERS.

i 'I|

it V

HH^-'ip

1

'III'" '||ii" '||U" 'l|U" 'l|H" 'II"" 'III'" M 3 )

"\


Queetisland

112

Line of

Steamers.

A G E N C I E S .

LONDON

GRAY, DAWES &

PLYiMOUTH

W E E K E S , PHILLIPS &

MALTA

T . C. S M I T H &

NAPLES

HOLME &

Co.

Co.

Co.

J W O R M S & Co. | W I L L S & Co., L T D .

PORT SAID SUEZ

G . BEYTS &

ADEN

COWASJEE,

Co.

DlNSHAW &

f Bois BROS. & Co.

COLOMBO

THE

BURKETOWN NORMANTON

ISLAND...

BURNS,

B U R N S , P H I L P & Co., L T D . K.

PORT

WALSH &

MACDONALD. Co.

CAIRNS

B U R N S , P H I L P & Co., L T D .

TOWNSVILLE

B U R N S , P H I L P & Co., L T D .

BOWEN

F.

WATSON.

MACKAY

W.

H . PAXTON &

ROCKHAMPTON

WALTER

GLADSTONE

A. U.S.N.

BUNDABERG

P.

RIDLEY.

MARYBOROUGH

H.

M . RAMSAY.

BRISBANE

AND

P H I L P & Co., L T D .

COOKTOWN DOUGLAS

LIMITED.

R E N D ALL, SYNOTT Co., L T D .

\ ..

Co.

BORNEO COMPANY,

( AFFLECK,

BROTHERS.

(Acting).

\ DARLEY, BUTLER &

BATAVIA

THURSDAY

Co.

Co.

R E I D & Co., L T D . Co.,

LTD.

\ BRITISH INDIA A N D Q U E E N S L A N D / AGENCY C O . , LIMITED.

SYDNEY

B U R N S , P H I L P & Co., L T D .

MELBOURNE

W . SIDDELEY &

ADELAIDE

B. W . MACDONALD

Co.


dttrmtslatti)

X i i u

nf

S t w m m ,

Ducal Line a n d British India Associated Steamers,

Ltd.

Comprising the following High-Class Steamers :TONS.

TONS.

Jumna Duke of Duke of Duke of Duke of Monthly

Westminster Devonshire... Argyll Sutherland... Service

Duke Duke Duke Duke

4,749 3,788 3,257 3,159 3,271

to London

from

Brisbane

Batavla, Aden, Suez, Port Said.

and

of of of of

Buckingham Portland Fife Norfolk

other

Queensland

3,134 3,822 3,720 3,819

Ports,

via

Extra Steamers as Inducement offers.

Travellers by this line have the great advantage of visiting the Queensland ports and enjoying the picturesque scenery and smooth water passage afforded by this route, while the monotony of a long sea voyage is relieved by the numerous interesting breaks in the journey, at Batavia and elsewhere. The above Steamers carry Second Saloon and Steerage passengers only at the following Rates :— S E C O N D CLASS (to London), £tf

Single ; £65 Return.

S T E E R A G E , £ 1 4 14s., F R O M B R I S B A N E ; £16 QUEENSLAND

FROM

NORTHERN

PORTS.

Parcels received for any part of the United Kingdom at 6d. per lb. charge, 2s. 6d., covering 5 lbs.

Minimum

Cargo and passengers booked through to the Continent of Europe, America, India, Burma, China, Japan, Straits Settlement, Java, New Zealand, Tasmania, Fiji, New Caledonia, New Guinea, Africa, Persian Gulf, Egypt, Algiers, &c. The Service is conducted in connection with the following Companies :— BRITISH INDIA STEAM NAVIGATION C O . , L T D . U N I O N STEAMSHIP C O . OF N E W Z E A L A N D , L T D . CASTLE M A I L

PACKET CO.

PENINSULAR AND ORIENTAL S T E A M NAVIGATION C O . EASTERN

STEAMSHIP C O . , L T D . ( D U C A L

NORTH GERMAN

LLOYD'S.

G E R M A N AUSTRALIAN STEAMSHIP C O . MESSAGERIES MARITIMES C O . AUSTRIAN LLOYD'S C O . F R E N C H TRANSATLANTIC C O . RUBATTINO C O . GENERAL STEAM

NAVIGATION C O .

And the principal Atlantic Steam Lines.

LINE).


Queensland

RATES

OF

PASSAGE

Line

of

MONEY

BRISBANE.

£ .

o

6

0

2 10

7

0

4

8

0

6

8

s.

MACKAY.

0

£ 2

10

0

4

0

0

s.

10

0

19

0

17

0

25

0

25

0

30

0

30

0

3i

20

0

3i

SALOON.

Full particulars of Sailing Dates will be found in the dailv nanArs.

HOW F.N.

6 10

10 10

10

QUEENSLAND.

ROCKHAMPTON.

£

12

FROM

SECOND

s

4

IO 10

Steamers.

£ 2

s.

5

0

TOWNSY £

s.

0

3

10

8 10

7

0

'5

10

U.K. COOKTOWN. £ s. .THURSDAY ISLAND. 4 0

1

'5

0

S. 10 IO

25

0

25

0

25

O

COLOMBO.

0

0

0

A D E N .

0

3"

0

31

0

31

0

SUEZ.

0

3'

0

PORT

70

37

0

LONDON.

16

0

25

0

25

0

0

0

0

31

0

3"

3"

0

31

0

3>

0

31

0

3>

0

31

37

0

37

0

37

0

37

0

37

0

3

BATAVTA.

SAID.

Children between 3 and 12 years of years of age are charged half the adult rates. One child under 3 years of age, if with parent (no berth provided), free When more than one child under 3 years, each additional child, quarter fare. Servants two-thirds of ordinary fare.

STEERACE

AND

DECK

RATES

FROM

QUEENSLAND

PORTS. PORTS.

STEERAGE

RATE.

DECK

RATE.

£

s.

d.

BATAVIA

8

0

0

6

0

0

SAMARANG

9

0

0

7

0

0

SOURABAYA

10 10

0

8

0

0

SINGAPORE

10

0

0

8

0

0

10

COLOMBO

0

0

0

0

0

12

0

0

«4

0

12

0

0

0

0

0

14

14

PORT SAID

14

LONDON

16

Brisbane to London :

d.

8

0

l i f e . - • -I

s.

12

0

«4 ' 4

ADEN SUEZ

£

.

Steerage, £14 14s.

The above Rates do not include Kit.


TABLE

M E L B O U R N E . 564

OF

SYDNEY. NEWCASTLE.

634

70

1.074

510

440

ISmsiiAN E.

1,424

838

768

328

ROCKHAMPTON. MACKAI

1,614

1,031

961

521

'93

1,719

1.149

'.079

639

311

118

1,822

1,252

1,182

742

4'4

221

103

2,082

1,510

1,440

1,000

672

479

361

258

2,522

1,940

1,870

1.430

1,102

909

791

688

4.759

4.'95

4.'25

3.685

3,357

3,164

3,046

8,609.

8.045

7.975

7,535

7,307

7,"4

6,996

10,016

9.452

9,382

8,942

8,614

8,421

8,303

10,104

9.54o

9.47o

9,030

8,702

8,509

11,219

10,655

10,585

10,145

9,817

i3> 9

12,665

12.595

12,155

'3.539

12.975

12,905

12,465

22

DISTANCES.

BOWEN. TOWNSVILLE. COOKTOWN. THURSDAY ISLAND. 430 BA I A \ [A.

2,685

2.255

6,635

6,205

3,950

8,200

7,942

7.5'2

5,257

',3°7

8,391

8,288

8,030

7,600

5,345

',395

88

9,624

9,506

9,403

9,145

8,715

6,460

2,510

1,203

1,115

11,827

11,634

11,516

«i,4'3

",'55

10,725

8,470

4,520

3,125

3,125

2,010

12,137

",944

11,826

11,723

11,465

",035

8,780

4,830

3,435

3.435

2,320

2,943

ADEN

jS U E / . PORT

SAID. NAPLES. PLYMOUTH.

a

LONDON.


n6

Advertisement.

<Lhe jNforth Queensland jMortgage and 3nve5trT\eqt Co., L

I

M

I

T

~n

It I I . I * I I ft I lÂť

Authorised

Capital

E

D

.

A Y

18, 18HO.

-

-

^ 1 , 0 0 0 , 0 0 0 .

Head Queensland Office: T O W N S V I L L E . H

e

a

d

O

f

f

i

c

e

-

Queensland THK

HON. W I L L I A M

A P L I N , F R A N K

-

-

L

O

N

D

O

N

.

Bo?rd of A d v i c e : M.L.C.

W A L T E R

N E A M E ,

H A Y S ,

ESQ.

ESQ.

MANAGER: L.

C. W O O L R Y C H ,

TOWNSVILLE.

The Company is prepared to grant L O A N S O N M O R T G A G E for fixed periods.

O e J3ritisr\ Jndia ar\d Queensland j\gency Co., Jumited, Agents.


cfiritisfi dfndia Steam Navigation Qompany, J26.


118

British

India

Steam Navigation

FLEET OF AFRICA A.MR A ASK A ASSYRIA *AVOCA BANCOORA BKZWADA BHUNDARA IK M i l . DAN A BYCULLA CAMORTA CANARA CHANDA CHILKA GHINDWARA CIIUI'RA •CHYEBASSA COLABA GOMM1 LI.A CULNA •DILWARA DUMRA DUNERA DWARKA ELLORA ETHIOPIA FAZILKA FULTALA GOA GOALPARA GOLCONDA GOORKIIA HENZADA HUZARA •INDIA JAVA JELUNGA •JUMNA KANGRA KAPURTHALA KAKAGOLA KASARA KATORIA KERBELA KHANDALLA KILWA KISTNA KOLA LALPOORA LANDAURA LAW A D A ... LINDULA LOODIANA MADURA MALDA MANORA MATIANA

M W F B I. V M N L J F S N SW M P

S D

C

V I) W 1 \ BW L T N F C T11WN R N L M S KJ W N L'W Q QNIMI \V V P Q S 11 T N S F R L N Iv I'J R MD G W T HB SG L Q N G D L N KCV M F D II N HTC S G P W N D II K L V M S L W M B W SN L H S C L K VCG W .1 V R T BIQ T D'l P W DT V L M FG M BF C K GT Q V FN M K PVI K PW D LQKJ L R U T T RW I N QDV k v HS K T LR L V MD J V KB K LB C IW BL K T PX JTQR M Q T N M S N J J H DB N PGR

Limited.

STEAMERS. TONNAGE.

Signal Letters.

Nun,

Company,

Gross.

Net.

*!

2030

1299

535 542

I70

1495 5324 2917 5001

970

202 90 90 200 627 1290 380 290 300 122 200 166 221 185 185 180 346 122 140 185 700 500 700 506 185 202 450 450 166 200

293° 2860 1516 2119 1902 2022 1971 2011

IS 4

34IO 2198 3270 2215 2144 1095 1351 1216 1305 1477 1502

1977 2663 1524 872 2026

•436 1688 1108

5441 1695

3517 762

5413 I&95 1996

3457 759 1494 1302 2698 2692 1217

2035 4152 4156 1903 2147 5874 4107 2078 2078 4074 1477 5186 4749 1984 1122 1208 "95 1127 1961 2040 1552 1182 1192 3269 33o8 3269 3346 3269 1956 1951 4697 5264

550 1464

1359 376i 2617 1341 1336 2591 920

55° 500 200 200 500 180 627

3371 2997 522 1478 180 721 151 622 ;28o 5°5 215 664 15' I468 180 I3I8 221 993 200 524 256 498 300 2124 370 2157 2124 2180 2124 1273 1251 2995 3413

385 370 290 370 280 280 650 500

COMMANDERS.

J . W.

ROBERTSON.

1'. II. M A R T Y R . C. F \ E V A N S , R.N.R. 1). L. XF.II.SON. E . R. ROBINSON, R.N.R. A. D. M O R T O N . W. B. S M I T H . A. E . STBBBIMG. |. K l L P A T R I C K , K.N. K. J . M. T Y R R E L L . J. A. M A C K N I S . K. S T A B B , R.N.R. G . A. S H E P H E R D . II. <;. C R E F T , R.N.R. W. H . W A T K E Y S , R.N.R. S. BOON. J. G. F. M E T C A L F E . A. M. R A I T , R.N.R. A. S T E V E N . [. B. G R O O M , R.N.R. A. W. M A N N . W. H . ROTHWF.I.L, R . N . R . J. S M I T H . J . C. T l C E , R . N . R . A. THOMAS. J. M . COUPER. G . J. Goss, R.N.R. A. B. C A V E . H . B . C Pl.OMMKR. W. H . JACOBS. W. A. B U R K I T T . T. J. JOHNSTONE. E . M C D O U G A I . L , R.N.R. I>. M A C F A D Y E N . E . G. D A V I S . H . P. JONES. A. SANDERS. H. J. W I L L S H E R . C. P. S E D D O N . W. I S D A l . E . S. M A C L A C H L A N . J. E. T. BUTLER. C . WILLIS. T. M. W H I T E H E A D . J. M A C L E A N . E. FOSTER. J. W. L I V I N G S T O N E . H . L. PARSONS. W. B R I T T E N . G . D. C L A R K E . W. L . S T E W A R T , R.N.R. W. M . H A R D C A S T L E . J . B . P E A R S O N , R.N.R. R. H . C O O P E . J . H E N D E R S O N , R.N.R. W. A. F A U S S E T .

* Fleet of the British India Associated Steamers, Limited.


British India Steam Navigation Company, Limited. 119

Signal Letters.

NAMES.

M E G N A M E R G U I • M E R K A R A M. M E A N A T C H Y MOMBASSA M U T T R A N E R B U D D A NEVASA N O W S H E R A N U D D E A OBRA O K A R A OKFILA O N D A O N I P E N T A O O L O B A R I A ORISSA P A C H U M B A P A L A M C O T T A PALITANA P A T N A P E M B A P E N T A K O T A P U N D U A P U R N E A P U R U L I A PUTIALA RAJPOOTANA R A M A P O O R A R A N G O O N RASMARA R E W A SCINDIA S E C U N D R A SIMLA S I R D H A N A SIRSA U G A N D A UJINA U L A U M B A L L A U M T A U P A D A U R L A N A V.—{Building) V.—(Building) V—{Building) V.—(Building) V.—{Building U .—(Buildino) V.—(Building) V A D A L A V A S N A VIRAWA VITA WARDIIA W A R O R A

W C X L J V II N P D C W ... W G R K L H B J M G T F H G D L 1 L K 0 II Q N 1 11 \ ( ) M N V M K P I) J H N V Q G P D 11 M P K K I ; P M C S P T C J W T N G L Q K P K 11 V S I. K K V Q VV \ M L W K T K V L M K W N R R W D F K J C M N P K | K M </H W T K B L Q K F W K V M S M K T J D T Q S D F K S K T G j Q Q Q P Q

L L L L K K

c c; s

C R J C D J D S L W Y S F H C

V K P R N S \V K K S T N M V 1 N L G

TONXAOE. dross.

Net.

1254 244

772 126 1949 I368

3°99 21 11 4662 4644 3° 5 2998 2

3° 4 3°°5 5456 5291 5288 2

5 47 5294 5294 543° 867 2

3413 2998 182P 1536 34'8 3305 3306 1554 2998 2030 910 547 892 3922 2729 2610 1615 2729 2610 5366 53'° 53 53 5366 5400 5400 5400 5400 5400 5400 5400 5400 5400 I G

1 0

3334 915 3333 915 3976 3980

3039 2985 I961 •945 1961 1944 349° 3439 3436 34io 342o 3420 3525 544 2208 •934 1164 987 2209 2126 2127 993 1929 1312 365 215 3°7 2519 2050 1675 i°39 2074 1675 3451 3426 3426 3426 345' 35°o 3500 35oo 3500 35°° 3500 35<» 35c° 3500 2164 5°3 2158 501 2563 2565

H.P. Nominal.

F L E E T OF STEAMER8-c«/™,rf.

98 54 400 320 450 45" 324 326 324 324 450 229 229 400 229 229 450 140 400 400 220 200 400 400 400 200 400 221 300 400 300 500 270 181 180 270 180 382 229 229 229

COMMANDERS.

W. Picon. T . COSTEI.I.O. R . IS' KKDSI.IE. A . K . M A N W A R I N G , R.N.R. G . G . C . STEVENSON. M . D . BLOTT. K . II. B R O W N . G . JACOBS. J . STONE. C . SCOTT. t B R I IU v F. S H E I . D R I C K . E . W . PECK. J . W I L S O N , R.N.R. S . W A R R I N G ION. D . F. L E E . R. B. W O O D . J . SKINNER. A . J . W I N D E R I N K , R.N. R. M . (;. W I L L I A M S . A . H . ACHESON. R . J . R l C K F O R D , R.N.R. A . MACKINLAY. T . P. N A I L E R . M. ENGLAND. R. HOARE. R . PHILLIPS. R. W . G l M B L E T T . A . H O U G H T O N , R.N.K. C . BROWNING. E . M . BARRETT. A . MORRIS. F . G . S M I T H , R.N R. W . W . ALLEN. J. ROBERTSON. "W. I I . H I L L . T . A . COLLINS. J . BLACK. G . F. WITHERS. P. L . W A D O E , R.N.R. D . C A M P B E L L , R.N.R. F. HERRINCTON.

382 300 300 300 300 300 300 300 300 300 290 F . P. How [.DEN. no F. C . D E W I N G . 290 W . GRAY. 110 I). M C I N T Y R E . 360 J. ANDERSON. 360 Ij. R . P . A L E X A N D E R , R.N. R.

* Fleet of the British India Associated Steamers, Limited.


120

British

India

Steam Navigation

COMPANY'S LINE

Company,

Limited.

SERVICES. N o . 1.

CALCUTTA, RANGOON and bask direct—Weekly.

L I N E N o . 2. CALCUTTA, RANGOON, and MOULMEIN and back direct -Weekly.

LINE

No. 3.

CALCUTTA, RANGOON, PENANG, and SINGAPORE

LINE

Weekly.

N o . 4.

CALCUTTA, CHITTAGONG, ARRACAN, and B U R M A H - W e e k l y .

LINE

N o . 5.

RANGOON, TAVOY, and MERGUI—Weekly, (a) MOULMEIN, TAYOY, and MERGUI—Fortnightly. Calling occasionally at Y E H and PAL AW.

LINE

N o . 6.

MADRAS, NORTHERN COROMANDEL PORTS, and RANGOON- Weekly.

LINE

N o . 7.

RANGOON, MADRAS, and NEGAPATAM—Weekly.

LINE

N o . 8.

MOULMEIN, RANGOON, COLOMBO, M A L A B A R PORTS, and BOMBAY—Fortnightly.

LINE

N o . 9.

MADRAS, N E G A P A T A M , P E N A N G , and SINGAPORE—Fortnightly.

LINE

N o . 10.

CALCUTTA, COLOMBO, and MAURITIUS—Four-Weekly. Connecting at M a u r i t i u s w i t h the Castle M a i l Packet C o m p a n y ' s Steamers to a n d from S o u t h A f r i c a n P o r t s .

LINE

N o . 11.

C A L C U T T A and BOMBAY COASTING—Weekly. C a l l i n g , if inducement offers, a t — WEEKLY. False Point Gopaulpore Calingapatam Bimlipatam Vizagapatam Coconada During the south-west

Masulipalam Colombo Narrakal Madras Tuticorin Calicut Pondicherry Colachel Tellicherry Cuddalore Quilon Cannanore Negapatam Aleppey Mangalore Galle Cochin monsoon communication with the Malabar coast ports is uncertain. T h e sailings on this line not being fixed by any contract are subject to re-arrangement from time to time.


British

India

Steam Navigation

Company,

Limited.

121

L I N E No. 12. BOMBAY, K U R R A C H E E . and PERSIAN GULF—Weekly.

LINE

No. 13.

BOMBAY and K U R R A C H E E - W e e k l y . C a l l i n g at Coast

LINE

Ports.

No. 14.

BOMBAY, K U R R A C H E E direct and back -Weekly.

L I N E No. 15. BOMBAY, and ZANZIBAR

Four-Weekly.

C a l l i n g at A d e n and Mombasa ; also at L a m u as may require.

LINE

occasion

No. 16.

BOMBAY to ZANZIBAR, via M A H E (Seychelles) and MOMBASA, and thence to MOZAMBIQUE, BEIRA, INHAMBANE, and DELAGOA BAY Four-Weekly. C o n n e c t i n g at Delagoa B a y with the Castle M a i l Packet Steamers to and from S o u t h A f r i c a n Ports.

LINE

Co.'s

No. 17.

LONDON and CALCUTTA

Fortnightly.

C a l l i n g at Marseilles, Naples (optional), P o r t S a i d , Suez, A d e n , Colombo, and Madras. On the Homeward Voyage these steamers call at Plymouth to land passengers. At Marseilles, Naples and Port Said exchanging traffic with other lines of steamers for Mediterranean ports. At Aden exchanging traffic with the Austro-Ilungarian or other steamers to and from Red Sea ports. At Colomlx) exchanging traffic with the Company's steamers on Line No. 8 for Malabar coast ports, and No. 12 for Mauritius. At Madras exchanging traffic with the Company's steamers on Line No. 5 to Northern coast ports and Rangoon, and Line No. 7 to Penang, Malay coast ports, and Singapore. At Calcutta exchanging traffic with the Company's weekly steamers to Arracan ports, Rangoon, Moulmein, and Straits. Also carrying traffic on through Bills of Lading to and from Continental ports and America.

LINE

No. 18.

LONDON, JAVA, and Q U E E N S L A N D - T w o - W e e k l y , Three-Weekly or Four-Weekly, as occasion may require. Calling at— Nalpes (optional) Port Said Suez Aden Colombo Batavia

Sourabaya Thursday Island *Cooktown *Port Douglas "Cairns Townsville

*Bowen * Mackay Rockhampton 'Maryborough Brisbane

* W h e n sufficient inducement offers

P L Y M O U T H (on homeward voyage only)


122

British

India

Steam Navigation

LINE LONDON, K U R R A C H E E .

No.

BOMBAY, and

Company,

Limited.

19.

PERSIAN G U L F — a s occasion

may

require.

C a l l i n g at P o r t Said, Suez, and A d e n . A t Port Said exchanging traffic with other lines of steamers to and from Mediterranean Ports, and at A d e n for Red Sea Ports. Connecting at Kiirrachee with the Company's coasting steamers to and from all the Persian Gulf Ports. Connecting at Bombay w ith the Company's weekly steamers to and from Malabar coast Ports as inducement may offer.

LINE LONDON and

No.

20.

E A S T A F R I C A N L I N E , transhipping at Aden

Four-Weekly.

C a l l i n g at Marseilles, Naples (optional), P o r t Said, Suez, A d e n , Mombasa, and Zanzibar ; also at L a m u as occasion may require.

ADDITIONAL

SERVICES.

C A L C U T T A and A U S T R A L I A — A b o u t Once a Month. Calling at Singapore, Adelaide, Melbourne, and Sydney, and usually returning vitt Torres Straits. CALCUTTA, CEYLON,

and

BOMBAY.

In addition to the service every week VtA coast ports extra steamers leave Calcutta for Ceylon, Malal>ar, and Bombay and vice versa" about once a week as inducement offers, proceeding direct or calling only at ports where requirements necessitate. BOMBAY and KURRACHEE. During the fair season an extra steamer usually plies between Bombay and Kurrachee, thus, with the Persian G u l f and coasting services, making four sailings a week, which are arranged as follows : — Leave Bombay. Tuesday, vitt coast ports. Thursday, direct. Saturday, viA Porebunder and Cutch Mandavie. Friday, or later, with English mail direct.

Leave Kurrachee. Tuesday, direct. Wednesday, viA Cutch Mandavie. Thursday, direct, with English mails. Saturday, vid coast ports.

TUTICORIN and A daily service (Sundays Colombo, and vice versa".

COLOMBO.

excepted) is

maintained

between

Tuticorin

and

T h e steamers will leave Colombo and Tuticorin every evening (except Sunday) and arrive at Tuticorin and Colombo the following morning. Passage about 16 hours. N E G A P A T A M and

COLOMBO, via

RANGOON and

PAMBAN

Weekly.

MOULMEIN.

T h e P.S. " Ramapoora" and " R a s m a r a " leave Rangoon every Tuesday, Thursday, and Saturday mornings for Moulmein, the passage taking about nine hours. The steamers on the return voyage leave Moulmein every Tuesday, Thursday, and Saturday morning. RANGOON and

PENANG.

Fortnightly from Rangoon with the English M a i l .


British

India

RATES

Steam Navigation

OF PASSACE

MONEY-SALOON Suss

LONDON AND C A L C U T T A L I N E .

^ 45

a>

17

0 0

£13

10 o

Second Class. ^

9

0

0

PORT SAID T O M A R S E I L L E S —

s. 8 0 PORT SAID. ^ s. 1SMAII.IA A N D 11 0 3 0

35 0 s. ,£ s. 0 to 5 0 0

3-8 c $ 7 u 52 1 0 C. ' c 3' •a n 47 I O „ S 2 I O A

TO MARSEILLES—

NAPLES. /

19

FARES.

First Class.

L O N D O N . ^ s. 12 12

123

Company, Limited.

1 0

First Class. £13

12 o

Second Class. ^

8

8

0

£ i

30

0

18

0

15

0 ADEN.

45

0

33

0

30

0

30

47

5

38

0

35

0

33 O

47

5

40

0

37

0

26

/ «.

CoLOM BO.

O

6 14

Q

14

5

8

4

7 'CALCUTTA.

18

NOTE. Passengers booked through from London to Cairo, £20. Second Class fare to Colombo, Madras, and Calcutta, ^ 3 2 . Native First Class Passengers victualling themselves, two-thirds of First Class rate. European Servants half of First Class rate, or if occupying a berth in a cabin with a passenger, two-thirds of First Class rate. Native Servants—London to Colombo, £ 1 7 ; to Madras or Calcutta, £ii (Native Fare).

LONDON TO K U R R A C H E E , BOMBAY,

AND PERSIAN

GULF.

Second Class, £yt to Kurrachee and Bombay ; to other ports, two-thirds of First Class. Native First Class Passengers victualling themselves, two-thirds of First Class rate. Children between 3 and 10 years o f age are charged half the adult rate. One child under 3 years, i f with parent (no berth provided), free. When more than one child under 3 years, each additional child quarter fare. European Servants half of First Class rate, or i f occupying a l>erth in a cabin with a passenger, two-thirds of First Class rate. Native Servants—London to Kurrachee or Bombay, £\-j (Native Fare). LONDON.

£

-

12 12

M A I . IA.

*7 P O R T S A I D . £ *.\JC ISMAILIA AND Sl'EZ. o IC I O 2 O £ s. £ s. ADEN. .55 ° 24 0 1 7 o 4 o 15 o °£ 47 > ° 42 o 33 i ' > 8 o 8 5 1 8 3 ' ° KtKKACHEE. 3 £ S. ; B O M BAT. 47 1 ° 42 u j ! 10 8 o 8 51 3 "o 5 5 31 1 0 \£ s.£ s. 17

o 7

S

1

19

3

55 1 0 45

o 36 1 0 9

57 1 0 4 9

0 4 0 1 0 9 10

o

61

5 50 10 42

o 10

o

63

0 5 2 1 0 4 4 o 11

o

34 > ° 38 10 40

o

42

o

8 102

M L'SC A T . s ~r ^ B U N D E R J ^ ABBAS. ° 2 14 9 IO 2 O \£\£ s.1 5 8 o 2 IO 5 I 12 DUSHIKE. 3 1 0 1 3 10 2 10 \£ s-|s. o 4 0 1 5 0 3 O 10 10 3 0 7 2 4 2 IO IO B U S K E H .

4

o 5 •«

9 024 5

o 7 ">

9 152!

5 10 "

10 10 3 0 6

o 13

2

o| 8

Oi 1

£ 5

N O T E . — D e c k Passage to Mediterranean Ports not provided from October to April inclusi\e. N o Deck Passages booked to or from London.

LONDON AND EAST AFRICAN L I N E . L O N D O N . £12 £17

12 N A P L E S . PORT SAID.

0

8

0

0

11

0

3

0

dk. 1 0

cb.

ISMAILIA cb.

30

0

17

0

4

0

47

5

32

0

10

5

47

5

32

0

10

5

30

o

10

47

5

32

0

10

s

30

c

£0

30

A N D SUEZ. dk.

£x 0 £s2 1 0 £52 1 0

o

3

0

9

0

9 9

ADEN. cb. I "7

5

o '• 2 0 o o i 20 o

dk. 1 10

I.AML".

1 10

2

cb. 5

dk. 0 15

1 10

4 10

0 15

MOMBASA. ZANZIBAR.

NOTE.—Passengers are booked through to Cairo from London at £20, and from Naples at £12.


Rs.

CALCUTTA.

cb. Ik. as 4 F A L S E P O I N T . cb. dk. 4° 6 30 4 P O O K E E . cb. die. 51 9 J 30 4 GrtNJAM A N D Goi'AUL cb. dk. aCALINGAI'ATA 53 10 28 6 -1 5 11 cb. .Ik. I'.l M 1.1 1 63 ra 38 8 30 6 23 5 •9 4 cb. Ik, COCONADA. 7' • 5 60 la 52 TO 43 9 4° 8 »3 5 •4 60 T2 54 11

75 16

10 38

6

•ft

18 75 16 72

\SS

11

S3 •7 8.. •7 76 16 74 •5 61 •3

'MS

.'i

9

•9 ij

•°S 24 100 21

...

•5

•9 83 18 8i a

110 25 toj aa 100 --1 xao *7

J

1 ]23 '"7

•l»8 ••' 1 '•43

)•

68 «4 66 •3 S3 11

•<• M-

•7 68

•5

Rs. Cabin

•5

25

3

4'

5

8

5

Deal *

'

PAUMBAN.

Cabin

H

30

Deck \

?.\

CALCUTTA

cb. ,1k.

Cabin

2 1'i'MlH cb. ,1k. IO '5 >i 8 2 N E G A P A T A M . 9

8

cb. dk.

20 97 «9 9° 18

'4 45

9 4°

8 3»

•38 at 1 -•. •7 128 36 126 »S 121. 23

Cabin o

•5 53 11 46 •7 TS°

18

••

49 11

KANGASANTURAI

cb. .Ik.

AND JAKPNA.

16

5 TRINCO

M ALEE.

30

8 3°!

6

HAMBANTOTTE

4° 10 40

IU

'9 75 •5 68 '4 60! 13 52 aa 83 •7 75

120

cb.idk.

13

55 . 1

•Ik

Co L O W ,1k

•9

4 Col.ACI

7« •4 70 •4

30

5 •5

3'

1 1. 29 •35 27

»4 9° •9 83 •7

75 '5 75 •5

38

6 30

5 •5

4 COCHIN

.!.,

26 98 ac- 90 18

82 16 80 16

45

9 38

8 3°

6 •9

4

32 156 3" 150 30

27 105 ta 9« 20

89 '7

S8 •7

56 11 49 10 4«

8 3°

6

97 »9 96 18

53 10 45

9

'58 32

IV

165 33 • v

3» •45 11 •43 3» 1 j | 1-' 1

V

28 '33 «7 128 25

3' 148 30 •43

cb.dk.

180 36 •73 35 16I

,15 163 34 164 33 • 58 .!-'

29 ••3 23 105

195 39 181

if 18

|8 181

37 .78 36 •73

15

32 128 25 •23 23

116 ao 105

19

75 •5 68 •4 60

303 4' •95

i'

39 188 .38 [86 37 180

|h

33 136 38 128 .•n

116 23 112

22

83 •7 75 •5 68 •4 61

11

a 10 1 aoq

M

198 40 •97 39 • 95 39 , 18 .18

35 •43 29 •35 •7

laa 35 118 34

86 •7 79 16 7'

1 :•

38 •54 32 •46 3<>

'35 27 130 26

90 18 8, •7 75 •5 7S

39 164 34 !5j

•45 28 140 27

98 20 90 18 83 •7 79 •5

1

44 113

43 a 19 4» aio 41 203 40

226 48 225 45 222 44 220 43 218 43 210 42

33

20

150

25

Cabin

1 leek

10

100

20

COCHIN.

Cabin

Deck

75

10

IBOMBAY.

cb. .Ik.

33

aaj

30

.40

RANGOON. COLOMBO.

cb. dk.

•73 34 [6j 33 [6<

31

OK

Deck

cb. dk.

»3 84 l» 76 16

15

S

TUTICORIN.

150 .1' •43 3° •38 3° •3« 28 •35 38 • 30 26

29 •37 29 1

31 . • >i

T h e rates from Chittagong, A k y a b or Mouhnei by Steamers proceeding direct to Colombo, Malabar and Bombay are the same as above from Calcutta.

AND GALLE.

BO.

67 •3 66 •J

'•{•

3

Second Class fare half of C a b i n rates.

'5

'48

Deck.

11 . . Rs. a 11 . . „ a •5 • • ,1 3 8.. „ a 8 . . ,, a 8 . • it •5 • • H 3 16 . • •, . 1 4° • • i> S

Rs.

4

31

l)eck =4 TOMDI.

MADRAS.

5 26

aa 105

KANGASENTURAI.

Cabin

Cabin Gaujam to Gopaulpore Calingapatam to Rarwah MasuTtpatam to Vperpolliain Cochin to Narrakal Hey pore to Calicut ... Telhcherry to Cannanore ... Negapatam to T o n d i „ Paumban ... Pearl Fishery COLOMHO „ Colombo viA Paumban

•Ik.

33

113

RATES.

MASULII'ATAM.

13

22 I06 ai 105 20 98 •9

Deck 3

3

'9 9° 18 85 •7

25 1 1 1 24 113 23

PASSAGE

NEGAPATAM

68

•3 60

13

13

BKVI'IIKE A N D C A L I C U T .

56 10

'4 7'

•1

Second Class fares balf of Cabin rates, with following exceptions : — * R s . 50, t R s . 30, "Rs. 75.

.Ik.

TKLLICHERRV A N D CANNANORE. MANGALORE. CARWAR.

d

GOA.

d.

VlNGOHLA.

cTd.

'9 3 RuTNAGHKIJKV.

c.ld. 3? 8 30 6 ..; i H O M 1 J A Y


Rs. ()abin

68

13s

PASSAGE

CALCUTTA. 28

*20

140

75

35

*2

400

250

130

"5

400

250

45°

280

490

300

PENANG. 2nd

Cabin

15° 180 230

5

138 l60 TOO

cl. E . D k N . D k

34

17

350

220

375 425 465

RATES.

OUTWARDS.

•Mill 1. E. Dk N . D k

235 265 290

8

*5 105

"5

120

140

140

160 210

175

Rs. CALCUTTA. Cabin Deck.

SINGAPORE.

Cabin andcl. E . Ilk N . D k 320 350 400 44°

200 220 250 275

i<5 130 150 2oq

100

/ M E L B O U R N E or \ SYDNEY.

110 130

4

56

8

26

4

60

10

34

6

75

'3

45

90

16

60

Cabin

Deck. Deck.

KYOUK

3

510

310

240

200

485

300

220

.85

460

285

210

"75

PORT

430

265

170

150

410

260

150

145

39°

=45

150

140

LAUNCESTON.

5

3

2nd cl. 2

Deck.

or

PHYOO.

Cabin Deck.

BRISBANE. / WELLINGTON \ DuNEDIN.

165

CHITTAGONG.

36 ADELAIDE.

12

9

SANDOWAY.

3

Cabin

Deck 7

Second Class fares half of Cabin rates.

Circular tickets (from any port en route) Calcutta and Rangoon back, via Arracan Coast, or vice versa— Cabin, Rs. 1 5 0 ; Second Class, Rs. 8 0 ; Deck, Rs. 27. Return tickets from Calcutta, Penang, or Above Deck fares include diet, with exceptions marked ;cond C." Singapore for round voyage—Cabin, Rs. 6 5 0 ; Second Class, Rs. 400. Native Rs. servants' deck, with food, Rs. 220, CALCUTTA. £ ADELAIDE. Cabin Deck. INWARDS Cabin 2 n d c l . Deck. RANGOON. MELBOURNE, 10 75 3 i 3 Cabin Deck. Cabin 2 n d c l . 1 l e e k .

8

5

I

•1

•9

9

20

10

Rs.

3 5 28 30

SYDNEY.

2

i

3

1

18

8

28

18

8

27

17

7

/ BATAVIA or \ SINGAPORE.

19

9

30

'9

9

30

'9

8

CALCUTTA.

Cabin 3

135

i

BRISBANE.

Cabin

150

2nd cl. Ifcck.

Deck passages from Australian ports must include diet, which is calculated as follows :— Europeans 30 per cent., and Natives 15 per cent, of Deck fare.

38

ts°

5 7

TAVOY

Rs.

Rs.

RIVEF

«i8

4

MERGUI.

Cabin

Deck. 3

15

Rs. CALCUTTA Cabin Deck. 75

„ .3

5

YEH. (';iiiiu 20

Deck. 4

33 RANGOON.

Cabin

45

Dac k

45 20

4

TAVOY. Cabin Deck.

7

33

6

'3

2

7

7

20

3

PALAW. ( '.iliin Deck. 8

MOULMEIN.

Second Class fare half of Cabin rates with exceptions :— *Rs. 12, jRs. 27-8.

82

PENANG.

10

Cabin 116

»5

15

Deck.

34

SINGAPORE.

5

CALCUTTA.

BOMBAY. ( a!>in Deck.

MOULMEIN

1 ulun Deck.

20

direct and

Second Class fare half of Cabin rates. C I R C U L A R T I C K E T S (from any port en route) Calcutta to Rangoon, Madras and back by direct steamers ox vice versa:—Cabin Rs. 200, 2 n d class Rs. 130, Deck, Rs. 4 0 .

RANGOON.

1 ahin Deck.

RANGOON

LYTTELTON

Cabin

Deck.

80

12

MADRAS.

Cabin

Deck. COLOMBO.

100

20

120

20

10

250

5"

250

50

220

40

200

30

M A U R I T I U S .

265

55

265

55

235

45

215

35

R E U N I O N .

Cabin

Deck.

Second Class fare five-eighths of Cabin rates.

2

MERGUI.


PASSAGE

Rs. IIOM l!AV.

RATES. Rs. IIOM H A Y . Cabin Deck.

Cabin.

Dk.

35

25

2.8

Cabin.'

Dk.

35

*5

2.3

25

'5

0.8

35

25

2.8

25

•5

1

,,.8

45

4

25

'5

1.8

»

6o

48

4

30

20

3-8

VEHAWAI..

Cabin."

Dk.

PORT

BUNDER.

Cabin."

Dk

CUTCH

MANDAYIE.

Cabia."

»5

3-81 3 0

30

Dk.

20

2

KURRACHEE.

ADEN

Cabin Deck.

180

20

330

30

240

20

33"

30

280

20

330

28o

20

LAMOO.

Cabin

Deck.

Cabin

5

Rs.

Rs.

Rs.

200 250 250 300 300

125

35° 400 400 400 400

45"

"35 '35 200 200 225 275 275 "75 275 300

SEVCHKLI.ES.

R s . it. C l . 2 d . C I . D k . MoMHASSA. Rs. Rs. Rs. it.CI. ad.Cl. D k . 30 100 Rs. Rs. Rs. Z A N Z I B A R . 5° 30 •5 it.CI. 2d.CI Dk. M O Z A M B I Q U E . ICO so 30 '5 , 50 3° 5 IBO. & - 1 0 R L 2 5 itCl.ad.Cl. Dk. £7-10 3 0 £7 50 £'3 4° £ 9 it.CI. a d . C l . D k . Q u i L I . I M A N E . IO 6 50 •4 3 45 £4 A 2 - I O £l 35 5 30 60 8-10 6 0 I I 6 1 0 5-10 I it.CI. a d . C l . D k . C H I N D E . 15 £3 5° 45 4 3 BKIKA. 60 60 12 6 3-10 I-IO 8 I-IO S 10 l t d a d C L D k . 55 45 5 3-10 £2 »7 9 £3 it C l . a d . C l . 60 10 60 18 8 60 I I O 4 £1 7 45 7 3 5 £1

60 60

20 21 26

7"

70 70 80

12

«3 14

16 17

22

IO 11 14-10

65 65 7°

9 10

5° 5° 60

10 11 '5

7 8 11

3 3 4-10

Deck.

60

ZANZIBAR.

Second Class fare two-thirds of C a b i n rates. European, Mombassa to Zanzibar, Deck, with food, R s

* T h e second column of Cabin rates shows Native First Class fares without food. Second Class from Bombay half, and between other ports two-thirds of C a b i n rates.

BOMBAY. it. C l . a d . C l . D k .

M O M BASS A.

6

7 10

2-10

4 5-10

l-io

9

I-IO

a

1*10 1- I O 2- 10

4 7

1

BAY.

B O M

1st. 300

-•nil.

Dk.

200

350 400 400

aas

5° 60 60 60

45° 500

275 275 300

M O Z A M B I Q U E A N D IBO. QUILLIMANE. C H I N D E A N D BEIRA. I N H A M B A N E ft D E L A G O A NATAL. EAST LONDON. ALCOA BAY. CAVE TOWN.

7° 80

6.x)

55°

335 385 400

Dk.

INHAMBANE.

'-1° a

9° 1 on

£3

£\ 1 8

£

6

lnCI.2d.Cl. Dk. '2 t1 ~£< I £3 I £1-5

BAY.

NATAL.

B O H HAY.

Cabin" Rs6o 86 105 120 128 '43 165 180 '95 200

48 7' 86 98 •05

Deck 5 5

5 6

lao

7 8

'35 '5° 165 168

9 10 12 12

KURRACHEE.

Cahin*^ 38 60 9°

3° 50 75 83 98 110 " 3 165 I " 3 5 ' 7 3 ! 14a

D

e c k CiWADUR. Cabin" 3 4 6 6 7 8 IO 10

Cabin* 3° 56 «4 72 '°5

lao '35

a4 49 53 6a 86 98 " 3

Deck 3 4 5 6 7 9 9

Cabin* 30

as

53 60 90 105 126

4' 4° 75 9° 98

Deck B U N D E R

* T h e second column of Cabin rates shows Native First class fares without food.

4 5 6 7 9 9

ABBAS.

FAO

&

KAMA.

Cabin*20

I

15

Oeck

I

BOMMK.

2

Second class for natives without food, Bombay to Busreh Rs. 4 5 other second class fares half of C a b i n rates.


British

India

Steam Navigation

P A S S A G E

R A T E S

127

Company, Limited.

O N

H O M E

L I N E S .

(Homewards only.) RANGOON,

Rs.

CALCUI

via Madras Saloon. 2nd cl. or Calcutta. MAIIKAS. Saloon. 2nd cl 80 50 Saloon.I 2nd cl. „

MAURITIUS, via Colombo.

Calcutta, Madras and Colombo to London via Marseilles. Saloon—Rs. 700. 2nd class— „ 410.

C O L O . M HO.

Saloon

•ni cl.

475

300

525

345

575

380

200

115

75

535

200

45o

255

600

33'

525

295

625

347

550

3'o

50 j 450

30

2nd cl.

Saloon

255

400

205

j ADEN.

525 ! 295

475

285

SUEZ

550 I

3IO

500

310 I

U S BM A I . I A O R P / FORT SAID.

575

325

550

325

NAPLES.

375 455

I

600

395

638

362

575

325

650

425

688

412

625

375

625

375

600

775

525

825

512

75o

455

750

455

725

\ PLYMOUTH / OR L O N D O N \ L O N D O N (incl. / C'ntin-'nt'l jour.)

N O T E . — A g e n t s at Coast ports must obtain Continental Railway tickets from Calcutta, Madras or Colomlio. Deck rates with food for Native Servants. A d e n to London. S a l o o n — R s . 400. 2nd class— ,, 300.

CALCUTTA.

Rs. RANGOON MAURITIUS

PLYMOUTH

or

27

•4

MADRAS. COLOMBO.

24

NAPLES

215

200

190

190

180

LONDON

225

213

200

200

190

NAPLES. P L Y M O U T H or

LONDON.

Passengers returning Home within six months of debarkation, are allowed 20 per cent. 01T the above steamer rates, and within twelve months to per cent., if full fare was paid on outward journey. Similarly Passengers returning to India are allowed the same reduction on the outward sterling rates by steamer. Missionaries and Hospital Nurses to London, 1st class Rs. 500. Theatrical Companies to London, 1st class Rs. 500, 2nd class Rs. 325. Bona-Jide members of one family, travelling first or second class to or from E n g l a n d , are allowed ID per cent, reduction on the steamer rates, if equivalent of three fares is paid, and 15 per cent, for equivalent of four full fares. H a l f fares for children under 12 on Steamer. Do. do. do. 7 on Railway. O n l y one of the above abatements is permissible on the same ticket, no passage rate being subject to reduction under two headings. Outward passages can be paid in India, and are based on the outward sterling fares at current rate of exchange All homeward passage rates from Persian G u l f and East African Coast Ports are calculated by taking the outward fares at current rate of exchange. S p e c i a l

R e t u r n

T i c k e t s

a r e

i s s u e d

a s

u n d e r : —

Period.

Period.

FROM

ks. Calcutta to Madras or vice versa ... ,, „ C o l o m b o , , ,, „ Madras „ ,, ,, „ „ Calcutta, Madras, Colombo, K u r r a * chee or Bombay to London Calcutta, Madras or Colombo to London, including rail across the Continent to and from Naples Calcutta, Madras, or Colombo to London across Continent one way and by sea the other

3 month?

6 months

•4( 90 216 „, •35 54 1150 725 33

5

Rs.

Rs.

1250 775 1500 935 !75

855

T h e above periods for these special rates are not calculated from time of debarkation, but from d.ate of embarkation at original port to the time of return to that port. A y a h s returning to India within three months of debarkation in Ixmdon are booked for the outward journey at half the sterling rate.


128

British

India

Steam Navigation

P A S S A G E

R A T E S

Company,

O N

H O M E

Limited.

L I N E S .

Native Servants, Deck, with food. London to C o l o m b o — ^ 1 7 Saloon. 2 n d cl. L O N D O N B Y R A I L T O N A P L E S . ,, ,, Madras (_ e• Saloon. 2 n d cl. N A P L E S . „ „ Calcutta ) 12 12 11 12 9 Saloon. 1 2 n d cl. P O R T S A I D . I S M A L I A or S U E Z . 17 o 19 12 8 o 1 5 o Saloon. 2 n d cl. 13 9 19 o Saloon. 2 n d c l . 22 12 3 o II o 1 7 10 15 19 35 o 10 o ADEN. 18 o 15 o 30 o j 20 o 41 72 28 9 18 o COLOMBO, 45 o 38 O 4 0 o 3 7 0 35 9 30 o 51 12 ai 7 MADRAS. 47 «o 33 o 23 7 43 10 37 o 35 9 54 >2 35 o 2a 13 i C A L C U T T A . 47 ' o 35 o 34 13 42 10 37 o 35 9 54 2 37 o „ I MAURITIUS 61 12 39 o 55 o 5" 33 * via C O L O M B O .

LnNDON.

A

8

and cl.

NAPLES.

la

ia

8

8

17

0

11

7

8

0

5

0

19

0

12

13

11

0

7

>o

3

0

2

0

35

0

23

6

30

0

ao

0

17

0

11

7

52

10

34

0

47

5

3"

0

3a

0

30

5

31

0

32

0

20

52 10

34

0

Saloon. and

47

8

0

Passengers are booked through from London to Cairo, first class ,£20.

LONDON.

Saloon.

I

cl.

PORT

SAID.

Saloon. 2 n d cl. Deck.

OVERLAND

1

0

ISMALIA

or

Saloon.

2nd

SUEZ.

cl. Deck.

0

15

0

13

10

5

30

0

20

0

9

°

/ L A M O O OR 1 MOMBASA.

13

10

5

30

0

30

0

9

0

ZANZIBAR.

SERVICES

TO

0

3

ADEN.

4

10

0

ENGLAND.

In connection with the B. t. S. N. Co.'s Home Line Steamers calling at Naples. Passages to London at the rates quoted in the foregoing tables, and across the Continent, are available by the,— (or

M O N T C E N I S R O U T E via Boulogne—Folkstone.)

including the railway

R o m e , Pisa, G e n o a , T u r i n , M o d a n e , Paris, Dijon, Calais and Dover

T r a i n leaves Naples • . . -. • /\ ,, due London (Charing Cross) / /

2.55 P . M . 4.50 P.M.

\ **M „ • J • V T i m e occupied 50 hours. / F

3

Passages may also be booked by either of the following routes on payment of the additional fares for the single j o u r n e y : M O N T C E N I S R O U T E via R o m e , P i s a . G e n o a , T u r i n , M o d a n (frontier) Paris, Calais, Dover (or Boulogne, Folkstone) to L o n d o n ... 5 0 hours ( A n y Station). T r a i n leaves Naples at 2.55 p. M . ,, due London 4 . 5 0 p. M . or 7 . 3 0 p. M . ) S T . G O T H A R D R O U T E , via Rome, P i s a , G e n o a , M i l a n , Chiasso (frontier) Lucerne, Bale, L a o n , Amiens, Calais, Dover, L o n d o n ... 5 0 hours ( A n y Station). T r a i n leaves Naples at 2.55 P. M . ,, due L o n d o n at 4.50 P . M . Second-class passengers going by this train are compelled to travel 1st class between M i l a n and Lucerne, paying a difference o f fcs. 12.00, otherwise they should leave Naples at 8.20 A . M . , travelling 2 n d class all way connecting at Bale with the same train. S T . G O T H A R D R O U T E , via Paris, Rome, Florence, M i l a n , Lucerne, Bale, Paris, Calais, Dover or Boulogne, Folkstone, L o n d o n ... 5 5 hours ( A n y Station). T r a i n leaves Naples at 8.20 A . M . „ due L o n d o n (any station) at 4.50 P . M . Landing charge by steam launch at N a p l e s (inclusive of baggage) is 2 fcs. for each passenger. T h e Company's Agents at Naples will give every assistance to through passengers, and can arrange for the heavy baggage of homeward-bound passengers to be left on board the Company's Steamer for convey.-u.ee on to London.

LANDING

AT

PLYMOUTH.

On the arrival of the Company's Steamers at Plymouth, they are boarded by the Company's Agents, from whom vouchers can be obtained for presentation to the Booking Clerk of the Great Western Railway Company on shore, which will ensure to passengers landing at Plymouth special advantages and great saving o f trouble and expense. Special reduced rates are charged by the above Railway C o m p a n y , and passengers taking their tickets on landing have their baggage passed through the docks and into the train free of dock dues and porterage. The Great Western Railway run special trains on the arrival of Steamers irrespective of the number of passengers landing.


Rs. MADRAS. Cab. Dk.

Rs. RANGOON. Cab. Dk.

PONDICHKRRY.

8

2

IO

*4

5

1

12

a*

8

2

5

1

'5

24

12

2

8

2

145

15

140

15

•35

13

135

13

120

13 P E N A N G .

160

20

'55

20

150

18

150

18

'35

'8

Cab. Dk.

*

PORT N O V O

Cab. Dk.

AND

CUDDALORE

KARICAL.

Cab. Dk. 5

1

90

18

100

18

110

18

MADRAS.

CabTjDk. g 15

2

PONDICHERRY

Cab. I Dk. I 24

8

2

AND

CUDDALORE.

N E G A P A T A M .

NEGAPATAM. Second Class fare half of Cabin rates.

Cab.| Dk.

* Second Class, Rs. 50.

Deck fare, Coromandel ports to Rangoon, Rs. 12.

Cab. Dk. 34

SINGAPORE.

5

Second Class fare half of Cabin rates.

Rs. R A M

;< )(

Cab. Dk. 67

'5

67

»5

Horses, Cattle, Bicycles, & c , on Indian Lines.

>\.

Cab. Dk.

67

•5

23

2 CALINGAPATAM AND BARWAIL Cab. Dk. BIMI.IPATAM. 4 '9 5

71

15

23

5

15

43

82

17

54

11

19

68

'4

•90

Horses Ponies (not exceeding 13 hands .'in. > Buffaloes Bullocks or Cows Dogs or Monkeys Sheep or Goats ...

Cab. Dk.

75

9

Under

Description of Animals.

GOPAUI.I'ORE.

'9

7

40 5°

10

66

«3

2 VIZAGAPATAM.

Cab. Dk.

COCONADA.

23

23

38

38

23

53

53

45

Cab. Dk. 5

MASUI.IPATAM. Cab.

Dk.

38

5

Second Class fare half of Cabin rates. * Second Class, Rs. 5 0 . Deck fare, Coromandel ports to Rangoon, Rs. 12.

MADRAS.

\ /

Under

Under

Under

1,000

2,000

miles.

miles.

miles.

miles.

Rs.

Rs.

Rs.

Rs.

Rs.

20

35

50

60

90

15

=5

35

45

60

12 10

22 »5

30 20

35 25

50 40

3

4

5

250

\ /

Under

miles.

2

5°°

800

Special Rates by direct Steamer— Rs. Calcutta to Colombo and Bombay Horses 50, Ponies „ ,, Penang and Singapore ,, 50 C o l o m b o , , Madras and Bombay... ... „ 35 ,, Bombay ,, Kurrachee (Polo ponies Rs. 15) ... ,, 30 ,, Calcutta „ Rangoon, Moulmein, Penang, and Singapore Sheep or Goats Northern Coast ports to Rangoon ,, „

g Rs. 35 35 25 20 3 3


CALCUTTA. MADRAS. C O L O N BO. "JADEN.

DISTANCES I N MILES.

CALCUTTA. PENANG. 1350 SINGAPORE. •73° ADELAIDE. 5250 400 | M E L B Q U R N 5740 SYDNEY. 6305 565 NEWCASTLE. 6375 70 635 BRISBANE. 6815 440 1075 5*0 8115 1740 2375 1300 T H U R S D A Y I . 10370 BATAVIA. 4630 4065 3995 3555 2255 10860 SINGAPORE 5120 4555 4485 4045 2745 490 1 ----12510 6205 61 ;s 5605 2 1 4 0 I 1650 I C A L C U T T A . 6770 -I 195 Melbourne to Calcutta direct, via Cnpe Leeuwin, 5 6 6 0 miles ; via Melbourne to M a d r a s ,, „ 5100 „ M

T h u r s d a y Island to D u n e d i n , 2 9 0 0 miles. to S y d n e y , 1 2 4 0 miles.

1223 1240 1320 2340

60 203 220 I 77 300 157 1320 1 1177

147

CUOUAI.ORE. POHDICHBKRV 80 ( M A D R A S . 1100

T140

78O~ 870 I

SINGAPORE. 490 I B A T A V I A .

BOMBAY. " CALCUTTA. 850 770 I M A D R A S . 3000 1380 610 ICOLOMBO. 2760

2150 j

252 I T A V O V 383J

RIVER.

131 I M E R G U I

C a l c u t t a to M o u l m e i n direct, 837 miles.

MAURITIUS.

Bombay to M a u r i t i u s direct, 2 6 1 0 miles. Zanzibar ,, ,, 1440 ,, Reunion ,, ,, 120 ,

900 I P O R T

DAKWIN.

..

..

..

2 3 4 0 miles 2330 „

CALCUTTA. 1650 S l N G A I 4'75 7005 7180 7305 74'° 7560

CALCUTTA. 376 C H I T T A G O N G . AKYAB. 566 KYOUK 642 761 1108

1040

T h u r s d a y Island to Fiji Melbourne to F i j i

.. 808 miles. .. 895 . . 1080

M o u l m e i n deviation adds 5 0 mites. Singapore to H o n g k o n g , 1440 miles. Bangkok 8 5 0 miles.

3510

*54Q

"Wellington

[MOULMEIN.

399

1020 I R A N G O O N .

CALCUTTA. 787 I R A N G O O N 1547 760 P E N A N G . 1630

THURSDAY ISLAND. 500 N O R M A N T O N . 140 B U R K E T O W N . 640

CALCUTTA. RANGOON.

Rangoon to Bimlipatam, direct ,, Coconada ,, Negapatam ,,

1927 2417

O m i t t i n g P l y m o u t h saves 35 miles.

Torres Straits, 6 7 5 0 miles 6*60

Wellington to M e l b o u r n e , ' 1 4 8 0 miles.

RANGOON. 1020 M A D R A S . 143 ( N E G A P A T A M . 1163

PORT SAID. jjje INAPLES. 3125 ^o7o~| P L Y M O U T H . 3435 I 2 3 2 0 I 3 1 0 I L O N D O N .

8665 14030 PHYOO.

V 1 9 IS A N D O W A V . 466 I

347 I R A N G O O N .

Rangoon to Bassein, 2 5 0 miles.

*5"5 1 3355 553° 5*55 5760 5910 7015 12380

WELLINTON. PORT 125 230 380 1485 6850

LYTTLETON. TIMARU. 105 IDUNEDIN. 255 150 J B L U K F . 1360 1255 1105 I S V D N E V . 6725 I 6620 1 6470 I 5365 I C O L O M B O .

D u n e d i n to Wellington direct, 3 4 0 miles C A L C U T T A OR R A N G O O N . " COLOMBO. TUTICORIN. 246

JCOCHIN.

860 I

CHITTAGONG. RANGOON. 258 T A V O Y 348

RIVER.

9c j M i l ' -1 1.

614 I B O M B A Y .

MADRAS. PONDICHERRY. nPORTO N O V O . KARICAL. NEGAPATAM. 1251

1240

JPENANG.

1631

1620

I

-*8o I S I N G A P O R E .


D I S T A N C E S B O M B A Y KUKRACIIEK. 500 ADEN. 1450 1950 2615 3375 3463 4398 6433 6863 7068

2115 2873 2963 3898 5933 6 ih i 6568

665 1425 •513 2448 4483 49'3 5118

SUAKIM. SUEZ. 7

6

O

PORT

848 1783 3818 4248 145 I

1023 3058 3488 3093

935 2970 3400 3°°5

SAID. MALTA. PLYMOUTH. 2035 ANTWERP. 2465 41" 205 I L O N D O N 2670 635 COCHIN.

BOMBAY. RUTNOHERKY. 130 go i V l N G O R L A . 210 238 285 4'5 is

o o

o 2 <

I N

28 G O A . 28 CAKWAR. •55 75 47 130 I M A N G A L O H E . 205 177 285 Bombay tu M o r m u g a o direct, 2 2 5 miles.

345 4"5 545

GOPAUI.PORK.

755

335

825

4°5

70

8S0

460

125

897

477

142

72

97i

55'

216

146

1071

65'

316

248

1271

851

516

'35'

93'

596

l " 39' 526 471

1368

948

6.3

14281008

675

C A L I N G A P A T A M . 55

QUILLIMANE. 6o 200

[CHINDE. 1

140 I B E I R A .

BlMLIPITAM. 17 9' 191

•1

COCONADA. 74' 100 M A S U L I P A T A M . '74 374l

300

CALCUTTA. FAI.SE 210

~2OO!MADRAS,

380

28o

So

I'ONI

HCIIERKY. CUDDALORE.

290 340

80 130

355

'45

543 603

488

47'

.}<>"

297

97

548

53i;

457

357

'57

77

1448 1113 ' ° 4 3

988

9711

897I

797

597

5'7

60 N E G A P A T A M 500 "44c G A L L E .

g ; S 151S 1183 " 3 1058 1041 967 867 2088 1668 1333 1263 1208 11911117 1017

667

587

570

5'c

S17

737

720

660

220

150

842

825

765

325

255

942

925

865

425

355

205

460

39°

24O

545 5S0

475

325

510

360I

593

523 600

868

" 1 3 1 3 I296 1222 1122 922 2173 1773!'438 I36S 2293 187311538 1468 1413 I396T322 1222 1022

2328 1908 1573 '503 1448 1431 1357 1257 ' ° 5 7 i 977 960 1142 1062 1045 2413 '993 '658 I 8 8 '533 I 5 l 6 I442 I342

90c

985 2448 2028 1693 1623 1568 '551 1477 1377 I I 7 7 I 0 9 7 1080 020 2451 2041 1706 I636 58i 1564 1490 1390 1190 1110 '093 103.? 25382113 1783:1713 1658 1641 1567 146; 1267,1187,1170 1110 5

2928J25082173I2IO3 2048 203i|i957|'857

4

732 • 232

3"7 867

602 T102

2

197 697

55 555

Bl'SHEH. 500 I B A G H D A D .

NEGAPATAM. 60 K A N G A S E N T O R I E . oo TONDY. 120 PAUMBAN. 170 IIO 5" PEARL 220 160 too 5" 110 160 27O 210 330

4245 4500

V l Z A G A P A T A M .

454

BUNDER ABBAS. LINGA. I20 BAHREIN. 3*5 245 BuSHEEK. 170 535 4»5 , FAO. 312 677 557

BOMBAY SEVCIIELLES. 1770 M O M BASSA. 1000 2770 ZANZIBAR. 2910 1140 MOZAMBIQUE. 3485 •7"5 575 500 B E I R A . 3985 2215 •075

MOZAMBIQUE. C A L C U T T A .

BOMBAY. VERAWAI. 192 POKEBUNDER. 257 65 120 I C U T C H M A N D A V I E . 377 .85 |82 I K l ' K K A C I I K K . 559 3°7

NARKACAL. 80 B E Y P O R E . CALICUT 9' WADDAGHEKRY. ••7 25 130 3 j TELUCHERRV. 39

90 101 127 14,,

108

M I L E S .

B O M B A Y . KURRACHEE. 500 GWDUAK. 257 757 230 M U S C A T . 487 987 627 140 J A S K . 1127 37" 757 270 500 •3" 1257 877 3 9" 620 250 •377 1122 635 1622 865 495 1272 805 1792 •»35 665 "434 •'77 807 947 •934 1232 862 • 4 8 9 1002 •989 1732 1362 1989 2489 1502

2475 2730

760 1015

•335 1590

200 515

FISHERY. COLOMBO.

INHAMBANE.

!

255 I D E I . A G O A B A Y .

Zanzibar to Seychelles direct, 1,015 miles. ,, „ Colombo direct, 2 , 6 3 0 miles. BOMBAY. 1665 ' A D E N .

POINT. POOREE. T5 I

•550 1690 1830 I

3215 3355 3495

IGANJAM. O O P A U L P O R E .

140 280

M O M BASSA. I

140 j Z A N Z I B A R .

^7~ 'COI.OMBO. 0

670

1657 157711560I15CX2 1060!

990

TUTICORIN.

NfctiAPATAM.

105 C O L A C H E L . I C O A l 1 I-.PPKV. 1

'35 220 255 268

'55 168 245

2IO

125

735

635

600

5'5

3731 450, 345 840,

70~lJA !i^ '' 180 T R I N C O M A I . E E . 250 2 0 0 j H A M B A N TO I'M-.. 450 380 500 430 250 50 I < i . U . I . K . F

3 5 'C O C H I N . 120 g^jCAI.ICUT. —

120

35

'33

48

TEI.I.K >3 90 480

1IKRKV.

CANNANORE. 77 467

MANGAI.ORK. 39o;BOMBAY.

A


Advertisement.

132

E

S

T

A

B

L

I

S

H

E

D

1 8 6 2 .

(Late GEORGE WATSON),

BROTHERS

(GEORGE WATSON and JOHN DOUGLAS WATSON),

Plumbing Contractors to the Queensland International Exhibition, 1897.

THE

PREMIER

H O U S E for

Gasfitting, P R A C T I C A L /TEN O N L Y

Plumbing,

and

KEPT.

Galvanised Iron Work.

Office, Warehouse, and W o r k s h o p s :

MARGARET

STREET.

hIB p.

«

(A y. U :E

3

5

M C

I

a _• < a r.

J J

01

pa • J

-

s i c II

I

•o

5

1*

o

.2 B

> "a

6

ft

o = a

2

-. 3 K

•-

7T

Z

O

•o

T3 C W

a

I

3* O 3

E

i

a

S3

N

j

\ A / A T S O N B R O T H E R S beg to draw attention to their large and varied assortment of the following requisites in stock, viz. : — Baths—Eureka, with Wave, Shower. Douche, and Needle Spray Action, with hot or cold water ; Iron Enamelled Baths, Earthenware Porcelain Enamel, Galvanised Iron ditto. Lavatories—Concealed, Ornamental Iron, Walnut, Oak, Cabinet, Angular Iron, etc. Gasflltings—In all varieties : prices to suit the humble artisan or the wealthiest citizen. Closets—Of all descriptions, with or without cisterns. Ships' Closets a Speciality. Urinals—Patent Concealed Porcelain and Iron Enamelled. Globes—Plain, Fancy, Opal Coloured, H a n d Painted, etc. Gas Stoves—For Hotels, Private Residences, Tailors, Hatters, etc. Spouting—Ridging, Ventilators, Cowls, Wash Tubs, etc. Shent Lead—From }lb. to 81b. weight. Galvanised Iron—Orb, C O . (anchor), Blackwall, Queen's H e a d , from 1 8 to 28 gauge. Galvanised Iron Tubes—Lloyd & Lloyd's ; all sizes.

Note the Address

Margaret Telephone,

No. 2 6 1 .

^

Street,

BRISBANE, Queensland.


Australasian

Tariffs,

1 8 9 9 (Corrected to 3ist December, i898).

INCLUDING

QUEENSLAND, N E W

SOUTH

WALES,

VICTORIA, SOUTH

AUSTRALIA,

W E S T E R N

AUSTRALIA,

TASMANIA, N E W

ZEALAND,

and FIJI.

Followed by_

Of the above Colonies.


AUSTRALASIAN

TARIFFS,

1899-1900.

Comprising the whole of the Australasian Colonies and Fiji, Alphabetically Arranged and Carefully Revised from Official Sources. For

X.g.W.

Tariff;

see

Page

158.

gJgT

Where the reference m u r k s [•Qch M *, t, s>ud J | occur tn t h e c e n t r e of t h e c o l u m n s the i n f o r m a t i o n w i l l be :' iii n the c o l u m n c o n t a i n i n g t h e na--.e of the a r t i c l e ; where the w o r d Sole a n d the italic letters u , ft, c, occur, t h e I n f o r m a t i o n w i l l be f o u n d * t t h * bottom of t h e nage. 1

ARTICLE,

Acid—sulphuric *(all kinds, n.o.e.) Acid—muriatic and nitric Adzes Aerated & Mineral Waters *(qts. perdz., i s . 6 d . , pints, per dz., oxl.) Aerated limejuice A i r beds *(and cushions) A i r bellows (blacksmiths' *free, ffree) A i r mattresses Albumenised paper A l e —in bulk in 6 rep. qts., or 12 rep. pts. = i gal. Albums—Confession Not enumerated Autographic Almonds *(atidcocoanuts)(shelled t 3 d l b ) Alum ... ... American leather *(not l>eing oil I>aize) Ammunition "(caps) t(caps free) Anchors ... Animals, living, viz.—Horses Horned cattle ... Sheep and Lambs Pigs Poultry Unenumerated ... Anti-foulin^ composition ... Antimony, in ingot *(and bismuth) Anvils Apparel and slops Apples-—Dried Fresh *(custard and pawpaw, free) ... Archery material ... Architraves t(see timber) *(ioo lineal feet, 2 s . ) Arms—Military ... Firearms, sporting Arr6wroot Arrows—Surveyors' ... Arrow links, iron Arsenic Artists' brushes "(and materials) Artists' colours Asbestos, unmanufactured Aspirators ... Asphalt Atlases "(maps, charts, & c , for school use) ... Augurs—Screw and shell... Axes A x e handles

Q'land.

Vic.

S.A.

W.A.

Tas

N.Z.

Fiji.

cwt 5* cwt * i 5 P C 2/6 cwt *free ... I2 j p c cwt 5s cwt 15 p c 2/6 cwt free ... 15 p c free ... free ... free ... free ... 10 p c free ... I 2 i p c 5s cwt 25 p c

25 p c free ... 25 p c free ... 5 pc 173 gal 1/6 gal 25 p c 25 p c 25 p c 3 d lb free ... free ... free ... (note) free ... free ... free ... free ... free ... free ... 3s cwt 25 p c free ... 25 p c 3 d lb... free ... 25 p c 25 p c 25 p c 25 p c i d lb... 25 p c 25 p c free ... free ... free ... free ... free .. free ... free ... free ... free ... 25 p c

is

l

5s

pc pc pc pc cwt lodgal l/3 gal 20 p c 20 p c 20 p c 2d lb free ... free ... *free ... free ... free ... 30s ea 2S ea 10s ea free ... free ... free ... free ... free ... 10 30 30 30 6s

35 P C 3 d lb *i/6bhl 10 p c

i s gal 25 p c 25 p c 25 p c

free ... 1/2 gal 1/6 gal 25 p c 25 p c 25 p c 3 d lb 10 p c free ... 10 p c (note) 4 0 s ea 2 0 s ea is ea 5s ea free ... free ... free ... free ... free ... 25 p c d lb IS bhi 25 p c t 10 p c 10 p c free ... 25 p c 25 p c IO p c 25 p c free ... 10 p c free ... free ... free ... free ... free .. 4

t free ... free .. 2 d lb free ... 30 p c free ... free ... free ... free ... free ... free ... free ... free ... free ... 25 p c *S P C

20 p c *IO pc

25 p c free ... tfree ... *I5 P C 10 p c free ... 15 P C 10 p c 15 p c free ... (note) i s gal 2s gal 1/6 gal 1/6 gal 2s gal 20 p c 20 p c 25 p c 20 p c 20 p c 25 p c 20 p c 20 p c 25 p c t 2 d lb (note) "15 P C free ... 5 P C . 10 p c 15 p c *free ... *5 P C 10 p c 20 p c t20 p c free ... 5 P C . 15 P C a 20s ea (/40s ea 20s ea a 13s ea 1 / 4 0 S ea 10s ea d i / 3 ea 2s ea... free ... a 2s ea 2/6 ea free ... 10 p c free ... free ... free ... free ... >5 P C 10 p c i d lb... 5s C\V,l "15 P C free ... free ... free ... 10 p c free ... A15 p c 1-I2* P C (J25 p c 3 d lb 2 d lb... 2 d lb... (note) IS bhl a i d lb 10 p c 15 p c 20 p c 20 p c 20 p c 20 p c free ... 15 p c 20 p c 10 p c 20 p c 15 P C free ... 2 d lb... free ... 15 p c 20 p c 15 P C 15 p c 20 p c 5 pc 10 p c free ... 15 p c free ... * i 5 P C 15 p c free ... free ... »5 P C free ... 2 0 p c free ... free ... 20 p c 15 P C free ... free ... free ... "free ... free ... free ... free ... free ... 5 PC free ... 10 p c free ... free ... 10 p c free ... *5 P C »5 p c 10 p c

*

2S gal

refpc I2J P C 124 p c 12$ p C

od gal i s gal 124 p C 124 p c 12k p c 2 d lb '5 pc 12} p c (note) 2/6 cw free free free free free free 124 p c 5 PC 12$ p c i 2 i pc

i d lb free ... 12*} p c 20 p c 20 p c

i d lb 12\ p c 12! pc 15 p c 124 p c 12J p c 124 p c 15 p c 5 PC

free 12J p c 125 p c 124 p

A c i d , acetic n.o.e.: N e w Z e a l a n d — C o n t a i n i n g not more than 3 0 p c , acidity 1 i d . per l b . ; for every 10 p c of acidity or fraction thereof additional, i d . per lb. Ale, in bulk : W . A . — i s 3 d g a l ; dandelion and Kop's non-alcoholic ; ginger, 20 per cent. Almonds : New Zealand—Shelled, 3 d l b ; in the shell, 2 d l b ; Barbary Sicity, and French, used in confectioners manufacturers, free. Ammunition '. Fiji—Cartridges, per 100, 2 s . ; caps, i d per 1 0 0 ; powder, 6 d per lb. Anchors : Queensland—Over 3 cwt, free ; under, 25 p c. S . A . — U n d e r 3 cwt, 25 p c ; over, free. Animals, living, viz. : W . A u s t . — F o a l s under 6 months old, free ; bulls for stud purposes, and calves under 6 months old, free; rams for stud purposes, free ; asses (donkeys), mules, and monkeys, 15 p e r cent; camels, 40s per bead ; dogs, / J i each. N O T E — U n d e r Section 3 of Tht Stock Tax Act, tS93—" ft s h a l l be l a w f u l for t h e G o v e r n o r - l n - C o u n c i l , If he s h a l l t h i n k fit, to r e m i t the d u t y o n a n r horses, c a t t l e , sheep, or pigs Imported for breeding purposes.

Horses and Horned C a t t l e — T a s m a n i a : If imported solely for stud purposes, free. Apples, Pears, and d r a p e s : W . A u s t . — A r e prohibited at Champion B a y and all ports south thereof. Apples, fresh : N e w Zealand—Imported from 1 4 t h J u l y to 31st December, i d per lb. Apparel and Slops: W . A . — I n c l u d i n g clothing, underclothing, and articles of attire n.o.e. 10 p c. Tasmania—Moleskins and Tweeds, 2 0 p e r c e n t . N e w Z e a l a n d — M a d e by British or Foreign tailors to the order of residents in the colony, 4 0 per cent Tasmanian tariff—All goods unenumerated pay 20 per cent. S. Australian tariff—In all cases ivhere duty is chargeable according to the rated list of the Tariffs Parcels purporting to contain more than tlte quantity actually contained will be charged duty, not on the actual, but on the reputed quantity. The exceptions to the foregoing are oysters, shrimps, concentrated jelly, potted fish, and potted meats in bottles which will be charged at actual weight, and sardines which will be charged as usual, viz.:—as quarter pounds atid half pounds. Cyanide 0/ potassium <pure) for mining purposes may be admitted free, on the importers undertaking to pay duty if called upoti to do so. In all cases where duty is charged at per gallon, one dozen reputed quart bottles will be taken as two gallons, and one dozen reputed pint bottles as one gallon.


Australasian ARTICLE.

Tariffs

135

Q'land.

W'.A.

Axles, arms and boxes

free ..

(note)

Back chains ... ... / Backs, wooden (for brushes) ... Bacon Bagging "(in the piece) tfjute, free) Bags and sacks (being new), viz. : — Bran ... Cornsacks ...

25 p c

free .. 25 p c 2 d lb free ..

free .. 3 d lb free ..

25 p L -

15 P C

C

P C

pc

4

»5 P C 15 PC'S P C

'5

i2i

free ... 15 p c free .., 12$ p C free ... 15 p c free .., 12j p c d lb 2 d lb 2d lb 2 d lb 2 d lb free .. •free ... free .. • 15 p c 5 PC

(note)

25 p c

free ...

Fiji.

free ..

5

Blacking

pc

15

x.z.

(note)

free .. free .. free .. free .. (note) free .., free .. free ... Gunny (note) free .. Ore Woolpacks .. ... ... free .. free .. free free .. *io p c Unenumerated ' ( 2 5 p c printed) 25 p c free .. 2 5 p c Bags, canvas.(water) ... ... 25 p c free .. 15 p c Baize—In the piece 15 P C free .. free .. free ... Oil 20 p c 25 p c Baking powder IO p c t Balks "(per 100ft sup) f(see Timber) , "1/6 free ... free .. free ... (note) Bark (for tanning) ... Barley, exc. pearl *(ioolbs) t(malting, 1/6 bhl) tod bhl (note) Barometers ... ... ... ... free .. free free ... Baskets "(lined 2 0 p c, unlined 15 p c) t(plain, lined fancy, i$ p c) ... 25 p c 45 P C ( 2 5 p c Baskets—"Carpenters' tool 25 p c Mree ... 25 p c Painters' brush "(see bags) ... 25 p c 25 p c 45 P C free .. free ... free ... Bass, brusbmaking *(ioo sup ft, under 3 m . ) . (note) Battens "(per 100ft sup) t(see Timlwr) ... (note) t 20s gal 24s gal 25 p c B a y R u m "(or as spirit) ... is bhl •2/11 Beans and peas (other than split) * ( i o o llw) . (note) Bedford cord (cloth) "(wool, cotton free) t(wool) *5 P C *3° P C * t i 5 P t 25 p c Bed keys 25 p c 30 p c Bedsteads , 25 p c 30 p c 25 p c Beer of all kinds (bulk) "(hop &. spruce, 2 0 p c), 1/3 gal (note) 1/2 gal i/5 gal 1/3 gal 1/6 gal 6 rep. qts. or 12 rep. pts. = i gal "free ... 30 p c 25 p c Beer engines "(free as pumps) 25 p c Beeswax ... ... free ... 3 d lb 25 p c *3° P C 25 p c Bellows—Portable forge "(air beds, free) 25 p c 25 p c 25 p c House ... ... ... 25 p c * 2 p c 25 p c Smiths' "(wooden) ... 25 p c free ... Bell pulls (ordinary) 25 Bells—Calls * ( 6 i n . and under, and cycle) 25 p c 'free ... 25 p c 25 pc *free ... Electric "do free ... Electroplated "do , 25 P C •free ... 25 p c 25 p c 'free ... Telephone "do free ... Belt buckles "(buckles, clasps, 15 p c) free ... (note) 'free ... ' i o p C free ... Belts, abdominal "(braces, 25 p c) (note) Bench screws free ... free ... 25 p c 10 p c free .. Benzole 6 d gal Bevels free ... free ... free ... ... (note) •6s Bezique cards "(per doz. packs) ... 25 P C 25 p c „ cases "(empty) ... ... 25 p c *IS P 10 p c Bicycles 15 p c 25 p c 'io p c Bird seed "(canary only) ... 25 P C 10 p c 2 d lb Biscuit "(dog, 15 p c) 2 d lb 2 d lb 20 p c Blacklead 25 p c 25 p c free ... free .. Black sand ... ... 25 P C

Flour

free ...

Tas.

25 P C

free ... free ... free ... free ... free ... free ... 15 p c 15 p c 10 p c 10 p c 3 d lb 5 P C 5 P C

(note) 10 p c •5 P C 15 p c 15 p c

free ... 20 p c *2o p c 6 d bbl 10 p c 15 p c

free .. free .. free ... free .. free .. 4 d ea free .. 15 p c 15 15 15

P C P C

pc free .. 15 P C i d lb 15 p c

pc

15

*2.s 6 d free ... 20 p c "1/6 ... 15 p c '5 p c 15 P c -

is gal '•/3gal 1/6 gal 1/6 gal 20 p c 15 p c 15 p c 5 PC 2 d lb free ... »5 P C 10 p c 15 p c free ... 15 p c 15 p c 15 p c aij p c 15 P C 20 pc 5 P C 20 p c 15 p c free ... 15 P C 15 p c 20 p c 5 P C

h

pc free ... free ... free ... 20 p c 20 p c 15 p c 15 p c * d lb 15 p c 15 p c 15 p c

15 15 15 20

PC

pc pc pc

15 P C

i d lb 2 d lb 15 P C

2

free

..

15 p c tS P C

tfree... free ... 20 p c free ... free ... free ... 15 25 20 20 20 "as

PC PC

pc pc pc

12* p c 12* p C 12$ p t '

id lb

... *IS

free ... *2S

free free free free free free free

...

5 PC Id lb

free ... 12* p C 20 p c free ... 20 p c free ... *2S ... 25 p c "Od ... 20 p c 20 p c 20 p c 2s gal 2s gal 20 p c free ... free ... 20 p c free ... 20 p c 20 p c 20 p c 20 p c 20 p c 20 p c 20 p c free ... 6 d gal free ... 6 d pek 20 p c 20 p c 20 p c

(note) 20 p c

free ... 20 p C

12$ 12$ 12$

pc pc pc

12! p c *t/6 15 P C i d lb 12$ p C 12$ p C 12$ p C

9 K ' is g a l d

a

I2i p c 2d lb 12$ p C 12$ p C 12$ p C 12$ p C 12$ p C I2fr p c I2.\ p C 12$ P C 12$ p C 12$ p c 12$ p C

>5 P C 12$ p C 12$ p C 12$ p C £2 e a c h i

pc

(note) 12$ p c 5 PC 12$ p c

Axles, arms, and boxes: V i c t o r i a — C o m m o n nuts and others, n.o.e., up to 1$ in, i s per a r m ; ditto, above i$in, i s 6 d per arm ; mail patent, up to i j in, 2s 6 d . per a r m ; ditto, above i$ in, 4 s per arm ; other patent, or known as patent, 4s per arm. Common dray, with linchpins, 25 per cent; axle boxes, 30 per cent. Backs, wooden (for brushes): South Australia—Tree ; when bored for hair, 25 per cent. Bags and sacks: V i c t o r i a — E x c e p t gunnies and sugar mats, the capacity of which is less than 3 bushels, 6 d per doz ; paper, 10s per cwt. Bags : N e w Zealand—Calico, hessian, forfar, and linen, 2 0 per cent; jute bags and sacks, free. Queensland—Cornsacks, 15 p c ; containing 4 bushels, free. Bark : South A u s t r a l i a - i o per cent; sumach and valonia, free. Barley : Western A u s t r a l i a — M a l t i n g , 6 d per bushel; other than malting, 4 d per b u s h e l ; pearl and Scotch, 15 per cent. South A u s t r a l i a — M a l t i n g , i s 6 d per bushel; pearl and patent barley, free. Battens : Queensland—3s per 100 ft sup. South A u s t r a l i a — 2 s 6 d load 40 cubic ft. Beans: South Australia—Beans, for garden, free; peas, if for use as garden peas, free; other, per ioolbs.,2s. Bells : Western A u s t r a l i a — F o r places of worship, free. Belts : Western A u s t r a l i a — A b d o m i n a l , 5 per cent; braces, 15 per cent; belting for machinery, free ; belting syrup, 15 per cent; all others n.o.e., 15 per cent. Queensland—Abdominal, free as surgical bandages. Bezique cards : V i c t o r i a — 3 s per doz packs ; in sheet, 2s 6 d . Beer : V i c t o r i a — i o d g a l ; lager beer, bottled, per gal or for 6 rep qt bottles or 12 rep pint bottles, i s 6 d . Belt buckles : V i c t o r i a — B e i n g jewellery or imitation jewellery, 2 0 per cent; or fancy, not being gold or silver, 10 per cent. Biscuits: N e w Z e a l a n d — S h i p only, 3s cwt; others, 2 d lb. Fiji—Sweetened or fancy, i d per l b ; other biscuits, per lb i d .


Australasian

136 ARTICLE.

Blankets and blanketing "(in piece, 15 p c) ... Blasting powder "(common, other i d lb) Blind cords ... Blind checks Blocks '(pulley) t(block juice, 15 p c) Blotting pads Paper Blue Bluestone ... Boards "(per 100 sup ft) ... ... Boats "(wood, canvas 10 p c) ... Boilers for steam engines and steam purposes Boiler tul>es FluidBolts and Nuts "(jin. and under, free) Door ... Boneblack Bones "(bone dust free) Bone manure Bonnets "(untrimmed straw, 15 p^r cent; chip, willow, tape or braid, free) Bonnet shapes Bookbinders* cloth Books, birthday text ... ... Printed and sewn or stitched, and not books of forms or account books "(or advertisements) ... ... Books of printed forms and account books Bootmakers' gloss "(and boot polish) Boots and shoes "(childs* 0 to 3, free) Boot cloth Boot uppers Boot elastic Boot hooks "(except gold, silver, or plated) ... Bottles, glass "(for pickles, fruits, and sauces)

Q'land.

pc free ... 8 s cwt 25 p c (note) 25 p c

*2

5

5 PC

2 d lb free ... *3« ... 25 p c

25 p c free ... 25 p c free ... 25 p c 25 p c "25 p c free ...

Tariffs. Vic.

(note) i pc "free ... free ... I2S CWt free free ... 2 5 p c (i "free 25 p c 25 p c ^5 P C 6 s cwt free ... 2 d lb 2 d lb free ... free ... (note) * i / 6 ... free ... " 2 5 p c 25 p c 25 p c (note) 30 p c free . . 10 p c (note) " 2 5 p c free ... free ... free — free ... free ... free ... free ... free ...

25 p c i s doz IS P C free ... free ... free ... free ... 25 P C

S.A.

S

W.A.

free ... free ... 8s cwt 10 p c tfree ... 15 P C 15 p c 15 p c 5 PC

(note) 20 p c 10 p c 10 p c free ... free ... 15 P C

p c 15 p c free ... 5 PC free ... free ... free ... »5 P C

"free ... free ... free ... 15 p c 35 P C 25 P C 25 p c (note) "15 p c (note) (note) (note) free ... 15 P C 10 p c 15 P C (note) (note) 2 5 P C 10 p c free .. free ... free ... free ... 2 5 p c * i o p c free ... 15 P C free ... (note) (note * c$ p c -

N.Z.

pc i d ib i d lb

(note) free ... free ... free ... 20 p c 25 p c 20 p c 2 d lb free .. (note) free ... 20 p c free ... 20 p c C20 p c 20 p c free ... free ... free ...

15

15 15

PC

pc

*5 P C 15 p c 2 d lb

free ... *5S ... 15 P C 10 p c 10 p c 15 P C 5 pc '5

PC

free ... 15 p c free ... 15 p c free ... free ...

•25

free ... 25 p c 25 p c (note)

Tas.

Fiji.

12$

pc

6 d lb 12$ p C 12$ 12$

pc pC

12$ p C 12$ p c 2 d lb

15 p c (note) 5 PC

free free 12$ p C

i d lb 12$ p c 5 pc 5 pc free

12$ p c 12J p c free ... free ... 12$ p c 12$ p C free ... 25 p c

20 p c 20 p c

25 p c 25 p c

free ... free ... free 25 p c 12$ p c »5 P C 20 p c 12$ p c 15 p c 15 P C *22$ p C (note) free ... free ... 12$ p c 22$ p c 12$ p c 15 P C free ... free ... 12$ p C 20 p c 12$ p C 10 p c (note) free ... 12$ p C

Blankets : Victoria—Cotton, 25 per c e n t ; cotton, each blanket being legibly and indelibly branded with the words, " A l l cotton," in accordance with regulation^ made by the Commissioner of Trade and Customs, free ; printers', free; being woollen manufactures or manufactures containing wool, n.o.e., 25 per cent; being woollen manufactures or manufactures containing wool, grey or coloured, but not of white body, 15 per cent; being woollen manufactures or manufactures containing wool of which the invoice value is is per lb or under, 15 per cent. N e w Z e a l a n d — 2 0 per cent ; for printers, free, B l o c k s : Queensland—Pulley, free; block juice, 25 per cent. V i c t o r i a — M e t a l , under 4 in, free; pulleys ; over, 3 0 per cent; wood, any size, 2 5 per cent. Boards: Victoria—See timber. W . A u s t . — P l a n e d , tongued, and grooved, 2 0 per cent; rough, 10 per cent; worked, 2 0 per cent ; short lengths for box making,free. N . Z . — D r e s s e d , 4s per 100 feet super ; rough sawn, 2s ; hewn and in log, free. F i j i — i s 6 d rough, 2s dressed, per 100 feet super. Boiler tubes : South Australia.—Wrought iron, u n d e r 6 in, free ; 6 in and over, ^os per ton ; metal, free. Bolts and nuts : V i c . — 3 0 p c ; carriage bolts, fin in diameter and under, and 4 m in length and under free; king and roller bolts, metal, free. N . Z . — 5 in. x 4 in. and under, free. Bootmakers' gloss : South A u s t r a l i a — 2 5 per c e n t ; Meltonian cream. 25 per cent. Boots and shoes : Queensland—Except indiarubber shoes (present English sizes to be the standard), Men's, N o . 6 and upwards,33s doz pairs ; youths, Nos. 2 to 5, 21s doz pairs ; boys*, Nos. 7 to 1, 17s 6 d doz pairs; women's N o . 3 and upwards, 19s 6 d doz pairs; girls' N o s . n to 2, 16s doz pairs; girls, Nos. 7 to 10, 1 is. 6 d doz pairs. V i c t o r i a — M e n ' s , N o . 6 and upwards, 60s doz pairs ; youths', Nos. 2 to 5, ^2s. idoz pairs; boys', Nos. 7 to 1, 3 0 s doz pairs; women's, N o . 3 and upwards, 4 5 s doz pairs ; shppe rs, Nos. 7 to 2, 12s doz pairs ; not otherwise mentioned, 18s doz pairs ; girls', Nos. 11 to 2, 36s doz pairs ; girls', N o s . 7 to 10, 24s doz pairs; children's, Nos. 4 to 6, and slippers, 8s 6 d doz pairs ; children's, Nos. o to 3 , and straw slippers, free ; with uppers of lasting or of other material, not being leather, with or without leather toecaps, but not goloshed or vamped with leather, 3 0 s per doz pairs; goloshes or overshoes 4s doz pairs; indiarubber, 12s doz pairs; spiked shoes, 1 2 s ; clogs and pattens, 20 per cent; shoes known as " S a n d , " "Gymnastic," Plimsolls," and " Douglas " Shoes, being shoes with uppers of canvas or canvas combined with leather, and having soles of indiarubber vulcanised to the upper, all sizes, 6 s doz pairs. South Australia—Men's, N o . 6 and up, 33s doz pairs; youths, N o s . 2 to 5, 21s doz pairs; boys', Nos. 7 to 1, 17s 6 d doz pairs ; women's, N o . 3 and upwards, 19s 6 d doz pairs ; girls', Nos. 11 to 2, 16s doz pairs ; girls', Nos. 7 to 10, 1 is 6 d doz pairs, except indiarubber shoes ; children's, N o s . o to 3, free ; lasting and stuff goloshed, women's and girls', 25 percent; unenumerated, 2 5 percent. W . Aust.—Children's, including slippers, 10 p e r c e n t ; men's, leather, invoiced at or under 10s pair, 18s doz pairs ; women's, leather, invoiced at or under 6 s pair, 10s doz pairs; all others, including slippers and goloshes, n.o.e., 15 per cent; boots, Nos. 7 to 10, infants, 11 to 1, maids, 10 per cent; 2 and over, women's, 5 and over, men's,vide tariffs ; and horse boots, 15 per cent. Fiji—Children's, 3 d per pair; girls', 6 d per pair; boys, 6 d per pair ; women's, is 6 d per p a i r ; Men's, 2s per p a i r ; Indiarubber, 6 d per pair. M

Boot and shoe uppers: Queensland—Men's, 18s doz pairs; others, 25 per cent. Victoria—Leather, men's, 24s doz p a i r s ; women's and children's, 18s doz p a i r s ; Wellington fronts and grafts, 6 s doz pairs; lastings and stuff, 3s doz pairs. Bottles : V i c t o r i a — G t a f S or stone, containing rep qt or less quantity of spirits (not perfumed), wine, ale, porter, or other beer, and bottles containing aerated or mineral waters, 6 d doz ; containing imp qt or less quantity of any liquid or other substance, n.o.e., 3 d d o z ; containing 1 fluid dram or less, free; bottles (except for aerated waters) and flasks, when cut, embossed, & c , 2s 6 d cubic ft; when not cut, embossed, & c , i s cubic foot; for aerated waters, 6 d cubic foot; syphons for aerated waters, free; ink, 35 per cent. South A u s t r a l i a — 2 0 per c e n t ; medicine, 15 per cent. Western A u s t r a l i a — E m p t y bottles, 5 per cent. T a s m a n i a — F r e e ; over J-pt, 5 per c e n t ; under, 15 percent.


Australasian A K 1 ICLE.

Tariffs. Q'land,

Bottles, ordinary beer, brandy, wine, gingerbeer, sodawater, and other syphons free (note) Bottled F r u i t s — Q u a r t s 3s doz 6s doz Pints "(and over half a pint) » / 6 d o z ' 3 s do? Smaller sizes same proportion ti/6dz •(over qt and under gal, 18s doz) Bottles, hot water, india rubber 2 5 p c free ... Bottling wire, tinned ... ... ... ... free .. free ... Bows and rims, wooden ... (note) (note) free ... Braces, rachet ... ... free free ... A n d hits free Brackets—Iron "(except window fittings) ... 2 5 p c " 3 0 p c 25 p L Wood ... ... 25 p c Pole ... ... ... 25 p c free ... Braids and bindings ''(tailors', free) ... ... free .. free ... Bran "(of 20 lbs) t(per 100 lbs) ... ... ... *+A bbl ts-s Brandy colouring, containing 35 per cent spirit "(15s gal proof) ... ... ... 14s gal 12s gal free .. Brass, sheet or rolled free 35 P C Label 25 p c 10 p c Breadcutters 25 p c free .. Breast or chest protectors ... free Bricks "(dinas, free) t(per 1000)... ... ... 25 p c (note) 20 p c A i r , clay, or earthenware... ... ... 25 p c 30 p c A i r , iron ... ... ... 25 p c A i r , galvanised 25 p c 30 p c 20 p c Fire 25 p c Bath ... ... ... 25 p c free .. 30 p c Bright wireware, not otherwise enumerated ... 25 p c Brimstone (crude) for manufacturing purposes ... ... free free ... Bristles "(bootmakers, 10 p c) "free free .. Britannia metal ware, not otherwise enumerated 25 p c 3 0 p c British plate, not otherwise enumerated ... 2 5 p c 3 0 p c Brooms "(and brushes) ... ... 25 p c TO p c Brushmaking materials, l>eing bristles and hair "(hair, 15 per cent) ... ... ... "free free .. Brush ware (except artists' and painters' brushes) ... (note) 25 p c Brunswick black ... 2s gal 25 p c Burnishing ink 15 p c 25 p c Button eyelets ... free .. free .. Buckets—Wood 25 p c j free ... 2 5 p c 1 25 p c Galvanised iron Buckles used in making saddlery and harness free ... free Buckles, belt "(for apparel ; see note, page i j ) free ... free .. Bulbs free ... free .. B u n g borers free ... free .. Bunting in the piece "(if suitable for ships only) ... free ... Tree .. Busk stay, of any kind, plain or covered free ... free .. Butchers* knives ... free ... free .. Butyrate of ethyl (pineapple) "(if spirit) * s gl '12s gal Butter "(butterine and oleomargarine i s per lb) t(butterine 4 d per lb) {(butter prints and powder 15 p c)... * 2 d lb • 3 d lb Buttons "(containing imitation jewels, 2 0 p c) free .. •free ... Bungs, wooden 25 p c 25 p c 4

M

Cabinetmakers* benches Cabinetware ... Cages, bird "(metal) Cameras, photographic C a m p ovens "(hollowware) ... C a n a r y seed... ... ... ... Candied fruits and peel "(pee^dlb), t(fruit 2 d lb) Candles ... ... ... ... Candle moulds, tin... Candlesticks(tin, " 2 0 pc, t2$ pc) {(metal, 3 0 p c china, 15 p c) ... Cane *(n. o. e ) ... Canvas "(if jute)

137 S.A.

W.A.

20 p c 4s doz

5PC 15 p c 15 p c

2.s doz

free .. ..

T2S

pc p c pc PC PC p c pc

free ... 25 p c

d lb

i d lb

25 p c

t3o p c

3opc

t. s 15 p c 15 p c 15 p c 20 p c 15 p c 15 p c 5

15s gal

12,

pC

12}

p c

p c pc pc pc pc p c p c p c

15 p c 5/- IOOO 12, p C I2« P C

free ..

free ..

12J

25 p c 15 P C 1/6 gal 1/6 gal

15PC 5 p c

free .. 15 p c 15 p c free .. '5PC

free .. free ..

15'pc

l 2 d lb 5PC 5 PC

25 p c

12J p c

20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20

(note)

25 p c

free .. free ... free .. free .. *free ... free ..

free ..

free ..

free ...

pc

14s g a l

12$ p C

*i6sgal

lb lb

tiod

16s gal

12I 124

10 p c 10 p c

p c

P C p C p c p C pC p C

20 p c

5 pc 15 p c

10 3d 2d 25

I2| 12J 12J 12$ 12$ 12 j

25 P C

I5PC

free .. free ..

25 p c 25 p c 25 p c

I2| p C

20 p c

25 P C 10 p c

t 2 d lb

•2| P C 12I p c

20 p c 20 p c 15 p c

free ...

.. .. .. ..

is doz

15 p c 12J p c

15 p c *io p c

free free free free

c c c c c c c c c

is doz

20 p c

25 p c 25 p c 25 p c

25 p c 25 p c

p p p p p p p p p

...

12J p c 2s doz

free .. free ..

free .. free ..

free .. free ..

10 20 15 15 15 15 15 15 15

fis

Fiji.

12J p c 5 PC 12I p c 124 p c

free ... free ...

free ... free .. *free ... 2 5 p c

2 d lb 25 p c

15 P C 15 p c

pc

free p c free ... p c p c £20 p c free ... PC free ... p c 20 p c p c 20 p c p c 20 p c p c p c *2o p c

5

25 10 •25 25 25 25 25

free ..

4

lb

free ... free ... free .. 15 P C free ... i p c

25 p c 30 p c •30 p c

10 p c 2 d lb

3d 15 15 15 5 5 15 15 15 15

15PC 20 p c 15 p c 15 p c 20s ton • lod .. 16s gal

25 p c 25 p c 25 p c 25 p c 25 p c

free .. «free .. 25 P C 3 d lb 25 p c 3d lb

1/6 doz • 5 P C free .. 15 p c free .. 5 PC 25 p c free .. free .. free .. free .. free ..

25 p c 25 p c 25 p c

N.Z.

'I.,

15 20 20 10 10 15 >i 2d 20

5

pc p c p c p c p c pc pc

lb p c

•15 p c *5 P p c c

5

20 p c

*free ..

free ..

pc pc

pc

I2J P C 12$ P C I2i p c

15 15 15 15 10 15

pc pc pc pc pc pc

free .. free .. 20 p c 25 p c free .. 20 p c free .. free ..

15 15 15 15

pc pc pc pc

'free free .. 20 p c 20 p c

2d lb 15 p c 15 p c

20 p c

i d lb

free .. 20 p c

I2i PC I2& P C

15 15 •5 15 15 id 3d 2d 15

PC pc PC pc pc III lb lb pc

20 p c 25 p c 20 p c

i->i p c

free .. 20 p c 20 p c t d lb 2 d lb

12, P C 12J p c 2 d lb 2 d lb

15

pc

free .. free ..

free .. free ..

3

125 I2J

pc p c

12J p c 126 p C 12)

pc

free 12J

pc

12J p c I2J p C 12J p c 15 p c

12; P C 125 p c

pc

i d lb IS* p c

*20 P C

12$ P C

25

free ... 5 p c free ... free

Bottles : Victoria—See note page 136. N . Z . — S y p h o n s , 2 0 per cent, and earthenware or stone, 2 0 p c. Bows and rims, wooden : V i c t o r i a — H i c k o r y rims, in the rough, free; bows, 25 per cent. Queensland — B o w s , 25 p c, rims carriage, free. N . Z . — A s h and hickory straight rims not exceeding 3 in sq, free. Bricks : V i c t o r i a — B r o w n ware, 8 d per cubic foot. Brushware : Victoria—Painters' brushes, 25 per c e n t ; artists', free; not otherwise enumerated 3 0 per cent. Western Australia—Artists', clothes, hair, tooth and nail, 15 per c e n t ; feather, 2 0 per c e n t ; all others, 10 p c.


Australasian

ARTICLE.

Tariffs. vie.

Q'land.

25 p c Canvas bags, water free ... Canvas—Prepared for artists ... Hose "(coupling, 3 0 per cent) free ... 4 s doz Capers—Quarts Pints 2s doz Smaller sizes "(same proportion) * (note) Caps and hats Capsicums "(ground, 2 d per lb) 3 d lb Capsules, bottle (medicinal, " 2 0 p c , 115 p c ) . . . free ... i s cwt Carbonate and bicarb, of soda "(carb. 3 s cwt) Cardboard, plain "(not less than royal size) ... free ... Cards—Playing "(doz packs) ... 25 p c 25 p c Chromo, advertising (of paper) Knamelled tin, advertising 25 p c Carpeting »5 P C Carpet, leather bags and portmanteaux 25 p c 3 d lb Caraway seeds ... Carbolic spray producer (surg. only) ... 25 p c Carlsbad Sprudel water "(per dozen pts) 25 p c (note) Carriages "(4 wheels, , £ 1 2 ; 2 do., , £ 6 ) . . . Carriage cloth "(leather cloth, free) *5 P C Springs 15 P C Trimmings ... *5 p c Cartridge fillers & re-cappers*(cartg cases i d 100) free ... Cartridges (not for blasting purposes) "(gun) t(io to 24, bore; other kinds, 20 per cent) free ... Carts "(4 wheels, ,£10 ; two, ^ 6 ) * (note) Cases (empty returns) Casks (empty returns) "(for dry goods, free) ... (note) Casks, new 15 p c 3 d lb Cassia "(ground) t(ground 4 d lb) 25 p c Castings, not otherwise enumerated "15 p c Castors *(for furniture) ... free ... Castor o i l — I n bulk ... *2S Bottle "(per doz pints)

free ... free ... "free ... 20 p c 20 p c 20 p c (note) "free ... free ... free ... (note) (note) d lb (note) 4

15 P C

(note) free ... Wree ... 10 p c (note) free ... 25 p c free ... free ... p C (note) free ... free ...

*20

S.A.

25 P C

free ... free ... 4s doz 98 doz 1/6 doz (note) 2 d lb "free ... "10 p c (note)

W.A.

15 p c »5 P C 15 P C »5 p c free ... 15 p c 15 P C 15 P C *5 P C '5 P C 15 p c t5

PC

15 p c (note) *6s ... 20 p c (not*-) 15 p c 25 p c 15 p c 15 p c 10 p c 25 p c >5PC 2 d lb 2 d lb IO p c IO p C 20 p c 20 p c (note) 20 p c 15 p c 10 p c 25 p c free ... free ... free ... free ... 10 p c 10 p c (note) free ... "(note) 25 p c 2 d lb

Tas.

15 P C 15 P C 15 P C 20 p c 15

pc

Fiji.

N.Z.

75 p c free ... free ... 20 p c 20 p c 20 p c 25 P C 20 p c

12$

p

12$ 12$ 12$

pC

C

pc p C I 2 i pc 12$ P C 6 d ea 2 d lb

"free ... 12$ p c i~> cwt 15 P C "free ... 2 d lb *6s ... 6 d ppk I2i pC 25 p c ?5 p c 12^ p c 2n p c 12$ P C 25 p c 12! p c 15 P C d lb 20 p C 15 p c 20 p c free ... 15 p c » 9d 20 p c 'SPC * i 2 i pc 20 p c "20 p c 12$ pc »5 p c (note) 12$ p C »5 P C 12$ p C (note) 15 P C 20 p c " l 2 $ p c 15 p c 15

PC

i d lb free ... 20 p c 15 p c 15 p c (note)

3

p c 20 p c pc * free ... free ... free ... 5PC 10 20

11/6 100 2 / - IOO

20 p c free ... free ... 35 P C 20 p c 5 PC »5 P C " 2 d lb t 2 d lb d lb , 2 d lb 30 p c 10 p c 25 P C 20 p c 15 P C free ... 25 p c free ... 20 p c »5 p c 6 d gal 6 d gal free ... 1/3 gal 6 d gal (note) 2 0 p c 15 p c 20 p c 15 P C 4

pc

12$

free free 12$ p c 2d lb 12$ p C 12$

pC

od gal 15

PC

Caps and hats: Queensland—25 p c ; hats,untrimmed straw, i s p c V i c t o r i a — C l o t h , sewn,with nofounda tion or frame, 8s per doz ; children's, boys', men's or women's felt, made of wool, 24s doz ; made of other material, 30s per d o z ; boys* and men's, with a calico or other foundation or frame and covered, made of wool, 24s per doz ; made of other material, 3 0 s per doz ; dress hats, 6 0 s per d o z ; hats or helmets, pith, 20s per doz ; straw, chip, willow, tape and braid, 35 per c e n t ; hats, caps and bonnets, all others, 25 per cent; hat and bonnet shapes, i s per doz ; hats, " Miner's Safety," free. South Australia—Boys' and youths' felt and glazed straw, 8s per doz ; men's felt, and women's felt, untrimmed, 15s per d o z ; others 25 per cent; boys', youths' and men's, foundation covered with silk, plush, & c , 30s per doz; dress hats, 48s per doz; straw, chips, willow, tape, or braid, untrimmed, free Cardl>oard : V i c t o r i a — P l a i n , 4s c w t ; boxes, 25 per cent. South A u s t r a l i a — P l a i n , free ; boxes, plain, 10 per cent; printed, 25 per cent. Western A u s t r a l i a — U n p r i n t e d (in the flat), 10 per cent; for box making, free ; l>oxes, 15 per cent. Cards : V i c t o r i a — P l a y i n g , 3s doz packs ; in sheets, 2s 6 d doz packs ; enamelled tin, advertising, 3 0 per cent; framed, advertising, 35 per cent. South A u s t r a l i a — C h r o m o advertising, 25 per cent; Christmas and birthday, 15 per cent. Western Australia—Christmas and birthday, 2 0 per cent. Carpet and leather bags : Victoria—Dutiable according to material, band and travelling, 25 per cent; leather trunks and portmanteaux, 3 0 per cent. Carbolic Spray : Victoria—Chiefly glass, 25 per c e n t ; plated bowls, 25 per cent (not surgical). Carriages: Queensland—Tilburys, dogcarts, gigs, Boston chaises and other wheeled vehicles, with or without springs or thorough braces, £ 1 0 each ; express waggons and waggons for carrying goods, or single or double-seated waggons and four-wheeled buggies, without tops, mounted on springs and braces, and hansom cabs, , £ 1 2 each ; single and double-seated waggons, waggonettes and four-wheeled buggies with tops, £ 1 5 each ; omnibuses and coaches for carrying mails or passengers, ,£20 each ; barouches, broughams, mail phaetons, drags, landaus and similar vehicles, ,£30 each. Victoria—Carriages, perambulators, children's or parts, 35 per cent; Boston chaises, dogcarts, gigs, Tilburys and other two-wheeled vehicles on springs or thorough braces, £6 ; four-wheeled buggies, waggons for carrying goods, single or double-seated, express, without tops, mounted on springs or thorough braces, £g; hansom and safety cabs, and single and double-seated waggons, waggonettes and four-wheeled buggies, with tops, . £ 1 2 ; omnibuses or coaches, for mails or passengers, , £ 2 5 ; barouches, broughams, drags, landaus, mail phaetons and Victorias, £40; cartsand waggons, without springs, and spring carts and spring drays with two wheels, 2 0 per cent; all others not otherwise enumerated, 25 p e r c e n t ; bicycles, tricycles, and similar vehicles, 10 per cent; and certain finished component parts of same, free ; carriages, & c , used for conveyance of passengers and goods across frontier, free. South A u s t r a l i a — T i l b u r y s , dogcarts, gigs, Boston chaises, and other two-wheelers on springs, j£io each; four-wheeled buggies, without tops, , £ 1 5 each ; hansom cabs, safety, single, and double-seated waggons, waggonettes, and four-wheeled buggies, ,£20 e a c h ; omnibuses and coaches for mails or passengers, ,£40 each ; barouches, broughams, mail phaetons, drags, ,£50 each ; unenumerated, 25 per cent. Carriage and cartmakers materials, viz.: N e w Zealand—Springs, mountings, trimmings, brass hinges, tire bolts, shackle holders, step treads, and other iron fittings (except steps, lamp-irons, dash-irons, seat-rails, and fith wheels), rubber cloth, free. Carpeting : Tasmania—Felts and hemp, 12$ per c e n t ; Brussels; tapestry, & C , 2 0 per cent. C a s k s : Q'land—Casks and cases, empty returns, in which Queensland produce has been exported, free. S . A . — C a s k s on which duty has been paid are subject to drawback when exported with S.A. wine. Castor o i l : Victoria—Quart and over pint, 4s d o z ; pint and over half pint, 2s d o z ; half pint and over quarter pint, i s doz ; smaller sizes, 6 d doz ; over quart and under gallon, 12s doz.


A ustra I as hi n

Tariffs.

139

Q'land.

Vic.

S.A.

free .. Caustic soda ... ... (note) Cedar in log "(iooft sup) t(over i n ) Ceiling roses "(under 3 m , free) t(metal, 15 p c) J(of c a n e d wood, 20 p c , of stamped metal 25 p c 15 P C Cement "(Keen's cement as plaster of Paris, 3s) 2s barl 15s ton Chaff and hay free ... ChafFcutting knives ... free ... Chaffcutting machines Chain—Cables *(£ in. and upwards) not being 25 p c galvanised t(black or galvanised)... 25 p c C h a i n — T r a c e s (dog chains, " 1 5 p c, tao p c) free .. Chalk "(for school use, free) 25 p c Charcoal blacking free .. Charts d lb Cheese ... (note) Chemicals "(crude, free) t(n.o.e.) 6 d lb Chicory 3 d lb Root, kiln dried 25 p c Green ... ... Chimney pots, earthenware "(per cubic foot or 25 p c brownware 20 per cent) 25 p c Chimney sweeping machines 25 p c China and earthenware "(brown, 20 p c) free ... China palettes ... ... is gal Chinese oil "(in bulk ; see page 148) free .. Chisels "(except cold chisels, 25 p c) ... d lb Chocolate "(chocolate confectioner)-, 4 d lb) (note) Choppers, butchers' ... 4s doz Chut nee—Quarts 2s doz Pints • Smaller sizes "(same proportion) as beer Cider and perry 15 p c Cigarette papers ... ... 3 d lb Cinnamon (ground, * 2 d lb, t 4 d lb) free ... Cleavers, butchers* ... »5 p c Clocks "(church, 10 p c) ... Cloths and tweeds, in the piece "(dress, 10 p c) 15 p c Cloth, carriage "(leather cloth, free) 15 P C Clothes lines "(wire, free)... 8s cwt 3 d lb Cloves "(ground, 4 d lb) free .. Coach screws 2s ton Coal 25 p c Coal scoops and scuttles ... free ... Cocks—Steam, for engines under 6 0 h p dlb Cocoa—Manufactured d lb Nibs (note) Nuts "(and cocoanut desiccated) 6 d lb Essence of, with milk Cod liver oil "(pints) t(in bottles, bulk, 10 p c) * 2 s doz free ... Cod o i l , in bulk ... ... 25 p c Coffee roasters d lb Coffee—Raw 6 d lb Roasted or ground Date, and mixed with coffee & chicory 6 d lb 6 d lb Essence of "(prohibited) 6 d lb Essence of, with milk 6 d lb Essence of, with chicory 6 d lb Extract of "(prohibited)

free free .

free . tfree .

pc cwt free ... free ...

25 p c T 2 0 P C »5 P C J 2 0 p c 2 s b a r 2S b a r l 9 d cwt 2s barl 20s ton 3 0 s ton 15 P C 10 p c 5 pc f r e e .. 10 p c 5 PC 5 PC 15 P C 5 PC TO P C free ... f 2 / 6 c w t • f r e e .. 5 PC free .. f r e e ... 15 P C tfree ... 124 p c " i s cwt 1/- cwt free .. * i 5 p c '5 P C 25 p c free ... 1 2 i p c 15 p c free ... free .. free ... free ... free ... 15 P C 2 d lb lb 4 d 2d lb free ... 20 p c i24 p c 10 p c 15 p c t 20 p C 2 d lb id lb 6 d lb 3d lb 3 d lb 20 p c 3d lb 6 d lb 15 p c 3 d lb lb 4 d 3 d lb 6 0 s ton 15 p c 3 d lb lb 4 d

ARTICLE.

4

4

4

4 4

4

"25 IS

15

PC

free ... free ... free ... 25 p c free ... 3 d lb "(note) 3 d lb 3 d lb free ...

free

...

5 PC

free ... free free ... free

l

4

pc pc (note) * I 5 p c 15 P C 15 p c * 6 d gal 6 d g a l free ... " f r e e ... 3 d lb 3d lb (note) ( n o t e ) 20 p c 4s doz 20 p c 2s doz 20 p c 1/6 doz (note) is g a l 2 d lb 15 p c "free ... 2 d l b free ... free ... 15 p c 15 P C 25 p c * i pc free ... 15 p c "12s c't ( n o t e ) free ... 2 d l b free ... 2S CWt free ... free ... 30 p c 25 p c 30 p c 25 p c 3 d lb 3d lb free ... free ... (note) free ... 3 d lb id lb (note) T20 p C free ... free ... 30 p c 25 p c free ... 3 d l b "8d ... 3opc

20 25

5

3d 3d 3d 3d 3d

lb lb lb lb lb

N.Z.

Tas.

W.A.

d lb 6 d lb 6d lb id lb o.l l b 6d lb 4

d lb

15 p c I5PC 10 p c 15 P C 15 p c 15 P C 15 p c 15 p c f r e e ... 1/3 gal f r e e ... 5 PC * f r e e ... 4 d lb f r e e ... *5 P C 15 p c •5 P C 15 p c 15 p c 15 p c 15 p c IS g a l (note) 15 p c 15 p c t 2 d lb lb 4 d f r e e ... *-5 P C 15 p c *20 p C 10 p c 15 p c 10 p c 15 P C

8s.cwt

2tl l b free ... f r e e ... 15 p c 10 p c free ... free ...

free ... d lb 15 p c (note) 4

15 P C 10 p c 4 4

d lb d lb

• • 5 P C 15 p c lb 15 p c 4 d 5 PC 20 p c f r e e ... 2 0 p c 15 p c 15 P C free ... 3 d lb 3 d lb lb 4 d 6 d lb lb 4 d 4

15 P C 6 d lb

4 4 4

d d d d

lb lb lb lb

p c pc pc free ... 6 d gal free ... 3 d lb free ... 20 p c 20 p c 20 p c 2s gal 25 p c t 2 d lb free ... 20 p c 20 p c *20 p C (note) * 2 d lb 20 p c free ... 20 p c 20 p c 3 d lb free ... free ... 3 d lb free ... free ... 20 p c 2 d lb 5 d lb d lb 20 p c 20 p c 20 p c 20 p c 20 25 20

5

Cedar (in log) : Queensland—is 6 d 100 sup feet; undressed, of a scantling 96 sq in, is 6 d 100 sup ft; dressed and sawn of a scantling under 96 sq in, 3s per 100 sup ft; duty to be estimated as of a thickness of 1 in and to be in proportion for any greater thickness. C h i n a and earthenware: V i c t o r i a — C h i n a and porcelain, 15 per cent adval; earthenware, 8 d per cubic ft and 15 per cent according to value of material. Chemicals and drugs: Queensland—Containing not more than 25 per cent spirits, if more, 14s per g a l ; others, 25 per cent. Victoria—Ammonia, carbonate of, 2 d per lb or p i n t ; cocculus indicus, i s per l b ; glycerine, pure, i j d per l b ; crude, {d per l b ; liquid ammonia, chlorodyne, morphia, nitrate of silver, nux vomica and strychnine, free; packed ready for retail sale, 25 per cent. Choppers, butchers': Queensland—Mincers, free; choppers, free. V i c t o r i a — F r e e ; mincers, 25 per cent. South Australia—Free ; mincing machines, 2 0 per cent. Cider and perry : V i c t o r i a — i o d in bulk ; is 3 d in bottles. T a s m a n i a — i s 3 d gal wood, i s 6 d gal bottle. Clothes lines: New Zealand—Cordage, 2 0 per cent; galvanised wire rope, free. South A u s t r a l i a n s c w t ; galvanised, 3s per cwt. C o a l : Tasmania—Small, 3s per ton ; round, 4s per ton. Cocoanut: Queensland—Free; desiccated, 25 per cent. V i c t o r i a — F r e e ; desiccated, 10 or 20 per cent, according to how packed. Cod liver o i l : Victoria—Quart and over pint, 4s doz ; pint and over half pint, 2s doz ; half pint and over quarter pint, is doz ; smaller sizes, 6 d doz ; over quart and under gal, 12s doz.


Australasian

140 ARTICLE.

Tariffs.

Q'land

Coffin furniture "(plated, 25 p c) 25 p c 25 p c Coffins, zinc free ... Coin C o i r matting "(adv.) .. ... ... . . . r '15 p c 25 p c Coke 25 p c Coloured fashion plates i s gal Colza oil "(in bulk ; see page 148) 25 p c Combs and brushes 25 p c Combs, curry 4 d lb Confectionery "(cake ornaments, 2 0 p c) free ... Copper and yellow metal sheathing free .., Nails free ... Wire, thread covered free ,., Copperas free ... C o p y books ... 25 p c C o p y i n g presses Cordage "(n.o.e.) t(galvanised wire rope, free) 8 s cwt Cordials, not being spirituous "(spirituous 16/25 p c gal) l i d lb Cord—Whip • i d ib Shop...

S.A.

"30 p c

25 p c 25 p c free ... 15 p c free ... 25 p c 6 d gal (note) free ... 3 d lb free ... free .. free ... free ... 25 p c 25 p c (note)

15 p c 15 p c free ... 10 p c free ... 15 p c free ... 15 p c 15 p c AA n . (note) free ... (note) free ... free ... * 5 PC 8s cwt

15 P C 15 PC free ... 12J p c is ton 15 p c 1/3 gal 15 p c is pc 2 d lb free ... free ... free ... free ... 15 PC 15 PC free ...

20 p c 25 p c free ... 20 p c free ... 25 p c 6 d gal 20 p c 20 p c (note) free ... free . . free ... free ... free ... 20 p c t20 pC

12$ p c 17$ p C free 12$ p c free 12$ p c od gal (note) 12$ p c 3 d lb free 12$ p c 12$ p c 15 PC 12$ p c 12$ p C 30s ton

20 p c 2 d Ib 2 d lb

20

pc 8s cwt 8s cwt

15

pc i d lb i d lb

"25 p C

2s gal

pc free ... 25 p c free ... free ... * 6 d gal (note) free ... (note) free ... free ... free ... free ... 35 P C 30 p c (note) 30

20 p c I2S CWt 2 d lb

Cords—Cotton, linen, worsted, in hanks, coils, free ... •free ... or reel "(being blind cord) ; "Spc free ... d Ib free ... Corks, cut free ... free ... free ... Cork "(virgin, 15 p c) *25 p c free ... free ... ,, socking "(adv.) ... 2 d lb 2 d Ib free ... Cornflour 25 p c * 3 0 p c 25 p c Cornices (in the piece, "free, 115 P c) Corncrushers ... . . . j free .., 15 p c 15 p c Cornsacks (4 bushels and over), new | free .., free ... free ... 15 p c free ... •free ... C o t t o n — B l i n d nets "(untaped) 15 p c free ... free ... Raw free ... free ... free ... Waste free ... free ... free ... W i c k (candle) ... ... free ... free ... free ... Wicks 5 PC free ... free ... Piece goods "(over 4 d yard, 2 0 p c)... Knitting, embroidery, crochet "(em1 free ... broidery, 2 0 p c) ... ... . . . j free free ... free . free ... free ... T h r e a d , sewing 4 d lb ' 2 5 p c 20 p c Cough lozenges "(patent) t(patent, 4 0 p c) J3 p c Crapes, silk "(other, 10 p c) 15 p c 15 p c free , free ... 10 p c Cream of tartar Cricket materials "(wooden 25 per cent, and 2 5 p c "10 p c 15 p c leather 3 0 p c) Crinoline and crinoline steel "(steel, 15 p c ) ... 2 5 p c free ... • 2 5 p c 25 p c 30 p c free ... Crowbars Cruets, glass, andcrockery ... ... ...I 2 5 p c 25 p c 2 0 p c 3 d lb d Ib 2 d Ib Currants "(dried, 2 d lb) .. 25 p c 20 p c 2 d lb Curry powder and paste ... 25 p c 1 free ... 25 p c Curtain bands free ... 25 p c Curtain chains I 25 p c 25 p c 20 p c 10 p c Custard powder 15 P C Cutlery 10 p c IO p C Cushions "(indiarubber, free) ! * 3 ° P C 25 p c 25 p c 4

I

3

Dampers and frames, iron Dashboards, leather covered Dates .. Deals "(100 ft sup according to size) Demonstration chalk "(Dholl, £2 per ton) Detonators "(metal) Diamonds, glaziers* D o g collars, leather

25 p c

3 *3 ... f • I frc* • j free .. ^5 P C d

l b

S

r c e

Tas.

Vic.

j 3°PC 30 p c d lb (note) free ... *free ... free ... 30 p c 3

W.A.

5 PC 5 PC

pc 15 p c free ... 20 p c 5 PC free ... 15 p c 15 p c free ... free ... free .. 10 p c

•5

5 pc 5 PC 15 p c •15

pc

'5PC 10 p c 15 p c free ... 15 p c ad Ib 15 p c 15 p c 15 p c 3 d Ib 15 p c 15 P C

25 p c

15

25 p c 3 d lb

20 p c

pc

i d lb (note) (note) free ... free ... free ... free ... free ... free ... 25 p c 20 p c

N.Z.

Fiji.

20 p c 20 p C

12$ p c 12$ pC

p c 12$ p c 20 p c 12$ p C free .. 5 PC free ... free ... 12$ PC i d lb )d lb i d lb 15 p c t 2 0 p C 12$ p C 15 p c 12$ p C 5 P free ... free ... free 12J p c 20 p C 12$ p C free ... free ... free free ... free ... 12$ p c free ... free ... 12$ p c free ... 2 0 p c 12$ p c 124 p c " i o p c 12$ pC 15 p c 10 p c 10 p c

£20

c

12* PC "free ... 12$ p c free ..

12$ p c 12$ p c

20 p c

t20 p C

3 d lb

20 p c 20 p c

25 p c

i d lb

12$ p c 15 p c

15 P C

20 p c

12$ p C

PC PC pc lb

25 p c 20 p c

12$ pC 12$ p c

15 15 15 2d

15 P C 15 p c 15 P C 15 P C 15 P C 15 P C 15 P C 15 P C 2 d Ib

20 p c

W lb pc 20 p c 20 p c 20 p c 20 p c (note)

1 1

20

20

pc

20 p c 2 d lb

12$ p C 2 d lb

2 d lb 12$ C P

12$ p C 12$ p C 12$ p C 12$ p C 12$ p C

10 p C 2 d Ib *6d

(note) (note) free ... free ... * I 2 $ 10 p c free ... 12$ free ... I 2 j »5 PC I2J 20 p c 15 PC

pC

PC pc pC

Combs and brushes : V i c t o r i a — C o m b s , 10 per c e n t ; brushes, 3 0 per cent. South Australia—Brushes, 25 per cent; combs, 10 per cent. F i j i — C o m b s , 12$ per c e n t ; brushes, 12^ per cent. C o n feet lonery : V i c t o r i a — 2 d lb, or 25 per cent, according to value ; cake ornaments, 10 per cent. New Zealand—Boiled sugars, comfits, lozenges, Scotch mixtures, and sugar candy, 2 d per l b ; chocolate, in plain trade packages, 3 d per lb; in fancy packages for retail sale, 2 0 per cent; n.o.e., 2 d lb., including internal packages. C o p p e r : Western Australia—Copperware of all kinds, n.o.e., rivets, free; tubes, 15 p c ; wire, rod, sheathing, sheet and ingot, free. C o r d a g e : V i c t o r i a — M e t a l cordage, free; coir rope, 5s c w t ; other, 12s cwt. South A u s t r a l i a — C o i r rope, 5s c w t ; galvanised and iron, 3s c w t : other, 11s c w t ; steel wire, free. C o r d s : N e w Z e a l a n d — P l a i n cotton or linen cord for Venitian blinds, free. Cushions : N e w Z e a l a n d — A i r cushions, free ; hair cushions, 25 p c. D e a l s : V i c t o r i a — F r e e (undressed); less than 7 in x 2$ in, 4s per 100 sup f t ; Oregon, less than 7 in x 2$ in, 4 s 100 sup f t ; 7 in x 2$ in and less than 12 in x 6 in, 2 s 1 0 0 sup f t ; 12 in x 6 in and upwards, is 100 sup ft. South A u s t r a l i a — 2 s 6 d per 4 0 cubic ft. Western A u s t r a l i a — R o u g h , in bulk, 5 per cent; rough, 10 per c e n t ; worked, 2 0 per cent. T a s m a n i a — 3 in and over, is 6 d per 100 ft; under 3 in, 2s 6 d per 100 ft. N e w Z e a l a n d — 2 s per 100 superficial ft.


Australasian ARTICLE.

Tariffs.

Q'land.

Vic.

S.A.

141 W.A.

Tas.

N.Z.

Fiji.

Doors and frames "(wood) (note) (note) 2 0 p c 2 0 p c (note) 2s piece 4S ea D o o r knobs, glass, brass or china (note) free . . 15 P C 15 p c 2 0 p c 2* p c 15 P C 25 p c 20 p c (note) Drapery of every description n.o.e. ... 15 P c 25 p i 15 P C Drawing pins free ... free .. free ... 15 p c 15 p c 2 0 p c 12* p c 20 p c free D r a i n pipes "(brownware) »5 P C 25 p c » 8 d c ft 2 0 p c 15 P C Iron, cast free ... 2 0 p c free free ... is cwt 2S CWt 5 PC 2 0 p c 12* p c D r a m bottles ... 2 0 p c *5 p c free ... ree ... 15 p c 25 p c 2 0 p c a 2 5 p c 124 p c Dresses of every description (made up) 15 p c 25 p c • 3 5 P 2 0 p c i2i pc 10 p c 20 p c Druggeting 15 P C 15 P C 5 PC 20 p c 12* p c 20 p c Druggists' ware ... 25 p c 10 p c "•5 P C Drugs, not specially enumerated "(& chemicals)^ *25 P C afree... b\o p c 15 p c 20 p c (note) 12* P C 20 p c D u m b bells 30 p c 25 p c 25 P C 124 p c 15 P C 15 P C 30 p c Dust pans "(tin, iron 15 p c ) t(tin, 25 p c ) 25 p L 25 p c * 2 0 p C 15 P C t 2 0 p C 12* P C D y e (hair,* 15 p c t 2 5 p c ) {(dyers' materials, free) free ... free ... tfree ... t i 5 P < free .. tfree ... 15 P C (note) •15 p c *5 P C 15 p c 2 0 p C 12* p C 25 p c Earthenware *(brown, 2 0 p c) 30 p c 20 p C 25 p c Earthscoops... ... 20 p c 15 p c 12* P C >5 P C 10 p c 2 d doz 20 p c 25 p c E g g s *(powder and preservative, 15 p c) 10 p c 5 PC 15 P C Eggbeaters, glass, earthenware, or china "(at rates for material) 10 p c 20 p c 25 p c 15 P C 12* P C 15 P C Elastic bands ... free ... 25 p c 15 p c 15 p c 2 0 p c 12* p C 25 p c 25 p c 20 p c 25 p c Electroplated ware 20 p c 25 pc12* p c 15 P C 20 p c 20 p c Electric bells free ... free .. 25 P C 12* p C 5 PC *5 p c 5 PC Embossing presses ... free ... 25 p c 25 p c 12* p c 5 PC 10 p c free ... E m e r y cloth free ... free ... 15 P C 12* p C 15 p c Paper free .. free ... 15 P C 10 p c free ... 12* p C 15 P C Powder free .. free ... 15 P C 10 p c free ... 17* p C I5PC Enamelled iron basins with plugs "(and enamelled ware of all kinds, n.o.e.) 20 p c 30 p c "10 p c ' l O p C 25 p c 5 pc 12* p C Engines, steam 10 p c 20 p c (note) (note) (note) free 5 PC Engravings "(as works o f art) t(institutions, other 15 p c) free .. free ... tfree .. 2 0 p c 12* p c "free 20 p c Erasers, indiarubber 20 p c free .. free .. 15 p c 25 p c 12* p c »5 P C Estameues and serges "(dress goods, free ; other, 30 p c) t(dress, 10 p c) 10 p c 2 0 p C 1 5 pc 12* p c 15 p c ti5 PC Essences, not l»eing spirituous compounds "(spirituous flavouring, 16/- gal) 10 p c 15 p c "15 p c free 25 p c 15 P C 15 P C 12s gal 10 p c Essence of orange "(proof) ... "14s gl 16s gal 15s gal 16s gal 15 p c 12s gal 10 p c Essence of rum "(proof) f(prohibited) "14s gl 1 5 gal 16s gal 15 p c t 20 p c IO p C Extract of meat d lb 20 p c 15 P C 15 P C 12* p c Eyelets "(bootmakers', free*, all others, 15 p c ) free .. free .. free .. 'free .. free ... free ... 12* p c E y e l e t punches free .. free .. free .. free .. free .. 2 0 p c 12* p c Webbing ... , free .. free .. free .. free .. free .. free ... 12* p c False teeth , 25 p c free .. free .. 10 p c 15 P C free ... 12* p c 10 p c 15 P C 20 p c F a n c y goods 25 p c 20 p c 20 p c d lb d lb 25 p c 3 d lb 20 p c 3 d lb F a n c y soap ... ... *5 p c Farinaceous food "(infants and other foods, maizena free) t(maizenaand cornflour }d lb) 2 d lb (note) i o p c free .. i d lb t 2 0 p C id lb Fashion plates free .. 25 p c 15 P C 15 p c 25 p c 12* p c 25 p c 15 P C Feathers, artificial ... 25 p c 15 p c 25 p c 25 p c 25 p c 12* p c Felloes, in the rough "(hickory, free) t(iooft sup) free .. * 6 d 100 25 p c free .. 15 p c free ... t i s 6 d Felt—Sheathing "(roofing, 15 p c) free .. free ... free .. Tree .. 10 p c free ... free 15 P C 5 PC free ... free Paper "(for roofing, free) 5 P C *6s cwt free .. 15 P C to p c 25 p c 15 P C 20 p c Fenders 12* p c 25 p c 15 P C free ... 25 p c 15 p c free ... 12* p c Ferrules 25 p c free ... free ... free .. free .. free .. F i b r e , cocoanut free free... Doors : V i c t o r i a — 1 * in and under, 5s each ; over 1* in and not over i j in, 7s 6 d each ; over 1J in, 10s each; for furnaces, 3 0 per cent; frames, door and window, 5s each. South Australia—1 Jin and under, 5s each ; i\ in to i j in, 7s 6 d each ; i\ in and over, 10s each ; door frames, 25 per cent. New Z e a l a n d — P l a i n , 2s each ; glazed with ornamental glass, 4s each. D o o r knobs : V i c t o r i a — M e t a l , free ; glass, 23 per cent; china, 15 per cent. Dresses: V i c t o r i a — W h e n made of woollens in piece, 25 per cent. New Z e a l a n d — M a d e to order of local resident, 4 0 per cent. Draper-)': F i j i — C o t t o n of all kinds, 36 in wide, per y d , i d ; 36 in and not exceeding 72 in, per yd 2 d ; 72 and not exceeding 108 in, per y d , 3d ; for ever)- 36 in, addition or portion, per y d , i d . D r u g s : Victoria—Carbonate of ammonia, 2d per pt or l b ; cocculus indicus, is per lb ; glycerine, pure, i * d per l b ; glycerine, crude, * d per l b ; liquid ammonia, chlorodyne, morphia, nitrate of silver, nux vomica and strychnine, free ; packed for retail sale, 25 per cent. South Australia—Cyanide of potassium may be admitted free for mining purposes on the importer undertaking to pay duty if called upon. N e w Zealand—Specially enumerated as free : A l u m , sulphate of ammonia, anhydrous ammonia, aniline dyes, arsenic, bluestone or sulphate of copper, borax, catechu, chloride of calcium, nitrate of silver, cochnieal, creosote (crude or commercial), glycerine (crude), gum arabic and tragacanth, gum (benzoin), artificial gum arabic, gum (damar), phosphorus, potash, caustic potash, and chlorate of potash, pearlash, cyanide of potassium, salammoniac, saltpetere, acetute of soda (crute), soda ash, caustic soda, nitrate of soda, silicate of soda, sulphate of soda, sulphide of sodium, strychnine, sulphur, chloride of zinc, iron sulphates, gall nuts, turmeric, saffron, nitrous oxide gas, tree washes, insecticides, maltind, chlorodyne. D y e : S. Australia—Dyestuff, being aniline dyes, bichrome, dyewoods, dyewood extracts, & indigo, free. Earthenware: V i c t o r i a — N o t otherwise enumerated, is^-per cent; the following at 8 d per cubic foot: brown, yellow, or cane ware, Rockingham ware, C . . chambers, C . C . bakers, C . C . pudding bowls, C . C . jellies, brown or cane or fireclay medical and sanitary ware, earthenware, flowerpotsand saucers. Engines, steam : Queensland—Engine and boilers, 25 per cent; portable and traction, free. Victoria — 3 0 per cent; portable, 15 per cent; traction, free. South Australia—25 per cent; portable, gas, traction and oil, free. Farinaceous food : V i c t o r i a — M a i z e n a , 2 d lb ; special preparations infants and invalids' foods, free. F

C

s

4

4

4

f

!

0


Australasian

142 ARTICLE.

Files {bill "25 p c , l i s p c) Filtering paper Filters, high pressure, metal Filters, high pressure, plated Fire clay Fire guards Fireirons Fireworks and Firearms ... F i s h — I n pickle or brine Dried and salted ... Preserved, potted or paste '(paste, 20 pc) Fish maws, Penang pipe ... Fishing lines, fancy goods not being fancy goods ... Fishing material, not being cordage Flags "(ships' free) Flannels, in the piece '(Crimean 5 p c ) Flax, in the piece Phormium tenax Flock (mattresses, ^15 p c, t=5 p c) Floorcloth and oilcloth Flour *(ioolbs) t(self raising i d per Ib) 1(2000 lbs) Flour bags (new), 3 bushels or over Flowers, artificial ... Forfar, in the piece Forges Forks—(iarden, hay or stable Steel '(table) Forks—Silver Plated '(or mixed metal) Frames and doors '(see doors) ... Fredericshal water '(pints) Fruit—Bottled Dried Fresh ... Preserved '(or part preserved) f(in syrup) Furniture Furniture polish F u r s ' ( n o t made up) Fuse, per coil of 24 feet ... Fusees '(see matches) Fuller's earth '(not perfumed), t(not perfumed)

Galvanic bands and belts '(batteries and gal vanometers io p c) ... ... Galvanised iron, manufactured, including guttering, ridgecaps, buckets, tubs, &c. ... Galvanised iron, unmanufactured (sheets for roofing), plain Galvanised iron, unmanufactured, corru gated Galvanised iron wire '(except barbed) t(fencing free) t(barbed, 3s cwt)

Tariffs.

Q'land.

Vic.

S.A.

free ... •free ... 10 p c 30 p c 25 p c 30 p c 2.5 p c IO p C •J PC 20 p c 25 p c 10 p c 25 p c 25 p c 30 p c 25 p c 25 p c 20 p c 20 p c id Hi 5s cwt 10 p c 5s cwt id lb i d Ib 2 d ll> (note) 2 d Ib 25 p c 2 d lb i d lb 25 p c to p c 15 p c 2 5 p c I2S CWt 2 d l b 25 p c m o p c 15 p c 25 p c free ... 10 p c • 1 5 p c r»25 p c 15 p c free ... free ... 5 PC free ... free ... free ... free ... " f r e e . . . 10 p c 15 P C 15 p c 15 p c ... 2 0 s ton 5s cwt *2S 15 p c free ... free ... 25 p c free ... •5 P C free .. free ... 5 PC 25 p c 30 p c 25 p c free ... free ... free ... 15 p c 10 p c * i o p c 25 p c 2s or. 25 p c 25 p c "25 p c 25 P C 4 s ea * * 25 p c 10 p c 20 p c (note) (note) (note) 3 d Ib (note) 3 d lb free ... (note) IS bhl (note) ' 3 d lb (note) 25 p c 25 p c 30 PC 25 p c 20 p c 10 p c 2 5 p c * 2 d lb 25 p c free ... i d ... free ... 25 p c 15 P C * 25 P C "free ... t i o p c 25 p c

5 PC

6 s cwt

2.5 p c 25 p c

free ... free ... 10 p c <i25

p c (note)

C25 p c

W.A.

tfree ... 15 p c 10 p c 10 p c free ... 15 p c 15 P C 20 p c (note) (note) (note) 15 p c 20 p c 8s cwt (note) 15 P C 10 p c 5 PC •5 p c free ... 10 p c Hos t'n free ... 15 p c 5 PC free ... free ... 15 P C 20 p c 15 p c 20 p c 20 p c 15 p c

Tas.

N.Z.

Fiji.

20 p C

12$ p c

15 p c

20 p C

pc 15 P C

20 p c

12$ 12*

20 p c 20 p c

12$ p C 5 pc

free

...

15

free

...

15 P C 15 p c

20 p c

10 p G

20 p c 20 p c lOSCWt lOSCWt

15 P C 15 p c

* 2 d lb lOSCWt

20 p c 15 P C 15 p c

20 p c 20 p c «20 p C

10 p C 10 p c

"25 P C 20 p c 20 p c free ... f r e e 10 p c 10 p c

pc «fl p c 15

free

...

20 p c 20 p c *2S . . . **IS free ... 20 p c 20 p c 25 p c I 2 i p i : 20 p c f r e e ... 10 p c

pC pC

12$ p c 12$ p C

20 p C

i d ib i d lb id lb 12$ p c 12$ p c 12$ p C 12$ p C 12$ p c I2i p C 12$ P C 5 pc 12$

p c

12$ P C J20/-

free 12$ p c 12$ p c 12J p c 12$ p c

free ... 20 p c 12I p c 20 p c 12$ p c 20 p c 12$ p c 20 p c 12$ p C 20 p c 20 p c *od dz 3 d Ib 25 p c i d lb 3dlb 2 d lb 2d Ib i d Ib 1V10 p c IS bhl rfid lb i d lb T25 p c 3 d lb i d lb 15 P C (note^ 25 p c 12$ p c 15 P C 15 p c 15 p c 20 p c '5 pc 15 p c 20 p c 25 P C 12$ p C free ... 12$ p C f r e e ... 15 P C 20 p c 12$ p C 15 P C * (note) 20 p c 15 P C 15 P C 5 PC 5 pc

20 p c 20 p c

5 PC

20 p c

20s ton

2S C W t

20 p c

th$

pc

15 p c 12$ p C

2S CWt

free ... free ... f r e e ... f r e e . . . 1/6 c w t 2S CWt

2S CWt

free ... 1/6 cwt f r e e ... 2S C W t

free ... "free ... free ...

Us

pc

(note)

2S CWt free

2S CWt J2S CWt

Fish : Victoria—Potted or paste, 20 per c e n t ; preserved, 2 d per lb. Western A u s t r a l i a — Dried and salted, in pickle or brine, preserved and tinned, i d per l b ; in paste, 15 per cent. Fishing material: Vi ct o ri a— S hark hooks, 3 0 per cent; nets, free. Western A u s t r a l i a — F a n c y , 20 per cent; other, 5 per cent; fishing, 15 per cent. N e w Z e a l a n d — F l i e s , 25 p c ; hooks, free. Flannels: Victoria—Printed and coloured all over, but not plain white, plain blue, or Shetland flannel, 15 per cent. Fruit, bottled : Q u e e n s l a n d - i s 6 d doz. rep. pints. V i c t o r i a — Q u a r t s , 6 s d o z ; pints, 3s doz ; smaller i s 6 d d o z ; over quart, 16s doz. South A u s t r a l i a — 4 s doz quarts ; 2 s doz pints : i s 6 d doz smaller. Fruit, dried : South Australia—Unenumernted, 4 d ; currants, 2 d ; raisins, 3 d ; dates, 3 d Ib. Fruit, fresh : Victoria—Oranges and lemons, c<d bushel; other, i s 6 d bushel; bananas, guavas, mangoes, olives, pineapples, pawpaw and custard apples, and persimmons, free. Western Australia—Apples, pears and grapes are prohibited at, and south of, Champion Bay. N e w Zealand —Apples, pears, plums, cherries, peaches, nectarines, medlars, apricots, quinces, tomatoes, i d l b ; (no duty exceeding $d the Ib to be levied on apples and pears from 1 4 t h J u l y to 3 1 s t December) ; currants, raspberries, gooseberries, black berries, and strawberries, $d lb ; lemons, i d Ib. Fruit, preserved: Queensland—Fruit pulp and fruit preserved by acids, 5s per cwt. South Australia —Preserved fresh, 2 d ; preserves and jams, 3 d per l b ; fruit pulp, 4 d ; preserved fresh by sulphurous acid or other anti-ferment, 2 d per lb. Furniture: Western A u s t r a l i a — 2 0 per c e n t ; furniture makers* materials, n.o.e., free ; bath chairs (invalid), 10 per cent. Fuller's earth : N e w Zealand—Crude, free ; perfumed, 25 per cent. Galvanised iron : Queensland—Piping free. V i c t o r i a — 3 0 per c e n t ; welded pipes, free; metal buckets, 2 5 per cent. South Australia—Galvanised pipes, wrought, over , 6 i n diameter, 2s cwt. N e w Z e a l a n d — R i d g i n g and guttering, 20 p c. Galvanised iron wire : T a s m a n i a — F e n c i n g , 5 per c e n t ; binding, exempt; other, 15 per cent.


Australasian

Tariffs. Vic.

Q'land.

Galvanised screws ... ... free ... free ... Garden tools (rollers " 3 0 p c, t 2 5 p c, \\o p c)... free ... "free Gaspipes, iron *(cast, welded free) f(wrought, under 6 i n ) free ... " 3 s cwt Gasaliers, or parts thereof 25 p c 30 p c Gas retorts "(of brownware) t ( i r o n ; brownware, 20 p c) ... ... 25 p c * 2 0 p C Gelatine, such as Nelson's patent 25 p c 6 d lb Gentian root "(ground, 2 0 p c) free ... free ... Gilt mountings, if in sets (foi saddlery) free ... free ... (iilt mouldings "(gold ; imitation, free) 15 p c (note) free ... free ... Gimp, silk or cotton "(for furniture, free) d lb " 2 d lb Ginger "(ground) t(whole, 2 d ) 25 p c free ... Ginger—Green d lb ky\ lb Preserved... 25 p c Gingerljeer "(pints ... ... 10 p c 25 p c Ginger ale "(pints) 10 p c free ... 10 p c Glacialine "(refined) ... 25 p c Glasses, opera, field, and marine free ... Glass stoppers for soda water bottles I 15 P C 2 5 p c Plate and sheet "(plain) t(si!vered 2 5 p c) 15 PC "free ... Glassware "(cut, uncut i s ft, n.o.e. 2 5 p c) t(plain, 15 p c) {(cut, 2 0 p c) 25 p c " 2 / 6 ft Glasses, looking (hand, "10 p c 115 p c) 25 p c " 3 0 p c Globes, not fancy "(educational) 'free .. free ... Gloves, kid and leather 25 p c C 2 0 p c Glue ... 2 d lb 2 d lb Glue, liquid ... 20 p c 2 d lb Gold leaf "(silver leat) f(paper in flat 15 p c ) free .. * 2 0 p C Goloshes "(pairs) 25 p c doz G r a i n — B a r l e y "(loolbs, pearl and Scotch, 7/6cwt)f(ioolbs) J(pearl, patent, free) rtCjd bhl*3» ». Beans and peas, except split "(garden free) t(split, 2s cwt) {(split, free) ... is bhl *2S n d G r a m "(per 100 lbs) t(j£2 per ton) ... 25 p c *2S ... Maize "(per 100 lbs) t(maize flour 2 d lb): 8 d 5 6 U ' * t 2 / l l Oats "(per 100 lbs) ...1 8 d o l b * 3 s ... Wheat "(per 100 lbs) j d 6olb *2S I id free ... 15 p c Grain sowers 25 p c Grates and ovens, and all parts thereof 30 p c 6s cwt Grease, axle and lubricating s cwt Grafts, leather "(and Wellington fronts, 6 s * dozen pairs) 25 p c Graining combs free ... free ... Graphoscope views... 25 p c free ... Groats 2 d lb 20 p c Grindstones, per inch diameter .. free ... free ... Guano free ... free ... G u m arabic "(except gum arabic) 25 p c free ... L i q u i d ... 25 p c 20 p c G u n n y bags (being new) ... free ... Gunpowder, sporting "(common blasting free) t(blasting and F F F loose, i d lb) free .. 3 d lb Guttapercha free .. free ... G u n covers, leather "(free with guns) 25 p c " 3 0 p c 4

4

4

4

4

Haberdashery, not otherwise enumerated 25 p c Hackers* putty knives free ... H a i r "(curled, 2 d per lb ; 115 p c) 125 p c H a i r pads and plaits "(fancy and wigs, 2 0 p c) t(imitation) 25 P C seating 15 P C sieves... 25 p c Halters "(leather, 3 0 p c) 25 p c Hames "(wood 2 5 p c) t(plated, 15 pc)... free . Hammers (except refining hammers) ... IS PC

M 3

S.A.

Tas.

W.A.

2S CWt free ... 15 P C tfree ... tfree 5 PC

ffree ... 5 PC 25 p c 15 p c t25PC

10 p c 10 p c

free ... "25 p c "15 p c 2 d lb

free ... 3 d lb 20 p c 20 p c IO p C free ... free ... tiSPC t

5

25 p c free ... 15 p c 2 d lb IO p C free ... 25 P C

free ... 15 p c 15 p c free ... 10 p c 15 p c t d lb 15 p c is p c 20 p c 20 p c 15 P C 10 p c 5 PC

15 T20 10 15

id 15 T20 15

12! I2i

I5PC

15 p c

IO p C 20 p c •free ... free ... 15 p c *20 p C t d lb 2 d lb 2 d lb 20 p c 20 p c *20 pC 20 p c free ... (note)

15 p c

20 p c

15 p c 15 p c 20 p c

25 P C 20 p c 25 p c

i d lb 15 p c 15 p c •SPC

i|d ib i|d lb free ... 2 0 p c 2 2 I p c 124 p c

4.d1l l 1! . .

4

I

5

P

C

I5PC 15 p c 15 p c 15 p c

tis6d

J*2S ... 6 d bhl *2S ... 6 d bhl •is ... 6 d bhl *2S ... d hhl (note) 6 d bhl 15 p c free ... 25 p c 10 p c 10 p c 15 p c

"isod •is 6d •is 6 d

4

12I p c 2 d lb

IS p c i24 p C 123 p c 124 p c i d lb 2 d Ib 2 d Ib * 9 d dz * 9 d dz 15 p c 12! p c • 2j p c i2j pc 12\ P C 124 p c 124 p c

t*2S ... c i d Ib

i d lb .. t 6 d bhl .. 6 d bhl *9d ... 6 d bhl •is5d *od ... 6 d bhl •is6d 5 pc 5 PC •5PC 20 p c 15 p c 20 p c

4

• 3 d lb

pc pc

5 PC

11/6 bhl (note)

25 p c free ... 15 P C free ... free ... free ... 10 p C (note) free ...

12! p c free ...

20 p C

20 p c

4

pc pc pc pc lb pc pc pc

2S CWt

15 p c

pc pc pc pc 15 p c dlb

ttio p c

Fiji.

15 p c

15 15 20 20

4

N . Z.

15 p c free ... 20 p c free ... 5 PC free ... 15 p c 15 p c free ...

•9d

"...

«9d •od

I5PC

22J p C

pc pc PC pc free ... 15 p c 15 p c free ...

free 20 p free free free free 20 p free

15 15 15 15

... c ... ... ... ... c ...

pc pc i d lb i d Ib free *iS P C 124 p c free 124 124

t 6 d lb • 6 d Ib

d lb free ... 15 p c 25 p c 10 p c 4

15 p c 15 P C

6 d lb free ... 124 p c 124 p c 20 p c

free ... 25 p c 15 p c 20 p c 124 p c IS P C free ... free ... free ... free ... free ... 12} p c "free ... •free ... 15 p c free ... free ... S p c 25 P C free ... 35 P C *I2/cWt "free ... (note)

15 p c free ... 25 p c 25 p c free ... (note)

124 p c 15 p c • 2 5 p c i pc free ... 124 p c free ... 15 p c free ... 12J p c 124 p c 15 p c 15 P C 20 p c tfree ... 15 p c free ... 124 p c free ... 5 P C free ... 124 p c •20 p c 15 p c

5

Gilt mouldings : V i c t o r i a — U n d e r 3 m , s per 100 f t ; 3 m and over, 7s per 100 ft; for picture frames, not mitred, 15 per cent; mitred, 35 per cent. Ginger, preserved : V i c t o r i a — I f in jars, as " Fruit, bottled."—See note, page i 2 . Glass, plate and sheet: X e w Zealand—Plate, 2 0 per c e n t ; crown, sheet, and common window, 2s per 100 sup ft. ; bevelled or silvered, 25 p c. Western Australia—Silvered, 15 per cent; coloured, for church windows, free. Gloves : V i c t o r i a — O t h e r than kid and leather, free. Grain, wheat: South A u s t r a l i a — 2 s per 100 lbs if by sea ; if overland, free. Western Australia—See barley. Qu e e n s l a n d — M al t i ng barley, is 6d per bushel. N e w Zealand—Pearl barley, is per cwt. F i j i — G r a i n and pulse, 6d p r bushel). G u m , liquid : South A u s t r a l i a — G l o y and stickphast, in bottle, 25 p c ; in bulk 10 p c. Hammers : Victoria—Quartz, napping, spalling, 3 0 per cent; steam, being machine tools, 2 0 per cent. South A u s t r a l i a — F r e e ; napping, quartz and spalling, 25 per cent. 4

4


Australasian

144 ARTICLE.

Q'land.

Tariffs. Vic.

Hammocks, Ashantee 25 p c 25 p c Hams *(mutton fd lb, potted, paste, 15 p c) 2 d lb 3 d lb Handcuffs 25 p c 30 p c H a n d trucks, and all parts "(steel wheels, free) " 2 5 p c 25 p c Handles, metal '(brass door free) 25 p c ayo p c Handles, wood, for tools '(small free) ... 25 p c "25 p c Hardware, unenumerated 25 p c 30 p c Harness ... 25 p c 30 p c Minor articles used in making, unplated free ... free ... Mountings free ... fret ... Composition or dressing... 25 p c 25 PC Furniture, plated, in sets free ... free ... 15 p c 35 PC Casks ' 10s c't 2 d lb Soap "(see soap) 8s cwt 8s c w t Harvest binding twine free ... 15 p c Harrows (Acme) ... 25 p c free ... Hasps and staples 25 p c ( n o t e ) H a t and coat hooks, iron and brass 25 p c Stands * Hats and caps of every description "(see caps) 0 2 5 p c free ... free ... Hatchets Hatters' materials *(felt hoods; plusb)t(pullover felt hoods, silk plush, fur, and Mungo, free) •free . t 2 p c 15s ton free ... H a y and chaff free .. free ... H a y knives 25 p c 15 p c H a y rakes free .. 15 p c Horse 25 p c I2S CWt Headstalls'(leather, 30 p c) 25 p c * 5 p c Hearthrugs 25 p c free ... Hedozone ... free .. free ... H e m p '(unmanufactured free) free .. I2S CWt H e m p , packing Herrings, dried ' ( R e d , i d . Ib.) t(Red, 2 d . Ib.) ' i d lb 5s CWt free .. free .. Hides and skins, raw .. Hinges "(hook and eye, 10s cwt) t(hook and eye, strapand T , 30 p c) J(hook and T , 25 p c) '15 p c •free ... H i p splints free ... free ... Hoes, garden free ... free ... Hogskin free ... free ... Holdfasts "(bench, free) 25 p c * 3 ° P C Holystones 15 P C free ... Hollowware "(cast iron, free) 25 p c " 3 0 p c 2d lb Honey 3d lb Hooks and eyes (boat hooks "30 p c, t i s p c)... free ... " f r e e Butchers' 25 p c free ... Reaping free ... free ... Shark 25 P C 30 p c 8 d lb Hops 8d Ib 25 p c H o p supplement 25 p c 30 p c Horseshoes 25 p c 30 p c Horsepowers, and parts thereof... 25 p c 25 p c Horse and cattle spice "(and tonic) Hose—Indiarubber "(and all kinds, n.o.e.), •Coupling, 30 p c) J(Couplings, 20 p c) ... free ... tfree .. Canvas free ... free .. Hosiery, n.o.e. "(knitted, 20 p c ) 25 p c £free .. Housing, saddlers' 25 p c 30 p c free ... 15 p c Huskers and shellers 5

Ice-cream machines "(and coolers) Ice-cooling machines, all kinds Ice-making machines, iron or wood Imitation cane "(Cane furniture, 20 p c)

Ink

25 p c 25 P C free free

25 p c 25 pC 25 p c

S.A

W.A.

Tas.

N.Z.

20 p c *2d Ib >5 P C 20 p c 15 p c free ... 15 p c 15 p c free ... free ... 5pc free ... SPC 7/6 cwt 8s cwt free ... •SPC 15 P C 20 p c 15 p c free ...

15 p c 2d lb 15 p c 15 p c 15 p c 15 p c 15 p c 15 p c free ... 15 p c 15 p c 15 p c 15 p c 15 p c i d Ib free ... 10 p c 15 p c 15 p c 20 p c 5 pc

(note) 10 p c free ... 15 P C 15 P C 25 p c •5 P C 20 p c free ... 10 p c *idlb free ..

•5PC 30s ton free ... free ... free ... 15 p c 10 p c 20 p c 5 pc 5 PC i d lb 1/6 ea

free ... ; 15 p c 5 PC 5 pc 10 p c 15 p c 20 p c 15 p c • i d 11. 15 p c 15 p c free ...

25 p c d lb 25 p c 25 P C "25 p c 7-5 p c 25 p c 25 p c free ... free ... 25 p c free ... 25 P C i d lb 8s cwt 15 p c 25 p c 25 P C 25 p c 4

free ...

pc Ib pc pc pc free ... 20 p c 20 p c free .. free .. 20 p c free .. free .. • 20 2d 20 20 20

Fiji.

i2»

pc

lb 12J p c

2d

i2i

pc

12J p c 12I p c I 2 | PC 12I p c 12I p c 12I p c i2i

pc

12I p c 12J p c i d Ib free ... i 2 i p c free ... free i?4 p c 20 p c 12k p c 20 p c I2i pc 20 p c 6 d ea 25 p c free .. I 2 i p c pc 5 PC 12J p c 124 p c 5 PC I 2 | PC 20 p c I2J pC 20 p c 12I p c 20 p c 15 p c free ... 12! p c free ... 124 p c l O S C W t •10 p c free ... free free ...

I2J

20s ton 20 p c 20 p c

•free ... 15 p c 10 p c 15 p c free ... free ... free ... 15 P C 25 p c 15 p c , free ... 15 p c free . . 15 p c 3 d lb 2d lb free ... t i s p c 25 p c 15 P C free ... free ... 25 p c •5 P C 6 d lb dlb to p c •5 P C 25 p c 15 P C 25 p c 5 PC 10 p c j ' l S P C

15 p c 20 p c 15 P C free ... 5 P C 20 p c 15 p c free ... IS P C I 20 p c 15 p c free .. 15 p c 20 p c 2 d Ib 2d lb 15 p c free ... 15 p c 20 p c 5 P C free ... 15 DC free ... 6 d Ib 3d lb 15 p c 20 p c >5 P C 20 p c IS P C 20 p c 20 p c 40 p c

12! p c free 124 p c 124 p c 5 pc 124 p c id lb !.'.' p C 124 p c free 124 p c 3 d lb 15 p c 124 p c 124 p c >5PC

free ... free ... "10 p c free 15 p c

15 15 is 15

p c free ... p c •free ... pc 20 p c p c 20 p c pc 5 PC

124 p c 12* p •: i2i pc 124 p c free

4

"free ... free ... J5PC free ... free ...

5

1

I2i

pC

25 p c : * i o p c 15 p c 20 p c i 124 p c 25 p C IO p 1. I S P C 2opCI24pC 25 p c 5 P C I 15 P C 2 0 p C , 124 P C free . •15 p c 15 p c Mree ... I 2 i p c I 2*pC

H a n d l e s : V i c t o r i a — F o r furniture, if metal, free. H a t and coat hooks: V i c t o r i a — 3 0 per cent; brass free. Hats and caps: Queensland—Straw hats and bonnets, unlined and untrimmed, 15 per cent. South Australia—Hatters' materials, free; except felt and pullover hoods and any article of felt prepared for hat manufacture. Hosiery : Victoria—Undershirts, undervests (except flannel) and hosiery combinations, 25 per cent ; of cotton or linen and ela-stic silk stockings for surgical purposes and military socks, free. Imitation cane: N e w Zealand—Cane furniture, 25 p c.


Australasian ARTICLE.

Q'land

Instruments, musical, v i z . : — Pianos (note) Harmoniums £3 ea Organs "(cabinet, 60s) £3 e a Other unenumerated 25 p c Instruments—Optical "(Spectacles, free) 25 p c 25 p c Scientific 25 p c Surgical ... 25 p c Indiarubber stamps 25 p c Indiarubber erasers "(and elastic bands) 25 p c Cushions f r e e .. T u b i n g , for druggists 25 p c "Anti-rattlers (for vehicles, free) 25 p c Buffers ... (note) Ink of every description and ink powder f r e e .. Iron—Bar ... a2$ p c Castings for_bedsteads 25 p c Columns Doors... ... ... ' . 25 p c Fencing "(standards free) t(fencing an standards), {(fencing wire) ... "2s cwt Galvanised, manufactured , 2S CWt Galvanised, sheet, plain 2S CWt 2S CWt Galvanised, corrugated *2SCWt Gates and fencing "(gates 25 p c) Girders "(rolled up to 10 x 5, free) *25 p c free ... Girder plates, unmanufactured ... Graniteware "(cast, free) t(except furniture candlesticks, buckets, tubs, and hollowware) ... 25 p c H o o p , black ! free ... Ore I free ... P i g "(ballast, free) ... ... free ... Pipes and tubes, cast and wrought ... (note) Plate j free ... Posts "(cast)... ... ... 3s cwt Posts, galvanised "(cast) 25 p c Pots "(cast, free) t(excepthollowware)... 25 p c Rails, for rail and tramways "(steel) ... "free Rods Safes ... ... ... 25 p c Scrap "(ballast, free) ... free ... Sheet ... ... free ... T u b i n g "(wrought, under 6 i n . diameter) free . T a n k s "(gal. iron, 25 p c) ... *8s ea Wire free ... Irons—Hatters' free ... Italian | free ... Smoothing ... ... ... ... ... 15 p c Tailors* free ... Isinglass, such as Nelson's patent "(uncut free) 15 p c Italian gasket "(if unmanufactured) ... ... 25 p c Ivory free ... Black "(unmixed) .. ... -js cwt Jacks, lifting Jams and jellies Janus water "(per dozen pints) Japan black Japanned ware Jet cocks, for engines ... ... Jewellery , Jewel cloth

Tariffs.

...

... 25 p c 2d Ib ... 25 p c , , J 25 p c j 25 p c . free ... ; 25 p c 15 p c

S.A.

145 W.A.

Tas.

(note) 15 p c £3 ea 15 p c "25 p c (note) free ... 10 p c free ... free .. free ... free ... free ... free .. free ... free .. free ... free .. 30 p c j 25 p c free ... free ... free ... free .. free ...| free ... (note) ! free ... free ... free .. 30 p c I 25 p c 30 p c ' 40s ton 30 p c 25 p c

(note) £•$ ea £3 ea (note) 10 p c 10 p c 10 p c 20 p c •15 p c 10 p c

30 p c t 2 5 p c 30 p c ! 35 p c free ...j free ... free ... 30s ton 30 p c 25 p c 60s ton 40s ton free ... free

*5PC 20s ton free 20s ton

1

15 p c

«3pc cts p c 15 p c 15 PC 15 PC 15 PC 15 p c 15 p c 15 p c 15 P C 15 PC 15 p c 15 PC free .. 15 p c iS PC 5PC

*5 PC 15 p c 15 PC *5 PC free .. 15 PC 15 PC 20 p c

5 PC 15 p c free ..

t i o p c 15 P C free ... free .. free 15 PC free .. free .. (note) 5 pc free .. free .. 15 PC " 3 0 p c 25 p c 5 pc t 2 5 p c 15 p c free ... free ... free .. 25 p c free ... free ... "free.. (note) free ... free ... free ... free ... free ... 10 p c io p c free ... "as cwt

25 p c 3d lb 10 p c 2s gal 30 p c 30 p c #20 p c free ...

25 3d 20 6d 25 25 25 15

*5 p c free .. free 5 PC 10 p c 15 P C 15 p c 15 15 15 15 5 20 20

PC PC pc PC PC pc pc

pc 5 PC Ib 15 p c p c 15 PC gal 10 p c p c 1 20 p c p c free ... p c 20 p c P C ! 15 p c

Fiji.

12* £3 £3 12* I2i 12* 12* 12* 12* 12$ 12* 12* 12* 12*

20 p c 1 f/20 p c *f20 p C 20 p C •free ... free ... free ... 20 p c 20 p c free ... free ... free ... free ... (note) free ... 20 p c 20 p c 20 p c

fr-:«j free free free free free 15 p c 15 P C 15 P C *5PC

20 p c free ... free ... free .. 5 PC free ... 20 p c 20 p c 20 p c free ...

15 P C 20 p c free .. free .. free .. free ... 15 P C 5 PC 15 p c (note) (note) free ... *5 P C 20 p c *5Pc 20 p c 15 P C 20 p c 15 P C free ... 15 pc- 20 p c iS p c 20 p c free ... free ... free ... free ... 15 P C 2d lb 15 P C i d Ib 15 P C free ... 20 p c 15 p c

I

pC ea ea pC pc pc pC pc pc pC pC PC pC pC

30s t o n

12* p c 12* p c 12* p C

15 p c a J free.. 15 p c 25 p c free .. 1/6 c w t 15 p c 2S CWt 15 p c 20 p C 15 p c free ... 15 p c free ...

30 p c ree ... free free ... (note) free

33 p c free ... free .. free .. 30 p c £3 ton free free ... free ... free ... *20 p c 'free ... free ... free ...

N.Z.

12* p C 12* p C 2S CWt 2S CWt 12* p C 12* p c 12* p C

12* p c IS cwt free ... *i2*pc 12* p C 30s ton 12* p c 12* p c 12* p C free ... 30s ton 12* p c "I2* PC 30s ton 12* p c (note) 20s ton 12* p c 12* p c 12* p c 12* p C 2d lb 12* p C 12* p C I2i pc

20 p C 12* p c 2d lb i d Ib 20 p c I o d 1/6 gall 2s gal 25 p c j 12* p c 20 p c 12* p c 20 p c 20 p c 20 p c . 12* p c #

Instruments, musical: Queensland—Pianos, upright, £6 each, horizontal, square, grand, or semigrand, £t-2 each. Victoria—£$ e a c h ; pianos, square, grand or semi-grand, /J15 each, South Australia—Organs, pipe, 25 per c e n t ; other, 15 per cent. Western A u s t r a l i a — N . o . e . , 15 per cent; for churches and defence force bands, free. N e w Zealand—Instruments specially imported for volunteer bands, free. I n k : Queensland—25 per cent; printing, free. Victoria—10 per cent; printing, coloured, 6 d per lb ; burnishing ink, 25 per cent. N e w Z e a l a n d — W r i t i n g , 20 per cent; other, free. Iron castings : Queensland—For building purposes, and malleable iron castings, 3s cwt. Iron fencing : N e w Z e a l a n d — F e n c i n g standards, 20 p c. Iron pipes : Queensland—25 per cent; cast, free ; metal tubing, free. V i c t o r i a — F r e e , and £2 per ton for pipes and tubes brass cased, brazed, & c , and pipes (castings) and connections; metal fittings for pipes and tubes, 30 per cent. South Australia—40s ton ; wrought, under 6 in, free. Iron tanks : South Australia—Corrugated galvanised, 25 per cent.; other, free. N e w Z e a l a n d — O f and under 200 gals, 5s each ; others, 10s each. F i j i — 5 s each; galvanised, 10s each. Iron wire : T a s m a n i a — F e n c i n g , 5 per c e n t ; binding, free ; other, 15 per cent. Jeweller>-: V i c t o r i a — G o l d rings, finished or unfinished, unset, 4s d w t ; precious stones, unset, free.


Australasian

146

Q'land.

ARTICLE.

Jewsharps Jute

Tariffs.

..

S.A.

W.A.

25 p c free ... ' 5 P C 15 p c free ... free .. free ... 5 P C

25 p c Kamptulicon 6 d gal Kerosene "(in bulk) Kettles "(hollowware, iron free) (iron, three, {20 p c) S(tin, iron free) ... 25 p c free ... Kidskins 25 p c Kidney links and rings Kitchen ranges 25 p c Knife Boards 25 P C Cleaners 25 p c Powder 25 p c Sharpeners ... 25 p c free ... Knives, hay "(and saddlers') "25 p c Sheath and belt "(sheath, free)... 25 p c Knolis, wooden China or glass "(china, glass 25 p c) t(door) 15 p c Knockers 25 PC Lace "(silk, free) Lace goods "(silk 25 p c) t(in the piece 15 p c) Laces—Boot Stay Lamps (gasaliersand chandeliers, "25 pc, t i s pc] }(ntid lampware) Lampblack ... L a m p chimneys and shades, glass L a r d ("dripping, 15 p c ) Lasts "(iron) ... Laths Lathe bands "(if leather) t(leather, other to pc) J(other kinds, free) ... I.e;id—Ore Pig Pipe Red "(in oil) Scrap Sheet White *(in oil) Leather—Patent and enamelled, kid, hogskin, levant, morocco, roan.s, satins, skivers, anc imitations Leather blinkers Buttons D o g collars Split Toecaps Unenumerated Leather and carpet bags and portmanteaux •(see Carpet bags) Lemonade "(pints) Letter balances Limejuice *(in bulk, io p c) t(in bottle, i o p c' {(sweetened) (unsweetened, free) ... Limejuice cordials, not spirituous "(spirituous i6sgal) Linen piece goods "(duck, 5 p c) Handkerchiefs L i n k tie-castings Linseed ... Meal O i l "(in bulk) Linseys, in the piece

Vic.

15 t25 25 25

Fiji.

15 p c 20 p c •25 PC free ... free ... 12S p c 20 p c 6d gal

10 p c 15 p c free .. 6d gal

"30 p c free ... 30 p c 30 p c 25 P C 25 p c 20 p c 30 p c free ... 10 p c 25 p c "-5PC free ...

15 p c 5 PC •5 P C 10 p c 15 p c 15 p c 15 p c 15 p c •free 15 p c 15 p c 15 P C 15 p c

15 15 15 '5 •5 15 15 •5 5 >5 15 15 15

p c 820 p c P C i d II. p c 20 p c P C 20 p c P C 20 p c p c 20 p c p c 20 p C p c 20 p c P C 20 p c P C 20 p C p c 20 p c p c 20 p c p c 20 p c

123 I2i

15PC 15 P C 10 p c 15 P C

20 20 15 15

pc pc pc pc

124 12) 12S 12,

$25 P C free ... free ... 25 p c 25 p c 25 p c free ... free ... free ... 10 p c 25 p c tfree ... 25 p c

25 p c 30 p c "15 3s cwt free ... 2S 15 p c (note) 15 i l d lb free ... 10 25 p c "free ... 25 25 p c 5s 1000 IS

pc PC pc pC

15 p c 15 p c free ... free ... 10 p c free ... free ... 10 p c

15 p c free ... 10 p c 2/6 cwt i d lb 10 p c 2/6 cwt i d lb

• ; d lb free ... free ... 3/6 cwt (note) free ... 1/6 cwt (note)

12^ p c free 5s cwt 5s cwt 124 p c 5s cwt 5-s cwt 124 p c

(note) 15 p c 5 PC 20 p c •5 P C 5 PC 5 PC

free ... 15 p c 15 p c 15 p c 15 p c 15 p c 15 p c

(note) 20 p c free ... 20 p c 3d lb free ... (note)

121 p c I2i p C • 2i pc 124 p c 12A p c 12$ p C • 2 i PC

15 p c 15 p c 15 p c

25 p c I 2 i p C 20 p c "od doz 12A p c 20 p c

(note) 25 p c free .. 25 p c d Ib 25 p c d lb

(note) 30 p c free ... 3°PC

4

30 p c (note)

(note) 25 p c free ... 25 p c 15 p c 25 p c 15 P C

25 p c 25 p c 15 p c

25 p c 15 p c * 10 p c 20 p c 20 p c free ... free ... 5 P C

25 p c

" 2 0 p c tfree ... 20 p c

25 p c 5 pc 25 p c 25 p c free ... 25 p c is gal 15 p c

20 p c free ... free ... 30 p c free ... free ... 6 d gal free ...

5

20 p c 1 2 ; p c free ... I 2 i p C 20 p c 124 p C 20 p c 2/6 CWt free ... 124 P C

125 p c free ... free ... 2/6 cwt 2S cwt free ... 2/6CW1 2S

pc PC 12S p c I 2 PC 12i pC 12* P C 121 PC 12$ p C I2i p C 124 pC 12I p c I2i pC I2i pC

15 p c free ... 15 p c 2d Ib free ... free ..

*35 P C free ... free ... 2/6 cwt * o s t'n free ... 2/6 cwt *2S cwt 4

25 p c 25 p c 224 p c 20 p c

I 2 i PC (note)

p c t . i o PCCWt 'S P C p c IO p C p c • 2 d Ib p c free .. IOOO 20 p c

25 p c free ... free ... 2S CWt 3s CWt 2S CWt 2S CWt s CWt

4

N.Z.

15 p c 15 p c "free ... 3d gal

p c "free ... 1 5 P C * P C "free... p c (note) (note) p c free ... free ..

3

Tas.

CWt

is gal free ... 15 p c 25 p c free ... 10 p c 6d gal 15 P C

20 p C *io p c 15 p c 15 p c 6 d bhl 15 p c free ... 10 p c

2S ICOO 2S IOOO 4

15 P C {25 p c

2s gal

15 p c * 2 P C 12I p c 20 p c 15 p c 25 p c 15 p c 20 p c id lb 20s ton i d lb 20 p c 1/3 galj 6 d gal I 2 i p C 20 p c

2-s gal 124 p c 124 p c 124 p c 15 p c 15 p c od gal 124 p c

5

Kerosene : F i j i — O f ioo or over, close flash test, od per gallon ; under ioo , is 3 d . Laces, boot : Victoria—Free, leather i s lb. South Australia—Leather 25 p c, other free. L a m p chimneys and globes : V i c t o r i a — C u t , engraved, or ground, & c , 2s 6 d cubic ft; plain, is cubic ft; shades, 25 per cent. Lead, red and white : New Z e a l a n d — M i x e d , 5s c w t ; ground in oil or turps, 2s 6 d c w t ; dry, free. Leather: Queensland—Patent, enamelled, kid, hogskin, levant, morocco, glace, chrome, Russia, chamois, bookbinders and imitations thereof, free; others, d lb. Victoria—Rough-tanned calf, goat, hogskin, sheep or kangaroo when not exceeding 7 lb each skin, E n g l i s h bend, kid, calf kid and mock kid, and patent calf, free; machine belting, morocco (except black), Persian sheep, roan and skivers, 35 per cent; black morocco and goat levant, 2 0 per cent; n.o.e., 6 d lb. South A u s t r a l i a — F r e e ; except roans and skivers, 10 per c e n t ; and satins, 15 per cent. Western A u s t r a l i a — K i p , whole and split, bridle, stirrup, bag and basil, rim, skirt, and sear, blinkers, sole, harness, manufactured goods n.o.e., 15 p e r c e n t ; calf, coloured, fancy composition, k i d , patent, and all kinds n.o.e. 5 per cent. New Zealand—Patent and enamelled, free ; sole, 2 d Ib ; belting and belt, harness, legging and bag leather, d Ib; buff, split, satin hides, tweeds, cordovan, levanted leather, roans, sheepskins, morocco, n.o.e., basils, 3 d l b ; East India kip, Persians, lambskins and goatskins (dressed other than morocco), kangaroo and wallaby skins (dressed), tan and coloured calf, 2 d l b . Leather, n.o.e., i d lb. c

D

4

4


Australasian

ARTICLE.

Q'land.

Tariffs.

'47

S.A.

Vic.

W A.

Tas.

Lint ... Liquid stain, for leather "(aniline) Lithofracteur Lithographic stones or blocks Liver pads Locks and latches Japanned ... ...

5 P C free ... free ... 10 p c free ... free ... *free ... 5 p c

15 p c 15 p c

free ... free ... 15 p c 15 p c

free free free free

Macaroni Machinery, unenumerated "(and free) Machines, washing—Wooden Galvanised Wringing, of every description "(galvanised 10 p c) Magic inkstands - Lanterns ... ... Magnets .. ... ... Maizenu ... * Malleable iron castings for bedsteads Mallets Malt "(extract of malt 15 p c) Mangles Mantelpieces "(marble, 25 p c ) t(wood 25 pc) ... Mantles '(if wool, mantelcloth 15 p c) ... Manures Maps Marble, unwrought "(cubic) Wrought, except slabs for sewing machines t(all kinds) Marline Matches and vestas "(safety, free) Matchboard for pictures "(see sawn timber t(iooft sup) Matting and mats "(matting 15 p c) M a u l rings ... Measures, metal ... Measuring tapes "(Surveyors', free) M e a t — F r e s h J(ioolb)(mincemeat,*iopc, t ' 5 pc] Preserved "(n.o.e.) In pickle or brine (pork " 3 d , fad) Covers, wire ... Hooks ... ... Stands "(safes, wire, 15 p c, wood 20 p c' Metal picture cord Metal service, white, not plated... T u b i n g "(except zinc or lead) t(except lead) {(except iron) §(lead or compo.] Metallic horse brushes ... Lustre ... ... Meters—Gas Water Methylated spirit "(foreign 5s, colonial 2s) ... M i l k , preserved Millinery Mills—cotTee, malt, &c. ... M i l l bands "(leather) +(leather, other, 10 pc] {(other kinds, free) M i l l silk

2d Ib "25 p c free ... free ..

X.Z.

Fiji.

free ... 12^ p c free ... i 2 j p c 6d lb free ... 124 p c 15 p c 20 p c 12S p c 20 p c 20 p c I 2 i p C

free ... 10 p c free ... free ...

free ... 15 p c 15 PC 15 P C

ic 20 15 15

pc pc PC pc

2 d lb (225 p c 25 p c 25 p c

id 20 25 25

lb p c PC pc

free ... free ... 15 P C 15 p c

2d 10 15 •5

free ... lb p c *2o p c p c 20 p c p c 20 p c

i d Ib free izi pC 12J p c

free ... 25 p c free ... 25 p c 2d lb 3s cwt 25 p c 4/6 bhl .free ... 25 p c 25 p c free ... free ... free ...

25 p c 20 p c free ... free ... 2d lb 30 p c free ... 4/6 bhl 25 p c t*35PC "35 P C free ... free ... (note)

25 P C 25 p c 15 P free ... free ... 25 p c free . . 4/6 bhl 25 p c 25 P C 25 p c free ... free ... IS ft*

15 p c 5 PC 15 P C 15 p c free ... 15 PC free ... • s bhl 15 p c 20 p c 15 p c free ... free ... 5 pc

•5PC 15 p c 15 p c I S PC i d lb 10 p c 15 p c IS bhl 15 p c 15 p c 15 p c free ... free ... 10 p c

2C p C 20 p c free ... 20 p c i d lb 20 p c free ... 2s bhl 20 p c *2o p c 25 p c free ... free ... free ...

"12! p c \i\ p c 124 P C I 2 i DC id lb 12S p c 124 p c 6d Mil ii\ pc tal p c 124 p c free free 5 PC

... ... ... ...

c

3

25 p c

(note)

20 p c

20 p c

free ... I25 p c

"25 p c

(note)

(note)

15 p c

20 p c

(note)

*tj» •25 p c 25 p c 25 p c free ... 25 p c

t s ... (note) 30 P C 30 p c free ... (note) 2d lb 5s cwt 30 p c 30 p c 30 p c free ... 25 p c

10 p c (note) 25 P C 25 p c free ... r s... 2d lb *2d lb 25 P C 25 p c 25 P C 25 p c 15PC

20 p c 10 p c 15 p c 15 p c 15 PC h i d Ib »M ii) i | d lb 15 p c 15 p c •15 p c 15 p c 15 p c

15 p c 12! p c 15 p c •5 PC • 5 PC i d Ib 10 p c i d Ib 15 p c 15 p c 15 p c 15 p c 15PC

t2S

<1 11)

4

id 25 25 25 25 25 4

lb pc pc PC pc PC

4

free 2/6 cwt 25 p c 30 p c 25 p c 25 p c 25 P C 25 p c 25 P C is gal 2d Ib 2d lb 25 p c 35 P C 25 p c 25 P C

12S p c 1/6 cwt (note)

... pC p C 20 p C *20 p C 2a p C 20 p C 20 p c 20 p C 20 p C 23 P C 20 p C 20 p C

124 p c 12I p c 12J p c 124 p c 124 p c id Ib id lb i d Ib i?i pc I2J p C 124 p c 12I p c 124 p c

ttfree ' 15 p c 15 p c 8 3 / 6 c w t 25 P C 10 p c 15 p c 25 p c 15 p c 23 p C 15 P C 15 p c 20 p c 10 p c 15 p c 10 p c 20 p c 10 p c 15 p c 20 p C 4s gal 2S gal (note) is gal idlb 15 p c 15 p c 25 p c 25 p c 1 15 p c 20 p c 25 p c 20 p c 15 p c 20 p c 15 P C

5s cwt 124 p c 124 p c I2i P C ISj p c 2s gal i d Ib I2J PC I2i p C

5

r

23

2n

1

25 p c *35 P C T25 P C i free .. free .. free .. 1 free .. free ..

15 p c IO p C

ib 124 p c free ... 12* P C

*: d 4

Machinery: South A u s t r a l i a — F o r carving, weaving, and spinning fibrous material; machinery used in the manufacture of paper, and for felting; roller machinery, and machinery connected therewith, not enumerated for flour m i l l i n g ; printing machines ; lathes, over 3* tons weight; drilling machines, over 2 i tons; planing machines, over 6 tons ; punching machines, over 7 tons ; shearing machines, over 7 tons ; plate-bending machines, over 5 tons ; slotting machines, over 4 tons ; shaping machines, over 2k tons ; bookbinding and ruling machines ; except engines and shafting, free. Marble : V i c t o r i a — M o n u m e n t a l , wrought, 7s 6 d ft; n.o.e., 35 p.c. ; lithographic, milling, grinding, free. Matches and vestas: V i c t o r i a — W o o d matches in boxes of 100 or under, p^r gross of boxes 6d ; over 100 and not exceeding 200 matches, i s per gross boxes ; for each additional 100, 6 d gross boxes ; • wax vestas in metal boxes of 100 vestas each or under, i s 3d gross boxes ; over 100 and not exceeding 200, 2s 6 d gross boxes ; for each additional 100, i s 3d ; paper, small round tin or other boxes, jOO vestas or under, is ; not exceeding 200, 2 s ; each additional 100, i s ; wood safety, free. South Australia—Safety, 10 per cent; except safety, boxes 100 each or under, i s gross; every additional 100, i s gross boxes. N e w Z e a l a n d — W o o d matches, in boxes of not more than 6o matches, i s per gross boxes ; in boxes containing over 6 0 and less than 100.matches, 2s gross boxes; wax plaid vestas, in cardlxjard boxes containing under 100 matches, i s 2d gross boxes ; pocket vestas, in tin or other boxes containing under 100 matches, i s oxl gross lx>xes; sportsman's oval and N o . 4 tin vestas, in boxes of not more than 200, 5s gross boxes; other kinds, for every 100 matches or fraction in one box, 2s 6 d gross boxes. F i j i — W o o d e n , in boxes under 100 6 d . gross boxes ; wax or other over 100, i s en, ros boxes; for every additional 100 or part thereof, i s gross boxes. Mattings and mats: V i c t o r i a — M a t t i n g , n.o.e., 15 per c e n t ; coir and jute, 25 per cent; floorings, n.o.e., 30 per cent,; floor mats and floor rugs made of carpeting and druggtting, oil and other floor cloth, 15 per cent. South A u s t r a l i a — M a t t i n g , coir and jute, 15 per cent; mats, 25 per cent. Meat, fresh : Victoria—Beef, mutton, veal and lamb, 7s per cental; pork, 10s per c e n t a l ; potted and extract, 20 per cent. Methylated spirit: Tasmania—Containing not less than 10 per cent of methyl alcohol, 3s.


Australasian

148 ARTICLE.

Taiijts.

Q'land.

Vic.

Millstones »(per inch diameter) ... free ... free ... Mineral waters, if not prepared with drugs or spirits "(per dozen pints) 25 p c 10 p c Molasses (note) <x6scwt Moleskin clothing "(in the piece, free) 25 p c 35 p c clothing (imitation) 25 p c 35 p c Mops 25 p c free ... Mortice furniture, all kinds 15 p c free ... Mould l>ourds, for ploughs free ... 15 P C Mouldings—(Jilt "(picture of alt kinds) 15 p c (note) Plain "(see timber)... 25 p c (note) Mowing machines free ... 15 P C Muntz metal free ... free ... Music free ... free ... Music paper "(ruled or printed) ... 25 p c *35 P C Muslin—plain, fancy or printed 5 p c free ... Mustard 3 d lb 2d Ih

S.A.

W.A.

Tas.

Fiji.

N.Z.

free ... free ... free ... free ... • i d 20 p c 3-s cwt "15 p c 15 p c free ... free ... 15 p c free ...

*

15 P C free ... free ... 23 p c free ... 3 d lb

20 p c free .. 15 p c to p c 15 p c 15 p c free .. *io pc 10 p c free ... free ... 5pc 15 p c IO p C 15 p c

15 p c 3/6 cwt 12I p c 12S p c 15 p c 15 p c free ... 20 p c 20 p c 5 PC free ... 10 p c 15 P C 12! p c 2d Ih

20 p c i d lb "25 p c free ... free ... 20 p c free ... 15 p c 15 p c free .. free ... free ... •25 p c 20 p c 2d lb

*od 3s cwt 12i p C 12i pC 12S p c I2j p C free I2i pc •2i pc I2i p C free free ... I2i pc I2j P C i d lb

Nails "(exceeding i in. in length) 3s cwt 3s cwt Nails, galvanised "(nails under i in.) Naphtha "(bulk) f(wood naptha, 25 p c) tod gal Needles—Packing free ... Sail free ... Sewing free ... Upholsterers' ... free ... Nets, fishing ... 25 p c Netting wire, galvanised "(iron) free ... Neurotone 25 p c Nevada silverware, n.o.e. 25 p c Nickel silver, n.o.e. "(services) ... 25 p c Nutmegs (ground, "ad lb, t+d lb) 3d lb Nuts—Except cocoanuts "(candlenuts, free) ... 3d lb Almonds "(shelled, 3d lb) 3 d lb Cocoanuts free .. Walnuts, except green 3d lb

(note) 7/6cwt free ... free ... free ... free ... free ... free ... free ... 25 PC 25 p c 25 p c "free ... " 2 d lb 2 d Ib free ... 2 d Ib

free ... free ... "free ... 15 p c 15 p c •5 P C 15 p c »5 P C free ... 15 p c 20 p c 15 p c 2d lb 2 d lb 15 p c 15 P C 2 d lb

free ... 2/6 cwt 6d gal 15 p c 15 p c 15 P C 15 p c 20 p c free ... 15 p c 20 p c 20 p c d lb 2d lb * 2 d lb 15 p c 2d lb

*/ .S

odgal free ... free ... free ... free ... free ... •free ... 20 p c '5PC •15 p c 2 d Ib 3 d lb 3 d lb free ... 3d Ib

CWt 2S CWt 6 d gal free ... free ... free ... free ... 20 p c free ... 40 p c 20 p c *20 p C t2dlb 2 d lb " 2 d Ib free ... 2d Ib

"3s cwt 12; p C 6d gal I2i pC I2i pC • 2 i PC 12I p c free 12! p c 15 p c I2i p C I 2 i PC d lb i d Ib i d lb free i d lb

Oakum Oars "(ash, free) t(spoon blade, 20 p c ) Oatmeal *(ioo lbs) t(ncluding rolled oats) Oenan, thylate of ethyl ... ... Oil—Castor, in bulk "(refined 15 p c) Chinese, in bulk ... ... Cocoanut "(in bulk) C o d "(in bulk) Colza (in bulk Kerosene, in bulk Linseed "(bulk) Medicinal "(cod liver, bottle, 2s doz rep. pts) t(and 10 p c) {(cod liver, free; JKpatent, 40 p c ) Olive, in bulk ... ... Palm, "(in bulk) Perfumed ... ... ... Rape "(in bulk) O i l of Rhodium "(essential oil) Salad Seal "(in bulk) Sewing machine "(in bulk) f(bottles, „ 15 P c) Sperm ... Unenumerated "(mineral and fish oils) t(in bulk) t(in bottle, 15 p c) Whale O i l Oilman's stores, not otherwise specified ...

free ... free ... 4s cwt 25 p c free ... i s gal is gal free ... i s gal 6 d gal is gal

free ... "25 p c os cntl free ... 6d gal 6 d gal "free ... "free ... 6 d gal free ... »6d gal

free ... free ... 25 p c 10 p c 2S CWt free ... IO p C 15 p c 6 d gal "free ... 6 d g a l free ... free ... free ... *free ... free ... 6 d gal free ... 3 d gal free ... 6 d gal free ...

free .. 15 p c i d lb 15 p c i/.l gal 1/3 gal 1/3 gab free ... 1/3 gal 6d gal 1/3 gal

free ... tfree ... *IS ... 20 p c 6 d gal 6 d gal 6 d gal free ... 6d gal 6d gal 6d gal

4s cwt free " i d Ib 15 P C od gal od gal 9 d gal i2i pc od gal (note) od gal

•25 p c i s gal is gal 25 p c i s gal free ... (note) free ...

(note) 6 d gal "free ... (note) " 6 d gal "free ... (note) "free ...

T20 p c 2s gal free ... 25 p c 6dgal free ... (note) free ...

20 p c ;Si5 pe1/3 gal ed gal free ... free ... 20 p c 25 p c 1/3 gall 6 d gal 20 p c ! free ... 1/3 gal 15 p c 1/3 gal free ..

i2i pc od gal c>d gal I2i pc 9d gal 121 p c 9 d gal od gal

2S CWt 2S CWt

15 p c free ... free ... 20 p c free ... »5 P C 15 p c free ...

4

3

3

6 d gal * 6 d gal 6 d gal tfree 1/3 g a l i t t s P C 6 d gal free ... free ... free ... free ... 1/3 gal| free .. gd gal »6d gal 6 d gal M d g a l cfree free ...

1/3 gal t 6 d gal is gal

12$ p C

Molasses: Queensland— 10s per cwt, 1 gal or under ; in any other packages, 7s 6 d per cwt. V i c t o r i a — Refined, 6s cwt; unrefined, in bond, 5s c w t ; unrefined, 2s cwt Mouldings: V i c t o r i a — A l l sorts, except picture frame, wholly or partly prepared, under 3m in width, 4s per 100 ft lineal; 3 in and over, 7s per 100 ft l i n e a l ; picture frame mouldings, not mitred, 15 per cent; mitred, 35 percent. N a i l s : Victoria—Horseshoe, 14s per c w t ; others, i f iron, 7s 6 d per cwt; for grindery and trunks, copper&zinc nails,clout nails under 1 in, free ;picture, free. N e w Zealand—Iron, 2s. cwt., copper, composition, and bellow nails, free. Barbary, Sicily, and French, used in confectioners* manufactures, free. O i l , kerosene : Fiji—100° test or over, 9 d g a l ; other, i s 3 d gal. Oils, in bottles, jars, &c. : V i c t o r i a — A l l kinds quarts and over pint, 4s doz ; pints and over half pint, 2s d o z ; half pints and over quarter pint, i s d o z ; smaller sizes, 6 d d o z ; over a quart and not exceeding a gal, 12s doz. O i l , in bulk : V i c t o r i a — F i s h of all sorts, cocoanut, mineral, refined, kerosene, palm, lubricating and resin, free. \V. A u s t . — F i s h , vegetable or turpentine, other than in bottle, free ; i f refined and in bottles, 15 per cent. O i l , Salad : Queensland—4s doz quarts ; 2s doz pints ; smaller sizes same proportion. Victoria—See note, Oils, in bottles." South Australia—in bulk, 2s g a l ; 4s doz quarts ; 2s doz pints ; i s 6 d doz smaller; whale, black shale, and cloth oil, free.


Australasian ARTICLE.

Tariffs.

Q'land.

Oil baize free ... Oilcake 25 p c Oilcloth 15 p c Oleographs, photographs on frames, all paper "(unframed) t(photographs free) ... (note) Olives (note) Opera glasses, except opera, field and marine combined ... ... ... 25 p c Opium 20s lb Ore bags, being new "(less than 3 bushels) 15 p c Ores, unsmelted ... ... free ... Organs and harmoniums, each ... Paints, mixed or dry 3s cwt Paint boxes, toy 25 p c Pain paint ... MS gal Painters' brush baskets ... 25 p c Paintings *(unframed) ... free ... Palings "(sawn, 3s per icoft super ; split, 25 per cent) * Pallet knives ... ... free ... Paper—Bags "(printed, 12s 6 d , plain 8s) t(printed, plain 10s cwt) J(coarse 7/6 cwt) *8s cwt Blotting 5 pc Brief "(cut, 2d Ib) t(ruled) 2d Ib Faint-hned "(cut, 2 d lb) 2d lb Filtering 5 pc Felt 5 PC Hangings 15 P C Marble and red glazed 5 PC Music ... ... free ... Plain demy "(folded, 35 p c) free ... Printing free ... Ruled or printed "(printed, ruled 2d lb)... "25 p c Tissue "(cut to size, 15 p c ) 5 pc Wrapping, brown and whitey-brown ... 5 PC W r i t i n g "(cut) t(plain) J(ruled, 25 p c ) ... *2d lb Fasteners ... ... 25 p c Papier-mache ware "(furniture 30 per cent) t(and ro per cent) ... 25 p c Papierterie "(ruled, 25 p c) 75 p c Parafin wax ... l i d lb Parasols "(see umbrellas) ... 25 p c Parchment "(uncut, free ; cut. 35 p c) 25 p c Passover cakes ... ... 2d Ib Patent doorsprings n|5 P Barley or groats "(barley, 3s per cental) t(groats, free) 2d lb Medicines "(see chemicals) 25 p c Roller composition "(printers', free) ... 25 p c W o o d filling 25 p c Pea flour "(per cental) t(meal) 25 p c Pearl barley "(per ioolbs) f(and Scotch) i d lb Pearl ash free ... Peel cutters "(if not machinery) 25 p c Pegs, clothes 25 p c Pegwood, for boots ... free ... Pen brushes "(fancy, 10 p c) 25 p c Pencils—Carpenters' ... »5 P C Except carpenters' 25 p c Slate free ... Pencil cases "(jewellery, 20 p c ; fancy, 10 p c) 25 p c Pease, dried, per bushel ...

c

Vic.

S.A.

149 W.A.

Tas.

N.Z.

free .. free ... 10 p c 15 p c 20 p c free ... free ... 1 os ton free ... 20 p c 15 p c 15 P C 10 p c 15 p c 20 p c

Fiji.

12* p c 5 PC 12* p c

"free ... (note) t 2 0 p c (note) (note) 15 p c

15 p c 20 p c <*i5 p c 20 p c

12A p c 12* p c

free ... 20s lb *6d doz free ..

IO p C 30s lb free ... 15 p c

15 p c 20s lb free ... free ...

20 p c 40s lb free ... free ..

12* p c 16s lb free free

10 20 15 15 20

id i5 20 15 io

(note) 20 p c 40 p c 20 p c 20 p c

(note) 12$ p c 15 p c I 2 | pC 12] p C

free ... 20s lb free ... free ...

(note) (note) 10 p c free ... 25 p c 20 p c 45 P C 25 p c "free... "free ...

p c p c pc pc p c

—Ib

pc p c pc p c

9d 100 6d 100 20 p c 15 p c free ... free ... free ... 15 p c I OS cwt 6s cwt *6s cwt *6s cwt 6s cwt 6s cwt free .. 6s cwt 35 p c "free ... (note) 35 P C 6s cwt 6s cwt ei2d lb free ...

^3

2S IOO 2S IOO free ... 12*. p C cwt I2j p C 12* p C I2j PC 12J p c I2j p C 12J p c 12i pC 12S p C 3S CWt 3s cwt 121 p C 12I p c 3s CWt 12$ p C I2J pC

tiss c't free ... t25 PC 25 p c IO p c free ... 10 p c free ... 25 p c free ... free ... 25 p c 3/4 CWt 3/4 CWt tfree ... free ...

15 P C '5 p c free ... »5 p c 15 p c 15 p c 15 P C free ... *5PC free ... (note) 15 p c "free ... free ... 15 p c 15 p c

»5 P C 15 p c 15 P C 15 P C 15 p c 15 P C 15 p c 15 p c 15 P C ci5 p c 5 pc 15 p c »5 p c 12* P C 5 pc 12* p c

1*5 P C 20 p c 20 p c 25 p c 20 p c free ... IS P C free ... 25 p c free ... free ... 25 p c 5s cwt 5s cwt J20 p C 20 p C

3s

*io p c t^ispc 25 p c 35 p c free ... id lb 20 pc * 10 p c * 2d lb 2d lb free ... free ...

20 p c *5PC free ... 15 p c 15 p c 2d lb 15 p c

12* p C 12* p C free ... 12* p c i?-i p c 12$ p c 12* p c

20 p C *20 p C l i d lb 20 p c 20 p c 20 p c 20 p c

I2j pC 12$ p C 5 PC I2a p c 12S p c free 121 p C

free ... 15 p c "15 p c 15 P C tfree ... t i 5 PC 15 PC 15 p c 15 P C free ... 15 PC 15 P C 15 p c free ... 15 P C

i d lb 20 p c 12* p c i d lb i d lb i d lb free ... real p c 12* p c free ... 12* p c 12* p c 12S p c free ... 12* p c

tisewt 40 p c free ... 2/6 cwt is loolb IS cwt free ... 20 p c 20 p c free ... 20 p c free ... 20 p c free ... 20 p c

i d Ib •15 p c 5 PC 12*. p C i d lb i d lb 15 p c 12*. p C 12* p c 12, P C 12*. p C 12, PC I2J p C 12$ P C 12! p c

"20 p c 25 p c free ... 80s ton * s ... 5

*7/6

...

free ... *io p c 25 p c free ... •30 p c free ... free ... free ...

*

free ... #2o p c free ... 2S cwt free ... free ... free ... 25 p c 25 p c free ... 25 p c free ... 25 p c free ... 15 P C

Oleographs and photographs : Queensland—Oleographs, free ; photographs, 25 p c. — U n f r a m e d , free ; photographs, 10 per cent.

6d

South Australia

O l i v e s ; Queensland—3s doz quarts; i s 6 d doz pints; smaller, same proportion. Victoria—6s doz quarts ; 3s doz pints ; is 6 d doz smaller ; over 1 quart and under 1 gal, 18s ; stuffed, 20 per c e n t ; fresh, free ; preserved, not bottled, 3 d lb. South Australia—4s doz quarts; 2s doz pints; is 6 d doz smaller. T asman i a — 3 s doz quarts ; 2s doz pints; is v \ doz smaller. Paints, mixed or dry ; V i c t o r i a — 8 0 s per ton mixed for use ; 40s per ton mixed in oil. South Australia — M i x e d ready for use, 4s c w t ; other, 2s cwt. N e w Z e a l a n d — M i x e d for use, 5s c w t ; ground in oil or turps, 2s 6 d c w t ; dry, free. F i j i — D r y or in oil, 3s c w t ; mixed, 6s cwt. Paper, : V i c t o r i a — U n c u t , 6s per c w t ; cut, 2 d l b ; printing and writing, uncut, in mill wrappers, free. Western A u s t r a l i a — F o r newspapers and posters, free. T a s m a n i a — I f uncut edges, 5 p c . Patent medicines : Victoria, South Australia, and N e w Z e a l a n d — D u t y is not charged on the value o f the revenue stamp. Pulpware : South A u s t r a l i a — S u c h as basins, dippers and jugs, 10 p c.


Australasian

ISO

Tariffs.

Q'land.

AKT1CI.E.

Vic.

Penelope canvas • 25 p c free ... Pens *(and penholders) . 15 p c rtfree... Pepper "(ground) •(whole i d lb) • 3d Ib » d lb Perambulators ... ... ... . 25 p c 35 PC . free ... free ... Percussion caps Perfumery n.o.e. "(perfumed spirits, 30s gal.) 20s gal 20 p c Perry "(same as ale and beer) (note) . free ... free ... Phormium tenax Phosphorus . free ... free ... Photographs, not fancy goods ... . 25 p c free ... Hound as albums ... • 25 p c 20 p c * * Pianos "*(see instruments) Pickets, palings "(see timber) (note) * Pickles . (note) (note) Picks "(miners', free) -,*25 p c 30 p c Picture cards, for schools . free ... free ... Frames and wooden backs for same . . 25 p c 25 p c Nails, fancy heads "(iron) . 25 p c "free ... Pill machines . free ... 2C p c Pimento "(ground) t(whole, ground 4d Ib) *2d Ib 3d ib Pins . free ... free ... Pipes, tobacco "(clay, is per gross) • 25 p c •25 p c Pistols and revolvers • 25 p c free ... Pitch and lar " ( S t o c k h o l m tar, 15 p c ) ... • *25 P C (note) * Plated nails "(see nails) ... • 25 P c Planes and plane irons . free ... free ... Plants and trees "(under quarantine) ... . free ... free ... Plaster of Paris . 2s barl IS cwt Plated bridle fronts . free ... free ... Hames, part plated . free ... free ... Harness furniture, in sets . free ... free ... Ware of all kinds "(n.o.e.) • 25 P C 25 p c * Plate, gold, silver "(gold 8s oz, silver 2s oz) . • 2£ p C Powder ^ ... • 25 p c 20 p c Ploughs "(gang, sulky, stump jumping free) . . "free ... 15 p c Ploughshares J free ... 15 PC Plough wheels "(steel wheels, free) .1*25 p c 15 P C Plush and felt hoods, hatters' materials . free ... (note) Pollard "(per loolbs) t(2olbs bushel) ... . t d bhl *5« ••• Pomades •! 25 p c (note) Portable forges, with bellows .1 25 p c 3 © p c Portmanteaux, leather . 25 p c 30 p c Posts and rails, wood, in the rough " ( i o o t super) •i 25 P C free ... Posts and rails, sawn *(iooft super), see T i m b e r — Potatoes . 15s ton 20s ton Potash, Canadian, for mineral purposes .: 25 p c free ... "(crude) Powder flasks "(metal) • 2 p c "30 p c Precious stones, unset . free .. free ... Preserves "(China preserves, 15 p c) . d ib (note) . d ib Preserved meat 2d lb Printing ink "(black, free) .! free .. " 6 d lb Printing presses and machines ... free .. free ... Pumps .] free .. 25 p c 2

A

4

S.A.

free ... free ... 2d lb 25 P C 10 p c 25 p c i s gal free ... free ... 10 p c 15 p c 15 P C 6 d 100 (note) 25 p c free ... 25 P C 2S CWt IO DC 2d lb free ... 15 P C 10 p c free ... 2S cwt free ... "free ... 3s barl free ... free ... free .. *25 p c 25 p c 25 p c 15 P C 15 p c 15 p c (note) *2S 25 P C 25 p c 25 p c

Tas.

W.A.

15 "15 •3d 10

pc PC lb pc IO p C 20 p c is gal 15 P C 15 p c free ... 20 j> c

20 p c 15 p c free ... free ... 20 p c free ... 15 P C d lb »5 p c 15 PC 10 p c free ... free ... free ... a free... 2S cwt free ... 15 P C free ... 15 p c 20 p c 15 p c free ... free ... free ... 15 p c 20s ton 20 p c free ... 15 p c 4

N.Z.

12 i p c 20 p c 12$ p c 20 p c (note) 2d lb 12$ p c 20 p c 12$ p i ' free ... 20 p C "25 p c (note) 2s gal free ... free ... free ... free ... free ... (note) 12!, p c 20 p c 12$ p L - 20 p c free ... 2S IOO (note) gal I 2 i p C free ... 12$ p C free ... 12I p c 20 p c I - P C 2S CWt 124 p c 20 p c • 2 d Ib d lb 12$ p C free .. 12$ p C 25 p c 12$ p C 20 p c free ... free ... 20 p c 3s cwt 12$ p c free ... 10 p c free ... od cwt free .. 20 p c free .,. 20 p c free ... 20 p c free ... 20 p c 20 p c 20 p c 20 p c 12$ p C 20 p c 10 p c free ... 5 p c free ... 5 P C 20 p c free ... free ... *IS ... "iod 20 p c 25 p c 10 p c free ... 25 p c I5PC

9

4

Fiji.

12) p C 12! p C 2 d III

12I p c i d 100 15 p c is gal 5 PC •5 P C free free

(note) 12) p c 125 p c 12! p c 125 p c 12$ P C 2 d lb 125 p c 12S p c 20 p c free 12-j p C I2i P C free IS cwt • 2) p c 12) P C 12$ p C I2>, p c 12$ p C I2J p C free free free 12I p c •iod 15 P C 12) p : 12! p c

r

5

4

4

IO p c IO p C IS cwt

10 p c 15 P C (note) * 2 S IO p C (note) (note) * i s 6 d 20s toil 6 d cwt 20 p c 5PC

free ... 25 p c free ... 3d lb 2d lb free ... free ... 20 p c

free ... 10 p c 20 p c 15 P C j d lb 5 PC 5 pc (note)

free ... 15 p c 20 p c 2d lb 10 p c free .. free ... 15 P C

"free 20 p c free ... " 2 d lb 20 p c free ... 5 PC 20 p c

15 p c I2t p C 20 p c 2 d lb

free 12J p c 12) P C 12, pC

Pens and Penholders: V i c t o r i a — G o l d or silver, with or without rings, as jewellery, 20 per cent ; of metal other than gold or silver, whether plated or not, and with or without rings, 10 per cent. Pepper : New Zealand—Cayenne, 20 per cent; ground, d l b ; unground, 2d Ib. 4

Perry : Victoria—In bottles, per gallon, or for 6 reputed quart bottles, or for 12 reputed pint bottles, is 3d ; n.o.e., iod gallon.

T a s m a n i a — I n bottle, i s 6 d gallon ; bulk, is 3d gallon.

Photographs : New Z e a l a n d — O n opal, 20 per c e n t ; family portraits, free. Pickets and palings : Victoria—Pickets, dressed, 6s 6 d per too ; undressed, 6 d per 100 ; palings, o.d 100. Pickles—Queensland, s doz quarts ; 2s doz pints. V i c t o r i a — 3 s doz quarts ; pints, 2s 6 d ; is doz smaller ; over a quart and not exceeding a gallon, 12s doz ; other, 20 per cent. South A u s t r a l i a — s doz quarts; 2s doz pints; i s 6 d doz smaller. T a s m a n i a — 2 s doz pints; 3s doz quarts. Fiji— 2s doz pints ; s doz quarts. Pitch : Victoria—25 per cent; bone pitch, sweated or prepared pitch, and Stockholm pitch, free. Plants : Western A u s t r a l i a — G r a p e vines (rooted) are prohibited; grape cuttings are prohibited, excepting those imported from South Australia only, and which are accompanied by a certificate to the effect that the nursery" from which they were obtained is free from disease ; trees, fruit, must be dipped at the port of landing under Customs supervision. Plush and felt hoods: V i c t o r i a — H a t t e r ' s silk plush, free ; felt hoods, pullover, free. South Australia Plush hoods, free ; pullover and felt hoods,, 10 percent. Pomades : Victoria—Flowers for manufacturing scent, free ; hair pomades, 20 per cent. Posts and rails, sawn : T a s m a n i a — 3 m . or over, i s 6 d per 100 ft s u p ; under 3 m , 2s 6 d per 100 ft sup N e w Zealand-—Posts, 8s per 1 0 0 ; rails, s per 100. Preserves : V i c t o r i a — I f in bottles, jars, & c , as fruit preserved per doz ; if jams or jellies, 3d per pint or pound. Pumps and apparatus : Western A u s t r a l i a — F o r raising water, free ; diving, 5 per cent. 4

4

4

4


A ustralasian

Tariffs.

Q'land.

Putty Putty knives ... Punching machines *(over 7 tons free)...

a

25 free free

uicksilver ... ... uilts "(sewn ; other, free) tfeiderdown, 25 p c Quoits

free

Rahbit traps, iron ... Rain gauges, iron, glass, tin "(metal, 35 p c ) .. Raisins Rakes—Garden Horse ... Raspberry pulp Raspberry vinegar... Rattans ..^ , Razor strops ... , Reading glasses , Reaping hooks Reaping machines... ... ... , Re-cappers and fillers for cartridges , R e d lead "(with oil, 2s cwt) t(see paints) Refrigerators "(dry air, without engine ; other, *S P c) Resin... ... ... Ribbons "(silk) Rice "(paddy, 2s per cental) t(per ton) Rice ground (flour) Ricemeal ... ... , Rivets—Iron ... Galvanised Rollers, garden "(shade 15 p c) ... Rope "(iron or g alvanised, 3s cwt) t(coir, 5s cwt' Rope, steel wire ... Rosettes "(Silk rosettes, 15 p c ) t(Saddlers', free] R o y a l cord "(woollen, cotton free) Ruddle Rugs—Opossum "(and goatskin, hush free) ... Woollen ... R u m , essence of t(prohibiled) ...

free

Saddle binding ... Saddle cloths t^20 p c, if bound, 25 p c) Saddle girths, made up Saddlery and harness, made up "(saddle and riding saddles, 2 0 p c) Saddlers' ironmonger)' "(except spurs) t(except spurs, bits and stirrup irons) Knives ... Safes, iron "(meat, wire, 15 p c, wood 20 p c). Sago S a i l s — N e w ... ... Tarpaulin ... Salad oil "(see sauces) t(see oils in bottle) Salmon, preserved "(not salted or dried) Salt "(in jars or bottles 15 p c) ... Rock "(brown rock) ... Pet re Beef "(except in pickle or brine) Sardines "(per doz lbs, salted i d Ib) Sarsaparilla, not more than 25 p c proof spirit "(proprietary, 40 p c) Sash fasteners ... Frames "(window) Lines "(metal sash, free) Weights Sashes, window, lead, iron or zinc "(4s per pair ; plain, 2s) J(wood, 20 p c)

25 25

pc ... ... ... pc pc

25 3d 25

.. pc 11.

pLfree ... 5s c w t

Vic.

2S

S.A.

CWt

free ... free

free

free

free

..

...

10 p c 10 p c

free .. " f r e e ..

free free

... ...

15 p c 10 p c 3d l b

...

free free

3d

3d

lb

free

...

...

30 p c free

...

... f r e e free

... p.:

• d l>> i d 11, i d l!> 25 p c

25 PC 25 PC

...

15 p e 25 P C

free .. f r e e ... (note) (note) f r e e ... free ... 3s c w t " f r e e ...

15

free

"30 p C 30 p c

free

free

lb

free

15 p c d lb 20 p c

p c free ... free

free

free

...

10

...

15 p c free

2S

...

CWt

. . . " f r e e ... ... free ...

"15 p c 15 p c *6s cntll 3s c w t 6s c e n l l 3s c w t 6s cwt 3s c w t free free

... free ... free

30 p c

... ...

25 p c

free

... ( n o t e ) " t n s c t ... free ... free ... 10 p c 15 P C pc pc ( n o t e ) *»5 PC c w t free ... free ... P C f r e e ... 15 p c pc gal

25 P C •5 P C J5 P c

25 P C free

25 id

25 25

... pc

lb

.

pc pc

...

5 pc 10 p c 10 p c

free free

... ...

free

free

t

35 p c 35 P C

25 P C 25 P C

3opc

25 p c •15

free free

... ...

20 p c • «2d lb

...

15 p c 15 P C pc

2S CWt f r e e ... f r e e ..

3s cwt 12* p c 1*1 p c

20 p c f r e e ... 2d l b 20 p c 5 pc i i d lb 25 p c free

20 20

15

pc ...

> pc

II. Ib 15 p c 10 p c '5 PC 5 PC id

free

... pc

pc free ... free ... 20 p c

f

...

... f r e e ... 20 p c

•20 p c 15 P C 10 p c

Fiji.

lb

id

...

10 p c 30 p c

id

... ... ...

...

...

•5 p c 15 p c 5 pc 5 PC '5 p c

free free free

free

free

is gal free ...

2

free

...

15 P C 2d.lb 5 pc 10 p c 15 p c

free

free

...

free

15 p c

"10 p c 8s c w t

N.Z.

10 p c f r e e ... 12* p c 15 P C t 2 0 p C 12* p c 15 P C 20 p c 12* p c

10 p c f r e e ...

25 p c 15 P C 12s g a l 10 p c

... " f r e e . . .

free

... ...

2d Ib 20 p c 5 pc 15 PC IO p C

4

free

25 25 3.S 25 25 14s

15 P C •5 P C 15 p c

... ...

free

"free

15 p c free free

25 P C ...

Tas.

25 p c "25 P C

15 p c 3d lb 20 p c

25 P C 25 p c

... ...

W.A.

5 PC free

.., pc cwt

25 6s 6s 6s

cwt cwt f r e e ... free ...

20 20

pc p c f r e e ...

(note) free ...

free

12* p c 12* p c 12* P C 12* p C 2S CWt 12* p c 2S CWt 2S CWt

12} p C 12* p C 12<j p C 1/6 c w t 3s c w t 12* p c 12; p c 12* p C

T25 p C 15 p c f r e e ... 15 p c f r e e ... 20 p c 20 p c i s i p c 20 p c 20 p c 12'. p c 15s g a l 16s g a l 14s g a l 15 15 15

pc

15

20

p c

pc

t

pc

20 p c

p c

20

p c

10

p c t f r e e ... free ... f r e e ... 25 p c •15 p c 15 P C 20 p c free ... free ... free ... 2d Ib 25 P C 20 p c free ... f r e e ... 20 p c 20 p c free ... 20 p c (note) free ...

12-1 p c 12* p C 2d Ib I2£ p c 12 i p C ad l b 2s gal 12* p C 12* p C 12* p C

12* p c 12* p C I2i

pC

12*

PC

12* p c 12* p C I2i

* 15 p c 1/3 .» 15 p c 2 d Ib i d Ib »5 p c 2d l b 20S t o n 25s t o n "20s t ' n 1/6 c w t 1 o s t o n 5 p c - f r e e ... f r e e ... f r e e ... " f r e e ... f r e e ... f r e e ... id lb free ... free ... free ... 15 p c i d l b "5s c w t 2d Ib * i i d Ib "15 p c 20 p c " f r e e 12* *2S ... 2d lb a i d lb i d Ib 15 P C 2d l b 2d

free

lb

...

6s g a l 12s g a l 6s g a l 15 P C free ... free ... 25 p c 25 pe- "5s e a gs c w t I2S CWt * n s c't 25 p c 3s CWt 25 p c 4s p a i r

(note)

(note)

15 •5 20 Cs 15

pc

Jt5

pc

20

pc pc

15 p c 15 P C 20 p c

cwt

free

pc

1/6

... cwt

p

c

pC

i d Ib 12* p c 12* p C od g a l 12* p C 20s t o n 20s t o n 20s t o n pc

"25 p c 15 p c 20 p c 125 p c 2s p a i r 12* p C 20 p c 12* p c 20 p c 12* p c

*

2s p i e c e

Reaping machines : Queensland—25 per cent ; reapers and binders, strippers, combined, free. Victoria —15 per cent; reapers and binders, free. Rope : Victoria—Cordage coir ; 5s c w t ; hemp, 12s c w t ; unserviceable, free. R o y a l c o r d : Victoria—Dress goods, containing silk, 15 per cent; of wool, cotton, linen, or other mixed material, containing-not more than 10 per cent of silk, free. Saddlers* ironmongery : South A u s t r a l i a — F r e e ; spurs, 25 per cent.

Western Australia—Materials,

furniture, and ironmongery n.o.e., free. Sardines : South A u s t r a l i a — I n pickle or brine, 10 per cent. Sashes : V i c t o r i a — U n g l a z e d , 2s ; glazed, 3s pair ; metal framed glass, 30 per cent. Sashes to 1* in, 4s pair ; over 1 \ i n , 6s pair ; metal, 25 per cent.

South A u s t r a l i a "


Australasian Q*land.

ARTICLE.

(note) Sauces .. Sausage machines "(skins, io p c) t(skins, 3 d lb) 25 p c Saws "(hand and pit, free) free ... Scales of all kinds *(up to 3 cwt) f(weighbridges over 20 cwt, 25 p c) ^15 p c Scarifiers 25 p c Scissors free ... Scrapers, iron or steel, door *(ship, free) "25 p c free ... Screws "(wood) ... Plated heads free ... free ... Galvanised Scythes free ... Scythe handles free ... Sealing wax 25 p c Seeds—Grass and Garden 25 p c Unenumerated "(carraways, d Ib) (note) Seltzogenes ... 25 p c Seltzerwater "(per doz pints) 25 p c Semolina "(per ioolbs) 2d lb Serges and estamenes "(except dress, 10 p c) ... 15 p c Sewing machines ... free ... Sewing twine "(seaming and roping free) (note) Silk free ... Shafts, dressed free ... In the rough "(load 40 cubic ft) free ... Sharps, *£\ p e r ton Shawls 25 p c Shears, sheep, tailors* and tinmen's free ... Sheep-ear labels, tinned iron 25 p c Sheep dip free ... Shellac ,. free ... Shingles 25 p c Shirts 25 p c Shoemakers' knives free ... Nails, viz—Sparrow bills, bright and black mal, hobs, wrought hobs, nuggets, Hungarians, cut sprigs, steel bills, brass rivets, "(wrought and cast tips, free ... 20 p c) ... Shoe pegs ... free ... Shooks and staves free ... Shot ... Shovels, iron and wood "(iron, free; wood free; house, iron, 25 pc) t(fire, 25 p c) (note) J(fire, 15 p c ) Show cards, "(framed) 25 p c Sickles ... ... free ... Sieves of all kinds 25 p c Silk, and alt manufactures containing silk, in the piece, except mill and sewing "(containing 5 p c of silk in the piece) ... 15 P C Silk rosettes 25 p c 25 p c Silk stockings ... free ... Skins and hides, raw Skittles 25 p c Slate pencils free ... 4

Tariffs. Vic.

S.A.

Tas.

W.A.

N.Z.

(note) (note) 15 p c 25 p c * 2 0 p C •15 p c free ... * 2 o p C free ..

(note) 15 P C 5PC

"free ... 15 P C 10 p c 30 p c "free ... free ... free ... free ... 25 p c free ... free ... "free ... free ... 10 p c 20 p c (note) free ... (note) free ... iod set free ...

tfree ... 15 p c 10 p c *2 p C 2S CWt 2S CWt 2S CWt free ... free ... 25 p c free ... (note) 15 p c 20 p c *2S ... "15 p c free ... free ... free ... 25 p c •2/6 ...

5 PC free ... 15 p c 15 P C free ... free ... free ... free ... free ... 15 p c free ... 15 P C 15 p c 20 p c free ... 10 p c 15 P C 8s cwt 5 pc 20 p c free ...

15 P C 2Q p C 5PC 5 PC 15 P C 20 p c 15 P C 20 p c 15 p c 20 p c 15 P C 20 p c *5 p c 2S CWt 5 P C free ... 15 p c free ... 15 P C 20 p c free ... 10 p c (note) (note) t5 P C 20 p c 15 PC 20 p c 15 P C * I S . . . 15 p c 20 p c 10 p c free ... i d Ib " 2 0 p c 15 p c free ... 15 p c 20 p c 15 p c free ...

10 p c free ... 15 P c free ... 5 PC 15 PC 15 p c free ...

20 p c (note) 15 p c 15 P C free ... 15 p c 12$ p c 15 P C

5

25 p c free ... free ... free ... free ... od IOOO 6 d 1000 35 P C 25 p c free ... free ... 35 P C free ... 30 p c free ... free ...

free ... free ... 35 P C i d lb

free ... free ... free ... free ... free ... free ... 25 p c 5 P C 15 P C 2/6 cwt 5s cwt id.Tb

•*.".#' tfree *35 P C £25 p c free ... free ... 30 p c 25 p c

(note) 10 p c 25 p c free ... 25 p c free ...

"15 p c 15 p c 10 p c free ... 25 p c free ...

{free 5 PC 15 p c 15 P C free ... 5 pc free ... 15 p c

15 P C 15 P C 15 P C 1/6 ea 15 P C free ...

20 p c 20 p c 20 p c 20 p c free ... '5 pc

Fiji.

s gal 12) p c t 2 0 p C 12$ p c 12$ p C free

4

20 p c free ... 25 p c free ... free ...

1?$ p C free 12$ p c 12$ p C 12$ P C iaj p c 12$ p c free free 12$ p c free free 12$ p c i d Ib 12) p c (note) i2i pc 125 P C 123 p c 12I p c

12^ p c 12$ p C Iftf p c 5 PC 15 p c

2S IOOO 2S IOOO

25 p c 12J p C free ... 12J p c

"free free ... (note) I OS cwt

12S p c 12S p c 12! p C 5s cwt

(note) 25 p c free ... free ...

12! P C free free i2i pc

25 p c 25 p c 20 p c free ... 20 p c free ...

125 p c I2|pC 125 p c free 12J p c i2* pc

Sauces: Queensland—4s doz q u a r t s ; 2s doz p i n t s ; smaller, same proportion. V i c t o r i a — 4 s doz quarts and over a p i n t ; 2s doz pints and over half a pint ; is doz half pints and over quarter p i n t : 6d doz quarter pints and smallersizes ; over quart and not exceeding gallon, 12s ; all other, 10 per cent. South Australia—4s doz q u a r t s ; 2s doz pints; is od doz smaller. T a s m a n i a — 4s doz quarts; 3s doz pints; 2s doz half pints ; is 6 d doz quarter p i n t s ; in bulk, 3s per gallon. F i j i — 2 s doz pints and smaller quantities ; 4s doz quarts. Scales : Queensland—Platform weighbridges, free. Seeds: Queensland—Unenumerated, 25 per cent; garden, free. South Australia—Garden, free ; carraway and chili, 2d l b ; others, 10 per cent. T a s m a n i a — C a n a r y , hemp, and rape, $d lb. N e w Zealand—Unenumerated, free; carraway, 20 per cent. Serges : Victoria—25 per cent; art, saddlers', and women's dress, free. Sewing Machines : F i j i — T r e a d l e , or treadle and h a n d , 10s each ; hand, 6s each. Sewing twine and seaming and roping : Queensland, free.

V i c t o r i a — O r seaming of hemp or flax, 10

per cent; other, 2 d lb. Shears : Tasmania—Sheep, 5 per c e n t ; other, 15 per cent. Shooks and staves : N e w Zealand—Shooks, 20 per c e n t ; staves in the rough, free. Show cards : South A u s t r a l i a — E n a m e l l e d iron, 10 p c , other 25 p c . Shovels : Queensland—Iron or wood, free ; house, 25 per cent. N e w Z e a l a n d — I r o n or wood, free ; iron scoops, 20 per :ent. S i l k : Victoria—Silks, being dress goods of wool, cotton,, linen, or other mixed materials not being silks, satins, velvets, or plushes, 15 per cent; containing not more than 10 per cent of silk, free.


Australasian

Tariffs.

ARTICLE.

Q'land.

Slates—School Book Roofing ... ... Slab, not wrought Slab, wrought Sleepers, railway *(per 100ft super) t J(see timber)... ... .. Slippers, embroidered or worked Slipper uppers in patterns Snuff (per lb) Soap *(other than fancy) Powder "(and extract) Scented and toilet ... Sofa springs... Soda—Bi-carbonate Caustic ... Crystals^ Nitrate * Ash Silicate Sodawater *(per doz pints) Solder "(solder composition, 15 p c ) Spades Spars *(for ships, in the rough) Specimens of natural history Spices "(ground 4 d Ib) Spikes "(iron) Spirit levels Spirits—Brandy "(proof) Geneva ,, Gin O f wine „ Perfumed (proof) Rum „ Whisky „ Unenumerated "(proof) Cordials and liqueurs ... Brandy colouring, containing 35 p c o f spirit "(proof) Split peas "(per ioolbs) Splints of all kinds Spokes—Dressed H e w n and sawn Sponge Sporting Powder, not in bulk ... Spray producer, carbolic "(plated, 25 p.c. .; tsurgical, free) Springs, patent door Spruce beer, "(in bottle is 6 d ) ... Spurs Spun yarn, except raw yarn Staples (fencing "free, i$ p . c , J i s cwt) Starch "(packets, per doz. lbs) t(and gl ize) .. Stationery—Manufactured Unmanufactured Steam inhalers ... Stearine Steel "(fencrng wire) W i r e rope ... Steels Steel forks, table *t(garden and dung, free) ... Steelyards "(up to 3 cwt)... Stencil inks or stencil combination *(ink free) Stereoscopes and views

free ... 25 p c 25 p c *5 PC 25 p c

Vic.

free ... free ... free ... free ... 35 P C

153

S.A.

Tas.

W.A.

free ... free ... 25 p c 15 p c 20 p c 5 PC IS cu ft 5 PC 20 p c 20 p c

15 15 15 15 15

pc pc pc pc PC

N.Z.

free ... 20 p c free ... (note) (note)

Fiji.

free . . . 12J p c d ib I2i pC 12i PC 5

• free *2S ... •l/6 * t s ... free ... free ... 25 P C (note) 25 p c (note) 20 p C 2 2 i p C 12* C 25 p c .-M doz 15 p c 15 P C 15 p c 2 2 i p C 12J p c 3* IOS cwt 2d lb • i d lb (note) i d lb •5s cwt i d lb d lb 10 p C 2d Ib *20 p c 15 p c 20 p c •5 P C d lb 3d lb d lb 20 p c 3d l b 25 p c 15 p c 10 p c free ... free ... free ... 20 p c I2i pc 5 pc IS cwt free .. 10 p c 15 p c IS cwt 15 p c • d 11, free ... free ... free ... free ... free ... free ... 15 p c 2S cwt 2S CWt 2S cwt 2S CWt i d Ib 2S cwt 20s ton free ... free ... free ... free ... free .. free ... free free ... free ... free ... free ... free ... free ... 15 P C free ... free ... free ... free ... free ... free ... 15 P C 25 p c 10 p c 20 p c 20 p c 15 P C 20 p c »od 25 p c free ... 10 p c •free free ... free .. 1 2 i P C free ... free ... free ... free ... 5 P C free ... i 2 i p c (note) "free ... (note) 5 P C free ... free ... (note) free ... free ... free ... •5 P C free ... free ... free 3d lb * 2 d Ib 2d lb •2d lb d Ib * 2 d Ib 2d lb 3s cwt 7/6 cwt 2S CWt free ... 2/6 c't *2S CWt 12*. p c 25 p c free ... free ... free ... 15 p c free ... 12I p c 14s gal "12s gl •15s gl 16s gal 15s gal •16s gl i s gal 14s gal » I 2 S gl •15s gl 16s gal 15s gal * i 6 s gl 14s gal 14s gal * I 2 S gl "15s gl 16s gal 15s gal * i 6 s g l i s gal 14s gal * I 2 S gl *I5* g ' (note) 15s gal * i 6 s gl 14s gal 20s gal * 2 S gl "25s gl 20 p c 2 s gal 30s gl 14s gal 14s gal * I 2 S gl *>5 g> 16s gal 15s gal * i 6 s gl 14s gal 14s gal " I 2 S gl •15s gl 16s gal 15s gal * i 6 s gl 14s gal 16s gal 15s gal 16s gl i s gal I4« gal * I 2 S gl " ' 5 s g l 14s gal i 7 s gal 15s gal 16s gal 15s gal 16s gal 14s gal 3

P

2

4

4

4

4

4

4

4

S

4

14s gal i d ib free ... free ... free ... 15 PC free ...

12s gal *5S ... free ... 25 p c 6d 100 free ... dlh

*I5S gl free .. 10 p c 25 p c free ... 10 p c 3d lb

25 pc15 p c "1/3 gal 25 p c 8s cwt free ...

*io p c free ... (note) 30 p c

10 p c free ... (note) 25 P C IIS CWt 25 p c 2d lb 25 p c no p c 10 p c i d lb free ... free ... free ... 10 p c free ...

*2S

...

25 p c 25 p c free ... i i d lb free ... free ... free ... 25 p c 25 p c 25 p c 25 p c

3

I2S CWt

30 p c 2d Ib 35 p c free ... free ... i d lb free ... free ... free ... 10 p c *free ...

(note) •25 p c free ... 15 p c

2S cwt

16s gal 15s gal i d lb 15 p c 15 p c free ... 15 p c free ... 15 p c 15 p c 15 p c dlb 6 d Ib

2S cwt

4

free ... 20 p c free ... 20 p c 6 d lb

15 15 20 15

pc pc p c pc 8s cwt •15 p c t ' 5 PC 15 P C 15 p c 15 p c free ... •free ... free ... 15 p c •15 p c 5PC

10 p c 15 p c (note) 15 p c free ... t i 5 PC i d lb 15 p c 15 p c 15 p c 10 p c free ... free ... 15 p c 15 P C 15 p c

T20 p c 20 p c 2S gal 20 p c 20 p c 20 p c 2d lb 25 p c 20 p c 20 p c l i d lb free ... free ... 20 p c T20 p c 20 p c

5 pc 20 p c

15 p c 15 p c

16s gal 14s gal i d lb 15 p c 12* p c 12* p C 12} p c 6 d lb 15 p c 12* p C od gal I2i pc 1/6 c't I2i p C i d lb 12J p c 12^ p C 15 P C 5 PC 12* p c 20S ton 1*1 p c i2i n " 12} p c

free ... 12* p C 20 p c T2* p C

Slate : N e w Zealand—not dressed or polished, free ; dressed, 25 per cent. Slippers : V i c t o r i a — N o 7 to 2, 12s per doz ; children's 4 to 6, 8s 6d per doz ; other, 18s per d o z ; children's o to 3, and straw slippers, free. Western Australia—Children's, 10 p . c ; n.o.e., 15 p.c. S o a p : Western Australia—7s 6 d c w t ; monkey and mineral, 15 p.c. ; soft, 7s 6d c w t ; soap makers' materials (including caustic soda, resin, cocoanut oil, palm oil and other), n.o.e., free; soap, borax, cream, dry disinfectant, 20 per cent. Spars : Queensland—As timber. South Australia—2s. 6d load 40 cubic ft. F i j i — I s 6 d 100 ft. sup. Spirits of wine : Western Australia—Proof, destroyed in bond, 5s per g a l ; rectified, not being for medicinal purposes, 16s proof gal. Spruce beer : V i c t o r i a — B u l k , iod g a l ; bottles, is 3d gal. South A u s t r a l i a — B u l k , is 2d g a l ; bottles, i s 6d gal. Tasmania—bottles, is 6 d gal. Stationery : South A u s t r a l i a — P a p e r : blotting, copying, marble, tracing, coloured surface, gelatine, flint, glazed, morocco striped, plaid, printing, and writing (except faint lined) cardboard, strawboard, and millboard plain, free. Stencil inks : V i c t o r i a — F r e e ; stencil combination, 10 per cent ; coloured, 6d lb.


Australasian

'54

Tariffs.

Q'land.

ARTICLE.

25 p c Stone—Wrought ... Unwrought »S p c Stoneware '(earthenware, 8tt per cubic ft ; 25 p c brown ware, 2 0 p c) ... ... Stoves .... ... 25 p c Street-sweeping machines 93 P Sugar "(refined, 6 s 8 d ; raw, 5s cwt) t(candy, " 5 s cwt d lb) 25 p c Sugar of milk ... ... ... free ... Sulphate of ammonia ... ... 5s cwt Sulphuric acid ... free ... Sunday school cards "(picture) free ... Surveyors' chains "(and riblxins) Sweeps' machines ... 25 p c Syrups "(golden syrup free) t(golden syrup, i d Ib) (note) Syringes free ... Table and butchers' steels "(butchers*, free) ... free ... "free Tacks "(saddlers') ... i 4 d lb Tallow 8s each T a n k s —Iron 25 p c Galvanised "(corrugated 25 p c) ?5 p c Taps—Wooden ... free ... Tapes—Cotton and linen ... ... free ... Measuring "(surveyors', free) i d Ib Tapioca "free T a r "(Stockholm, 15 p c) t(see pitch) Tarpaulins 25 p c " 6 d Ib T e a "(in packets, 8 d per Ib) 25 p c T e a caddies "(metal or wood) ... free ... Telephones, with or without bells free ... Telephone bells ... free ... Telescopes "(astronomical, free) 25 p c Tents free ... Theodolites free ... Thermometers ... ... ... free ... Threads, sewing ... 25 p c Tiles, flooring and other ... ... " 25 p c Timber -Architraves "(icoft sup) 25 p c Balks "(looft sup) Battens "(100ft sup) t(if worked) ... * 3 » ... Boards, rough or planed, tongued or grooved, \ to i$in**(iooft sup) ... * 3 * »i/6 . . . Cedar, in log *(iooft sup) 3» ... Deal "(100ft sup) 25 p c Laths "(1000) •1/6 ... I^)gs *(ioo ft sup) Mouldings, not gilt ... 25 p c (note) Palings and pickets Posts and rails, rough "(icoft)

*

20 p c

30 p c 25 p c

25 p c 20 p c

(note) free ... free ... I S cwt free ... free ... 30 p c 20 p c free ... "10 p c free ... free ... 30 p c 30 p c 25 p c free ... free ... free ... "free 20 p c 3 d lb > P C free ... free ... free ... 20 p c free ... free ... free ... 20 p c (note) free ... free ...

3s cwt

#

(note) free ... free ... ... free ... (note) (note) free ...

10 p c 10 p c 5s cwt

"free ... free ... 25 p c (120 p c 10 p c free ... 2S cwt free ... free ... "free ... 25 p c free ... free ... free ... free ... 20 p c 3 d lb '5 P C free ... 25 p c free ... 20 p c free ... free ... free ... 25 p c (note) free ... (note) *i/6

pc to p c 15 p c 15

tfree... 15 p c 15 p c 15 p c 20 p c *I5 p c 15 p c •20 p c 15 p c 15 p c free ... 10 p c to p c 10 p c 15 p c 15 p c 15 p c free ... free ... 20 p c free ... 15 p c free ... free ... to p c 15 p c 10 p c IO pC 5 PC 15 p c 20 p c 5 PC t20 p C

... (note)

free ... (note) •is ... free ... (note) 6 d too 10 p c

Tas.

N.Z.

Fiji.

15 p c 10 p c

25 p c free ...

5 P=

"5PC

20 pc

123 p c

20 p c 20 p c

12, p c 12, p C

i d lb 20 p c free ... free ... free ... free ... 25 p c 25 p c 20 pc 20 pc free ... free ... (.note) (note) 20 p c free ... "20 pc free ... free ... ?o p c d lb 20 p c 10 p c 20 p c •20 pc 20 p c free ... free ... free ... 20 pc 20 p c

hP lb 15 p c 15 p c 15 p c I2.J p C I2i pC it| pc t i s gal 15 p c i2( pc 124 p c 5 PC 12A p c 12J p c

W.A.

(note) 20 p c <I20 p C free ... IS cu ft 5 PC

c

4

S.A.

Vic.

cs p c (note) 20 p c <r p c 20 p c 20 p c to p c 5

15 15

pc pc

(note) •5 P C free ... 2/6 c't 15 P C 15 P C 15 p c 15 p c 15 p c 15 p c 2/6 c't free ... 15 p c 15 p c 15 p c 15 p c 15 P C 2 d lb free ... 15 p c 3 d lb 15 p c 15 p c 15 p c •5PC

i pc 5

15 p c 15 p c 15 p c 15 P C 20 p c

4

#

1 5 1 JO 11 1^ 1 1

> 4

J 1 1 1 1 /

v

s "

0 ^

2S

SPC

12I 12;

pc pc

124 PC

i d Ib free 12A p c 6 d Ib 12$ pC 12} p C 12$ PC 12$ p C 124 p c 12; p c 12$ p c 12$ p c 5/ IOOO 2S •1/6

•1/6 S r ) •2s

s

s

(note) •1/6

(note) 01 ... *2S

free ... 15 p c 2S ICO (note)

V6 i?4

pc

2S ICO 2S IOO

Stone : Victoria—Monumental wrought, 7s 6 d cub f t ; n.o.e., 35 per c e n t ; lithographic, milling, and grinding, free. Western Australia—Stones and slates imported by municipalities for flagging, free; turkey, sharpening, touch, soap, and pumice, 15 per cent; lithographic, free; precious, 20 per cent. Sugar : Victoria—Cane, 6s c w t ; produce of cane to be refined in Victoria, 5s od c w t ; produce of other than cane, 12s c w t ; glucose and refined molasses, 6 s c w t ; molasses, refined in bond, 5s c w t ; unrefined molasses, 2s c w t ; candy, d lb. T a s m a n i a — L o a f and crushed, i d lb ; other, 6s cwt. 4

Syrups : Queensland—Golden syrup, 7s 6 d and 10s cwt.

South A u s t r a l i a — G o l d e n syrup, 3s cwt.

Tanks : New Zealand—400 gals, 10s each ; 200 gals and under, 5s each. Architraves : Victoria and South A u s t r a l i a — 3 in and under, s 100 ft l i n e a l ; over 3 in, 7s 100 ft. 4

Battens : South Australia—2s 6 d per load of o cubic ft. 4

Boards, rough or planed, tongued or grooved, | in to i i in : Victoria—Dressed, is 6 d 100 super ft. Western A u s t r a l i a — R o u g h , 10 per cent; worked, 2 0 per cent. F i j i — R o u g h , i s 6 d ; dressed, 2s 100 super ft. Cedar and other logs: Western A u s t r a l i a — 1 2 inch by 12 inch and over, 5 p c . Deal : South Australia—2s 6 d per load. Western A u s t r a l i a — R o u g h , 5 per cent; worked, 20 per cent, in short lengths for case making, free. F i j i — R o u g h , is 6 d ; dressed, 2s 100 super ft. a N e w Z e a l a n d — R o u g h sawn, 2s per 100 super f t ; dressed, s per 100 super ft; hewn, free. Mouldings : Victoria and South Austi a l i a — T h e same as architraves—see page 134. Palings and pickets: Queensland—Split, 25 per c e n t ; sawn 3s 100 super ft. Victoria—Palings, od 100 ; pickets, undressed, 6 d i c o ; dressed, 6s 6 d 100. 4

Posts and rails: N e w Zealand—Posts, 8s per 1 0 0 ; rails, 4 s per 100. Tf Timber : T a s m a n i a — I n log, free ; boards, planed, tongued, and grooved, 5s per 100 super ft; sawn, not enumerated, 3 in or over, i s 6 d per 100 super ft; under 3 in, 2s 6 d per 100 super ft; in short lengths, suitable for making cases u p to 2 cubic ft, i$d each case ; mouldings, 2 0 per cent,


A ustralasian

Tariffs. vie.

Q'land.

Timber—Planks, not exceeding 4 m thick *(iooft sup), not being boards "3s ... Quartering *(iooft sup) *3S Sawn posts and rails *(ioo feet super) *3S ... Shingles *(iooo) 25 p c Skirting "(iooft lineal) *3 -• Sleepers, railway *(ioo sup ft) (note) Spars *(iooft sup) f(rough, free) (note) Square "(iooft sup) (note) Trenails and spokes "(spokes, 5 p c) f(rough) "25 P C T i n — B l o c k and sheet "(sheet) "free Plates free ... Plates.decorated,except show cards, t i n 2 5 p c 25 p c Tinfoil free .. Tinware ... 25 p c T i n openers "(pliers, free) 25 p c Tinned rivets 15 p c Toasting forks, telescope ... 25 p c Tobacco—Manufactured ... s Ib Cigars and cigarettes 6s Ib Destroyed for sheepwash 25 p c Snuff s lb.. Unmanufactured (note) Tobacconists' ware, not otherwise specified 25 p c T o o l baskets "(carpenters', free) 25 p c Tools, artificers' ... ... free ... Towels "(in the piece, 5 p c ) "25 p c Toys ... 25 p c Transfer ornaments "(Carriage) 25 p c Trays, papier mache ... 25 p c Treacle and molasses "(and 7s 6 d cwt) *ios c't Triangle, wooden ... ... 25 p c Trimmings, mantle or dress 15 P C Tricopherous, Barry's ... S

"od

.

*7S

.

free . *ti/6. *i/6 .

S.A.

W.A.

(note) (note)

(note) 10 p c

10 p c *6d ..

10 15 20 10 5 10

tree .. (note) afree..

Tas.

pc

I

P C

pc pc P C

pc

(note) 15 P < free .. free . free .. free . 20 p c 15 p c free .. free . 20 p c 15 p c 15 p c »5 P C free .. ' 5 p c 15 P C I5pc 3s lb.. s!b.. 6s lb., s lb.. free .. 10 p c f r e e ... s lb... 6s lb... 6s Ib... 6s Ib... i s lb... i/7l lb i/io* Ib 3/6 lb *5 p c 15 P C ' S P C 15 P C 15 p c " f r e e ... 25 p c free ... 10 p c d f r e e . . . (note) f r e e ... 15 p c 15 p c 12* p c 10 p c •5 p c 20 p c 20 p C free .. 20 p c 15 p c 10 p c 15 P C 20 p c 15 P C 10 p c 6s cwt 3s cwt free ... 3/6 cwt 25 p c 25 p c 20 pc- 15 P C free ... 15 p c 15 p c 20 p c 25 P C 15 p c 20 p c i2sgal Trouthooks 15 P C 15 p c 15 P C 14s gal 10 p c Trowels "(artificers', free) 25 p c f r e e ... free ... free ... >5 p c Trusses "(surgical) ... free .. f r e e ... i o p c 5 P C free ... T u b i n g , metal, except iron "(or lead) t(gasandj free .. water pipes, 5s) t(bicycle, in short lengths, 20 p c) (note) •free .. 15 p c 15 p c Tucked skirting free .. 25 p c 25 p c 15 p c 15 p c 4

5

• 6 d 100 tfree ... free ... free ... free .. free — 124 p i free ... free ... free ... 30 p c 25 p c * i o p c free ... f r e e ... free ... 30 p c 25 p c 3s lb.. 2/9 Ib 6s lb.. «6/3 lb

3 7

3

(

i

5

p<:

Planks: South Australia—as 6 d per load. Western A u s t r a l i a — R o u g h , 10 per cent; worked, 20 p c . Quartering : South Australia—2s 6d per load. Sleepers: Queensland—is 6 d and 3s per 100 super ft, according to dimensions. Spars : Queensland—is 6 d 100 super ft; not prepared, as timber. South Australia—2s 6 d per load. Timber, square : Queensland— is 6 d and 3s per 100 super ft, according to dimensions. South Aust r a l i a — T o entitle timber to lie called " square " it must exceed 4 in in thickness ; for example, 5 in x 5 in. N e w Z e a l a n d — R o u g h sawn, 2s per 100 super ft; dressed, 4s per 100 super ft. Timber, trenails and spokes : New Zealand—Trenails, 20 per cent; spokes, rough, free. Western Australia—Spokes, rough, free ; trenails, 15 per cent. T o b a c c o : Queensland—Unmanufactured tobacco, 2s lb, if entered to be manufactured within the colony, otherwise 4s. lb. Tobacconists' ware : N e w Zealand—Pipes and cigar holders. 25 per cent. aCigarettes : South Australia—One pound in every ten thousand in number is allowed as tare for paper used in manufacture. N e w Z e a l a n d — i 7 s 6 d per i,ooo, not exceeding 2^lb in weight ; excess, 6 d oz. Tools : Victoria — T o o l s of trade, being manufactured of metal and not being machinery, and tool handles—viz., brushes (artists'), chisels, chests of tools (fitted), clippers (horse), clamps (boatbuilders' and carpenters'), compasses, cutters (pipe), diamonds (glaziers'), drills (breast), eyelets, fids (sailmakers'), files, forks (hay, garden and stable), froes, gimlets, grindstones, hammers, hatchets, hoes, nones and oil stones, hooks (bag, bush, furze, reap and sail weed), irons (caulking, plane, soldering, tailors' geese and tue), jacks, knives (butchers', cane, chaff, drawing, farriers', hay and shoe), ladles (lead and pitch), levels (spirit), marline spikes, mallets, needles (saddlers', upholsterers', packing and sail), nippers (cutting), planes, pincers (carpenters' and farriers'), plumbs and levels, pliers, pullers (nail), punches, rakes (hay and garden), rasps, rules, saws (of all kinds, but not the machinery connected therewith, if any), saw clamps, saw sets, scrapes (also plumbers' and ships'), screws (bench), scythe blades, scythe snaths, scythe stones, sets (rivet), shaves (coopers'), spades and shovels (except wooden), spokeshaves, shears (garden, pruning and sheep), sickles, slashers, snips (tinmen's), spanners, squares (carpenters', harness, masons', collar and dresssmakers'), stocks and dies, soldering irons, tapes (measuring), tools (grafting, saddlers' and tinsmiths'), trowels, turnscrews, vices, wheels (tracing), wrenches. South Australia—Not enumerated, free ; bench screws, blacksmiths' tongs, boring rods and tools, carpenters' and joiners' benches, cast steel drills, cold chisels, gas tongs, hammers (napping, quartz, and spalling), mandrels, picks and mattocks, pliers, quarry mauls and picks, sieves, tiring plates, and wedges—all 25 per cent. Tubes and pipes (metal): Victoria—Brass-cased, brazed, solid drawn, welded and fitted, iron-screwed for wrought iron pipes, iron for bedsteads (in the rough), free; cast iron, £3 per ton ; lead, 2s 6 d per cwt; other, 30 per cent.


'56

Australasian

Tariffs.

ARTICLE.

Q'land.

Turnery .. Turpentine ... Tweeds and cloths, in the piece "(dress piece, lope) Tweezers ... Twine, shop, fishing net or sewing, shop cord, and harvest binding twine ... T y p e , printers' "(typewriters, 5 p c )

25 p c 6 d gal 15 p c 25 p c

Tas.

N.Z.

25 p c 25 p c free ... 6 d gal

20 p c free ..

15 p e ls gal

20 p c free ..

12J

25 p c free ..

•15 P C free ...

10 p c f r e e ..

15 p c 15 p c

20 20

pc pc

•2i

(note) free ...

8s cwt "free

(note) i d Ib free ... free ..

2 d lb 12J p c

20 p C 5PC

;:1

S.A.

hi

lb a d d lb free .. free ..

Umbrellas "(stands 20 p c) Umbrella parts ...

25 p c free ..

(note) (note)

Valerianate of amyl Vanilla Vanilla, essence of Vaseline, or soft paraffin Varnish "(containing spirits, 5s gal) Vegetables—Fresh Preserved Ventilators, cast iron Veneer, wood "(according to the timber—see tariff) Vermicelli Vermilion "(see paints) Vestas and matches "(see matches) Vices "(bench) Vigorine "(and hair vigor) t(doz pints) Vinegar "(not over 10 p c acetic acid) ... V i n sante

25 p c 25 p c 14s

free .. 10 p c free .. 10 p c 12s gal 10 p c

25 25 25 25

2s gal

Waddings, cotton ... Waggons "(see carriages) Wallpaper (ad val.) Walnuts, green Washers—Iron (iatvanised iron Raw hide Indiarubber Washing machines—(ialvanised Wooden ... Watches Waterpipes, iron "(cast) t(wrought and welded free) Wax—Vegetable "(japan and engravers') Enamelling or modelling Webbing, boot Wedges Weights "(paper and sash 15 p c) Weighing machines "(over 5 cwt) Wheels "(steel and axles) Wheelbarrows "(wood, metal 30 p c) ... W h i p sockets Whips and walking sticks "(walking sticks. *5 P C ) White cord

free ..

pc pc pc pc

25 p c 2d lb 3s cwt 25 p c free .. 25 p c (note) (note)

free

...

3d Ih 30 p c

»

6d 10 2d 25

gal pc lb pc

free

...

2d Ib

2d Ib

2S CWt

* free

20 p c "15 p c free ... 15 p c

...

free

...

10 p c 6d gal

20 p c

free ..

free

(note)

20 p c ...

(note)

free .. 25 p c 25 p c 25 p c free .. free .. 15 p c

1/6 bhl is bhl .. 25 p c 25 p c .. free .. free .. free .. 25 p c 25 P C 25 p c 25 P C 15 p c 15 p c free free

'5 P C 10 15 10 15

pc pc pc pc

20 p c free .. 10 p c 15 p c free .. •15 p c 6 d gal 20 p C

25 p c (note)

free .. 2 d Ih i d lb 20 p c 15 p c 20 p c • i s gal 20 p c

PC PC

20 p c

12*0

free

id Ib 12*1p c PC 121 p c

..

is 15 15 15

15 p c 15 p c 15 p c

15 p c 15 p c 20 p c

(note)

20 p c 20 p c

c

•free 25 p c »9>1 (note) 6d gal 16s gal 15 p c

2 d Ib free .. free .. free ..

15 P C 5 PC

I2S CWt

1/6 15 15 15

12I p c free .. (note) 2 0 p c

"30 p c P

I2i

20 p c 15 p c free .. 2 d l b 16s gal 2 d lb 2 d lb gal 2s gal 2s gal id lb p c 20 p c id Ib p c 20 p c i2j pc p c 20 p c

15 p c 20 p c

5 PC •free .. 15 p c free .. free .. •5 p c 5 PC

5

20 p c free ..

pc is gal

20 p c 15 p c 15 p c 16s gal 15 p c

•free t l S CWt * 4 0 s t o n 25 p c free .. free .. 25 p c free .. 10 p c free .. f r e e .. free .. 25 p c 30 p c 25 p c (note) 3s c w t (note) 15 p c * 2 P C (note) "free 25 p c (note) 25 P C "25 p c 25 p c 15 p c f r e e ... free ..

i?d |b

Fiji.

W.A.

Vic.

bhl J 2 d lb p c ! free .. pc free .. pc free ..

pc pc pc id Ib I2i PC

12! 12I 12J

12*

pC

124

pc

20 p c 20 p c 20 p c

12} 124 20

pc pc pc

free ... 15 p c 15 p c ; free 15 p c 15 p c 7l P C 5 pc 15 p c

5 pc l i d Ib l i d Ib free 20 p c 20 p c 20 p c 20 p c 20 p c 20 p c

free 5 PC 5 PC I2i pc 124 p c 124 p c 124 p c 124 p c 124 124

pc pc

15 p c free ..

20 p c 20 p c

12*

pC

Twine : Queensland—Binder twine as cordage, 8s cwt ; twine for net making, free. Victoria—Sewing or seaming, free ; reaper and binder and yarn made from jute, hemp or flax, 8s cwt. South Australia—Twine, shop, fishing net, or shop cord, 2 d l b ; harvest binding twine, 8s cwt; sewing, seaming and roping, free. N e w Zealand—Binder twine, free; netmakers' cotton twine, free; sail, seaming and roping, and other kinds n.o.e. 20 per cent. Umbrellas : Victoria—Umbrellas, parasols and sunshades (plain), cotton, woollen, or other, not specified, is each , of silk or silk mixtures, 2s 6 d each. Umhrella parts : Victoria—Sticks, silk, & c , handles, and minor articles, free ; sticks, wholly or partlyfitted with frames, each is. Vinegar and vin sante: Queensland—In wood, od g a l ; in bottle, is gal. South A u s t r a l i a — N o t containing more than 5 per cent acidity, yd per g a l ; every extra 1 per cent, 2d gal. New Zealand— vinegar, not over 6.5 acidity, 6 d per gal., over 6.5 per cent acidity, as acetic acid. Waggons : Victoria—Without tops, mounted on springs or thoroughbraces, £9 each ; with tops, ; £ i 2 each ; without springs, 20 per cent. T a s m a n i a — F o u r wheels, j£io; two wheels, £5. Weighing machines : South A u s t r a l i a — U n d e r 20 cwt capacity, free ; over 20 cwt, 25 per cent. Weights: Queensland—For scales, 15 p c ; and sasn, 25 per cent. Wheels : Victoria—Metal, 25 per cent. 20 per cent.

other, 25 p c.

South A u s t r a l i a — F o r scales, free;

paper

Western Australia—Carriage, 10 per cent; cart and waggon,

White cord : South Australia—Being twine, 2d l b ; being window blind cord, free


Australasian

Tariffs.

Q'land,

W h i t e l e a d "(40s per t o n i n o i l ; d r y , free) •-• Whiting ... W i c k e r w a r e "(except f u r n i t u r e ) ... W i g s " ( a n d f a n c y h a i r ) ... ... W i l h e l m ' s Q u e l l e w a t e r s " ( d o z p i n t s ) ... ... Windmills W i n d o w sashes, l e a d , i r o n , o r z i n c " ( w o o d , 20 p c ) W i n e , not c o n t a i n i n g m o r e t h a n 35 p c p r o o f spirit ... .. ... ... Sparkling Presses, w o o d e n ... ... W i n n o w i n g machines ... ... Wire—Iron ... Copper, thread covered B o t t l i n g , tinned or other Gauges ... ... ... S t r a i n e r s , for f e n c i n g ... U n e n u m e r a t e d " ( c o p p e r , free) ... ... W o o d e n h o o p s for c a s k s ... ... ... ... H o o p s for s a i l s P e g s for hoots ... ... ... ... R i m s for sieves ... ... Rope H a n d l e s for tools " ( s m a l l , free) ... B u n g s "(and shives) Shovels ... ... ... B a c k s for b r u s h e s " ( w h e n b o r e d , 25 p c ) Woodware Wool—Unmanufactured Berlin and knitting ... Woollen handkerchiefs ... ... I n the piece, u n e n u m e r a t e d ... ... Shawls R u g s "(and blanketing) T w e e d s a n d c l o t h s "(dress, 10 p c ) ... W o o l p a c k s ... ... ... ... W o r k s o f art "(free for p u b l i c i n s t i t u t i o n s ) ... W r i t i n g p a p e r , not o t h e r w i s e e n u m e r a t e d " ( c u t ) t ( f a i n t l i n e d , 25 p c , o t h e r , free) ... W r i n g i n g machines, of all descriptions ...

157

S.A.

W.A.

2S CWt

10 p c is cwt 15 P C *20 p C 20 p c 5 PC "15 p c

id od 15 15 15

3s c w t 7/6 t o n 25 p c 25 p c 25 p c 25 p c 25 p c

(note) free ... "45 p c 35 P C 10 p c 25 p c 30 p c

6s g a l 10s g a l 25 p c free ... free ... free ... free ... 25 p c 25 p c "25 p c free ... 25 p c free ... 25 p c

8s g a l 12s g a l free ... 15 p c free ... free ... free ... free ... free ... free ... 25 p c 25 p c free ... 25 p c

12s g a l 15s g a l 25 p c 15 p c free ... free ... free ... free ... free ... free ... free ... 25 p c free ... 25 p c

(note) 1 os g a l 5 pc 5 PC 15 P C free .. 5 PC free .. free ... 15 P C 5 PC 15 P C free .. 15 P C

(note) (note) 5 PC 15 P C 15 P C 15 P C 15 p c IS p c

25 p c 25 p c free ... free ... 25 p c free ... 15 p c 25 p c 15 p c 25 p c 25 p c 15 p c free ... free ...

*25 p c 25 p c 25 p c 25 p c 25 p c free ... free ... 10 p c (note) 35 P C 25 p c 25 p c free ... free ...

25 p c 25 p c free .., "free ... 25 p c free .., 25 p c 15 p c 15 P C 25 p c 15 P C *i5 p c free ... free ...

free .. "5 p c free .. free .. 15 P C 15 P C 15 p c 15 p c 10 p c 10 p c "free .. 10 p c free ..

(note) 15 P C 5 PC 15 P C »5 P C free . 15 P C 15 P C 15 P C 20 p c 20 p c I5PC 4d ea *io p c

tfree .. 25 p c

'5 P C '5 P C

15 P C 7* p c

2d l b *2d l b free ... 25 p c

10 25 25 20 25 25

pc PC pc pc pc pc

lb cwt pc PC PC 10 p c 15 p c

5 PC pc 15 P C 15 P C free . 15 P C 10

Y a r n — S p u n "(Russian, Italian, jute and coir, free) t ( R u s s i a n b o l t r o p e y a r n , free) "free ... I2S CWt t u s c w t 8s c w t Angora, Berlin and wool ... ... 15 p c free .. (note) 15 p c Y e a s t p o w d e r "(yeast, 15 p c ) 25 p c 2 0 p c * d Ib

free ... 15 P C 15 P C

Zinc—Sheet "(and plain) Ingot Perforated Zoedone "(doz pints)

free ... free ... free , 15 P C

3

W h i t e l e a d : V i c t o r i a — £ 2 per t o n , d r y .

...

free free free 25 p c

free free free 10 p

.. .. .. c

free ... free ... free ... 20 p c

"free .. free .. free .. 20 p c

N e w Z e a l a n d — M i x e d , 5s c w t ; i n o i l , 2s 6d c w t ; d r y , free.

W i n d o w sashes : N e w Z e a l a n d — S e e sashes. W i n e : T a s m a n i a — I n w o o d , 6s g a l ; i n b o t t l e s , 8s g a l ; s p a r k l i n g , 10s g a l . N e w Z e a l a n d — S p a r k l i n g , 9s g a l ( A u s t r a l i a n o f 35 per c e n t , 5s g a l l o n ) ; o t h e r k i n d s , 6s g a l . F i j i — B o r d e a u x (claret), A u s t r a l i a n , i n b u l k , 2s g a l ; o t h e r k i n d s , a n d i n b o t t l e , 4s g a l . W e s t e r n A u s t r a l i a — G i n g e r , 6s 6 d g a l ; q u i n i n e w i n e , 15 per cent ; u n f e r m e n t e d for c h u r c h purposes, 20 p e r c e n t ; s p i r i t s of, 16s g a l . W o o d e n h a n d l e s for t o o l s : T a s m a n i a — A x e , fork, s c y t h e , r a k e , spade a n d s h o v e l , 10 per c e n t ; b r o o m a n d m o p , 15 per c e n t ; u n e n u m e r a t e d , 15 per c e n t . W o o l l e n s : V i c t o r i a — C o a t i n g s , vestings, t r o u s e r i n g s , s h i r t i n g s a n d flannels, 25 per c e n t ; flannels, p r i n t e d a n d c o l o u r e d a l l o v e r (but not p l a i n w h i t e , p l a i n , b l u e d , or S h e t l a n d flannels), f a n c y s h i r t i n g s a n d s h i r t i n g s c o n t a i n i n g s i l k , 15 per c e n t . Y a r n : S o u t h A u s t r a l i a — A n g o r a w o o l a n d c o t t o n m e n d i n g , free ; A n g e r i n g , 25 per c e n t .

p


New South Wales Tariff.

NEW SOUTH WALES TARIFF. Spirits— s. d. N o t otherwise enumerated, proof gal ... 14 o ( N o allowance beyond 16.5 shall be made for the under proof of any spirit of a less strength than 16.5 under proof) Spirits, bitters, essences, fluid extracts, sarsaparilla, tinctures, medicines, infusions, and toilet preparations— N o t more than 25 per cent proof spirit, per gallon ... ... ... N o t more than 50 per cent proof spirit, per gallon . Not more than 75 per cent proof spirit, per gallon ... ... ... ... More than 75 per cent proof spirit, per gallon Overproof proof spirit, per gallon ... Spirits—Methylated spirit proof spirit... If

3

6

10

6

14 14 o

o o 1

o

Spirits— Perfumed spirits, perfumed waters, Florida water, and bay rum, per liquid gallon ... .. .. 20

o

Wines— Sparkling, per gallon Other kinds, „ BeerHulk, per gallon Bottled „

Unmanufactured, entered to be manufactured in the colony, per lb.. ...

1

o

Sheepwash, per l h . . .

...

o

3

Cigars and cigarettes (including wrappers in latter case), per lb ... ...

6

o

O p i u m , and any preparation thereof, per lb 2 0 o . . 7 0

containing spirit overproof to be charged as spirituous compounds, per gallon .. ... 14

...

Tobacco— s. d . Delivered for home consumption manufactured, unmanufactured, and snuff, per lb 3 o

...

... 10 ... 5

o o

...

...

6 9

o o

Biscuits, per lb

o

\

Confectionery (including cakes, comfits, liquorice, liquorice paste, lozenges of alt kinds, cocoanut in sugar, sugar candy, succades, and sweetmeats, per Ib ... ...

o

1

Fruits, dried, candied, and prunes (exclusive of dates), per Ib

o

2

Glucose, solid, per cwt ,, liquid, „

3 2

o

o 2

h o

o 4

J

3

o 1

... ...

J a m s and jellies, per lb, or reputed package o f that weight, and so in proportion for any such reputed weight ... Molasses and treacle, per cwt ... ... Preserves and candied fruits, fruits boiled, peel drained or dry, per Ib Sugar, refined, per cwt ... „ raw, „ T e a , per lb

o

Every effort has been made to ensure accuracy in the foregoing tables, but the Publishers of the Handbook cannot be responsible for any errors.

E X C H A N G E H O T E L , CHARTERS TOWERS.

R.

COLLINS

=

*

Proprietor

0

0


POSTAL AND TELEGRAPHIC INFORMATION OF

Q

U

T H E COLONIES.

E

E

N

S

L

A

N

D

.

R A T E S OF POSTAGE. Letters. Town Letters, for delivery at the Post Office or within the limits of the city or town in which letters are posted : Not exceeding J oz., id. ; and for every additional J oz. or fraction of J oz., id. Post Cards (single), id. Country and Intercolonial Letters, for transmission between separate post towns or places within the Australasian colonies: Not exceeding 4 oz., 2 d . ; and for every additional .J oz. or fraction of j oz., 2d. Post Cards, single, id. ; reply, 2d. Letters to United Kingdom, Europe, and America : Ordinary Letters, not exceeding oz., 2 j d . , and for every additional J oz. or fraction of J oz., 2Jd. Post Cards, ijd. ; reply, 3d. 1

Registered Letters. For the Registration of Letters a stamp of the value of 3d. must be affixed in addition to the postage chargeable. Letters Containing Gold. For transmission by post between separate post towns or places within the colony : Not exceeding oz., 4d. ; and for every additional J oz. or fraction of J oz., 4d. Late Fee on Letters. Colonial, i d . , and Intercolonial, 2d. each letter; Foreign, 2jd. Loose Ship Letters. Loose Letters posted on board steamers must bear a late fee, besides the regular postage. Consignees' Letters. Letters concerning goods sent and to be delivered therewith are not required by the Post Office Act to be posted, nor to bear postage stamps, but those sent by railways must, to avoid being taken for ordinary letters, have, besides the words "Consignees' Letter," the name and address of the sender legibly written or printed on the face thereof, and be open for inspection. Newspapers. Newspapers published in Queensland transmitted within the colony, each newspaper not exceeding 10 ozs., 3d. ; to the Australasian Colonies, Fiji, and the New Hebrides, Jd. for every 2 ozs. or fraction thereof; to the United Kingdom, not exceeding 4 ozs., id. ; for every additional 2 ozs. or fraction thereof, ÂŁd. ; to foreign countries, not exceeding 4 ozs., id. ; for every additional 2 ozs. or fraction thereof, ^d. Newspapers published out of the colony transmitted within the colony, each newspaper id. for every 10 ozs. or fraction thereof; to the Australasian colonies, Fiji, and the New Hebrides, each newspaper, Jd. for every 2 ozs. or fraction thereof; to the United Kingdom or foreign countries, each newspaper not exceeding 4 ozs., id. ; for every additional 2 ozs. or fraction thereof, ÂŁd.


i6o

Postal

Information,

Queensland.

Books. Inland and Intercolonial, New Hebrides, Fiji, and British New Guinea: For every 4 ozs. or fraction thereof, id. To any other destination : For every 2 ozs., id. Packets Are subdivided as follows :—Books, I'rinted Papers, Commercial Papers, and Patterns and Samples. Parcels of books must not exceed 18 in. in length, 12 in. in width or depth, and 4 lbs. in weight. To places within the colony to which there is no parcel post, a single book may be sent not exceeding 7 lbs. in weight. Printed Papers. To any place within or l>eyond Queensland: thereof, id.

For each 2 ozs. or fraction

Commercial Papers. To places within Queensland and the Australasian colonies : For each 2 ozs. or fraction thereof, id. To all places except the above : For any weight not exceeding 2 ozs., 3d. ; l>etween 2 ozs. and 4 ozs., 3jd. ; between 4 ozs. and 6 ozs., 4d. ; Iwtween 6 ozs. and 8 ozs., 4jd. ; l>etween 8 ozs. and 10 ozs., 5d. ; l>etween 10 ozs. and 12 ozs., 6d. ; and for each additional 2 ozs. or fraction thereof, id. The limit of size for Printed Papers or Commercial Papers is—Length, 18 in. (2 ft. allowed by virtue of an arrangement with other Australasian colonies); width or depth, 12 in. ; and the weight must not exceed 4 lbs. Patterns and Samples. To all places within and l>eyond Queensland : For every 2 ozs. or fraction thereof, id. To places within the colony 2 ft. allowed (by virtue of an arrangement with other Australasian colonies); to India and the Australasian colonies must not exceed 18 in. in length or I ft. in depth or width, and 16 ozs. in weight; and for the United Kingdom 2 ft. in length, I ft. in depth and width, and 16 ozs. in weight. Money Orders. Should a letter containing an Order go astray, the money can 1 « obtained by means of a duplicate, and payment by Money Order can always be proved. Money may be remitted by means of Money Orders to places in Queensland, the other Australasian colonies, India, Canada, and the United States of America, in sums not exceeding £,10 in single orders, and to other places in sums not exceeding £10 in single orders. Fractions of a penny not to be allowed. Money Orders can l>e issued on foreign places, British colonies, China, Japan, and India, the head offices in London, Hongkong, and India making certain deductions for transmitting them to their destination. The rates of commission to be charged are as follows :—For Orders payable in Queensland : Not exceeding £5, 6d. ; alxne £5 and not exceeding £10, is. For New South Wales, Victoria, South Australia, Western Australia, Tasmania, and New Zealand : Not exceeding £2, 6d. ; £$, is. ; £7, is. 6d. ; .£10, 2s. All other places :—6d. for every £\ or fraction thereof. For colonies and countries on which single Orders may l>e issued up to .£20, the same proportion as above is to be charged for sums exceeding £10. Money may be remitted by telegraph to any Money Order Office in Queensland, New South Wales, Victoria, South Australia, Tasmania, New Zealand, and to Perth (Western Australia), on payment of the charge for a telegraph message of ten words (excepting for New Zealand, which is 5s.) in addition to the Money Order commission. The remitter should advise the payee by a telegram paid for in the ordinary manner. Postal Notes. Postal Notes are sold, and are paid or cashed at all Money Order Offices during the hours they are open for Money Order business, and at other offices as notified from time to time.


Postal

and

Telegraphic

Information,

Queensland.

161

The following are the denominations of l'ostal Notes and the fee or poundage to be charged for them :—Is., is. 6 d . — i d . ; 2s., 2s. 6d., 3s., 3s. 6d., 4s., 4s. 6 d . — i d . ; 5s., 7s. 6d., 2d. ; ios., 10s. 6d., 15s., 20s.—3d.

These Notes are only payable in New South Wales, Victoria, South Australia, and Tasmania on payment of an additional fee equal to amount charged in issuing colony. PARCELS POST. Inland. Parcels not to exceed 11 lbs. in weight or 3 ft. 6 in. in length, or 6 ft. in girth and length combined. Postage : Not exceeding 1 lb., 6d. ; each additional lb. or part thereof, 3d. Parcels may be registered for 3d. extra. All parcels must l>ear the name and address of the sender on the left corner of the side l>earing the address. Parcels will only be received and forwarded at the risk of the owners. Intercolonial and Foreign. Parcels not to exceed 11 lbs. in weight, or 3 ft. 6 in. in length, or 6 ft. in girth and length combined. Postage : Intercolonial, 8d. for first lb., and 6d. for every additional lb. or part thereof; United Kingdom, is. for first lb., and 6d. for every additional lb. or part thereof. The sender of any parcel will be required to sign a declaration, on a form provided for the purpose, furnishing an accurate statement of the contents of the parcel and the value thereof, address of the addressee, and the sender's place of abode, which declaration must be attached to the parcel to which it relates. Declaration forms will l>e issued to the public free of charge, and may lie obtained at any Parcel Post Office. A certificate of posting may be obtained, if desired and applied for at the time, by the person posting a parcel, on payment of a fee of 3d. No parcel shall consist of or contain two or more parcels addressed to different persons at different addresses. If such parcel be discovered, each of its contents will be treated as a separate parcel, and be charged for accordingly. Parcels will only be received and forwarded at the risk of the owners. Parcels posted in Queensland for the United Kingdom, France, and Algiers can be delivered at their destination by special messenger if plainly marked by the sender " Express." Such parcels will be charged 5<1., to be prepaid by the sender. T E L E G R A P H I C INFORMATION. Between all stations within a radius of eight miles from the General Post Office : Ten words, 6d. ; each additional word, id. Between any two stations in Queensland: Ten words, is.; every additional word, id. Telegrams marked " Urgent," at double rates—and these take precedence. Envelopes containing messages for transmission from any Telegraph Office may be posted at any Post Office free of charge, provided the words '' Telegraph message only" are written above the address, that the envelope is directed to the nearest Telegraph Office, and the message contained therein is fully paid, either in stamps or cash. To New South Wales : Ten words, is. ; every additional word, 2d. To Victoria: Ten words, 2s.; every additional word, 3d. Urgent, double rates. To South Australia (excepting stations on the Overland Line from Port Augusta to Port Darwin) : Ten words, 3s. ; every additional word, 3d. Urgent, double rates. Stations on Overland Line (according to distance) : Ten words, 4s. to 9s. ; every additional word, 4d. to 9d. To Tasmania : Ten words, 4s. ; every additional word, 4d. Only ten words are allowed free for address and signature. Urgent, double rates. To New Zealand : Ten words, 4s. 6d. ; every additional word, 6d. Address and signature to be counted and paid for. To Western Australia : Ten words, 4s. ; every additional word, 4d. Urgent, double rates. To New Caledonia : 9d. per word, including address and signature. To Europe : Direct and viii India, each word, 5s. id. Address and signature charged for.


l62

Pt>stal

N

E

W

S

O

U

Information.

T

H

W A L E S .

R A T E S OF POSTAGE. Letters. City and Suburban Letters, also Town Letters (delivered in town where posted): Not exceeding i oz., id. ; every additional £ oz., id. Country Letters: Not exceeding \ oz., 2d ; every additional } oz., 2d. Letters are also transmitted at the town rate of postage (id. per j oz.) between certain places in the colony. Letters containing gold, transmitted within the colony : Not exceeding I oz. (avoirdupois), 4d. ; every additional I oz. or fraction, 4<i. Intercolonial Letters—New Zealand, Queensland, South Australia, Tasmania, Victoria, Western Australia, Fiji, Norfolk Island and British New Guinea: Not exceeding J oz., 2d. ; every additional J oz., 2d. United Kingdom and foreign countries: Not exceeding '. oz., 2 j d . ; every additional J oz., 2jd. Letters can t>e registered by affixing the registration fee (3d.) and the amount of the proper postage thereto (in stamps). Late letters may l>e posted, l>earing late fees in stamps :— Inland or Intercolonial—At G.P.O. : 15 minutes after the time for closing mails. At Sydney Railway Station: Up to within 15 minutes of the departure of the Express or Mail Trains. Late Fee, 2d. For San Francisco Mail Steamers—United Kingdom, Canada, United States, and Honolulu—At G . P . O . : i j hours after the time for closing mails. Late fee, 2jd. For Canadian Mail Steamers—United Kingdom, Canada, United States, and Honolulu—At G.P.O. : i j hours after the time for closing mails. Late fee, 2.Jd. For

P. and

O.,

Orient,

French

and

German

Mail

Steamers—United

Kingdom—At G.P.O. : I hour after the time for closing mails. Late fee, 2.Jd. At Sydney Railway Station: Up to within 15 minutes of the departure of the train. Late fee, 5d. Foreign Countries—At G.P.O. : 30 minutes after the time for closing mails. Late fee, 2*.d. At Sydney Railway Station : Up to within 15 minutes of the departure of the train. Late fee, 5d. It has been arranged as a tentative measure to sell to the public at the General Post Office 2jd. postage stamps of Great Britain, and 2d. stamps of certain of the colonies, viz., Victoria, South Australia, Queensland, and New Zealand. These stamps are only intended to be used to cover the postage on replies to letters, &c., and not for remittance purposes. Therefore not more than iod. worth will be sold to any person at one time without additional charge. For any excess required a commission will be charged as follows :—For British stamps, 2d. on every 5d. worth or portion thereof. For Intercolonial stamps, 2d. on every 6d. worth or portion thereof. Letter Cards. Double Cards, which may be closed against inspection, may be transmitted within the colony, and to Queensland, British New Guinea, Victoria, South Australia, Western Australia, Tasmania, New Zealand, and Fiji, 1 Jd. each. Post Cards. Inland and Intercolonial: Single, id. ; reply (double cards each half impressed with id. stamp), 2d. United Kingdom and Foreign Countries : Single, i^d. ; reply (double cards each half impressed with i j d . stamp), 3d. Newspapers. A publication must be registered at the General Post Office, Sydney, for circulation as a newspaper or registered or passed as such in Great Britain or any of the colonies to entitle it to pass through the post as a newspaper. Newspapers printed in the colony from type set up in the colony, or from stereotyped plates made therefrom, if posted within seven days of the date of


Postal

Information]

Neiv South

Wales.

publication, are transmitted within the colony free, if not exceeding IO ozs., and at the rate of a half-penny each for every additional IO ozs.; those posted after seven days from the date of publication are charged a half-penny each for every io ozs. Newspapers posted in any Post Office or receiver in Sydney for delivery within the Ixxindaries of the city are charged a penny each up to io ozs., and a half-penny for every additional IO ozs. Newspapers for Victoria, South Australia, Western Australia, Tasmania, New Zealand, and Fiji are charged a half-penny per IO ozs. ; those for the United Kingdom and Foreign Countries, a id. each up to 4 ozs., and a half-penny for every additional 2 ozs. or fraction. Newspapers for Queensland and British New Guinea are charged a half-penny for every 2 ozs. or fraction thereof. No newspaper containing any advertisement contravening the " Indecent Advertisement Act of 1892," or the "Suppression of Gambling Act of 1895," of Queensland, will be permitted to pass through the Post Office of that colony. Newspapers from lieyond the colony are delivered without charge if they have Ijeen fully prepaid. Newspapers may be posted at the General Post Office for the West to 7 a.m. and 5.30 p.m., and South to 7 a.m., 3 p.m., and 6 p.m., and for the North by 7 a.m. and 4 p.m. If for despatch by intercolonial mails, they should be posted one hour previous to the time fixed for posting letters. Packets. In Ian it and

Intercolonial.

Books and Magazines are charged at the rate of a half-penny for each 2 ozs. up to 4 ozs., and for every additional 4 ozs. or portion of 4 ozs., id., and must not exceed 5 lbs. in weight. Commercial and Printed Papers : id. for every 2 ozs. or fraction of 2 ozs. up to 4 lbs. Packets of Merchandise, Samples, &c. : id. for every 2 ozs. or fraction of 2 ozs., up to 16 ozs. United

Kingdom

and

Foreign

Countries.

Printed Matter : id. for every 2 ozs. or fraction of 2 ozs. up to 5 lbs. Commercial Papers: 3d., when not exceeding 2 ozs. ; 3jd., exceeding 2 ozs., but not exceeding 4 ozs. ; 4d., exceeding 4 ozs., but not exceeding 6 ozs. ; 4M., exceeding 6 ozs., but not exceeding 8 ozs. ; 5d., exceeding 8 ozs., but not exceeding 10 ozs. ; and id. for every additional 2 ozs. or fraction of 2 ozs. up to 5 lbs. Patterns and Samples: For the United Kingdom, up to I lb. ; for Austria, Belgium, France, Portugal, Italy, India, Egypt, Salvador, or Hawaii, up to 12 ozs. ; for other places, up to 10 ozs.—For every 2 ozs. or fraction of 2 ozs., id. Money Orders. Money Orders may be obtained and made payable at any of the offices in New South Wales as follows :—For any sum not exceeding £5, 6d. ; exceeding £ $ , but not exceeding £10, is. ; exceeding £10, but not exceeding £15, is. °d> ; exceeding £1$, but not exceeding £20, 2s. Intercolonial Orders : Not exceeding £2, 6d. ; exceeding £2, but not exceeding £ $ , is. ; exceeding £ $ , but not exceeding £7, is. 6d. ; exceeding £7, but not exceeding £10, 2s. ; exceeding £ 1 0 , but not exceeding £12, 2s. 6d. ; exceeding £\2, but not exceeding £ 1 5 , 3s. ; exceeding £l$, but not exceeding ,£17, 3s. 6d. ; exceeding £ 1 7 , but not exceeding £20, 4s. By telegraph (to New Zealand excepted) the charge for a telegram of ten words, in addition to the foregoing rates. Orders on the United Kingdom and foreign countries are issued : For every sum not exceeding £2, is. ; exceeding £2 and under £5, 2s. 6d. ; exceeding £5 and under £7, 3s. 6d. ; exceeding £7 and under £10, 5s. ; and in cases where single orders up to £20 are issued, such as on Germany, the United States, Canada, India, and Italy, and a few other places, the rates of commission up to £10 are as shown above, and thence exceeding £10, but not exceeding £12, 6s. ; exceeding £12, but not exceeding £1$, 7s. 6d. ; exceeding £1$, but not exceeding £17, 8s. 6d. ; exceeding £17, but not exceeding £20, 10s. Every order issued in the colony must bear a penny duty stamp, to be paid for by the remitter. All orders issued out of the colony of the value of £2 or upwards, paid in New South Wales, must bear a 2d. stamp, provided by the payee.


164

Postal and Telegraphic

Information,

New

South

Wales.

Postal Notes. Postal Notes may tie obtained at— The Stamp Sales Office, General Post Office, Monday to Friday, 8 a.m. to 9.30 a.m., and 3.30 p.m. to 9 p.m. ; Saturdays, 8 a.m. to 9.30 a.m., and noon to 9 p.m. The chief Money Order Office, General Post Office, Monday to Friday, 9.30 a.m. to 3.30 p.m. ; Saturday, Q.30 a.m. to noon. All Money Order Offices in the colony, and certain other Post Offices, during the hours they are open for the sale of stamps. They are payable only at Money Order Offices, and during the following hours:— Monday to Friday, 9.30 a.m. to 3.30 p.m. ; Saturday. 9.30a.m. to noon. Branch, suburban and country offices—Monday to F'riday, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. ; Saturday, 10 a.m. to I p.m. The following are the denominations of the Notes and the poundage or price charged for them:—Is., Is. 6d., 2s. 6 d . , 3s., 4 s . — i d . ; 5s., 7s. 6d.—2d. ; ios., 15s.—3d. ; 20s.—4d.

T E L E G R A P H I C INFORMATION. Between Sydney and Suburban and City Branch Offices: For ten words, 6d. ; each additional word, id. (Telegrams are also transmitted at this rate between certain other stations in the colony.) Between all stations in New South Wales, except suburban offices : For ten words, is. ; for every additional word, id. Between Barringun and other border stations and all stations in Queensland, between Broken Hill and other border stations and all stations in South Australia, between Albury and other border stations and all stations in Victoria, and between all stations in New South Wales and border stations in Queensland, South Australia, and Victoria : For ten words, Is. ; for each additional word, id. Telegrams posted at any Post Office (not a Telegraph Station) will be forwarded by first mail to the nearest Telegraph Office for transmission by wire, provided the necessary stamps (unobliterated) are affixed to the message, and that the message is enclosed in an envelope endorsed "Telegraph message only," and directed to the Telegraph Stationmaster at the nearest Telegraph Station. This envelope need not be stamped. All telegrams must l>e written on the form specially provided. Messages within one mile from any office are delivered free ; exceeding one mile, porterage or cab hire w ill l>e charged; likewise boat hire where messages are delivered on board ship. Messages to any stations in South Australia (Port Darwin line excepted) are charged 2s. for the first ten words, and 2d. for every additional word. To Queensland and Victoria the charge is is. for first ten words, and 2d. for ever)' additional word. To Tasmania the charge is 2s. 6d. for the first ten words, and 3d. for each additional word. To Western Australia the charge is 3s. for the first ten words, and 3d. for each additional word. To New Zealand the charge is 3s. for the first ten words, and 5d. for every additional word. The address and signature to be counted and paid for. To New Caledonia : Ten words, including address and signature, 8s., and each additional word iod., plus 2d. per word New Caledonia land line rate. To Europe : Direct, 4s. 1 id. per word ; vi& Moulmein, 9s. 8d. ; viS Hongkong, 12s. od. Address and signature are charged for. The charges on telegrams (except New Zealand, New Caledonia, and International Cable business) must be prepaid in postage stamps, which must be affixed to the message forms by the senders. Telegram forms, impressed with sixpenny or shilling stamps, may be purchased at their face value, either singly or in packets of twenty, at any Telegraph Office in the colony. Business people using these stamped forms are in a measure protected against peculation by dishonest employees, inasmuch as the stamps imprinted are not recognised for any other purpose. A spoilt form can be utilised by re-writing the message and attaching it to the form.


Postal

V

I C

Information.

T

O

R

165

I A .

R A T E S OF POSTAGE. Letters. Town and Inland letters : For every ounce or under, 2d. Intercolonial • For every J 07.. or under, 2d. United Kingdom, viii Brindisi, Marseilles, or San Francisco, and foreign countries : Not exceeding ! oz., 2jd. ; every additional £ oz., 2jd. Letters can be registered on payment of 3d. in stamps. Urgent Letters : For each letter, in addition to ordinary postage, 6d. Letters marked " Urgent," and lwaring 6d. for urgency fee, will, on arrival at the Post Office in the town to which they are directed, lie treated in the same manner as telegrams and delivered with the utmost despatch. Urgent letters will not, however, be delivered if addressed to persons residing beyond the radius of the ordinary delivery by telegraph messenger, nor if addressed to any place where there is no delivery by either letter or telegraph messenger. Urgent letters will tie accepted at all Post and Telegraph Offices during the hours of 8.30 a.m. to 8 p.m., and such letters will be stamped at the office where they are posted with the " Urgent" stamp. Newspapers. If published in Victoria, and addressed to places in Victoria, New South Wales, South Australia, West Australia, Tasmania, New Zealand, Fiji, British New Guinea, New Hebrides, 10 ozs., jd. International and Queensland, 4 ozs., i d ; each additional 2 ozs. Jd. If published out of Victoria, addressed to places in Victoria, New South Wales, South Australia, West Australia, Tasmania, New Zealand, Fiji, British New Guinea, New Hebrides, 8 ozs. id ; each additional 4 ozs., id. Foreign and Queensland, 2 ozs., id. Magazines. Town and Inland : Magazines and Publications not published in Victoria, under 2 ozs., }d; 2 ozs., not exceeding 8 ozs., id. ; every addittonal 4 ozs., or fraction thereof Jd. Intercolonial, excepting Queensland : Magazines and Publications not published in Victoria, 8 ozs. or under id ; each additional 4 ozs. d . Foreign : As per printed papers (other than newspapers) rate. J

Post Cards. Inland and Intercolonial: Stamp on card, each, id. foreign countries, 1 Jd. Letter Cards. 2d. each ; stamp on cards. Packets.

To United Kingdom and

Packets are divided under the following heads, viz.:—(1) Commercial Papers, (2) Printed Papers, and (3) Patterns and Sample Packets of Merchandise, &c. Commercial Papers and Printed Papers: Inland and Intercolonial—For every 2 ozs. or under (up to 4 lbs.), id. Packets and Samples, &c. : For every 2 ozs. or under (up to 1 lb.), id. To the United Kingdom and foreign countries—Commercial Papers : 2 ozs. or under, 3d. ; exceeding 2 ozs., but not exceeding 4 ozs., 3Jd. ; for every additional 2 ozs. up to 10 ozs., Jd. ; every additional 2 ozs. or under (up to 5 lbs.), id. Printed Papers (other than newspapers): For every 2 ozs. or under (up to 5 lbs.), id. Patterns and Samples, &c. : For every 2 ozs. or under (up to 1 lb.), id. Books. Inland and Intercolonial : Every 4 ozs. or under (up to 5 lbs.), id. United Kingdom and foreign countries : For every 2 ozs. or under (up to 5 lbs.), id. Money Orders. Post Office Orders can be obtained between the hours of 10 and 3 daily (except Saturdays, when offices close at noon), payable at any Money Order Office in Victoria : Not exceeding £5, 6d. ; above £5, but not exceeding £ 10, is. ; exceeding £10, but not exceeding £1$, Is. od. ; exceeding £ 1 5 , but not exceeding £20, 2S.


166

Postal

Information,

Victoria.

On any Money Order Office in the Australian colonies, Tasmania, or New Zealand : Not exceeding £2, 6d. ; exceeding £2, but not exceeding £$, Is. ; exceeding ^ 5 , but not exceeding £1, is^6d. ; exceeding £7, but not exceeding £\o, 2S. ; exceeding £ 10, but not exceeding £ 1 2 , 2s. 6d. ; exceeding ^12, but not exceeding ^15, 3s. ; exceeding £\$, but not exceeding £\ , 3s. 6d. ; exceeding £17, but not exceeding £20, 4s. United Kingdom, Canada, and foreign countries: Not exceeding £2, is.; above £2, but not exceeding £5, 2s. 6d. ; above £ $ , but not exceeding £7, 3s. 6 d . ; above £7, but not exceeding £10, 5s. ; and further amounts up to £20 are issued for China, India, Italy, and United States of America, only. t

Telegraph Money Orders. Payable in Victoria : Charge for a message of nine words in addition to above rates. To New South Wales, Queensland, South Australia, Tasmania, Perth (Western Australia): Charge for a message of ten words in addition to foregoing rates. Postal Notes. Postal Notes may be obtained at any Post Office during the hours the offices are open for transaction of business with the public, and will be payable only at any Money Order Office in the colony between the hours of 10 a.m. and 3 p.m. on week days, Saturdays excepted; on Saturdaysl>etween 10a.m. and 12 noon. The following are the denominations of the notes that will l>e issued, and the prices charged for them:— For a postal note of is. or is. 6d.—Jd. ; 2s., 2s. 6d., 3s., 3s. od., 4s., 4s. 6 d . — i d ; 5s. and 7s. 6d.—2d. ; 10s., 10s. 6d., 15s., and 20s.—3d.

Inland Parcels Post. Parcels for transmission will be received at the Parcel Office, Post Office Place, Melbourne, and all Post Offices in the colony, subject to the following regulations:— The Melbourne office is open daily (Saturdays excepted) from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., and on Saturdays from 9 a.m. to 12 noon. At all other Post Offices Parcel Post business is transacted at the same hours as general postal business. Parcels are conveyed to any part of the colony of Victoria at fixed rates, which cover the entire service and leave nothing to be paid on delivery. Limit of weight of parcel, 7 lbs. ; limit of size of parcel, 3 ft. 6 in. in length, or 6 ft. in girth and length combined. Postage (to be prepaid by stamps): 2 lbs. or under, ad. ; each extra lb., 3d. The stamps to l>e affixed to an adhesive lal>el, obtainable at any Post Office, which label will be attached to the parcel by the postal receiving officer after he has ascertained the weight. Parcels may be registered upon payment in stamps of an additional fee ot 3d., and for an additional id. a receipt will lie obtained on delivery, which will be forwarded to the sender by post. As all parcels are liable to examination, it is advisable that they should not be sealed, so that, if necessary, they may be conveniently examined. Parcels up to 3 lbs. weight will be received and delivered at all Post Offices in the colony, but parcels exceeding that weight will only be received at and forwarded to Post Offices to which the mails are conveyed by rail or coach, or both. Parcels Post with the United Kingdom and India. Limit of size—Maximum, 3 ft. 6 in. in length, or 6 ft. in girth and length combined. • Limit of weight—11 lbs., except where otherwise stated in Victorian "Postal and Telegraphic Guide." Postage : To United Kingdom, First lib., Is. ; each additional lb., 6d. To India, 1 lb. or under, is. ; each extra lb. or under, is. The aliove rates must be fully prepaid by stamps affixed to the parcels. The sender of any parcel will be required to sign a declaration stating its contents and the value thereof. Parcels will only be received and forwarded at the risk of the owners.


Postal and Telegraphic

Information,

Vic. and S.A.

167

Articles of a dangerous, damaging, or offensive character will not lie received or delivered ; neither will opium in any shape l>e forwarded to India. All such prohibited articles may be forthwith confiscated. Parcels on arrival in Victoria will be sent to the Customs Officer at the Parcels Office, General Post Office, Melbourne, for examination ; and in cases where Customs duty is payable, the same must be paid before the parcels are delivered. T E L E G R A P H I C INFORMATION. To or from any station in Victoria: Nine words or under, exclusive of name and address, od. ; every additional word, id. Address and signature free. The charge must be paid in stamps affixed lo the message form. To stations in Tasmania : Ten words or under, 2s. ; every additional word, 2d. Urgent messages : Double charge; address and signature combined not to exceed ten words, above ten charged for. To stations in South Australia (Overland Line excepted): Ten words or under, 2S. ; every additional word, 2d. Address and signature free. To stations in New South Wales: Ten words or under, is. ; every additional word, 2d. Address and signature free. To stations in Queensland : Ten words or under, 2s.; every additional word, 3d. Address and signature free. To stations in New Zealand : Ten words, the minimum message, 3s. 6d. ; every additional word, 6d. Address and signature to be counted and paid for. To Western Australia : Ten words or under, 3s. ; every additional word, 3d. Address and signature free. To New Caledonia : Ten words, 10s. 8d. ; each additional word, 1 id. Address and signature counted as part of the message. To Europe : Direct (per word), 4s. iod. Telegrams Transmitted at Night (Sundays excepted). After 8 p.m. until midnight: Ten words or under, 2s.; every additional word, 2d. After midnight and until 8.30 a.m.: Ten words or under, 3s.; everyadditional word, 3d. Sunday Telegrams. After 8.30 a.m. until 9.30 p.m.: Ten words or under, 2s.; every additional word, 2d. After9-30 p.m. until 8.30 a.m.: Ten words or under, 3s.; every additional word, 3d. Messages deposited during the day will be transmitted at 9.30 p.m., unless other arrangements have been made. Messages lodged for transmission on holidays during the hours the Telegraph Offices are closed to the public are charged at Sunday rates. Urgent Messages. In Victoria, Queensland, South Australia, Tasmania : Double rates. New South Wales : Rate and half. West Australia : io words, 5s ; each additional word, 5d. New Zealand : Treble rates. Urgent Telegrams take precedence of all ordinary telegrams.

S O U T H

A U S T R A L I A .

RATES OF POSTAGE. Letters. Town and Country Letters: Not exceeding J oz., 2d.; every additional J oz., 2d. Intercolonial Letters : Not exceeding ÂŁ oz., 2d. ; every additional J oz., 2d. United Kingdom: Not exceeding % oz., 2^d.; every additional J oz., 2jd. Registration Fee, 3d., payable in stamps. Acknowledgment of delivery of registered articles, 2hd. Inland and Intercolonial (including New Zealand): Post Cards, i d . ; Reply Post Cards, 2d. United Kingdom and other countries and colonies, I ' d . ; Reply Post Cards, 3d.


i68

Postal Information,

South

Australia.

Newspapers. Inland or Intercolonial (including Fiji, hut not Queensland), id. for the first to ozs. and Jd. for each additional 4 ozs. Queensland, id. for the first 2 ozs. and 'd. for each additional 2 ozs. ; no newspaper or other periodical publication intended for transmission to Queensland may contain indecent advertisements or advertisements relating to gambling. United Kingdom and foreign countries or colonies, id. for first 4 ozs., and ^d. for each additional 2 ozs. Packet, Magazine, and Book Post. Packets are divided under the following heads, viz. :—(1) Commercial Papers, (2) Printed Papers, and (3) Patterns and Samples, Packets of Merchandise, &c. Commercial Papers and Printed Papers, Inland and Intercolonial: For every 2 oz. or under (up to 4 lbs.), id. Packets and Samples, ftc (except to Queensland) : For every 2 ozs. or under (up lo 1 lb.), id. Packets and samples for Queensland the same rates, but if they contain merchandise (no matter how small) they can only l>e forwarded per parcel post. Coin, jewellery, gems, watches, bullion, and articles of the like kind can be sent to Queensland at letter rate of postage only, and must l>e registered. To the United Kingdom and foreign countries : Commercial Papers, not exceeding 2 ozs., 3d.; exceeding 2 ozs., but not exceeding 4 ozs., 3^d.; exceeding 4 ozs., but not exceeding 6 ozs., 4d.; exceeding 6 ozs., but not exceeding 8 ozs., 4)d.; exceeding 8 ozs., but not exceeding 10 ozs., 5d.; exceeding 10 ozs. but not exceeding 12 ozs., 6d.; each additional 2 ozs. (up to 5 lbs.), id. Printed Papers (other than newspapers), for every 2 ozs. or under (up to 5 lbs.), id. Patterns and Samples, ftc., for every 2 ozs. or under, id. The limit of weight varies from 8 ozs. up to I lb. Inland and to Victoria, New South Wales, Tasmania, and New Zealand — Magazine Rates: Not exceeding 8 ozs., id. ; each additional 4 ozs. or under (up to 4 lbs. inland, or 3 lbs. intercolonial), d . Inland and Intercolonial Book Packets : Every 4 ozs. or under (up to 4 lbs. inland, or 3 lbs. intercolonial), i d . Parcels Post (United Kingdom), wholly by sea: For each parcel of 1 lb. or under, is. ; each extra lb. or under, 6d. Intercolonial Parcel Post: For each parcel of I lb. or under, 8 d . ; each additional lb., 6d. Money Orders. 3

Money Orders are issued and paid at the chief office, Adelaide, from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m., and at any of the country Money Order Offices in the colony between 10 a.m. and 5 p.m. All offices close at 1 p.m. on Saturdays. In the colony : Not exceeding £$, 6d. ; al>ove £ $ , and not exceeding £\o, is. ; for each additional £5, 6d. extra up to £20. By telegraph, in addition to the above rates charge for message of ten words. To the Australian colonies, Tasmania, or New Zealand : Not exceeding £2, 6d. ; not exceeding £5, is. ; not exceeding £,, Is. 6d. ; not exceeding £10, 2s. ; not exceeding £ 12, 2s. 6d. ; not exceeding £i$, 3s. ; not exceeding £17, 3s. 6d. ; not exceeding ^20, 4s. By telegraph, in addition to the above rates, charge for a message of ten words. To the United Kingdom and other countries. For each £1 or fraction thereof, up to £10, 6d. To Canada, China, Germany, British India (and its agencies at Aden, Baghdad, Bahrain, Bunder Abbas, Bushire, Bassorah, Guadur, Jask, Linga, Mohammerah, and Muscat), Mauritius, and the United States of America (including Hawaii): For each £1 or fraction thereof, up to £20, 6d. Postal Notes. Postal Notes may be obtained at any Money Order Office and various other Post Offices in the colony at the following rates : For a Postal Note of Is. or Is. 6d., Jd. ; 2s., 2 5 . 6d., 3s., 3s. 6d., 4s., 4s. 6d., id. ; 5s., 7s. 6d., 2d. ; 10s., 10s 6d., 15s., 20s., 3d.

Unobliterated penny postage stamps up to 5d. may be affixed to the back of a note and the amount of the note and stamps will be paid.

U


Postal

and Telegraphic

Information,

S.A.

and

W.A.

169

T E L E G R A P H I C INFORMATION. Telegrams are forwarded to or from any two stations on the Adelaide, Port, and Peninsular Line, and between various suburban stations, at the rate of 6d. per ten words, and id. for every additional word. Between any other stations in the colony except the Overland line : Ten words, is. ; every additional word, id. Name and address of sender and receiver are free in both cases. To Victoria and New South Wales : Ten words, 2s. ; every additional word, 2d. To Queensland : Ten words, 3s. ; every additional word, 3d. To Tasmania : Ten words, 3s. ; every additional word, 3d. Only ten words allowed free for name and address. To Western Australia : Ten words, 2s. ; every additional word, 2d. To New Zealand : Ten words, 4s. 6d. ; every additional word, 6d. The address and signature to be counted and paid for. To New Caledonia: Each message n d . per word, addresses and signatures counted and charged for. To Europe : Each word, 4s. od. Messages can lie sent to London more cheaply through the Oriental or Renter's Telegram Company by having the names and addresses of the sender and receiver registered, which are then transmitted as one word. W E S T E R N

A U S T R A L I A .

RATES OF POSTAGE. Letters. Town Letters : Not exceeding!j oz., i d . ; exceeding J oz., but not exceeding 1 oz., 2d.; for every additional 1 oz. or fraction thereof, 2d. Country Letters: Not exceeding ;. oz., 2d.; not exceeding I oz., 4d.; every additional 4 oz., 2d.; late fee, 2d. Intercolonial I-etters—South Australia, Victoria, New South Wales, Queensland, Tasmania, New Zealand: Not exceeding J oz., 2 d . ; every additional J oz., 2d.; late fee, 2d. United Kingdom : Not exceeding J oz., 2 M . ; every additional i, oz. 2 d . ; late fee,6d. Letters can tie registered on payment of 3d. extra (stamps to the amount to be affixed). 5

Newspapers. Printed and posted in the colony within a week of publication : For delivery within the colony, beyond the city or town where published, free ; for delivery within the boundaries of such city or town, i d . ; to the Australian colonies, Jd. up to 10 ozs.; to the United Kingdom, id. up to 4 ozs., and Jd. for every additional 2 ozs. Packets. Packets are divided under the following heads, viz.:—(1) Commercial Papers, (2) Printed Papers, and (3) Patterns and Samples, Packets of Merchandise, &c Commercial Papers and Printed Papers—Inland and Intercolonial: For every 2 ozs. or under (up to 4 lbs.), id. Packets and Samples, &c.: For every 2 ozs. or under (up to 1 lb.), id. To the United Kingdom and foreign countries : Commercial Papers, 4 ozs. or under, 2 j d . ; exceeding 4 ozs., but not exceeding 6 ozs., 3d.; every additional 2 ozs. or under (up to 5 lbs.), id. Printed Papers (other than newspapers), for every 2 ozs. or under (up to 5 lbs.), id. Patterns and Samples, &c., for ever)' 2 ozs. or under, id. The limit of weight varies from 10 ozs. up to 1 lb Books. Inland : Every 4 ozs. up to 4 lbs., id. Intercolonial: Every 4 ozs. up to 4 lbs., i d . Parcel Post with the United Kingdom. Parcels may be sent to the United Kingdom by the P. & O. Company's steamers fortnightly. A parcel should not exceed 3 ft. 6 in. in length, or 6 ft. in girth and length combined, nor weigh more than 11 lbs. Rates for each parcel of 1 lb. or under, is.; each additional lb. or under (up to 11 lbs.), 6d. Parcel Post with the Eastern Colonies. I lb. or under, 8 d . ; each additional lb. (up to II lbs.), 6d.


I jo

Postal

and Telegraphic

Information,

W.A.

and

Tas.

Money Orders. Inland: Under £$, 6d.; under ^10, is.; under/15, is. 6 d . ; under £20, 2S. To the Australian colonies : Any sum under£2, is. 6 d . ; under .£5, 2s. 6d. ; over £ $ and under £7, 3s.; over £7 and under ,£10, 4s., .£15, 5s., ,£20, 6s. 6d. Germany (issued at Perth only): Any sum under £1, 6d ; any sum under £2, is.; any sum under ,£3, Is. 6d.; any sum under £4, 2s.; any sum under £5, 2s. 6 d . ; any sum under £6, 3s.; any sum under £7, 3s. 6d.; any sum under ^ 8 , 4s.; any sum under ,£9, 4s. 6 d . ; any sum under £10, 5s. To the United Kingdom, Cape of Good Hope, India, Singapore, and Hongkong : Any sum under £1, 6 d . ; any sum under £2, is.; any sum under £ 3 , Is. 6d.J any sum under £4, 2s.; any sum under £5, 2s. 6 d . ; any sum under £6, 3s.; any sum under £7, 3s. 6d; any sum under £8, 4s.; any sum under £<), 4s. 6 d . ; any sum under £\o, 5s. T E L E G R A P H I C INFORMATION. To or from any station in Western Australia: Ten words, Is.; every additional word, id. (excepting between Perth and Fremantle, the charge for which is 6d.) To Victoria and New South Wales: Ten words, 3s.; every additional word, 3d. To New Zealand : Ten words, 5s. 6 d . ; every additional word, 7A.; address and signature charged as part of the message. To Queensland and Tasmania : Ten words, 4s.; every additional word, 4d. To South Australia : Ten w ords, 2s.; every additional word, 2d. To Europe : Each word, 4s. ox!.; address and signature charged for. T

A

S

M

A

N

I

A

.

RATES OF POSTAGE. Letters. Town Letters : Not exceeding J oz., id. ; every additional J oz., id. Country Letters : Not exceeding J oz., 2d. ; every additional h oz., 2d. Intercolonial Letters (Victoria, South Australia, Western Australia, New South Wales, Queensland, New Zealand, and Fiji) : Not exceeding J oz., 2d. ; every additional } oz., 2d. United Kingdom, vid Brindisi: Not exceeding J oz., 2 d . ; every additional J oz., 2$d. Letters can be registered by affixing an additional 3d. stamp. a

Newspapers. To any post town in the colony, Western Australia, and New Zealand: Free if posted within seven days. To Victoria, South Australia, and Queensland, and New South Wales : $d. each up to 10 ozs. To the United Kingdom : Up to 4 ozs., id. ; and Jd. for each additional 2 ozs. Books. Inland : For every 4 ozs. or under, id. up to 3 lbs. Intercolonial: For every 4 ozs., id. Packets. Packets are divided under the following heads, viz. :—(1) Commercial Papers, (2) Printed Papers, and (3) Patterns and Samples, Packets of Merchandise, & C . Commercial Papers and Printed Papers : Inland and Intercolonial—For every 2 ozs. or under (up to 4 lbs.), id. Packets and Samples, ftc : For every 2 ozs. or under (up to 1 lb.), id. To the United Kingdom and foreign countries—Commercial Papers: 2 ozs. or under, 3d. ; exceeding 2 ozs., but not exceeding 6 ozs., 3 W . ; every additional 2 ozs. or under (up to 10 lbs.), 4 j d ; from 10 oz. to 51b., id. Printed Papers (other than newspapers): For every 2 ozs. or under (up to 5 lbs.), id. Patterns and Samples, &c. : For every 2 ozs. or under, id. The limit of weight varies from 10 ozs. up to I lb.


Postal

and Telegraphic

Information,

Tas. and X.Z.

171

Honey Orders. Tasmania : Under £2, 3d. ; above £2 and under £$, 6 d . ; above £ $ and under £7, 9d. ; above £7 and under £ 1 0 , is. Intercolonial : For £2 and under, 6d. ; above £2, but not exceeding £$, is. ; above £ $ , but not exceeding £7, is. 6d. ; a!>ove £7, but not exceeding £10, 2s. Telegraph Money Orders on the Australian colonies (New Zealand excepted) can be obtained on payment of the usual charge for a message of ten words additional. United Kingdom, United States, Germany, India, China, Canada, Cape Colony: Under £2, Is. ; under £5, 2s. 6d. ; under £7, 3s. 6d. ; under £10, 5s. T E L E G R A P H I C INFORMATION. Inter-Tasmanian Telegrams: Ten words, including name and address, Is. ; every additional word, id. Between central and suburban offices in Hobart and Launceston: Ten words, 6d. ; every additional word, id. To Victoria: Ten words, 2s. ; every additional word, 2d. New South Wales: Ten words, 2s. 6d. ; every additional word, 3d. South Australia : Ten words, 3s. ; every additional word, 3d. Western Australia and Queensland : Ten words, 4s. ; every additional word, 4(1. New Zealand : Ten words, 5s. 6d. ; every additional word, 7d. Address and signature charged for. To London : Each word, 5s. 5d. Address and signature charged for.

N

E

W

Z

E

A

L

A

N

D

.

RATES OF POSTAGE. Letters. Town Letters, delivered in town where posted : Not exceeding J 0 7 . . , i d . ; every additional i oz., i d . Country, Interprovincial Letters, and letters to the Australian colonies, Fiji, Samoa, and South Sea Islands: Not exceeding i oz., 2d. ; every additional J oz., 2d. Registration fee for any letter, newspaper, Iwok, or other packet or parcel within the colony, 3d. United Kingdom : Not exceeding J oz., 2 j d . ; every additional ioz., 2 d . Late letters : One additional rate. 2

Newspapers. Newspapers printed and delivered within the colony of New Zealand are chargeable with a rate of 3 d . Those printed in New Zealand and sent to the other colonies of Australia are charged i d . ; and to the United Kingdom i d . up to 4 ozs., and id. for every additional 2 ozs. Books and Packets. Inland—Books and Printed Papers : Jd. for every 2 ozs. or fraction thereof. Commercial Papers and Patterns and Samples: Town, Jd. if not exceeding oz. ; i d . not exceeding 4 ozs. ; and Jd. for every additional 2 ozs. or fraction thereof. Intercolonial (except Queensland), the United Kingdom, and foreign countries— Books and Printed Papers : id. for every 2 ozs. or fraction thereof. Commercial Papers: 2jd. not exceeding 10 ozs., and Jd. for every additional 2 ozs. or fraction thereof. Patterns and Samples : i d . not exceeding 4 ozs., and id. for every additional 2 ozs. or fraction thereof. Queensland—id. 4 ozs. ; every addtional 2 ozs., i d . 1

Money Orders. Money Orders may l)e obtained and made payable at any Money Order Office in New Zealand: For any sum not exceeding ^ 5 , 6 d . ; exceeding £ $ and not exceeding ,£10, Is. : exceeding £10 and not exceeding £15, is. 6d. ; exceeding £1$ and not exceeding £20, 2s. Intercolonial Money Orders : £2, od. ; £2 to £$, is. ; £5 to £7, is. 6d. ; £7 to £10, 2s. ; £10 to £ 1 2 , 2s. 6d. ; £ 1 2 to £i$, 3s. ; £l$ to £ 1 7 . 3s- 6d. ; £ 1 7 to £20, 4s.

Money Orders to the United Kingdom, United States and Canada, and all Foreign Offices : 6d. for every £1 or fraction of £1. Maximum, £20.


172

Postal and Telegraphic

Information,

New

Zealand.

Money Order Telegrams are charged 3d. per j £ l , and a telegraph fee of Is. for each order. Money Order Telegrams can l>e sent as " urgent" upon payment of Is. on each order in addition to the previous rates. Such telegrams will rate as " urgent ordinary telegrams," and be sent in order of their receipt with other telegrams of the like code. Postal Notes. Postal Notes are issued and paid at all Money Order Offices in New Zealand at the following rates: Fora Postal Note of Is., is. 6(1.—Jd.; 2s. 6 d . — i d . ; 5 s . — i j d . ; 7s. 6d.—2d. ; ios., 12s. 6d., 15s., 17s. 6d., 20s.—3d ; 100s.—6d. Broken amounts may t>e made up by the use of postage stamps up to 5d. being affixed on the lack of the note. Crossed notes will only be payable through a Ixmker. T E L E G R A P H I C INFORMATION. From any station to any station in New Zealand: For thefirsttwelve words or less, including address and signature, 6d. ; every additional word, id. Sundays, double rates. Urgent telegrams, double ordinary rates. Fees must be paid in stamps. To New South Wales: Ten words, 3s.; every additional word, 5d. To Queensland and South Australia: Ten words, 4s. 6(1.; every additional word, od. To Tasmania: Ten words, 5s. 6d.; every additional word, 7d. To Victoria: Ten words, 3s. 6d.; every additional word, 6d. To Western Australia : Ten words, 5s. 6d. ; every additional word, 7d. To New Caledonia: is. 2d. |>er word. To Europe: Direct, each word, 5s. 2d. ; viS Moulmein, 9s. 1 id.; viA Hongkong, 13s. Address and signature to be counted and paid for.

* A T S O N , F E R G U S O N A. C O . . P R I N T E R S , BRISBANE.


W . A . Advertisement.

Sole Contractor in fremantle to the

V . )\. 6oYern.mer\t and

Shipping Coys.

I

V.

BANFURD. HIGH C L A S S P A S T R Y C O O K AND BREAD BAKER.

JRAVELLERS

to W e s t A u s t r a l i a cannot

do better, on landing, than visit J . V . BANFURD'S

Establishments ; they w i l l

there

be attended to w i t h c i v i l i t y , and served w i t h real good tea, first-class cakes, pastry, h a m and beef sandwiches, Scotch pies, & c .

J . V . B. u s e s n o t h i n g b u t

first-quality

material,

a n d a l l o w s n o s h o d d y g o o d s t o be s o l d .

Jiok

the addressrjigh Street,

fremantle. T E L E P H O N E S 847 and 614. A A


N.S.W. & Yict. Advertisements.

IV.

CARBOLINEUM AYENARIUS. Preservative of WOOD against D E C A Y .

HENRY

.

.

.

.

.

Certain Cure for W H I T E A N T S .

BROOKS

&

COMPANY,^

Wynyard

Buildings,

SYDNEY.

Elizabeth St., MELBOURNE ; Main Buildings, P E R T H ; Westminster Chambers, W E L L I N G T O N ; 70 Bishopsgate, W i t h i n , LONDON, E X .

PEACOCK & SMITH,

and

""SSSSK.-™

Coppersmiths and Braziers, Ship arid Sanitary Plumbers MANUFACTURERS

OF

Every description of COPPER, BRASS, and L E A D WORK, Distillery and Brewery Work, Steamboat Work, Ships' Closets, Pumps, etc.

4 9 8 Flinders Street West, M E L B O U R N E .

ESTABLISHED

MELBOURNE.

1850.

TELEPHONE

I 149.

Y . Stooke B M I

Shipping Butcher,

and rork

Salter and Packer,

LIYE

PrOVfidOPfi

—-

„d y

STOCK, P O U L T R Y . F I S H , P R O D U C E ,

and every variety of Fresh and Salt Provisions always in stock.

560 Flinders Street,

Opposite Queen's Wharf.

Agencies at W I L L I A M S T O W N

and

GEELONG.


Victorian Advertisement.

ESTABLISHED

W O O D

&

1870.

C O M P A N Y ,

Proprietary,

L i m i t e d ,

Dain} Produce /Merchants. 33 & 35 K i n g Street,

Butter,

Cheese,

Bacon,

H a m s ,

MELBOURNE.

& c ,

Carefully selected and specially packed in the most improved methods for Export Orders.

W E C A L L P A R T I C U L A R ATTENTION TO OUR

In I lb. and^lb Tins

C O W

f f o d l l d

g l i t t e r ,

W e l l known throughout Queensland and the East.

f a c t o r y Butter, jgT

S e p a r a t o r Butter, and

* I n

Dairy Butter,

5째 it>. Boxes.

*

Colonial Cheese, Hams, Lard, Honey, Sheep's Tongues, and all kinds of English and Continental Cheese, Bacon, and Hams, always on hand.

ORDERS

PROMPTLY

EXECUTED.


vi.

V i c t o r i a n Advertisements.

The Indiarubber, Gntta-Percha, and m

1

A

in

L

i

LARGEST

t u

t\

RUBBER

Telegraph Works Co. Ltd. RUBBER

SHEET.

RUBBER

INSERTION

VALVES.

and CANVAS

HOSE,

STOCK

GOODS

TUBINGS.

IN

AUSTRALIA. <>C.

'STSSSk**

I. R .

CO."

TYRES.

" SILVERTOWN " Mackintosh Coats, sewn throughout and guaranteed

274

Flinders

WILSON,

MANAGER.

3 9 7 .

E S T A B L I S H E D

WATSON H A M

381

waterproof.

M E L B O U R N E ; 283 George Street, S Y D N E Y .

Street, JAS.

T E L E P H O N E

OF -

MATS,

BETVNG—^™^1

MANUFACTURERS OF T H E " S I L V E R T O W N

-

1 8 6 2 .

8c P A T E R S O N ,

A N D

Flinders

B A C O N

Street,

C U R E R S ,

M E L B O U R N E .

Goods expressly prepared for Shipment, and specially packed to resist the influence of hot climates. Export Orders promptly and properly executed. All goods guaranteed. We have secured more Prizes than any firm in Australia for Excellence of Quality in H A M S and BACON.

THE C H A T E A U TAHBILK PROPRIETARY LTD. (Chateau T a h b i l k V i n e y a r d ) , = FINEST

SELECTION

OF

MATURED PURE

GRAPE

=

=

T A H B I L K ,

T O W N

O F F I C E S

V I C T O R I A .

&

C E L L A R S -

WINES,

525

BRANDY,

HIGHEST

Collins

Street

=

=

QUALITY.

M E L B O U R N E . T E L E P H O N E 653.

Ai CODE

USED.

C O U f e S O N , H A V Sc C O . , HOP

M E R C H A N T S and I M P O R T E R S , 552

and

5 5 4 F l i n d e r s Street,

Agents for H . M . Russ & C o . , Praque.

MELBOURNE.

Finest Kents, Bohemians, Californians,

Nelson, and Tasmanian H o p s always in stock.

" Crown," " Crown and Cannon," and " Lion " Brand Hops, in Paper and Carton Packets. Agents for " SPALDING '* OLD SCOTCH W H I S K Y , in case and bulk.

PROVISION,

WINE

P A I N T S , All Sorts of Preserves in Bond.

AND

O I L S ,

SPIRIT

C A N V A S ,

MERCHANTS.

& C ,

4

C

Orders by Telegraph and Letter will receive prompt attention.


New South Wales

vii.

Advertisements.

TWO-SEAS" Tobacco, DARK

A N D LIGHT.

AMERICA'S GREATEST

BRAND.

USHER'S

Special Reserve Whiskv). Smith & Kopsen, IMPORTERS

OF

Ship=Chandlery a n d Ironmongery,^^

68

and 70 C L A R E N C E

S T R E E T , SYDNEY.

SAILMAKING, RIGGING, BLACKSMITHS' WORK.

Ships' Stores supplied in Bond.

« s E « r s FOR Nomo's Celebrated Paints for Ship's Bottom. Thos. & W . Smith's Special Steel W i r e Ropes.

*J*

#

L#«

Wilson & Cunningham's Canvas and Twines. T a r r & Wonson's Copper Paint.

Obi 1* £11 IT Q 61*

Pitt and Bridge Streets, SYDNEY.

9

(NORTH QUEENSLAND

INS. CO. LTD.

Marine S U T V ^ j J O r § Compass Adjuster.


New South Wales Advertisements.

viii.

xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx ^

X /\ir_ C-.:_L. i... , L _ K t i e xi » c» (We pay freight by the A . U . S . N . Co.'s Steamers.)\ XX XX 203, 205, 207, 209, 211 XX Pitt Street (only), XX SYDNEY. XX XX ily residents in all the (to be) Federated colonies with their goods at lowest XX possible rates, and give satisfaction. XX Travellers from any of the colonies visiting N e w South Wales are invited to call XX upon our Cutters (either in Dressmaking or T a i l o r i n g Department, as the case may be) XX and leave their measures, so that, should you require a Suit or a Costume, we can give XX you as satisfactory a fit as when personally attended lo. XX Orders from all o f the colonies are promptly attended to, and every care taken in XX forwarding goods. XX OUR ONLY A D D R E S S IS XX Hordern Brothers, THE E C O N O M I C A L DRAPERS. XX XX 203, 205, 207, 209, 211, Pitt Street ( o n l y ) , SYDNEY. XX XX X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X XX X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X . X X X . X . X X X X X X X X X X X X X X

Hordern Brothers,

XX

XX XX XX XX XX XX XX XX XX XX XX XX XX XX XX XX XX XX X X XX

j. Blackwood * son, Engineers Steamship

a n d

F

u r n

i

s n e r s

-

x_ AGENTS ROSS

&

FOR DUNCAN'S

Marine Kngines and Boilers. A.

G.

43 a n d 45 Sussex Street.

MUMFOKD'S

Steam

Pumps.

HANNAY'S Electrogens for Preventing

Bulk S t o r e s :

Point Street,

Piling in Boilers.

Pyrmont.

SPECIALTIES Machinery Goods.

and

: Indiarubber

Albany Lubricating Compound. Albany Engine and Cylinder Oils. Asbestos Goods. Deck and Engine Rooms Stores.

(Established 1830.)

&. tenfold

S &o.,

STATIONERS, Printers, Account Book Makers,

183

P i t t Street,

Sydney

(NEAR

KING

Importers Winsor and Newton's Artists' Materials.

STREET).


ix.

New South Wales Advertisements.

Our

Shief

Finest American Dark Tobacco. Established 1841. Under the Patronage of

^.^ellency the Governor.

Stanley &r Co., _ : . - • „ . , W h o l e s a l e

and

Retail

Gardeners.^

Fruiterers,

I M P O R T E R S

Greengrocers, and „ ,

.

.

bhipping

,

A R T I F I C I A L

rrovedores.

Q u e e n

Victoria

HOPKINS

A N D

E X P O R T E R S .

A G E N T S FOR

M a r k e t s ,

&

M A N U R E S .

S y d n e y .

LIPSGQMBE,

123 Y O R K S T R E E T ; and FRUIT EXCHANGE, BATHURST

M E R C H A N T S

STREET,

AND

SYDNEY. C O N S I G N M E N T S

COMMISSION AGENTS. RECEIVE

SPECIAL

ATTENTION. BB


New South W a l e s Advertisements.

X

John T H E

Dynon,

C H I N A

S o n

& Co.

H A L L

265 George Street, Opposite

Bond

Street,

SYDNEY. IMPORTERS

M

OF

China,

Glass,

Earthenware, &c. CONTRACTORS THE

TO

GOVERNMENT. The Latest

P r o d u c t i o n s In

Crown Derby and Royal Worcester Porcelain. SOLC

A G E N T S FOR

"Brown Lichfield Dinnerware." W e Invite Visits of Inspection. Our long experience as the O l d e s t H o u s e in the T r a d e offers buyers special advantages. M E L B O U R N E : J . D y n o n 0 Sons. 23 E l y P l a c e , L O N D O N , E X .

P E R T H , W . A . : J o h n D y n o n ft C o y .

P u r v e y o r to H i s

Excellency

the G o v e r n o r .

William Buttel, Shipping and Family Butcher. S U P P L I E R

T O T

H

E

Messageries M. Co.

North Coast S.N. Co., L t d .

A . U . S . N . Co., L t d .

China Navigation Co.

Orient S.N. Co.

Adelaide S.S. Co., and

Gulf and Tyser Lines.

H . H . NAYY.

IOI and io3 Castlereagh

— Sole P u r v e y o r t o the Jewish Community

of Sydney.

Street,

SYDNEY.


New South Wales Advertisements.

xi.

HEYDE TQDMAN & CO, W H

P

O T

E

\ A

R

L E

A

N

Tobacco M e r c h a n t s ,

D

39 York Street, W y n y a r d Square, S Y D N E Y . AGENTS FOR— W . D . & H . O . Wills, L t d . , Celebrated Cigarettes and C u t Tobaccos. T . C . Williams & Co.'s " D i a d e m " — D u n l o p ' s " D e r b y , " Cameron B r o s . & C o . ' s H i g h Grade Tobaccos, Flor de Murias, H e n r y Clay's, Bock & C o . , Vencedora, Habana Cigars. L a Favorita Manilla Cigars. El Destino Mexican Cigars. I«i U n i o n Mexican Cigars. L a Linda, Marcellaand H i g h Life Cigars. D E P O T

F O R

T H E

A U S T R A L I A N

N E E D L E W O O D

P I P E .

John B o o t h & Co., L t d .

The B a l m a i n Steam Saw M i l l s , Timber Yards and Joinery W o r k s , Johnstone's Bay, B A L M A I N , N . S . W . S Y D N E Y

162 TELEPHONE

O F F I C E :

SUSSEX

N O . 43.

STREET. CABLE ADDRESS:

FISH6R

&•

" B O O T H . "

A.B.C.

CODE.

SONS

Y A C H T & BOAT B U I L D E R S , BLUE'S -

POINT -

-

jfoRTH

SYDNEY.

Boats Built While You Wait. CC


New South Wales

THE

SYDNEY

T h e Leading Morning Newspajjer of New South Wales. PRICE

OWE

Advertisements.

DAILY

TELEGRAPH

Circulates t h r o u g h o u t the whole of A u s t r a l a s i a ,

PENNY.

THE BEST ADVERTISING MEDIUM IN THE COLONIES. SPECIAL MARINE VARNISHES FOR

S T E A M S H I P S , SHIPS,

Y A C H T S , AND

London and Merton, ENGLAND.

280

B O A T S .

GEORGE ST.,

SYDNEY. By

Appointment

to

H.R.H.

THE DUKE

OF EDINBURGH.

Thomas Playfair, Shipping | Family

BUTCHER, Purveyor to the

British,

American,

Russian, and Italian Navies.

103 George S t . N o r t h , SYDNEY.

Ox Tongues, Tierce Beef, Pork, Grain, and Live Stock always on hand.


New

If

you

want

a

South

Wales

Advertisements.

really

first-class

J

S l T I O k e r S .

Q

smoke,

XIII.

try

T. C. W i l l i a m s Co.'s

VICTORY.

TC WILLIAMS CO

VICTORY

.

RICHMOND, VA

Manufactured of the Finest Virginia Aromatic Tobacco at their Factory, in Richmond, Virginia, U . S . A .

Beware of Imitations,

Wholesale Depot

Each R a g Should hear an Oblong R e d Label with the Manufacturers' name i n gold lettering a* hereto.

SUTTON

<&

C O . ,

103 Clarence Street,

Steel W i r e Ropes

F

°

r

A

»

Sydney.

purposes.

Guaranteed Strength, Uniform Quality, Light, Pliable, Very Durable.

BULLIVANTS' For

WINDING,

HAULING, Largest

TRAMWAYS, Stock

M E L B O U R N E : 486 Collins Street. HEAD

DEPOT: 331

CRANES,

L I F T S , &c.

in Australia. B R I S B A N E : Wakefield's

Buildings.

B U L L I V A N T S ' AUST. CO., Ltd., Kent

Street,

SYDNEY,

HARRY

E.

FARMER,

M A N A G E R .

ASK

FOR

\

tester's Jlh & Stout, and effuppers

JSagcr *3eer.

S P L E N D I D O B T A I N A B L E

C O N D I T I O N .

O N

A L L

S T E A M E R S .

MORT'S DOCK AND ENGINEERING COMPANY, Limited, Balmain, Sydney, N.S.W.

DRY

DOCK 640 Feet Long, a n d PATENT SLIPS up to 2,000 Tons Gross.

ENGINEERS,

BOILER-HAKERS, BRASS,

BRIDGE-BUILDERS;

and S T E E L

FOUNDERS;

IRON,

C O P P E R - S M I T H S , &c.

Manufacturers o f all classes of M i n i n g Machinery, including Stamper Batteries, Rock-Breakers, various types o f Mills, G o l d Dredges, all types of Land and Marine Engines and Boilers, Pumping Plants for Water Supply, H y d r a u l i c Power, and other purposes, and Artesian Boring Tools. Special facilities and accommodation for carrying out Ship Repairs with the utmost despatch.


xiv.

New South Wales and Queensland

Advertisements.

Walyety & Qompany, JEimifed, AND

NEWCASTLE,

N.S.W.

f CAPITAL Fully Subscribed CAPITAL Paid Up RESERVE FUND -

-

and

£4,000,000 Sterling. £1,000,000 Sterling. £130,000 Sterling. Managing Director:

*kWoo( cfflcrcRanis,

Snipping

AT

London, Melbourne (V.), Geelong (V.), Sydney (N.S.W.), Dunedin (N.Z.).Christchurch (N.Z.), Napier (N.Z.), Fremantle and Perth (W.A.), Albany (W.A.), Rockhampton, Brisbane, and Townsville(Q'land), Adelaide (S.A.).

HON.

insurance

A L E X A N D E R

B R O W N ,

M.L.C.

LAMBTON LAND AND COAL COMPANY, LIMITED. DUDLEY COLLIERY. AUSTRALIAN UNITED STEAM NAVIGATION COMPANY, LIMITED. BRITISH INDIA STEAM NAVIGATION COMPANY, —-saos» LIMITED. K&" A D V A N C E S made on Stock, L a n d , Stations, G r o w i n g Clips of W o o l , and Produce from Australasia consigned for sale in L o n d o n or the Colonies, paying special attention to the great staples of Wood, Tallow, Hides, Metals, Coals, G r a i n , and Frozen Meats. (FIRE

AMD

NEW

MARINE)

cSrofiers.

Brisbane

Courier.

Penny Horning Newspaper.

Has long held the unquestioned position of the Leading Queensland Newspaper. Posted to any address in Queensland for i o / - per quarter ; to places beyond Queensland, 13/- per quarter ; single copy, id.

®be Abetting

(©bserber-

Price One Penny.

The Best and most widely circulated Evening Paper in the Colony.

The largest and Host Popular Weekly Newspaper in Queensland. Posted to subscribers in Queensland, 25/- per. annum ; beyond Queensland, 32/- per annum, in advance ; single copy, 6d. Published by t h e .

BRISBANE

NEWSPAPER

COMPANY,

Courier Buildings, Queen Street, B R I S B A N E .


Queensland

XV.

Advertisements.

<£&r/iins i Go., £td., I^rewers, Importers, a n d Wine and S p i r i t /Vlerchants. BRISBANE

and

T0OWO0MBA.

Sole Agents for Bulloch, Lade & Co.'s Celebrated Highland Whisky, Eight Years In Wood. Robert Porter's Bull Dog Ale and Stout.

tRaldmn,

tXoward Costin

'fflfiotasalo

Street,

Poulterer,

BRISBANE. Purveyor to_

Queensland Line of Steamers and Australasian United Steam Navigation Company, Limited.

Magdalen A s y l u m

Under the Care of the Sisters of Mercy.

Steam Laundry.

LUTWYCHE, Near BRISBANE. Contractors to_

Australasian United Steam Navigation Company, Limited. British India Steam Navigation Company, Limited. Howard Smith ft Sons, and Adelaide Steamship Company. GOODS C A L L E D

FOR A N D D E L I V E R E D .

T E L E P H O N E

No. sen.

S f t M H©P & e©.,^ contractors to BLs N!c o /ssteamers. S

a

n

J

U

Fruiterers and Wholesale Vegetable Dealers, N

e

T

T

O

N

,

S

O

U

T

_ H

_

_

^ S R i s s a i v E .


xvi.

Queensland Advertisements.

A. HERGA,^^

Edward St., B R I S B A N E .

eHRONCMETER

MAKER.

^s004^ ^ C S D V

Contractor to the A . U . 8 . N . Co. and B.I. & Q.A. C o .

N A U T I C A L AND SCIENTIFIC INSTRUMENTS R E P A I R E D .

BIGGS & MORCOM, LTD., ACCOUNT BOOK MANUFACTURERS PrintpPQ AND STATIONERS. < ^ - ^ r i 1I1U3I b. 21 Eagle Street, K N O W L E S

E .ah.i hed,8 ,. 5

S

BRISBANE.

7

Elizabeth W H O L E S A L E C O M M I S S I O N

F R U I T E R E R S

C Importer

of Patent ckromos,

ri

,

Street, B R I S B A N E . 'Wo

Contractors to the A.U.S.H. and B.I.S.N. Companies.

LARGE SMOOTH LEAF PINES A SPECIALITY.

BRISBANE

PICTURE-FRAME

Knights.

oleographs,

(C

A G E N T S .

B O X 102, ('..P.O.

I"-

C O . , tt* cl 5

&

Washable rkoios,

Gilt

Mouldings,

and Engravings,

148 Queen Street, BRISBANE,

WORKS

Carver a n d Gilder, P ^ n t Seller, a n d picture Frame Maker

" 'VlioffiL.

*~

l

Prints, Drawings, and Needlework framed in the best style. Estimates given for Framing Show Cards, & c .

O l d Frames repaired and re-gilt. T h e T r a d e supplied at lowest prices.

160 Columns for

3d. A n Excellent F a m i l y J o u r n a l w i t h a Large in a l l parts of A u s t r a l i a .

Circulation

Information for the FARMER, PLANTER, GRAZIER, SPORTSMAN, and everybody else.

Eight Pages for

Id. T H I S Popular Evening Journal has the Largest Circulation of any other daily paper in Queensland. It is Lil>eral but independent in polities, exercises a powerful influence on public opinion, and is recognised by everybody as the

BEST ADVERTISING

M E D I U M IN T H E COLONY.


xvii.

Queensland Advertisements.

DENHA/W

Produce and Grain Merchants,

O p A C A G E N T S

S O L E

YANGAN F U L L CREAM CHEDDAR CHEESE. S I L V E R W O O D MOUNTAIN C R E A M E R Y B U T T E R . B U T T E R C U P BRAND t Ib. TINNED B U T T E R .

F O R

SHARPLES' CREAM SEPARATORS. B A R N E K O W ' S RENNET AND A N N A T T O . P R E S E R V A L I N E FOR MILK AND BUT I E R .

A G E N T S

FOR

SOMETHING

N E W ^ >

(Provisional

Protection

Granted).

The Combination

SITZ

& FRICTION

BATH

Send to H . E . M I N E S , South Brisbane, for list.

©utridge Printing Company,

398 Queen

Street,

BRISBANE. Ltd.,

PRINTERS,

BOOKBINDERS,

ACCOUNT BOOK

LITHOGRAPHERS,

STATIONERS,

MANUFACTURERS.

O. P. Co., Ltd., having recently installed the marvellous LINOTYPE machinery in their Office, are booking numerous orders at rates very satisfactory to clients. The machine is driven by electric power, and is eminently adapted for such work as Articles of Association, Books, Pamphlets, Annual Reports, etc.

R. M a r t i n & Co.,

ESTABLISHED

1876.

Ship=Chandlers and Coach

Ironmongers.

Edward and Margaret Streets, B R I S B A N E . IMPORTERS OF

A u n. • r> T>I 1 Anchors, Chains, Kopes, Blocks, T> • . u H ' u 1 . ee Paints, Oils, \arnish, \\ hee stuff, , ' . , ' l'ron a nd S.ed ' ' Bar iron ancl hteel. eS

P

n

g

mPS

T. &, W. Smith's celebrated Galvanised Flexible Steel Wire Kopes, Belfast Yacht u „ „ „ „ „ J r',.„„„i r \ . i . 1 Kopes, and (murock Canvas, in arge and ,.„f , ,:„•„ , 1 . 1 varied quantities always on hand. ^ m a k i n g and Rigging in all branches attended to by a competent staff of workers.


xviii.

-SÂť

Queensland Advertisement.

JlSerdare

I

fc_

| (Bo- Operative

LATE

L E W I S

T H O M A S

Qundamba,

Queensland.

T h e Coal from the above C o l l i e r y bears the undoubted reputation of being the

ffest in the Colony. The longest established Pit, and the greatest output of any in

Supplies from 1

to

1,000

Queensland.

)

Tuns

per

Day.

Contractors to the

Queensland Government. A.U.S.N. Company, L t d . , Queensland Line of Steamers.

J O H N O A V I E S , Agent, / C/o Potts, Paul & Sargant.

2 1 Eagle Street, B R I S B A N E .


Queensland Advertisements

HOWES BROS. & CO., lrod"ce EAGLE STREET,

Offices at L O N D O N , L A I D L E Y , ( I A T T O N , B O O N A H , F E K N V A L E . LOWOOP. and H A R R I S V I L L E .

AGENTS Plantation.

Lowood

Creamery'

n,s

' Auctioneers, and C o m m i s s i o n Agents.

BRISBANE.

Bingera Sugar

:

Merch

FOR Butter,

First

Prize National

Association, 1 8 9 5 ;

Special and G o l d Medal International Exhibition, 1 8 9 7 ; First Prize National Association, 1 8 9 7 ; Oxley and

Bacon and Hams, Corn Gob Brand, First and Second Prize

National

Association, 1894

1 8 9 5 ; Special and G o l d Medal International Exhibition, 1897 ; First Prize National Association,

1897.

Trelawny Cheese.

Telephone 3095.

T i a n a u Cheese.

Q

Telegraphic Address, Fish Markets.

9

Box G . P . O . 222.

<3RQ <&ris6ane <£isfi and dlgency FISH M A R K E T S , Ann Street,

(Bo. JOimifad,

(Opp. Supreme Court),

BRISBANE. F I S H , O Y S T E R S , P R A W N S , & c . Supplied to the trade either

in town

or Country.

Orders

from ships, hotels, and private families will receive prompt attention.

B A Y N E S BROTHERS, . .

BRISBANE.

SUCCESSORS TO

THE GRAZIERS' MEAT EXPORT C O , ARE

CONTINUING T H E WORKS AT QUEENSPORT, BRISBANE RIYER, AS

PACKERS O F :

Preserved Meats O f every description, i n tins of all sizes, comprising Beef and M u t t o n , Spiced, Corned, and Boiled.

Roast,

Our Table Delicacies Include O x and Sheep Tongues, Luncheon Oxford a n d Cambridge Sausages, Soups, & c .

Beef,

Brawn,

Potted

Meats,

These Canned Meats are produced from the Primest Stock that Southern Queensland can produce. They are extensively consumed a l l over Australia, a n d have obtained a reputation for excellence second to none.

Beef Extract O u r N e w Plant is in operation. execute.

Orders for supplies we are now prepared to

N.B.—All Stock Slaughtered under Government Veterinary Inspection.

BAYNES BROS.,

BRISBANE,

Contractors for the Supply of Canned and Salted Meats to the Government of Netherlands-India.


X X .

Queensland

Advertisement.

Queensland Smelting Co., hid., 3 Aldershot,

MARyROROUGH.

Head Registered Office: 54 OLD BROAD S T R E E T , LONDON.

Buyers and Smelters of

Gold, Silver, Lead and Copper Ores, Auriferous Concentrates and Pyrites, A m a l g a m , Cyanide Slags, &c.

Highest prices paid for Auriferous Concentrates and Pyrites.

Special rates for Argentiferous ;„ 10 tons.

L e a d

V*

Q r e

q u a n t i t i e s

a b o v e

^

First-class Facilities for C r u s h i n g , A m a l g a m a t i n g , and Concentrating on F r u e Vanners. Assays and Practical W o r k i n g Tests made, and all k i n d s of A n a l y t i c a l work done on reasonable terms. T A R I F F S UPON A P P L I C A T I O N . A G E N T S IN A L L P O R T S .

T. I. D Y S O N W. H. CLARK

= =

=

Manager. = Local Secretary.


Queensland Advertisements.

xxi.

I'mier His

the Patronage

Excellency

the

o/ Governor,

LORD LAM1NGTON.

Bourbon St., B U N D A B E R G ,

Q

Opposite Post a n d Telegraph Office. Established and carried on as a Leading First-class Hotel since 1881. Most convenient House to Public Offices, Wharves, Railway Station, &c. Best furnished private suites of rooms in town. First-class Cuisine. Itest Che/ in Queensland. Connected by Telephone with Fairymead, Hingera, M o n Repos, and leading Sugar Plantations. T w o first-class Billiard Tables (Alcock's). C-irge and commodious Sample Rooms. Vehicle awaiting all Trains and Steamers. J . S. DAVISON, Proprietor.

ESTABLISHED 1871. The Leading First-Class Hotel.

The Grand Hotel.

FRED.

COLMAX.

Bundaberg.

Electric Belts. H o t and Cold Baths. Sample Rooms Free. Telephonic Communication with Plantations.

yj\

StJ yf\

Buggy meets all Trains and Steamers.

Walter Reid & So.. Limited, R O C K H A M P T O N .

GENERAL MERCHANTS, SHIPPING AND INSURANCE AGENTS.

AGENTS

FOK

.

.

Queensland Line of Steamers. British India Steam Navigation Company, Limited. Australasian United Steam Navigation Company, Limited. Peninsular and Oriental Steam Navigation Company. Compagnle des Messageries Haritlmes. Gibb Line of China Steamers. Union Steamship Company of New Zealand. Scottish Line of Ships and Steamers. Lloyd's Agents. Imperial Insurance Company, Limited. North Queensland Insurance Company, Limited ' Specially tions /or

W.

Wool Jrom

Sheep's

and /or

Open

Lore

Quota-

Policies).

R. & Co., L t d . , are prepared to execute Indents and realise upon Consignments of Wool to the best advantage, and upon the most reasonable terms.

F. Wynne, P

Back

Tc^; co,sana h

Howard Smith & Sons'Steamers.

Stanley Street,

B R E A D

ROCKHAMPTON.

a n d

B I S C U I T

_ B A K E R


xxii.

Queensland

X.^t=* X * *

Advertisement.

5?-* X * * X * A x t * X * * x t * X*^r 5 * 4 X * * x t x ^ A * ^ x t j r

CENTRAL

QUEENSLAND

(8 P A G E S - )

'I

x * * X * A x j * X t * X*£. X * * J ^

NEWS.

Established 1861

15-

Price, 2 d . ; Per Quarter, 13s.;

per A n n u m , £ 2

I

10s.

Posted, per Quarter, 16s.; per Annum, £3.

i*

Crj£ Capricnrniait. (44

PAGES.) PUBLISHED

i

Established 1875. EVERY

SATURDAY

I

MORNING.

Price, 6d.;

[5.

Per Quarter, 6s. 6d.; per A n n u m , £1 Posted, Posted, per oer Quarter, Quarter. 7s.; 7s.: per oer Annum, Annum. £1 £1 3s 3s.

'!

Is.

1 3

|

|

The

FIRST

Daily and W e e k l y

Papers

|

Horth of Brisbane.

i\

A yi .ii 3 vi 3

2

ij»

. These Journals contain the News of the World by cable and wire, and the fullest information on all matters relating to Pastoral, Mining, Agricultural, and Mercantile pursuits. , As

Advertising

Mediums

they are without doubt the

fe

best

in Central Queensland.

=

3

t* 14. !* iv

jj

F

4

x

;

PROPRIETORS

x

3

M ' l L W R A I T H EAST

'I

:

& STREET.

y

B L A I R ,

jf

ROCKHAMPTON.

. .

"5!

£

. -Jr

^rViv"^ix'**,x'Vix VJx"^x'Vix*Vix Vix*VJx'VJx*"^Jx"j.Jx"^,x *,x *>x #,x *,x *Jx ' i X l ^ ,


Queensland

xxiii.

Advertisements.

LITTLER

& BRUCE,

IMPORTERS & MACHINERY MERCHANTS, E

N

G

I

N

E

E

R

S

,

Boiler Makers, Iron and Brass Founders. M A K E R S CHI.ORINATION

A N D ARTESIAN

STATION

REQUISITES,

TROUGHING, MINING

QUAY

AGENTS

IN C E N T R A L

S H U T T L E

MACHINERY, IRONWORK, E T C .

QUEENSLAND FOR

W O R T H ,

STREET,

CLEVELAND

PLANTS,

PUMPS,

A L L KINDS O F

A N D ARCHITECTURAL

SOLE &

WELL-BORING

WINDMILLS,

AND AGRICULTURAL

ORNAMENTAL

C L A Y T O N

O F —

L i n c o l n ,

E n g l a n d .

ROCKHAMPTON.

TELEPHONE

No.

37.

FOUNDRY

and P A T E N T

SLIP.

BRAND * DRYBROUCH, TOWNSVILLE.

Engineers, Iron a n d

Plans, Specifications, and Estimates

Ship,

for all and every class o f work supplied. <

Vessels

Slipped 500

Mining

Boilermakers,

Brass

Boat

Founders

Builders,

and'

Coppersmiths,

up to

Tons.

Machinery. Stamper Batteries, Berdan Pans, Shoes, Dies, C a m , e t c

Sugar

Machinery. W e have for Sale V a c u u m Pans, Triple Effets, Coolers, Tanks, etc.

Well-Boring

Plants.

W e make a speciality of these, and have imported a large Stock of Best Steel for T o o l s , and can supply complete Plants on very short notice. Squatters. Sheep and Cattle Troughing, Sluice Valve for Dams, always in stock. Agents for A. & J . Stewart's " R u s s i a n Brand " Artesian Well-Boring Casing and Fittings. Large stock always on hand.


xxiv.

Queensland

Advertisement.

W . H. P A X T O N $ CO., A16RCHANTS, Shipping,

Insurance,

Station,

StOCl{,

and

G e n e r a l Agents. ÂŤXFX AGENCIES: K c X , Australasian United Steam Company, Limited.

Navigation

T h e U n i o n Mortgage

and Agency

Company

of Australia, Limited.

British India Associated Steamers, Limited.

Adelaide M i l l i n g Company, Limited.

North G e n u a Lloyds.

Thos. B m n t o n & Co., Millers, Victoria.

P. & 0. Steam Navigation Company, Limited. Kastern and Australian Steamship Limited.

Company,

China Navigation Company.

Melbourne M a c k a y Sugar Company, Limited. North Queensland Limited. South

Scottish Line of Packets.

Insurance

British Insurance

Company

Company, of

New

Zealand (Fire Branch).

Gibb Line of China Steamers.

Imperial Insurance Company, Limited.

Nippon-Yuscn Kaisha Steamship Co., L t d .

Australian Alliance Assurance Company.

Also Agents for Alexandra D i s t i l l e r y , and the Principal Plantations in the District.

Indents Executed for all Descriptions of Merchandise.

W . H. PAXTON *

CO.,

Victoria Wharf and Stores,

HACKAY. Mcllwraith, McEacharn & Company, Limited, London, Melbourne, Adelaide, Newcastle (N.s.w.), Fremantle, and Albany (w.A.)

Walter Reid & Company, Limited, Rockhampton.


Queensland Advertisements.

J o h n s o n

FLINDERS

xxv.

STREET,

T O W N S V I L L E .

Castling, WHOLESALE

AND

RETAIL

—•w

dtamily, Snipping and @ areas*. P U R V E Y O R S T O A . U . S . N . COMPANY'S STKAMKRS.

Kurcindd

The

Hotel,

Near Qarron F a l l s ,

4

CAIRNS RAIbWAy. At an altitude of over 1.000 Feet.

MRS. A . R E M I L T O N , Proprietress. 21 miles on the Railway towards Chillagoe. Southern visitors.

Offers exceptional attractions lor

Since building, it has been several times enlarged to meet

increasing demands, and the Proprietress desires to intimate that she has now purchased the adjoining grounds and residence, where ladies and families can be accommodated privately. Situated in the midst of thefinestsub-tropical scenery, and within easy distance of the now famous Falls, a pleasant and healthful change can be enjoyed, and boating, fishing, shooting, and fern hunting indulged in. There is also a good lawn tennis court in the grounds. Mrs. Remilton pays personal attention to all arrangements.


Queensland

Advertisements.

Cooktown ^Laundry. All descriptions of Laundry Work done. Goods Called for and Delivered on the

LADIES'

shortest possible notice.

^

Furneaux Street, A.

ROMANO,

Contractor

CLOTHING

SPECIALITY.

COOKTOWN.

to A . U . S . N .

Company's

Steamtrs.

SUN WO TIY, Fruit and General Store. VEGETABLES of all descriptions.

CHOICE F E R N S

Purveyor to A . U . S . N . Company and

British India Company.

SACHS

STREET,

Tomm\) A h K u n i , T

t

/

d

0 ,

*

C H 1 D

S

CAIRNS.

Purveyor to

A.U.S.N. Company, B.I.S.N. Company,

^ggt—

/ H - r

n

SUPPLIED.

and all Shipping.

w

Chinese Goods always on hand.

F r U l t C r C r ,

G r O C C T ,

a n d

Vegetables and Seeds always fresh. P r o d u c e

^

Charlotte

^Vlerchant,

Street, COOKTOWN.

WILLIAM FOOKS wholesale and Retail

Charlotte

FAMILY and SHIPPING Street,

BUTCHER,

COOKTOWN,

Opposite the Post and Telegraph

Offices.

Purveyor to

B.I.S.N. Co. s Line of Steamers, A.U.S.N. Co.'s Steamers, Sc.. Ac. Best Quality Small Goods T^Z-'of every description.

All Orders promptly attended to. Trial Solicited.


-•

.>:.:.:.>:.:.:.:.:.:.:.:.:.:.:.:.:.:.:.:.:.:.:.:.:.:»x^^^

Combined Service of tne_ AND

BETWEEN

Fremantle,

North-West

Australian

Ports, a n d Singapore

(Calling at Java if Inducement Offers.) S.S. S.S. S.S. S S.

5

" AUSTRALIND " " SALADIN " "SULTAN " " KARBAKATTA "

1,019 2,000

T

o

n

s

Register.

Tons Register.

2,063

Tons Register.

2,500

Tons Register.

H E S E magnificent Steamers, with Passenger Accommodation unequalled o n the North-West Coast, fitted with Smoking, Music, and Ice Rooms, Baths, and every comfort and convenience for a tropical voyage, and installed with the electric light throughout, trade between Fremantle and Singapore, leaving Fremantle alternately about every 14 days, calling at Geraldton, Sharks' Bay, Carnarvon, Onslow, Cossack (port for Pilbarra Goldfields and Marble Bar), Broome, Pearling Grounds, and Derby.

Through Communications to London via Singapore. Passengers by this Route avoid the heavy seas met with off Cape Leuwin, the greater part of the voyage in fact being usually in smooth water. T h e Steamers call at all the North-West Ports, and travellers have also the opportunity of seeing the beautiful Straits of Balli or I.ombok, the picturesque Islands of the Java Sea, and the most interesting Port of Singapore. A t Singapore psssengers tranship to one of the P. & O . S. N . Co.'s Fortnightly M a i l Steamers, which call at Penang, Colombo, Aden, Port Said, and Brindisi, thence proceeding to London, touching at M a l t a , Gibraltar, and Plymouth ; or to one of the P. & O . Company's intermediate Steamers, which touch at some of the before mentioned Ports, and usually at Marseilles, but occasionally steam direct from Singapore to London, calling only at Port Said. F A R E S

T

O

L O N D O N

(From any Western Australian Port not South of Fremantle) :—

Saloon in both Steamers Saloon in W.A. and Singapore Steamers i Second Class in P. & 0 i

£62 £40

to £ 4 2

According to accommodation In P. & 0. Steamer. RETURN TICKETS available for return by same route, or to Albany by P. & 0. S. N. Co.'s Australian Steamers, and valid for 12 months from date of Issue:—

Saloon in both Steamers £ 1 1 0 Do. in W.A. and Singapore Steamers, Second Saloon in P. & 0. £ 7 0 Steamers o f the P . & O . S. N . C o . call weekly at Singapore bound for London. Should there l>e any delay between departure o f the West Australian Steamer and arrival of the P . & O . Steamer, passengers must defray any hotel expenses on shore themselves. T h e usual time on passage o f a P . & O . Steamer, Singapore to London, is about 35 days by sea, or 27 days via Brindisi by M a i l , or a few days longer by a P. & O . Co. cargo steamer, which leave on alternate weeks with the M a i l Boats. Through Tickets are also issued by Messrs. Thos. Cook & Sons to London via Singapore, C h i n a , Japan, Vancouver, and the United States. Singapore to Indian Ports, China, and Japan despatches weekly.

Goods Carried at Through Rates to and from the Principal Ports of the World. FOR

FURTHER D A L G E T Y

PARTICULARS

APPLY—

& C O M P A N Y , FREMANTLE;

LIMITED,

And at A . U . S . N . C O . ' S A G E N T S LONDON B E T H E L L ,

G W Y N

& C O . ,

22 B I L L I T E R

•>>>:.>>>>:.>>>>>>>>>>:.:.>>:.>:.>:.:.:.:.:.:.:.:o

STREET.

E . C S H E N T O N &C O . , PERTH; AT A L L AUSTRALASIAN PORTS. 1

I

T R I N D E R , A N D E R S O N

& CO.,

4 ST. MARV A X E .

•*


The London Assurance Corporation, No.

7

No.

AO

ROYAL

EXCHANGE,

AND

MALL,

LONDON.

Governor: H E N R Y J . 11. K E N D A L L , E S Q . ,

The Hyde, Hatfield.

PALL.

Sub-Governor: HOWARD GII.LIAT, E S Q . (John K. Gilliat & Co.) Deputy-Governor: H E N R Y G O S C H E N , ESQ. (Messrs. Friihling & Goschen). Director!: C H A R L E S 0. A R B U T H N O T , E S Q . (Arln.thnot, Latham & Co.)

FREDERIC LUBBOCK, ESQ., hall Street.

OTTO AUGUST B E N E C K E , ESQ. R O B E R T H E N R Y B E N S O N , ESQ. Henson & Co.)

SIR

(Rohert

WILLIAM T. BRAND, ESQ. (Harvey, Brand &Co.) ARTHUR H E N R Y BRANDT, ESQ. (Messrs. A. H. Brandt and Co.) C O L I N F. C A M P B E L L , E S Q . (Messrs. Finlay, t '.imp! ..-II & Co.) A L F R E D C L A Y T O N C O L E , ESQ. (Vi. H . Cole & Co.) J O H N D E N N I S T O U N , Esq. SIR ROBERT G I L L E S P I E . C.

S. S. G U T H R I E , ESQ. (Messrs. Chalmers, Guthrie & Co.) G E O R G E W. H E N D E R S O N , E S Q . (Messrs. R. & J. Henderson). LOUIS H U T H , E S Q . (Frederick Huth & Co.) Secretary: C H A R L E S A . D E N T O N ,

ESQ.

I6 Leaden-

A H M I . SIR F. L E O P O L D M c C L I N T O C K , K.C.B., F.R.S. MONTAGU K.C.M.G.

F.

OMMANNEY,

C.RKVILLE H. P A L M E R , ESQ. SKl.WYN R. PRIOR, ESQ. worth & Powell). GEO.

ROI.FES,

ROBERT Street COL.

(Messrs. Coles-

ESQ.

RYRIE, ESQ.,

34 Upper Brook

L E O P O L D R. S E Y M O U R , Brockham Park, Betchworth.

FIELD-MARSHAL SIR D O N A L D M. S T E W A R T , Bart., G.C.B., G.C.S.I., Royal Hospital, Chelsea. LEWIS A. W A L L A C E , E S Q . (Wallace Bros.) JOHN YOUNG, Actuary:

Underwriter: CHARLES GEORGE ELLS,

ESQ. GEORGE

KING,

ESQ.

ESQ.

Manager of the Fire and Life Departments: JAMES C L U N E S , ESQ. The Corporation has granted Fire, Life, and Marine Assurance for more than a century and a half. During that long_ period it has endeavoured to introduce into its practice all the real improve* incuts that have from time to time been suggested, and to afford every facility for the transaction of business. INCOME, 1808. Life Premiums ^156,088 4 o Fire Premiums 376,016 15 5 Marine Premiums 3J8.-I77 17 4 Interest 11:2,800 17 5

j£o&3.383 •*

AGENTS

FOR

FUNDS AT 31st DECEMBER, 1898. Shareholders' Capital ... ... £448,275 • General Reserve Fund 310,000 Life Assurance Fund 3,147,480 Fire Fund... 675,051 Marine Fund ... 181,310 Profit and Loss 133,036 Provision for Accrued Liabilities 141,390 J 10

»

MARINE

£4,036,434

INSURANCE

The British India & Queensland Agency

- 3 goooooo«tfK»or»r«ooooa«eopoooooeow»

18 11

ONLY:

Co., Ltd., Brisbane.

£.


W A k S H & CO., M E R C H A N T S AND I M P O R T E R S . Shipping,

Insurance,

Mining,

Forwarding, and

General Commission AGENTS. CAIRNS,

PORT

DOUGLAS,

HERBERTON,

And MAREEBA,

Granite

Greek.

W m . flaner, Wholesale and Family

Fancy IJiscuit Brunswick

5 r e a d and gaker.

Street,

Fortitude

Valley. BRISBANE. T E L E P H O N E N o . 522.

Sole Purveyor to theA . U . S . N , a n d B.I.S.N. Company's

4\

Steamers, &c.

11%