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ANGUS bulletin Autumn 2018


Angus Australia, Vice President, Brad Gilmour, with Ben Glatz and Angus Australia’s Commercial Supply Chain Manager, Liz Pearson at the Casterton weaner sale in January. Image courtesy of Kate Dowler, The Weekly Times

For the second time in three years, Boonaroo Angus have won the RASV Heifer Challenge during the Stock & Land Beef Week. Pictured are RASV president Matthew Coleman, with winners Jodie and Shane Foster and judge Malcolm Cock. Credit: Stock and Land

Champion open parader Kate Swain, Kaytee Angus, Peak Hill, with judge Scott Myers, at the 2018 Royal Canberra Show. Credit: The Land

out & about

Anna Bewley (left), Bewmont Angus Stud, Boorowa, and Cassie Sutcliffe, Jarobee Angus Stud, Beechworth, at the Wodonga weaner sales. Credit: Stock & Land

2018 Thomas Foods International Angus Youth Roundup coordinators, Murk and Kate Schoen

Farm Weekly livestock manager Jodie Rintoul (left) and Beth McKay, formerly Wilson Downs Angus stud, Cunderdin, hold the winning ticket in the Farm Weekly and WA Angus Breeders, Win 10 Heifers Competition with WA Angus State Committee representative Bruce Campbell (second left), vice chairman Angus Bulletin autumnthan 2018 14,000 PAge 1entries Mark Hattingh and Beth’s husband John, and the—more received in the competition. Credit: Farm Weekly


26 Contents Autumn 2018 | volume 31

18

11 1 Out and About 2 Contents 4 From the President 4 From the CEO 9 Around the Weaner Sales 11 Supporting the leaders of tomorrow Publisher: Angus Australia Locked Bag 11 Armidale NSW 2350 P: 02 6773 4600 | F: 02 6772 3095 E: office@angusaustralia.com.au W: www.angusaustralia.com.au

12 Angus Focus on Northern Australia 13 Angus Australia at Beef Australia 2018 14 Benefits of Infusing Angus Genetics into Northern Australian Beef Herds

32 26 Relaunch of Angus Brand Verification 28 From Consumer Demand to World Class Brands 30 Feedlot dominance for Angus 32 Beef Spectacular Spotlights 34 Most Widely Used Sires in Last Two Years 37 Around the Beef Weeks 39 ASBP Cohort 9 –Time to Nominate Your Next Super Sire 40 ASBP Cohort 5 Analysis Completed – How did the Bulls Perform?

Layout: Ebonie Sadler-Small

16 Management Strategies for Relocation & acclimatisation of Angus Bulls into Northern Australia

Printer: APN Print, Warwick QLD

18 Angus content proves fruitful

45 Breed Development Matters

Disclaimer: Opinions expressed in this publication are not necessarily those of the Editor or of the Board of Angus Australia. Neither the Editor nor Angus Australia takes any responsibility for the accuracy of the information contained within this publication, nor for the outcome (including consequential loss) of any action taken by readers or others based on information contained therein. The publishers reserve the right to refuse or cancel without notice any advertisement in a publication issued by them.

19 Roma family's switch to breeding proves successful

45 World Congress on Genetics Applied to Livestock Production

Editor: Diana Wood

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Angus Bulletin — autumn 2018

20 Angus infusion brings rewards 21 Big benefits in Angus crosses 23 Expert reproductive advice on offer at Beef Week 2018 24 Gray’s striving for Angus brands

42 Retail Beef Yield Data Collection and Analysis Update

46 Comparison of Two Live-Animal Ultrasound Systems to Predict Carcase Intramuscular Fat and Marbling in Australian Angus Cattle


76

advertising index Angus Studs 19 Alumy Creek Angus 15 Ascot Angus

54

42

IFC Bald Blair Angus 79 Clunie Range Angus 20 Dance Angus 22 DSK Angus 77 Dulverton Angus

48 Understanding the “New” Angus BREEDPLAN Analysis

64 Successful Roundup held in Wodonga

51 Identifying Animals with Genomic Information

66 2019 Angus Youth Roundup Set For Armidale NSW

52 Updates to Angus Australia’s Gene Probability Analysis

67 2018 Beef Australia Scholarships 68 Sam in the States

52 Pentire Angus

53 Changes to Angus Australia’s DNA Services

70 Trans-Tasman Will Open New Opportunities and Networks

38 Sandon Glenoch Angus

54 Research Continues into Calculation of EBVs for Additional Traits

71 Cargill sisters passionate about Angus cattle and beef industry

27 Sprys Angus

55 Sourcing Angus Genetics with AngusSELECT™

72 Angus cattle are in demand

56 InstaAngus

73 Strategies help Alison Napier make it through the tough times

57 Linking to Individual Animals in Angus Database Search

74 Strong market for Angus heifers in China

58 Guide to signing into ANGUS.TECH

75 When times get tough, you can always sell Angus cattle

60 Around the female sales

76 A family affair at Kanangra Grazing

61 From your Member Services Team

78 Breeding winning cows

61 Better BREEDPLAN Management

80 Rebrand VS brand refresh

62 Member Services 10 Year Comparison

81 Welcome to the Web

63 Service to Angus Youth 63 Around the Shows

82 Angus Australia Staff Directory

47 Eaglehawk Angus IFC Eastern Plains Angus 39 Knowla Livestock 57 Noonee Angus BC Outwest Angus

72 Seaforth Angus 66 Strathewen Angus IBC Texas Mount K2 51 Wargundy Angus

Commercial Advertising 10 Achmea Australia 36 Agri-Gene Pty Ltd 8 Anipro 31 Anipro 24 Boehringer Ingelheim Animal Health 25 Boehringer Ingelheim Animal Health 75 Eastern Spreaders Pty Ltd 44 Neogen Australasia 8

Nowlan Stock & Station Agent

54 Prolix 55 Queensland Machinery Agency 7

Transport Welding Engineering

22 Transport Welding Engineering 23 Vetoquinol 50 Zoetis

Angus Bulletin — autumn 2018

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from the president Libby Creek, Angus Australia President

While cattle prices have softened from the high of 2017, the 2018 bull sales in Western Australia, South Australia and currently Victoria have been solid, with healthy averages and pleasing clearances. Angus cattle continue to gain premium prices around the markets with strong demand by backgrounders, feedlots and processors. Angus Australia is currently working on many initiatives – building on past programs and instigating new opportunities to benefit members. The conduct of research in collaboration with MLA and other research organisations is a key role for our Society; validating and finding new knowledge to improve productivity and quality of the Angus breed. This research is extended out to members and the wider beef community, to ensure the knowledge can be easily utilised to benefit Angus breeders. The Angus Sire Benchmarking Program led by Angus Australia’s Strategic Project Manager, Christian Duff, continues to be an informative and successful program, adding to the 9,000 + progeny records generated from 299 sires in the first 8 cohorts. There is a wide range of valuable research data and BREEDPLAN validation coming out of this project. A Northern Consultative Committee has been established with a group of breeders who are invested in the northern cattle industry. This Committee’s role is to have input into the direction of the program to ultimately expand the use of Angus and Angus infused cattle into Northern Australia. Through Strategic projects we are evaluating an alternative approach for assessing ultrasound scan images on live animals for carcase attributes. Using data collected in the ASBP, the Central Ultrasound Processing method is being compared to the current, commonly used systems for phenotypic and genetic parameters. As many members are aware, the “single-step” method for incorporation of genomic data into Angus BREEDPLAN was implemented in November 2017 with the assistance of ABRI and our research partners at the Animal Genetics and Breeding Unit (AGBU). This utilizes the 40,000+ genomic profiles on animals in the Angus Australia database and will continue to include future genomic data collected from members and various collaborative research projects. Andrew Byrne, the Breed Development and Extension Manager and his team have initiated a collaborative project to improve the ability to benchmark Australian Angus animals within the global Angus gene pool. With the heavy use of international genetics within the Angus breed, being able to better identify overseas animals with suitable genetics will be very beneficial, while also improving the ability to market Australian genetics into overseas countries. A strong focus is given to extending information out to members. The Angus Education Centre and AngusTech tools allow members to access a range of useful PAge 4

Angus Bulletin — autumn 2018

information online, while the regional forums and workshops, held annually around the country, give an opportunity to engage directly with Angus Australia staff and management. The Angus HeiferSelect tool continues to roll out, assisting members in identifying the genetically superior commercial heifer replacements. The Angus Australia Software Development team, led by Christopher de Crespigny is implementing new and database software to improve the efficiency of member transactions and to enable the eventual switch across to a fully independent database. Our Commercial Supply Chain Manager, Liz Pearson reports an increasing list of processors utilising Angus brand verification services which gives assurance of the integrity of proprietary Angus brands, ultimately benefiting many members. The Verified Angus program, assisting in generating premiums for quality commercial Angus cattle is also being established. A review and simplification of Regulations in regard to registration and recording of Angus, and a streamlining of member transactions and genetic testing, is being led by Member Services Manager Michael Beattie. Importantly, the benefits of breeding Angus cattle are communicated and promoted through social media and at industry events such as Beef Australia by Diana Wood and her team in Communication, Marketing and Youth. This year will see the commencement of the GenAngus Future Leaders program, generously supported by Acmea Australia, for 25-40 year olds. And the Angus Foundation continues to support a large range of scholarships, bursaries and award programs for Angus Youth. While a long way off, the planning of the 2021 World Angus Forum is well underway, and we look forward to an exciting and interesting program for this major event. Through collaborative research, education and communication, Angus Australia is supporting members to keep the Angus breed in the enviable position as the largest and most successful beef breed in temperate Australia.

Libby creek, president

peter parnell, Ceo

2017 - The year in review Dr Peter Parnell, Chief Executive Officer

2017 was another excellent year for Angus Australia and its members. Some of the key performance indicators and highlights for the year are summarized below.


Finance

Angus Australia and its controlled entities returned a surplus of $57,563. Figure 1 shows the primary areas of expenditure in 2017 compared to other recent years.

Governance

The Angus Australia Board consisted of 10 Directors (9 elected; 1 appointed). The Board conducted meetings in March, May, August, September, and November. Various Board Committees met numerous times during the year by teleconference. In addition, the Angus BREEDPLAN Consultative Committee, Angus Sire Benchmarking Program Consultative Committee, Angus Youth Consultative Committee and World Angus Forum Consultative Committee each met several times during the year to provide valuable input to the Board.

(RAR); and 1,352 in the Multi Breed Register (MBR) – see Figure 3.

A total of 12,595 transfers of ownership were recorded.

Breed Development & Extension

High levels of performance recording continued in 2017, including 56,506 birth weights; 46,832 400-day weights; 36,752 ultrasound carcase measurements; 16,902 scrotal size measurements; 13,832 mature cow weights; and, 20,860 docility scores added to the Angus database – see Figure 4.

Membership

At the end of 2017 there were 3,590 members, including 1,083 Full Members, 25 Honorary Life Members, 367 Junior Members and 2,114 Commercial Members. There were 3 members recognized with 50 years membership (Raff Angus, Tas; BD McFarlane, NSW; MK & SG Davis, WA), and 12 members recognised for their 25 years membership.

Registrations

A total of 112,447 females were enrolled on the female inventory - see Figure 2.

The increase in Angus Breeding Index Value among 2016 born calves was +$4.40 (+4.2%) with an average increase of +$2.74 (+3.7%) per annum over the past 5 years – see Figure 5.

A total of 67,034 calves were registered including 41,002 in the Herd Book Register (HBR); 18,642 in the Angus Performance Register (APR); 5,961 in the Angus Commercial Register (ACR); 77 in the Red Angus Register Angus Bulletin — autumn 2018

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A total of 13,222 DNA tests were conducted in 2017 for the recessive genetic conditions Arthrogryposis Multiplex (AM), Neuropathic Hydrocephalus (NH), Contractural Arachnodactyly (CA) and Developmental Duplications (DD). As shown in Figure 6, the prevalence of carrier animals for each of these conditions has reduced substantially compared to when these conditions were initially recognized.

Data collection has continued to schedule in the Angus Sire Benchmarking Project (ASBP) and results incorporated into fortnightly Angus BREEDPLAN analyses. A total of 299 sires with 9,154 progeny have been included across the first 8 Cohorts of the ASBP. A total of 13,626 Zoetis i50k DNA profiles and 1,603 GeneSeek Genomic Profiler (GGP) profiles were added to the Angus Australia database, and the resulting genomic values integrated into Angus BREEDPLAN EBVs. Considerable work was done through the year in preparation for the implementation of “single-step” methodology for incorporation of genomics data into Angus BREEDPLAN. At the time of the “single-step” implementation in November 2017, genomic information was included for over 30,000 animals. During 2017, Angus HeiferSELECT was launched in collaboration with Zoetis Animal Genetics as a genomic selection tool to help inform the selection of Angus replacement females in commercial herds. A number or workshops and field days were conducted, including 10 Regional Forums across all states in October and a Genetics Service Provider Workshop in December.

Marketing, Communications and Youth

A total of 167 auction sales were reported to Angus Australia in 2017, with 9,297 Angus bulls sold for an average of $7,634 – see Figure 7. Numerous sale records were eclipsed during 2017, including $3,650 for PTIC Commercial Angus heifers sold by M & P Harris & family at the Boyanup Landmark Specially Selected Breeders Sale; and, $4,100 for Commercial Angus cows with calves sold by G and R.J Buller at the Monterey Ladies Day Sale, Karridale WA. In addition, record prices for registered Angus females of $54,000 for Millah Murrah Prue H112, followed by $190,000 for Millah Murrah Prue M4, and a record average for a Registered Female Sale of $13,709 were achieved by Millah Murrah Angus, Bathurst NSW. PAge 6

Angus Bulletin — autumn 2018

Angus eNews was distributed to over 3,000 email addresses each week; and, 4 issues of the Angus Bulletin were circulated to members and 36 press releases issued. The Angus Australia website received an average of 18,962 visits (33,121 page views) per month. Database lookups and searches averaged 381,042 views per month. Interest in Angus Australia’s social media platforms continued to increase with 4,741 Facebook followers, 2,107 Twitter followers and 1,074 Instagram followers at the end of 2017. A successful National Conference (#GrowAngus) was conducted in Ballarat on 16-17 May, with 180 participants in attendance. Angus Australia also participated in the World Angus Forum in Edinburgh Scotland in June. During 2017, Angus breeders had good success at Royal Shows across Australia. At the Sydney Royal, K5X Kaharau L31 took out Supreme Interbreed heifer. The K5X stud also took out the Interbreed Breeders Group title. At the Royal Adelaide Show PC Miss E99 Foreman J181 won the All-Breed Supreme Champion Female title. PC Miss E99 Foreman J181 also won Supreme Exhibit at Melbourne Royal Show, and Hollywood Miz Scarlett M18 won the interbreed heifer class. At Perth Royal, Little Meadows Edwina J28 was crowned All Breeds Supreme Senior Champion Beef Female; and, at the Launceston Royal Show, Platinum Angus Fleru-Ru won the Supreme Exhibit award. In January, a successful Angus Youth Roundup was conducted in Mount Gambier, SA with 122 participants. International youth scholarships were awarded in 2017 to Samantha Neumann (Semex Genetics Kansas State University Scholarship); Kate Schoen (New Zealand Exchange); Kait McGregor, Angus McGregor, Chloe Gould and Jasmine Ramage (World Angus Forum). Several other scholarships, awards and bursaries were awarded by the Angus Foundation to assist youth members with study and travel costs to attend industry events. The Angus Youth electronic newsletter titled “The Herd” was distributed monthly across the Angus Youth membership network.

Export certification

During 2017, export certificates were issued for 10,278 animals across six shipments all destined for China.


Information Systems

Angus Australia’s angus.tech software development project progressed during 2017 with the rollout of Angus DATABASE SEARCH tools including Angus SELECT, Member SELECT, Sale SELECT, Semen SELECT, Heifer SELECT and Export SELECT. In addition, a revised Mobile App was implemented to incorporate these tools.

Commercial Supply Chain

During 2017, the Angus Australia Commercial Supply Chain program commenced breed verification activities for numerous Angus brands across 6 major processors, along with verification of the supply of Angus products sold by McDonalds Australia Ltd. With the move in emphasis from brand ownership to verification of proprietary brands, equity in the Angus PureTM brand was sold to Thomas Foods International and the Certified Australian Angus Beef (CAABTM) brand was retired.

was modified in early 2017 with all company activities integrated into Angus Australia.

Summary

2017 was a busy year for Angus Australia, with several new initiatives progressed for the long-term benefit of members. The important contributions of our members, Board, State Committees, staff, and various R&D and commercial partners in our achievements during 2017 are gratefully acknowledged.

Infrastructure

During 2017, extensions to the Angus Australia building in Armidale were completed to provide additional office accommodation and meeting room space.

Certified Angus Group Pty Ltd

Governance and management of Angus Australia’s wholly owned subsidiary, Certified Angus Group Pty Ltd (CAG)

Angus Australia’s CEO Peter Parnell, with current President Libby Creek and past President Hugh Munro at the opening of the Angus Australia building extension

TRANSPORT WELDING ENGINEERING

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PHONE: (07) 4633 3822 483 Greenwattle St, Toowoomba, QLD, 4350 http://www.mansell.com.au/companies/transport-welding-engineering.html Angus Bulletin — autumn 2018

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Angus Bulletin — autumn 2018

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Tallageira Pastoral Company's Demijohn manager Kevin Knight with Landmark's David Heinrich, sold 136 Angus steers to $1,234 average $1,170 at Naracoorte SA 18/01/18

Graeme and Dawn Macaulay, with daughter Michelle and son-in-law Simon Ward, and Rural Bank's Matt McAninley and Mark Hodge, Huon VIC, sold the top price pen of 18 Angus steers, 429kgs for $1410. Their consignment of 70 steers sold upward from $1,130 at the Elders & Landmark Angus weaner sale in Wodonga VIC, 5/01/18

Brothers, Trent and Brodie Sirl with Brodie's partner Jess, "Scrubby Hill", Bethanga Vic pictured beside 47 Angus steers, 252-286kg, which sold for $985 – $1,010 or 353 – 391c/kg, at Wodonga Vic, 4/01/18

around the weaner sales Images: Fairfax Media

Arizona Farms had a successful Landmark special Angus weaner sale, 2/01/18/ Mt Barker WA, selling almost 550 Angus steers. Highlights included, 20 Angus steers, 310kg, for $1,108 or 358c/kg, 20 Angus steers, 348kg for $1,195 or 348c/kg and 16 Angus steers, 393kg for $1,258 or 320c/kg. Karen (left), Luke and Noel Bairstow, Arizona Farms, Lake Grace, with Landmark Lake Grace agent Gary Prater and Landmark southern livestock manager Bob Pumphrey

Rifa Salutary Pastoral regional manager Wayne Johnstone oversaw the sale of the company's 134 Blackwood Angus steers that topped at $1,209 to average $1,144, at Hamilton VIC 8/01/18

Brigalow Pastoral Co sold 198 Angus steers for $705 - $950, or 368 Angus Bulletin — autumn 9 – over 500c/kg at the Independent Agents Blue2018 RibbonPAge Sale, Wodonga VIC, 4/01/18


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Talk to your local Achmea Australia Risk Specialist today by calling

1800 724 214 or visit achmea.com.au/find-a-risk-specialist Proud supporters of the GenAngus Future Leaders program The information in this advertisement is general advice only and does not take into account your individual objectives, financial situation or needs (your personal circumstances). Before using this information to decide whether to purchase the insurance policy, you should consider your personal circumstances and the relevant Product Disclosure Statement available from the ‘Downloads’ section of our website www.achmea.com.au. Achmea Schadeverzekeringen N.V. ABN 86 158 237 702 AFSL 433984.

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Angus Bulletin — autumn 2018


Angus Australia’s Events & Youth Development Officer, Candice Liddle and Chief Executive Officer, Peter Parnell, with Achmea Australia Chief Executive Officer, Emma Thomas and Angus Youth member Jasmin Ramage at the announcement of the new partnership between Angus Australia and Achmea Australia to develop the GenAngus Furure Leaders Program

Supporting the leaders of tomorrow Achmea Australia and Angus Australia announce a program to support the leaders of tomorrow. Specialist rural insurance company Achmea Australia and registered breed organisation Angus Australia have announced a new program designed to support the future leaders of Australia’s Beef and Agricultural industries. The GenAngus Future Leaders Program will mentor young entrepreneurs seeking to advance their knowledge and skills, via a first-class initiative that will help shape the industry for years to come. The comprehensive program will provide opportunities for program members to create a business plan, utilising knowledge gained in corporate governance and commercialising ideas, to business resilience, obtaining funding, financial planning, farm risk management, insurance, succession planning, marketing, promotion and branding, effective business networking, industry insights and supply chain. With Achmea Australia committing to funding support over three years to help set up and sponsor the program, it’s intended to be of huge benefit to the ongoing establishment and promotion of entrepreneurial beef and cattlerelated businesses. Achmea was established in the Netherlands over 200 years ago, when 39 farmers put money into a glass jar to be compensated in the event one of them had a haystack fire, Achmea has a long history of supporting the agricultural industry through a mutual approach to farm insurance. Today they provide a full range of farm insurance in a package that gives cover for buildings, inventory, business interruption, vehicles, liability, and crop insurance. Achmea Australia will share their years of knowledge and experience with members, helping them to better identify, reduce, prevent and manage their on-farm risks – and they’ll also work with Angus Australia to co create/ develop and offer a tailored beef cattle insurance solution and stud stock insurance product as part of the package. For Achmea Australia’s Chief Executive Officer Emma Thomas, the program reflects Achmea Australia’s unique focus on collaboration and community: “Our approach

offers a partnership alongside an insurance solution – and our ‘glass jar beginning’ represents the co-operative spirit that still drives us today. We hope this industry partnership will be first of many aimed at helping to protect and enhance our agricultural communities, and we’re delighted to be involved in this much-needed initiative.” This initiative should be seen as a sign of Achmea Australia’s commitment to the future leadership of the agriculutural industry and that we want to invest and grow our presence in rural Australia. Angus Australia’s Chief Executive Officer Dr. Peter Parnell spoke of the importance of the new program, which is intended to bridge the generation gap between people finishing Youth Programs and taking up industry leadership roles: “While our existing Youth Program is already highly successful in providing opportunities via a suite of Scholarships, Awards and Bursaries, this new initiative is part of our organisation’s aim to support the development of leadership and entrepreneurial skills amongst our young members. “We find that while a lot of youth programs tend to focus on the 16-25 age group, there aren’t many programs for 25-40 year-olds. It means that a lot of younger people are hesitant to take on leadership roles, because they feel they don’t have enough experience. “It’s our goal to equip our young members with the knowledge they need to run a successful beef business, and develop their knowledge and skills so they can more effectively establish, advance and promote our breed, and the beef industry as a whole. This is a tremendous opportunity to realise that goal, and we’re thrilled Achmea Australia has come on board to deliver a highly innovative and meaningful new program.” For more information, on the GenAngus and Future Leaders Program, please contact Candice Liddle Events and Youth Development Officer 02 6773 4622. For more information on Achmea Australia call 1800 724 214 or visit www.achmea.com.au. Angus Bulletin — autumn 2018

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Northern Focus

Angus Focus on Northern Australia Christian Duff, Strategic Projects Manager

An important strategic project for Angus Australia is devising a sustainable program with the overall aim to increase demand for Angus and Angus infused cattle in the beef supply chain in northern Australia covering breeders, backgrounder’s, grass finishers, feedlots, abattoirs and exporters. An early initiative to underpin the northern development program was the formation of the Northern Development Consultative Committee. This committee was formed in mid-December 2017 with the purpose to: • Provide guidance in developing policies, strategies and plans relating to Angus Australia’s Northern Development Program. • Monitor activity, progress and results of the Northern Development Program.

Brett Guest

• Communicate and represent the views and require ments of northern Australia beef breeders in relation to Angus genetics and Angus influenced cattle.

The members of the committee are: • • • • •

Brett Guest (Chairman) – Clunie Range Angus, Coolatai, NSW. Johnathan Schmidt – Burenda Angus, Dalby, QLD. Ben Noller – Palgrove Ultrablacks, Dalveen, QLD. Ben Mayne – Texas Angus, Warialda, NSW. Simon Falkiner – Murdeduke Angus, Winchelsea, VIC.

Johnathan Schmidt

Ben Noller

Also on the committee as ex-officio are Libby Creek (President), Sam White (Strategic Projects Committee Chair), Peter Parnell (CEO) and Christian Duff (Strategic Project Manager). The committee held their first meeting on February 28th, 2018 in Toowoomba. The introductory meeting focussed on reviewing Angus Australia’s past and current strategies in the Northern Development area and commencement on developing a re-invigorated program. It is planned that the draft program will be finalised by the third quarter of 2018, with specific initiatives to commence soon after.

Ben and Wendy Mayne

At the inaugural meeting, Brett Guest from Clunie Range Angus, Coolatai, NSW was appointed as Chairman. While this committee has been formed for formal guidance, all Angus Australia members are encouraged to have input into this initiative by contacting Christian Duff, Strategic projects Manager on 0457 457 151 or christian@angusaustralia.com.au

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Angus Bulletin — autumn 2018

Simon Falkiner


Northern Focus

Angus Australia at Beef Australia 2018 Diana Wood, Marketing & Communications Manager

Angus Australia are proud supporters of Beef Australia 2018, taking place in Rockhampton, Queensland from May 6th to 12th 2018. Beef Australia is a celebration of all facets of the Australian beef industry and Angus Australia will be involved during this world class event across a number of areas.

Trade Stand

Angus Australia will have a trade stand in the Durack Pavilion across sites 1-3. Angus Australia staff will be available on the stand for consultation.

Seminar

Tuesday May 8th, 9.30am – 10.30 am in the Gallagher Energizer Room (James Lawrence Pavilion) Seminar Title: The Angus benefit – from being an Angus producer, through the supply chain to the supermarket shelf Intro: Through the supply chain from the producer, to the lot feeder and processor and making its way onto the supermarket shelf, the production of Angus cattle and the development and processing of Angus beef brands plays an integral role in the advancement of the Australian beef industry. In this seminar you’ll have a backstage pass to one of our industry’s most successful integrated Angus supply chains. What they do, how they do it, why they do it and the Angus premium generated throughout their enterprises.

Speakers:

• Pat Gleeson: Pat is the General Manager at Oakey Beef Exports and Thomas Borthwicks, Mackay in the NH Foods Australia Group. He is also a director of AMPC (Australian Meat Processor Corporation) and active on a number of industry boards and advisory panels. A fourth generation cattle farmer from Crows Nest in Queensland, Pat has over 3 decades of experience in cattle production, beef processing, and management across the supply chain. Pat will discuss the roll of Whyalla Feedlot and Oakey Beef Exports in the Angus

Reserve production process and the benefits NH Foods Australia sees in promoting an Angus brand. • Whyalla Beef Supplier (TBC): A leading supplier of black Angus feeders into the NH Foods Australia Angus Reserve program will discuss their commercial Angus operation and their integrated relationship with NH Foods Australia’s supply chain. • Costco Meat Manager (TBC): Costco’s Meat Manager will share the merits of the black Angus Reserve program and how it assists them in generating consumer demand and delivering quality Angus beef to their to these consumers. Tickets are available for purchase from the beef Australia website: www.beefaustralia.com.au

Beef Symposium

Angus Australia are proud sponsors of the Beef Industry Symposium taking place on Tuesday May 8th. With the Beef Industry Symposium lunch proudly sponsored by Angus Australia and Bindaree Beef, offering Bindaree Beef’s Cape Byron Angus, a Verified Angus Beef brand.

Angus Cattle Judging

The Judging of Angus stud cattle will take place on Thursday 10th May from 7.30am in Ring 2. Angus Bulletin — autumn 2018

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Northern Focus

Benefits of Infusing Angus Genetics into Northern Australian Beef Herds Angus Australia has surveyed producers in northern Australia to increase the understanding of the benefits of infusing Angus genetics into their beef herds. This research, involved interviews with over 60 commercial or seedstock producers either running or supplying bulls into northern Australia. Responses from producers interviewed in this research confirm that using Angus genetics in northern beef herds can have many benefits, and that Angus bulls can be run successfully in most areas of northern Australia if some simple management practices are adopted. The main benefits of incorporating Angus genetics into northern Australian beef herds included improved marketability of stock, hybrid vigour, enhanced female fertility and the introduction of polledness. Additional benefits were also obtained from the utilisation of complementary attributes with other breeds when Angus were included in structured cross breeding programs. The extent to which the benefits from the infusion of Angus were achieved was impacted by the management of bulls prior to and after relocation to the north, as well as the female replacement policy used in these herds.

Market Flexibility

Northern producers have reported that the incorporation of Angus genetics has broadened the market options for their stock and provided greater access to processor premiums available for cattle meeting MSA specifications. The adoption of MSA grading by the major meat processors in Queensland and some specific markets requiring a minimum Bos taurus content was cited as a key driver for the increased use of Angus genetics. The growth in demand for Angus branded product has also been a significant factor driving premiums for Angus cattle. Premiums of up to 20 cents/kg live weight or more have been cited for Angus or Angus cross steers over animals with no Angus content.

Enhanced Fertility

Increases in calving rates were widely reported by northern producers following the incorporation of Angus genetics into their breeding herds. Reduced age at puberty allowed heifers to conceive earlier and calve down at a younger age when the seasonal conditions were favourable. In addition, shorter lactation anoestrus periods were reported in the crossbred cow herd, resulting in shorter calving intervals and heavier weaners at mustering.

Hybrid Vigour

Incorporating Angus genetics resulted in benefits through hybrid vigour among crossbred calves and replacement females, as well as combining positive attributes of both Bos taurus and Bos indicus genetics. PAge 14

Angus Bulletin — autumn 2018

It was reported that the expression of hybrid vigour decreased the age at which progeny are finished. This enhanced the chances of obtaining premiums associated with MSA grading by ensuring that bullocks were above 500 kilograms live weight with milk or 2 teeth. Crossbred females with Angus content were reported as being more fertile and having superior milk production compared to Bos indicus derived females.

Polledness

One of the benefits associated with the use of Angus bulls is that the majority of their progeny will be polled. While the polled gene is dominant, the African horn gene and scur genes common in Bos indicus breeds are inherited separately. Consequently, it may take several generations of breeding with polled bulls to achieve a fully polled herd. Northern producers reported that breeding polled cattle was highly desirable as it eliminated stress and weight losses associated with dehorning, reduced the risk of work place injury and reduced bruising of cattle during yarding and transportation.

Beef CRC research

The Beef Co-operative Research Centre (Beef CRC) conducted a large crossbreeding trial in central Queensland where bulls from eight breeds were joined to Brahman cows. Calves were grown out on grass and in feedlots for different market endpoints. The results showed that Angus cross calves were lightest at birth and had similar growth performance and carcase weights to European crosses. They were easier to finish, with good muscling, more marbling, better tenderness and highest MSA meat quality scores.


Northern Focus

Angus Bulletin — autumn 2018

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Northern Focus

Management Strategies for Relocation & acclimatisation of Angus Bulls into Northern Australia Andrew Byrne, Breed Development & Extension Manager

Reflecting the profitability of Angus genetics, the recent autumn bull sales have seen a considerable number of Angus bulls being purchased for use in beef breeding operations in northern Australia. With many bulls having been bred in more temperate areas, it is timely to reflect on several important recommendations for the successful relocation and acclimatisation of Angus bulls. These recommendations are the result of a research study conducted by Angus Australia aimed at understanding the management requirements of Angus bulls in northern Australia, and involved interviews with 60 seedstock and commercial producers across Australia who were selling or purchasing Angus bulls into northern Australia.

Acclimatisation Requirements

The length of time and management required for acclimatisation is ultimately determined by the variation in the climate and production environment between the bull’s origin and the destination region and the time of year when re-location occurs. The biggest factor influencing successful acclimatisation is the management of bulls before and immediately after they reach their new environment. Areas that require particular attention include the acclimatisation period post relocation, bull age, nutritional regime pre- and post-relocation, use of controlled joining periods, implementation of vaccination programs prior to re-location, external parasite control and disease management. All of these factors can affect how well bulls will perform in their new environment.

Duration of acclimatisation

Management of the acclimatisation of bulls to new environments will impact their subsequent mating performance and longevity. A minimum of 3 months acclimatisation is recommended when relocating Angus bulls into northern Australia. This is required to minimise any reductions in semen quality which may result from transportation and post relocation environmental stressors. Longer periods of acclimatisation will generally give better results.

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Angus Bulletin — autumn 2018

Age of bulls when relocated

Generally, the younger a bull is when it is relocated the better it will ultimately become acclimatised to the new environment. When purchasing bulls of different ages the following general acclimatisation periods should be considered before putting them to work: • A minimum of 3 months for 18 to 24 month old bulls • A minimum of 6 months for 12 to 18 month old bulls • Bulls 12 months and under will ultimately acclimatise better to the new environment, but should be allowed 6 to 12 months acclimatisation period If used within the first 12 months, bulls should only be given a very light load. A minimum joining percentage of 5% is recommended.

Time of year at relocation

The climatic conditions that animals are exposed to vary substantially between environments. The main factors to consider when relocating animals include the variation in temperature, humidity and nutrition. The cooler months are the best time to relocate bulls, with autumn usually providing the least variation in climatic conditions. Where possible animals should be relocated before the end of the northern wet season when pastures are generally still of reasonable quality and temperatures are beginning to drop. If feed quality and availability after arrival is limited then bulls should be provided with some supplementation until they are placed into the breeding herd.

Nutrition

Bulls should be gradually transitioned onto their new diet post relocation to allow rumen micro-organisms time to adapt. A minimum of 14 days is recommended to allow bulls to adapt to pastures in the new environment, with some supplementary feeding offered where necessary. Post relocation supplements should consist of good quality hay and/or protein and energy supplements. Where possible, it is best if bulls are provided with minimal grain supplement in their diets prior to relocation. Bulls that have received large amounts of grain supplementation prior to relocation should be let down on a protein and energy supplement for at least a 3 month acclimatisation period. Bulls purchased from an auction will commonly have received supplementation or high quality forage presale. These bulls should be monitored carefully to ensure that they body condition doesn’t drop too rapidly, and if it does, they should be moved quickly onto supplementary feeding.


Northern Focus In areas where shrubs and trees are an important part of the diet bulls should be carefully managed while they acquire the necessary browsing skills for this process.

Managing ticks

Producers in endemic tick areas should treat all Angus bulls on a regular basis. Due to their lower resistance when compared to their Bos indicus counterparts, Angus bulls have a potential to lose weight quickly and possibly die due to high tick burdens if not managed carefully. Angus bulls should ideally be treated for ticks twice per year, both at the beginning and end of the wet season. This provides protection during their period of peak work, and uses the natural break in season to interrupt the life cycle of the ticks. Bulls that are removed during the dry season should be treated as required. In situations where it is impractical to treat bulls for ticks, using Angus influenced composite or cross bred bulls with some Bos indicus content rather than pure bred Angus bulls is recommended.

Buffalo fly control

Buffalo flies and mosquitoes affect production through irritation to the animal and as vectors for disease. One or more of the following control methods should be used to reduce these insect burdens: • Buffalo fly traps • Ear tags, which release small amounts of chemical over a long period of time • Sprays and pour on chemicals • Back rubbers, containing an oil and insecticide mixture

Vaccinations requirements

All bulls should be vaccinated in accordance with standard protocols against the Clostridial diseases (5 in 1, or 7 in 1), Pestivirus and Vibriosis. Additionally, bulls should be vaccinated for: • Tick Fever: Producers purchasing bulls for relocation into the ticky areas of northern Australia should ensure that all bulls have been pre-vaccinated. The ideal time for bulls to be vaccinated for tick fever is between 6 to 12 months of age, with a second shot ideally prior to relocation or as soon as possible post-relocation. Bulls vaccinated when older than 9 months of age may react to the vaccine and should be monitored for signs of ever. Likewise, all bulls, including those that have been vaccinated, should be monitored for signs of tick fever for the first month after relocation.If bulls have not been vaccinated prior to relocation into a tick zone they should be vaccinated on arrival and treated with a tickicide that kills nymph ticks. This strategy is inferior to pre-vaccination and should be avoided if possible as bulls can become affected by tick fever prior to the vaccine taking affect. • 3 Day Sickness (Bovine Ephemeral Fever): Bulls should be vaccinated prior to relocation to reduce the risk of contracting Bovine Ephemeral Fever. • Botulism: Producers relocating bulls to areas endemic to Botulism should ensure bulls are vaccinated either before relocation or immediately on arrival.

effects on the animal if not managed appropriately. All livestock transportation should be conducted in accordance with the state and federal legislation. A maximum of 48 hours off water for cattle over 6 months of age is recommended, with additional considerations for animals after 36 hours off water. The use of trucks with air bag suspension systems, and the addition of flooring covering such as rubber matting, wood shavings, rice hulls or carpet can assist in reducing the level of physical stress on animals during transportation.

Removal of bulls from the breeding herd

Management during the first 12 to 18 months after relocation will affect a bull’s fertility and health for the duration of its working life. The removal of new bulls from the cow herd after the wet season and during the first winter post relocation is particularly important as the bulls will be still acclimatising to the environment. Where possible bulls should be removed between musters and supplementary fed to increase their body condition. The type and amount of supplementation required will vary depending on the season and availability. In situations where it is not practical to remove all bulls, and/or where sourcing supplementary feed is either difficult or too costly, an alternative approach may be to only remove bulls for supplementary feeding that are in poor condition.

Mixing bulls

Injuries to younger bulls due to fighting with older herd bulls can cause losses. The success of younger bulls in their first breeding season can be substantially increased by only running bulls of similar ages together. In cases where young bulls have been put into areas with high numbers of feral bulls their survivability can be negatively affected. It is recommended that feral bulls should be removed from the property. If feral bulls cannot be controlled, it is recommended that only well acclimatised bulls over 2 years of age should be used.

Mustering

During periods of extremely hot weather it may be preferable to minimise mustering of bulls. If spear traps are in use then bulls will need to be inducted and trained to use this equipment prior to setting the traps.

Further Information

To further discuss the relocation and acclimatisation of Angus bulls in northern Australia, please contact staff at Angus Australia.

Transportation

The transportation of bulls can have multiple negative Angus Bulletin — autumn 2018

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Northern Focus

Angus content proves fruitful Lucy Kinbacher, Queensland Country Life

They are renowned for their Brangus and Angus cross weaners sold annually to the Roma store sale but now if you look closely at cattle from Ian and Joy Macallister, Roma Downs, Roma and their grandson Ben Whip you will see a slight change. At the Roma store sale on July 11, the family sold their first calves sired by their new Ultrablack bulls, which were introduced to their herd two years ago, developed with Angus genetics for their black hide, with a small percentage of Brahman infusion. Buyers from Inverell and Condamine snapped up the weaners , which brought promising results with their 202 steers making 354c/kg at 288kg to return $1021/hd. The 49 heifers made 323c/kg at 255kg to return $824/hd. The Macallister family runs breeders on Struan and Drumfern, both 100km south of Roma, and brings the progeny back to Roma Downs for growing.

“It’s pretty average” Mr Whip said. “We have got some dry standing feed left.” From January 2017 the year family was selling weaners to the Roma store sale with the first offload of 561 Brangus/ Angus cross steers averaging 396c/kg at 271kg to return $1079/hd. The family also sold 92 Angus cross heifers averaging 364c/kg at 277kg to return $828/hd. The yarding of steers and heifers was to be held until the start of winter but had to be sold earlier due to dry conditions.

As part of the family’s management plan the cattle are then walked to the saleyards to avoid shrinkage and loss of weight in trucking the animals while also saving on transportation fees.

Ian & Joy Macallister

The family aims to keep the herd young and retain replacement heifers to be introduced into the mating program when aged cows are sold off. Mr Whip said the decision to incorporate Ultrablack genetics came down to have higher Angus content and maintaining the hybrid vigour in their cattle. “We are very happy with the calves” he said. The weaners were already proving successful in doing what most producers hop to achieve and didn’t show the tough season they have faced with little rain since Cyclone Debbie.

Operation: Brangus & Angus cross

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Angus Bulletin — autumn 2018

Location: ‘Roma Downs’ 5km from Roma ‘Struan’ & ‘Dumfern’ 100km south of Roma


Northern Focus

Roma family's switch to breeding proves successful Lucy Kinbacher, Queensland Country Life

A Roma family have moved from the background of the cattle industry and are seeing great success being front and centre of the breeding game. Huck and Helen Allen and their children, Jean, 5, and Neve, 8, operate the 4046 hectare property, Mountain Cottage, between Roma and Mitchell, where they cross Angus bulls over Santa cows. Up until five years ago the Allen family were backgrounding straight Angus steers on their property but made the shift to start breeding after recognizing the changing market. In addition, they better prepared their country for a female herd by introducing a variety of tropical pastures. “We have been breeding the last five years because the market dynamics were changing, backgrounders got dear and breeding was better to be in,” he said. “We got our country more developed so I could hold breeders more safely in the dry times.” Their weaner steers and heifers are sold direct to the Roma store sale. At the store sale on June 27, 2017, where more than 9000 head were yarded, the family sold 136 Angus cross steers and 145 heifers with great success. The steers topped at 384c/kg with the line averaging 369c/kg at 307kg to return $1136/hd. The heifers reached 337c/kg for an average of 335c/kg at 290kg to return $976/hd. Mr Allen said supplying what the market demanded was their end goal and not only was top quality weaner cattle currently top of the agenda, their Angus Santa cross was also fulfilling the needs of buyers.

He said their choice of breeds came down to Santa cows being able to handle the dry times and the Angus bulls being fertile and keen to work. “The market wants this cross,” he said. “I am just catering to the market, not catering to any personal preferences.” The Allen family, Huck, Helen, Jean and Neve, of Mountain Cottage, Roma, with their weaners at the Roma saleyards

Angus Bulletin — autumn 2018

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Northern Focus

Rob Atkinson with some of his cattle behind him

Angus infusion brings rewards Atkinson Pastoral Company, Hughenden in North Queensland is a family partnership that includes, Rob and Donna Atkinson, their son John and wife Bec and their daughter Amy and her husband, Guy Slack-Smith. In a normal year the Atkinsons would normally run 3000 females, but severe drought for the past five years has seen numbers cut back to 1500. Since 2012, the Atkinsons have been buying Angus bulls out of the New England region of NSW, to use over their Droughtmaster females in a bid to test the impact of the Angus infusion on eating quality. Mr Atkinson was initially unsure about the ability of the Angus bulls to handle the Hughenden conditions, but has been really impressed by their performance. ‘They walked straight into a drought, but they handled it and got plenty of calves and did everything we asked of them’, he said.

Success in the RNA Paddock to Palate Competition

After a 12 year hiatus, the Atkinsons decided to enter steers in the 2017 RNA Paddock to palate competition to

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Angus Bulletin — autumn 2018

test the impact of the Angus infusion and compare their cattle with others, a decision that certainly paid off. Six Angus cross Droughtmaster steers entered by Atkinson Pastoral Company Queensland took out the 100 day class for highest weight gain in the competition, producing and average daily gain (ADG) of 3.117kg. The Atkinson’s also took out second place in this class with another pen of six Angus cross Droughtmaster steers. The Atkinson’s also won the highest individual weight gain for the 70 day class with an Angus Droughtmaster steers producing and ADG of 3.94kg. Their success in the competition has reinforced their decision to the introduce the Angus infusion to secure more market specifications.


Northern Focus

big benefits in Angus crosses Matt Sherrington, Queensland Country Life

Long-term Hereford breeders Geoffrey and Leanne Hartwig, Calrossie, Eidsvold, are highly enthusiastic about the advantages the Angus breed bring to the table and have been using them for crossbreeding purposes for close to 50 years. In good seasons the Hartwig’s run close to 1000 breeders on the 36,000 acre Calrossie property, as well as nearby Barrington (2500 acres) and Pinevale (3500 acres). They also recently purchased another block, Ercildoune (18,000 acres) situated 60 kilometres south of Tambo. Geoffrey said a lot of their sale cattle now have Angus content, as they use Angus bulls as a second cross over their Hereford/Droughtmaster cows to produce a tougher animal. “In our environmental conditions, we need a fairly hardy animal’. “We’re still maintaining almost entirely pure Hereford female herd, so we use the Angus bulls to get the black in the progeny.” The Hartwig’s primarily sell heavy feeders to the market, but also sell a few lighter feeder cattle to Coles and Woolworths, as they “seek cattle with high British content”. “Lately we’ve been getting our cattle out younger with the seasonal conditions and markets the way they are. “Most of our heavier feeders weigh in the 440kg to 460kg range and still have their milk teeth." He said Angus bulls cross exceptionally well with all other breeds, and that their durability and muscling is also great.

“The hybrid vigour with Angus come through very quickly, and their marbling is also very attractive.” Come sale time, Geoffrey said he always looks for Angus bulls with great type, a good temperament, weight for age, and eye muscle content. “Big eye muscle content usually goes hand-in-hand with good growth rates and marbling.” “We need good bulls for our tough conditions which is what he looks purchase. We get young ones to acclimatise on better paddocks for a couple of years, then toss them into harder country, and we’ve found they adapt very well.” Geoffrey said one of his main sources of satisfaction that has kept him interested in cattle production through the decades is seeing a particular plan he’s put in place for his herd come to fruition. “We’re continually improving our genetics to suit our environmental conditions, and it’ll continue to provide a pretty gratifying feeling if we can manage to keep the high market prices where they currently are.”

Geoffrey & Leanne Hartwig properties: Calrossie, 36,000 Barrington, 2500 acres Pinevale, 3500 acres Ercildoune, 18,000 acres Location: 100km south of Roma Operation: 1,000 breeders

The hybrid vigour with Angus come "through very quickly, and their marbling is also very attractive " Angus Bulletin — autumn 2018

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Chris Knox: 0427600278 Email: dskangusandcharolais@ westnet.com.au

DSK

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DSK 25th Annual Bull Sale 1pm 16th Aug ‘18

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PHONE: (07) 4633 3822 PAge 22

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Northern Focus

Expert reproductive advice on offer at Beef Week 2018 Dr Sophia Edwards, Business Unit Manager - Australia & New Zealand

Expert reproductive advice will be a key offering at Beef Week 2018 on behalf of Vetoquinol’s Repro360. International and local experts in the field of assisted reproduction will be present and available for free consultation with producers and industry stakeholders throughout the event. A formal seminar will be run on Tuesday 8th May at 2 pm “Precision breeding: practical assisted reproduction for beef profitability”. The theme of this seminar is to provide beef cattle breeders the tools to utilise assisted reproduction, but also understand how the use of these technologies can drive profitability in their herds. The keynote speaker at the seminar will be Dr Gabriel Bó from Argentina. Dr. Gabriel Bó, is currently President and Director of Research and Post-graduate training of the Instituto de Reproducción Animal Córdoba (IRAC) and Professor of Obstetrics and Biotechnology of Reproduction at the Veterinary School of the Instituto de Ciencias Basicas y Aplicadas, Universidad Nacional de Villa Maria in Cordoba, Argentina. Dr. Bó has been working for many years on applied research and the commercial application of fixed-time artificial insemination (FTAI) and bovine embryo technologies. Dr. Bó, on many occasions has travelled throughout Australia and has gained an excellent appreciation of the Australian beef production systems. With the exponential growth of assisted reproduction in South America, Dr. Bó is able to draw on his wealth of experience to assist Australian producers achieve their best possible reproductive outcomes. At the seminar, Dr. Bó will be presenting on two topics: 1) “Precision breeding: how to get the best results using FTAI”, and 2) “Practical use of embryo transfer technology in beef herds: donor and recipient selection and management”. Importantly, Dr. Bó will be available at the Repro360 stand during the

trade show to provide free consultation with producers about their reproductive requirements. This will be an invaluable resource for producers to understand the best approach to their breeding system that will be tailored to their requirements. Repro360 is also proud to be offering the advice of a local expert Dr Enoch Bergman throughout the week. Dr Enoch Bergman is a beef cattle veterinarian, consultant, and partner within Swans Veterinary Services, located in Esperance WA. He travels widely across the state providing veterinary services and advice to southern beef producers, seed stock producers, lot feeders, and pastoralists. Dr Bergman has a passion for the development of assisted reproduction in beef cattle herds. Within the region that he services, Dr Bergman has demonstrated how implementation of FTAI in heifer mobs has changed the profitability of commercial beef herds. Dr Bergman will present his work in his presentation at the Repro360 seminar “Realising the value of the integration of FTAI into commercial beef cattle enterprises”. Dr Bergman will also be available for consultation on the Repro360 trade stand throughout the week with Dr. Bó for producers who want to understand further details of how assisted reproduction could be built into their herds. The Repro360 team is excited and looking forward to Beef Week 2018. Dr Bó and Dr Bergman invite you to touch base with them at the Repro360 stand which will be located at sites 28P and 47P in the Durack Pavillion.

www.repro360.com.au Experience reproductive gains beyond just profits Try the new Repro360 resource - the Calving Calculator app. Available in the Apple App store and Google Play, or from the resources section in repro360.com.au For more information visit www.repro360.com.au or call 1800 302 355

Angus Bulletin — autumn 2018

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Northern Focus

Gray’s striving for Angus brands

Matt Sherrington, Queensland Country Life

THE SMART START FOR YOUNG CATTLE.

Obtaining entry into Angus beef brands and the premiums that come with the designation is the primary goal Steve and Grace Gray are currently striving for in their Brangus breeding operation, Wallebella, 20km south of Wallumbilla. Pastures on Wallebella consists of mainly Brigalow/ Belah and box, ironbark and pine in their red country. The property is watered by six flowing artesian bores, which Steve said provide the herd with plenty of water, even during the current ordinary conditions they’re contending within the region. Along with their children, Archer, Nancy, and Tom, the family run 1000 to 1100 predominantly red and black Brangus females with Angus bulls on the 22,000 acre property. “We’ve been using Angus bulls over our Brangus cows for close to eight years. They’re appealing to us because the breed society does a great job of marketing them, making them easy to sell,” Steve said. “When you have McDonald’s and Hungry Jack’s fighting over them, it’s always a good thing being involved with the breed as a producer,” he said. Generally, the Grays wean their calves on oats then send them to the local feedlots.

What does an extra 5kg/head mean to you? That’s the difference making the smart choice for worm control in young cattle can have on productivity!

“We do diversify on occasion though; earlier last year we got caught a bit short on oats so we sold our lead weaners through the Roma Saleyards.

In a recent, multi-farm, study, weaners treated with Eclipse® Australia’s only dual active, broad spectrum pour-on – gained on average 5.1kg more than those treated with a single active ML over a period of 90 days1.

Steve said they are in the midst of increasing the Angus content in the herd so that they can get into the Angus beef market.

For effective worm control in young cattle, choose your drench with confidence. Choose Eclipse for smarter productivity.

“We generally get good prices for our steers, but if we can get the into the Angus label, it’ll be a great advantage as we’ll be able to attract a premium end of the market.”

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To help towards this goal the Grey’s have been attending Queensland Angus bull sales to select from the highgrade Angus sires being offered.

FOR MORE INFORMATION, CALL 1800 808 691 OR VISIT YOUR LOCAL STORE.

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1

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Angus Bulletin — autumn 2018

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ADVERTORIAL

Combination drenches likely to slow resistance and boost weight gain in cattle Boehringer Ingelheim Animal Health

Combination drenches can not only help cattle producers prevent the development of resistance, they can also deliver measurable production benefits, a recent trial has suggested. The trial, conducted by Charles Sturt University (CSU) in collaboration with Boehringer Ingelheim, compared Boehringer Ingelheim’s Eclipse® Combination PourOn against single active macrocyclic lactone (mectin) drenches on six beef cattle properties in southern NSW involving 550 weaner steers. Eclipse® is the only combination drench available to cattle farmers in Australia. At the start of the trial, cattle were weighed and allocated to one of two treatment groups, to receive either Eclipse® Pour-On or a single active pour-on. Egg counts were taken and weights were recorded 10 days after treatment and then every 30 days for three months. Eclipse® demonstrated a statistically significant advantage over the single active (mectin) treatment on two of the six farms. On average across all six farms, at the end of the trial those treated with Eclipse® were 5kg heavier than those treated with single active. Lead researcher Professor Bruce Allworth said the trial found resistance to the single active mectin drench on five of the six farms. Boehringer Ingelheim’s Eclipse was effective on all six properties, with an estimated efficacy greater than 99 per cent. “Producers are not always aware of the significance of the production risks to younger cattle. This research demonstrates the risk of treatment failure for the first time in Australia,” Bruce says. He suspects even greater weight differences for Eclipse® may be expected depending on seasonal conditions. “Worm burdens usually peak during winter, but 2017 had a relatively dry winter so the worm count was not as high as it might have been,” he says. “The results may have been more pronounced in a tougher winter season.” The trial was conducted in younger cattle aged nine to 15 months. Dr Brad Goonan, one of the researchers and a veterinarian at Murray Valley Veterinary Services, says worms are particularly problematic in cattle at this age. “Younger cattle are particularly vulnerable to worms as they have recently been weaned, so they only have a few months’ exposure to worms via the pasture. Their systems have not built an immunity to worms, and this is a peak time for their development,” he says. “It is a time when young cattle are trying to grow and develop. We’re aiming to give them the best chance, and using an effective drench helps them develop into wellgrown and healthy beasts.” One of the farmers who participated in the trial said that cattle producers are very conscious of the link between worms, weight and profit.

“You want them to be in their prime. Because they’re growing, worms can set them back – they just don’t do as well. They probably feel a bit crook, don’t eat as much and don’t put as much weight on,” he says. The majority of the farmers who participated in the trial say they are likely to use Eclipse® as their preferred drench. Lead researcher Bruce Allworth says that now is the ideal time for producers to look more closely at their drenching regimen. “At the moment, returns on cattle are reasonable and steer prices remain strong. It’s a good time for farmers to implement best practice, including monitoring worm burdens, assessing their drench usage and testing for resistance on-farm. Using a combination drench will help producers make the most of a strong market by potentially optimising weight gain, and at the same time is likely to be the best strategy to combat drench resistance.”

For further information, contact Boehringer Ingelheim Customer Service on 1800 808 691. About Boehringer Ingelheim Animal Health

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Angus Bulletin — autumn 2018

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supply chain

Relaunch of Angus Brand Verification Liz Pearson, Commercial Supply Chain Manager

With the transition phase of services provided by CAG Pty Ltd over to Angus Australia complete, I am excited to share Angus Australia’s new Angus Brand Verification Program. This program consists of 2 levels of verification, Verified Black Angus Beef and Verified Angus Beef. Both programs are utilised by many well-known Angus brands as a clear show of support for and protection of the Angus brand and Angus Australia. Why are there two programs? I’m glad you asked. Throughout the supply chain there are numerous brands that suit specific markets. With that being the case, what can these brands do to stand out from the crowd. By

utilising the Angus Brand Verification that best describes their brand, differentiation is achieved and a genuine marketing advantage over their competitors.

Let’s get into the nitty gritty of these two programs;

Both programs have a minimum standard of specification, of which all must be met.

Verified Black Angus Beef:

Verified Angus Beef:

These sets of assessment guidelines have been developed collaboratively with the brands Angus Australia verifies to meet customer specification and demand.

The Verified Black Angus Beef verification is our top level of verification and demonstrates to the market that they can purchase product carrying this stamp with confidence they are buying quality black Angus beef.

· Sire: Angus · Dam: Angus · Straight black and representing Angus phenotype · Small amount of white underline (no more than 10% of the hide) · No white legs and feet · No horns · Scurs are acceptable, however they must not be fixed to the skull · No Bos Indicus or dairy characteristics such as loose sheath, bos indicus ears or hump

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Angus Bulletin — autumn 2018

· Sire: Angus · Dam: Angus or Angus cross · Must contain a minimum of 75% Angus breed content · Approx. 90% black or red hide · Whole or broken white face · Small amount of white underline · No white legs and feet · No horns · Scurs are acceptable, however they must not be fixed to the skull · Representing Angus phenotype · No Bos Indicus or dairy characteristics such as loose sheath, bos indicus ears or hump


supply chain Verified Angus Beef is our second-tier verification with the key difference of parentage with the dam able to be a minimum 50% Angus animal. Consumers still know they are buying Angus product, however this product may contain a maximum of 25% from another breed. The list of brands utilising Angus Brand Verification is continuing to grow, with increased interest from more brands from across the country coming on board. A key significance of Angus Brand Verification is the commitment by these verified brands and the companies who own them to the protection of the “Angus’ brand. This commitment shows a genuine interest to work with Angus Australia to the advantage of its members. With Angus Australia’s brand verification being completely independent of the brand owner, the confidence of the customers of these brands that it truly is Angus, is at an all-time high. Couple that with the consumers awareness that the verification is independently conducted by the body representing Australian Angus producers who raised the animals and the story doesn’t get much better. Angus Australia is working collaboratively with these brand owners to build recognition and awareness of the Verified Black Angus Beef and Verified Angus Beef stamp throughout domestic and international markets. It’s exciting to share that Angus Australia will be supporting these brands in their key international marketing activities in Asia in the coming months. Also, an innovative campaign will run in a large supermarket business in Australia. I look forward to sharing more about these activities in our next Angus Bulletin.

For more information on Angus Brand Verification please visit the Supply Chain tab on our website or contact Liz Pearson, Commercial Supply Chain Manager, 0488 758 360 or liz. pearson@angusaustralia.com.au

Angus Bulletin — autumn 2018

PAge 27


supply chain

From Consumer Demand to World Class Brands Liz Pearson, Commercial Supply Chain Manager

Rangers Valley has a history stretching back to the early 19th century as a settlement for early European explorers. In 1988 Japanese company Marubeni, purchased Rangers Valley utilising this site to excel as a clean-air, high-quality welfare feedlot on the world stage. This year Rangers Valley is celebrating their 30th anniversary of ownership and collaboration with Marubeni’s global trading company. Cattle fed through the rigorously tested and perfected Rangers Valley system, coupled with the freshness of the New England Tablelands climate, produces rich textured, flavourful beef that Japanese consumers demand. For the first 12 years of Marubeni ownership, all beef produced was sold directly to Japan. Fast forward to today and at any one-time Rangers Valley can have 54,000 cattle on feed on their specialised vegetarian ration with 28,000 of these cattle being Black Angus. Their slow growth philosophy is one of the hallmarks of their beef, so each one is cared for and fed for over 270 days.

What’s all the fuss about?

With a marble score of MB5+, Black Market is extremely rare and represents only 10% of Rangers Valley’s Verified Black Angus Beef production. Rangers Valley’s customers, and increasingly, their diners, know this. It’s elusiveness simply makes it more prized. You can see from the social media snapshots that when a Black Market cut makes it to a commercial kitchen, chefs take pride in making the most of what they know is a very special cut and it seems that even diners are making this connection.

Why branded beef?

With a surge of international interest in Australian beef and an increasingly sophisticated domestic consumer-base, Rangers Valley seized the opportunity to develop their beef into brands that meet and exceed beef specifications and expectations of these new consumers worldwide. Once the market expanded past Japan, Rangers Valley developed, refined and celebrated their now famous Verified Black Angus Beef brands – Black Onyx and Black Market. In any industry, a brand elicits an emotional response from its users and consumers. A great one engenders loyalty, attachment, warmth and repeat business, so it stands to reason there’s value in developing this model within Rangers Valley’s business. From a practical point of view, a brand gives a name to a group of specifications: Black Onyx: Verified Black Angus Beef steers, HGP free, Minimum 270-day grain fed, MB3+ Black Market: Verified Black Angus Beef steers, HGP free, Minimum 270-day grain fed, MB5+ These brands have become so popular all over the world that Rangers Valley now have over 41,000 followers across their social media platforms and this number is growing every day. Both Black Onyx and Black Market are sold predominantly to chefs and the foodservice industry through their dedicated distributors. It’s on the back of this distributor network that the whispers among diners now span the globe. Some of these customers will sell to the public and they find that these discerning diners turned consumers, ask for the brands by name. PAge 28

Angus Bulletin — autumn 2018

What, for a less prestigious brand, might be seen as weakness through low volume supply, is lauded as strength through exclusivity with Black Market beef and this has been a deliberate and strategic communications approach from the beginning. Black Onyx on the other hand represents a flavour profile that belies a marginally lower marble score. At MB3+, Rangers Valley is consistently told the eating quality of Black Onyx outstrips comparable beef in texture, flavour and consistency. Black Onyx offers a premium and achievable product to a whole world of commercial kitchens, in Australia and across the globe. It’s hard to define demographics of eating establishments who consistently use Rangers Valley brands. Black Onyx and Black Market appear equally on menus in burger joints, steak houses, bistros and fine dining across the world. So, what’s the common element that drives the use of Rangers Valley brands? The team at Rangers Valley put a finger to the keyboard to do some research and found that


supply chain

Rangers Valley Feedlot largely these establishments have a noted commitment to flavour and quality ingredients and Rangers Valley are proud to be on menus of any establishment when this is the criteria. Black Onyx and Black Market have become famous and infamous (in that order) in locations such as Sydney, France, Hong Kong, Dubai, Netherlands, Taipei, Monaco, Geneva, Singapore, Italy, Sweden, Los Angeles, Lebanon, Kuwait, Seoul, Shanghai and Bangkok and the list grows each year.

Otto Ristorante & Rangers Valley

A twist on the regular brand story: It was just over a year ago that Rangers Valley were approached by Chef Will Cowper from one of Australia’s top restaurant groups, Otto. Will was looking for something exclusive for his diners, and with the relationship the group already had with Rangers Valley, together with the reputation of their brands, the call was made. Chef was already using Black Onyx with loads of success, but he wanted something he could call his own. A product that would be ultra-responsive to the dry aging process and a specialised whole-of-animal menu. Leveraging the equity in each brand, they began supplying Otto Reserve by Rangers Valley. This beef is MB7+, unheard of in the Angus realm. In fact, only 0.01% of Rangers Valley Verified Black Angus Beef make it to this grade. The resulting menu by Otto Ristorante Brisbane is officially, out of this world, extremely rare and extremely good.

How it all comes together

Results like these help Rangers Valley grow their position as leaders in the domestic and international beef market. They need success and opportunity in equal measures. Underpinning this is a great deal of hard work by dedicated and skilled people in every area of the meat value chain. Importantly, the cattle that become the beef the world is asking for are the cornerstone of the Rangers Valley business. This means having the right processes and

capacity: 32,000 Location: Glen Innes Processed: John Dee Processing Plant, Warwick Brands: Black Market, Black Onyx & Highland Black Angus tools in place to ensure their lineage, ration, care, health and comfort. Playing their part in the selection process, Rangers Valley also have their cattle supply verified by Angus Australia, and they’re an integral part of the Angus Sire Benchmarking Program, ensuring each animal meets the Verified Black Angus Beef program standard. Together, this all means Rangers Valley can go to the market with confidence. Verification audits are performed twice a year by Angus Australia and the team at Rangers Valley proudly display each new verification certificate on each website as a mark of assurance for customers. As part of the big picture, these processes and tools mean Rangers Valley customers & consumers are confident every time that their brands are consistent, top quality, premium flavoured and are an eating experience they can steak (pun intended) their reputation on. To find out more about Rangers Valley’s Verified Black Angus Beef program, contact Livestock Procurement Manager, Andrew Malloy 0428 428 816 or malloya@ rangersvalley.com.au

To find out more about Rangers Valley’s Verified Black Angus Beef program, contact: Livestock Procurement Manager, Andrew Malloy 0428 428 816 or malloya@rangersvalley.com.au

Angus Bulletin — autumn 2018

PAge 29


supply chain

Feedlot dominance for Angus Diana Wood, Marketing & Communications Manager

Out of 55 vendors and 475 head of cattle to make up 95 teams, Angus and Angus influenced cattle came extremely close to a clean sweep of The Land 2018 Beef Spectacular Feedback Trial, winning all bar two of the twenty awards handed out at the recent presentation dinner. In its 9th year, and run by The Land in conjunction with Teys Australia, the Beef Spectacular Feedback Trial was described by event organiser Brett Tindal, as a competition with relevant commercial focus, allowing producers to benchmark their cattle with producers from across the country. And in a first entries into the Beef Spectacular were also able to be nominated in the Beef Australia 2018 National beef Carcase Competition, with these awards to be presented at Beef Australia 2018 at the beginning of May. Wayne, Patti, Sharni & Sonney Bartholomew, Gunninguldrie Pastoral

Grant Garey Teys Australia with Stephen & Sarah Palmer, Kyeamba Downs

John Bull, Coopers Animal Health with Craig and Lynette Turbull, Shepstone Park, who won, Champion Carcase Performance and Reserve Champion Riverine Premium Beef Pen

MA on the carcase on one of the Kyeamba Downs steers

Feedlot Performance Exhibitor

Team

Breed

Points/350

Champion

JM & SA Morse

H77

Angus influenced

330

Reserve Champion

Waverley Run

H89

Angus influenced

300

Exhibitor

Team

Breed

Points/350

Champion

Shepstone Park

H81

Angus

404

Reserve Champion

Tait Pastoral Company

H43

Angus

383.5

Exhibitor

Team

Breed

Points/1000

Champion

Gunninguldrie Pastoral Co

H61

Angus

730

Reserve Champion

Shepstone Park

H89

Angus

724

Exhibitor

Team

Breed

Points/1000

Champion

Kyeamba Downs Partnership

H65

Angus

731.5

Reserve Champion

Barfold Beef

H48

Angus

724

Carcase Performance

Riverine Premium Beef Champion Pen

Teys Certified Premium Black Angus Champion Pen

Images courtesy of The Land

PAge 30

Angus Bulletin — autumn 2018


supply chain

Riverine Classic Champion Pen Champion

Exhibitor

Team

Breed

Points/1000

Rosedale Livestock Partnership

H78

Angus Influenced

703.5

Grand Champion Pen of 5 Steers Exhibitor

Team

Breed

Points/1000

JM & SA Morse

H77

Angus Influenced

806.5

Reserve Champion Pen of 5 Steers Exhibitor

Team

Breed

Points/1000

Kyeamba Downs

H65

Angus

731.5

3rd

Gunninguldrie Pastoral Co

H61

Angus

730

4th

Tait Pastoral Company

H43

Angus

728.5

5th

R.G Allen & Sons

H46

Angus

725.5

=6th

Barfold Beef

H48

Angus

724

=6th

Shepstone Parky

H81

Angus

757.5

9th

Barfold Beef

H03

Angus

718.5

10th

Waverley Run

H89

Angus influenced

715.5

Placings

WEANING FOR SUCCESS Never accept calf weight-loss at weaning. Stressed calves won’t drink. Dehydrated calves won’t eat, so their rumen stops working. Malnourishment adds to stress. Disease starts; coccidial scours and pneumonia are most common. A simple change in weaning practice can remove all these problems. The result – improved liveweight gain and less animal health costs. Here is the recipe. Firstly, yard wean. Yard weaning is preferred over paddock weaning as it reduces stress. Secondly, make sure the calves are used to being handled. And thirdly, give the calf a security blanket. This is where Anipro becomes the perfect weaning tool.

Call 1300 ANIPRO

Anipro offered to cows and calves is the secret to a good weaning start. The cow teaches the calf to take supplement. Then, when the calf is separated, move the Anipro tub into the weaner’s yard. There is 2 benefits in doing this. The Anipro is a security blanket for the calf. Then, Anipro encourages drinking and eating. As long as the weaner’s have quality silage or hay, then metabolic and immune stress is less of a problem. Many thousands of calves are weaned on Anipro every year. Anipro weaning programs are simple, cost effective, and set the calf up for a lifetime of excellent health and development. It all starts with a red tub in a paddock.

| www.performancefeeds.com.au Angus Bulletin — autumn 2018

PAge 31


supply chain

Matt, Jasper, Charlie and Riley Shea, "Barfold Beef", Barfold, Victoria

Claydon Butt, manager of "Shepstone Park", Bookham, has played a key role in driving the quality of the property's Angus breeding programs

MARKET FLEXIBILITY

Beef Spec Results:

Reserve Champion Teys Certified Premium Black Angus, Champion Pen & 6th and 8th Place team overall

Property:

Barfold Beef, 20km north of Kyneton VIC

Enterprise:

650-700 Angus females Run by Matt Shea, his wife Karly and 3 sons and Matt’s mother, Margaret, the Shea Family have been running a beef operation near Kyneton since 1975 and have spent decades refining their purebred Angus herd. The Sheas join between 650 and 700 Angus females each year, giving them flexibility for marketing. Angus bulls are sourced from Victorian studs, with Mr Shea placing an emphasis on calving ease and temperament in his bull selection, along with marbling and IMF. “As weaner producers we want to get calves off as quickly as possible so we do look at the 200- and 400day weights, ideally we want easy-doing, moderately framed cattle.” Over the past four years the family has sought to strengthen the herd’s genetics further, embarking on an AI program with heifers, artificially inseminating 130 heifers last September and 40 heifers this autumn. Heifers are joined at the end of September for a start of July calving and at the end of May for a start of March calving. The majority of their weaners are sold at Barnawartha in May or June to backgrounders and feedlots.

Stephen & Sarah Palm

ANGUS GENETICS FOCUS Beef Spec Results:

Reserve Grand Champion Pen of 5 Steers & Champion Teys Certified Premium Black Angus Pen

Property:

'Kyeamba Downs', Wagga Wagga NSW, 1230 hectares

Enterprise:

500 Angus heifers & cows Operating a 1230 hectare farm at Wagga Wagga NSW that has been in the family since 1949, Stephen and Sarah Palmer have spent many years of careful genetic development as they made the switch to an Angus herd in 2011 and now join 500 Angus cows and heifers to registered Angus bulls. Angus bull selection is made after Mr Palmer has identified areas for improvement in his herd and then carefully assesses the traits of potential sires. "When I look at buying bulls I pick out a few, and then use BREEDPLAN to make my final decision,' he said. 'I try an buy bulls with birthweights under +5 and I want a bull in the top 10% for all their growth and carcase traits and retail beef yield'. When it comes to joining, the Palmers operate a single joining for autumn calvers and a mutli joining for the spring calvers.

Images courtesy of The Land

Beef Spectacular Spotlights PAge 32

Angus Bulletin — autumn 2018

Diana Wood, Marketing & Communications Manager


supply chain

mer, 'Kyeamba Downs'

Patti and Wayne Bartholomew (far right) with their son, Sonney, his wife, Sharni, their daughter, Phoebe, and Wayne's father, Alan

Stuart, Joanna & John Tait, "Sunny Downs", Mandurama, with a run of their seven-year-old Angus cows and their dog, Wendy

CARCASE PERFORMANCE

BREEDING STRATEGY ON TRACK

Beef Spec Results:

Beef Spec Results:

Champion Carcase Performance Team, Reserve, Champion Riverine Premium Beef Champion Pen & 7th Place Team overall

Property:

‘Shepstone Park’, Bookham NSW

Enterprise:

450 Angus cows Owned by Sydney based Craig Turnbull, “Shepstone Park” was purchased 22 years ago, primarily as a farm holiday destination for his family. Now the farm and its beef enterprise, managed from the start by Claydon Butt, has grown to about 450 Angus cows. Angus sires used in their herd have been sourced over the years from Angus studs in Tasmania, Victoria and New South Wales. The feedlot trial was entered in the hope that the intensive feedback and scrutiny would sharpen their understanding of what feedlots want. “We were hoping we would do well in meat quality, we put a lot of (breeding) focus on that”, said Mr Turnbull. He said they aimed to sell cattle to feedlots and had been getting good feedback from customers.

FERTILITY FOCUS Beef Spec Results:

Reserve Champion Carcase Performance & 4th Place team overall

Property:

‘Sunny Downs’, Mandurama NSW, 2000 hectares

Enterprise:

550 Angus cows & 200-800 Angus weanerss Stuart Tait and his parents, John and Joanna, are striving for moderation across the board in their Angus cattle operation. For nine years, the family learned a lot about what was required to successfully market cattle to the feedlots after backgrounding cattle for Australian Meat Holdings, now JBS. Now, the family are running 550 Angus cows and also buy in between 200 and 800 weaners each year.

Champion Riverine Premium Beef Champion Pen & 3rd Place team overall

Property:

'Gunninguldrie Station‘, north west of Lake Cargelligo NSW, 4250 hectares & “Uranaway”, 35km further west, 2318ha

Enterprise:

400 Angus cows For Wayne and Patti Bartholemew the results from Beef Spectacular showed their breeding strategy was on track, with the challenge for them now to keep the herd at the top level. “We have got the length, style and leg in them, we have to keep them where they are,” he said. “We need cattle that can walk in our country, because of the larger paddocks,” Mr Bartholomew said. The Bartholomews run about 400 Angus cows and source their sires from Angus studs in New South Wales and were pleased to be able to track the performance of their cattle in the competition right through the feedlotting and the carcase phases.

The family is using feedback to refine the original breeding aims, with Angus bulls purchased from studs in Tasmania, Victoria and New South Wales over the years. “The three main things I look at today are low birth weights, very high 600-day weight and low to moderate mature cow weights. A moderate temperament is also key for John, who culls for this in weaners over any other trait. The Taits also put a high emphasis on fertility, carefully selecting the females with the best fertility traits to build the herd around. 70% of the Taits steers are sold direct to feedlot at 500kg liveweight, with the 30% who go heavier slaughtered. All steers are 100% grassfed and graze on wheat, annual ryegrass and a mix of perennial pastures. “It is very pleasing to receive feedback from a competition like this. What is working and what isn’t. We have been looking to improve our carcase traits so it is very exciting to see how they performed onBulletin grain,” Stuart2018 said. PAge 33 Angus — autumn


Most Widely Used Sires in Last Two Years Andrew Byrne, Breed Development & Extension Manager

1. EF Complement 8088 has the most progeny born in the last two years, followed by Te Mania Emperor E343 and Matauri Reality 839. These bulls have a combined total of 5,738 progeny born during this period. 2. Of the 20 bulls with the most progeny in the last two years, 9 are imported sires, with 8 from the United States and 1 from New Zealand. 3. The average Angus Breeding Index of the 20 bulls with the most progeny in the last two years is +135, which is placed in the highest 10% percentile band (when compared to 2016 drop calves). Only 2 bulls have an Angus Breeding Index that is below breed average.

EF Complement 8088

4. Across individual traits, the average EBVs of the 20 bulls with the most progeny in the last two years is as follows:

Trait

Sire Average

Breed Average

Calving Ease Direct

+1.8

+0.1

Calving Ease Daughters

+2.1

+0.3

Gestation Length

-5.8

-3.9

Birth Weight

+3.7

+4.3

200 Day Growth

+52

+43

400 Day Weight

+94

+80

600 Day Weight

+123

+104

Mature Cow Weight

+103

+90

Milk

+17

+15

Scrotal Size

+2.1

+1.8

Days to Calving

-5.4

-4.0

Carcase Weight

+72

+58

Eye Muscle Area

+6.9

+4.8

Rib Fat

+0.2

+0.0

Rump Fat

-0.1

-0.1

Retail Beef Yield

+0.3

+0.3

IMF

+2.3

+1.7

NFI-P

+0.28

+0.10

NFI-F

+0.40

+0.16

Docility

+3

+5

Front Feet Angle

+2

-1

Front Feet Claw Set

+3

-2

Rear Feet Angle

+5

-3

Rear Leg Hind View

+1.6

+0.0

Rear Leg Side View

+0.3

+0.0

Te Mania Emperor E343

Matauri Reality 839

G A R Prophet

PAge 34

Angus Bulletin — autumn 2018


Angus Bulletin — autumn 2018

PAge 35

USA14686137

Sire Ident

VTMB219

USA13009379

USA14543651

VTMB1

USA15354674

NZE469

USA16447771

USA16969555

BNAD145

VTMB1

NENZ181

NGMT30

NORE11

USA16004857

USA14675445

USA15719841

USA15848590

HIOE7

NORE11

131 2073 261 1993 190 1672 81 1448 185 1327 91 1189 69 1132 59 973 53 953 26 879 51 823 181 817 50 735 41 696 30 691 12 674 85 657 71 648 75 608 156 590

2972 65 6456 918 4224 372 2346 196 5416 1040 2287 1 1108 0 1203 0 1134 41 1093 16 1212 0 3390 629 735 0 986 29 819 3 623 0 1288 80 1290 62 754 0 4546 574

Prog Anly Perf Dtrs 1048 0 3640 52 2186 5 1063 28 2826 17 1146 0 421 0 332 0 393 9 333 0 467 0 1950 0 269 0 433 0 321 0 146 0 591 0 698 0 252 1 2693 22

Scan Prog Carc Prog

Average EBVs for 2016 born calves:

NGMY145

RENNYLEA EDMUND E11

USA16984170

R B TOUR OF DUTY 177

USA16916944

V A R RESERVE 1111

USA17307074

DEER VALLEY ALL IN

DXTK002

TEXAS MOUNT K002

HIOH9

AYRVALE HERCULES H9

NAQH255

ARDROSSAN HONOUR H255

NMMK42

MILLAH MURRAH KLOONEY K42

QHED62

CARABAR DOCKLANDS D62

USA17614813

MUSGRAVE BIG SKY

HKFJ5

PARINGA JUDD J5

SMPG357

PATHFINDER GENESIS G357

USA17171587

V A R GENERATION 2100

NMMK35

MILLAH MURRAH KINGDOM K35

USA17236055

SYDGEN BLACK PEARL 2006

HIOE7

AYRVALE BARTEL E7

USA16295688

G A R PROPHET

NZE14647008839

MATAURI REALITY 839

VTME343

TE MANIA EMPEROR E343

USA16198796

EF COMPLEMENT 8088

Animal Ident

Name

Num Herd Prog 2Yr

Statistics

+5.2 95% +5.5 86% -2.5 62% +0.8 55% +3.0 70% -1.1 69% +1.6 69% +1.2 89% +1.2 63% +0.7 78% +2.1 68% +4.9 57% +3.7 84% -0.1 78% +0.5 60% +1.3 92%

+4.4 98% +4.9 92% -10.2 83% -0.7 83% +1.0 81% +3.1 80% -3.1 84% +3.9 96% +3.4 84% +0.6 87% +3.3 85% +4.5 81% -1.3 90% +3.6 88% +1.7 76% +5.1 97%

+0.3

+1.3 87%

-0.4 94%

+0.1

+6.3 -10.5 91% 99%

+6.6 96%

-3.9

-7.6 99%

-4.4 98%

-4.2 99%

-5.4 99%

-8.7 98%

-9.0 99%

-3.3 99%

-5.8 98%

-9.0 99%

-5.0 99%

-4.4 99%

-6.8 99%

-3.9 99%

-2.4 98%

-7.7 99%

-5.3 99%

-0.6 99%

-6.5 99%

+3.3 92%

+1.8 98%

-5.4 99%

+3.6 88%

+4.3

+1.1 99%

+4.5 98%

+2.6 99%

+2.7 98%

+4.0 98%

+1.6 98%

+4.1 98%

+5.8 98%

+4.0 99%

+3.7 98%

+2.6 98%

+6.8 98%

+4.5 99%

+8.7 98%

+3.1 99%

+1.7 99%

+3.6 99%

+1.1 99%

+5.1 99%

+2.6 99%

Bwt

Birth GL

+3.8 93%

Calv-Eas Dir e Dtrs 600

Growth

+79 99%

+98 99%

+88 90%

+73 98%

+93 97%

+84 97%

+99 86%

+89 +114 97% 91%

+87 82%

+79 +105 +109 97% 97% 87%

+87 +117 +109 96% 90% 81%

+89 +126 +100 99% 99% 98%

+98 +130 98% 95%

+94 +124 +103 97% 95% 86%

+84 +110 98% 98%

+86 91%

+43

+37 99%

+90 99% +80 +104

+70 99%

+90

+72 98%

+55 +106 +136 +113 96% 97% 96% 85%

+45 98%

+62 +118 +144 +100 98% 98% 97% 90%

+57 +115 +147 +136 95% 95% 87% 80%

+50 97%

+44 97%

+49 96%

+48 99%

+55 97%

+49 97%

+62 +110 +150 +163 97% 97% 97% 89%

+84 85%

+96 +135 +140 97% 93% 82%

+87 +122 98% 98%

+88 +113 99% 99%

+58 +103 +118 97% 97% 95%

+53 97%

+51 98%

+49 99%

+89 95%

Mwt

+95 +127 +127 99% 99% 98%

+97 +122 98% 98%

400

+64 +108 +132 98% 98% 98%

+41 99%

+51 99%

+52 98%

200

+15

+14 98%

+24 78%

+14 89%

+21 90%

+16 70%

+23 70%

+12 81%

+16 68%

+21 98%

+15 79%

+21 78%

+21 85%

+17 78%

+8 68%

+17 82%

+26 98%

+23 96%

+10 97%

+9 98%

+20 91%

Milk

-6.9 64%

-2.8 69%

-8.5 85%

-3.6 57%

DC

-2.5 49%

-2.1 54%

-2.4 55%

-3.7 50%

-6.1 56%

-6.4 59%

-3.5 60%

-7.3 78%

-4.8 49%

-6.7 62%

-7.3 67%

-3.8 51%

-4.2 60%

-4.0 53%

+1.8

-4.0

+2.2 -10.1 99% 84%

+2.1 95%

+0.9 98%

+1.7 97%

+3.6 93%

+0.8 96%

+2.0 96%

+1.4 95%

+3.3 98%

+1.9 97%

+2.1 96%

+4.7 96%

+3.3 96%

+0.6 96%

+1.5 98%

+2.3 -11.0 99% 83%

+0.8 98%

+3.8 99%

+1.9 99%

+0.9 98%

SS

Fert

+8.7 85%

+7.8 88%

+7.0 96%

+6.0 91%

+3.7 93%

+4.5 96%

+8.4 90%

EMA

+58

+56 96%

+79 84%

+59 87%

+82 87%

+80 79%

+86 80%

+65 82%

+64 79%

+71 96%

+68 85%

+81 81%

+98 88%

+4.8

+6.4 96%

+6.1 86%

+7.6 88%

+6.4 88%

+3.1 82%

+9.7 85%

+3.4 86%

+6.2 84%

+6.6 95%

+6.1 88%

+8.9 85%

+9.8 88%

+78 +11.6 84% 87%

+62 79%

+78 87%

+80 97%

+74 95%

+48 94%

+64 97%

+76 89%

Cwt

+0.0

+3.2 96%

-4.0 86%

-2.2 88%

-2.7 87%

-1.3 83%

-1.1 85%

+1.4 86%

-0.9 84%

+1.4 95%

-0.1 87%

+1.5 85%

+2.3 89%

-0.9 87%

-0.6 85%

+0.6 88%

-1.0 97%

+0.5 91%

+5.4 93%

+1.4 97%

+1.1 90%

Rib

-0.1

+1.8 96%

-3.6 82%

-2.4 84%

-3.7 83%

-0.3 81%

-1.0 83%

+1.6 84%

-1.5 83%

+1.4 95%

+0.2 83%

+1.1 83%

+0.2 87%

-2.2 83%

-0.2 83%

-1.4 84%

+0.1 96%

+1.4 92%

+4.4 93%

+0.7 97%

+1.1 87%

P8

Carcase

+0.3

-1.1 94%

+4.1 79%

+1.8 81%

+2.4 80%

+0.1 76%

-0.3 78%

-0.8 79%

+1.0 78%

+0.2 93%

+0.2 80%

-1.2 78%

+0.6 82%

+3.2 80%

+1.6 78%

+0.4 81%

-0.5 95%

-1.5 87%

-2.7 91%

-0.8 96%

-0.2 84%

RBY

Estimated Breeding Values and Accuracies (%)

+1.7 +0.10 +0.16

+4.2 +0.82 +1.12 95% 88% 90%

+0.2 -0.64 -0.86 84% 59% 62%

+1.9 +0.11 +0.35 86% 64% 68%

+1.8 +0.26 +0.56 86% 62% 67%

+2.3 +0.06 -0.37 81% 62% 64%

+4.1 +0.48 +0.52 83% 66% 69%

+3.5 +0.57 +0.80 84% 67% 70%

+2.0 +0.04 -0.09 82% 66% 68%

+0.9 +0.36 +0.60 94% 85% 86%

+1.2 +0.45 +0.98 85% 62% 65%

+3.6 +0.62 +0.86 83% 67% 70%

+1.8 +0.71 +1.07 87% 74% 80%

+1.3 +0.15 +0.35 85% 62% 66%

-0.3 -0.21 -0.22 83% 66% 69%

+1.9 +0.20 +0.40 86% 64% 69%

+3.6 +0.50 +0.62 96% 90% 92%

+4.1 +0.35 +0.19 92% 70% 74%

+3.1 +0.37 +0.53 91% 80% 81%

+3.3 +0.11 +0.07 96% 91% 91%

+2.0 +0.25 +0.52 88% 67% 71%

IMF NFI-P NFI-F

Extra

march angus australia - 20- Sires with thethemost twoyears years March2018 2018 Angus Australia BREEDPLAN BREEDPLAN 50 Sires with mostprogeny progenyininthe the last last two Indexes ABI DOM GRN

GRS

+98

+90

+90 +103

+5 +110 +106 +114 +108

+11 +141 +118 +167 +124 99%

-20 +134 +134 +136 +135 79%

+28 +120 +117 +127 +118 98%

-3 +145 +142 +156 +142 95%

-9 +150 +135 +167 +143 94%

+21 +146 +127 +171 +133 95%

-14 +126 +109 +146 +114 95%

+4 +122 +114 +132 +118 95%

-17 +133 +114 +133 +132 99%

-7 +121 +112 +119 +122 84%

-2 +145 +121 +167 +134 69%

+23 +154 +129 +171 +145 94%

+35 +134 +138 +137 +133 93%

+14 96%

-5 +132 +118 +137 +130 97%

-12 +159 +133 +183 +143 98%

+5 +151 +132 +171 +139 98%

+3 +109 +105 +111 +109 98%

+3 +153 +126 +181 +138 99%

+7 +132 +124 +133 +132 98%

Doc


Growth & Power

SAV RESOURCE 1441

CHILTERN PARK MOE M6

ALLOURA GET CRACKING G10

ESSLEMONT LOTTO L3

PA FULL POWER 1675

KAROO KNOCKOUT K176

EF COMMANDO 1366

SCHIEFELBEIN EFFECTIVE 61

Calving Ease

Marbling

BRUNS BLASTER

BALDRIDGE BEAST MODE B074

PATHFINDER KOMPLETE K22

Agri-Gene Pty Ltd PAge 36

Angus Bulletin — autumn 2018

123-125 Tone Road, Wangaratta Victoria 3677 Ph: 03 5722 2666 Fax: 03 5722 2777 Email: info@agrigene.com.au | www.agrigene.com.au


Tom French, Alec Moore, Leah Drendel, Bryce McDonald, and Jo Moore, at Weeran Angus, VIC

Stud principal Sam Trovatello, Kyneton VIC, and Sam King from Bowmont Stud, Tatyoon Vic at Adameluca Angus

Sterita Park stud principal Nanni DiGiorgio, Lucindale SA with return clients Neil Engler, Maaoupe, and Pat Geraghty, Mount Schank

around the beef weeks Images: Fairfax Media

Esther and parents Liz and Graeme Glasgow, Woolsthorpe VIC, Claremont Angus

ABS Australia beef product manager Bill Cornell is pictured with Glenfern Angus stud principal Gregg Nash, Yundi SA

Peter Downward, Kingston SE, Granite Ridge stud principal Colin Flanagan with Brittany and Richard Hancock, Narrung, inspect a pen Angus Bulletin — autumn 2018 PAge 37 of Angus bulls at Granite Ridge, Avenue Range SA, during Stock Journal Beef Week


PAge 38

Angus Bulletin — autumn 2018


sire benchmarking

ASBP Cohort 9 –Time to Nominate Your Next Super Sire Christian Duff, Strategic Projects Manager

It’s time to nominate sires for the next joining round of the Angus Sire Benchmarking program (ASBP to produce the Cohort 9 progeny. This joining program will commence in mid-September 2018, and is expected to involve approximately 2,000 cows across several co-operator herds.

The benefits of bulls entering the ASBP include:

joining program with the aim to join each bull to at least 50 cows by fixed time AI. The bull selection criteria will be based on genetic diversity, breeding values, selection indexes and their relationship to sires already used in the ASBP. Preference will also be given to early nominations. For further details on the ASBP and to nominate bulls for Cohort 9 visit the Angus Australia website www. angusaustralia.com.au

• Receive progeny average values and sire ranking from within the ASBP, including traits such as MSA Index and MSA Marble Score. • Involvement in Australia’s largest beef cattle progeny test program including large contemporary groups. Approximately 40 bulls will be selected for the 2018

For all questions in relation to the nomination process or the ASBP in general please contact:

• Be involved in cutting edge research in areas such as genomics, immune competence, beef quality and nutrition. • Close genetic linkage to the ASBP reference population ensures research outcomes, particularly in the genomics area, will have high relevance to your herd. • High density DNA profiles will be stored for current use (e.g. sire verifications, single-step BREEDPLAN analysis) and future research. • Receive high accuracy EBVs, particularly for hard to measure traits such as net feed intake, abattoir carcase data and female reproduction.

Christian Duff, Angus Australia Strategic Projects Manager M: 0457 457 141 or email: christian@angusaustralia.com.au

Angus Bulletin — autumn 2018

PAge 39


sire benchmarking

ASBP Cohort 5 Analysis Completed – How did the Bulls Perform? Christian Duff, Strategic Projects Manager

The collection and analysis of the full suite of performance data for Cohort 5 of the Angus Sire Benchmarking Program (ASBP) has been completed. This most recently included abattoir carcase grading outcomes for the steer progeny, and fertility information for the heifer progeny. Cohort 5 includes 1,327 progeny from 48 Angus sires. Of the sires, 38 are from Australia and 10 from New Zealand. A summary of the phenotypes and genotypes (i.e. genomic profiles) collected in Cohort 5 and analysed in Angus BREEDPLAN and/or ASBP progeny performance reports is reported in table 1. Table 1 – Summary of data (phenotypes and genotypes) collected and analysed in ASBP Cohort 5

Trait

#

Comment

Genotypes – Sire

48

Average 70,708 SNPs Average 25,758 SNPs

Genotypes - Progeny

1327

Calving Difficulty Score

1327

Birth Weight

1327

Gestation Length

1327

200 Day Weight

1247

400 Day Weight

1051

600 Day Weight

899

Days to Calving

404

Docility Score

1241

Scan EMA

1149

Scan IMF

1149

Scan Rib Fat

1149

Scan Rump Fat

1140

Foot Angle - Front

1195

Heifers Only

Claw Set - Front

1195

Foot Angle - Rear

1195

Rear Legs - Hind

1195

Rear Legs - Side

1195

Net Feed Intake

562

Steers Only

Carcase Weight

556

Steers Only

Carcase EMA

554

Steers Only

Carcase IMF

552

Steers Only

Carcase Rib Fat

554

Steers Only

Carcase Rump Fat

556

Steers Only

Retail Beef Yield

147

Steers Only

MSA Ossification

554

Steers Only

MSA Marbling Score

554

Steers Only

MSA Index

554

Steers Only

Figure 1 – The Results for ASBP Cohort 5 are Available in Progeny Performance Reports

The full analysis results are available from the ASBP section on the Angus Australia website by way of updated Progeny Performance reports (figure 1). This report, available for each ASBP Cohort, includes BREEDPLAN EBVs, progeny averages and sire rankings. PAge 40

Angus Bulletin — autumn 2018

Alternatively, you are also able to access, search and sort through the data available on the ASBP sires via the ASBP online catalogue (https://angus.tech/catalogue/ asbp) or ASBPSELECT online facility (https://angus.tech/ enquiry/animal/asbp) A summary of the top performing sires from Cohort 5 is tabled on the following page. This table lists the top 10 Cohort 5 sires for the Angus Breeding Index (ABI) and a range of progeny average values from birth to slaughter based on their progeny within the ASBP. For further information on interpreting the values in the table refer to the introductory notes in the ASBP Progeny Performance reports available from the Sire Benchmarking section of Angus Australia website (www.angusaustralia.com.au).

BNAD81

HKFJ87

VCCH185

QQFH147

For all ASBP related questions contact: Christian Duff, Angus Australia Strategic Projects Manager M: 0457 457 141 or email: christian@angusaustralia.com.au


+127

NZE19507012H41

NORJ140

VSNG34

CSWH211

HTMJ41

NGXH171

NBBJ94

TRHG4

VHWJ1

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

Angus Bulletin — autumn 2018

VCCH185

NGXH171

TJTH33

NZE1215401213

NDAH468

NZE145720100104

VHWJ1

HBUJ301

HKFJ87

NZE145720120992

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

37.8

36.5

36.5

36.4

36.1

36.1

36.1

35.8

35.5

35.0

34.9

Birth Wt (kg)

+107

+136

+139

+140

+140

+141

+142

+147

+156

NWPJ3

VSNG34

NURJ94

NORH7

TRHG4

BNAD81

WDCH249

WJYJ28

HKFJ87

HBUJ018

Sire

VTTJ26

VSNG34

NJWH283

NWPJ3

CSWH211

VTMA149

VCCH185

QQFH147

NORJ140

BNAD81

Sire

NWMH162

NORJ140

HKFJ87

NORH708

NURJ94

NDAH508

BNAD81

NJWH283

HTMJ41

Sire

87.7

90.2

90.3

90.3

90.4

91.3

92.1

93.0

93.2

96.0

Carcase EMA (cm2)

WLHJ20

VTTJ26

NORJ140

HKFJ87

NZE16932011553

TRHG4

NGXH171

HTMJ41

NZE12922011238

NORH708

Sire

8.8

9.6

9.6

10.1

10.1

10.3

10.6

10.7

10.7

11.1

12.0

Carcase IMF (%)

279.4

277.7

277.5

277.5

277.5

277.3

277.2

277.1

277.0

276.2

275.7

GL (days)

VRBJ297

NORJ140

HTMJ41

VSNG34

NZE145720100104

NMMJ137

QQFH147

CSWH211

WLHJ20

NBBJ94

Sire

244.6

250.7

251.4

251.5

251.7

251.7

251.9

252.6

255.1

255.7

258.1

200 day Wt (kg)

572.9

NJWH283

558.3

572.9

573.2

577.2

577.3

578.0

581.0

582.7

587.9

592.1

593.9

600 day Wt (kg)

NGMH605

NBBJ94

VTMA149

VRBJ297

BNAD81

CSWH211

WLHJ20

NMMJ137

NORJ140

QQFH147

Sire

HTMJ41

Sire

BNAD81

VTMA149

NORH708

NDAH508

QQFH147

NZE1199001064

WDCH249

HBUJ301

QBGM16+92

VTTJ26

Sire

NZE19507012H41

TRHG4

NORJ140

NZE16932011553

HKFJ87

NZE12922011238

BNAD81

NGXH171

NORH708

Angus Sire Benchmarking Program (ASBP) – Cohort 5 Top 10 Performing Sires

422.8

437.0

437.3

437.8

438.7

439.9

441.3

443.0

443.4

445.9

449.5

Carcase Wt (kg)

*Angus Breeding Index - March 2018 Trans-Tasman Angus BREEDPLAN analysis. For further information on interpreting the values in the table refer to the introductory notes in the ASBP Progeny Performance reports available from the Sire Benchmarking section of Angus Australia website (www.angusaustralia.com.au)

Av. (48 Cohort 5 Sires)

Sire

Rank

Av. (48 Cohort 5 Sires)

+127

QQFH147

2

+165

NORH708

1

ABI*

Sire

Rank

Angus Sire Benchmarking Program (ASBP) – Cohort 5 Top 10 Performing Sires

301.7

296.8

296.6

295.8

294.8

294.0

293.1

292.6

292.5

290.5

288.7

DTC (days)

545.8

496.5

498.4

500.3

502.2

504.3

506.3

507.7

517.5

579.0

600.2

MSA Marbling Score

-2.7

WDCH249

-2.2

-2.7

-2.7

-2.7

-2.7

-2.8

-2.8

-2.8

-2.9

-3.0

-3.0

-3.2

NFI-f (kg/ day)

64.0

64.6

64.6

64.6

64.8

64.9

65.2

65.5

65.5

65.5

MSA Index

VONH467

VHWJ1

NZE1199001064

NGXH171

VTMA149

NWMH162

NJWH194

NORH7

WJYJ28

NMMJ137

CSWH211

Sire

NZE14647010F031

HKFJ87

BNAD81

NGXH171

QBGM16+92

NMMH250

NZE145720100104

NORH708

HTMJ41

Sire

sire benchmarking

PAge 41


sire benchmarking

Retail Beef Yield Data Collection and Analysis Update Christian Duff, Strategic Projects Manager

Actual retail beef yield (RBY) data has recently been collected and analysed through Angus BREEDPLAN on 150 contemporary Angus steers bred in Cohort 5 of the Angus Sire Benchmarking Project (ASBP). This significantly increases the RBY data recorded on Angus animals for genetic analysis by 9.5% to 1,592.

The collection of RBY data involves the full bone-out of one side of each steer carcase in a standardised way (i.e AUS-MEAT standards and company specifications) in a controlled environment within the abattoir. For each side, all components (fat, bone, primal cuts and trim) are identified and weighed. To calculate RBY percentage the combined weight of the primal cuts and trim are compared to the overall carcase weight. As RBY is considered a hard and expensive to measure trait, this data is a very valuable addition to the Angus reference population of phenotypes coupled with genotypes (i.e. genomic profiles). Table 2 –Top 10 RBY EBV ASBP Cohort 5 Sires (March 2018 Angus BREEDPLAN)

ID

Name

NURJ94

MURRAY INGENUITY J94

+2.5

81

NMMJ137

MILLAH MURRAH JACKPOT J137

+2.3

82

NJWH283

MILWILLAH ELSOM H283

+2.3

83

NGMH605

BOOROOMOOKA HYPERNO H605

+2.2

88

NWMH162

MUNDOO HOT STUFF H162

+2.2

81

VTTJ26

TIBOOBURRA IMPACT J26

+2.0

83

BNAD81

TUWHARETOA D81

+1.7

88

NZE19507 012H41

STORTH OAKS H41

+1.6

84

VICG43

IRELANDS GALAXY G43

+1.6

85

VTMA149

TE MANIA ADA A149

+1.5

95

Breed Average

PAge 42

Angus Bulletin — autumn 2018

RBY EBV (%) Accuracy (%)

+0.3

The phenotypic variation observed for each of the yield related components collected in this project are shown in table 1. The RBY data was included in the February 2018 Angus BREEDPLAN analysis, along with the full suite of carcase data from Cohort 5 of the ASBP. For the 48 Cohort 5 sires, with an average of 3 RBY progeny, an additional 10% accuracy was achieved for the RBY EBV (from 74% on average to 84%). The top 10 RBY EBV sires from Cohort 5 of the ASBP are listed in Table 2. While RBY is a commercially important trait, like any EBV it should be viewed in a balanced context with other economically important traits in an overall breeding objective (i.e. avoid single trait selection). RBY is included in the Australian Angus Selection indexes, for example in the Angus Breeding Index there is a 22% weighing on the RBY EBV. As background, the 150 steers in this project, which were bred through the ASBP on NSW DPI research stations (Glen Innes and Trangie) were fed for 150 days at the University of New England’s Tullimba research feedlot located near Armidale. Following feeding they were processed and graded at John Dee abattoir Warwick in groups of 50-60 steers across three days. The collection of the bone-out retail beef yield data is additional to other traits recorded such as calving ease, weight, feed intake, carcase scanning and carcase grade performance. To add further to the reference population, NSW DPI in collaboration with Angus Australia is leading a follow-up project to collect bone-out RBY data on an additional 1000 Angus steers over the next three years. This will include several mobs of ASBP sired steers from Cohorts 6, 7 and 8. The first mob from Cohort 6 is scheduled to be processed in April 2018.


sire benchmarking

Table 1 – Descriptive Statistics from Retail Beef Yield Collection Project (n=150 ASBP Steers) Primal/Component

Average

Max

Min

Standard Dev.

HINDQUARTER Topside/inside (kg)

8.64

11.23

7.00

0.81

Silverside (kg)

11.02

14.38

8.89

1.02

Thick Flank (kg)

6.09

7.90

4.75

0.62

Striploin (kg)

5.02

6.51

3.77

0.51

Tenderloin (kg)

2.51

3.28

2.02

0.26

Rump (kg)

6.80

8.46

5.20

0.68

Thin Flank (kg)

6.35

8.43

4.41

0.90

Hindquarter Shin/Shank (kg)

2.33

2.94

1.71

0.24

Hindquarter trim (kg)

2.95

6.25

1.06

0.70

Hindquarter Fat (kg)

5.24

9.26

1.79

1.34

Hindquarter Bone (kg)

12.58

15.89

10.44

1.11

Cube roll (kg)

4.49

5.71

2.85

0.50

Ribset without Cube roll (kg)

7.68

11.44

5.33

1.06

Brisket (kg)

15.05

20.14

11.33

1.72

Chuck (kg)

15.90

20.28

11.70

1.62

Blade (Clod) (kg)

9.60

12.15

7.74

0.93

Chuck tender (kg)

1.39

2.14

1.00

0.18

Intercostals (kg)

3.28

5.03

2.10

0.56

Forequarter Shin/Shank (kg)

4.57

5.86

3.56

0.43

Inside Skirt (kg)

1.60

2.34

1.02

0.21

Forequarter trim (kg)

2.39

4.99

0.37

0.74

FOREQUARTER

Forequarter Fat (kg)

6.19

13.06

3.01

1.52

Forequarter Bone (kg)

21.61

30.56

17.50

2.07

Recovered side weight (kg)

163.38

199.73

137.93

11.95

Retail meat (kg)

117.65

144.80

98.57

8.75

RBY%

72.0%

75.3%

68.7%

1.4%

Bone (kg)

34.19

42.94

28.10

2.97

Bone %

20.9%

23.3%

18.2%

1.0%

Fat (kg)

11.53

21.71

5.54

2.39

Fat %

7.0%

11.8%

3.6%

1.3%

Angus Bulletin — autumn 2018

PAge 43


sire benchmarking

Angus. only Angus.

There’s only one DNA profile created specifically for Angus cattle.

Angus GS™ is the new standard in genetic testing for Angus cattle. Created by Angus Genetics, the profile is purely Angus DNA. So it will have better predictability and deliver more power and accuracy than any previous generation genomic enhanced EBV, and at greater value. Learn more about Angus GS at the Angus Genetics website: angus.org/agi. Visit angusaustralia.com.au/ to see how to order the test in Australia.

For Angus. by angus.

ANGUS Genetics Australasia

To learn more contact: Angus Australia 02 6773 4600 office@angusaustralia.com.au

PAge 44

Angus Bulletin — autumn 2018


breed development

Breed Development Matters Andrew Byrne, Breed Development & Extension Manager

Angus Australia’s Breed Development & Extension program remains focussed on ensuring Angus Australia members, and their commercial customers, have access to world leading genetic evaluation technologies, and associated tools for genetic improvement. Following is a brief update regarding several developments within Angus Australia’s Breed Development & Extension program, including: • World Congress on Genetics Applied to Livestock Production • Understanding the “New” Angus BREEDPLAN Analysis • Identifying Animals with Genomic Information in Angus BREEDPLAN • Updates to Angus Australia’s Gene Probability Analysis • Changes to Angus Australia’s DNA Services • Research into the Calculation of EBVs for Additional Traits To further discuss any of these initiatives, or other initiatives within Angus Australia’s Breed Development

program, please contact Andrew Byrne, Breed Development & Extension Manager, on (02) 6773 4618 or andrew@angusaustralia.com.au.

World Congress on Genetics Applied to Livestock Production During February, Angus Australia’s CEO, Peter Parnell, Strategic Projects Manager, Christian Duff and Breed Development and Extension Manager, Andrew Byrne attended the World Congress on Genetics Applied to Livestock Production in Auckland, New Zealand. The congress, which is held every 4 years, was attended by 1423 delegates from 70 countries worldwide, with 873 scientific papers presented throughout the week. The conference provided a great opportunity for Angus Australia to interact with leading international geneticists from all livestock species, and get an insight into the latest genetics research that is being conducted.

Key messages from the conference included:

• current international research across all species is mainly focused on how to best harness the benefits of genomic technology in livestock breeding programs • there is considerable interest in better describing the genetics of livestock for hard to measure traits, particularly traits associated with environmental adaptability and sustainability • for any livestock population to maintain competitive rates of genetic improvement in the future, a well recorded reference population of animals with comprehensive performance measurements and genomic information is essential Additionally, Christian Duff presented a paper at the conference stemming from his early PhD research utilising information from the Angus Sire Benchmarking Program (ASBP). The paper was titled “Comparison of Two Live-Animal Ultrasound Systems to Predict

Carcase Intramuscular Fat and Marbling in Australian Angus Cattle” (see page 46). Alongside the conference, Angus Australia staff also had the opportunity to progress several collaborative projects with organisations both in Australia and abroad, which in time will deliver outcomes such as a better ability to benchmark Australian Angus genetics within the global Angus gene pool; the availability of enhanced genomic technologies to Angus Australia members; and the genetic description of Australian Angus animals for a range of new and novel traits, such as immune competence, heat tolerance, disease resistance and beef nutritional qualities. Angus Australia’s Strategic Projects Manager, Christian Duff with University of New England’s Dr Sam Clark and Angus Australia’s CEO, Dr Peter Parnell

Angus Bulletin — autumn 2018

PAge 45


breed development

Comparison of Two Live-Animal Ultrasound Systems to Predict Carcase Intramuscular Fat and Marbling in Australian Angus Cattle C.J. Duff1,2, J.H.J. van der Werf2, P.F. Parnell1 & S.A. Clark2

1 Angus Australia, 86 Glen Innes Road, Armidale, New South Wales, Australia, 2 School of Environmental and Rural Science, University of New England, Armidale, New South Wales, Australia

Introduction

• A common breeding objective for Angus beef producers is to improve carcase quality. • Marbling score and intramuscular fat (IMF) are key traits, but expensive and difficult to measure, particularly on selection candidates. • Due to this limitation, correlated ultrasound scan measurements of the live animal is utilised. • Two ultrasound systems for measuring IMF in the live beef cattle are: - CUP = Central ultrasound processing system (CUP Laboratory, Ames, Iowa, USA) - PIE = Esaote Aquila ultrasound system (Pie Medical, Maastricht, The Netherlands). • Objective = Estimate phenotypic and genetic para meters for two live-animal ultrasound systems (PIE and CUP) and determine their relationship with carcase IMF and marbling scores.

• 3 generations of pedigree: - No. Animals = 6138 - No. Sires = 386 - No. Dams = 2794 • Model: Ultrasound traits = CG + Age + Dam Age + a + e Carcase traits = CG + Cwt + Dam Age + a + e • Where: - CG = Contemporary group as defined by BREEDPLAN (Graser et al., 2005). - Age = Age at measurement. - Cwt = Carcase weight - Dam Age = Age of dam at measurement. - a = Random additive genetic effect. - e = Random error of prediction.

Results

Heritabilities (SE)

Materials and Methods

• All phenotypic data, associated fixed effects and pedigree data were generated from the Angus Sire Benchmarking Program, also known as the Angus Beef Information Nucleus (BIN), described by Banks (2011). • Angus animals were ultrasound scanned crush-side using the PIE system with IMF predicted with the PIE algorithm. • At the same time, images were captured from PIE hardware and sent to CUP laboratory for IMF prediction with the CUP algorithm. • No. sires with phenotyped progeny = 126

Genetic Correlations (SE) to Objective Traits

• ASReml (Gilmour et al., 2015) was used to estimate heritabilities and correlations.

Trait PIE_IMF CUP_IMF

Number of records and descriptive statistics Trait1

1

No.

Mean

PIE_IMF CUP_IMF

2971 2773

6.32 5.47

PIE_IMF CUP_IMF CWT CIMF AMBL MMBL

1508 1432 1462 1475 1473 1474

PIE_IMF CUP_IMF

1463 1341

SD

All

Min

Max

1.59 1.75

0.50 0.96

8.30 11.92

7.23 5.98 460.21 10.05 2.67 514.40

0.96 1.78 37.44 3.28 1.24 120.21

3.50 1.32 334.9 3.20 0 160

8.30 11.92 568.6 25.1 8 1030

5.39 4.91

1.57 1.52

0.50 0.96

8.20 9.77

Steers

Heifers

PIE_IMF: Ultrasound Scan IMF using PIE (%); CUP_IMF: Ultrasound scan IMF using CUP (%); CWT: Hot Standard Carcase Weight (kg); CIMF: Carcase Intramuscular Fat by NRI; AMBL: AUS-MEAT Marbling Score; MMBL: MSA Marbling Score.

PAge 46

Angus Bulletin — autumn 2018

CUP_IMF 0.90 (0.04) -

CIMF 0.74 (0.08) 0.70 (0.07)

AMBL

MMBL

0.69 (0.10) 0.67 (0.09)

0.70 (0.09) 0.72 (0.08)

Phenotypic Correlations (SE) to Objective Traits Trait PIE_IMF CUP_IMF

CUP_IMF 0.45 (0.02) -

CIMF

AMBL

0.42 (0.03) 0.36 (0.03) 0.42 (0.02) 0.32 (0.03)

MMBL 0.38 (0.03) 0.36 (0.02)


breed development • The heritability for CUP_IMF was significantly higher than PIE_IMF at 0.58 and 0.35, respectively. • CUP_IMF heritability was higher than those reported by Reverter et al. (2000), and Borner et al. (2013). PIE_IMF heritability in our study was closer to previous estimates. • The genetic and phenotypic correlations of PIE_IMF and CUP_IMF withCIMF, AMBL and MMBL were similar in sign, magnitude and direction. • The genetic correlations of PIE_IMF and CUP_IMF to CIMF were higher than those observed by Reverter et al. (2000), and Borner et al. (2013). • Phenotypic correlations between the scan and carcase traits were moderate and positive, but lower than those observed by Herring et al. (1998).

• Angus bull breeders, co-operator herds, supply chain partners, technicians and research organisations.

For Further Information: Christian Duff, Strategic Projects Manager, Angus Australia 86 Glen Innes Road, Armidale, NSW, Australia Phone: +61 2 6773 4620 | Mobile: +61 457 457 141 Email: christian@angusaustralia.com.au

Conclusions • •

CUP ultrasound scan technology is most suitable for genetic evaluation of Angus cattle arising from: - Significantly higher heritability of CUP_IMF compared to PIE_IMF, and - Similar phenotypic and genetic correlations to the breeding objective traits of CIMF, AMBL and MMBL. Further research is required to compare the genetic parameters for the full suite of ultrasound scan traits including eye muscle area, rib fat and rump fat.

Acknowledgments The authors thank: • Angus Australia • Meat and Livestock Australia (MLA) References Banks, R.G. 2011. Progress in implementation of a beef information nucleus portfolio in the Australian Beef industry. Proc. Aus. Assoc. Anim. Breeding Genet. 19:399402. Börner, V., Johnston, D. J. & Graser H-U. 2013. Genetic relationships between live animal scan traits and carcass traits of Australian Angus bulls and heifers. Ani. Prod. Sci. 53: 1075-1082. Gilmour, A. R., Gogel, B. J., Cullis, B. R., Welham, S. J. & Thompson, R. 2015. ASReml User Guide Release 4.1 Functional Specification, VSN International Ltd, Hemel Hempstead, HP1 1ES, UK www.vsni.co.uk. Graser H-U., Tier B., Johnston D. J., Barwick S. A. 2005. Genetic evaluation for the beef industry in Australia. Aus. J. Exp. Agri. 45: 913-921 Herring, W. O., Kriese, L.A, Bertrand, J.K. & Crouch. J. 1998. Comparison of four real-time ultrasound systems that predict intramuscular fat in beef cattle. J. Ani. Sci. 76:364-370. Reverter, A., Johnston, D. J., Graser, H. U., Wolcott, M. L., & Upton, W. H. 2000. Genetic analyses of live-animal ultrasound and abattoir carcass traits in Australian Angus and Hereford cattle. J. Ani. Sci 78:1786-1795.

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Angus Bulletin — autumn 2018

PAge 47


breed development

Understanding the “New” Angus BREEDPLAN Analysis December 2017 heralded a new era for the genetic evaluation of Angus cattle in Australia with the implementation of a new and improved approach for incorporating genomic, or DNA information into the calculation of Estimated Breeding Values (EBVs). The new approach, utilising single step analytical software, simultaneously utilises genomic, pedigree and performance information, placing appropriate emphasis on all available sources of information, to generate the best possible prediction of each animal’s breeding value. By comparison to previous versions, the new approach for incorporating genomic information into the calculation of EBVs for Angus cattle included a number of new features, including modifications to: • the manner in which genetic relationships between animals are determined • the method by which genomic, or SNP effects are estimated • the way in which genomic information contributes to the EBVs of relatives • the relative emphasis that is given to genomic information • the EBVs for which genomic information is considered This article provides some further background regarding the first new feature, being modifications to the manner

in which genetic relationships between animals are determined, and attempts to give Angus breeders an insight into what to expect when obtaining EBVs for their animals from the “new” Angus BREEDPLAN analysis.

Understanding Mendelian Sampling

Before discussing the new approach, it is firstly important to review the way in which genes are passed from one generation to another. Most people will be familiar with the concept that an animal possesses two copies of each gene, with one copy inherited from each parent. When an animal becomes a parent, only one copy of each gene is passed onto each offspring, resulting in four different combinations of the gene being possible in the offspring. This is illustrated in Figure 1, with the chance factor describing which half of a parent’s genes are passed on to their offspring referred to as “mendelian sampling”, named after the scientist who developed the concept in 1822, Gregor Mendel.

X

Figure 1 – Offspring of two parents, illustrating that offspring receive half of their genes from each of their parents. Which half they receive is a matter of chance and is referred to as “mendelian sampling”.

Relationships Between Animals

Considering what is known about how genes are passed from one generation to the next, it is possible to use pedigree information to estimate the expected genetic relationship, or expected proportion of genes in common, between relatives. Some common examples of the expected relationship between an individual and its relatives are illustrated in Table 1. PAge 48

Angus Bulletin — autumn 2018

Table 1 – Expected genetic relationship between an animal and its relatives

Type of Relative

Relationship

Parent

0.5

Grandparent

0.25

Great grandparent

0.125

Full sibling

0.5

Half sibling

0.25


breed development

Number of full siblings

However, in practice, the transfer of genes from one generation is a bit more complicated, so while animals inherit 50% of their genes from their sire and 50% of their genes from their dam, there is some variation in the actual genetic relationship that is observed between animals and their relatives. For the more technically minded, this variation is due to the fact that genes are not transferred in isolation but as part of a chromosome, the manner in which chromosomes are separated during meiosis, and the exchange of chromosome segments that can occur during this process (a phenomenon known as “crossing over”). In the case of an animal’s relationship with their full siblings, on average, an animal will have a genetic relationship of 0.5 with each full sibling, as described in Table 1, but the actual relationship between the animal and each individual full sibling may vary. This is illustrated in Figure 2, with the genetic relationship between the animal and its individual full siblings ranging from approximately 0.4 to 0.6.

Genetic relationship Figure 2 – Distribution of the genetic relationship between an animal and its full siblings.

The same variation in the actual versus expected genetic relationship applies to all different classes of relatives, such as parents, grandparents and great-grandparents. For example, while an animal will, on average, have a genetic relationship of 0.125 with each great-grandparent, it may have a closer genetic relationship to individual greatgrandparents than others.

Modifications to Approach for Determining Relationships in Angus BREEDPLAN

The availability of genomic technology now enables the genetic relationship between an animal and each relative to be estimated more precisely in the calculation of EBVs. Previously the relationship between an individual animal and other animals in the Angus BREEDPLAN

genetic evaluation was estimated by pedigree alone, and consequently, assumed an animal had the same relationship with each of its relatives. For example, in the case of full siblings, the genetic evaluation assumed the animal had a genetic relationship with each of its full siblings of 0.5. The new analysis approach uses genomic information, in association with pedigree, to more precisely estimate an animal’s genetic relationship with other animals in the genetic evaluation. In the example of full siblings, as described in Figure 2, rather than a relationship of 0.5, the genetic evaluation now estimates the actual relationship between an animal and each individual full sibling, when calculating the animal’s EBVs.

Consequences for EBVs

The new approach for determining the relationship between animals has several consequences for the EBVs that are calculated for Angus animals. Angus breeders may notice: • while in most cases there will have been no change, the EBVs for some individual animals, particularly those with genomic information, may have changed considerably by comparison to the EBVs calcu lated previously. • there may now be considerably more variation observed between the EBVs of full and half siblings, such as embryo transfer calves from the same flush, or progeny of the same sire. • the EBVs of progeny may be less aligned to the EBVs of their parents, particularly if the genomic information is showing the progeny has a genetic relationship with its parent/s that is considerably different to 0.5. • the influence that a pedigree error has on the EBVs calculated for an animal is greatly reduced, as the genomic information will demonstrate the relationship between the animal and the respective “erroneous” ancestor is negligible, and the “erroneous” ancestor’s information will no longer incorrectly contribute to the animal’s EBVs. • the information from an animal that is unrelated by pedigree but who shares genes in common will contribute to the calculation of an animal’s EBVs. Importantly, the improvement in the way genetic relationships between animals are determined within Angus BREEDPLAN will result in EBVs being calculated that provide a better prediction of an animal’s breeding value, particularly for animals with genomic information available. To further discuss the modifications to the manner in which genetic relationships are determined in Angus BREEDPLAN, please contact Angus Australia’s Breed Development & Extension Manager, Andrew Byrne, on (02) 6773 4618 or andrew@angusaustralia.com.au. Angus Bulletin — autumn 2018

PAge 49


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Angus Bulletin — autumn 2018


breed development

Identifying Animals With Genomic Information Several initiatives have either been completed or are nearing completion with regards to the identification of animals with genomic information analysed within the Angus BREEDPLAN genetic evaluation.

New Genomic Trait Indicators

New trait indicators are now available to assist with the identification of whether animals’ have had genomic information included in the calculation of their Angus BREEDPLAN EBVs. Animals for which genomic information is included in Angus BREEDPLAN will have one of the following trait indicators, subject to the genomic information that is analysed and the analytical methodology utilised. • Genomics(CE) – indicating the animal has a genomic prediction incorporated in the calculation of their Calving Ease EBVs • Genomics(S-Step) – indicating the animal has a low or high density genotype (i.e. > 10,000 SNPs) incorporated in the calculation of their EBVs for all traits within the main single step component of the Angus BREEDPLAN analysis (i.e. includes all traits except calving ease, docility and structural soundness) • Genomics(CE,S-Step) – indicating the animal has both a genomic prediction incorporated in the calculation of their Calving Ease EBVs, and a low or high density genotype incorporated in the calculation of their EBVs for all traits within the main single step component of the Angus BREEDPLAN analysis Genomic information is not currently included in the calculation of EBVs for docility and the structural soundness traits for any animals. The new genomic trait indicators can be viewed by searching for an animal in the Angus Database Search facility, and then selecting the EBVs tab. The trait indicators are displayed within the traits observed section, which is towards the bottom of the EBV table. Additionally, the number of progeny from a particular sire or dam who have genomic information analysed in the main single step component of Angus BREEDPLAN are now also displayed in the traits observed section within the Angus Database Search.

Development of Genomic Exclusion Reports

In association with the implementation of the new single step analytical software into the December 2017 Angus BREEDPLAN genetic evaluation, a range of comprehensive quality assurance checks are now applied before genomic information is included into the analysis. The quality assurance measures not only review the quality of the genotypes for measures such as call rate and the level of heterozygosity, but identify any discrepancies between the genomic information and the information recorded on the Angus Australia database. For example, discrepancies in the pedigree, gender and breed that is recorded for the animal. Angus Australia’s software development team is now actively working on the development of herd reports for each member of Angus Australia that is enrolled in Angus BREEDPLAN that identify any genomic information that has failed the quality assurance checks and been excluded from the Angus BREEDPLAN analysis. Notification will be sent to Angus Australia members once the new genomic exclusion reports are available.

Angus Bulletin — autumn 2018

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breed development

Updates to Angus Australia’s Gene Probability Analysis Angus Australia conducts a gene probability analysis to assist with the management of four genetic conditions that are present within the Angus population, being Arthrogryposis Multiplex (AM), Contractual Arachnodactyly (CA), Developmental Duplications (DD), and Neuropathic Hydrocephalus (NH). As part of Angus Australia’s software development initiative, more efficient software has recently been introduced for conducting the gene probability analysis. The implementation of the new software means the gene probability results can now be updated more frequently, while a number of improvements have been made to the manner in which the results from the gene probability analysis are presented. Gene probability results are now updated each Tuesday night, with results available from the Angus Australia website on Wednesday morning each week. Results are made available from the Angus Database Search, where not only can the gene probability status for an individual animal be viewed, but searches can be undertaken to identify animals with a specific gene probability status. In addition, two new reports are now made available via the member login area on the Angus Australia website for each individual member of Angus Australia. The “Genetic Condition Report” is presented in pdf format and provides a range of information regarding the gene probability results for animals in the respective herd, including: • the gene probability result distribution for each of the genetic conditions, in both tabular and graphical form • the carrier frequency by birth year and registration status for each of the 4 genetic conditions • the genetic condition status of sires used in the herd in the last 5 years. The “Genetic Condition Results” is presented in csv format and contains the gene probability results for each individual animal bred in the respective herd for each of the 4 genetic conditions. Members who require assistance in accessing or interpreting the results from the gene probability analysis are advised to contact staff at Angus Australia.

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Angus Bulletin — autumn 2018

NDL - OUTWEST Gene Probability Result Distribution AM - Arthrogryposis Multiplex

Calving Year

Estimated Carrier Frequency *

Animal Count by Gene Probability Result

Total Animals

AMF

AMC

AMA

No.

%

1999

119

2000

134

0

62

29

28

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

4

4

2001

154

0

90

44

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

2

2002

108

0

107

33

0

0

0

1

9

0

0

0

0

4

0

11

7

2003

78

3

56

17

0

0

1

0

26

0

0

0

1

4

0

20

18

2004

121

1

68

8

0

0

0

1

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

1

2005

175

3

100

7

0

2

0

4

2

0

0

0

1

2

0

7

2006

212

16

126

7

0

0

1

3

17

0

0

0

0

5

0

16

9

2007

154

5

164

9

1

0

0

12

13

0

1

0

0

7

0

21

10

2008

251

10

114

7

0

1

1

5

7

0

0

0

0

9

0

16

10

2009

252

2010

223

2011

260

2012

352

2013

350

2014

317

2015

325

2016

313

2017

195

AMFU AM<10 AM<20 AM<30 AM<40 AM<50 AM<60 AM<70 AM<80 AM<90 AM90%

1

1 6

8

216

6

0

4

0

9

5

0

0

0

0

3

0

11

4

13

205

4

1

0

0

12

5

0

1

0

0

11

0

21

8

3

206

5

0

0

0

7

0

0

0

0

0

2

0

6

3

3

250

0

0

0

0

3

1

0

0

0

0

3

0

5

2

1

343

1

0

0

0

4

3

0

0

0

0

0

0

5

1

3

340

1

0

1

0

1

3

0

0

0

0

1

0

3

1

0

311

0

0

0

0

1

5

0

0

0

0

0

0

3

1

0

315

1

1

1

0

0

6

0

0

0

0

1

0

4

1

4

300

4

1

3

0

0

1

0

0

0

0

0

0

2

1

3

187

1

0

2

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

2

0

3

1

* Estimated number of carriers based on gene probability results.

Angus Australia

February 15, 2018

Page: 2

NDL - OUTWEST Gene Probability Result Distribution DD - Developmental Duplications 2013 Drop Calves

2014 Drop Calves

2015 Drop Calves

2016 Drop Calves

2017 Drop Calves

2013-2017 Drop Calves

Angus Australia

February 15, 2018

Page: 8

Angus Australia

February 15, 2018

Page: 10

NDL - OUTWEST Carrier Frequency


breed development

Changes to Angus Australia’s DNA Services Angus Australia partners with several genomics laboratories in delivering modern, affordable DNA testing services to Angus Australia members. Several changes have recently been implemented with regards to the DNA testing services that are provided.

Introducing Neogen Australasia

Many will recall that GeneSeek AustralAsia (GAA), a wholly owned Neogen Corporation Company, acquired 100% of the assets and business of the Animal Genetics Laboratory at the University of Queensland in September 2017. As of March 1st, 2018, GeneSeek AustralAsia will now be known as Neogen Australasia (NAA). The change in name reflects an expansion of the services offered by the laboratory in Gatton into veterinary diagnostics, food safety genomics, and the leveraging of Neogen’s entire food and animal safety portfolio of products into agricultural markets in the region. Importantly, the services that were previously available to Angus Australia members from GeneSeek AustralAsia remain unchanged. • the DNA services that were previously available to Angus Australia members are still available from Neogen Australasia and at the same price. • The process by which Angus Australia members send DNA samples/test requests and receive test results via Angus Australia is the same. • The same UQ sample collectors should be used by members when requesting DNA services from NAA. The only change that Angus Australia members will notice is to the name of the laboratory on any correspondence and documentation received from Angus Australia.

Removal of Surcharge for TSU Samples

Members undertaking DNA services through Angus Australia can currently provide DNA samples in the form of either hair, semen, tissue sampling units (TSUs) or tissue samples (e.g. from dead calves). While hair remains

the most common type of DNA sample submitted, there is growing interest in the use of TSUs. TSUs involve the use of specialized equipment that takes an ear notch, places it in a collection tube that contains preservative, and seals the collection tube. TSUs are often integrated with ear tags, with the collection tube having a bar code that corresponds to the NLIS and management tag, which helps to prevent human error and sample mix-ups. The most common form of TSU used in Australia is marketed by Allflex, however several different types of TSUs are marketed by companies in overseas countries. Until recently, one limitation of TSUs was an inability to store any sample that was surplus to the initial DNA testing requirements for future DNA testing of the animal. Consequently, a surcharge of between $5 - $10 was applied, subject to the DNA laboratory, to cover the cost of DNA extraction and long term storage should future testing be required. Advances in technology, plus investment in cold storage capability in Angus Australia’s DNA storage facility in Armidale, have meant that this surcharge has now been removed. For those interested in the detail: • When testing is completed with Neogen Australasia, the preservative fluid in the TSU will be replenished, the TSU recapped and sent back to Angus Australia, where it will be frozen and available for future testing. • When testing is completed with Zoetis, the DNA that has been extracted will be returned to Angus Australia, where the extracted DNA will be frozen and available for future testing.

Advances in technology, plus investment in cold storage capability in Angus Australia’s DNA storage facility (pictured above), have meant the surcharge previously applied when DNA testing using TSUs no longer applies

Angus Bulletin — autumn 2018

PAge 53


breed development

Brad Hine collecting immune competence information with Angus Australia Staff members Ally Van Duijnhoven and Samantha Hamilton

Research Continues into Calculation of EBVs for Additional Traits Angus BREEDPLAN currently calculates EBVs for 25 traits, with EBVs relating to calving ease, fertility, growth, carcase yield and quality, docility, structural soundness and feed efficiency. While the current EBVs describe the genetic merit of Angus animals for many traits of economic importance within the beef supply chain, research continues in collaboration between Angus Australia and several research organisations to improve the scope of the EBVs that are calculated in Angus BREEDPLAN, and in turn, to provide a genetic description of Angus and Angusinfluenced seedstock for a wider number of traits. Current research is focussed on improving the genetic description of traits such as: • Eating quality (e.g. marble score, ossification) • Meat quality (e.g. marbling fineness, fatty acid composition, mineral content)

• Adaptability to northern Australian production systems (e.g. coat score, adaptation) • Animal resilience (e.g. immune competence) • Cow maintenance efficiency (e.g. mature condition score, mature height) • Female reproduction (e.g. age of puberty) To further discuss any of the research that is underway to improve the calculation of EBVs within Angus BREEDPLAN, please contact staff at Angus Australia. Further details regarding each respective item will be circulated as the research is completed, and subsequently, when the implementation of the research outcome into the Angus BREEDPLAN genetic evaluation has been scheduled.

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Angus Bulletin — autumn 2018

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Angus Software

Sourcing Angus Genetics with AngusSELECT™ The ability to source Angus genetics for use in your breeding program, be it in a seedstock or commercial enterprise, has just got a lot easier with the availability of AngusSELECT™. Developed by Angus Australia’s software development team, AngusSELECT™ consists of a modern and intuitive suite of genetic selection tools that enable users of Angus genetics to identify the Angus genetics that are most aligned with their breeding goals and objectives. Using the AngusSELECT™ suite of tools, Angus breeders can: • view upcoming sales featuring registered Angus genetics • search and sort for registered Angus animals, semen or embryos that are currently available for sale, and

identify the most suitable Angus genetics for use within their breeding program • find suppliers of registered Angus genetics • access education modules that assist users of Angus genetics to identify those animals that best meet their genetic selection criteria The new AngusSELECT™ interface can be accessed from the Angus Australia website (https://www.angusaustralia. com.au/) by clicking on the AngusSELECT link in the menu at the top of the homepage.

PERFORMANCE & RELIABILITY STEELE RUDD CORNER, NOBBY QLD 4360 | Ph: (07) 4696 3350 Fax: (07) 4696 3370 | Email: mark@qma.net.au | QMA.NET.AU Angus Bulletin — autumn 2018

CR127147AA

(New and Used)

PAge 55


#

InstaAngus

Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve noticed some stunning Instagram accounts from Angus breeders and others across the beef supply chain that are capturing the essence of Angus life, so we would like to share them a little further to celebrate the diversity of the Angus breed across Australia. Don't forget to follow us on Instagram!

@minmccormack

@weeranangus

Credit Ben Simpson

@geralynflower

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Angus Bulletin â&#x20AC;&#x201D; autumn 2018

#AngusPremium #GrowAngus #IUseAngusBulls

@mattaldridge87

@baldblairangus

@eaglehawkangus

@a_country_heart

@koojanhills

@jarobee_angus_stud

Credit Al Mabin


Angus Software

Linking to Individual Animals in Angus Database Search Angus Australia members who had links on their websites and in marketing material to individual animal pages in the animal enquiry facility that was previously available via the Angus Australia website are advised that similar functionality now exists in the Angus Database Search. To access the direct link for an individual animal, complete the following steps: Step 1. Sign in to the Angus Database Search as a registered user Step 2. Enter the Angus Australia ID or name of the animal of interest Step 3. From within the results screen, scroll the RH side and click the task symbol (i.e. lightning bolt). Note: click the task symbol that corresponds to the row of the individual animal, rather than the task symbol in the results table header. When you click the task symbol, two options will appear. Select “Copy Single Animal URL for this Animal”.

Handy Hint: Linking directly to individual animals on Angus Database search from your website or social media channels means you will always be providing potential clients with the most up to date information on animals

Step 4. A screen should then pop-up with a link to the individual animal page. Click on the “Copy to Clipboard” button

Step 5. Paste the link into the relevant spot within your within your website or marketing material. It is likely that existing links to the animal enquiry facility will cease to work over coming months, and so Angus Australia would encourage members to update all links as a matter or priority.

28TH ANNUAL SALE

WEDNESDAY 12TH SEPTEMBER

nooneeangus.com.au

PAUL JAMESON 0428 667 998 ANDY McGEOCH 0418 737 470

Angus Bulletin — autumn 2018

PAge 57


Angus Software

Guide to signing into ANGUS.TECH

Samantha Hamilton, Senior Member Services Officer

How to sign up as a registered user for angus.tech 1. First Click on angus.tech

2. Once in the angus.tech screen, click on ENTER AS A REGISTERED USER.

3. In order to sign up for angus.tech click on register here. You do not need to be a member of Angus Australia to register.

NEW BLACK MERCHANDISE Available now through the Angus Australia website

www.angusaustralia.com.au PAge 58

Angus Bulletin â&#x20AC;&#x201D; autumn 2018

4. Complete all of your information indicated in the fields, read the terms and conditions and then click Register. Depending on whether you enter a mobile number or email address you will receive one of the following prompts for Step 5.


Angus Software 5a. Registered with a mobile phone A message will be sent to your mobile number that you have entered containing your verification code.

Signing in for the first time if you are a Member of Angus Australia 1. First Click on angus.tech

5b. Registered with an email address You will be prompted to call the office to complete your registration. Once you call the office, you will receive a verification email like the one pictured sent to your entered email address. Click on the link in blue.

2. Once in the angus.tech screen, click on ENTER AS A REGISTERED USER.

6a. Once you have received your verification code you can now verify your User Account. I registered with a mobile phone number, add in your mobile phone number and your verification code, then click Verify My Account.

3. To sign in enter the following:

User ID – your Herd Ident eg. ABC

Password – this is usually the same password that you would use to log into Member Login.

Then click Sign In.

6b. Once you have clicked on the blue link you can now verify your User Account. I registered with only an email address, add in your email address and your verification code, then click Verify My Account.

4. You should now be signed in as a user. If you have forgotten your password or it is not working, it is recommended that you click on Forgotten your password? in Step 3. 7. Now you are registered as a User for angus.tech.

Angus Bulletin — autumn 2018

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Marcus, Olga & Michael Hill, Connamara Angus, Ruffy VIC, stand with some of their 73 PTIC Angus heifers that sold from $2,100-$2,625 ($2,385 av) at Euroa VIC 13/12/17. Credit: The Stock & Land

Frank Tomasi Nominees sold 8 Angus PTIC heifers for $3,500 at the Landmark Mated Beef Female Sale, 4/01/18 Boyanup WA. An additional 8 Angus PTIC heifers were sold for $3,300. Pixtured are Landmark South West livestock manager Michael Rose (left), Frank Tomasi, Kevin Owen, farm manager Frank Tomasi Nominees, buyer Dennis Roche, Pemberton and Jock Embry, Landmark Margaret River

Michael Garvey sold 130 PTIC Angus heifers for $2,070 – $2,800, Wodonga Agents All Breeds Beef Female Sale 18/01/18

around the female sales Images: Fairfax Media

C & L Italiano & Sons sold 9 Angus cross heifers for $2,025 at the Landmark unjoined female sale, Boyanup WA, 11/01/18. Pictured: Landmark Brunswick agent Errol Gardiner (left), with Cameron, Lauren, Eva, Nathan, Charlie and Julien Italiano, Landmark auctioneer Tiny Holly and Jarvis Polglaze

Diana Ryan sold 15 PTIC Angus heifers for PAgeeach 60 atAngus — autumnBreeders 2018 $2,000 theBulletin Mt Compass Sale SA, 12/01/18

Langi Kal Kal sold 18 Angus heifers PTIC for $3,475 at the Ballarat Feature Female Sale VIC, 2/02/18. Pictured are Prison’s Industries manager, Evan Zammit, and State Ag manager Matthew Menhennet


member services

from your member services team Samantha Hamilton, Senior Member Services Officer

Happy New Year to all our members at Angus Australia for 2018! Hopefully by the time this goes to print everyone will have had some much-needed rain and 2018 is looking more positive for studs and commercial breeders. The 2018 sale season has kicked off to a flying start. So far, the Member Services Team have processed over 50 Sale Catalogue requests for members sales between the months of January through to April and still with more to come. Compared to last year’s statistics for the same period, sales have increased by up to 10%. Members are reminded to ensure that any DNA and Breedplan data for sale catalogues need to be submitted at least a month prior to developing a Sale Catalogue to allow time for results and any delays. A big change that occurred at the start of 2018 was the launch of Angus Australia’s new angus.tech database search and AngusSELECT sections. Whilst the layout of these searches are quite different to the old database search, there are many benefits and additional search tools that could assist members in running their breeding programmes such as narrowing down potential sires on particular EBV values, security within a members herd and animal information, searching what stud sales are on in your area and plenty more. As this change is abit of a shock to the system for some, members are encouraged to contact the Member Services

Team with any questions or enquires regarding how to operate angus.tech. Comprehensive help information is also available from the Angus Education Centre on the Angus Australia website. Members are also encouraged to pass on any problems or issues they may find when using angus.tech, with this information we can address the areas that need attention and fixing. In the coming months, keep an eye out for information providing tips on using the new angus.tech facility on the Angus Australia website, and in Angus E-news and Angus Bulletin publications. If you have any questions or enquires for the Member Services Team, please feel free to contact us on 02 6773 4600 or email regos@angusaustralia.com.au.

Better BREEDPLAN Management Nicky Carey, Member Services Officer

Submission Deadlines

If you are relying on updated EBVs from a particular analysis whether it be for your sale catalogue or show please make sure that all of your registration details, DNA and performance data is submitted well ahead of the submission deadline to guarantee that updated EBVs are available when they are needed.

Check Your Outlier Reports

A quick reminder that all BREEDPLAN outlier reports are provided in the Files to Download section of the Member Login Area on the Angus Australia website as well as being sent to you via post. An outlier occurs when the difference between a performance record for an animal, and the average of all animals in the contemporary group is greater than what would normally be expected for the traits measured (more than 3 standard deviations). When this happens the “outlier” data is excluded from the BREEDPLAN analysis until the data is checked and Angus Australia has been notified that it is correct. Please endeavour to regularly check for outlier reports in the “Files to Download” section of the Angus Australia website. If you do not check these records and notify

Angus Australia of the corrections or verification of the data, then the outlier records will remain excluded from all future BREEDPLAN analyses.

Submitting your performance data

There are various Microsoft Excel templates that can be used to submit performance data to Angus BREEDPLAN. These templates are easy to understand and allow staff at Angus Australia to quickly process each herd’s performance data with ease. If you are looking to submit performance data to Angus BREEDPLAN and would like to try the excel templates provided, please contact staff at Angus Australia or download the templates from the BREEDPLAN resources section of the Angus Australia website. Alternative methods of data submission include paper performance recording forms, data submissions through herd recording programs and our online website performance submission facility. For more information, please contact breedplan@angusaustralia.com.au.

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Member Services 10 Year Comparison 2017 VS 2007 67,033 / 70,657 animals

223 / 174 sale catalogues 11,220total/lots8,838

registrations

28,850 29,865

33,209 35,422

Male

4,974 5,370

Female

Sale CatalogueS

Steers

HBR Registrations:

APR Registrations:

RAR Registrations:

MBR Registrations:

77 / 33

1,352 / 16,875

41,002 / 33,325

18,642 / 16,460

ACR Registrations:

5,961 / 3,963

transfers

62,728 7,981

Total DNA requests submitted

12,595 13,646

Total transfers

2017 Zoetis i50K

13,626

Dwarfism (DW)

7

Angus Heifer Select

988

2,006

SEQ/SNP (DNA Profile)

8,602

Neuropathic Hydrocephalus (NH)

Parent Verifications

24,094

Oculocutaneous Hypopigmentation (OH)

--

Pestivirus

1,228

Osteopetrosis (OS)

4

Arthrogryposis Multiplex 1,769 (AM) Contractural Arachnodactyly (CA)

1,899

Development Duplications 7,548 (DD)

Alpha Mannosidosis (MA) 101 Coat Colour

579

Myostatin (NT821)

44

Transfer DNA Between Labs

233

2007 GeneSTAR

1,017

Parent Verifications

3,276

GeneSTAR Upgrade

41

Red Gene Test

244

MIP (DNA Profile)

3,322

Mannossidosis

81

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Total Members: 3,590 / 2,104 Full

Junior

1,084 / 882

367 / 164

Commercial

Life

2,114 / 1,058

25 / 23


angus youth

Service to Angus Youth

Candice Liddle, Events & Youth Development Officer

Stewart Award

The Stewart award recognises someone who has contributed a large amount of time and passion into the Angus Youth program, with the most recent presentation for this prestigious award made to Jasmin Nixon. Jasmin has been involved with Angus Youth for many years, developing from a Roundup participant through to an Angus Youth Ambassador and on to being a recipient of the Trans-Tasman Exchange Scholarship. She has also held positions on the Angus Youth Management Committee has been heavily involved in a number of Angus Youth Roundup committees over the years. ‘Jasmin’s wealth of knowledge and passion for the program have been an asset to Angus Youth and for the Angus Youth program to be able to shape young leaders in the industry like Jasmin is a credit to the program,’ said Angus Australia Director Dean Fredricksen upon presenting Jasmin with this Award.

Angus Australia’s Events & Youth Development Officer, Jasmin Nixon and Angus Australia Director Dean Fredericksen

Murk Schoen and Angus Australia’s Marketing & Communications Manger, Diana Wood

Cornell Sheild

The Cornell Shield, in memory of the tireless work done by David and Kathleen Cornell to set up the Australian Angus Youth movement, was awarded to Murk Schoen, Coordinator of the 2018 Roundup who successfully ran a smooth and enjoyable Roundup. Murk has a long relationship with Angus Youth having been a Roundup participant and also a recipient of a number of Roundup awards like the 2014 Bulliac Studmaster Award. Murk also had the opportunity to represent Angus Australia at the World Angus Form in New Zealand in 2013. Angus Australia’s Marketing & Communications Manager, Diana Wood commended Murk for the outstanding job he did in the organisation of the 2018 event. ‘To see someone like Murk, backed by his wife Kate and his committee run such a successful event was fantastic. Having watched both Murk and Kate start their Angus Youth journey a number of years ago as Roundup participants, to now coordinating the event is great to see and should provide today’s participants to stay involved,’ she said.

around the Shows

Canberra Show

Senior and Grand Champion Angus Bull, and Champion Interbreed Bull and Supreme Champion Beef Exhibit, J & C Mouse Trap M20, exhibited by J & C Angus. Images courtesy of Emily H Photography

Senior and Grand Champion Angus Female, Hillview Jillian, exhibited by Hillview Angus. Images courtesy of Emily H Photography

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angus youth

Successful Roundup held in Wodonga Candice Liddle, Events & Youth Development Officer

The 2018 Thomas Foods International Angus Youth Roundup took place in Wodonga from the 11th to the 14th of January 2018 Held over 4 days, the Roundup attracted 145 participants from ages 8 to 25 with all levels of cattle experience and provided both a learning and fun experience for all. The educational sessions were delivered by experts in the industry & included topics such as halter making, junior judging, livestock marketing as well genetic selection. The competitions at the event included the Paraders classes, Junior Judging & Herdsperson competitions. The Special Dinner Dance was held on the Saturday night with 340 people in attendance. Thank-you to Sam Hunter for leading the auction which raised $21,000 for Angus Youth. Featured lots in the auction included several elite embryo and semen packages, mystery items and artworks as well as a diverse range of items featured in the silent auction. The Roundup is supported by Thomas Foods International, Angus Youth and Angus Australia, however, the event is coordinated by a young and enthusiastic committee who volunteer their time to ensure the success of this annual event. This year’s committee went above and beyond the usual call of duty to ensure that the 2018 Roundup was successful and professional.

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Angus Youth National Roundup Results 2018 Trans-Tasman Exchange – Steph Frankham Bulliac Angus Studmaster Award – Sarah Nesbit Waitara Angus National All Breeds Heifer Show Award – Robert Neil Blackstone Angus SA Junior Heifer Expo Award – Chloe Beaumont Merridale Angus Aspiring Breeder Award – Sam Parish Matthew George Citizenship Award – Lochie McLauchlan David and Kathleen Cornell Shield – Murk Schoen EJ Angus Encouragement Award – Hannah Cargill Dalwhinnie Angus Breeders Encouragement Award – Monique Estrada Champion Seniors Award – Hannah Powe & Steph Frankham Intermediate Champion Junior Judge Award – Will Kosch Champion Team – Geelong Best Presented Animal – Lauchie McLauchlan Best Maintained Stall – Goondoola


angus youth

Herdsman

Junior Judging

Parader

Pee Wee

Junior

Intermediate

Senior

Champion

Thomas Duddy

Lochie McLauchlan

Georgia Laurie

Steph Frankham

Reserve Champion

Jack Robson

Benjamin Duddy

Sam Parish

Hannah Powe

3rd

Josie Porter

Abby Male

Erica Bayliss

Bethany Bayliss

4th

Jayde Grylls

Caitlin Porter

Hamish Branson

Rachel Relf

5th

Matthew Vosper

Hayden Hanson

Ryan Carpenter

Marshall Arnonld

Encouragement

Thomas Bond

Casey Halliday

Benn Reid

Clayton Ray

Encouragement

Mason Ballintine

Monique Gapes

Walter Wilson

Cameron Baker

Champion

Thomas Duddy

Caitlin Porter

Will Kosch

Hannah Powe

Reserve Champion

Edward Maclure

Hayden Hanson

Sam Parish

Bethany Bayliss

3rd

Clayton Porter

Brock Ballintine

Annabelle Seaton-Cooper

Alexander Chester

4th

Zanna Spence

Benjamin Duddy

Benn Reid

Mathew Porter

5th

Abby Llewellen

Trinity McInnes

Lilli Stewart

Sarah Nesbitt

Champion

Thomas Duddy

Lochie McLauchlan

Tiffany McLauchlan

Hannah Powe

Reserve Champion

Abby Llewellyn

Caitlin Porter

Sam Parish

Clayton Ray

Grand Champion Herdsman

Lilli Stewart

Grand Champion Parader

Lochie McLauchlan

Grand Champion Junior Judge

Hannah Powe

Images courtesy of Emily H Photography

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angus youth

2019 ANGUS YOUTH ROUNDUP SET FOR ARMIDALE NSW Candice Liddle, Events & Youth Development Officer

Angus Youth Australia is pleased to announce that the 2019 Angus Youth Roundup will take place in Armidale, 10 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 13 January 2019 and will kick off the Centenary Celebrations for Angus Australia. Zac McInerney from Brisbane Queensland will be the Coordinator for the 2019 event and will be supported by Caitlin Berecry as Vice Coordinator. Zac has a long association with Angus Youth and the Angus Youth Roundup having been a competitor and a previous committee member. Zac also held a position on the Angus Youth Management Committee for 4 years

Roundup Committee

The Roundup Committee for 2019 is almost full however if you are interested in joining the committee in order to help with the organisation of this event, please

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contact Zac McInerney by phone on 0402 512 262 or email zac@scarbahangus.com.au

Sponsorship Opportunities

A quality event such as this is dependent on the generous support of numerous partners. If you are interested in supporting the event, contact Candice Liddle 0437 873 220 or youth@angusaustralia. com.au or Zac McInerney 0402 512 262 or zac@ scarbahangus.com.au Keep an eye out over the next few months for more information on this fantastic event.


angus youth

2018 BEEF AUSTRALIA SCHOLARSHIPS Candice Liddle, Events & Youth Development Officer 4/16/2017

Beef Australia is held every three years and is a world class event that showcases more than 4000 cattle along with hosting numerous seminars, property tours and conferences. Held in Rockhampton QLD, Beef Australia attracts more than 75,000 local, interstate and international visitors. The Angus Australia Foundation along with the Queensland State Committee have offered three young Angus Youth enthusiasts the opportunity to experience Beef Australia.

Jack Laurie

Jack grew up on his family farm at Knowla Angus Moppy New South Wales. He has a strong Angus stud background with his family running over 200 stud Angus females. Jack has attended nine Angus Youth National Roundups and has had many successes in junior judging competitions, including winning the State Final at last year’s Sydney Royal Easter Show. Jack is currently studying a Bachelor of Rural Science at the University of New England and has a particular interest in cattle genetics. ‘I have a real passion for agriculture and its exciting future. I have a love for all cattle, however I do believe that the Angus breed is on its own in terms of versatility, production and profitably’, said Jack. ‘To attend Beef Australia would give me an opportunity to look at different cattle and genetics. It would also allow me to talk to other producers to gain an understanding of their production systems and what they are having success with in regards to breeding,’ he said.

Jack Laurie

Emily Webb Ware

Emily has grown up on a 4th generation farm, near Yea, Victoria. Her family have a self-replacing Angus herd of 400 cows and have been in the Angus breed from before Emily was born. She is currently a student at University of Melbourne studying a Batchelor of Agriculture Emily has recently toured the United States meat industries as part of the Australian National Meat Judging Team, after being selected in the top 5 students from the Australian Intercollegiate Meat Judging Competition. ‘To attend Beef Australia would be an incredible learning experience,’ Emily said.

‘I know that I learn best when I am in a hands on situation or learning directly from industry professionals. Going to Beef Australia would allow me to spend the week engaging with a variety of people and gaining as much knowledge of beef production and the wider beef industry as I can,’ she said.

Emily Webb Ware

Laura Wishart

Laura grew up on a mixed farming enterprise on the South Coast of Western Australia. The focus of her family farming business is their commercial Angus herd and beef feedlot. Last year Laura graduated as Dux of the Marcus Oldham Associate Degree in Farm Business Management and is now currently working in the meat industry for Meat Standards Australia. ‘I’m excited to attend Beef Australia as it is a fantastic learning and networking opportunity for me on both a personal and professional sense,’ Laura said. ‘Being part of Beef Australia would enable me to meet and engage with a number of people from a range of beef-related sectors, providing the opportunity to build relationships and increase awareness of my role,’ she added. ‘Ultimately, this opportunity would boost my ability to bring value back into the industry that I am so passionate about,’ she said.

Laura Wishart

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angus youth

Sam in the States

Candice Liddle, Events & Youth Development Officer Samantha Neumann left Adelaide in a whirlwind of organised chaos to begin her journey on the Semex Kansas State University Scholarship. On arriving in Mahattan Kansas Sam was greeted by an 11 degree day and the remnants of snow, which by Kansas standard was warm for that time of year. This was a far cry from the 44 degree day she left behind in Adelaide. Soon after arriving at Kansas State University Sam met with Dr David Nicholls at Webber Hall and launched straight into organising her classes. ‘The enthusiasm of my professors has impressed me, and I’m excited about how much I can Learn from them,’ said Sam. ‘My first week included identifying digestive tracts in the laboratory, beef and pork pricing and grading, animal physiology and behaviour, engaging speakers ranging from beef marketing specialists to restaurateurs, and that was all in week one,’ she exclaimed. ‘Sustainability has been referenced in most of my classes and seems to be attracting a lot of focus from within the industry here,’ said Sam.

‘It’s interesting to see the variation in what sustainability means to different sectors of the industry here and compare that with our Australian industry,’ she said. Sam had the opportunity to travel to the National Cattleman’s Beef Association (NCBA) Cattle Industry Convention and NCBA Trade Show in Phoenix, Arizona. The NCBA Trade Show is the oldest and largest national convention for cattle business.

‘I attended Cattlemen’s College, including sessions covering genetic technologies, cattle ID and management and, one of my favourites, Beef Business survival stories, some incredible true stories from Yon Family Farm, 6666 Ranch and Pratt Feeders,’ Sam noted. ‘I was then lucky enough to attend the emerging beef leader’s summit where I was seated at an incredible table full of driven young industry advocates.’

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angus youth

‘I enjoyed Bruce Vincent’s story “sharing lessons to be learnt from logging” an infectiously passionate man, sharing not only enthusiasm for his own industry, but a drive to share his story so that other industries can learn from the road he has travelled,’ she said. In February Sam was lucky enough to spend a day travelling with John Butler, CEO of Beef Marketing Group to see Sellers Feedlot in Ellsworth Kansas. She was privileged enough to meet with the feedlot manager and be shown on a tour of the large feedlot ‘We headed out to tour the feed yard, which included inspecting the newly constructed feed pens, which will increase capacity by 2,000 head,’ said Sam. Following this Sam was able visit Great Bend Feeding Inc., Great Bend, Kansas with Brandon from Innovative Livestock Services. ‘John and I then travelled onto to Great Bend to meet the team at Innovative Livestock Services and discuss their progressive beef program,’ Sam Said. ‘We first saw the scrapings from the feed yard, which are composted and used as fertiliser in their farming activities. We then moved onto the feed mill, where I could see corn being steam rolled, and then loaded with a weighing bucket used to mix feed, in 22 batches,’ Sam noted. ‘We were also able to inspect the cattle pens, which included custom fed cattle, company owned cattle, sustainability project cattle and cattle which are in a DNA testing trial.’ The K-State Legacy Bull Sale and Cattlemen’s Day was held in early March and Sam was given the opportunity to immerse herself in her first experience of an American Cattle Sale.

‘I experienced the same adrenaline rush and atmosphere on either side of the planet! I was even able to have a go at being ‘ringman’ for the cow portion of the sale which is similar to ‘spotting’ bids in Australia,’ said Sam. ‘I was so grateful for the learning opportunities that I have been offered and the incredible patience and understanding of the sales staff and buyers, especially as I spoke ‘Australian,’ Sam said of her experience. ‘There were certainly some notable differences between this sale, and the sales my colleagues at Elders conduct,’ she Said. ‘The main one being the auctioneer, Australian auctioneers will call the price they have, while American auctioneers will call the price they are looking for, there is certainly a different style and rhythm also.’ Sam is only half way through her Semex Kansas State University experience and has already experienced so much of the American Beef industry and the American Agricultural Industry and there is still plenty more on offer for her to learn from. To read more about Sam’s K-State adventures visit her blog ‘Sam in the States’ https://samanthaneumann5. wixsite.com/website Angus Bulletin — autumn 2018

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angus youth

2017 Trans Tasman Exchange recipient, Kate Schoen, 2018 Trans Tasman Exchange Recipient, Steph Frankham and Angus Youth Consultative Committee Member, James Knight

TRANS-TASMAN WILL OPEN NEW OPPORTUNITIES AND NETWORKS Candice Liddle, Events & Youth Development Officer

Steph Frankham from Toowoomba Queensland has been awarded the 2018 Trans-Tasman Exchange scholarship at the 2018 Thomas Foods International Angus Youth Roundup held in Wodonga, Victoria. Sponsored by New England Travel Centre and Angus Australia Foundation, the Trans-Tasman Exchange Scholarship provides a young beef cattle enthusiast with the chance to spend time in New Zealand and experience how other beef producers are operating in another country. Ms Frankham has a long relationship with the Angus Youth Roundup, having competed in her very first round up when she was 12 years old and going on to attend at least 10 Roundups. Her passion has continued on in the beef industry with Ms Frankham going on to be an Angus Youth Ambassador in 2011 and studying a Bachelor of production animal science at University of Queensland Gatton. She also spent some time working for Angus Australia as a Member Services Officer. Ms Frankham is currently studying a diploma of grain management and working as a Logistics and Quality Manger for Adams Australia Pty Ltd. When asked about her reasons motivating her to apply for the Trans-Tasman Exchange Ms Frankham noted that representing Angus Australia and being able to broaden her view on how producers are operating in New Zealand, was a major draw card in applying. ‘I am excited to be given the opportunity from Angus Australia and New England Travel Centre to Travel to New Zealand.,’ she Said ‘The opportunity to view a range of Angus beef operations in a different country is valuable to advancing my knowledge and skillset in the beef industry. PAge 70

Angus Bulletin — autumn 2018

‘I’m also interested in a range of different agricultural industries and advancing my networks with like-minded people in the beef industry that I can learn from while I’m on exchange,’ Ms Frankham added. Ms Frankham was recognised by Angus Youth Consultative Committee member, James Knight during her award presentation as ‘A commendable young woman who is certainly going places with her career’.

Trans Tasman Exchange Winner Steph Frankham 2018


Cargill sisters passionate about Angus cattle and beef industry Ruth Schwager, The Land

They’re the fourth generation to breed Angus cattle, but the Cargill sisters at “Billaglen”, Braidwood, NSW, have taken it a step further with their stud operation. Hannah, 18, Sophie, 16, and Zoe, 14, are passionate about the beef industry and the Angus breed. They’re all members of Angus Youth, and in the past eight years, with the help of their parents Ian and Noelene, they’ve built up their Billaglen stud to include about 75 breeders. “I found an interest in showing cattle and I had a deeper interest in the industry so we looked at registering the stud,” Hannah said. “We went to the Sydney Royal Show, and a couple of stud sales, to buy a few heifers. The Cargills started artificially inseminating to build numbers about four years ago, and they’ve also used embryo transfer to increase genetic diversity. “We’ve sold a few bulls privately to local clients. “The goal is to set up an on-farm sale, but at the moment we’re just building the herd, getting more breeders on the ground.” The Cargill family is focusing on a moderate- to largeframed carcase, with a focus on producing good quality commercial bulls to be used in weaner operations. “A lot of people in our area are focused on the weaner market so we’re producing bulls with good early growth to suit that market,” Hannah said. The stud is run alongside a commercial herd of about 500 breeders, as well as a 1200-head prime lamb enterprise.

Hannah said Angus cattle were suited to the climate, and temperament had played a big part in the girls’ involvement with the breed. “Angus cattle are generally quiet, easy to work with, and there are so many different opportunities within the Angus breed. “They’re good in crossbreeding or pure herds and there are many different market opportunities.” Being Angus Youth members has given the sisters access to workshops about everything from breeding to meat marketing – helpful tools in running the stud. “There are workshops on breeding programs and the use of technology like AI, meat marketing and market specifications, as well as where the breed can take you in the future, with university and a career,” Hannah said. “They give you an insight into all areas of the industry, from paddock to plate.” All three Cargill sisters attended the recent Angus Youth Roundup held at Wodonga, and they had plenty of success, with their 17-month-old bull Billaglen Man of War M5, exhibited by Hannah, being named champion bull of the show. Hannah was also a major award winner, receiving the EJ Angus Encouragement Award.

The Cargill sisters - Hannah, Sophie and Zoe - at the recent Angus Youth Roundup where Billaglen Man of War M5 won champion bull

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Robert Hall, Canyonleigh, joins around 1300 Angus females on six properties he manages. Photo by Emily Hall Photography.

Angus cattle are in demand Julia Wythes, The Land

Saleyards just love Angus cattle. And this is why Robert Hall is confident in the future of the breed, and that Angus offspring will always find a market. Mr Hall manages six properties in the Canyonleigh region of the Southern Highlands. He joins around 1300 Angus females on the 4580 hectares, which is owned by Filetron Ptd Ltd. He also runs around 1000 fine wool Merinos, which are joined with composite rams. Mr Hall has a lifelong interest in working with cattle, having also worked for studs and on cattle stations in the Northern Territory and Queensland. It seems his passion for Angus cattle is also hereditary, with his 15-year-old twin daughters Katelyn and Emily beginning their own Angus stud, KEM Angus. Mr Hall said his aim at the moment was to increase stocking rates since another property was bought towards the end of last year. Breeders are joined in November for a spring calving. Currently Mr Hall retains all heifers in order to build up numbers.

Meanwhile, steers are often sold at weaner sales around May. Mr Hall said he aims to sell his steers on AuctionsPlus. “You’ve got more control that way,” he said. “It’s just the end of the line in the saleyards.” Mr Hall also makes pasture and sorghum silage to feed stock, as well as planting oats and wheat forage crops for the winter. Mr Hall said it made sense to breed Angus cattle. “They are just good cattle,” he said. “They get the premium at all the sales, and the feedlots love them. “There are a lot of good breeds out there, and some really good cattle. But when the saleyards are telling you they are selling five to 10 cents better than others, you really can’t argue with that.”

50 ANGUS BULLS Annual Sale 1st August, 2018

305 Glenshiel Road, Llangothlin NSW 2365 Enquiries: E: seaforth3@bigpond.com P: 0427 250 102 Herb & Lucy Mackenzie

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Alison Napier, "Millbrook", St Marys, Tasmania, has set strategies in place to help handle seasonal changes. Photos by Hot Tin Roof Communications

Strategies help Alison Napier make it through the tough times Julia Wythes, Stock & Land

Alison Napier is a woman with a plan. And having set strategies in place has helped her endure some tough times. The Angus breeder, “Millbrook”, St Marys, Tasmania, is used to up to 1000 millimetres of rain annually on some parts of her 3000 hectares, which spans over three properties. In the last year, she has only received 370mm, and is in the grips of a very dry period. But thanks to her drought strategies, as well as a very level-headed approach, her Angus herd is thriving. Taking it all in her stride, she is determined to continue to improve the property and has long-term plans in place to increase the stock numbers. She currently runs about 1000 Angus breeders, and practises low-stress stock management. Bulls are sourced from Tasmanian Angus, with Mrs Napier is adamant about the kind of bulls she needs. “One of the key profit drivers in a beef breeding business is kilograms of beef weaned,” she said. “Therefore naturally one of our focuses is getting cows back in calf and calves on the ground.” The cooler climate - a relatively short growing period with long, cold winters – plays a part in bull selection. “It is important that our genetics can handle a hard winter and achieve our targets,” she said. “It is about getting a good balance of traits.” Cows are joined for eight weeks and heifers for six, with calving taking place in September. Heifers are retained to build the herd numbers, while steers are kept for 12 to 18 months and grown out on high quality pastures until they weigh around 450 kilograms. They are either sold to the local feedlot or into the premium meat market.

But the dry season has meant some changes to the running of the properties. “It is certainly giving our drought management strategy a good test,” Mrs Napier said. The strategy has included selling steers lighter than usual, having some cattle on agistment and hand feeding cattle remaining on farm, which is something Mrs Napier usually doesn’t do. “But it is working. The cattle are in good condition, the calves look good, and the pastures are in good condition,” she said. “We are managing the dry season really well.”

Angus steers are grown out on pasture at "Millbrook"

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Strong market for Angus heifers in China Kylie Nicholls, Stock & Land

Fifth-generation cattle producer Mick Mullane, Ballan, is reaping the rewards of a new market to China for his best purebred Angus heifers. During the past two years, Mr Mullane has sold more than 200 weaner heifers through Landmark International’s live export order to be used in Chinese breeding programs. “We sold a line of 70 heifers in October last year at $1,200 a head which was at least $300 above market prices at the time and we have a further 46 heifers heading off shortly,” Mr Mullane said. “Previously all our heifers would have gone into a special sale in February but this niche market has given us another option, it has been a great outlet for our heifers and very lucrative.” The heifers need to weigh a minimum of 250 kilograms and meet the live export order’s stringent health requirements. Mr Mullane and his wife Anne live on the 400-hectare home property, which has been in his family for more than 180 years, and own a further 1200ha in the district, as well as farms at Mt Wallace and Bungal. They also lease land locally. In partnership with his brother Colin, the Mullane family runs a purebred herd of 330 Angus cows. They also run 2500 first-cross ewes joined to Poll Dorset rams. Additional off-farm ventures include a fencing contract business, Premier Fencing, and hay baling. The Mullane family made a switch to Angus cattle more than 20 years ago to increase their marketing opportunities. Mr Mullane generally buys two to three registered Angus bulls annually, selecting them on temperament, soundness and frame size.

"I do try to choose a bull with low birthweight to join to heifers and for older cows I’ll select bulls on length and frame.” Temperament is also vital for Mr Mullane as he is often working alone with the cattle in the yards and paddocks. The main breeding herd calves in March and April, while a mob of 50 spring calvers are run on a separate leased property. The calves are yard-weaned at nine months of age, running in several small paddocks for a week to quieten them down before being split into two mobs of heifers and steers. The weaners are fed silage and hay throughout the summer prior to Landmark’s special sale in Ballarat in late February. The Mullane family has been selling weaners in the Ballarat sale since it started more than 40 years ago and still offer their steers and remaining heifers. Mr Mullane aims to sell the steers at 360kg to 410kg. “Last year, we sold more than 300 weaners and averaged more than $1,200 which was a great result, it wasn’t the same this year, with 47 of our steers, 364kg, making $1,150, but these are still good prices,” he said. Mr Mullane prefers to buy in his replacement heifers either pregnancy-tested-in-calf (PTIC) or as first or second calvers. “I think it takes too long if you keep your own heifers to breed from, I look for a large-framed heifer with plenty of milking ability and structure is also important.”

Mick Mullane, Ballan, with his Angus heifers destined for China as part of Landmark International’s latest live export order

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Malcolm Davies (right), with son Sam Davies and nephew Morgan Davies at the Mount Gambier sale in December

When times get tough, you can always sell Angus cattle Julia Wythes, Stock & Land

When the going gets tough, you can always sell Angus cattle. And Angus breeder Malcolm Davies feels this is not just because they are impressive cattle, it is also thanks to excellent marketing by Angus Australia. Mr Davies, Greenwald Pastoral Company, Foster, runs his Angus herd on two properties – 687 hectares at Foster, which is a family property, and another 1821ha at Dartmoor. And he aims each year to produce between 2100 and 2200 calves. Mr Davies runs his heifers at the Foster property, while running his second and third-time calvers at Dartmoor, where he has a manager to oversee production. He joins 400 heifers each year. “An autumn calving suits our operation,” he said. Mr Davies sells his steer calves as weaners, sending them through the store markets or feedlots. He sold 612 steer weaners at the Mount Gambier sale in December last year. The steers, which were an average weight of 310 kilograms, made $3.55 a kilogram or $1100 a head.

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Meanwhile, he said he directs some of his heifers through the Chinese market, depending on price, at the age of about eight months. Otherwise his cull heifers are sold through Coles at 18 months of age. Mr Davies has been enjoying a fantastic season in his 40inch average rainfall region. “The clover and grasses have been magnificent,” he said. And thanks to the excellent season, he hasn’t had to supplement his cows’ feed throughout the winter. Mr Davies said the quality marketing campaign by Angus Australia had really helped the already renowned breed succeed. “It was a very sensible and good campaign,” he said. “When the going gets tough, you can still sell Angus. “There is always a market for them.”

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Angus Bulletin — autumn 2018

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Manjimup cattle producer Lyndsay Phillips is one of three generations working the 900 strong herd of cattle at Kanangra Grazing where the focus is all about quality of breeding

A family affair at Kanangra Grazing Courtney Walsh, Farm Weekly

Kanangra Grazing is one of the cattle powerhouses of Western Australia’s South West. The family behind the 900-strong herd of top notch quality breeding Angus and Santa Gertrudis cattle is the Phillips family, with three generations currently working the Manjimup-based farm. After moving to Manjimup from Pemberton in 1970, Mal’s dream was to have a herd of 1000 cattle so he and his dad Bill went to work building on the direction of the cattle operation from the initial small herd. Now Mal’s daughter Lyndsay is home on the farm too, and the focus of the business is very clearly on quality of breeding at Kanangra. “Early on we used to have all first-cross cows but they were difficult to look after in this country, so we bought in a few stud Angus cattle from a dispersal and that’s where we started from really.” More quality lines of females were sourced and it was going to the effort of sourcing quality stud genetics to build the backbone of their breeding herd that has gone on to put the reputation of the yearly drop of Kanangra calves in good stead. “Almost 100 per cent of the heifer calves we sell each year at the weaner sales are bought for future breeding,” Mal said. “There are a lot of excellent Angus studs in WA – it’s easy to find a really quality bull.” So what do they look for in a bull? Bill said it must pass the visual inspection first. Mal and Lyndsay both agreed and mentioned temperament as another important factor to gauge. “But he’s also got to be thick, soft, fleshy with a good head ,” Mal said. PAge 76

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“We we prefer a frame score around the six to six and a half mark". “Out in this country, having huge framed cattle doesn’t work well in dry years like this one. “It’s easier to keep a medium framed cow in condition and get her back into calf in a tough year, whereas a bigger cow struggles.” When it comes to EBVs, high growth for the 200 and 400-day weight traits as well as a good milk score around 15+ are the more important figures the family keeps an eye on, along with eye muscle, intramuscular fat and carcase Weight. “But the carcase traits aren’t really the things we’re rewarded on at the moment,” Mal said. “Over east, butchers pay on marbling, intramuscular fat and things like that but here they don’t really so we chose to focus more on growth.” Lyndsay said follow through after selecting the right bull was important too. “When we’re selecting replacement heifers obviously temperament, structure and fertility are things we look at, but keeping an eye on the bloodline and which bull they’ve come from is really important,” she said. “We probably focus on that even more than the EBVs because we’ve already looked at those figures closely when we buy the bulls in, so we basically just try to keep the heifer progeny from the best bulls we’ve got.” The calves start hitting the ground in March and though the majority of the calves are purebred Angus, there are always some purebred Santas as well as some very glossy Santa Gertrudis-Angus cross Calves.


And while the marketability of the Angus breed is a nobrainer, the Santa Gertrudis-Angus different marketing option, performing particularly well at the saleyards. “The Santa Angus cross calves look fantastic and sell really well, because they are nice, shiny and soft,” Mal said. The Santa Gertrudis- Angus cross calves are the result of the backup portion of the joining program at Kanangra, where the Angus bulls get first go at the breeders and the Santas go in as a backup later in the season. It means there are a few different lines of breed types when the weaners are ready at 9-10 months of age, but the quality of those lines is never in question, evidenced by the strong breeder demand for the Kanangra heifer drop as mentioned earlier. Sometimes the family offers PTIC heifers, but didn’t in 2017 in order to stock a new property, and the steers are usually bought by feeders and backgrounders. Mal believes the property is stocked on par with the district average at about one cow per 1.2 hectares. The family doesn’t crop at all except for the occasional paddock locked up for silage, and relies on a contract with a local hay producer to feed the cattle throughout the year. “We’ve chosen not to produce hay in favour of running more stock basically,” they said.

The Phillips family plans to just keep on blazing ahead, business as usual with their breeding herd going forward, working on continually pumping in quality bloodlines and pumping out quality calves.

The 2017 drop of Angus and Santa Gertrudis-Angus calves have grown out nicely at Kanangra

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Breeding winning cows Casey Treloar, Fairfax Media

Strong bloodlines, selling young cows, favourable conditions and happy return buyers has resulted in Paul and Karen Bryson’s, Keppoch, South Australia, Angus cows and steers achieving strong prices with the start of the sale season. For the third year in a row, the Byrson’s pregnancytested-in-calf cows have won the blue ribbon for best presented pen of PTIC cows at the Naracoorte Angus feature female sale on December 14. The 19 2014-drop, EU-accredited, Stoney Point-blood females were joined to Coolana bulls and due to calve from early February, reached the top price at the sale for PTIC cows at $2320. “It’s always nice to receive those accolades (as) it just gives you a bit of recognition that you’re on the right track,” Mr Bryson said. “And it’s judged by your peers, so that’s always a good pat on the back.” Mr Bryson’s 2013-drop females were also keenly soughtafter, making between $1900 and $2000. Mr Bryson said he only started selling cows at the Naracoorte Angus feature female sale in 2015 as a way to turn over surplus stock. It was that year 51 Coolana-blood females over four pens sold to a $1160 high, averaging $1144, and also won Mr Bryson his first blue ribbon pen of PTIC cows. With a more positive season and stronger livestock prices in 2016, the Bryson’s second blue ribbon pen also claimed the $2360 top price for the mature females at the feature sale. Mr Bryson’s livestock agent Robin Steen, from Pinkerton Palm Hamlyn and Steen, said Bryson’s cows were always attractive to buyers because they were young in-calf cows about five years of age.

Paul Bryson and son James with their winning blue ribbon pen for the best presented PTIC cows

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“He’s always got them in very good condition so they sell very well because of their age, so he’s on a winner,” Mr Steen said. Mr Bryson said he kept all his heifers to calve down as 2-year-olds to then sell them as PTIC 5-year-olds because it created a younger and better breeding selection by making the most of the youngest gene pool. “It’s about better bred cattle, so rather than hanging onto your old cows until they’re no longer useful, your genetics is getting better,” he said. Mr Bryson also saw selling success at the first Naracoorte weaner sale of the season in December, where he sold Angus steers to a top of $1370 with an average of $1221, with average weights of 350 kilograms for the 9 - to 10-month-old steers. Mr Bryson said the solid prices for the start of the weaner season contributed to average weights being up by up to 50 kilograms per steer on previous years. He credits the extra weight on the steers to a good season seen during winter and spring. Paul Bryson and son James with their winning blue ribbon pen in 2016 for the best presented PTIC cows. “It’s good to have a couple of good seasons, because that makes growing the livestock a lot easier by having better pastures and better quality of stock,” he said. Mr Bryson said he also enjoyed feedback from return buyers who continued to be happy with his steers and cows.


A group of the Bryson’s 2 year old maiden cows

“I’ve noticed in past few years buyers kept coming back because they know the stock do well,” he said. Mr Bryson runs about 1000 Angus cattle at Keppoch in the South East with his father Clive and wife Karen, while working alongside Robert Gailbrath, and looks forward to seeing his sons take on the farm as fourth generation farmers. Buying bulls from reknowned Angus breeders Stoney Point and Coolana has resulted in strong bloodlines helping with the quality of stock.

Mr Bryson said he purchased bulls with low birth-weight figures and noticed the improved growth rates from the consistency of the bulls in his breeding program. “They’re (the bulls) all pretty even, which is good because there’s not a lot of variation in the calves,” Mr Bryson said. He said when choosing bulls, he focused low birthweight for easy calving. “I calve down about 300 maidens each year and don’t have a problem calving them down with the low birthweight bulls,” he said.

150 BULLS MADE OF

TOUGH STUFF!

2018 ANNUAL ON PROPERTY SALE

FRIDAY 3rd AUGUST 2018

Hugh & Hazel: (02) 6729 9067 Brett & Kim: 0427 438 318

E: angus@clunie.com.au

www.clunie.com.au

Angus Bulletin — autumn 2018

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marketing

Rebrand VS brand refresh Ebonie Sadler-Small, Graphics & Multimedia Officer

In the Summer 2018 Bulletin we broke down branding concepts, and what makes your brand noteworthy. You might now be considering whether your brand is working as hard as you are, which brings us to the idea of a rebrand or brand refresh. Have you ever looked at your work boots and thought about whether it was time to buy new ones, fix them or just deal with them for a little longer? Well your brand should be considered in the same way. We recently had an Angus producer discuss his need for a new brand but not wanting to give up the familiarity and recognition that his stud already had, which is where we suggested a brand refresh. A brand refresh is essentially a renovation, you keep the bones – be it your name, colours or logo – but you reimagine the look and feel of it. One way is to update but keep a visual connection. In this case you could rework your logo instead of remake from scratch, like updating your logotype to a more modern font or simplifying a complex logomark to fit in with a more modern audience. You can then base your new or updated design elements from that. A rebrand is an opportunity to start from scratch and build your image again. This could be because of many reasons, for example, your business has outgrown its identity or there has been a fundamental change in your business. It involves redesigning the brand name, logo and visual elements, and anything that flows on from this. Basically, if you are changing the name or logo significantly it is a rebrand, but if you are changing anything else it is a brand refresh. When considering either a rebrand or brand refresh it is important to consider the impacts of both and do your research into what will suit you the best. This is the representation of you, so you want to be displaying your best self.

Different types of logos

There are many different types of logos, but here is a basic breakdown of the 3 main types: Logotype – These are stylised logos that spell out a company name. More often than not a larger organisation that utilises a logo like this will have a font created for use in their branding based off their logotype. Examples include Facebook, Google and Nestle. Logomark – Simple but dynamic, these are designed to be instantly recognisable. When utilising this type of logo, many businesses have alternative versions that incorporate the company name. Examples include Apple, Target and Nike. Combination mark – Incorporating both a symbol or icon and the company name, these logos – if well designed – can be separated for different applications or used as a whole. This is an ideal choice for new businesses. Examples include Microsoft, Reebok and Hallmark. When designing or reworking a logo, bear in mind that your logo is not your brand, but a design element that is a part of your overall brand.

Logotype example

Logomark example

Combination mark example

Example of a logo being reworked as part of a brand refresh Concepts

Original Logo

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New Logo


marketing

Welcome to the Web

Ebonie Sadler-Small, Graphics & Multimedia Officer Are you online? With 88% of Australians being active internet users in 2018, you could be missing out on significant marketing opportunities if you aren’t. These days we all want quick snippets of information - What is Joe Blow from the example stud’s phone number? Google and it will come up with the stud contact page, usually. It is still excellent to have a word-of-mouth reputation but people need to be able to actively engage with you in their own time without the pressure of a faceto-face interaction. This is where your website or social media channels come in to tell them who you are and what you do. We highly suggest looking around at different websites to gauge what you think works and what doesn’t, while gauging the user experience and ease of use. If you are on the fence of whether to outsource the production of your website or to do it yourself, it is an excellent opportunity to gauge what level of professionalism you will be able to achieve from both options.

Is DIY a good idea?

Well, first let me ask, do you have the time or interest in learning a new computer program? Building your own website gives you full control of all the content going online and it gives you the freedom to update information at any time of day. But it does mean that when you are in full control of your content you don’t necessarily have an objective second set of eyes looking at it from a marketing point of view. Websites are also very time consuming and frustrating when you don’t understand something or things just go wrong. Outsourcing is very much like turning the washing machine on and doing another job, everything happens the way you’ve described you wanted it, even if you don’t fully understand what you’ve asked for, and it gets done in the background of your everyday life. A big thing to consider is whether you want to be in control of your website once it has been made, or if you are happy to send content and changes to the web designer and they are in turn responsible. Both have their positives and negatives so it is worth looking into, and cross checking against your time limitations and technical ability or willingness to learn. For a website that is built and handed over to you, you should definitely look into sitting down with the designer and learning the basics – specifically, which parts you need to touch – so that you don’t accidently delete something or post something that you shouldn’t. For websites that you outsource to create and manage, it can be a very mess-free solution as they take care of ‘break downs’ and provide professional guidance. The major downside would be that you need to fit in with their life and clients, meaning you may have slight delays in content uploads.

The very basic Do’s & Don’t’s

In saying the above, there are some things to consider from the idea generation stage. By no means is this a definitive list, think of it as some helpful pointers to get your thoughts rolling. • Hierarchy is important and creates visual relief for the viewer • Clean and simple – This cannot be stressed enough, there is no need to over complicate things • Legibility – consider easy to read fonts and sizing • Images – Images need to be good quality, as they can improve the look of the website instantly • Relevant info – being concise is gold. People can call you if they want more information • Contact info – should be easy to find but as with anything, should not be overwhelming in detail • Images of family or staff – having images of staff / your family can help create a sense of familiarity and gives a sense of empathy to the viewer • Balance – between information, branding / design elements and breathing room • Web copy – Do take the time to triple check any wording going on your website, and it is always a good idea to have a second (minimum) set of eyes have a look. If you feel like writing the copy isn’t your thing, don’t hesitate to outsource it. Designing a website is very much a case of how long is a piece of string, as it will never be ‘finished’ and given the nature of a website it never should be. It should be a point of interest for people that evolves with the business, communicates new and important information, and probably most importantly, up to date contact and location information.

Tell people who you are and what you do Ensure legibility

Consise information

Example Angus Est 2018 Triple check content

2018 Bull Sale - 18th of November 2018

75 Bulls

Have quality images Have a heirarchy

Make navigation easy

Angus Bulletin — autumn 2018

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Looking for a design that stands out? Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve got you covered. From sale catalogue design to complete rebrands, we can help you.

Graphic Design by Angus Australia

Ebonie Sadler-Small | 0428 518 880 | design@angusaustralia.com.au

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Peter Parnell

Ron Bower - Part time

Chief Executive Officer M: 0428 918 632 P: 02 6773 4605 E: peter@angusaustralia.com.au

Human Resource Manager P: 6773 4607 E: ron@angusaustralia.com.au

Angus Bulletin â&#x20AC;&#x201D; autumn 2018

Human Resources

Chief Executive Officer

angus australia staff directory


Marketing, Communications & Youth

Finance & Administration

angus australia staff directory David Cameron

Joy Howe

Administration Manager - Accountant P: 02 6773 4624 E: david.cameron@angusaustralia.com.au

Accounts Officer P: 02 6773 4612 E: joy.howe@angusaustralia.com.au

Sue Webeck

Amanda Wolfe

Accounts Officer - Part time P: 02 6773 4606 E: sue@angusaustralia.com.au

Administration Officer P: 02 6773 4600 E: amanda@angusaustralia.com.au

Diana Wood

Robyn Brazier

Marketing & Communications Manager P: 02 6773 4601 M: 0411 242 001

Marketing Assistant - Part time P: 02 6773 4609 E: marketing@angusaustralia.com.au

E: marketingmanager@angusaustralia.com.au

Candice Liddle

Ebonie Sadler-Small

Events & Youth Development Officer P: 02 6773 4622 M: 0437 873 220 E: youth@angusaustralia.com.au

Graphics & Multimedia Officer M: 0428 518 880 E: design@angusaustralia.com.au

Christopher de Crespigny

Michael Ainsworth

Information Systems Manager P: 02 6773 4619 E: christopher@angusaustralia.com.au

Computer Programmer P: 02 6773 4610 E: michael@angusaustralia.com.au

Software Development

Mark Evered Computer Programmer P: 02 6773 4610 E: mark.evered@angusaustralia.com.au

Angus Bulletin â&#x20AC;&#x201D; autumn 2018

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Breed Development & Extension

Strategic Projects

angus australia staff directory Christian Duff

Nick Butcher

Strategic Projects Manager P: 02 6773 4620 M: 0457 457 141 E: christian@angusaustralia.com.au

Project Officer, ASBP M: 0427 701 236 E: nick@angusaustralia.com.au

Andrew Byrne Breed Development & Extension Manager P: 02 6773 4618 M: 0418 412 042 E: andrew@angusaustralia.com.au

Member Services

Commercial Supply Chain

Liz Pearson Commercial Supply Chain Manager P: 02 6773 4608 M: 0488 758 360 E: liz.pearson@angusaustralia.com.au

Michael Beattie

Nicky Carey

Member Services Manager P: 02 6773 4604 E: michael.beattie@angusaustralia.com.au

Member Services Officer P: 02 6773 4616 E: nicky.carey@angusaustralia.com.au

Ally Van Duijnhoven

Samantha Hamilton

Member Services Officer P: 02 6773 4611 E: ally@angusaustralia.com.au

Senior Member Services Officer P: 02 6773 4613 E: sam@angusuaustralia.com.au

Robyn Kelly

Lou Wood

Member Services Officer P: 02 6773 4615 E: robyn@angusaustralia.com.au

Member Services Officer - Part time P: 02 6773 4617 E: office@angusuaustralia.com.au

Angus Australia Locked Bag 11, Armidale NSW 2350 P: 02 6773 4600â&#x20AC;&#x201D;| F: 02 6772 PAge 84 Angus Bulletin autumn 2018 3095 | E: office@angusaustralia.com.au Website: www.angusaustralia.com.au


Outwest Angus 6th ON PROPERTY

SALE

AYRVALE BARTEL E7

THURSDAY

Feature sire - 12 sons sell 31st May • One of the highest proven sires currently available. • Standout carcase sire in Cohort 2 of the Angus Sire Benchmarking Program, proving to be one of the most balanced Angus sires • Ranked #1 sire of Cohort 2 for MSA Marble Score and MSA Index. • Ranks in the top 1% for all Indexes • A proven calving ease sire, who is a trait leader for CE Dir, CE Dtr, BW, Milk, Days to calving, CWT & IMF EBV’s

2018

50 BULLS & 20 Sons in the sale by Outwest TB Jericho J216 HEIFERS

‘Wombalano’ Coonamble NSW 2829

The Cattleman’s Choice

Ewen & Marg McLeish Ph: 02 6824 2044 Mob: 0428 242 044 E: outwestangus@bigpond.com Outwest Angus W: www.outwestangus.com.au

Matt Prentice: 0437 036 691 Ricky Looten: 0429 013 123 Brian Kennedy: 0427 844 047 Paul Jameson: 0428 667 998

2018 Angus Autumn Bulletin  
2018 Angus Autumn Bulletin