Page 1

Vancouver Island

Fishing Regulations page 40-46 Fish Stocking page 50

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2019

8th Edition

Prospect Lake Smallmouth Kanin proudly showing off his impressive catch!

+

Chinook Reg’s Update MyCatch Research Update for 2019

WINNER

Owen Kassinen

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CANADA’S FISHING STORE For days like today TM

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Whether you love fishing a mountain lake, a coastal river or the ocean waters off the wild west coast, Canadian Tire carries fishing gear for all of these experiences. Photo by Angler’s Atlas member Macfly

WE DO UGLY Ugly Rod & Reel combos, from casting to spinning to trolling we have you covered.

LOOKING FOR A FLASHER? We got them. Hot Spot, Coyote, Matzuo, Oki,Gibbs and more.

Go to canadiantire.ca to view all product listings. Photo by Angler’s Atlas member dadam_t

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TACKLE BOXES FISHING APPAREL & ACCESSORIES RODS, REELS & STORAGE FLY FISHING KID’S FISHING SUPPLIES LIFE JACKETS

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VANCOUVER ISLAND STORES Campbell River 1444 Island Hwy Campbell River, BC 250-286-0188

Duncan 2929 Green Rd Duncan, BC 250-748-0161

North Saanich 10300 McDonald Park Rd Sidney, BC 778-746-4120

Port Alberni 3550 Johnston Rd Port Alberni, BC 250-720-0085

Victoria - Hillside 1610 Hillside Ave Victoria, BC 250-361-3152

Victoria - Royal Oak 801 Royal Oak Dr Victoria, BC 250-727-6561

Courtenay 2801 Cliffe Ave Courtenay, BC 250-338-0101

Nanaimo 4585 Uplands Dr Nanaimo, BC 250-585-8045

Parksville 822 Island Hwy W Parksville, BC 250-248-1085

Victoria - Cedar Hill 3993 Cedar Hill Rd Victoria, BC 250-721-1125

Victoria - Langford 855 Langford Pkwy Victoria, BC 250-474-2291

Victoria - View Royal 1519 Admirals Rd Victoria, BC 250-381-3111


CONTENTS W

IN

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ON THE COVER! Kanin Kassinen, age 7, caught this smallmouth bass one sunny June day on Prospect lake. Picture submitted by Okassinen

Vancouver Island KEY MAP

FEATURES

34

Fishing Around Campbell River Check out our new and improved Campbell River page for some juicy new tips courtesy of Tyee Marine.

40

Regulations

48

Fishing BC Members

50

Regional Fish Stocking Tables

page

32

The Freshwater Fishing Regulations for Region One, Vancouver Island and Haida Gwaii, beginning on page 40.

If you’re looking for a resort, fishing lodge or a guide, check out the listings on pages 48-49.

Freshwater Fisheries Society Stocking tables for Region One.

OCEAN FISHING From Tahsis to Sooke and up the eastern shore, we’ve got your ocean bases covered.

Vancouver Island has lakes and rivers that are home to rainbow trout, cutthroat trout, kokanee, brown trout and even smallmouth bass.


V

ancouver Island is located in the southwest corner of British Columbia, part of a temperate rain forest that hugs the Pacific coast. The Island is known for fabulous fishing, both saltwater and freshwater.

kokanee, brown trout and even smallmouth bass. In this guide, we have featured several types of lakes and one river (Cowichan). Many of these lakes are stocked with rainbow trout and cutthroat trout as part of a proOn the freshwater side, the vincial stocking program Island has lakes and rivers operated by the Freshwater that are home to rainbow Fisheries Society of B.C. trout, cutthroat Many of the region’s best t r o u t , fishing lakes are a little out of the way. Wolf Lake, northwest of Courtney, and both Nahmint and Great Central Lake, past Port Alberni, are all well worth traveling for. Still, don’t rule out the lakes closest to home! Quennel, Elk and Beaver, and Cameron Lakes are all easily accessible, and offer some of the best fishing for bass, brown trout, and much more.

portunities for prawning. We have featured four famous West Coast fisheries in the guide this year. They include Barkley Sound, the area around Nootka Island (including Esperanza Inlet), Campbell River and Sooke. The guide provides a taste of the fishing opportunities on the Island, but for more detailed maps for downloading and many other fishing hot spots visit our website at AnglersAtlas.com FEATURING IN 2019

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e’ve included an updated listing of resorts and guides, covering both saltwater and freshwater opportunities. Lake maps show detailed access information, including roads and boat launches. As well, we again feature the freshwater fishing regulations for Vancouver Island region. The guide also includes all of the current fish stocking data for the lakes in the region, courtesy of the Freshwater Fisheries Society of BC.

For saltwater, the Island is famous for its salmon fishery. Halibut and ling cod fisheries are also important, and there are plenty of o p - Also included are two updates on saltwater fishing regulations — one for Chinook on page 47, and another for Rockfish on page 36.

PUBLISHER Sean Simmons PRODUCTION Jane Gauthier, Fraser Hayes, Jamie Svendsen CONTRIBUTORS Bruce Bolton, Jon Bond, Ward Bond, drewbags, Lorna Duncan, John Falavolito, Robin Fearn, Shane Hagen, Tory Howe, Al Kennedy, Marcus Kennett, Richard Kennett, Roger Kirk, Sam LaForge, Jesse Legg, Courtney Ogilvie, Richard Powell DIGITAL + DESIGN Joel Knudsen, Clayton Green, Eric Pinfold, Jamie Svendsen ADVERTISING Interested in advertising? Get in touch with us and we will develop an integrated program suited to your needs. Angler’s Atlas is owned by Goldstream Publishing Inc. Suite 210-500 Victoria St. Prince George, BC V2L 2J9 (250) 596-6277 mail@anglersatlas.com www.AnglersAtlas.com

VANCOUVER ISLAND FISHING 2019 8TH EDITION


A fisheries monitoring program

Built By Anglers In 2018 we launched MyCatch, an ambitious project where anglers can play an active role in fisheries research. A major challenge faced by biologists and researchers is the cost of collecting fisheries data. By working with an-

glers, we are able to generate new data for thousands of lakes and streams that currently go unmonitored and are at conservation risk. The map below shows waterbodies that were surveyed by anglers in 2018.

• Over 2,500 waterbodies surveyed • Anglers reported over 10,000 trips • Six ongoing research projects

Secret spots stay secret Zeroes matter * See catch rates and compare

Sign up today and help with fisheries research in Canada! AnglersAtlas.com/mycatch

* Remember that not catching anything is important data, so please report zero catches!


MyCatch Research Below are some research projects we are currently working on. If any of these projects interest you, visit our research page and learn more.

AnglersAtlas.com/research Using MyCatch to engage anglers and research movement patterns related to the spread of Whirling Disease Led by Dr. Mark Poesch, Assistant Professor, University of Alberta. This research is sponsored by Alberta Environment and Parks.

Using citizen science to enhance fisheries data collection and monitoring

Led by Dr. Fiona Johnston, lead researcher at Angler’s Atlas. This research is sponsored by Angler’s Atlas and the Alberta Conservation Association.

Tracking the movement of thousands of fish throughout the Rideau waterway

Led by PhD candidate Jordanna Bergman, Department of Biology, Carleton University. This research is funded from National Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada.

Spatial ecology of Arctic grayling in the Parsnip area

Led by Dr. Eduardo Martins, Assistant Professor, Conservation Science and Practice, University of Northern BC. This research is sponsored by BC Hydro’s Fish and Wildlife Compensation Program.


Antler Lake 20 Hectares (49 Acres)

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10.4 metres (30 feet)

152 metres (499 feet)

retty little Antler Lake, while not that deep or large, supports a thriving fishery. This popular spot just north of Gold River works well for a quick evening troll or a weekend getaway. As well as fishing, the lake offers beautiful natural landscapes and the opportunity to view wildlife such as bears, cougars, and deer. Be sure to pack the camera!

Lake is in the spring. Early fall is productive too, as the fish intensify

Antler Lake offers abundant habitat in the form of shoals and aquatic plants, particularly at the southeast end at Yellow Pond, an ideal location to start your search.

For those casting or trolling flies on Antler Lake, there are a number of reliable patterns to have on hand. Leeches are always promising. Damsel and dragonfly nymph patterns work well for

Richard Powell, avid local angler, notes that there is a sunken boat just after the first picnic spot. Keep your eyes peeled for that. Both cutthroat and rainbow trout are present in Antler Lake; the cutthroat are native, and the catchable-sized rainbows are stocked. [Check out the stocking tables included in this guide!] A creek at the opposite end of the lake empties into the Gold River. Coho can be seen spawning in the creek in the fall, and there are always Cutthroat Trout in the creek— check the top end, where you will also find pleasant little beaver ponds.

their activity and feeding. All sorts of lures work well here, and your best bet is to stock your standards, though at times the cutthroat will prefer larger lures or Flatfish. Kwikfish or small spoons are good bets as well.

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mid-summer. Caddisflies and sedges are also good mid-season patterns. Later in the season, egg patterns can work wonders. General searching fly patterns, such as Woolly Buggers, Careys, Halfbacks and the Spratleys imitate a range of food sources for rainbow and cutthroat trout. They make excellent attractors any time of the year. The flies can be trolled with a full-sink line close to the bottom.

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LAKE ACCESS

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ntler Lake is located 3 km north of Gold River off the Gold River Main Rd. (also known as East Rd. and Hwy. 28). Turn right at the fork in the road before the bridge. There is a cartop boat launch beside the lake and a picnic site. Power boats are not allowed. Camping is available at Muchalet Lake, about 8 km further up the road towards Woss, or at the Peppercorn RV Park in Gold River. A third camping site is a 400 metre hike to access the lake, so any boat must be carried that far. 4x4s are also recommended to ease access.

The best time to fish Antler

Caution: Do not use this map for navigational purposes. This map may not reflect current conditions. Uncharted hazards may exist. Base Map ŠProvince of British Columbia.

Vancouver Island 2019

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Atluck Lake 308 Hectares (762 Acres)

77.4 metres (254 feet)

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here’s a reason our license plates say “Beautiful British Columbia”, and Atluck Lake, south of Port McNeill on Vancouver Island, is a prime example of this pristine natural landscape.

137 metres (450 feet)

May 1971

Feet

vast lake, and be sure to use LAKE ACCESS caution in small boats! tluck Lake is located Atluck Lake flows into about 50 km south of Port Nimpkish Lake to the north. McNeill. Head down Hwy. 19 Nimpkish Lake attracts people for about 42 km. Turn onto for all types of fun, from wind- Atluck Road and follow this surfing on the wilder southern for about 14 km to the rec site end, and fishing and hiking in at the north end of the lake. the calmer north end. For cut- The rec site has pit toilets throat and rainbow trout, head and a boat launch. During the to nearby Mukwilla Lake, week, be wary of active log48 kilometres south of Port ging trucks in the area. McNeil.

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Atluck Lake is long and deep with a complex underwater structure. At the southern end of the lake, islands abound. Take your family there to investigate a network of trails and caves, fit for exploring If you’re looking for specand adventuring. tacular cutthroat trout, hit up The lake has a healthy stock of Tskio Lake, where fish of up rainbow trout, cutthroat, and to 40 cm are not uncommon! dolly varden that keep this As well, Wolf Lake abounds a little slice of heaven for with cutthroat, and is just a anglers. The best fishing is in hop, skip, and jump away from late spring, and early to mid Atluck— a nice little day trip if you want a change of scenautumn. Atluck Lake is somewhat of ery. a secret, and the fish can be quite easily enticed by plugs, spoons, or spinners. Troll out from the boat launch and through the dropoff areas. Some of the best structure is around the islands nearer the south side. Be wary of sudden winds whipping round the narrower parts of the

Caution: Do not use this map for navigational purposes. This map may not reflect current conditions. Uncharted hazards may exist. Base Map ©Province of British Columbia.

FISH

AnglersAtlas.com/research

TAGGING PROJECTS Vancouver Island 2019

Page 10

and help

Fisheries Research in Canada

photo from Cooke Lab, Carleton University, Ottawa

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Beavertail Lake 103 Hectares (255 Acres)

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eavertail Lake is a popular fishing and camping destination in the Campbell River area. Several species of fish inhabit the lake, making it a perfect choice for novice anglers or for those who just want to head out and cast a line. In 2018, Beavertail was stocked with 1,500 rainbow trout.

26 metres (85 feet)

270 metres (886 feet)

modest 20 minute drive from downtown Campbell River, Beavertail offers anglers the opportunity to try just about every method in their repertoire to land a respectable trout.

Your best success will be with the tried and true split shot hook and worm, though for a more exciting day, small spinners and spoons will work. Try Local Sam LaForge has this to bright reds and pinks. Blues and greens also turn some success in say about Beavertail Lake: certain conditions. For the fly Like so many of the pocket fisherman the sky is the limit. No lakes in the northern region of Beautiful Vancouver Island, Beavertail is a wonderful place to fish away a weekend or muchdeserved day off. Located

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need to break out a shooting head line as you’ll find plenty of fish close to shore. In early spring the hatches are plentiful so dry fly casting works quite well. In the colder months the sinking tip line with your choice of Muddlers, Leeches even Chironomids should yield a hit or two. The banks are treed but if you look around you can find a few small beaches to try your luck.

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LAKE ACCESS

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rive west of Campbell River on Hwy. 28 (Gold River Hwy.) for 16 km. At Camp 8 (the Timberwest marshalling yard and offices), turn right (west) onto the Elk River Mainline, an all-season, gravel logging road. Drive for six km until the lake comes into view on the north side of the road. The boat launch is directly off the Elk River Mainline pullout This is a manmade lake, so pic- on the south side of the lake. ture a forest under water. Be 4WD is absolutely necessary wary of stumps and logs and to get to the lake. other hidden things that wait to gather up your gear by the eavertail Lake has a boat bushel! launch and two rustic camping areas. One of these camp areas is located at the pullout off the Elk River Mainline at the south side of the lake, the other is off the spur road at the west side of the lake. Please note that there are no amenities at these sites.

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Caution: Do not use this map for navigational purposes. This map may not reflect current conditions. Uncharted hazards may exist. Base Map ŠProvince of British Columbia.

Vancouver Island 2019

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Cameron Lake 477 Hectares (1,179 Acres)

43 metres (141 feet)

186 metres (610 feet)

July 1951

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ot a remote lake, Cameron Lake is located within driving distance of most mid-Island centres. Despite a generally beautiful and warm summer, this lake remains cold, and the fish remain active throughout the warm weather. Fishing is great all year round, with the trophy sized fish being caught after the kokanee spawn of late fall. Courtney Ogilvie, owner of Nile Creek Fly Shop boasts about the size and abundance of the is between 3-5 lbs, trophy sized brown trout living in the lake. fish have been known to come Although, the average brown trout out of Cameron Lake. Along with kokanee and cutthroat trout, this waterbody is loaded for any angler.

R0011231900

250-757-2095 www.nilecreekflyshop.com 6590 West Island Hwy, Bowser BC

During the summer, fish tend to be hiding along the south side of the lake, close to the camping areas of McMillian Provincial Park. Although not particularly deep, there are many channels with cool water that house many fish. Brown trout in particular are night-feeders, meaning late evening or at night is when the lake is most active. Try using a large coloured minnow pattern in the 4-6” range. Reds and burgundies are known to have some success, however the fish are fairly open to most colours. If you’re a fly fisher,

Dark Bunny leeches or dragonfly patterns work well. Ogilvie explains that some local anglers swear by a trolling plug and large wedding band set-up for brown trout. Courtney Ogilvie is extremely knowledgeable about Cameron Lake and many others in the area. He is a great resource to be utilized! Contact him (250) 7572095, or stop in at Nile Creek Fly Shop in Bowser, BC. LAKE ACCESS

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ameron Lake is located east of Port Alberni along Highway 4. From Port Alberni, head east along Highway 4 for about 26 kilometres.

Provincial Park has campsites and amenities. Cameron Lake Lodge is a private campground on Cameron Lake offering camping and a boat launch. Boaters need to be aware that the lake is subject to sudden strong gusts of wind. Anglers with smaller boats need to take appropriate precautions when venturing into Cameron Lake. There are great opportunities for swimming and sailing on Cameron Lake, and nearby hiking trails are an excellent way to explore the area. McMillan Provincial Park with its spectacular old-growth forest, and Little Qualicum Falls are other prime attractions here.

Several camping and accommodation options exist around Cameron Lake. Little Qualicum Falls

250-757-2095 www.nilecreekflyshop.com 6590 West Island Hwy, Bowser BC Vancouver Island 2019

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Caution: Do not use this map for navigational purposes. This map may not reflect current conditions. Uncharted hazards may exist. Base Map ©Province of British Columbia.

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Comox Lake 1,998 Hectares (4,936 Acres)

109.1 metres (358 feet)

134 metres (440 feet)

August 1951

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upcoming events, or if you want to add your own fishing tips, check out our lake page for Comox Lake at anglersatlas.com LAKE ACCESS

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comes out the end of May, but you want to fish this pattern just before the big hatch happens.

These plugs are used to represent kokanee, often with orange on the bellies. Spoons also work well.

“Some of the lakes just get covered in ants, so you really want to fish them before the real hatch, and then after. Otherwise you are just throwing a fly in there with ten million more.”

ovember is the best month for fishing Comox Lake,” says local trout specialist, Bruce Bolton. The most popular lure is a Tomic plug.

In the summer months a lot of anglers use Flatfish and run Rooster Tails, says Bolton. Spin casting with Panther Martins andCrokodiles is also popular. Small Tomic plugs, Flatfish and Rapalas are popular trolling lures in the lake. In the summer, fly fishing can be very productive in “The Stump” area, where the Puntledge River runs into the lake. “It’s quite shallow and just full of stumps...a really good place to work a fly.” Some of the key hatches are chironomids and ants. “The ant hatch

rom Cumberland, follow Dunsmuir Ave. west to Sutton Rd., then turn left. About 200 metres later turn right onto Comox Lake Road and follow it about four km to the Cumberland Lake Park Campground. There is also a BC Hydro Picnic area at the outlet to Puntledge River at the north end of the lake.

Bolton also recommends trying out the higher elevation lakes, up to Paradise Meadows. Once the snow goes, it can be great fishing up there. New regulations for Comox Lake read “no wild rainbow trout over 50 cm.” Comox Lake is a part of the Cutthroat Trout Reward Tag Program. $100 reward tags are being used to assess the cutthroat trout fishery. Refer to the regulations guide for instructions on what to do if you catch a fish with a reward tag. If you’ve got information on

Caution: Do not use this map for navigational purposes. This map may not reflect current conditions. Uncharted hazards may exist. Base Map ©Province of British Columbia.

Vancouver Island 2019

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Cowichan Lake 6,204 Hectares (15,330 Acres)

152 metres (499 feet)

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owichan Lake is one of the jewels of British Columbia. It offers easy access and excellent fishing and recreational opportunities. Its stunning scenery showcases some of the best of Vancouver Island, making Cowichan Lake very popular with

Coastal outboards

A – 5285 Polkey Road Duncan , BC

250-597-7782

r0011237426

• Marine service parts and repairs • Certified marine mechanic • Trailer Repair

163 metres (535 feet)

May 1960

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tourists and locals alike. There is a lot to explore. One could spend a very long time on Cowichan Lake and still not experience all it has to offer. Local fishing guide, Marcus Kennett, fishing guide offers some great tips to help you make the most of your trip. “There is good trout fishing for rainbows and cutthroat trout all year, but I like to fish it in the winter and spring,” he suggests. “It is a bigger lake, so fishing out of a boat does give you more options and opportunities. I like to fish in front of some of the tributaries that flow into the lake in the winter when the fish eggs are coming out of the creeks, when the salmon are spawning, and in the spring when all of the salmon fry are coming out of the creeks.” Kennett’s lures of choice for trout in Cowichan Lake are 3” Tomic Plugs. His favourite colours are: #632iig,

#231, #351, #602 #256ii, #232, and #619. Also try 3.5” Coyote spoons in Army Truck, Cop Car and Glo Green; Diawa Dr Minnow in Prizm shade; Rainbow Trout from 2” to 3 1/2”; Rapala plugs in black and silver; and Rainbow Trout in sizes CD11 or F11. Kennett notes that his favourite fly patterns for lake are “all of the same flies that I use in the river for trout.” The Cowichan River Guide Fly works very well and is very popular. “Some other favourites are Doc Spratlies in red and black and green, Muddler Minnows, Wooly Buggers, Stone Flies, Cased Caddis Flies,

Tom Thumbs, May Flies, Sedge, Irresistibles and Mosquitoes,” says Kennett. LAKE ACCESS

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rom the town of Lake Cowichan, west of Duncan, there are several access points to the lake. Visit the info centre in town or one of the local tackle shops for information about the many places to launch boats in the lake. There are several accommodation options as well, ranging from rustic camping to more serviced campsites to motels and hotels in town.

Caution: Do not use this map for navigational purposes. This map may not reflect current conditions. Uncharted hazards may exist. Base Map ©Province of British Columbia.

12 Months of the Year!

Salmon and Halibut fishing in the famous waters of Sooke, Victoria and Port Renfrew, British Columbia. CALL US TODAY! Victoria’s Largest Fishing and Hunting Store!

3319 Douglas St., Victoria, BC Vancouver Island 2019

250-475-4969 1-866-915-4254 email: info@fishingvictoria.com islandoutfitters.ca

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Cowichan River HOT SPOTS 1. Skultz Falls

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he Cowichan River is a worldclass fishing river, and even if you’ve never fished it, you’ve likely heard tales of its fabulous fishery. Ward Bond, co-owner of Island Outfitters in Victoria, says that the season begins with steelhead from January through April. “Fly fish with traditional steely flies as well as Intruders and Stone flies. Single hand, Switch and Spey rods are all used. [Try] drift fishing with floats and pink worms, bead eggs and spin and glows. Cast with spoons and steely jigs.” Trout are a year-round favourite. Bond’s fly suggestions are early spring nymphs like March Browns and Hair’s Ears, egg patterns and stones. “Late spring and early summer dry fly fishing gets good with

2. Stoltz Pool Park

3. Sandy Pool Park

Adams and Hoppers. Fall, as the river and its extreme hazards before salmon run, eggs patterns are good.” boating. If you’re unfamiliar, hiring a guide is your best option. The Cowichan River also supports a good brown trout population. Bond There are several date changes in suggests that Streamers are best in the new regulation guide for the the early spring, moving to dry flies Cowichan River. Make sure you and mouse patterns as the season read through the new regulations progresses. Streamers are also the before heading out on the river. flies of choice for the cutthroat trout, he adds, as are dry flies and nymphs. RIVER ACCESS here are many access points For some anglers, the highlight of to the Cowichan River. the season are the chum and coho runs in the late fall. Spoons and spin- Cowichan Provincial Park offers ners are good choices for salmon. camping and a cartop boat launch. Fly fishers will want an 8-weight or Accommodations are available in heavier, and Bond suggests stream- the town of Lake Cowichan, and at many campsites nearby. ers and rabbit patterns.

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Bond notes that there are several drift-boat access points along the river, but he cautions that it’s extremely important to know the

Victoria’s Largest Fishing and Hunting Store (Full selection of firearms & accessories)

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Caution: Do not use this map for navigational purposes. This map may not reflect current conditions. Uncharted hazards may exist. Base Map ©Province of British Columbia.

12 Months of the Year!

Salmon and Halibut fishing in the famous waters of Sooke, Victoria and Port Renfrew, British Columbia. CALL US TODAY! Victoria’s Largest Fishing and Hunting Store!

3319 Douglas St., Victoria, BC Vancouver Island 2019

250-475-4969 1-866-915-4254 email: info@fishingvictoria.com islandoutfitters.ca Page 15

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Drum Lake 20 Hectares (49 Acres)

24 metres (79 feet)

305 metres (1,000 feet)

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ocated on the western boundary of Strathcona Provincial Park, Drum Lake is a beautiful lake, stocked with trout and excellent for fly fishing. Drum Lake’s two basins have great shore fishing opportunities, especially on the section between the two basins. If you feel like exploring deeper sections, boating is good too, though be wary of the shallower west basin. Drum Lake is stocked with cutthroat and rainbow trout, and is a natural habitat for Dolly Varden and kokanee. Stick to some of the shallower areas in the spring and fall if you’re trolling. The weedy areas around the shore are prime habitat. Prime time

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to fish is in the spring and fall launch is 150 metres west of the Elk River lot. Although the lake months. Rainbow trout seem unable to is quite near the highway, access resist small plugs in this lake. can be tricky: you might need Small spoons and spinners pro- to park your vehicle and walk duce results as well. Drum Lake to get fishing. There is a cartop has a good chironomid hatch. boat launch across the highway Other standard patterns, like from the Elk River trailhead Leeches and Nymphs are use- parking lot, a picnic spot and a pebble beach for swimming in a ful. day-use park. Don’t plan on an LAKE ACCESS overnighter, though: there aren’t ccess is right off Hwy 28 any campsites or resorts nearby. on a paved road, 19 kilo- As always, be careful and make metres northeast of Gold River, sure to pack emergency gear, or 73 km west of Campbell food, and warm clothes, espeRiver. There are two park- cially if you intend to go offing areas. One is located at trail. Other fishing lakes within Crest Creek on the lower basin, the park are Upper Campbell although the best spot to park Lake and Buttle Lake. is the pullout at the Elk River trailhead between the lower and upper basins. The cartop boat

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Caution: Do not use this map for navigational purposes. This map may not reflect current conditions. Uncharted hazards may exist. Base Map ©Province of British Columbia.

Vancouver Island 2019

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Echo Lake 24 Hectares (59 Acres)

14 metres (46 feet)

240 metres (787 feet)

Unknown

many more are in the still-large 5 pound range.

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ocated in the majestic and towering Sayward Forest, one of Echo Lake’s best features is that it is accessible for everyone (including people who use wheelchairs). It was developed to encourage families and visitors to get out and get fishing. Each June, the BC Freshwater Fisheries Society hosts events for Family Fishing Weekend. Echo Lake is one of Vancouver Island’s Family Fishing Waters. In 2019, Family Fishing Weekend is June 14-16. Echo Lake supports a thriving

Echo Lake is also somewhat unique in that it can challenge experts while still being easy enough for beginners to fish. You can try out your new fly patterns and lures, and you’ll often still catch fish with basic gear.

fishery for cutthroat, kokanee, and Dolly Varden, and rainbows are stocked regularly to round out the fishing experience. In 2018, 2,500 rainbow If you want to get fancy, trout were released in Echo though, good colour choices Lake. for Echo Lake are chrome One of the lake’s unique fea- or nickel combinations. tures is that it is fed by a very Krokodiles in chrome / orange, large number of underground silver speckled Kwikfish or springs. This not only keeps red / nickel Dick Nite spoons the water in the lake circu- are good producers. lating, but also brings in an The Carey Special and the Doc abundance of food for the fish. Spratley are excellent attracAs a result, some of Echo tor patterns any time of the Lake’s trout have been known year. Other common patterns to reach over 15 pounds. This that produce good results are is an exceptional size, and the Pheasant-tail Nymph, 52

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Buick, Halfback and Baggie Shrimp. Flies can be trolled with a full sink line in 20–38 cm (8–15 inches) of water, close to the bottom, or cast and retrieved. Varying your speed while trolling or retrieving the fly can be effective at enticing fish to bite. LAKE ACCESS

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cho Lake is located 20 km southwest of Campbell River on Hwy 28 to Gold River and is easily accessed at two locations directly off the highway. Boat launch. Electric motors only. Campsites are located nearby, as well as at Echo Lake Resort. The Fish and Game Society, along with the Freshwater Fisheries Society, is currently upgrading the dock and the day-use area.

Caution: Do not use this map for navigational purposes. This map may not reflect current conditions. Uncharted hazards may exist. Base Map ©Province of British Columbia.

Vancouver Island 2019

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Elk and Beaver Lakes 190 Hectares (469 Acres)

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or popularity and ease of access, Elk and Beaver Lakes are tough to beat. These conjoined lakes are located directly in Saanich, just north of Victoria. Adding to the lakes’ accessibility, there is a fishing pier on the northwest side of Elk Lake. Elk Lake is stocked with rainbow trout. There are bass and perch in Elk / Beaver Lakes, too. These were introduced some years ago.

16.7 metres (55 feet)

41 metres (135 feet)

July 1976

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want to be casting close to weed beds and rock structures. Cast and let it sink. Give it little twitches every five to seven seconds,” says Bond. The Elk Lake pier on the NW shore via Brookleigh Road is wheelchair accessible. Regulations for Beaver and Elk Lakes have been updated with a smallmouth bass quota of 4.

The lake page for Elk and Beaver Lakes at anglersatlas. The fishery was highly produc- com is packed full of tips, map tive last year, with hopes for the markers and coming events. same in 2019. “Powerbait has been really good lately,” says Jon Bond, Pro Staff at Island LAKE ACCESS Outfitters. lk Lake: From Victoria take “Talked to some people recently the Pat Bay Hwy towards and they’ve had 20-30 trout a Sidney. Take left on Sayward day just from shore.” drive and then left on Hamsterly Bond recommends bubblegum Road. Continue to Brookleigh Powerbait as it’s been producing Road and take a right. Just ahead very well so far this year. He is park entrance. says the most effective colours Beaver Lake: From Victoria seem to be pink, white, and take the Pat Bay Hwy towards flourescent yellow. Sidney. Take the Royal Oak For bass fishing, Bond recom- Drive exit, cross over the highmends Yum Dingers (soft plastic way, and take right onto Elk bait), as well as a new product Lake Drive. Park entrance is on your left. called­the Jackal.

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When fishing for bass, “you Caution: Do not use this map for navigational purposes. This map may not reflect current conditions. Uncharted hazards may exist. Base Map ©Province of British Columbia.

730 Hillside Ave • 250-382-8291 www.sgpower.com Vancouver Island 2019

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Fuller Lake 24 Hectares (59 Acres)

17 metres (56 feet)

45 metres (148 feet)

F

uller Lake provides the rare opportunity to pursue larger trout in a picturesque, easily accessible, semi-urban environment. For these reasons, the lake is a favoured destination for resident and visiting freshwater anglers. Both bass and rainb o w s are here, which is a boon to anglers who can enjoy very different kinds of fishing in different kinds of conditions. In 2018, Fuller Lake was stocked with over 7,000 adult and catchable-sized rainbow

Unknown

trout. Local angler, Richard Kennett, says that Fuller Lake is a real family fishing lake, and is oriented towards helping kids learn to fish. There’s a wharf at Fuller Lake which is an ideal spot for kids. “A few times a year, the local clubs put on learn-to-fish programs,” he adds. Fuller Lake is good all year, and Kennett says there are big fish in the lake. “Even at midday, I’ve caught fish there,” he says, noting that morning and later afternoon might be better, but not crucial for catching fish. Kennett suggests that flies are a great choice for Fuller Lake. “Lots of leeches, chironomids. Red Spratleys are good. Even trolling a Wedding Band and worm will work well,” though he reminds anglers that only electric motors are allowed on Fuller Lake. If the trout fishing slows down in the heat, the bass get going. This fishery has been described as lively. Work with surface lures, especially in the morning or evening. Head to shallow water and try soft plastics

Feet

or crank baits. Please release the bass as soon as possible and as close to where you hooked them as possible; once removed from their nests, their eggs and fry are very vulnerable. LAKE ACCESS

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uller Lake Park is located on the east side of the Island Highway immediately south of Chemainus Village. Signs mark the turnoff and the lake is accessed by a paved road. There is a boat launch next to a day-use park with a picnic area and washroom facilities. Electric motors only.

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Great Central Lake 4900 hectares (12108 acres)

333 metres (1092 feet)

82m (269 feet)

n/a

n/a

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almon, steelhead, numerous feeder creeks and a fish hatchery are just some of the highlights of Great Central Lake. It’s close to Port Alberni, yet largely inaccessible. It experiences very low fishing pressure, yet it is popular with anglers. Great Central Lake is incredible for fishing. At one time, Great Central Lake was stocked with steelhead. However, since that program ended, the lake is home to a thriving population of steelhead from the Stamp River, which is one of the most popular steelhead rivers on Vancouver Island. As well, there is a naturally producing population of rainbow trout. Courtney Ogilvie, owner of Nile Creek Fly Shop, says, “During the late summer and into the fall large schools of Sockeye Salmon will make their way up to where they will spawn in the small

streams located at the top end of the lake. This is a tip for those wanting to catch record size trout feeding on drop back eggs and pieces of decaying carcasses. Sockeye fry hatch and fall back into the lake where they will live for the next year or so and ultimately for those that survive will make their way back into the River gaining access to the ocean. These fry are a main staple for all Trout species during their time in the lake. “The cutthroat trout of Great Central Lake are serious fish eaters and can reach trophy size up six plus pounds. The rainbow trout are likely juvenile steelhead that also travel in and out of the lake. Although the Dolly Varden

char are in serious decline they are present and a natural species for the lake.” Local angler Ben Potter agrees that the fish get big in Great Central Lake. In fact, in the past couple of years, he says that the winners in the Trestle RV Park fishing derby were just under five pounds. The water clarity can mean that anglers need to be stealthy in their tactics. As well, steelhead are strong, and they fight hard. Spoons and spinners are reliable lures, though you’ll want to cast out fairly far to help avoid detection. Steelhead are not terribly fussy, but they can be put off if

you’re too obvious in your presentation. The whole lake has great fishing, but some of the best spots are at the Pumphouse and the Rock. Ben Potter adds, “The best places to fish are where creeks enter the lake as trout gather here for the food being carried in. Quite a few fish have been caught in front of the hydro station, but watch out for strong currents. Another productive spot, although it is a long run of about 23 miles, is at the mouth of either Drinkwater or McBride Creek.” Courtney Ogilvie agrees. “The better fishing locations are at the far end of the Lake near stream mouths, close to and into the outlet and along the East side of the Lake where there are many

250-757-2095 www.nilecreekflyshop.com 6590 West Island Hwy, Bowser BC Vancouver Island 2019

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small streams entering. Large gravel deposits typify most stream entries making excellent hiding places for fry and holding stations for large predatory Trout. Dry fly fishing can be exceptional during the annual Black Ant hatches and never overlook tying on a Cicada Nymph or even very large dragon Fly Nymps up to 2” long. For those non fly-fishers, small Spoons and spinners work well all season long. Of course all good fly and gear fishers alike must have colourful bead head Leech patterns along in variety of sizes and mixed colours, a staple food source. Check bait regulations before heading out.”

Other good spots can be at the east end of the lake, he adds. “For the locals Great Central Lake is a place to come and pass the time fishing off the Ash Main Bridge located at the lower end of the lake’s drainage creating the Upper Stamp River. Often you can see Steelhead and large Trout manoeuvering for protected lays under the bridge.” Ogilvie notes that these fish are keen to take a well-presented fly. Ben Potter suggests fishing Great Central Lake in early spring. Even though the lake is very deep, it gets quite warm in the summer, making fishing tricky. Anglers can absolutely benefit from a boat for Great Central Lake. Not only can you cover its great expanse more efficiently with a boat, but its shoreline makes it challenging to fish from land. This is rug-

ged and remote, despite its proximity to town. Explorers will want to make certain they have the most recent backroads maps available, as there are numerous logging roads.

waterbody you plan to fish. Many rivers and streams are subject to special regulations.

There are hundreds of smaller streams and lakes nearby, and a person could explore and fish for years here without ever going to the same place twice. From the world-class fishing in the Stamp River, to the much smaller View Lake, there are endless fishing opportunities in the area. Please make sure you consult the Freshwater Fishing Regulations f o r each individ u a l

ccess is via Hwy 4 from Port Alberni, turning onto Central Lake Road.

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Scout Beach Rec Site is nearby, and offers campsites and a boat launch. As well, there are several fish hatcheries in the area, which are well worth the visit. Before you get there, stop in and talk with Courtney Ogilvie at Nile Creek Fly Shop just north of Qualicum Beach. They have everything you need for a great fishing trip, from lessons and clinics to top-notch gear. See nilecreekflyshop.com for more.

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Horne Lake 960 Hectares (2,372 Acres)

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pectacular caves full of stalactites and stalagmites are the chief draws of Horne Lake Provincial Park, but the area still offers a great fishing experience for the dedicated angler. Horne Lake has good fishing even through the winter, but your best bet is to try your luck in the spring. Trout are the big draw for anglers. Targeting cutthroat trout can be similar to fishing for rainbows. Fished through the dropoffs, small spinners and spoons are reliable producers all season. Try the southwest bay, or near the inflow and outflow of the river. As well, there is a small island in the eastern basin. The deeper section near there is a good place to start in the heat of the summer.

50 metres (164 feet)

119 metres (390 feet)

bridge, as well as access to the river where small boats can be launched from the rough shoreline. To control the water flow from Horne Lake, a dam and a sluice gate have been installed. This maintains protection from flood and drought and increases the survival of fish fry.

July 1951

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and family adventure camps logging trucks every day. round out the experience at Please drive with your headHorne Lake Provincial Park. lights on and obey the traffic and speed limit signs. LAKE ACCESS

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rom Highway 19, take the Horne Lake Road exit (#75), drive inland to Horne Lake Caves Road, turn right If you want to make your and follow the north shore trip a family affair, a world- of the lake all the way to the famous caving parks. It is about 13 kilometres from the highway to the parks. p a r k The road is gravel with narrow blind corners, actively used b y

Horne Lake Provincial Park offers camping (single and group), along with boating, day-use picnicking and swimming. The communities of Qualicum Bay and Bowser are situated about 25 kilometres to the east along the oceanfront, and provide the nearest location for gas, groceries, restaurants and other amenities.

Famous for its excellent salmon fishing, Qualicum River is a treat in itself. From the West side, Horne Lake Caves Provincial Park provides access to a Caution: Do not use this map for navigational purposes. This map may not reflect current conditions. Uncharted hazards may exist. Base Map ŠProvince of British Columbia.

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Lowry Lake 58 Hectares (130 Acres)

13 metres (42 Feet)

R

137 Metres (450 Feet)

olling hills and lush forests in hundreds of shades of green surround the beautiful clear waters of Lowry Lake. Located just outside of Strathcona Provincial Park, Lowry Lake is an excellent spot for new and experienced anglers. An excellent fishing lake, Lowry supports a good fishery for Dolly Varden, as well as rainbows, cutthroats and kokanee. The lake does have natural spawning grounds, and is stocked regularly with cutthroat trout. The lake is home to trumpeter swans during the winter. Be cautious of the swans: while graceful, their wings are strong enough to break bones if they are disturbed.

May 1968

some definite preferences when it comes to Lowry Lake. “My favourite fly on Lowry Lake is the Royal Coachman followed closely by a large Elk Hair Caddis. Also worth the effort is using a #6 Pumpkin Head with grey coloured Grizzly Hackle. Using a full sinking line increases your odds for the larger fish.”

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rustic campground managed by the B.C. Forest Service and a launching site for cartop boats are available. Map based on material provided by the Freshwater Fisheries Society of BC.

“The west end near the outflow can be excellent for minnow patterns like a muddler or small black leeches,” he adds.

When the bite is on, both gear and fly fishers may want to try new patterns and lures. Keep note of the conditions; sometimes all it takes is the difference between a cloudy day and sunshine for a Lowry Lake is more of a boat lake particular pattern or lure to entice than shore fishery. The shoreline the trout. is steep in many places, and is better explored on the water. Both Stop by and talk to Ogilvie at flies and gear succeed on Lowry Nile Creek Fly Shop. They have Lake. Troll flies, small spoons, all the gear you need, along with or plugs. Casting spinning gear clinics and some great suggestions with small lures is another reliable to help you succeed on the water. method. Of the hundreds of reliable spinners that can be found in tackle stores, Mepps and Bluefox LAKE ACCESS spinners remain some of the most owry Lake is located 30 km common choices and are good northwest of Port Alberni off options for beginner or experi- Hwy. 4 on the Great Central Lake enced anglers to try. Road. A car is adequate. An access Courtney Ogilvie, owner of Nile road leads to the shoreline on the Creek Fly Shop, says that he has east side of the lake. A small,

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Nahmint Lake 799 Hectares (1,974 Acres)

150 metres (492 feet)

105 metres (344 feet)

inches, are the way to go for these lunkers. “There’s also a really good damsel fly hatch. You can use these patterns on the shoals on the west side, again up to two inches. They’re huge,”

N

ahmint Lake is long, deep and cool, surrounded by oldgrowth fir, fragrant cedar and spectacular mountain views. The fishing, though, is the real draw. Courtney Ogilvie, from Nile Creek Fly Shop, says that there is, “really good trout fishing in Nahmint Lake.” Most of the fish here are rainbows, and there are Dolly Varden and steelhead, too. “The Dollies are very big,” Ogilvie says, “and your best bet is to use large fly patterns.” He suggests that minnows up to two inches, and leeches up to three

June 1990

creeks there, and there is really good fishing at the creek mouths (the creeks themselves are closed).

Also consult the regulations for the restrictions in place for Nahmint Lake, and the rivers and creeks.

The water in Nahmint is clean. Ogilvie suggests black and blue for your minnow patterns. “Pink is always good,” he adds.

LAKE ACCESS

Ogilvie says that there are also stonefly and caddis hatches at Nahmint Lake. While much of the Island is not known for its huge insect population, these hatches are worth noting. Along with the fish, Ogilvie says that the wildlife in the area is exceptional. There are lots of elk, eagles and bears. This area is considered remote. Please use bear-safe b a c k country practis-

Ogilvie notes. He suggests trolling at the drop-off. As well, there is a lot of debris from the run-off at the west end where the river comes in. The fish feed there.

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Ogilvie says that the dry fly fishing around the debris area in the summer is excellent. “You may even get a steelhead then,” he says. Most people fish around the Rec site, though Ogilvie says that if you’ve got a boat, you can get down to the east end. There are a few

es.

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he road to Nahmint Lake can be rough in places, though Courtney Ogilvie, from the Nile Creek Fly Shop, says that the access is generally pretty good. From Port Alberni, cross the Somass River on Highway 4 toward Tofino. Take McCoy Lake Road on the left and follow for 4.7km. Turn left onto Stirling Arm Main (unmarked first left after Herbert Road). Turn right on the Stirling Arm Forest Service Road and continue 21km on to Gracie Main. Turn left on to Gracie Main which becomes Gracie Hookup. The site is on the right at just past 16km. There are several campsites, with picnic tables and pit toilets. Please be sure to consult good backroad maps, as logging roads and access points can change without notice. Nile Creek Fly Shop has everything you need for a short jaunt or a longer trip. They’ve got specialty equipment and expert staff. They host all kinds of clinics and demos, from women’s fly fishing weekends to single-hand casting demos. Stop by and talk with Courtney Ogilvie and the staff for all your fly fishing needs.

Caution: Do not use this map for navigational purposes. This map may not reflect current conditions. Uncharted hazards may exist. Base Map ©Province of British Columbia.

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Prospect Lake 60 Hectares (148 Acres)

P

14 metres (46 feet)

rospect is a popular swimming, fishing, and boating lake 20 minutes northwest of Victoria in the municipality of Saanich. With mild winters, lush forests, and abundant wildlife, Prospect Lake is cherished by its permanent residents and visitors alike. Prospect benefits from a vibrant volunteer community who work to improve the health of the lake and maintain sensitive habitat through establishment of natural protected areas and invasive management programs.

15 metres (49 feet)

May 1986

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rom Victoria, follow Hwy 17 for 8km and take exit 11, turning left on Royal Oak Dr. After less than a km, turn right on West Saanich Rd and follow north for 4km to Prospect Lake Rd on your left which will take you to Whitehead Park. There are two carry-in boat launches with access from Estelline Park and Whitehead Park. A trailer boat launch is available from Echo Drive on the northeast corner of the lake but note that parking is limited. There are seasonal toilets at both Whitehead Park and the Echo Boat launch.

The lake is stocked yearly with rainbow trout and also supports a healthy population of smallmouth bass. There is shore access but fishing from a boat is by far the preferred method here. Anglers have success casting into the shallows and working the lake’s natuBoaters should be ral structure. aware that there Bass and trout can both be targetare speed and noise ing using small spinners and plasrestrictions on tics. For some extra excitement, Prospect Lake as well try a topwater bait like a frog, as a mandatory counpopper, or prop bait. There’s noth- ter-clockwise direcing quite like seeing a bass hamtion of travel within mer your lure on a fast retrieve. the buoys. Make sure For the fly anglers, leech patterns you know the restricwith floating line works and chitions before heading ronomid fishing can also be quite out on the water and productive. be respectful of private residents.

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Roberts Lake 161 Hectares (400 Acres)

A

popular local lake just outside Campbell River, Roberts Lake supports a thriving rainbow and cutthroat fishery. Fishing is consistently good through the spring, summer and fall, peaking from April to June and through September and October.

53 metres (174 feet)

167 metres (547 feet)

June 1987

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part of the eastern side is more gentle. There is a boat launch on the western shore, right down the access road off the highway.

Cutthroat and rainbows can be caught by many of the same methods. Small Flatfish, Kwikfish and Hotshots are really good choices. Lorna Duncan, from Roberts Lake In general terms, anglers will Resort, says that the best thing often catch both rainbows and about Roberts Lake is that it is a cutthroats with the same gear. perfect family fishing lake. There Early hatches on Roberts Lake are is a floating dock, funded jointly a boon to fly fishers. Chironomids between government and private can begin as early as March. enterprise, that has really helped While in many places the mayfly to made the lake easy to fish. It hatch doesn’t occur until May, is a perfect way to get kids out these flies work well as early as without needing a boat. Duncan April in Roberts Lake. adds that there’s also good shore fishing. Willow Leafs and plugs are the LAKE ACCESS

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oberts Lake is located next most popular, Duncan notes, and to the Island Hwy. (Hwy. 19) pink or white are good colour choices. Simple techniques work 25 km northwest of Campbell River. Access is excellent on a well, she says. Duncan adds that fly fishing is paved road. Cartop boats can be great in the summer, and that it’s launched from the lake’s sandy definitely becoming more popular beach, a short walk from the road on a forest service trail to a useron the lake. maintained camping area. Roberts Lake is deep and cool. The northern shore has large rocks Please consult the B.C. Freshwater under the water’s surface, making Fishing Regulations before headfor good trout habitat. Many of the ing out. dropoffs are steep, perfect places to start a troll or even to still fish. A sandy beach along the southern

Caution: Do not use this map for navigational purposes. This map may not reflect current conditions. Uncharted hazards may exist. Base Map ©Province of British Columbia.

12 Months of the Year!

Salmon and Halibut fishing in the famous waters of Sooke, Victoria and Port Renfrew, British Columbia. CALL US TODAY! Victoria’s Largest Fishing and Hunting Store!

3319 Douglas St., Victoria, BC Vancouver Island 2019

250-475-4969 1-866-915-4254 email: info@fishingvictoria.com islandoutfitters.ca

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Spider Lake 58 Hectares (130 Acres)

13 metres (42 feet)

135 metres (443 feet)

June 1986

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ith its many legs of winding inlets it’s easy to imagine how the forestringed centrepiece of Spider Lake Provincial Park came by its name. Explore Spider Lake’s many bays, and take your time; power boats are not allowed here.

LAKE ACCESS

Note that the regulations for Spider Lake have changed this year with a smallmouth bass quota of 4.

metre before the main park entrance. This area has two picnic tables, a pit toilet and parking for up to eight vehicles. Small craft can be easily launched from this location.

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pider Lake Provincial Park is located 16 km west of Qualicum Beach off Hwy. 19. Turn left on the Horne Lake exit then immediately left again and follow signs to Spider Lake Park on a paved road. When the pavement Spider Lake is a healthy ends, there is a short section of waterbody with large hatches. gravel. Watch for the lake on This allows for larger than your right. average bass and rainbow There is a boat launch beside trout. Bait fish are a good the parking lot. Motorboats are choice for this lake. Flyfishers prohibited. The picnic area and have success with wooly bug- parking lot are open 7 am to 11 gers and chironomids perform pm, mid-May to mid October. well although windy condi- A smaller day-use area, open tions on this lake can make year-round, can be found off presentation difficult. Lakeview Rd. less than a kilo-

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Sproat Lake 3,775 Hectares (9,328 Acres)

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proat Lake is very large, deep and quite popular for all manner of water recreational pursuits from swimming to fishing. Despite its size and depth, the water is relatively warm, adding to its value as a destination lake. April and May are good months for steelhead with April through June being especially productive for rainbow trout. The cutthroat fishery on Sproat Lake is catch-and-release only, and all wild rainbows over 60 cm must be released as well.

195 metres (640 feet)

29 metres (95 feet)

Although the spring provides the best rainbow trout fishing, Sproat can produce well year-round.. Many anglers go deep in the heat of the summer and troll slowly through the depths. Flatfish and Ford Fenders can work well, and many anglers report great sucess with plugs. While the most productive method of fishing this large beauty is with hardware, fly fishing also nets great results. Try a small marabou leech, trolled slowly around the drop-offs. Another worthwhile method

1951

for both gear and flies is to still fish. Anchor in shallower water and cast out. The Sproat River is an excellent fishery, and is also known locally for great swimming in parts. Restrictions apply in regards to bait and locations; consult the Freshwater Fishing Regulations for information.

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rom Port Alberni, follow Highway 4 (not 4A), or Johnstone Road through town. Sproat Lake is approximately 14 km west of town. Follow the signs to Sproat Lake Provincial Park. Sproat Lake boasts several campgrounds, each with its own character. Sproat Lake Provincial Park, on the north shore, has two campgrounds. Numerous private campgrounds exist as well.

Caution: Do not use this map for navigational purposes. This map may not reflect current conditions. Uncharted hazards may exist. Base Map ŠProvince of British Columbia.

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Wolf Lake 1,564 Hectares (3,865 Acres)

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olf Lake is a popular fishing destination for freshwater anglers, with catches up to six pounds.

39 metres (128 feet)

215 metres (705 feet)

Bruce Bruce Bolton is the trout specialist at Tyee Marine in Courtenay. He says that late February and March are huge months for this lake. “The fish are getting ready to spawn at that time,” says Bolton, adding that the fish like “big presentations like Crokodiles, big leeches and big Muddler Minnows ... five, sometimes six inches long.” The goal is to show strong movement, articulating the lures and flies so they move

May 1977

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around. Cutthroat trout will LAKE ACCESS take both insects and smaller olf lake is located about fish, and keep in mind that 16 km northwest of most of the early-season Courtenay. From the town, folinsects will be under the water. low the Comox Logging Road. During the summer, trolling Just before passing the Island and fly fishing are popular on highway turn right onto the the lake. Worms always work Duncan Bay logging mainline. well. There is a boat launch and In 2018, the Freshwater camping site located on Wolf Fisheries Society of BC Lake. According to Angler’s stocked 2,500 cutthroat trout Atlas member drewbags, in Wolf Lake. “Northwest boat launch is Visit the lake page for Wolf accessible; Southeast boat Lake at anglersatlas.com. This launch is gated off from main is a great spot to post your road.” fishing tips, photos and map markers.

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FULL LIMITS FOR 2019 “The very good news for 2019 is that inside the surf line of all of Area 25, Chinook Salmon regulation will remain the same.”

John Falavolito, owner Westview Marina and Lodge. To learn more about the 2019 fishing regulations in John’s area, give him a call at 250-934-7672. www.westviewmarina.com Vancouver Island 2019

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Fishing for Salmon in Barkley Sound A

ll species of salmon can be found in Barkley Sound, as it sits along major migratory path for salmon from Alaska, as well as being connected to extensive streams and rivers that provide excellent spawning grounds.

Barkley Sound is home to cod, flounder, halibut and sole, not to mention all species of Pacific salmon, ling cod, and all kinds of shellfish. While West Coast salmon is often the draw, anglers have the chance to catch dozens of other Amphritite Point, near the town types of fish, or just sit back and of Ucluelet, is popular for chi- enjoy the beauty of the Sound. nook salmon in the summer, with Local angler Shane Hagen says Newcomb Channel also provid- that year-round, you can catch all ing some earlier spring fishing. types of fish migrating up through Moving east into the sound, different river systems along the Toquart Bay is another popular coast. “Find the right bait, and you’ll fishing location. The area is rela- definitely catch something,” he says. tively sheltered and can provide Hagen notes that from June through some cover from the open ocean. August, sockeye run right up to Another sheltered location that is the Robertson Creek Hatchery. For good for trolling is along Sechart all species, you’re allowed to keep Channel. between two and four per person, Barkley Sound is also the gate- depending on the species. Sockeye way to Port Alberni, via the Al- run between three and ten pounds, berni Inlet. There are a number he says. of great fishing locations near the In July, the chinook runs begin. inlet. Try hugging the shore along These go up to the hatchery as well, Junction Passage and into Rainy and can be from 15 to 60 pounds, “if Bay. you’re lucky,” Hagen says. chinook Trevor Channel runs from the Al- run until October. berni Inlet to Cape Beale, providAnglers will be lucky around this ing a number of excellent fishing time as well, because the coho spots all along the southern shore. are also running, usually between Cape Beale is known as a hot August and October. spot, especially for moochers and jiggers. The village of Bamfield Hagen suggests that his first choice is also located along this channel. of bait is anchovy. He finds that the salmon are keen on these, though A series of islands (Tzartus Flemyou can try others as well. “Try ing, Diana, Edward King) sepaCoyote Spoons, or green and white rate Trevor Channel from the Hoochies,” he says. open water of Imperial Eagle Channel. Where Imperial Eagle “For sockeye, I’d go with a pink and Channel meets the open Pacific, a red Hoochie. Sockeye seem to like cluster of islands (the largest be- pink and red,” he says. ing Effingham) are also great fish- Head for Nahmint Bay and China ing locations. Try trolling around Creek for sockeye, Hagen suggests. the islands. For chinook and coho, try Kirby arkley Sound is known for its Point, Cree, or Effingham Island. sheltered waters and excel- Also Muir’s Bluff is a good place lent fishing. According to Tourism to try. Ucluelet, Barkley Sound has the best Later on, for coho or chinook, try fishing in the Pacific Northwest. Pill Point or Diplock.

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Vancouver Island 2019

People fishing in Barkley Sound are going for other types of fish besides salmon. The halibut and ling cod fisheries are very popular. “Anchor up on a high spot, any muddy or sandy area, for halibut between 250 to 300 feet deep. Anchor up, and jig for halibut.” For bait, Hagen says that herring, octopus, or salmon bellies are all good choices. For ling cod, Hagen says that any pinnacle or rocky section can be a good starting point. “The only thing to watch for, though, is the Broken Group Islands, because that area is closed to ling cod fishing. It’s a juvenile breeding ground, and the ling cod are protected from interference there.”

Unit is made up of over 100 islands and rocky areas scattered between Loudoun Channel and Imperial Eagle Channel in the middle of Barkley Sound. There are various spots to camp, and experienced kayakers can follow well-travelled kayak routes throughout the area. (Be sure you have guidance equipment, and as always, we recommend hiring a guide or going with a tour group if you’re unfamiliar with the area.)

A

nglers and tourists will also find no shortage of accommodation options in and around Barkley Sound. The towns of Ucluelet and Port Alberni offer a range of lodging from campgrounds to hotels, as well as mooring for boats.

The Pacific Rim National Park Reserve is another option, with campsites on the more rugged side throughout the park. Please be mindful that most of these spots do not offer amenities of any sort, and require campers to pack out everything they pack in. There are seven different campgrounds in this group, most of which are small, and again, unserviced. They are popular, The other important point to note however, so trip-planning can be is that Barkley Sound is a working especially important, and if at all inlet, and there are several commerpossible, try to avoid peak seasons. cial vessels passing through the area. Hagen reminds people to watch for Tourists should also note that while logs, and to always read the regula- there is camping in the Deer Group tions. There are many closed areas, Islands, most spots are unsuitable and there is always something that due to inaccessible landings, dense requires extra checking, whether it forest and high tides with no beach areas. Always allot extra time to be catch quotas or size limits. eyond the fishing, there is a reach your overnight stopping point, huge array of options, from hik- particularly noting that winds typiing to diving, with kayaking being cally pick up in the afternoons. Hagen reminds anglers that while Barkley Sound as a whole is sheltered compared to the open ocean, it can still be “weathery.” Anglers really need seaworthy boats and navigation equipment. The latter becomes particularly critical in the fog, and Hagen says that in August and September, “you will get fogged in, without a doubt.”

B

among the most popular activities.

The Broken Group Islands, and the Pacific Rim National Park Reserve, are kayak-friendly waters that give paddlers a chance to see humpback whales, eagles, sea lions, and bears. The Broken Group Islands

Page 32

Be sure to consult regulations for this area before heading out, closures and restriction changes are ongoing so make sure you have the most up-to-date information prior to your trip.

FREE MAPS AT AnglersAtlas.com


1

Spring and summer chinook

Amphritite Point to Red Can

14

Good winter chinook

Vernon Bay

2

Spring and summer chinook

Outer Straight

15

Summer chinook / fall coho

Pill Point to Blood Bay

3

Early spring and summer chinook

Great Bear

16

Summer chinook

Cross Point

4

Winter and early summer chinook

Sail

17

Both winter / summer chinook

Diplock to Hollford

5

Summer chinook and coho

Janit

18

Summer chinook

Robbers

6

Winter and summer chinook, and also coho

Meares Bluff to Cree Island

19

Summer chinook

Fleming

7

Summer chinook

Gibralter to Entrance

20

Summer chinook

Sandford

8

Winter and summer chinook

Swale Rock

21

Summer chinook and coho

Kirby

9

Winter and summer chinook

Howard

22

Both winter and summer chinook, and coho

Ships to Edward King

10

Winter and early summer chinook

Lyall to Mayne Bay

23

Winter and summer chinook

Cape Beale to Brady's Beach

11

Winter and early summer chinook

Mayne Bay

24

Winter/summer chinook, coho summer/fall

Bamfield to Kelp Bay

12

Both winter and summer chinook

Outer Swale Rock

25

Summer chinook

Yankee Bay

13

Winter Chinook into June

Back Door

26

Summer chinook (mainly August)

Assits

Caution: Do not use this map for navigational purposes. This map may not reflect current conditions. Uncharted hazards may exist. Source data provided by TCARTA.

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TRACKING

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Vancouver Island 2018

Page 33

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Caution: Do not use this map for navigational purposes. This map may not reflect current conditions. Uncharted hazards may exist. Source data provided by TCARTA.

Vancouver Island 2018

Page 34

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Fishing Around Campbell River V

isitors have flocked to Campbell River, the “Salmon Capital of the World”, for over a hundred years in search of an unbeatable fishing experience. Nestled on the mid-northeast coast of Vancouver Island where smaller islands cluster at the narrowing of Discovery Passage, Campbell River boasts a rare geography, where rivers meet ocean, and the resulting nutrient rich waters attract and hold fish in a way unique to this area. Sport-fishing is available throughout the entire calendar year. Though salmon tend to be the headline act, other species such as steelhead and cutthroat trout also ply the waters. You can also be surprised by an unexpected wildlife sighting on the ocean, the river bank, or on the edge of one of the many hundreds of lakes in this area. There are 5 species of Pacific Salmon: Chinook, Chum, Coho, Pink and Sockeye. Campbell River is unique in that you can catch all five species at different times of the year. The ability to fish for salmon locally, on the compar-

Vancouver Island 2018

atively calm, protected waters of the inside passage is a real allure to the many anglers who would rather not be bounced around by the large ocean swells of the west coast of Vancouver Island. Fish for salmon as they travel along the ocean coastline and follow their journey up through freshwater rivers. Winter steelhead can be found in local river systems like the Oyster, Quinsam and Campbell River starting in early January through April, with summer runs going from July through to the end of November. Many anglers enjoy the challenge of learning the geography of the lakes,rivers and ocean waters themselves, but if you’re new to the sport, hire a professional guide for a fun and informative experience. The many area lakes abound with various species of trout, most predominantly cutthroat and rainbow and to a lesser extent, dolly varden. Popular known locations for freshwater fishing in this region are the previously mentioned Quinsam River and the Camp-

bell River, right close to town. They have 4 of the 5 species of returning Pacific salmon, along with sea-run Cutthroat trout and Steelhead. These species migrate and spawn at different and somewhat over lapping times of the year. Mid to late summer and all throughout the Fall are when these runs provide non-stop fishing action.

Mohun, etc, etc. Please check your regulation synopsis before heading out and always clean up your mess before leaving! There are many, many more bodies of water to explore in the Campbell River area, the opportunity is almost endless! Truly a world class fishing destination offering variety seen rarely in any other There is an abundance of an- location. gling opportunity in the many Article courtesy of Tyee Malakes of this region. A good rine, 880 Island Hwy. Campbell map and some simple direc- River. www.tyeemarine.com. tions from one of the friendly staff at a local tackle shop tyee- Location Species marine.com will put you onto Brown Bay Chinook, Coho, some very productive water. Chum Trout are easily caught in all Campbell River Trout, Steelhead, of these lakes either out on the Salmon water in a small craft or even Deep Water Bay Chinook, Coho, Pink, Chum right off the shore. The lake fishing is fun, very reward- Dogfish Bay Prawns @ 400’ ing and can be enjoyed year Echo Lake Trout round. Unlike much the rest of Gowland Harbour Crab Canada, the local lakes rarely Chinook, Coho freeze and the fish never stop Green Can biting! Local area lakes to try Middle Quinsam Lake Trout include Buttle, Robert’s, Regi- Oyster River Trout, Steelhead, nald, Crawfish, Muskeg, Echo, Salmon Upper, Middle and Lower Quinsam Lake Trout Quinsam, Upper and Lower The Hump Chinook, Halibut Campbell, Brewster, Fry, Gray, Upper Quinsam Lake

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Trout

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Protecting Rockfish from Barotrauma

Fisheries and Oceans Canada needs your help to protect and conserve British Columbia’s rockfish. Rockfish suffer barotrauma when brought to the surface. Barotrauma is caused by expanding gasses in the swim bladder which can cause the stomach and eyes to bulge making it difficult for the rockfish to descend when released at the surface. Quickly releasing rockfish to the depth of capture with the help of a descending device improves their ability to stay down and increases their chance of survival.

Barotrauma Symptoms: Expanding gases in the swim bladder cause eyes to bulge and pushes the stomach into and through the mouth.

“Closed” swim bladders expand during ascent

NEW MANDATORY FISHING LICENCE REQUIREMENT Effective April 1, 2019

Use one of these common descending devices to release unintended rockfish catch Spring-loaded clamp

Pressure-release clamp

Barbless inverted weighted hook

Attaches to the jaw and releases the fish from a manually-triggered clamp at the chosen depth.

Attaches to the jaw and automatically releases when a depth setting on the device is reached.

Attaches to the jaw and when the correct depth is reached and the line is tugged, a recovered rockfish will swim away.

China Rockfish

Quillback Rockfish

Yelloweye Rockfish

Help improve survival

Always carry a descending device on your boat and be prepared to use it on a spare rod or downrigger. Limit handling and wear gloves to preserve the protective slime coating. In under 2 minutes lower unintended rockfish catch to near the depth of capture.

EXPECT and be prepared to

use a descending device to release unintended rockfish catch.

PROTECT

rockfish by avoiding areas with high rockfish concentration when fishing for other species.

RESPECT regulations requiring use of a descending device to release rockfish, catch limits and fishing closures.

For more information visit: www.dfo-mpo.gc.ca/rockfish-conservation


Ocean Fishing Around Sooke E

xcellent salmon and halibut fishing, and breathtaking scenery in Sooke. Tory Howe from Goin Coastal Fishing Charters tells us “The Strait of Juan de Fuca, and the Sooke Harbour is friendly water,” he adds. “There aren’t too many people who get seasick.”

with everything you need for a tournament. For $150, you can compete in three derbies. successful day on the water. The fishing is non-stop action, Points are awarded, with sevtoo. Howe tells of a time when eral chances to score big and he was guiding a couple who win huge prizes. Al Kennedy were out for halibut. While they from Reel Excitement Charwaited for the tide to be right, ters says, “Even if you don’t they decided to take a chance win the halibut derby, you’ve on some chinook, resulting in got two more chances to win ishing is great year-round an epic 15 minute battle with a overall”. Jesse Legg, from Sea Leggs in this area but winter forty pound salmon. salmon fishing can be par- “Our fish totes are often full Fishing Adventures, adds that ticularly productive. Bottom of big fish. When the bite goes the derby is also a chance to do fishign for halibut and ling cod off you get carried away, and some good. “At the end of each is popular as well as trapping we have to keep recounting to derby, if you buy a ticket and dungeness crab. Crab traps can make sure we’re staying in our donate a fish, you win a prize. The fish are vacuum sealed and be purchased or rented at the limits!” donated to a local shelter for Sooke Harbour. Prestige Hotels sponsors the food. Everyone wins.” here are several available Sooke Saltwater Series, a fishing charters with rea- combined salmon and halibut The Saltwater Series begins with the Halibut Derby on May sonable rates that provide you

F

T

11th and 12th, followed by the Coho Derby October 12th, and the Boxing Day Derby in December. Prestige Oceanfront Resort hosts a reception at the end of each derby. See more at sookesaltwaterseries.ca. Recent closures and restrictions have been put in place for the Sooke area. Make sure you are fully informed of the current regulations before heading out on the water. If you are not from the area, we strongly encourage hiring a guide to increase your chances of success, and to make sure that you are in compliance with current regulations.

1 GORDON’S BEACH

6 RACE ROCKS

2 MUIR CREEK

7 SECRETARY/DONALDSON ISLAND

3 O’BRIEN POINT

8 SHERINGHAM POINT

11 “TRAILER PARK”

4 OTTER POINT

9 SOOKE BLUFFS/MUIR POINT

12 WHIFFIN SPIT

5 POSSESSION POINT

10 SOOKE RIVER ESTUARY

13 WHIRL BAY

Caution: Do not use this map for navigational purposes. This map may not reflect current conditions. Uncharted hazards may exist. Source data provided by TCARTA.

Vancouver Island 2018

Page 37

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Caution: Do not use this map for navigational purposes. This map may not reflect current conditions. Uncharted hazards may exist. Base Source Mapdata ©Province providedofbyBritish TCARTA. Columbia.

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Catch Big Fish Out Of Tahsis–Year Round T

he west coast of Vancouver Island is one of the most productive fishing waters in the world and Tahsis is centred right in the middle of it. Whether you are going after the world-class prawning grounds in Tahsis Inlet, some big ling cod and halibut along the coast, or the famous Conuma River salmon run in late July, Tahsis offers year-round fishing adventures. There are four major fishing areas easily reached from Tahsis—Tahsis Inlet, Esperanza Inlet, Nootka Sound and Tlupana Inlet. Each one of these locations holds a unique fishing experience.

T

ahsis Inlet is famous for its productive prawning, and is the only place open year-round. John Falavolito, owner of Westview Marina and Lodge in Tahsis, says prawns are near steep drop-offs in about 75 to 100 metres of water. Falavolito gives one final tip for prawning. “Don’t use fresh fish of

any kind. If you do, your traps will be full of slime eels rather than loaded with delicious prawns.”

E

speranza Inlet has experiences to offer anglers, any time of the year. Just off the coast is Six Mile Reef and The Pinnacles. Both are great locations to fish for halibut. You can also catch the salmon as they head into the inlet. “Lots of people fish the ebb tide [of Six Mile Reef] for halibut and then get their salmon“ says Falavolito. Moving into Esperanza Inlet, you will pass a number of great fishing locations, such as Double Island, Rosa Harbour and Blind Reef. He describes the Whale’s tail as “worth its weight in gold. Its structure on the bottom looks just like a whale’s tail ... and the fish hold in this depression.” In 2018 the Esperanza area saw a huge jump in the hatchery marked Coho in mid-July continuing well into September.

Exceptional fishing opportunities exist throughout the inlet, from early spring to late fall. With a little help from Westview Marina, you can be sure to find the hottest fishing spots any time of the year.

M

aquinna Point, at the south end of Nootka Island, is one of the first hot spots as the Connuma fish enter Nootka Sound. This is because the bait stacks up here, along the big rocks. Moving into the sound, along the south side of the island, anglers can try out Wash Rocks, San Miguel Islands and Friendly Cove for more great places to fish. A lot of salmon travel up Zuciarte Channel—a narrow but deep stretch of water. Fish the walls up and down the channel, mainly the down-island side. Chinook fishing is good from May to August.

T

lupana Inlet begins just past the north tip of Bligh Island and this is where the Conuma River salmon run converges. Fishing this

run starts mid-July and runs about two to three weeks. “Anywhere from 250,000 to 400,00 fish come back,” says Falavolito. “You can fish the mouth of the river, into the estuary and up the river as well, from the hatchery down.” If you time the run right, the fishing is unbelievable. Three good spots to cover are Hoiss Point, San Carlos Point and Camel Rock. John tells us that there are a number of factors that will contribute to an excellent fishing season in 2019. There are also number of volunteer hatcheries that enhance the quality and quantity of fishing opportunities in the Campbell River area. For more information about fishing this section of Vancouver Island’s west coast, call John at Westview Marina and Lodge. Call 250-9347672 or email to info@westviewmarina.com. Also visit anglersatlas.com and search for Esperanza, Nootka, and Tahsis.

FULL LIMITS FOR 2019 “The very good news for 2019 is that inside the surf line of all of Area 25, Chinook Salmon regulation will remain the same.” John Falavolito, owner Westview Marina and Lodge.

To learn more about the 2019 fishing regulations in John’s area, give him a call at 250-934-7672.

(250) 934-7672 | info@westviewmarina.com | www.westviewmarina.com Vancouver Island 2018

Page 39

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2019

to 2021

Vancouver Island Fishing Regulations Changes as of April 1, 2019 highlighted.

IMPORTANT NOTICE Freshwater angling regulations and fisheries management for Haida Gwaii (Management Units 6-12 and 6-13) are now within Region 1. Refer to the Region 1 section for angling regulations on Haida Gwaii and contact Region 1 for any Haida Gwaii freshwater angling enquiries. Note: There is no freshwater fishing permitted within Pacific Rim National Park Reserve, Gwaii Haanas National Park Reserve (on Haida Gwaii) and Gulf Islands National Park Reserve.

GENERAL RESTRICTIONS Summer closure: No fishing in any stream in Management Units 1-1 to 1-6 from July 15 to August 31 (see water specific regulations table for exceptions). Single barbless hook: must be used in all streams of Region 1, all year. Bait ban: excluding Haida Gwaii, applies to all streams of Region 1, all year, with some important exceptions. Check the tables. STREAMS include rivers, creeks and sloughs. CUTTHROAT TROUT REWARD TAG PROGRAM Comox Lake, Cowichan Lake, Horne Lake and Oyster River: $100 reward tags are being used to assess the cutthroat trout fishery. Refer to page 86 for instructions on what to do if you catch a fish with a reward tag. MERCURY ADVISORY Mercury levels in larger Smallmouth Bass in lakes on Vancouver Island and the Gulf Islands may be above national guidelines. Mercury levels tend to increase with the size of the fish and larger Smallmouth Bass generally have higher levels of mercury. The general public, especially children and women of child bearing age, including pregnant and breastfeeding women, are recommended to limit their consumption of Smallmouth Bass. More information on mercury in fish and fish consumption can be found in the HealthLinkBC Food Safety: Mercury in Fish at https:/www.healthlinkbc.ca/healthlinkbcfiles/mercury-fish. It is advised to regularly check the online Freshwater Fishing Regulation Synopsis for more up-to-date information (http://www.env.gov. bc.ca/fw/fish/regulations/).

WILD TROUT RELEASE ALL STREAMS REGULATION Anglers note there is a region wide regulation (excluding Haida Gwaii) requiring the release of all wild origin trout in streams. This regulation allows only hatchery origin trout in streams to be harvested. In Region 1, hatchery origin trout from streams can be distinguished from wild origin trout by the presence of a healed scar in place of the adipose fin. Please note, this regulation does not apply to lakes. For more information please contact regional fisheries staff at (250) 751-7220.  Stocked Lake or Stream (not all stocked lakes listed, see p. 87*) CW Classified Waters Licence required to fish Class I or Class II waters, see p. 8* * Including tributaries  Wheelchair Accessible  Youth/Disabled Accompanied Water

ADIPOSE PRESENT

HEALED SCAR IN PLACE OF ADIPOSE FIN

POSSESSION QUOTAS Possession quotas = 2 daily quotas ANNUAL QUOTAS Annual catch quota for all B.C.: 10 steelhead per licence year (only hatchery steelhead may be retained in B.C.) DAILY & ANNUAL CATCH QUOTAS FOR SALMON Please refer to the NOTICE on page 90* for Salmon Regulations.

Vancouver Island 2019

Page 40

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2019 to 2021

Vancouver Island Fishing Regulations Changes as of April 1, 2019 highlighted.

REGION 1 DAILY QUOTAS (EXCLUDING HAIDA GWAII)(See tables for exceptions) Trout: 4, not more than • 1 over 50 cm (2 hatchery steelhead over 50cm allowed) • 2 from streams (must be hatchery) And you must release: • All wild steelhead • All wild trout from streams • All char (includes Dolly Varden)

ADAM RIVER (EXCEPT Eve River)* AHNUHATI RIVER* CW ALICE LAKE AMOR LAKE AMOR DE COSMOS CREEK

1-10 1-15 1-13 1-10 1-10

“ANDERSON” LAKE

1-3

ANTLER LAKE CW ARTLISH RIVER*

1-9 1-12

ASH RIVER

1-7

BAINBRIDGE LAKE

1-7

BEAR LAKE BEAR RIVER BEAVER LAKE  BENSON RIVER* “BIG QUALICUM” RIVER BLACK CREEK* BLACKBURN LAKE BLACKWATER LAKE BONANZA LAKE BOOT LAKE  BRANNEN LAKE  BROWNS RIVER BUTTLE LAKE’S TRIBUTARIES (Lower) CAMPBELL LAKE’S TRIBUTARIES CAMPBELL RIVER

1-4 1-10 1-1 1-13 1-6 1-6 1-1 1-10 1-11 1-10 1-5 1-6 1-9 1-6

CARNATION CREEK* CATHERINE CREEK CAYCUSE RIVER CHEMAINUS RIVER

1-3 1-10 1-3 1-5

CHICADEE LAKE  CLAUD ELLIOTT CREEK CLAUD ELLIOTT LAKE CLEAR LAKE (Quadra Island) CLUXEWE RIVER * 

1-6 1-10 1-10 1-15 1-13

Vancouver Island 2019

1-10

Note: There is no general minimum size limit for trout in lakes or hatchery origin trout in streams. Bass: unlimited (see water specific regulations table for exceptions and mercury advisory below) Crayfish: 25 Kokanee: 5 (none from streams) White Sturgeon: CATCH AND RELEASE ONLY Yellow perch: unlimited

HAIDA GWAII DAILY QUOTAS (See tables for exceptions): Trout/char: 5, but not more than • 1 over 50 cm • 3 Dolly Varden • 2 from streams And you must release: • Trout/char under 30cm from streams • All wild steelhead Kokanee: 10 (none from streams)

Artificial fly only upstream of Eve River, to Highway 19 bridge Class II water Apr 1 - Oct 31; Steelhead Stamp mandatory Apr 1-June 30 Bait ban, single barbless hook, No trout over 50 cm Trout daily quota = 2 No Fishing from upper falls downstream 1 km to (Bear River) logging road bridge 3 km from tidewater No Fishing from mouth to falls about 4 km upstream, Dec 1-May 31 Artificial fly only, bait ban, single barbless hook Trout and kokanee release* Unnamed lake in the Walbran Creek Watershed approximately 7 km W/ SW of Mt. Walbran No powered boats No Fishing upstream of the boundary signs at the bridge crossing approximately 10 km from the mouth, Nov 1-Apr 30 No Fishing from Elsie Lake to Dickson Lake No Fishing from Dickson Lake to signs 200 m downstream of Lanternman Falls, Dec 1-Apr 30 No Fishing from Dickson Falls downstream 30 m to signs No angling from boats; ∂ Youth/Disabled Accompanied Water year round (see page 5 in the Provincial Regulations) See Cowichan Lake See Amor de Cosmos Creek Smallmouth bass daily quota = 4; Engine power restriction - 7.5 kW (10 hp) Fly fishing only See Qualicum River No Fishing Dec 1-May 31 and July 15-August 31 No powered boats Trout daily quota = 2 Bait ban, single barbless hook, no trout over 50 cm Bait ban, single barbless hook, trout daily quota = 2 Speed restriction on parts (60 km/h) No Fishing Fly fishing only; Except Thelwood Creek is closed all year No Fishing Feb 1-July 15 including Campbell River between Strathcona Dam and (Lower) Campbell Lake No Fishing between Elk Falls and John Hart Dam Power Station No Fishing from Strathcona Dam downstream 100 m No Fishing from the boundary sign at the end of Maple Street downstream to the boundary sign at the cement block, Aug 1-Oct 31 No Fishing in any tributaries (except Quinsam River), Dec 1-May 31 From John Hart Dam Power Station to power line crossing approximately 200 m upstream of Quinsam River confluence: fly fishing only year-round Artificial fly only downstream of power line crossing approximately 200 m upstream of Quinsam River: Dec 1-May 31 No boats between Elk Falls and John Hart Dam Power Station No Fishing No Fishing Fly fishing only upstream of and including Hatton Creek, No Fishing July 15-August 31 No Fishing downstream of Bannon Creek* July 1-Sept 30 No Fishing upstream of Bannon Creek* Dec 1-Sept 30 No Fishing from Copper Canyon Falls downstream 100 m to the fishing boundary signs Electric motors only No Fishing No trout over 50 cm; bait ban, single barbless hook Electric motors only No Fishing upstream of the West Main logging road bridge (approximately 7.5 km upstream of the Highway 19 bridge), Dec 1-May 31

Page 41

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2019

to 2021

Vancouver Island Fishing Regulations Changes as of April 1, 2019 highlighted.

COLQUITZ RIVER* COMOX LAKE CONSORT CREEK* COPPER CREEK CW

1-1 1-6 1-10 6-12

COURTENAY RIVER COUS CREEK COWICHAN LAKE (including Bear Lake)

1-6 1-7 1-4

COWICHAN RIVER (see map below)

1-4

CRAIGFLOWER CREEK* CRANE LAKE CRESCENT LAKE CRUICKSHANK RIVER* CUSHEON LAKE  DATLAMEN CREEK* CW DAVIE RIVER* DEENA CREEK CW

1-1 1-10 1-10 1-6 1-1 6-13 1-11 6-12

DICKSON LAKE DIMPLE LAKE DIVER LAKE  DONNER LAKE DOUGAN LAKE  DURRANCE LAKE  ECHO LAKE  ELK LAKE 

1-7 1-3 1-5 1-9 1-4 1-1 1-6 1-1

ELK RIVER (Also see Buttle Lake*) ENGLISHMAN RIVER

1-9 1-5

ESARY LAKE EVE RIVER*

1-6 1-10

FAIRY LAKE

1-3

FAREWELL LAKE FICKLE LAKE FLORA LAKE FORBUSH LAKE FRENCH CREEK * FULLER LAKE 

1-10 1-10 1-4 1-6 1-5 1-5

GLEN LAKE  GOLD LAKE

1-2 1-9

Vancouver Island 2019

No Fishing No wild rainbow trout over 50 cm No Fishing No Fishing from Skidegate Lake to signs at second bridge 6km upstream of tidal boundary, Feb 1-Apr 30 Cutthroat trout release Class II water Sept 1-Apr 30*; Steelhead stamp mandatory Dec 1-Apr 30* No Fishing Dec 1-Sept 30; Speed restriction on part (8 km/h), No Fishing Nov 1 - Apr 30 Cutthroat trout daily quota = 2 (none over 50 cm) Bait ban and single barbless hook, Nov 15-Apr 15 Speed restriction on parts (8 km/h), plus overall 10 km/h speed restriction within 60 m of shore No Fishing July 15-August 31, No Fishing from weir (dam) at Cowichan Lake’s outlet to Greendale trestle, Nov 15-Apr 15 No Fishing in tributaries upstream of and including Holt Creek Fly fishing only upstream of CNR trestle (Mile 66) Sept 1-Nov 15 No Fishing downstream of the CNR Mile 66 trestle between Sept 1-Nov 15 Fly fishing only from signs at Greendale trestle to CNR bridge (mile 70.2) Speed restriction (8 km/h) and engine power restriction - 7.5 kW (10 hp) on parts No Fishing Trout release; bait ban, single barbless hook Trout release; bait ban, single barbless hook No Fishing Electric motors only Class II water Sept 1-Apr 30; Steelhead Stamp mandatory Dec 1-Apr 30 No Fishing downstream of Schoen Lake, Dec 1-May 31 No Fishing upstream of fishing boundary signs posted at second bridge approximately 5 km upstream of the tidal boundary*, Feb 1-May 31; Cutthroat trout release Class II water Sept 1-Apr 30; Steelhead Stamp mandatory Dec 1-Apr 30 No trout over 50 cm; bait ban, single barbless hook Trout release; bait ban, single barbless hook Electric motors only;  wheelchair accessible fishing platform located in Diver Lake Park No powered boats Electric motors only Electric motors only Electric motors only Smallmouth bass daily quota = 4 Engine power restriction on parts - 7.5 kW (10 hp); no vessels on parts, no powered boats on parts, no towing on parts  A wheelchair accessible fishing pier is located on the lake’s NW shore via Brookleigh Road Fly fishing only No Fishing July 15-August 31 No Fishing from lower falls in Englishman River Park to signs approximately 100 m downstream No Fishing downstream of the lower falls in Englishman River Falls Provincial Park to the Top Bridge crossing at the end of Allsbrook Road*, Dec 1-May 31 Trout release; bait ban, single barbless hook No Fishing upstream of the fishing boundary signs (near the South Main bridge crossing) located approximately 5.4 km downstream of the Hwy 19 bridge, Dec 1-May 31 Trout daily quota = 1 (none over 50 cm); bait ban, single barbless hook; Engine power restriction 7.5 kW (10 hp) Trout daily quota = 1 (none over 50 cm); artificial fly only, bait ban, single barbless hook No trout over 50 cm; bait ban, single barbless hook Trout release; bait ban, single barbless hook No trout over 50 cm; bait ban, single barbless hook No Fishing Dec 1 - May 31 and July 15-August 31 Smallmouth bass daily quota = 4; Electric motors only;  wheelchair accessible fishing platform is located in Fuller Lake Park Electric motors only; fishing platform is located in Glen Lake Park No trout over 50 cm; bait ban, single barbless hook

Page 42

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2019 to 2021

Vancouver Island Fishing Regulations Changes as of April 1, 2019 highlighted.

GOLD RIVER

1-9

GOLDSTREAM RIVER* GORDON RIVER*

1-2 1-3

GRACIE LAKE  GRAHAM LAKE GREAT CENTRAL LAKE

1-7 1-6 1-7

GREEN LAKE  GREENSTONE CREEK* GUNFLINT LAKE HAGUE LAKE HARRIS CREEK* HAREWOOD (Extension) LAKE HASLAM CREEK HAWARTH LAKE HEALY (Panther) LAKE HEALY LAKE’S OUTLET STREAM HEBER RIVER

1-5 1-10 1-15 1-15 1-3 1-5 1-5 1-9 1-5 1-5 1-9

HEMMINGSEN CREEK* HENRY LAKE HIGGENS LAKE HOLLAND LAKE HONNA RIVER* CW

1-3 1-5 1-10 1-5 6-13

IDA LAKE ILLUSION LAKES JASPER LAKE JOHN HART LAKE’S TRIBUTARIES JUNE LAKE KAKWEIKEN LAKE KAKWEIKEN RIVER* CW KEMP LAKE  KEOGH RIVER

1-11 1-6 1-10 1-10 1-7 1-15 1-15 1-2 1-13

KINGCOME RIVER* CW KOKISH RIVER

1-14 1-11

KOKSILAH RIVER* LAKE WESTON (“Weston Lake”) LANGFORD LAKE 

1-4 1-1 1-2

“LINK” RIVER 1-13 LITTLE MAIN LAKE (Quadra Island) 1-15 LITTLE QUALICUM RIVER 1-6

LIZARD LAKE 

Vancouver Island 2019

1-3

No Fishing upstream of, but excluding the Muchalat River* No Fishing upstream of the Muchalat River*, Dec 1-May 31 (see Muchalat River and Heber River for specific restrictions) No Fishing between the cascade falls (located approximately 6.5 km upstream of Muchalat Inlet, UTM 709137E, 5512420N) and fishing boundary signs approximately 80 m downstream No powered boats No Fishing No Fishing July 15-August 31 No Fishing upstream of Bugaboo Creek, Dec 1 - Apr 30; artifical fly only upstream of Bugaboo Creek when open Electric motors only Electric motors only No Fishing Jan 1-Apr 30, from the dam to fishing boundary signs approximately 50m upstream (southwest) of the Ash Main bridge Single barbless hook, no wild rainbow trout over 50 cm Electric motors only No Fishing Trout release; bait ban, single barbless hook; electric motors only Electric motors only No Fishing July 15-August 31, No Fishing upstream of and including Hemmingsen Creek*, Trout daily quota = 2 No Fishing No Fishing Trout release; fly fishing only, bait ban, single barbless hook No Fishing No Fishing downstream of top of the lower canyon, located approximately 1.3 km upstream of the Gold River confluence No Fishing upstream of top of the lower canyon, Dec 1 - Apr 30 Fly fishing only downstream of Saunders Creek to the top of the lower canyon, May 1 - Nov 30 No Fishing Trout release; artificial fly only, bait ban, single barbless hook Trout release; bait ban, single barbless hook No powered boats Cutthroat trout release Class II water Sept 1-Apr 30; Steelhead Stamp mandatory Dec 1-Apr 30 No trout over 50 cm; bait ban, single barbless hook No powered boats Trout release; bait ban, single barbless hook No fishing Apr 15-July 15 (includes channel downstream of Ladore Dam) Trout daily quota = 2 Trout release; bait ban, single barbless hook Class II water Apr 1 - Oct 31; Steelhead Stamp mandatory Apr 1-June 30 No powered boats No Fishing downstream of lower fish counting fence near tidewater No Fishing in all parts*, Dec 1-May 31 Class II water Apr 1 - Oct 31; Steelhead Stamp mandatory Apr 1-June 30 No Fishing from boundary signs in Kokish canyon to Ida Lake, Nov 1-Apr 30; No Fishing from the log boom located approxinately 100 m upstream of the IPP intake to signs at the tail of the canyon pool located approximately 250 m downstream No Fishing between signs at the IPP tail race confluence downstream approximately 500 m to signs No Fishing Dec 1-May 31 and July 1-Sept 30 Trout daily quota = 1 (none over 50 cm); bait ban, single barbless hook; electric motors only Smallmouth bass daily quota = 4; Electric motors only; fishing platforms are available off Leigh Road and the Nixon Trail See Marble River Bait ban and single barbless hook, Nov 1-Apr 30; electric motors only No Fishing July 15-August 31, No Fishing - All tributaries No Fishing from the falls in Little Qualicum Falls Provincial Park downstream to the hatchery fence, Dec 1-May 31 The standard 100 m closure around a fish rearing facility has been reduced to a no fishing area from the hatchery fence to signs approximately 35 m downstream Fly fishing only, Sept 1-Nov 30 (where open) Trout daily quota = 2; bait ban, single barbless hook; electric motors only

Page 43

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2019

to 2021

Vancouver Island Fishing Regulations Changes as of April 1, 2019 highlighted.

LIZARD POND LOIS LAKE  LONG LAKE (Nanaimo) 

1-7 1-4 1-5

LOON LAKE  MACKTUSH CREEK MAGGIE LAKE MAHATTA RIVER MAIN LAKE (Quadra Island) MAMIN RIVER* CW

1-7 1-7 1-8 1-13 1-15 6-13

MAPLE LAKE  MARBLE (“Link”) RIVER (only between Victoria and Alice lakes) MARTHA LAKE  MATHESON LAKE  “MAXWELL LAKE” (Lake Maxwell) MAYO LAKE  MCKENZIE LAKE MCNAIR LAKE MEGIN LAKE MICHAEL LAKE MILLER CREEK* MINE LAKE MISTY LAKE MOHUN CREEK*

1-6 1-13 1-10 1-2 1-1 1-4 1-2 1-10 1-8 1-5 1-6 1-15 1-13 1-10

MORTE LAKE MUCHALAT RIVER* MYRA LAKE NAHMINT LAKE NAHMINT RIVER

1-15 1-12 1-10 1-7 1-7

NANAIMO RIVER

1-5

NIMPKISH RIVER* NITINAT LAKE

1-11 1-3

NITINAT RIVER*

1-4

NOLA LAKE O’CONNELL LAKE OYSTER RIVER 

1-9 1-13 1-6

PALLANT CREEK* CW PANTHER LAKE PERRY LAKE “PETE’S POND” Unnamed lake at the head of San Juan River PRIOR LAKE  PROSPECT LAKE 

6-12 1-5 1-12 1-3

Trout release; bait ban, single barbless hook Electric motors only Electric motors only ∂ Youth/Disabled Accompanied Water (see page 5 in the Provincial Regulations) No powered boats Trout release; bait ban, single barbless hook No trout over 50 cm; bait ban, single barbless hook No powered boats No Fishing Engine power restriction - 7.5 kW (10 hp) No Fishing (located in an Ecological Reserve) No Fishing Dec 1-May 31 No Fishing from Menzies Bay logging mainline bridge crossing to Morton Lake Electric motors only No Fishing Dec 1 - May 15; No wild rainbow trout over 50 cm No Fishing No trout over 50 cm; bait ban, single barbless hook; engine power restriction 7.5 kW (10 hp) No Fishing Nahmint River (upstream and downstream of the lake), Dec 1-Apr 30; flyfishing only upstream of Nahmint Lake when open No Fishing July 15-August 31 No Fishing from power line crossing at “Bore Hole” upstream to fishing boundary signs at the mouth of Boulder Creek No Fishing from the Cedar Road bridge upstream approximately 400 m to the white square boundary signs near the Hwy 19 bridge, Sept 15-Oct 30 No Fishing upstream of the Hwy 1 bridge*, Dec 1-May 31 Artificial fly only upstream of the westernmost of the two Nanaimo Lakes, known locally as “Second” Lake, including tributaries Engine power restriction on parts - 7.5 kW (10 hp) No Fishing upstream of Davie River, Dec 1-May 15 Note: Nitinat Lake is tidal water; tidal regulations apply and a (federal) Tidal Waters Sport Fishing Licence is required Exempt from July 15-August 31 summer closure No Fishing upstream of Parker Creek No Fishing between fishing boundary signs approximately 100 m upstream of and downstream of “Red Rock Pool,”approximately 2 km (by road) south of the Nitinat River bridge, Aug 25-Dec 31 No Fishing between boundary signs approximately 50 m upstream of and downstream of the Nitinat River bridge, Aug 25-Oct 15 No Fishing No trout over 50 cm; bait ban, single barbless hook Exempt from July 15-August 31 summer closure No Fishing upstream of the confluence with Little Oyster River*, Dec 1-June 30 Class II water Sept 1-Apr 30; Steelhead Stamp mandatory Dec 1-Apr 30 See Healy Lake Trout daily quota = 1 (none over 50 cm); bait ban, single barbless hook Trout release; artificial fly only, bait ban, single barbless hook

1-2 1-2

No powered boats Smallmouth bass daily quota = 4 ; Speed restriction on parts (8 and 60 km/h)

Vancouver Island 2019

Trout daily quota = 1; artificial fly only, bait ban, single barbless hook Trout daily quota = 1; Artificial fly only, bait ban, single barbless hook Speed restriction on parts (60 km/h);  wheelchair accessible fishing platform is located in Loudon Park Electric motors only No Fishing No wild rainbow trout over 50 cm; bait ban, single barbless hook No Fishing Nov 1-Apr 30 Bait ban and single barbless hook, Nov 1-Apr 30; Engine power restriction - 7.5 kW (10 hp) Class II water Sept 1-Apr 30; Steelhead Stamp mandatory Dec 1-Apr 30 No Fishing upstream of fishing boundary signs posted on third bridge approximately 10 km upstream of the tidal boundary, Feb 1-Apr 30 Electric motors only Fly fishing only*

Page 44

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2019 to 2021

Vancouver Island Fishing Regulations Changes as of April 1, 2019 highlighted.

PROVOST DAM PUNTLEDGE RIVER

1-5 1-6

QUALICUM RIVER

1-6

QUATSE RIVER* 

1-13

QUENNELL LAKE  QUINSAM RIVER*

1-5 1-6

REGAN LAKE REGINALD LAKE  ROBERTS LAKE ROSELLE LAKE ROSEN LAKE (Read Island) ROWBOTHAM LAKE ST. MARY LAKE  SALMON RIVER*

1-6 1-6 1-10 1-11 1-15 1-5 1-11 1-10

SAN JUAN RIVER* SEYMOUR RIVER CW SHAWNIGAN LAKE  SOMASS RIVER 

1-3 1-14 1-2 1-7

SOOKE RIVER*

1-2

SPIDER LAKE  SPROAT LAKE SPROAT RIVER

1-6 1-7 1-7

STAMP RIVER 

1-7

STEWART LAKE

1-10

Vancouver Island 2019

No powered boats Exempt from July 15-August 31 summer closure No Fishing downstream of the BC Hydro diversion dam (approximately 3.5 km downstream of Comox Lake) to the base of Stotan Falls (approximately 450 m downstream of the Duncan Bay Mainline logging road bridge) No Fishing between fishing boundary signs approximately 100 m upstream and downstream of the confluence with Morrison Creek No Fishing from fishing boundary signs located 50 m upstream of the BC Hydro generating station tailrace to signs located 75 m downstream of the Puntledge River hatchery fence (total distance approximately 500 m); No Fishing tributaries; Fly fishing only upstream of the BC Hydro diversion dam (approximately 3.5 km downstream of Comox Lake), including tributaries No Fishing downstream of boundary signs located approximately 100 m downstream of the hatchery counting fence; No Fishing from E&N trestle to boundary signs located approximately 100 m downstream of the hatchery counting fence, Aug 10-Oct 15; No Fishing tributaries single barbless hook, no hooks greater than 15mm from point to shank Exempt from July 15-August 31 summer closure,  wheelchair accessible fishing platform is located at the hatchery No Fishing May 1-June 15 Hatchery steelhead daily quota = 1 No Fishing upstream of the Quatse River fishway (approximately 1.4 km upstream of Dick Booth Creek), Dec 1-June 15 Bait ban, May 1-Nov 30 Smallmouth bass daily quota = 4; Speed restriction on parts (8 km/h) No Fishing from the fishing boundary signs at power line crossing (approximately 25 m upstream of Quinsam Hatchery weir) to fishing boundary signs approximately 300 m downstream of weir No Fishing from the falls situated downstream of Middle Quinsam Lake to the fishing boundary signs at power line crossing (approximately 25 m upstream of the Quinsam hatchery weir) , Dec 1-June 30 Exempt from July 15-August 31 summer closure;  wheelchair accessible fishing platform is located near the Hwy 28 bridge Trout release; bait ban, single barbless hook Trout release; bait ban, single barbless hook No trout over 50 cm; bait ban, single barbless hook Trout daily quota = 2 No powered boats Trout release; artificial fly only, bait ban, single barbless hook Electric motors only No Fishing upstream of Kay Creek No powered boats upstream of confluence with White River; speed restriction (10 km/h) from estuary to confluence with White River No Fishing upstream of Fleet River, No Fishing July 15-August 31 Class II water Aug 15-Oct 31*; Steelhead Stamp not required unless fishing for steelhead Smallmouth bass daily quota = 4; Speed restrictions on parts (8 and 65 km/h) No Fishing between the tidal boundary at Papermill Dam to boundary signs approximately 1.0 km upstream (Falls Road Gravel Pit and the southern most end of Collins Farm/Arrow Vale Campground on Hector Road), Aug 25-Nov 15 Bait ban, June 1-Aug 24 Engine power restriction 7.5 kW (10 hp) Fly fishing only downstream of Sooke River Falls, Sept 1-Nov 30 No Fishing July 15-August 31, No Fishing from the base of the lower “potholes” falls to signs approximately 100m downstream Smallmouth bass daily quota = 4; no powered boats Cutthroat trout release, no wild rainbow trout over 50 cm; single barbless hook No Fishing from Sproat Lake to fishing boundary signs approximately 300 m downstream of Hwy #4, June 15-Nov 15 Bait ban, May 1-Oct 31 No Fishing between fishing boundary signs 200m upstream of and 500m downstream of Stamp Falls, June 15-Nov15 No Fishing from the confluence with Ash River upstream to the Great Central Lake dam*, Jan 1-Apr 30 Bait ban all year upstream of signs at “Girl Guide Falls” (approximately 250 m upstream of the mouth of Beaver Creek)* Bait ban downstream of signs at “Girl Guide Falls” (approximately 250 m upstream of the mouth of Beaver Creek), June 1-Aug 24 Engine power restriction 7.5 kW (10 hp), on parts No trout over 50 cm; bait ban, single barbless hook; electric motors only

Page 45

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2019

to 2021

Vancouver Island Fishing Regulations Changes as of April 1, 2019 highlighted.

STOCKING LAKE “STOWELL LAKE” (Lake Stowell)  STRAMBERG LAKE STRATHCONA PARK WATERS

1-5 1-1 1-15 1-9

TADJISS LAKE  TAYLOR RIVER THELWOOD CREEK THETIS LAKE  TLELL RIVER* CW

1-4 1-7 1-9 1-1 6-13

TLOWILS LAKE TLOOLS LAKE TOQUART LAKE TOQUART RIVER*

1-10 1-9 1-8 1-8

TOY LAKE TRENT RIVER* TSABLE RIVER* TSABLE LAKE TSITIKA RIVER

1-7 1-6 1-6 1-6 1-10

TSOLUM RIVER* UNNAMED LAKE “A” - MAP A, on p.20 UNNAMED LAKE “B” - MAP A, on p.20 UNNAMED LAKE “C” - MAP B, on p.20 UNNAMED LAKE “D” - MAP B, on p.20 UNNAMED LAKE “E” - MAP B, on p.20 UNNAMED LAKE “F” - MAP B, on p.20 UNNAMED LAKE “G” - MAP B, on p.20 UNNAMED LAKE “H” - MAP B, on p.20 UNNAMED LAKE “I” - MAP B, on p.20 VILLAGE BAY LAKE

1-6 1-10 1-10 1-10 1-10 1-10 1-10 1-10 1-10 1-10 1-15

WAHPEETO CREEK

1-14

WAKEMAN RIVER* CW “WESTON LAKE” WESTWOOD LAKE 

1-14 1-1 1-5

WHITE RIVER*

1-10

WILLEMAR LAKE WOWO LAKE 

1-6 1-6

YAKOUN RIVER* CW

6-13

ZEBALLOS LAKE ZEBALLOS RIVER*

1-12 1-12

No powered boats Electric motors only Trout release; bait ban, single barbless hook; electric motors only No powered boats on any water within Strathcona Park except Gold, Upper Campbell and Buttle lakes Trout daily quota = 1; artificial fly only, bait ban, single barbless hook Fly fishing only No Fishing Electric motors only Cutthroat trout rlease; Class II water Sept 1-Apr 30; Steelhead Stamp mandatory Dec 1-Apr 30 Tidal waters regulations apply to waters downstream of tidal boundary sign located 1.5 km upstream of Hwy 16 bridge Electric motors only No Fishing No trout over 50 cm; bait ban, single barbless hook Flyfishing only upstream of the Toquart mainline logging bridge when open; No Fishing upstream of the boundary sign located near the falls approximately 800 m downstream of Toquart Lake (including the Upper Toquart River) between Nov 1-May 31. Note: this includes the river upstream of the lake Trout daily quota = 2; bait ban, single barbless hook No Fishing Dec 1-May 31 and July 15-August 31 No Fishing Dec 1-May 31 and July 15-August 31 Trout release; bait ban, single barbless hook No Fishing upstream of Catherine Creek, Nov 1-Apr 30, fly fishing only downstream of Catherine Creek No Fishing Trout release; bait ban, single barbless hook Trout release; bait ban, single barbless hook Trout daily quota = 2; bait ban, single barbless hook Trout daily quota = 2; bait ban, single barbless hook Trout release; bait ban, single barbless hook Trout daily quota = 2; bait ban, single barbless hook Trout daily quota = 2; bait ban, single barbless hook Trout release; bait ban, single barbless hook Trout daily quota = 2; bait ban, single barbless hook Bait ban and single barbless hook, Nov 1-Apr 30 Engine power restriction - 7.5 kW (10 hp) No Fishing within 100 m downstream of the falls situated approximately 4.5 km upstream of Wakeman River Class II water Apr 1 - Oct 31; Steelhead Stamp mandatory Apr 1-June 30 See Lake Weston Smallmouth bass daily quota = 4  wheelchair accessible fishing platform is located in Westwood Lake Park No Fishing between fishing boundary signs at the salmon viewing pool No Fishing upstream of the Sayward Road Bridge crossing, Nov 1-Apr 30 No trout over 50 cm; bait ban, single barbless hook Trout daily quota = 2; artificial fly only, bait ban, single barbless hook Electric motors only No Fishing from Yakoun Lake downstream approximately 13km to posted fishing boundary signs, Oct 1-Apr 30 Cutthroat trout release; No powered boats Class II water Sept 1-Apr 30; Steelhead Stamp mandatory Dec 1-Apr 30 No Fishing No Fishing Nov 1-Apr 30

Please Note: Provincial wide regulations also apply. Download the complete regulations to view these rules. www.env.gov.bc.ca/fw/fish/regulations/

Vancouver Island 2019

Page 46

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2019 Chinook Update

What you need to know about the Chinook retention changes: Johnstone Strait and Northern Strait of Georgia • Until July 14th: Non-retention • July 15th to August 29th: Daily limit of one (1) • August 30th to December 31st: Daily limit of two (2) Strait Juan de Fuca and Southern Strait of Georgia • Until July 31st: Non-retention • August 1st to August 29th: Daily limit of one (1) • August 30th to December 31st: Daily limit of two (2) West Coast Vancouver Island Offshore • Until July 14th: Non-retention • July 15th to December 31st: Daily limit of two (2)

What you need to know about the Total annual retention reduced from thirty (30) to ten (10) Chinook retention changes Johnstone Strait and Northern Strait of Georgia • Until July 14th: Non-retention • July 15th to August 29th: Daily limit of one (1) • August 30th to December 31st: Daily limit of two (2) Strait Juan de Fuca and Southern Strait of Georgia • Until July 31st: Non-retention • August 1st to August 29th: Daily limit of one (1) • August 30th to December 31st: Daily limit of two (2)

Closure of Fraser River recreational remains inofplace at least West Coast Vancouver Is- fishingRetention twountil (2) ChiAugust 23rd land Offshore nook per day remains for

Northern BC and inshore • Until July 14th: Non-retenRetention of of twoWest (2) Chinook day areas Coast per Vantion for Northern • July 15th to December remains couver Island.BC and inshore 31st: Daily limit of two (2) areas of West Coast Vancouver Island. Information current as of Information current as of April 18th, April 18th, 2019. Total annual retention 2019. Visit http://www.dfo-mpo.gc.ca reduced from thirty (30) to up-to-date information about regulaten (10) Visit www.dfo-mpo.gc.ca tion changes and closures up-to-date information Closure of Fraser River about regulation changes and closures. recreational fishing remains in place until at least August 23rd Photo submitted by Angler’s Atlas member Kelly Riehl.


Vancouver Island 2019 Fishing BC Member Directory BUSINESS NAME Absolute Sportfishing AG-Fish Enterprises Alan Boyd, Wild Pacific Charters Albion Charters Alpine Marine Andrew Luch, Andrews West Coast Adventures ATP Bait & Tackle Barkley Sound Lodge Bear Cove Cottages Sportfishing Big Creek Lodge Bill Murray Bill Sargent Bob Matlock, Haggard Cove Resort Braedy Mack Charters Brant Peniuk, Peniuk's Sportfishing Adventures Brian Devlin, Brian's 6 Pac Fishing Charters Brian’s 6 Pac Fishing Charters Brigham Smith, Offshore Fishing Brown’s Bay Resort Carl Archibald Castle Point Charters Chad Calder, Coastwide Sports Fishing Chris Ranger, Tides and Tales Sportfishing Adventures Clayoquot Ventures Cleanline Sportfishing Ltd. Coastal Charters Coastal Island Fishing Adventures Coastal Wilderness Adventures Coastwide Sports Fishing Codfather Charters Ltd. Critter Cove Marine Group Inc. Curtis Smith, Coastal Wilderness Adventures Dan Bishop Dan Harvey, Pacific Sport Fishing Charters Dave Hunchak Dean McLaren, Powell River Sportfishing Don H. Parrish Doug Lindores Eagle Manor Resort Eiji Umemura, AG-Fish Enterprises Fishers Island Adventures Foghorn Fishing Charters Gary Stotts, Coastal Island Fishing Adventures Gerry Rupp, Invictus Charters Glenn Hamilton, Tides and Tales Sportfishing Adventures Gordon Martin, Foghorn Fishing Charters Greg Grieve Haggard Cove Resort Harry MacDonald, Mid Island Fishing Charters Hidden Cove Lodge Hindsight Fishing Charters Hook’N Them Up Fishing Charters Invictus Charters Island Outfitters Ltd Jackson Jane James Fisher, Fishers Island Adventures Jeremy Maynard Guiding

EMAIL fishbonz@telus.net agfish@connected.bc.ca N/A murray@albioncharters.com alpinemarine@shaw.ca andrewluch@hotmail.com atpbaitandtackle@shaw.ca chad@barkleysoundlodge.com info@bearcovecottages.ca jhoessl@bigcreeklodgebc.com fishshack17@gmail.com bsargent1@shaw.ca bmatlock@shaw.ca jeff@fishingtofino.ca brantpeniuk@gmail.com backlash@telus.net backlash@telus.net offshorefishing@shaw.ca marina@brownsbayresort.com carl_archibald@hotmail.com castlept@telus.net chad@coastwidesportsfishing.com ranger@telus.net info@tofinofishing.com blake@cleanlinesportfishing.com N/A gary@coastalislandfishing.com fish@coastwild.com chad@coastwidesportsfishing.com info@codfathercharters.com info@crittercove.com fish@coastwild.com danbishop@shaw.ca steelhead07@hotmail.com hunchaks@telus.net powellriversportfishing@gmail.com donhparrish@hotmail.com dlindy@shaw.ca eagleman@island.net agfish@connected.bc.ca fish@fishersadventures.com gord@foghorncharters.com gary@coastalislandfishing.com grupp@shaw.ca glennham@hotmail.com gord@foghorncharters.com greggrieve@hotmail.com N/A info@midislandfishing.com hidcl@island.net john@hindsightfishing.com fishguy007@gmail.com invictuscharters@shaw.ca info@fishingvictoria.com jjane93@hotmail.com fish@fishersadventures.com jmaynard@island.net

PHONE (250) 287-2210 (250) 285-2770 N/A (250) 726-8761 (250) 474-2448 (250) 619-4999 (250) 478-5935 (250) 702-2179 (877) 949-7939 (250) 394-4831 (250) 465-2292 N/A N/A (250) 726-8499 (250) 830-7108 (250) 286-6245 (250) 286-6245 (250) 882-9039 (250) 286-3135 (647) 862-3213 (250) 949-9294 (604) 765-0436 (250) 949-2713 (250) 725-2700 (855) 726-3828 (778) 891-3845 (250) 287-3831 (250) 205-0022 (604) 765-0436 (250) 949-6696 (250) 283-7366 (250) 287-3427 N/A (250) 954-3997 (250) 923-7603 (604) 223-5394 (250) 830-7276 (250) 724-2502 (250) 949-2685 (250) 285-2770 (250) 871-3474 (250) 658-1848 (250) 287-3831 (250) 722-7201 N/A (250) 658-1848 (250) 339-6978 (250) 468-6374 (250) 923-2236 (250) 956-3916 (250) 483-1353 (250) 956-3474 (250) 722-7201 (250) 475-4969 (250) 715-5600 (250) 702-6309 (250) 203-1602

WEBSITE absolutesportfishing.ca agfish.net wildpacificcharters.com westcoastfishingbc.com alpinemarine.ca andrewswestcoastadventures.com atpbait.com barkleysoundlodge.com bearcovecottages.ca bigcreeklodgebc.com N/A N/A haggardcove.com fishingtofino.ca peniukssportfishing.com brians6pac.com brians6pac.com N/A brownsbayresort.com N/A castlepointcharters.com coastwidesportsfishing.com tidesandtales.com tofinofishing.com cleanlinesportfishing.com coastalcharters.ca coastalislandfishing.com coastwild.com oastwidesportsfishing.com codfathercharters.com crittercove.com coastwild.com N/A pacificsportsfishing.ca N/A powellriversportfishing.com N/A N/A N/A agfish.net fishersadventures.com foghorncharters.com oastalislandfishing.com invictuscharters.com tidesandtales.com foghorncharters.com N/A haggardcove.com midislandfishing.com hiddencovelodge.com hindsightfishing.com vanislefishing.com invictuscharters.com fishingvictoria.com N/A fishersadventures.com theardentangler.com

TYPE Charters & Guides Charters & Guides Certified Tidal Angling Guides Charters & Guides Tackle & Marine Retail Certified Tidal Angling Guides Tackle & Marine Retail Resort/Lodges Charters & Guides Resort/Lodges Certified Tidal Angling Guides Certified Tidal Angling Guides Certified Tidal Angling Guides Charters & Guides Certified Tidal Angling Guides Certified Tidal Angling Guides Charters & Guides Certified Tidal Angling Guides Resort/Lodges Certified Tidal Angling Guides Charters & Guides Certified Tidal Angling Guides Certified Tidal Angling Guides Charters & Guides Charters & Guides Charters & Guides Charters & Guides Charters & Guides Charters & Guides Charters & Guides Resort/Lodges Certified Tidal Angling Guides Certified Tidal Angling Guides Certified Tidal Angling Guides Certified Tidal Angling Guides Certified Tidal Angling Guides Certified Tidal Angling Guides Certified Tidal Angling Guides Resort/Lodges Certified Tidal Angling Guides Charters & Guides Charters & Guides Certified Tidal Angling Guides Certified Tidal Angling Guides Certified Tidal Angling Guides Certified Tidal Angling Guides Certified Tidal Angling Guides Charters & Guides Certified Tidal Angling Guides Resort/Lodges Charters & Guides Charters & Guides Charters & Guides Tackle & Marine Retail Certified Tidal Angling Guides Certified Tidal Angling Guides Charters & Guides


Vancouver Island 2019 Fishing BC Member Directory BUSINESS NAME Jigs & Reels Fishing Jim Henschke, Castle Point Charters John Nikiforuk, Tonquin Fishing Charters John Reynolds, Jigs & Reels Fishing Josh Temple, www.primetimeadv.com Ken Fuller, No Bull Charters Larry Weber, Leisure Suit Charters Last Cast Guiding Laurel Gareau, Absolute Sportfishing Leisure Suit Charters Lochie MacKenzie, Tofino Fish Guides Lucky Sportfishing at Eagle Nook Resort Michael McLennan Mid Island Fishing Charters Mike Kelly, Codfather Charters Ltd. Murphy’s Sportfishing Nick Yanchuk, Morning Magic Sportfishing Nimmo Bay Resort No Bananas Fishing Charters No Bull Charters Nootka Marine Adventures Nootka Wilderness Lodge Oak Bay Marine Group Offshore Fishing Pacific Gateway Wilderness Lodge Pacific Sportfishing Charters Pat Ahern, Last Cast Guiding Peter Geneau Port Boat House Quatsino Lodge Reel Obsession Sportfishing Richard Rawlings Rip & Reel Sportfishing Rob Brandon, Runaway Adventures Rob Havers, West Coast Resorts Ron Doumont, Rip & Reel Sportfishing Rugged Point Lodge Runaway Adventures Ryan Chamberland, Vancouver Island Lodge Salmon Eye Charters Sidetrack Charters Slivers Charters Stephen Johnston Steven Cahill, Hook'N Them Up Fishing Charters Sunshine Bay Resort Tall Tale Charters Tides & Tales Sport Fishing Adventures Tides and Tales Sportfishing Adventures Tofino Fish Guides Tofino Resort & Marina Tonquin Fishing Charters Trevor Zboyovsky, No Bananas Fishing Charters Vancouver Island Lodge Walters Cove Resort Ward Bond, Island Outfitters Ltd Westview Marina & Lodge Wild Pacific Charters

EMAIL info@jigsandreels.net castlept@telus.net info@tonquincharters.com john1.reynolds@shaw.ca captjosh@me.com nobull@island.net N/A pat.ahern@shaw.ca N/A larry@leisuresuitcharters.com lochie@tofinofishguides.com dan@luckysportfishing.com mikemclennan1990@hotmail.com info@midislandfishing.com N/A murphy@island.net N/A heli@nimmobay.com N/A nobull@island.net info@nootkamarineadventures.com N/A N/A offshorefishing@shaw.ca info@pacificgatewaylodge.com dcharvey07@gmail.com N/A petergeneau@hotmail.com sales@portboathouse.com thequatsinolodge@gmail.com adrian@reelobsession.ca N/A info@ripandreel.com N/A tyee51@hotmail.com N/A info@ruggedpointlodge.com r.brandon@shaw.ca ryan@vancouverislandlodge.ca info@salmoneye.net fishing@sidetrackcharters.com dlindy@shaw.ca stephendanjohnston@gmail.com fishinguy007@gmail.com N/A sbabcock@talltale.bc.ca info@tidesandtales.com tides@island.net info@tofinofishguides.com info@tofinoresortandmarina.com info@tonquincharters.com info@nobananas.ca vancouverislandlodge@gmail.com gofishing@walterscoveresort.com N/A info@westviewmarina.com fish@wildpacificcharters.com

PHONE (877) 923-0856 (250) 949-9294 (250) 725-3184 (250) 204-3390 (250) 266-1987 (250) 949-6990 N/A (250) 954-8060 N/A (250) 902-9493 N/A (250) 880-0636 N/A (250) 923-2236 N/A (250) 723-2772 N/A (250) 956-4000 (250) 812-2123 (250) 230-2590 (877) 337-5464 (250) 850-1500 (250) 598-3366 (250) 882-9039 (888) 493-8933 (250) 954-3997 N/A N/A (250) 724-5754 (250) 338-7473 (250) 391-6691 N/A (250) 390-4744 N/A (250) 478-4120 N/A (250) 332-5220 (250) 723-6586 N/A (250) 757-8335 (250) 881-1801 (250) 724-2502 N/A (250) 956-3474 (250) 723-6700 (250) 287-6021 (250) 949-0641 (250) 949-0641 (250) 266-0587 (844) 680-4184 (250) 725-3184 N/A (250) 858-3611 (250) 287-2223 N/A (250) 934-7672 (250) 735-9453

WEBSITE N/A castlepointcharters.com tonquinfishingcharters.com N/A primetimeadv.com nobullcharters.com leisuresuitcharters.com lastcastguiding.com absolutesportfishing.ca leisuresuitcharters.com tofinofishguides.com eaglenook.com N/A midislandfishing.com tidesandtales.com murphysportfishing.com morningmagic.com nimmobay.com nobananas.ca www.nobullcharters.com nootkamarineadventures.com nootkawildernesslodge.com obmg.com N/A pacificgatewaylodge.com pacificsportsfishing.ca lastcastguiding.com N/A portboathouse.com quatsinolodge.com reelobsession.ca N/A N/A runawayadventuressportfishing.ca westcoastresorts.com N/A ruggedpointlodge.com runawayadventuressportfishing.ca N/A salmoneye.net sidetrackcharters.com catchsalmon-ca.com N/A vanislefishing.com sunshinebayresort.com.my talltale.bc.ca tidesandtales.com tidesandtales.com tofinofishguides.com tofinoresortandmarina.com tonquinfishingcharters.com nobananas.ca vancouverislandlodge.ca walterscoveresort.com fishingvictoria.com westviewmarina.com wildpacificcharters.com

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2018 Vancouver Island Fish Stocking Report Waterbody

ANTLER BATTLESHIP BEAVERTAIL BLINKHORN BOOT BRANNEN CHEMAINUS CHICADEE CIRCLET CLUXEWE R COLLIERY#1 COLLIERY#2 COLLIERY#3 COLWOOD CUSHEON DARKIS DIVER DOUGAN DURRANCE ECHO ELK FROST FULLER GLEN GRACIE GRAY GREEN

Species

RB RB RB RB RB RB RB CT RB ST RB RB RB RB CT RB RB RB RB RB RB RB RB RB RB RB RB

Released

750 500 1,500 400 1,500 3,000 3,500 600 300 20,859 3,500 3,250 2,000 500 500 500 3,000 3,000 5,000 2,500 20,193 500 7,750 2,250 1,000 1,000 4,000

Waterbody

HELLDIVER IDAANNE KEMP KISSINGER KWAI LANGFORD LARRY LIZARD LOIS LONG LOOKOUT LOON MAGIC MALASPINA MAPLE MATHESON MAYO MCCLURE NIMNIM OKAY OYSTER R POIRIER PROSPECT QUAMICHAN QUAMICHAN QUATSE R QUENNELL

Species

CT RB RB RB RB RB RB RB RB RB RB RB RB RB RB RB RB CT RB RB ACT RB RB CT RB ST RB

Released

500 950 2,500 2,000 200 6,497 750 750 250 7,500 1,500 2,500 1,000 1,000 7,750 2,000 1,550 2,000 1,000 500 4,910 850 10,308 1,500 1,000 21,429 5,000

Waterbody

REGAN REGINALD RHODODENDRON SHAWNIGAN SHELTON SOMASS R SOMENOS SPECTACLE SPIDER ST. MARY ST. MARY STAR STOWELL TADJISS THETIS WESTWOOD WOLF WOWO

Species

RB RB CT RB RB ST RB RB RB CT RB RB RB RB RB RB CT RB

Released

500 600 500 8,500 450 40,529 1,000 2,500 7,500 2,000 5,000 500 500 250 4,000 7,500 2,500 500

Stock Species Codes:v ACT Anadromous Coastal Cutthroat Trout CT Coastal Trout RB Rainbow Trout ST Steelhead For more information on Fish Stocking in British Columbia, visit: www.GoFishBC.com


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Profile for Angler's Atlas

2019 Vancouver Island Fishing - Angler's Atlas  

Fishing is an important part of the culture on Vancouver Island. With endless opportunities for both salt and freshwater fishing, this guide...

2019 Vancouver Island Fishing - Angler's Atlas  

Fishing is an important part of the culture on Vancouver Island. With endless opportunities for both salt and freshwater fishing, this guide...

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