Page 1

Eastern Ontario

Fishing Regulations page 32-34 Fish Stocking page 31

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2019

5th Edition

Frontenac Park Largemouth

WINNER

Todd Kohut

“6 pound largemouth caught by my 12 year old son on a canoe trip.”

Help with Conservation in Canada! Get the updated MyCatch app. More on pages 6-7.


CANADA’S FISHING STORE For days like today TM

TM

LIVE YOUR OUTDOOR LIFE Photo by Angler’s Atlas member iamdros

FISHING

ONTARIO - EAST

Whether you are fishing along the mighty rivers or exploring in the land of lakes, Canadian Tire has you covered for all your fishing and camping needs. Visit a local store today. ONTARIO’S

TOP BRAND

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Photo by Angler’s Atlas member ds5295024

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brand of lure by 37% of Angler’s Atlas members.

• The Rapala Husky Jerk Lure can be cast or trolled at any speed and still run true • Rattle chamber transmits sound waves that amplify through the water • Premium VMC black nickel hooks • Lure weight: 1/8 oz (3.5 g). Available in a variety of colours Photo by Angler’s Atlas member Supernewf71

Photo by Angler’s Atlas member stevedowner


“The very good news for 2019 is that inside the surf line of all of Area 25, Chinook Salmon regulation will remain the same.” John Falavolito, owner Westview Marina and Lodge. To learn more about the 2019 fishing regulations in John’s area, give him a call at 250-934-7672!

FULL LIMITS FOR 2019 Happy angler with a really big Lingcod. Westview Marina and Lodge.

(250) 934-7672 | info@westviewmarina.com | www.westviewmarina.com


CONTENTS W

IN

NE

R!

ON THE COVER! “Six pound largemouth caught by my 12 year old son on a canoe trip.” Submitted by Todd Kohut.

Eastern Ontario KEY MAP

E

astern Ontario offers nearly everything you could want for recreational fishing. For the seasoned fly caster or a vacationing family, there is such an abundance of lakes, rivers and streams, and so many different fish species, that a general guide like this one will come in handy. Most lakes in this region contain largemouth and smallmouth bass, as well as rock bass, which can be fun for the kids to go after with a hook and worm. Lake trout, northern pike, whitefish, carp, perch, crappie and pan fish abound. There is trophy fishing for pike, bass, walleye and musky. Entire regions rely on the recreational sport fishery as an economic base.

FEATURES

18

Rideau Canal Fisheries Research How do the Rideau Canal locks affect fish populations? Steven Cooke’s Fish Ecology Lab from Carleton is tagging 10,000 fish to find out. Learn more about this project and how you can help with our MyCatch app. More on page 18.!

31

Fish Stocking

32

Fishing Regulations

page

ST. LAWRENCE

6

Has your favourite lake been stocked with fish? Want to catch four different species of trout? Find out on page 31.

You’ll need these before heading out! Take a look at the fishing regulations on pages 32-34.

Check out what SDG Counties has to offer on pages 6-7.

In Eastern Ontario, most lakes are highly accessible, which makes it easy for anyone to get out, whether it be for a weekend or a quick evening trip. And everyone, from first-time anglers to pro staff, will find places where the fishing can be as easy or challenging as you like, often all on the same lake. We can’t forget the rivers! The rivers in Eastern Ontario are just as fishing-friendly as the lakes. The Rideau River, Napanee River, and even the massive St. Lawrence River, are all there for anglers to enjoy. Anglers must possess an Outdoors Card and a valid fishing licence tag. These two documents together represent your li-


cence to fish. Anglers can choose a sport licence or a conservation licence, which is used by catch-and-release anglers. Spread the joy of fishing by taking advantage of Ontario Family Fishing Weekend, a licencefree weekend held every February and July to encourage participation. Ice fishing is popular sport in Eastern Ontario between January and March, and many species of fish are even more active in the winter. Walleye, perch and pike are just a few of the typical ice fishing targets. Many lakes in Ontario are managed for particular species. Check the regulations at ontario.ca/ travel-and-recreation/ice-fishing and in the back of this guide. Wherever you go, you’ll be hooking into some excellent fishing, and these lakes are just a small sample of the great fishing areas in this region. For every great lake featured here, there are dozens more to explore. We’d love to hear about some of your other favourite fishing lakes! Head over to anglersatlas. com and check out our new website! We’ve got new search functions, so you can even look for all of the lakes in the region that have your favourite fish in them. That’s just one of the great new features we’ve got in place for members. Recruit your friends, too, for chances to win! Make sure to check out our new app, MyCatch, before your next trip. MyCatch allows you to log or live track you fish trips and catches, while confidentially contributing to fisheries research as a citizen scientist. Visit anglersatlas.com/mycatch for more details.

PUBLISHER Sean Simmons PRODUCTION Jane Gauthier, Fraser Hayes, Jamie Svendsen CONTRIBUTORS “Chris”, “sturner”, Al Chouinard, Garry Fisher, Hidden Cove Cottage and Resort, Sebastian Kowalczuk, John LaFrance, Adam Leach, Alex Nutt, Sheena Pillay, Trish Richardson, Chuck Shaw, John Sideris DIGITAL + DESIGN Joel Knudsen, Clayton Green, Eric Pinfold ADVERTISING

Jane Gauthier, Dallas Kirkpatrick, Dave Ouellette, Raeanne O’Meara, Sean Simmons Angler’s Atlas is owned by Goldstream Publishing Inc. Suite 210-500 Victoria St. Prince George, BC V2L 2J9 (250) 596-6277 mail@anglersatlas.com www.AnglersAtlas.com

The rivers in Eastern Ontario are just as fishingfriendly as the lakes. The Rideau River, Napanee River, and even the massive St. Lawrence River, are all there for anglers to enjoy.

EASTERN ONTARIO FISHING 2019 5TH EDITION


SDG COUNTIES AND CORNWALL SPORTFISHING MAP

ST.LAWRENCE RIVER

MORE INFO

www.WhereOntarioBegan.ca www.cornwalltourism.com


CORNWALL AND SDG COUNTIES

A

ll water flowing from the Great Lakes passes through the St. Lawrence River, making it one of the largest river systems in the country. Throughout this river system there are more than 20 species of sport fish to target. 50 km southwest of Montreal, along the St. Lawrence River, you’ll find the SDG Counties including the City of Cornwall. From boat or shore, this section of river is well regarded for its world class fishing.

There are several charter opera­ tions on this section of the St. Lawrence that will teach you their trade secrets on how to fish these waters. Remember that the St. Lawrence River shares a border with the United States. Use navigation charts if you are planning to get close to it. CORNWALL

Cornwall acts as a great homebase for fishing around the area. There are two free boat launches and plenty of supply stores to make sure you have a successful day on the river. Take advantage of free Whether you’re looking to target family fishing events Father’s Day heart of the river. It also boasts pike, walleye, perch, carp, bass, Weekend, June 15­16, and Family the largest public beach on the St. Lawrence corridor (Mille Roches), bluegill, or muskie, there are Fishing Week, June 29­July 7. winding bike paths, pristine nature endless options along this stretch GLENGARRY trails, boat launches, picnic parks, of river. Visitors will appreciate CAMPGROUND diving and remarkable fishing. the change of pace when compared to neighboring Montreal and Less than an hour west of MORRISBURG Ottawa. Cornwall has all the Montreal, Some 183 campsites are amenities of a big city including situated among a towering stand of Home to one stop of the Renegade restaurants, hotels, and shopping, old growth pine. The region is an Bass fishing tour, Morrisburg with a quante, small town feel angler’s paradise, boasting some boasts to a truly world class bass and friendliness. There are many of the best bass and carp fishing fishery. Anglers also report success options for accommodations in anywhere, in fact, in July of 2010 trolling for walleye in this area. Cornwall and SDG Counties, and the largest bass in North America Try trolling crankbaits for walleye in the early season and drag tubes no matter where you choose to was caught just offshore. for smallmouth bass in the fall. stay, you’ll be close to a marina to launch a boat, or a beach to fish GREY’S CREEK UPPER CANADA from shore. With great spring fishing for MIGRATORY Typically fishing is strongest be­ bluegill, crappie, and perch, BIRD SANCTUARY tween June and September. For Gray’s Creek Conservation Area CAMPGROUND those targeting Muskie, you may is only minutes east of Cornwall, Turn your fishing trip into a want to extend that season into in the beautiful Township of South learning adventure at one of North Glengarry. October and even November, when America’s only campgrounds the Muskie come up to shallower IROQUOIS located in the heart of a bird depths as the water cools. The section of river close to the sanctuary. The nature reserve The Renegade Bass Tour community of Iroquois can be features 69 campsites and five includes the St. Lawrence River excellent for smallmouth bass. group campgrounds, a Visitor in Morrisburg for one of it’s When targeting bass try dropshot Interpretive Centre with displays qualifying events. Taking place on with four to five­inch soft plastic and themed merchandise, 8 August 10th, registration for 2019 baits in darker patterns near rocky kilometres of self guided hiking is full, but that doesn’t mean you shoals, deep underwater points, trails and, of course, abundant wildlife with over 150 different can’t participate in the event. This and weed edges. bird species. The Sanctuary’s stop on the tour is always well Morrison Island offers some of the attended with spectators enjoying LONG SAULT PARKWAY live weigh­ins, prizes, and gear. A series of eleven islands sweep best carp fishing in the world with Morrisburg is a welcoming in an arc through the St. Lawrence anglers coming in on chartered community and a great host for River like a necklace of green excursions from around the globe. this stop on the tour. In one of the jewels. It is home to three RIVERSIDE-CEDAR PARK best smallmouth bass fisheries unique campgrounds with over in the world, at peak season, you 600 campsites (Mille Roches, The Parks of the St. Lawrence’s won’t want to miss the weight­in Woodlands and McLaren) where largest campground offers 301 for this event. you can get away from it all in the campsites and five cabins on

MORE INFO

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the shores of the St. Lawrence River near Upper Canada Village and Crysler Farm Battlefield. The cabins are nestled around a picturesque little inlet that also offers recreational opportunities like canoeing and fishing. The St. Lawrence Seaway is right in front of the campgrounds with ships passing so close you can almost touch them. SOUTH LANCASTER Angler’s report excellent bluegill and crappie fishing in this area. For bluegill use small hooks and light gear with small flies, crickets, or worms two or three feet below a strike indicator. Angler’s have success jigging for crappie in the spring using small soft baits in a wide range of colors. CRYSLER PARK MARINA Crysler Park Marina is the area’s premier marina on the St. Lawrence River at Marker 72 ­ a perfect stopover or long term stay between Quebec and the 1000 Islands Region ­ ranked as one of the most beautiful marinas along the St. Lawrence River! Services include transient and seasonal slips (boats up to 120 feet), fuel dock, licensed patio with pub food (weekends), a well­stocked retail store, secure vehicle and trailer parking, an exclusive private beach, hydraulic lift, winter storage and shrink wrapping.


Birch Lake

196 Hectares (485 Acres)

S

40 metres (131 feet)

cenic Birch Lake, with its trophy smallmouth bass, is set on the southern arm of the Canadian Shield, north of Kingston. Frontenac Provincial Park is a semi-wilderness park that encompasses dozens of lakes, Birch Lake being one of the larger ones on its western flank.

134 metres (440 feet)

July 1971

Feet

trout, nowadays the lake is fished more for smallmouth bass, black crappie, and northern pike. The weedbeds and reefs make excellent bass and pike habitat, and anglers often find that they have no trouble catching their limit with spoons

While Birch Lake is known to give up good-sized lake

Fly Fisher show, caught an Ontario record 7 lb bass on and jigs. The smallmouth bass in Birch Lake. McKeown’s Birch Lake tend to be fly was a white Upmqua quite large. In fact, Colin Gamechanger. McKeown, from The New Ice fishers should bear in

mind that power augers, chainsaws, generators, ATVs and snowmobiles are not permitted in the park.

Caution: Do not use this map for navigational purposes. This map may not reflect current conditions. Uncharted hazards may exist. Base Map ŠProvince of Ontario.

FISH

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TAGGING PROJECTS Eastern Ontario 2019

Page 9

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photo from Cooke Lab, Carleton University, Ottawa

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Bobs Lake 3,200 Hectares (7,007 Acres)

25 metres (84 feet)

161 metres (530 feet)

Unknown

Feet

B

obs Lake is part of the the Tay and Rideau watersheds, both tributaries of the Ottawa and St. Lawrence.

One of the first things to search out is the weed line. “First of all for Bobs Lake, any weed line drop off using 1/2, 3/4 oz spinnerbaits in A large lake with white are awesome for bass, more than 120 is- pike and walleye,” Kowalclands and 740 km zuk suggests. of shoreline, Bobs He also recommends looking Lake features gran- for the sand bars in about 6 ite outcroppings and to 10 metres of water. “Use extensive marsh- topwater Walk-the-Dog baits lands. This combina- and poppers for smallmouth tion makes it great for bass. fishing for large and smallmouth bass, lake trout, walleye, LAKE ACCESS pike, black crappie, obs Lake is located 80 rock bass, bluegills km north of Kingston and perch. and west of Westport. From While any talk of hot spots Westport, drive northwest on on Bobs Lake can be over- Highway 36 until reaching whelming, Sebastian Kow- the north of the lake.

B

alczuk, former fishing guide from Bobs Lake Cottages says that, “because Bobs Lake is so big you don’t always have to fish structure because the fish move a lot. Finding drop offs and sand bars is key to success.”

Please note there are four other Bobs Lakes in southern Ontario, not to mention three Bob’s Lakes. It is easy to confuse them so make sure you know your route before heading out.

Caution: Do not use this map for navigational purposes. This map may not reflect current conditions. Uncharted hazards may exist. Base Map ©Province of Ontario.

Eastern Ontario 2019

Page 10

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Crotch Lake 1,558 Hectares (3,850 Acres)

31 metres (102 feet)

Unknown

Unknown

U

nspoiled pine forest, rocky points, sheltered bays and beautiful islands set in clear, blue waters make for a classic Canadian Shield experience at Crotch Lake. You’ll find walleye, smallmouth bass and yellow perch. Crotch Lake sees a lot of pressure, so it’s helpful to have a game plan.

Metres

open water area is susceptible to gail-force winds when there are storms in the area. Please monitor the weather carefully. LAKE ACCESS

O

ne of the largest and most accessible lakes in North Frontenac Provincial Park, Crotch Lake offers 77 campsites and a hiking trail through Angler’s Atlas member Adam wetlands along the southwest Leach says that the western shore. bay at the north end has fish, but it gets pretty shallow in Take Road 509 near the the summer. “Target the tops community of Ompah. Turn of weed beds when fishing for south on South Bush Road, which leads to a Crown road largemouth bass,” he says. leading to the north end of the Leach says that the north end lake. is the most favourable area for largemouth bass. The rest of Southern access is provided the lake is generally quite deep by Ardoch Road. There is a and a little too cool for the bass. lodge and a boat launch at the At the north end, however, it’s north end of the lake, or guests shallower. “Target bass with can access the water from crank baits and lipless baits, use Tumblehome Lodge on the natural minnow colors like silver lake’s southernmost shore. or black, orange or green,” he suggests. During warmer months, fishing slows right down, making ice fishing seem steadier and more productive. Live bait is more effective than using only lures. Please note: Leach warns that the Caution: Do not use this map for navigational purposes. This map may not reflect current conditions. Uncharted hazards may exist. Base Map ©Province of Ontario.

Eastern Ontario 2019

Page 11

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Dalhousie Lake 590 Hectares (1460 Acres)

A

11 metres (36 feet)

great muli-species lake, Dalhousie is home to small and largemouth bass, northern pike, and walleye. In addition to the fishing opportunities, the lake is located just over 30 minutes outside of Perth, making it a great day or weekend trip destination. John LaFrance of Canadian Tire Perth says that walleye or pike are great for new anglers, especially during the spring. When targeting pike, LaFrance recommends larger size Mepps spinners. He says that during the spring and early summer pike can be found in 6-12 feet of water. They are likely to remain in this range, only dropping down if there is a significant raise in temperature. Pike tend to be scattered throughout the lake, however have been known to frequent to the southeast side of Dalhousie. Walleye are most active during the early morning and late afternoon. During late spring they can be found in water around 18 feet deep, notes LaFrance. A very popular choice of the lake is is bass. Opening on the third Saturday

156 metres (513 feet)

in June, LaFrance recommends using topwater lures. Not only are they effective, but also provide a great show for anglers. LaFrance notes that jitterbugs and hula poppers are popular. For more information about Dalhousie Lake, or any of the other lakes in the area make sure to contact Canadian Tire Perth, (613) 267-3412. The staff are well equipped to ensure a great day of fishing.

July 1969

Feet

Visit the store at 45 Dufferin onto Fallbrook Rd/County Rd 7 and then right after 2.8 km St in Perth! to stay on Fallbrook Rd. Turn left onto McDonalds Corners LAKE ACCESS Rd/Route 12 and finally a here are two boat launches right onto Watsons Corners into Dalhousie Lake, one Rd/County Rd 8 to arrive at of which is located at Sylvania Sylvania Lodge. Lodge, a popular camping resort. There is a fee to use this launch. From Perth, turn right onto Lanark Rd/Route 511 and follow for 6.8 km. Turn left

T

Caution: Do not use this map for navigational purposes. This map may not reflect current conditions. Uncharted hazards may exist. Base Map ŠProvince of Ontario.

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photo by Angler’s Atlas member Chris Schenk

Eastern Ontario 2019

Page 12

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Desert Lake 382 Hectares (944 Acres)

68 metres (224 feet)

22 metres (73 feet)

July 1971

D

esert Lake, located east of the town of Godfrey in Frontenac County, is among the deepest lakes in the area and has a natural population of lake trout. Posting a report on The Angler’s Atlas, member Chris writes, “Desert Lake is one of the largest and deepest lakes in the area. I marked spots well over 300 ft. deep and there are said to be deeper holes still. “Desert Lake is a popular lake for lake trout and is busy all season long. In the spring, trout are shallower and can be taken long-lining or still-fishing the shallower areas. “During the summer, trout go much deeper and can be taken deepwater trolling along the narrows and off points dropping out into deep water, or by finding deep shoals and anchoring and fishing with dead-bait. “Large boulders and rock piles rise surprisingly fast out of deepwater, so caution must be taken, especially off points near the top of the narrows.”

Feet

work very well. Also, pink worms and frog lures can be productive. Desert Lake is located in Ontario Fisheries Management Zone 18. LAKE ACCESS

T

ake Highway 401 to Kingston, then Highway 38 north to Verona. Turn right on Desert Lake Road just after leaving Verona. Desert Lake Family Resort has a large campground, cottages and an inn, as well as a boat launch. See their website for their full range of amenities at desertlakeresort.on.ca.

Ontario’s Favourite Family Campground Experience A Fun Filled Summer Adventure

Sheena Pillay, from Desert Lake Family Resort, agrees with this caution, and suggests that a depth finder can be an invaluable tool. She adds that along with lake trout, bass and pike fishing are very popular with her guests. There are several spots where the shallow and weedy areas offer excellent habitat for these species. Pillay suggests that live bait can

613-3742196 desertlakerv@gmail.com 2466 Desert Lake Rd Hartington , ON

Caution: Do not use this map for navigational purposes. This map may not reflect current conditions. Uncharted hazards may exist. Base Map ©Province of Ontario.

Ontario’s Favourite

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Page 13

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Mazinaw Lake 1,594 Hectares (3,930 Acres)

144 metres (475 feet)

M

azinaw Lake, located along the upper reaches of the Mississippi River in Bon Echo Provincial Park, is one of the deepest inland lakes in Ontario, a popular destination for lake trout, walleye, bass, musky, whitefish and pike.

268 metres (880 feet)

August 1972

Feet

in deeper water. A downrigger or weighted fishing line are best for trolling. Flat-line trolling is fine when fish are active in shallow areas.”

Most of the fishing action is close to shore in 10-50 ft. of water. Look for stucture or for One of the best spots to fish for suspended fish actively feeding lake trout is offshore from Ma- on baitfish. zinaw Rock, where the water is The area on both sides of the about 300 ft. deep. The lake’s narrows entering lower Mazinaw name is an Algonquin word de- receives the most fishing presscribing the pictographs along sure. Walleye, pike and smallthis rock. mouth bass are taken here.” Angler’s Atlas member Adam Leach fishes Mazinaw Lake and says that it can be a great place to fish with kids. “You should be lucky enough to target pan fish and bass as well as smaller pike in some of the shallower portions of the lake. Fishing with kids is optimal, especially if you’re staying at Bon Echo Park.” The best way to target these fish is with live minnows, leeches or worms and bobbers or sinker rigs, he suggests.

Mazinaw Lake is also a great ice fishing lake, and The Angler’s Atlas has some pictures of large lake trout taken through the ice. Mazinaw Lake is part of Fisheries Management Zone 18. LAKE ACCESS

L

ocated in the townships of North Frontenac and Addington highlands in the Land O’ Lakes Region, Mazinaw is about He adds that while the peak sum- a three-hour drive from Toronto. mer boat traffic can affect the Take Highway 401 east to Bellfishing, most of the time it’s not ville, then Highway 37 north. an overly busy lake. Turn east when the highway in“Target lake trout during the tersects with Highway 7. From spring in shallow water or troll Kaladar, take Highway 41 north. Caution: Do not use this map for navigational purposes. This map may not reflect current conditions. Uncharted hazards may exist. Base Map ©Province of Ontario.

Eastern Ontario 2019

Page 14

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Mississippi Lake 2,347 Hectares (5,800 Acres)

145 metres (475 feet)

A

relatively warm and shallow lake in the County of Lanark, Mississippi Lake is fished primarily for walleye, bluegills, northern pike, and small and largemouth bass. There are a number of other, less popular species as well. Walleye are the favourite of the lake and are most active during the early spring and late fall. They can be caught with a variety of tactics, which make them a great species for novice anglers. As the water heats up, they become much more dominant and tend to sink to the bottom. Bucktail jigs have proven to work well along the weedlines. 3 or 4 inch twister tails are effective along rock shoals and points. Be sure to use brightly coloured baits as the water is quite muddy. Pink, chartreuse, white, and black are excellent colour choices. There is a municipal park located in the town of Carleton place which includes a paid boat launch and a great opportunity for shore fishing, as largemouth and smallmouth bass, pike, crappie, bluegill, and sunfish have all been

134 metres (441 feet)

August 1961 and 1969

Feet

known to frequent this spot. Live bait suspended under a float, spinners and noisy topwater lures should make for an exciting fishing trip. Early spring is also a good time to fish for bluegills. Mini crankbaits are recommended. Bass fishing can be hot in midsummer, with bass ranging up to 5 lbs. and averaging 1-2 lbs. The municipal park also offers parking, picnic areas, washrooms and a playground. This is a good spot for casting for bass, pike, crappie, bluegill and sunfish. Try spinners or live bait with a float. LAKE ACCESS

M

ississippi Lake is popular partly because it is only a half-hour drive from Ottawa along Highway 7. The lake extends from southwest of the community of Carleton Place to the village of Innisville. There is a public boat launch in the town of Carleton Place. The wetlands surrounding the river at McEwan Bay are protected as a national wildlife area.

Caution: Do not use this map for navigational purposes. This map may not reflect current conditions. Uncharted hazards may exist. Base Map ŠProvince of Ontario.

Eastern Ontario 2019

Page 15

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Opinicon Lake 787 Hectares (1,944 Acres)

O

11 metres (35 feet)

119 metres (389 feet)

pinicon Lake is 40 kilometres north-east of Kingston and is part of the Rideau canal system. There are many species of fish in this lake, but largemouth bass is a favorite among anglers.

Another popular lure is the ‘Rebel Pop-R,’ which works well over weed beds and shoals. As a general rule, natural colours work well for largemouth bass.

Primary habitat to seek out are areas with low hanging trees along the shoreline, especially undercut banks. Also try fishing the weed beds and anchoring along shoals. Largemouth bass have been known to get spooked easily, so the denser the weed coverage the better. Lily pads are a favourite of largemouth bass.

LAKE ACCESS

July 1972

Feet

F

rom the town of Smiths Falls, drive south on Highway 15. Turn right on RR9 and head for Chaffey’s Locks. From Kingston, drive 30 km north on Perth Road (Highway 10). Look for the right-hand turn north of Perth Road Village.

For a small fee, you can launch There are many great fishing at the Opinicon Hotel ramp. holes in the lake, and two The hotel is 9 km down RR favorite areas are around Eight 9. Acre Island and Deadlock Bay. The fishing season for largemouth bass opens the last Saturday in June. The best time to go after this species is July and August, noting that evening (especially at dusk) is especially productive. A few topwater lures to try at Opinicon lake are Hula Poppers and Crazy Crawlers. Caution: Do not use this map for navigational purposes. This map may not reflect current conditions. Uncharted hazards may exist. Base Map ©Province of Ontario.

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Red Horse Lake 301.9 Hectares (746 Acres)

37.2 metres (122 feet)

R

ed Horse Lake near Lyndhurst (not to be confused with Redhorse Lake north of Ompah), is a terrific spot for bass, pike and lake trout, as well as perch and crappie. It has everything from rocky shores to weedy shallows and long channels. Chuck Shaw, from Shawmere Cottages, says that his guests often call the lake trout fishery, “moody,” however the depth of the lake offers excellent habitat for these deep-water lovers. John Sideris, owner of Wing’s Live Bait and Tackle, says, “Some of the lures preferred by local anglers for lake trout are gang trolls with Williams Wablers, with green, blue or copper, and Jonny Greens. Bait is frozen herring or medium sized shiners. Depending on the temperature of the water, they usually run around 65 feet or so.”

84.1 metres (276 feet)

July 1971

Feet

with curly-tailed jigs, crankbaits, and crayfish imitations. Some of the shallow and weedy areas are good pike habitat, Shaw says. While pike are known to be attracted to large, flashy, moving objects, they generally won’t refuse much that gets in their way. These same shallow areas are good for largemouth bass, which tend to prefer the weedy cover in warmer water. Try plastic worms and spinnerbaits. Live bait is also especially enticing to bass. Red Horse and three other lakes form a navigable inland waterway about 28 km long, upstream from the Gananoque river. Power boats must navigate carefully through narrow, shallow channels between the lakes. LAKE ACCESS

R

ed Horse lake is located immediately west of Charleston Lake Provincial Park. Many Ontario lakes, including It is accessed via County Road Red Horse, are managed for sen- 3 that runs between Lansdowne sitive lake trout stocks. Please and Lyndhurst. consult regulations for limits and Shawmere Cottages provide the closures. only access to Red Horse Lake, Shaw notes that the rocks and with a boat launch for guests shoals are perfect for smallmouth only. See their website at shawbass. Most active from late spring mere.com. to late fall, they can be caught Caution: Do not use this map for navigational purposes. This map may not reflect current conditions. Uncharted hazards may exist. Base Map ©Province of Ontario.

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photo by Angler’s Atlas member reelistic90

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Fish Tagging in the Rideau Canal by Jordanna Bergmann PhD student with the Cooke Lab, Carleton University.

W

ith pristine aquatic habitats, and one of the most diverse fish communities in Canada, the Rideau Canal is home to first-class fishing and supports tourism in the region. However, it is unknown how lockstations might be influencing the connectivity of fish populations throughout the system. Do fish move through locks? To what extent? Are movements species- reached out to them to report catches: 73 fish have been recaptured as of specific and/or seasonally driven? November 2018. Students and researchers in Dr. Steven Cooke’s Fish Ecology and Recaptured fish species include Conservation Physiology (FECPL) bluegill, largemouth and smallmouth Lab at Carleton University are working bass, and northern pike. To help to understand fish movements by make reporting recaptures easier, partnering with anglers to conduct an the FECPL lab has partnered with Angler’s Atlas. Simply submit your extensive tagging study. catch information online, or through They are working to tag 10,000 fish their app, and it will be directed with external identification tags, also straight to the researchers working known as anchor tags. Besides an on the project. ID code, the tag also has contact information (email and phone In real-time, that information will number) for anglers to report their be added to the tracking database, helping to inform both science and catches. management. Angler’s Atlas is Tagging began in spring of 2018, and linked to the most up-to-date project by the time winter rolled around, status, allowing for readers to learn 1500 fish had been tagged. Tagged more about the tagging program and species include black crappie, project updates. bluegill, bullhead, largemouth and smallmouth bass, northern pike, Additionally, the lab will be starting pumpkinseed, rock bass, and yellow an acoustic telemetry study to investigate fine-scale movements of perch. individual fish which will be analyzed Waterbodies include Big Rideau in conjunction with large-scale markLake, Clear Lake, Indian Lake, recapture data from anglers. Lake Opinicon, Lower Rideau Lake, Upper Rideau Lake, Newboro Lake, Select fish species will be caught, and the Rideau River mainstream. internally tagged with an acoustic The FECPL lab has been thrilled tag, and externally tagged with an with the number of anglers who have anchor tag. Acoustic tags emit an Eastern Ontario 2019

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underwater sound signal that sends unique identification information about that specific fish to receivers. Receivers, which have been strategically deployed throughout the waterway, collect the sound signals and convert them to digital data that can be used to determine tag positions in real-time. The FECPL lab sincerely appreciates the efforts and willingness of anglers who have reported their catches and they are excited to hear from anglers this summer. If you’re curious to learn more about their research, or see a video of how fish are tagged, you can check out their Facebook page: www.facebook.com/CookeFECPL/ or visit their website www.fecpl.ca. ABOUT THE RIDEAU

T

he Rideau Canal Waterway is a 202-kilometre series of lakes and rivers connected by 23 working lockstations. Originally constructed in the 1800s to facilitate commercial and military transport between Lake Ontario and the Ottawa River, today the Rideau Canal is almost entirely operated to support recreational, cultural, and economic activities. FREE MAPS AT AnglersAtlas.com


Eastern Ontario 2019

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Big Rideau Lake 6500 Hectares (16,010 Acres)

120 metres (360 feet)

B

ig Rideau Lake is the largest and deepest lake of the Rideau Canal waterway and it can be a great spot for smallmouth and largemouth bass as well as lake trout, walleye and large northern pike.

124 metres (406 feet)

June.

There is good bass and pike fishing in Hogg Bay or adjoining Loon Lake. Bigger largemouth bass are caught around Stonehouse Island. Black crappie and sunfish are plentiful in Big Al Chouinard, from Rideau Lake. Canadian Tire in Smiths Trolling along the channel Falls, says that pike are edge is likely to produce a plentiful in Big Rideau number of bass and musky. Lake, and recalls a time A crawfish-coloured Fat when his daughter caught Rap has been known to 18 pike while ice fishing at work well for both species. Nodes Point. Musky, however, tend to “My recommendation for anglers to add to their tackle box is the Ripplin Red Fin in blue and silver. Another lure I would recommend would be the Z-Man ChatterBait white and black. You can pick these beauties up at Canadian Tire in Smiths Falls.

Pike and walleye season begin on the first weekend in May. The bass anglers start showing up in late

July 1972

can be difficult to catch on the waterway. In warmer months, keep an eye out for bait balls on the surface, a big draw for lakers. Troll to a depth range of 60-100 ft. Catch-and-release is encouraged with lake trout due to the fishing pressure and the number of years required for these fish to mature.

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Follow Highway 7 for another 30 km until arriving at Carleton Place. From there, turn south onto Highway 15 for another 50 km and pass through Smith Falls.

Continue along Highway 15 until the road intersects with County Road 38 on the west (right). Follow County Road 38 to the north end of Canadian Tire in Smith Big Rideau Lake. There are Falls has a great selection a half-dozen boat launches of lures and gear to help around the lake. you get ready for a day of catch on after being caught fishing at Big Rideau Lake. and released a few times. If no musky are biting, the key LAKE ACCESS is to change your set up. ig Rideau is 72 km There are scads of perch, southwest of Ottawa crappie and bluegill between the towns of throughout the canal Portland and Rideau Ferry. waterway. These are lots From Ottawa, take Highway of fun for kids and adults 417 west for approximately alike, and make excellent 30 km until it intersects table fare if you’re going to with Highway 7 near keep what you catch. Stittsville-Basswood. Take Lake trout are sustained by the southwest exit. yearly stocking, but they

B

Caution: Do not use this map for navigational purposes. This map may not reflect current conditions. Uncharted hazards may exist. Base Map ©Province of Ontario.

Eastern Ontario 2019

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Caution: Do not use this map for navigational purposes. This map may not reflect current conditions. Uncharted hazards may exist. Base Map ŠProvince of Ontario.

Eastern Ontario 2019

Page 21

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Rideau River T

he Rideau River takes its name from a “curtain of water,” the waterfall where it drains into the Ottawa River in the nation’s capital.

in the Rideau so you will want a sturdy heavy-action musky rod equipped with a baitcasting reel, capable of holding 80-100 braided line.

fattest Muskie are caught in the Rideau, due to the fact that they gorge themselves prior to winter, when they hardly feed at all.

Hogsback Falls, Manotick, the Jock River Mouth.

You will also need long forceps for unhooking Muskie as they have very sharp teeth, and bolt cutters for cutting the hooks on deeply hooked fish or for when the barb has hooked into a The river has a sandy bottom sensitive area such as the eyes. with very few rocky structures Other crucial investments are along a stretch known as Long large basket style nets that are Reach, from Burritt’s Rapids rubber coated to protect the fish’s slime and a bump board to Manotick, they say. This section is the longest for quickly measuring a length stretch of the river that does of your catch.

If I had only one lure to use all season on the Rideau I would use the jig-a-beast 8” swim jig from ERC. You can burn this lure in quickly, and even if you are fishing from shore you can get following fish to commit without doing a figure 8 by dropping it down into the rocks or bottom and twitching it to get the tail moving.

P

“The Rideau’s got bass, pike, pickerel and musky,” says staff at Canadian Tire in Kempville. “Your best bait is pretty much spinners and plastic.”

not have a lock on it.

Finding Muskie is always Angler’s Atlas member Alex challenging, however on the Nutt has fished the Rideau Rideau river we are blessed River extensively, and offers with a very large population of them, and there are certhis report: tain techniques you can use to Rideau Muskies 101 improve your odds. Muskies for many are the In the spring I will generprized sportfish of the Rideau ally never use lures over 8”, River. Difficult to catch, they as they are recovering from also put up impressive fights the spawn and want the easiest and are known to snap off meals they can get. many walleye and bass angler As the season progresses into during the summer months. summer I start using larger If you plan on targeting lures and retrieving them at Muskie this year make sure higher speeds. In fall I will use you have the proper tools first my biggest lures and someand foremost. Muskie can times slow down my retrieve. reach sizes longer than 50” Fall is when the biggest and

Other great producers on the Rideau are Suicks outside of large weedbeds with current, and later in the year Bulldawgs and other large rubber bait near drop-offs to shallow bays produce well. Always be on the lookout for deep pockets near shallow structure and current. Muskie like a good variety of habitat in their range. If a prime spot looks like it has all these ingredients, it probably holds Muskie. Don’t be discouraged if you don’t catch one in several attempts, you can always return to promising locations during peak moonphases, or just as the sun is setting to get the ones with lockjaw to commit. Some areas to try: Mooney’s Bay,

Good Luck and tight Lines RIVER ACCESS art of the Rideau Canal in certain sections, the river connects several lakes in the area. A fee is charged for use of the lock system. To reach the Rideau River, travel south from Ottawa on Highway 416. There is a boat launch at Curry Park, on Kemptville Creek. This creek runs into the Rideau River. There is no fee to launch there. Rideau River Provincial Park also has a good boat launch. There is a fee to gain entrance into the park, and it may not be suitable for larger boats. The Reeve Craig launch is free. Reportedly this is a popular launch, though it is not paved. Kars Public Wharf and Kars Recreation Area both have no fee for their services, though the parking at the recreation area is closer to the launch. There are several more free launches, as well as several paid marina services.

Visit the Canadian Tire Pro Shop in Kemptville 311 Ryans Well Dr., Kemptville, ON K0G 1J0 Eastern Ontario 2017

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Caution: Do not use this map for navigational purposes. This map may not reflect current conditions. Uncharted hazards may exist. Base Map ŠProvince of Ontario.

Eastern Ontario 2018

Page 23

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VISITOR INFORMATION

613-548-9400


LOCAL RESOURCES

1. BRULE LAKE Bass and lake trout. Sandy bottom, clear water. Pleasantview Lodge offers comfortable cottages along water’s edge.

MARKER

LAKE

BUSINESS NAME

PHONE

WEBSITE

1

Brule Lake

Pleasantview Lodge

1- 613-479-0350

pleasantviewlodge.com

2

Crotch Lake +11 others

North Frontenac Parklands

1-800-234-3953

northfrontenacparklands.com

Crotch Lake has walleye, bass. North Frontenac Parklands offers 77 campsites at 11 lakes, with wetlands and hiking trails.

3

Kashwakamak Lake

Fernleigh Lodge

1-866-459-9099

fernleighlodge.com

4

Big Gull Lake

Kirk Kove Cottages

1-877-688-8388

kirkkovecottages.com

3. KASHWAKAMAK LAKE

5

Lake Kennebec

Springwood Cottages

1-866-241-0842

springwoodcottages.ca

6

Sharbot Lake

Sharbot Lake Country Inn 1-613-279-2198

sharbotlakeinn.com

7

Bobs Lake

Bobs Lake Cottages and Escapes

1-613-273-9193

bobslake.com

8

Loughborough Lake

Loughborough Inn

1-833-864-9348 loughboroughinn.on.ca

2. CROTCH LAKE

Come here for excellent walleye and smallmouth bass fishing. The fishing reaches its best in mid-June and mid-October 4. BIG GULL LAKE Bass, walleye, muskie, perch, pike. Kirk Kove Cottages offers full amenities, family-oriented, with long-term owners. 5. LAKE KENNEBEC Deep fishing holes and lots of bays and inlets. Pike, pickerel, panfish, bass. Springwood Cottages open year-round, full amenities. 6. SHARBOT LAKE Diverse, walleye to rockfish. Sharbot Lake Country Inn & The Crossing Pub offer well-appointed rooms with attached restaurant. 7. BOBS LAKE Walleye, lake trout, pan fish, lake herring. Large, diverse lake. Bobs Lake Cottages are luxury in a pristine setting. 8. LOUGHBOROUGH LAKE Bass and pike fishing, hiking and wildlife viewing. Loughborough Inn is a full service facility, with a marina next door. 9. ST. LAWRENCE RIVER Plenty of shore fishing. Bass, panfish, catfish, and lots of diverse habitat. 10. LAKE ONTARIO Pike, panfish, bass, trout, walleye. Huge lake with huge opportunities.

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rontenac takes more than its name from the French explorer. The region is all about exploring and adventure, while maintaining the simplicity that our souls crave. Where else can you seek out the rugged Canadian Shield, while feeling like you’re home? Whatever your adventure may be, and whatever you want to explore, you’re invited in and treated like family.

and growth, and this makes the area perfect habitat for fish.”

Fishing takes centre stage in so many adventures, and Frontenac’s diversity will have you filling your catch, and your spirit. From the lake trout in Sharbot Lake to the walleye in Lake Kennebec, you’ll find great fishing, breathtaking scenery and exceptional hospitality. After all, fishing and hospitality are just the way of life here.

“It’s so accessible. We’re perfectly situated between Ottawa and Toronto, and right close to the American border, yet it can feel like you’re in a remote corner,” he adds.

Sebastian Kowalczuk, from Bobs Lake Resort, says that Frontenac lakes are “far enough removed from Toronto, yet easy to get to. At the same time, there are lots of hidden gems that are just right there, but no one ever goes to them. It’s like discovering a whole new lake.”

If it’s bass you’re after, Kennebec Lake is known as one of Bass Canada’s top cottage and fishing locations. It’s easy to see why. With 100 foot deep fishing holes, Kennebec Lake has rocky shores and nineteen miles of gorgeous shoreline. Melissa Dickinson, from Springwood Cottages, suggests hiring a guide with one of their fishing packages to make the most of your trip.

For Kowalczuk, diversity is the word he uses to describe Frontenac. “The multi-species makes it unique. The Rideau system allows for ecological movement

Jim Walker, from Kirk Kove Cottages, agrees that with 5,000 lakes, there are very few people around, and those who come, become friends. “It’s a way of life, it’s what we do. You watch kids grow up from diapers to weddings, yet there are always new people coming year after year,” he says.

Walleye is the big draw for Big Gull Lake, and Walker notes that they are “educated fish.” They keep anglers guessing, and that adds to the thrill of the outing.

Kevin Phillips, from Fernleigh

MORE INFO

www.visitfrontenac.ca

Lodge on Kashwakamak Lake, says that he’s been fishing on the lake since he was five years old, and then bought the lodge. “It’s all about family fun and showing them how to fish,” he says. “We’ve got patience for everyone,” he adds. Their practise of catch and release helps to sustain the amazing fishery on Kashwakamak Lake, Phillips notes. “The lake can sustain a diverse fishery. It’s all about the future. It’s a sunny day here, and I’m looking out over the lake, and God willing, we’re lucky to do this.” GETTING HERE

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rontenac is an adventure, but getting here isn’t! Lakes, campgrounds, hiking trails and beaches are all on the beaten path between Toronto and Ottawa, yet if you long for escape, this is where you’ll find it. Take a look at www.visitfrontenac. ca for local listings of lakes, festivals and events.


St.Lawrence River - Gananoque

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ll water flowing from the Great Lakes passes through the St. Lawrence River, making it one of the largest river systems in the country. Throughout this river, there are more than 20 species of sport fish to target. Trish Richardson of Canadian Tire Gananoque boasts the river’s vast underwater structure and many islands and shoals. The St. Lawrence River holds a large amount of fish, and is a great place for both novice and expert anglers. Fishing around Wolfe Island can be very productive, having strong walleye and bass fisheries. Pike and muskie can also be found here, especially among the weed beds. Moving downstream, you will pass the town of Gananoque. Garry Fisher says that “the fishing is second to none” and the area known as the Thousand Islands is prime fishing habitat with countless shoals and ledges for the fish to call home. This area holds some of the best bass fishing the river has to offer. Smallmouth bass especially can be found along the rock piles and weed beds. They move into the shallow water to feed, so best to target them during dusk and dawn. They spawn in the shallows of the Thousand Islands and are most active just at the water is beginning to heat up in the spring. Fisher recommends using jerk or crankbaits. Anglers may also try drop-shotting to bounce along the bottom of the weedy areas. Largemouth bass are considerably more aggressive when compared to their smallmouth counterparts. They prefer thick weed coverage, coming out only to feed. Due to their aggression, Fisher suggests using topwater lures. Angler’s will be treated to a show as the bass ambush their bait. Try using frogs or poppers and head out at night or early morning as the fish are at their most aggressive during this time.

Caution: Do not use this map for navigational purposes. This map may not reflect current conditions. Uncharted hazards may exist. Base Map ©Province of Ontario.

Eastern Ontario 2019

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St.Lawrence River - Brockville F

urther downstream, the river narrows and the current picks up speed approaching Brockville. Some of the largest muskies have been pulled out of the St. Lawrence River in this area, as well as has one of the most productive walleye fisheries. Pike, perch, and bass can also be found along the weed beds and islands, along with many other species. Typically, fishing is strongest between June and September. For those targeting muskie, you may want to extend that season into October and November, when the muskie come up to the shallower depths as the water cools. Look along the shoals and around the islands. Muskie prefer to be in 15 to 30 feet of water, and respond well to trolling lure such as Stalkers, Ernies, or Kriscos. It is not uncommon to catch northern pike over 10 pounds. They can usually be found in the shallows as they move into warmer water during the spring to feed. Pike are usually found with largemouth bass, so look for dense weeds that provide lots of cover. Spinners, Crankbaits and Jerkbaits have all been proven for pike, and using a flurocarbon fishing line is recommended.

Caution: Do not use this map for navigational purposes. This map may not reflect current conditions. Uncharted hazards may exist. Base Map ŠProvince of Ontario.

SEE

AnglersAtlas.com/mycatch

CATCH

Fisheries Research in Canada

RATES Eastern Ontario 2019

and help

photo by Angler’s Atlas member steveallen73

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Thirty Island Lake 162 Hectares (400 Acres)

A

nglers report plenty of bass, black crappie and northern pike in Thirty Island Lake, north of Kingston. This is a very spread out lake with a number of islands and arms. The size helps to keep traffic low, and offers many different types of fishing. The pike average 1-2 lbs., according to other reports. Pike are often found in dense weeds, so this is a good place to start. They are most active during the early spring and late fall while the water is still cool. When casting, try using crank or jerkbaits. Similarly, largemouth bass are found in the weedy areas along the shoreline. Compared to smallmouth, they tend to be spooked easily, however they are less susceptible to changes in the weather. Look for lily pads and use natural colours and crank baits.

32 metres (131 feet)

160 metres (525 feet)

July 1970

Feet

shoals found throughout the lake. They prefer to be in moving water, so look for creeks. Try using soft plastics in a crayfish pattern. When targeting crappie, keep in mind that they prefer colder water, so will often be found in deeper water especially during the summer months. They are nocturnal feeders, so head out to the weedy areas of the lake at dusk. Other fish species include lake herring, yellow perch, pumpkinseed, rock bass, white suckers, burbot and minnows. Thirty Island Lake is located within Fisheries Management Zone 18. LAKE ACCESS

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he lake is 20 km from Verona and 40 km from Kingston. There is an access point off McNichols Lane but Smallmouth bass are more a posted sign indicates that likely to be caught off the the launch is private. shoreline and around rocky Caution: Do not use this map for navigational purposes. This map may not reflect current conditions. Uncharted hazards may exist. Base Map ŠProvince of Ontario.

Ontario’s Favourite

FamilyCampground

ExperienceAFunFilledSummerAdventure

613-374-2196 | desertlakerv@gmail.com | 2466 Desert Lake Rd Hartington, ON Eastern Ontario 2019

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Upper Rideau Lake 1,362 Hectares (3,366 Acres)

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eparated from the larger, northern lobe of what was once one lake by construction of the Rideau Canal, picturesque Upper Rideau Lake marks the height of the watershed.

22 metres (72 feet)

124 metres (408 feet)

western and southern arms.

July 1970

to Portland. The town of Westport lies at the northern LAKE ACCESS end and Newboro lies at its pper Rideau Lake is southern end. located 60 km north The lake is also accessible of Kingston in the Coun- through the canal system try of Leeds and Grenville. from Lower Rideau Lake or The lake is known for its Follow Highway 15 north Rideau River. The lake consmallmouth and largemouth bass fishing, though lake trout, pike, yellow perch and walleye are also plentiful. Pan fish are also present, including crappie, pumpkinseed, bluegill and lots of rock bass.

U

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nects to Newboro Lake via a lock on the south side and to Big Rideau Lake via the lock at County Road 14 on the east side.

This lake’s underwater structure, featuring points, shoals and islands on the eastern end, are signs of good smallmouth fishing. For bass or pike, troll along the main shoreline or around the islands. The pike are mostly small to medium-sized. Angler’s Atlas member sturner has posted the locations of some hot spots, particularly in the shallower Caution: Do not use this map for navigational purposes. This map may not reflect current conditions. Uncharted hazards may exist. Base Map ©Province of Ontario.

Eastern Ontario 2019

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Weslemkoon Lake 1,773 Hectares (4,832 Acres)

55 metres (180 feet)

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eslemkoon Lake is one of Ontario’s top 10 bass fishing destinations, a pretty lake with plenty of opportunities to see some action, whether by fishing from shore or by boat. Though there are many cottages on the lake, it is far enough from the well-trodden path that it does not have the fishing pressure of many southerly lakes.

316 metres (1,038 feet)

1973

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Bait such as crank bait in orange or green with a chartreuse belly, or crayfish, or worm and frog imitations cast into the weeds, seem to work well. Try fishing the islands, inlets, submerged logs, deep holes, and rocky shoals, where fish like to find cover. LAKE ACCESS

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eslemkoon Lake is located in the township of Addington Highlands about 110 km north of Belleville.

This clean, spring-fed lake also holds a genetically distinct natural population of lake trout, whose eggs are used as hatchery stock. To get to the south end, drive Bass in the 3- to 5-lb. range 50 minutes southeast of Banare common in Weslemkoon. croft, follow Highway 62 The season opens in mid-June. south and turn left onto WesThere are also ample pan fish, lemkoon Lake Road. including perch, bluegill and To reach the north end, folcisco. low Highway 28 east, turn Hidden Cove Cottage Re- right on Mayo Lake Road, sort, posting on The Angler’s then left on Harstmere Road Atlas, says that the bass fish- until reaching the lake. ery is fabulous on Weslemkoon There are three marinas on Lake. They suggest using top the lake, two at the south water baits and heddon torpe- end of the lake and one at the dos on calm mornings and eve- northern tip. nings. Caution: Do not use this map for navigational purposes. This map may not reflect current conditions. Uncharted hazards may exist. Base Map ©Province of Ontario.

TRACK

and help

Fisheries Research

YOUR CATCH Eastern Ontario 2019

in Canada

www.anglersatlas.com/research photo by Angler’s Atlas member Brock Paciejewski

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2018 Stocking Program Zone 18,20 Township

Waterbody

Sp

#

Township

Waterbody

Sp

#

City of Hamilton City of Hamilton City of Mississauga City of Ottawa City of Ottawa City of Ottawa County of Prince Edward County Municipality of Brighton Municipality of Marmora and Lake Municipality of Marmora and Lake Municipality of Tweed Town of Mississippi Mills Town of Niagara-on-the-Lake Township of Addington Highlands Township of Addington Highlands Township of Addington Highlands Township of Addington Highlands Township of Addington Highlands Township of Addington Highlands Township of Addington Highlands Township of Addington Highlands Township of Addington Highlands Township of Addington Highlands Township of Addington Highlands Township of Addington Highlands Township of Addington Highlands Township of Addington Highlands Township of Addington Highlands Township of Addington Highlands Township of Addington Highlands Township of Addington Highlands Township of Addington Highlands Township of Addington Highlands Township of Addington Highlands Township of Addington Highlands Township of Central Frontenac Township of Central Frontenac Township of Central Frontenac Township of Central Frontenac Township of Lanark Highlands Township of Lanark Highlands Township of Lanark Highlands

Lake Ontario Lake Ontario Lake Ontario *Findlay Cr. *Poole Cr. *Shields Cr. Lake Ontario Lake Ontario Big Buck Lake Freen Lake Elzevir Lake Indian Creek Lake Ontario Big Birch Lake Blakely Lake Bon Echo Creek Chouinard Lake Eno Lake Feeny Lake Graham Lake Horseshoe Lake Kilbourne Lake Kilpecker Creek King Lake Little Long Lake Machesney Lake Mistry Lake Nowlan Lake Rainy Lake Rettans Lake Rose Lake Spring Lake Thirty Eight Lake Trout Lake Twintoor Lakes Hungry Lake Pauls Creek Silver Lake Small Clear Lake Bottle Lake Craigs Creek Darling Long Lake Duncs Lake Eastons Creek Green Lake Kates Lake Pauls Creek Perch Lake Peterwhite Lake Mud Lake

ST OM ST ST ST ST ST OM SF SN SNSF SF OM SF OM SF OM SF SF SF SF OM SF OM SF OM SF SF SF SF SF SNSF SF SN SF SN SF SN OM OM SF ST

177911 29238 177911 350 750 350 177911 29238 750 200 1200 500 29238 1300 600 500 500 1000 2300 750 600 900 500 2300 1400 2000 700 1000 300 750 450 4000 450 1500 2000 5172 500 7500 2000 1000 500 1807

Township of North Frontenac Township of North Frontenac Township of North Frontenac Township of North Frontenac Township of North Frontenac Township of North Frontenac Township of North Frontenac Township of North Frontenac Township of North Frontenac

SF SF SNSF OM SF SF SN OM SF

1550 500 2000 8000 250 700 400 450 1600

SF SF SN OM SF SF SF OM SF OM

950 4350 500 3100 1250 550 500 7506 450 656

SF SN SF SN

1600 600 350 3500

SN

2100

SF

2500

SF SF SF ST ST OM SV

400 300 1125 4500 973 2300 10145

OM

4000

SF SF SF SF SF SNSF SF SF

1000 500 1000 1000 500 5000 2500 1000

Croker Lake Graham Lake Granite Lake Grindstone Lake Kitchen Lake Little Camp Lake Little Green Lake Little Green Lake Little Mosque Lake Lonewolf Lake Longbay Lake Mackie Lake Mair Lake McCreary Lake McDowall Lake Minnow Lake Mosque Lake Otter Lake Quackenbush Lake Quinn Lake Reid Lake Rock Lake Round Schooner Lake Shabomeka Lake South Quinn Lake Spot Lake Spring Lake Sullivan Lake Summit Lake West Quinn Lake Wolfe Lake Westport Sand Lake *Challies Pub. Fishing Area P. Clearwater Lake Cronk Lake Dog Lake Loughborough Lake Moulton Lake Potspoon Lake Tetsmine Lake Thirteen Island Lake Upper Rock Lake Twinpine Lakes

SF SNSF SNSF SN

300 2800 25333 17000

SF SN SF SV

500 2000 750 12342

Red Horse Lake

SN

7500

*Big Mair L. *Grace L. Big Ohlmann Lake Blue Lake Bullseye Lake Camp Lake

SNSF 1350 SF 650 SN 400

Township of Lanark Highlands Township of Lanark Highlands Township of Lanark Highlands Township of Lanark Highlands Township of Lanark Highlands Township of Lanark Highlands Township of Lanark Highlands Township of Leeds and the Thousand Islands Township of Leeds and the Thousand Islands Township of North Frontenac Township of North Frontenac Township of North Frontenac Township of North Frontenac Township of North Frontenac Township of North Frontenac

SNSF 2500 SF 300 SN 500

Township of North Frontenac Township of North Frontenac Township of North Frontenac Township of North Frontenac Township of North Frontenac Township of North Frontenac Township of North Frontenac Township of North Frontenac Township of North Frontenac Township of North Frontenac Township of North Frontenac Township of North Frontenac Township of North Frontenac Township of North Frontenac Township of North Frontenac Township of North Frontenac Township of North Frontenac Township of North Frontenac Township of North Frontenac Township of North Frontenac Township of North Frontenac Township of North Frontenac Township of Rideau Lakes Township of South Dundas Township of South Frontenac Township of South Frontenac Township of South Frontenac Township of South Frontenac Township of South Frontenac Township of South Frontenac Township of South Frontenac Township of South Frontenac Township of South Frontenac Township of Tudor and Cashel Stock Species Codes CC Lake Whitefish OM Rainbow Trout SF Brook Trout SN Lake Trout

SNSF 2300 SF 650

SNSF Splake ST Brown Trout SV Walleye

For more information on Fish Stocking in Ontario, visit: https://www.ontario.ca/data/fish-stocking


Eastern Ontario Fishing Regulations

2019

SPECIES*Aggregate limits apply to these species. See page 7 for full details

Atlantic Salmon Brook Trout Brown Trout Channel Catfish Crappie Lake Sturgeon Lake Trout Lake Whitefish Largemouth and Smallmouth Bass combined Muskellunge Northern Pike Pacific Salmon Rainbow Trout Splake Sunfish Walleye and Sauger combined Yellow Perch

ZONE 18 & 20 SEASONS AND CATCH LIMITS ZONE 18 ZONE 20 OPEN SEASON LIMITS OPEN SEASON LIMITS closed all year 0 open all year S-1; must be greater than 63 cm, and C-0 open all year S-5 and C-2 n/a n/a open all year S-5 and C-2 open all year S-5 and C-2 open all year S-12 and C-6 open all year S-12 and C-6 open all year S-30 and C-10 open all year S-30 and C-10 closed all year 0 closed all year fourth Saturday in May S-2 and C-1 January 1 to SeptemS-3 and C-1 to September 8 ber 30 and December 1 to December 31 open all year S-12 and C-6 open all year S-12 and C-6 third Saturday in June S-6 and C-2 third Saturday in June S-6 and C-2 to December 15 to December 15 1st Saturday in June to December 15 January 1 to March 31 and second Saturday in May to December 31 open all year open all year open all year open all year January 1 to March 1 and second Saturday in May to December 31 open all year

S-1; must be greater than 91 cm, and C-0 S-6 and C-2

third Saturday in June S-1; must be greater to December 15 than 137cm, and C-0 January 1 to March 31 S-6 and C-2 and first Saturday in May to December 31 open all year S-5 and C-2 open all year S-2 and C-1 n/a n/a open all year S-100 and C-50

S-5 and C-2 S-5 and C-2 S-5 and C-2 S-300; only 30 may be greater than 18 cm, and C-15 S-4 and C-2; must January 1 to March 1 be between 40-50 cm and first Saturday in May to December 31 S-50 and C-25 open all year

S-4 and C-2; not more than 1 greater than 63 cm S-50 and C-25

NOTE: • S refers to to limits under a Sport Fishing Licence Tag. • C refers to limits under a Conservation Fishing Licence Tag. • All size limits refer to total length, which measures from the tip of the mouth to the tip of the tail. • This section does not act as a subsitute for Ontario’s fishing regulations. Please be sure to read the Ontario Recreational Fishing Regulations prior to casting. Ashden Lake (Ashby White Lake) (45°08’59”N., 77°22’00”W.) Ashby Township

Lake Trout: Open all year

Big Ohlmann (45°03’18”N., 77°00’23”W.)Miller Township

Lake Trout: Open all year

Camp Lake (45°04’54”N., 76°57’39”W.) Miller Township

Lake Trout: Open all year

Freen Lake (44°45’25”N., 77°44’53”W.) Lake Township

Lake Trout: Open all year

Grimsthorpe Lake (44°52’29”N.,77°23’29”W.) Effingham Township

Lake Trout: Open all year

Hungry Lake (44°48’23”N., 76°53’18”W.)Central Frontenac Township

Lake Trout: Open all year

Little Green Lake (44°57’37”N.,76°53’06”W.) Clarendon Township

Lake Trout: Open all year

Long Mallory Lake (44°59’59”N.,77°09’48”W.) Abinger Township

Lake Trout: Open all year

Long Schooner Lake (45°06’15”N.,76°58’41”W.) Miller Township

Lake Trout: Open all year

Loughborough Lake (44°27’00”N.,76°25’00”W.) Pittsburgh Township

Lake Trout: Open all year

Mackie Lake (45°04’38”N., 76°59’18”W.)Miller Township

Lake Trout: Open all year

Eastern Ontario 2019

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2019

Eastern Ontario Fishing Regulations

Potspoon Lake (44°36’13”N.,76°34’56”W.) Bedford Township

Lake Trout: Open all year

Redhorse Lake (44°32’21”N.,76°05’02”W.) Lansdowne Township

Lake Trout: Open all year

Reid Lake (45°04’15”N., 76°55’59”W.) Miller Township

Lake Trout: Open all year

Round Schooner Lake (45°07’12”N.,76°59’14”W.) Miller Township

Lake Trout: Open all year

Shabomeka Lake (44°53’33”N.,77°08’10”W.) Barrie Township

Lake Trout: Open all year

Silver Lake (44°49’48”N., 76°35’46”W.) Oso Township

Lake Trout: Open all year

Simpson Lake (45°09’24”N.,77°24’13”W.) Ashby Township

Lake Trout: Open all year

Trout Lake (45°08’58”N., 77°26’08”W.) Ashby Township

Lake Trout: Open all year

Moira Lake (44°29’14”N., 77°27’13”W.) Huntingdon Township

Muskellunge Limits: S1; must be greater than 102 cm, and C0

Moira River from the first dam above Lake Ontario(City of Belleville) upstream to Highway 7

Muskellunge Limits: S1; must be greater than 102 cm, and C0

Stoco Lake (44°28’15”N., 77°17’29”W.)

Muskellunge Limits: S1; must be greater than 102 cm, and C0

Rideau River All parts

Muskellunge Limits: S1; must be greater than 112 cm, and C0

All Waters Lancaster and Charlottenburgh Townships (South Glengarry Township) and the City of Cornwall all waters

Yellow Perch Season: January 1 to March 31 and second Saturday in May to December 31

Big Rideau Lake Bastard and Burgess Townships, The Bog and Long Island

Fish Sanctuaries: No fishing closed all year

Newboro Lake North Crosby and South Crosby Townships, Old Iron Mine Bay

Fish Sanctuaries: No fishing closed all year

Newboro Lake South Crosby Township, The Bog

Fish Sanctuaries: No fishing closed all year

Opinicon Lake Storrington Township, Darlings Bay

Fish Sanctuaries: No fishing closed all year

Opinicon Lake South Crosby Township, Murphy Bay

Fish Sanctuaries: No fishing closed all year

Sand Lake South Crosby Township, Freeman’s Bay

Fish Sanctuaries: No fishing closed all year

Westport Pond North Crosby Township

Fish Sanctuaries: No fishing closed all year

White Lake Olden Township

Fish Sanctuaries: No fishing closed all year

Whitefish Lake South Crosby Township, Jones Falls Bay

Fish Sanctuaries: No fishing closed all year

Lingham Lake Grimsthorpe Township

Fish Sanctuaries: No fishing January 1 to Friday before third Saturday in June and December 16 to December 31

Sand Lake North Crosby Township, that part lying in Lots 15 and 16 in Concession 9 and Lot 15 in Concession 8, and the waters of the river flowing between Wolfe Lake and Sand Lake

Fish Sanctuaries: No fishing January 1 to Friday before third Saturday in June and December 16 to December 31

Christie Lake in Lot 3, Concession 3 (Bathurst Township) and the Tay River from Christie Lake downstream to the bridge at Lot 7, Concession 2 (Bathurst Township)

Fish Sanctuaries: No fishing March 1 to Friday before second Saturday in May

Crotch Lake and Mississippi River Palmerston Township, from Sidedam Rapids to north shore of Skull Island including McLean’s Bay

Fish Sanctuaries: No fishing March 1 to Friday before second Saturday in May

Dalhousie Lake and Mississippi River Dalhousie Township, within a 300 m radius of the bridge of the Township road crossing the Mississippi River where it enters Dalhousie Lake

Fish Sanctuaries: No fishing March 1 to Friday before second Saturday in May

Hoople Creek Osnabruck Township

Fish Sanctuaries: No fishing March 1 to Friday before second Saturday in May

Indian River and Clayton Lake within a 300 m radius of the Command Bridge crossing the Indian River where it enters Clayton Lake (Lanark Township)

Fish Sanctuaries: No fishing March 1 to Friday before second Saturday in May

Eastern Ontario 2019

Page 33

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2019

Eastern Ontario Fishing Regulations

Mississippi River Drummond Township, from 240.8 m west of Main Street in Innisville to Mississippi Lake

Fish Sanctuaries: No fishing March 1 to Friday before second Saturday in May

Mississippi River Pakenham Township, between the falls in the Town of Almonte and upstream side of bridge on Lanark County Road 20

Fish Sanctuaries: No fishing March 1 to Friday before second Saturday in May

Raisin River those portions of the river in the Village of Martintown and Lot 43, Concession 1, north side of Raisin River (Charlottenburgh Township)

Fish Sanctuaries: No fishing March 1 to Friday before second Saturday in May

South Nation River Cambridge Township, Coupal’s dam in Casselman downstream to the westerly limit of Lot 11, Concession 5

Fish Sanctuaries: No fishing March 1 to Friday before second Saturday in May

South Nation River Hamlet of Crysler in Finch Township

Fish Sanctuaries: No fishing March 1 to Friday before second Saturday in May

South Nation River North Plantagenet Township, between north side of Concession 4 and a point 30.5 m upstream of C.P.R. rightofway

Fish Sanctuaries: No fishing March 1 to Friday before second Saturday in May

South Nation River Village of Chesterville in Winchester Township

Fish Sanctuaries: No fishing March 1 to Friday before second Saturday in May

St. Lawrence River, waters east of aline drawn between Bishops Point andthe easternmost tips of Howe and WolfeIslands, and including Lake St. Francis

Walleye Limits: S4 and C2; no size limit

Lake St. Francis and the waters of the St.Lawrence River lying east of Robert H.Saunders Generating Station

Yellow Perch Season: open from January 1 to March 31 and second Saturday in May to December 31

All waters of Lake Ontario, includingthe Niagara River (downstream ofNiagara Falls). The following waters areexcluded: Jordan Harbour, HamiltonHarbour, Toronto Harbour, Frenchman’sBay, Murray Canal, Presqu’ile Bay,Weller’s Bay, East Lake, West Lake,the Bay of Quinte (the waters lyingwest of the Glenora Ferry), the St.Lawrence River (waters lying east of aline drawn between Bishops Point andthe easternmost tips of Howe and Wolfeislands), and all other tributaries to LakeOntario.

Two lines may be used when angling from a boat in open water

Consecon Creek Hillier and Ameliasburgh Townships, from the dam in the Village of Consecon to Weller’s Bay

Fish Sanctuaries: No fishing - April 1 to Friday before first Saturday in May

Consecon Creek Hillier Township, from Lot 86 in Concession 5 to the mouth of the creek

Fish Sanctuaries: No fishing - April 1 to Friday before first Saturday in May

Moira River and Bay of Quinte from the Lott Dam downstream, including Belleville Harbour in the Bay of Quinte

Fish Sanctuaries: No fishing - April 1 to Friday before first Saturday in May

Napanee River Town of Napanee,from the waterfalls at Springside Park downstream to the bridge at Centre Street

Fish Sanctuaries: No fishing - April 1 to Friday before first Saturday in May

Trent River City of Quinte West, between the first dam north of Lake Ontario downstream to the south side of the Dundas Street bridge and the Trent Canal from Lock Number 1 downstream to where it joins the Trent River

Fish Sanctuaries: No fishing - April 1 to Friday before first Saturday in May

Eastern Ontario 2019

Page 34

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MyCatch Research Below are some research projects we are currently working on. If any of these projects interest you, visit our research page and learn more.

AnglersAtlas.com/research Using MyCatch to engage anglers and research movement patterns related to the spread of Whirling Disease Led by Dr. Mark Poesch, Assistant Professor, University of Alberta. This research is sponsored by Alberta Environment and Parks.

Using citizen science to enhance fisheries data collection and monitoring

Led by Dr. Fiona Johnston, lead researcher at Angler’s Atlas. This research is sponsored by Angler’s Atlas and the Alberta Conservation Association.

Tracking the movement of thousands of fish throughout the Rideau waterway

Led by PhD candidate Jordanna Bergman, Department of Biology, Carleton University. This research is funded from National Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada.

Spatial ecology of Arctic grayling in the Parsnip area

Led by Dr. Eduardo Martins, Assistant Professor, Conservation Science and Practice, University of Northern BC. This research is sponsored by BC Hydro’s Fish and Wildlife Compensation Program.


A fisheries monitoring program

Built By Anglers In 2018 we launched MyCatch, an ambitious project where anglers can play an active role in fisheries research. A major challenge faced by biologists and researchers is the cost of collecting fisheries data. By working with an-

glers, we are able to generate new data for thousands of lakes and streams that currently go unmonitored and are at conservation risk. The map below shows waterbodies that were surveyed by anglers in 2018.

• Over 2,500 waterbodies surveyed • Anglers reported over 10,000 trips • Six ongoing research projects

Secret spots stay secret Zeroes matter * See catch rates and compare

Sign up today and help with fisheries research in Canada! AnglersAtlas.com/mycatch

* Remember that not catching anything is important data, so please report zero catches!

Profile for Angler's Atlas

2019 Eastern Ontario Fishing - Angler's Atlas  

Eastern Ontario enjoys a huge number of well developed lakes and rivers with an extensive list of sport fish available. This guide spotlight...

2019 Eastern Ontario Fishing - Angler's Atlas  

Eastern Ontario enjoys a huge number of well developed lakes and rivers with an extensive list of sport fish available. This guide spotlight...

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