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CONTENTS EXPOSE’

6: CYBERBULLYING: MAKE IT STOP BY TYRA SMITH, LINDBLOM MATH & SCIENCE 7: DIARY OF A BULLY VICTIM BY DEVENE PARKER, CLARA BARTON ELEMENTARY 8: GAY CALLING BY TIA SMITH, LINDBLOM MATH & SCIENCE

4EVER YOUNG

9: ASK SYDNEY BOBBIE BY SYDNEY TENTON, LINDBLOM MATH & SCIENCE 10: THE TWERK EFFECT BY JETAUN SCOTT, LINDBLOM MATH & SCIENCE 11: GIRL/GUY CODE: THE MIDDLE SCHOOL EDITION BY U.C. WOODSON CHARTER STAFF 12: OLD SCHOOL TV SHOWS UNSCRAMBLE BY U.C. WOODSON CHARTER STAFF 13: TOP ROLE MODELS FOR TEENS BY U.C. WOODSON CHARTER STAFF

FASHION

14-17: TURN UP YOUR STYLE FOR SUMMER

HOT OFF THE PRESS

18: IMANI HAKIM GOES FOR THE GOLD IN “THE GABBY DOUGLAS STORY” BY SYDNEY TENTON, LINDBLOM MATH & SCIENCE 19: “HOUSE OF PAYNE” STAR DOC SHAW TALKS ABOUT BULLYING BY KELSI WILLIAMS & TYRA SMITH, LINDBLOM MATH & SCIENCE 20 & 21: TREVOR JACKSON HOPES TO MAKE YOU A FAN BY DIOVION GALLIMORE, LINDBLOM MATH & SCIENCE 22: ANTHONY LEWIS: A STAR IN THE MAKING BY KENNEDY CHANEY, MORGAN PARK ACADEMY 23: KIANA SPEARS A TRIPLE THREAT BY KENNEDY CHANEY, MORGAN PARK ACADEMY

DEEPER THAN SKIN

24 & 25: PHOTO-CHOP BY RIAN DUNN, LINDBLOM MATH & SCIENCE 26: SHOULD APPEARANCE MATTER BY KELSI WILLIAMS, LINDBLOM MATH & SCIENCE 26: DIO DELIGHT SCRUB RECIPE BY DIOVION GALLIMORE, LINDBLOM MATH & SCIENCE

TALKIN’ NERDY

27: ARE THERE ENOUGH DIVERSE CHARACTERS IN YOUNG ADULT BOOKS? BY TYRA SMITH, LINDBLOM MATH & SCIENCE

28: BUNDLES OF BOOKS MOVE TO THE BIG SCREEN BY TYRA SMITH, LINDBLOM MATH & SCIENCE 29: SHOULD STUDENTS BE TAUGHT BETTER BEHAVIOR FROM TEACHERS? BY DIOVION GALLIMORE, LINDBLOM MATH & SCIENCE 30: LLORENZ MELITON 7TH GRADE MATH CHAMP BY DIOVION GALLIMORE, LINDBLOM MATH & SCIENCE 31: MEDGAR EVERS GETS NEW COMPUTER LAB BY AURIELLE DRUMMER, U.C. WOODSON CHARTER

KEEPIN’ SCORE

32: NOAH TIME BY JEREMIAH SMITH, PERSPECTIVES MIDDLE ACADEMY 33: ANOTHER YEAR WITHOUT DERRICK ROSE BY OLIVIA SMITH, PARK MANOR ELEMENTARY 34: COST OF CONTACT SPORTS BY AVERY BOLDEN, SKINNER WEST

CREATIVE CORNER

36: HOPE OR DARKNESS BY DIOVION GALLIMORE, LINDBLOM MATH & SCIENCE 37: GRAFFITI: ART OR VANDALISM? BY TIA SMITH, LINDBLOM MATH & SCIENCE 38: FACE PAINT BY TIA SMITH, LINDBLOM MATH & SCIENCE 39: ART BY BRITTANY ALEXANDER, PERSPECTIVES MIDDLE ACADEMY

EXECUTIVE DIRECTORS DEANNA MCLEARY & J. NA-TAE’ THOMPSON MANAGING EDITOR MARTI PARHAM EDITORIAL INSTRUCTORS NYKEYA WOODS KATHY CHANEY WEB CONTENT & MARKETING MANAGER JOI MITCHELL WEB CONTENT ASSISTANT HENRY COLLINS ART DIRECTION DESIGN AND ILLUSTRATION ANGEL D’AMICO-BAUER PHOTO COORDINATOR DESHAUN ADAMS SPECIAL PROJECTS MANAGER DESHAUN ADAMS PHILISTINE THOMPSON

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CONTRIBUTORS Lindblom Math & Science

Back Row: Tia Smith & Tyra Smith Front row: Jetaun Scott, Kelsi Williams, Rian Dunn & Diovion Gallimore U.C. Woodson Charter

Kiana Kali, Aurielle Drummer, Kaylah Wright

PLEASE LET US KNOW YOUR THOUGHTS ON TRUE STAR JR. MAGAZINE CONTACT US: LETTERS TO TRUE STAR JR. 1130 SOUTH WABASH, SUITE 302 CHICAGO, IL 60605-2717 EMAIL: TRUESTARJR@TRUESTARMAGAZINE.COM 4 TRUE STAR JR.


STUDENT EDITORS

LINDBLOM MATH AND SCIENCE ACADEMY

LINDBLOM MATH AND SCIENCE ACADEMY

SYDNEY TENTON

DIOVION GALLIMORE

EDITOR

EDITOR

FREELANCE WRITERS

AVERY BOLDEN SKINNER WEST

BRITTANY ALEXANDER PERSPECTIVES MIDDLE ACADEMY

DEVENE PARKER BARTON ELEMENTARY SCHOOL

JEREMIAH SMITH PERSPECTIVES MIDDLE ACADEMY

KENNEDY CHANEY MORGAN PARK ACADEMY

OLIVIA SMITH PARK MANOR ELEMENTARY


EXPOSE’

Cyberbullying: MAKE IT STOP BY TYRA SMITH, LINDBLOM MATH & SCIENCE

A

s more technology is being introduced, it is easier to harm a person than ever before. “Nearly 43 percent of kids have been bullied online. One in four has had it happen more than once,” according to DoSomething.org, an organization committed to empower the younger people in society. When more than 80 percent of teenagers own a smart phone it’s common for bullies to switch to an online medium rather than approaching their victims face-to-face. The result is cyberbullying.

TheDenverChannel.com, “Ashley Cardona was a victim of bullying and she unfortunately lost her fight.” Social media apps and websites such as Instagram, Facebook and Twitter make bullying people simple. The sites don’t filter what people say on their accounts, and the only way to notify someone that something harmful was said is to click the report button. Fast Facts about Cyberbullying

NoBullying.org, says “Cyberbullying is defined as a young person tormenting, threatening, harassing or embarrassing another young person using the Internet or other technologies, like cell phones.” Also, cyberbullying can happen anytime during the day and anywhere as long as the bully has access to the Internet. The bullying can be so harsh that people commit a type of suicide called bullycide. An example of bullycide happened in April when Denver teen Ashley Cardona committed suicide. One of Cardona’s friends told

* 70 percent of students report seeing frequent bullying online. * 68 percent of teens agree that cyber bullying is a serious problem. * Girls are about twice as likely as boys to be victims and perpetrators of cyber bullying. * 90 percent of teens who have seen social-media bullying say they have ignored it; 84 percent have seen others tell cyber bullies to stop. Source: NoBullying.org

6 TRUE STAR JR.


Diary of a BULLY VICTIM BY DEVENE PARKER, CLARA BARTON ELEMENTARY SCHOOL

Nov. 4, 2013

Dear Diary, I’ve been bullied all my life, but now that I am in 8th grade it’s become harder to deal with. Today I was bullied for talking correctly to an adult when everyone else was being disrespectful. In my opinion, that is a true sign of ignorance. I want to talk to someone that might understand my perspective and try to help, not by talking to my parent, but by just giving me advice from a child’s point of view.

Nov. 5, 2013

Dear Diary, Today I was bullied again. Although being bullied is a bad thing, I have gotten used to it, which makes my situation even worse. Instead of it being for my pronunciation, I was bullied about how I dress. The people at my school have a thing about downing people and making them feel selfconscious. I just have to accept that I am a little old fashioned.

Nov. 6, 2013

Dear Diary, A few days after the fight happened at school, the girl that fought me thought she wouldn’t get caught.

Boy, was she wrong. Like I always say, “the truth will be exposed,” and so it was. I decided to tell the administration what happened. They gave this girl three days of suspension. The hardest part about the fight was learning it was one of my former best friends that staged it. I guess I need to watch who I call my friends.

Nov. 13, 2013

Dear Diary, I have kept this diary, not only because I wanted to write a journal entry, but because I wanted to express to other people that are being bullied, and to bullies, how it feels to be a victim. One thing I don’t think bullies take into account is the possibility of consequences. I have learned to ignore people, and if that doesn’t work you stand up for yourself, not always by violence, but by trying to be civilized and talking it through. Being accepted is not always guaranteed, but what you can do is embrace being different and do what you can to be positive. Sometimes the best way to beat an enemy is not to act tough or result to violence; if the situation is taken to a physical level then tell an adult and do what you can to leave them alone. I learned that the hard way. TRUE STAR JR. 7


GAY-Calling BY TIA SMITH, LINDBLOM MATH & SCIENCE

I

t seems as if in every era there has to be someone to discriminate against, and in this time period it is gays, lesbians, transgendered, bisexual, or basically anything that has to do with sexuality. Every day there is always someone calling a person gay or a fag, whether it’s their best friend or someone who they despise based on what they wear or the things that they say. Statistics done by Make Beats Not Beatdowns, a nonprofit that uses the arts to help bullies and bullied children, states, “Nearly nine out of 10 LGBT youth reported being verbally harassed at school in the past year because of their sexual orientation. Nearly half (44.1 percent) reported being physically harassed. About a quarter (22.1 percent) reported being physically assaulted. Nearly two-thirds (60.8 percent) who experienced harassment or assault never reported the incident to the school. Of those who did report the incident, nearly one-third 8 TRUE STAR JR.

(31.1 percent) said the school staff did nothing in response.” The word gay used to mean happy, but over time the term has changed to something new. If a boy wears “girly” clothes or says something that can be taken in a negative way, he’s considered gay. Using the word gay as an offensive term is rude and uncalled for. Several years ago, the National Basketball Association (NBA) created a public service announcement (PSA) featuring Grant Hill. The PSA, part of the “Think B4 You Speak” campaign sponsored by the NBA, the Gay, Lesbian, Straight Education Network and the Ad Council, discouraged using the term gay as a negative slur. The site thinkb4youspeak.com monitors how often terms like “fag” or “dyke” are tweeted on Twitter in an effort to stop the negativity. There’s nothing wrong with being gay. There’s nothing funny about being gay, so why should we make fun of it?


4EVER YOUNG

Advice Column: Ask Sydney Bobbie BY SYDNEY TENTON, LINDBLOM MATH & SCIENCE

Q: How do you

adjust to a new school, especially if you’re going to high school?

A:

I attended an academic center, so I guess that counts as high school. Entering, I didn’t really know anybody and I was very shy, however, I didn’t let my shy personality change who I was so I could fit in. My advice is to try not to be shy like I was. Be open. Try talking to some people and get to know them, but always show your true colors and be yourself.

High school is full of ups and downs; you lose friends and you gain friends. But if you’re real and honest with everyone, including yourself, you’ll be fine. Not only that, but don’t let the social scene distract you from what’s really important—your education. You’re not at school to please your peers. Focus on yourself, your family, and working to impress your teacher. Teachers show more interest when YOU show interest. It’s good to take a break and have some fun, but trust me; social networking can definitely cause procrastinating. So start with good habits, because it’s hard to break bad ones once you’re used to them. So again, try to make a few good friends and get used to the academic environment by working hard and showing interest in the curriculum. TRUE STAR JR. 9


The TWERK Effect

BY JETAUN SCOTT, LINDBLOM MATH & SCIENCE

B

y the 1950s it was all about the Twist. In the1960s it was all about the Mash Potatoe and the Pony. Disco arrived in the 1970s with big Afros, bell bottom and platform shoes. By 1980 there was break dancing. From spinning on your head to doing the worm, hip-hop was then popular. By 1990s came line dancing and Krumping. By 2008, everyone wanted to “put a ring on it.” And then it was all about that Cat Daddy or doing the Dougie. By 2013 “twerking” became a mainstream dance. According to Wikipedia.org, twerking is a “dance to popular music in a sexually provocative manner involving thrusting hip movements and a low, squatting stance.”

hasn’t made any more of a difference than any other suggestive dance fad. It’s all about your intention. If your intent is to seduce, walking down the street can be suggestive,” Hardy said. “There are versions of this style of dance wherever there are people of African descent; some older than others, Mapouka from the Ivory Coast is one.” When singer Miley Cyrus was seen twerking at the 2013 Video Music Awards she made headlines. Ever since then twerking has become more popular than it ever was. It seems that twerking has an effect on teens. Now most music is about sex, twerking, and drugs. It looks harmless but it can bring the wrong idea and a bad impression to boys.

“It is, however not a new form of dance,” said Executive Artistic Director Vershawn SandersWard of Red Clay Dance Company. “You can find some of its movement roots, such as the hips and pelvis movements from African dance.”

When teens do these kinds of dances they think it’s just a dance. They’re so caught up in the dance that they don’t see the suggestive message it could be sending to other people.

Dancer Mashaune Hardy agreed with Sanders about the origin of twerking. “(Twerking)

So, should we twerk or shouldn’t we? That is the real question.

10 TRUE STAR JR.


Girl / Guy Code: The Middle School Edition

T

BY U.C. WOODSON STAFF

he popular TV shows “Guy Code” and “Girl Code” are not appropriate for tweens and teens, even though we sometimes sneak to watch them. Well, it’s time for the middle school version of “code.”

For girls: *DON’T LEAVE INAPPROPRIATE THINGS IN PUBLIC BATHROOMS SUCH AS “GIRL” PRODUCTS. *DON’T WEAR TOO TIGHT OR TOO BAGGY CLOTHES. *DON’T LET YOUR WEAVE TRACKS SHOW. *KEEP A SMALL SUPPLY OF YOUR “GIRL” PRODUCTS IN YOUR BOOKBAG. *DON’T ACT LIKE MILEY CYRUS WHEN SHE WAS AT THE VMAs.

For boys: *DON’T WEAR PANTS TOO TIGHT. *DON’T WEAR SAGGY PANTS.

& For girls & boys: *HAVE CONFIDENCE AND BELIEVE IN YOURSELF. *ALWAYS STUDY. BEING SMART IS ATTRACTIVE. *BE TRUE TO YOURSELF. *TREAT OTHERS HOW YOU WANT TO BE TREATED. *CREATE TRENDS, DON’T FOLLOW THEM. *MAKE SURE YOU CHECK FOR TISSUE HANGING FROM YOUR SHOES WHEN LEAVING THE BATHROOM. *ALWAYS KEEP DEODORANT IN YOUR BOOKBAG. *KEEP YOUR HAIR NEAT AT ALL TIMES. *ALWAYS MAKE SURE YOUR CLOTHES ARE IRONED BEFORE LEAVING HOME. *KEEP LOTION WITH YOU TO PUT ON YOUR HANDS EACH TIME AFTER YOU WASH THEM. *KEEP A SMALL AMOUNT OF LIP GLOSS OR VASELINE WITH YOU SO YOUR LIPS WON’T BE CHAPPED. *KEEP A BRUSH OR COMB IN YOUR BOOKBAG. TRUE STAR JR. 11


Old School TV Shows UNSCRAMBLE BY U.C. WOODSON STAFF

Answers: Proud Family Doug Kim Possible The Famous Jett Jackson Lizzie McGuire All That Kenan and Kel That’s So Raven True Jackson VP

12 TRUE STAR JR.

Rugrats

imlfay durop uogd sseioplb mki ttje msauof het kcaonsj iielzz gceiurm lal htta dna lke nnkae vnrea os sahtt pv eurt njoasck rruastg


Top Role Models FOR TEENS BY U.C. WOODSON STAFF

1. Malia and Sasha Obama 2. China Anne McClain (actress-singer)

3. Gabrielle Douglas (Olympic gymnast)

4. Carson Huey

(11-year-old genius accepted to college)

5. Zendaya Coleman (actress-singer)

TRUE STAR JR. 13


TURN UP YOUR

STYLE FOR

SUMMER

Hair & Make Up – Beauty Boulevard Photographer – DeShaun “Trig” Adams

14 TRUE STAR JR.


16 TRUE STAR JR.


TRUE STAR JR. 17


HOT OFF THE PRESS

Imani Hakim Goes for the Gold in “The Gabby Douglas Story” BY SYDNEY TENTON, LINDBLOM MATH & SCIENCE

R

emember Tonya from the CW’s “Everybody Hates Chris”? Well, fast forward five years after that show ended in 2009 and picture her as U.S. Olympic gymnast Gabrielle Douglas. Actress Imani Hakim found out about Lifetime’s “The Gabrielle Douglas Story” through Twitter and a friend suggested she go for the role. Hakim told her manager and the process began. Getting the role and being part of the movie was “pretty amazing” and she’s “honored to have been part of it,” Hakim said. The energy on set was described as great and very fun, although Hakim wishes she had more time to get in shape for the role. And while she was only able to work with Douglas during the last week of production, she was able to contact the gymnast if she had any questions. 18 TRUE STAR JR.

Hakim hopes viewers who watch the movie realized that no matter how hard things may get, you can accomplish it, if you really want it. “When I was able to see the final product I wanted to cry. There were tears in my eyes. I’m very proud of Gabby,” she said. At the 2012 London Summer Olympics, Douglas won gold medals in both the team and individual all-around competitions. She is the first American gymnast to win gold in both the gymnastic individual all-around and team competitions at the same Olympic Games. She was also the first woman of color of any nationality and the first African-American gymnast to become the individual All-Around Champion. Who knew a cartwheel could get someone so far?


“House of Payne” Star

DOC SHAW

Talks About Bullying

BY KELSI WILLIAMS AND TYRA SMITH, LINDBLOM MATH & SCIENCE

D

uring his acting career, Doc Shaw has played many roles including Malik Payne on “Tyler Perry’s House of Payne” and King Boomer on Disney’s “Pair of Kings.” Despite him being on television for several years, Shaw told Lindblom Math and Science Academy students earlier this month that he was still teased because of his weight. While Shaw can be remembered as a pudgy teen, the 22-year-old has lost 50 pounds and is hardly recognizable. He told the students that exercising has become a part of his daily life, and even before he spoke about being bullied he did pushups backstage. “Working out now is one of my hobbies,” Shaw said. “I made it my hobby…my lifestyle, because it is something that helps keep me on track.” Shaw also talked about improving yourself, your environment and participating in activities, such as sports, that have a good influence on not only your life, but the people whose lives are affected by yours. According to the YouTube video that documented this event, “Actor Doc Shaw Talks With Youth,”

Shaw said, “What are you all going to do, not just today, not just tomorrow, not just the next day, but every day from here on out? When we come here today what are you gonna do to make yourself better, to make the person beside you better and make your environment better?” Shaw talked to True Star Jr. about being on set with such inspiring actors like Lance Gross, LaVan Davis, Allen Payne and Cassi Davis. “[Working with them] helps me get better as an actor,” he said. “I never did acting growing up… It was great working with all those actors that were mentors to me; that are still mentors to me today.” Shaw is a relaxed person that looks for learning opportunities in everything that he does. He also looks up to his mother for inspiration, admiration and just about everything you can imagine. “My mother is my best friend,” he said. Look for Shaw to co-star in the Rise of the Planet of the Apes blockbuster sequel Dawn of the Planet of the Apes in July. TRUE STAR JR. 19


TREVOR JACKSON

HOPES TO MAKE YOU A FAN BY DIOVION GALLIMORE, LINDBLOM MATH & SCIENCE

A

n American writer, singer, dancer, and actor best known for playing Kris McDuffy on Disney’s “Let It Shine” and his role as Kevin Blake in the “Eureka” series is currently a teen sensation. His name is Trevor Jackson, as you may have guessed. Jackson, 17, has his first promotional tour across the country this year, which he is looking forward to because he believes it’s a great opportunity to meet new people, fans, and make himself known. He recently wrapped up work up for the “Drop It”remix, his latest music video, featuring hip-hop artist B.O.B. “It felt good [working with B.O.B]. He is very talented, and his lyrics took the song to a new level,” Jackson stated, smiling at the thought of working with the rapper. Jackson was also featured in a new music video with Diggy Simmons called “My Girl.” The Indianapolis native has gotten the chance to perform with different successful artist in the music industry. The quadruple threat has been rumored to be dating the talented Zendaya Coleman, 17. The gossip started around the time of his “Like We Grown” music video, which features the two of them as a couple. “I don’t know if we’d make another song together; it’s possible, and it would be great. 20 TRUE STAR JR.

But no, we do not date. We’re just really close friends. From the outside, I see it would look like we’re together, but we aren’t. She is just a great friend,” Jackson said referring to the Coleman rumors. Jackson described himself as a grateful person, and he believes everything happens for a reason. He said he is glad he took the steps he did to become an entertainer. He is responsible for writing some of his own songs, including “I’ll be who you love (This Christmas)” and “Superman.” He said he is passionate about his career, and he fears not doing well. He also fears spiders! Staying grounded is also important to him. That’s why he travels with his best friends Nathan and Michael. Jackson’s hobbies include tap dancing, dancing, singing, skateboarding, surfing, playing basketball and practicing. If he wasn’t in the position he was in currently, he’d picture himself as playing in the NBA or caring for animals. His favorite basketball players happen to be Kevin Durant and Kobe Bryant. He doesn’t think that having a favorite team is a good idea, but having favorite players are because, putting your everything into one team could have a negative turnout. In the future, Jackson will be touring and gaining a stronger fan base. We wish him the best, here at True Star!


TRUE STAR JR. 21


Anthony Lewis:

A Star In The Making

BY KENNEDY CHANEY, MORGAN PARK ACADEMY

A

young newcomer to the R&B scene is giving his generation a modern, electronic yet soulful version on the classic, “Candy Rain.” Los Angeles native Anthony Lewis has been singing since around 1st grade, but it was just for fun. One day his sister decided to put a video of him on YouTube and the rest was history. “I wasn’t expecting things to go as quickly as it did. One day it was uploaded and soon I kept getting more views each day. People really started noticing and I got a call,” the 17-year-old told True Star Jr. Music industry heavyweight Garnett March reached out to Lewis while he was working with producer Donnie Scantz. 22 TRUE STAR JR.

By choosing a classic song like “Candy Rain,” Lewis appeals to teens and our parents’ generation. The song, originally made by Soul 4 Real, was a hit in the mid-1990s and the original version is still played on the radio. After watching the video for “Candy Rain,” which also features rapper Billy Bang, there’s no question of who Lewis’ musical influences are. “I’m definitely a fan of Michael Jackson, Justin Timberlake and Chris Brown,” he said. Lewis has been in the studio and wants to start touring soon. “I’ve been working on my first album and hope to get it out this year,” he said. Follow him on Twitter: @ALewisMusic and YouTube: AnthonyJahzari.


Kiana Spears: A Triple Threat On The Move BY KENNEDY CHANEY, MORGAN PARK ACADEMY

C

hicago native Kiana Spears said the sky is the limit. The 14-year-old can sing, dance and act and realized early on what her natural-born gift was. “I always knew I was a star. When I was 10 I realized my true ability to sing,” Spears told True Star Jr. Ten years ago she started her journey to become a star. In 2004, she was a runner up in the New Star Discovery Pageant. The next year she became a member of the Chicago Bulls Kids, and a few years later Spears was featured in the DVD series “It’s Hip Hop Baby.”

Spears has also performed with the famous band Pink Floyd and was recently a state finalist in the National American Miss Pageant. But, what she is most proud of so far has been “performing at the Black Women’s Expo.” Spears describes her music style as “mellow and original.” When she’s not performing, Spears is focused on her education. She’s a S.T.E.M. (science, technology, engineering and math) scholar at St. Malachy’s School on the West Side. Looking ahead five years from now, she hopes to be “nationwide.”

She kept getting exposure and was invited to be the opening act for B Smyth and The New Boyz. TRUE STAR JR. 23


DEEPER THAN SKIN

Photo CHOP BY RIAN DUNN, LINDBLOM MATH & SCIENCE

A

role model is someone you can look up to, but it might be difficult to look up to someone, like a celebrity, when they look one way in magazines and another way in real life. Actress Kate Winslet is someone who is fine with her body. “I don’t look like that and I have no desire to look like that,” she said in regards to altered images done in the media. A magazine still photoshopped her without her consent in order to promote their business. Rachel Johnston, who lives all the way in England, was influenced by super slim celebrities like Winslet, according to reports, and suffered from an eating disorder for seven years. She used to 24 TRUE STAR JR.

Rachel Johnston Before and After


“stick magazine cuttings inside her school locker and compiled motivational scrapbooks which she would pore over to prevent herself from eating when she felt hungry,” she told Dailymail.uk.com. What editors don’t realize is that by making themselves look good, they are making girls, like Johnston, feel bad about themselves. Some girls are unhappy with their body image, and will do whatever is needed in order to achieve personal goals, or look like the celebrity of their choice. Some girls even try to achieve a

celebrity’s figure that honestly does not exist. According to the National Association of Anorexia Nervosa and Associated Disorders (ANAD), “The body type portrayed in advertising as the ideal is possessed naturally by only 5 percent of American females.” Bulimia, anorexia and other eating disorders are just some of the many consequences caused by photoshopped images. Photoshopping leads to insecurity, and insecurity leads to change. In this case specifically, change is not for the better. TRUE STAR JR. 25


Should APPEARANCE Matter? BY KELSI WILLIAMS, LINDBLOM MATH & SCIENCE

E

veryone has their own style that shows who they are. Not everyone agrees with the style, but should it matter? Believe it or not, some people rely on appearance, but sometimes what you wear can get you teased. People will just change their appearance because they want to fit in with a certain group of popular people who supposedly dress in a more flattering form than the people who are less popular than them. You may dress differently, but that does not mean you have to change who you are. Sooner or later the popular life won’t be for you because you can’t be yourself. Instead of wearing the usual attire that suits you, you now wear something that is foreign to you.

The teasing about outfits and the changing of someone’s personal appearance is most evident in high school. When people think that someone dresses differently or in a less attractive way, then they feel obliged to make a comment on the matter. The fact is that what people say should not affect how you dress or how you feel about your appearance. The answer to the question is that appearance should not matter. You are who you are.

Dio Delight Scrub Recipe BY DIOVION GALLIMORE, LINDBLOM MATH & SCIENCE

D

o you ever wake up and look in the mirror to find a face full of rough, dry skin? Well, mourn no more. With Dio Delight face and body scrub, your skin will feel and look great. With the few steps below, you’ll be able to create and properly use the scrub. You’ll have the skin you desire in no time. But, watch out because people will continuously try to touch your face.

Ingredients:

• Jar with lid • Extra Virgin Olive Oil • Coarse Sea Salt • Fragrant Essential Oil (Optional) Crush sea salt into medium sized pieces. Do not make them tiny. Put salt in a jar and add the olive 26 TRUE STAR JR.

oil and stir. The amount is based on the size of the jar, too much or less of the olive oil will not affect the scrub. Lastly, if you would like the scrub to have a scent use a fragrant essential oil like lavender, orange or jasmine.

Directions:

1) Wash your face. 2) Then, wash you face with the special scrub. 3) Next wait approximately 10 minutes, then rinse off with hot water. 4) Pat skin dry with towel. 5) Moisturize skin with facial lotion/ oil, that contains SPF, afterwards. 6) Repeat every day for noticeable results.


TALKING NERDY

Are There Enough Diverse Characters in

Young Adult Books?

BY TYRA SMITH, LINDBLOM MATH & SCIENCE

I

n many young adult books the protagonists are lacking diversity, which includes not only race, but sexual orientation and disability. Characters that come from different backgrounds in the young adult genre are not represented enough.

authors themselves aren’t disabled or people of color. Less than 10 authors on New York Times Best Sellers List are not Caucasian.

“Among the 65 young adult fiction titles on the bestseller list, 10 featured main characters of color; that’s 15 percent,” according to DiversityinYA.com, a website dedicated to promoting diversity in the YA literature.

More writers are taking initiative by promoting diversity with social media. Recently Ellen Oh, the author of The Prophecy series, hosted an event throughout May called “We Need Diverse Books.” The goal was to get more people to be aware of the lack of diversity in young adult literature and to get more people to buy books were the characters aren’t all the same.

In addition, “Of the 65 fiction titles on the YA list, eight titles include LGBT (lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender) main characters, at 12 percent of total. Only two titles on the New York Times YA Bestseller list featured main characters with disabilities.” This includes The Fault in Our Stars by John Green (cancer and related disabilities) and Will Grayson, Will Grayson by John Green and David Levithan (depression). A reason why many of the young adult characters aren’t diverse may be that the

Valerie Woods, the author of Katrin’s Chronicles: The Canon of Jacqueléne Dyanne, is optimistic about diverse characters in media. Woods stated, “Unfortunately, it seems that the experiences of diverse characters are still considered ‘other’ in mainstream media... something that is difficult to ‘crossover.’ The good news is this is changing, especially in television, thanks in large part to the enormous success of Shonda Rhimes and her shows, such as “Scandal” and the upcoming “How to Get Away with Murder,” which will star Viola Davis. I can only hope this will catch on in literature, as well.” TRUE STAR JR. 27


Bundles of Books

Move to the Big Screen

BY TYRA SMITH, LINDBLOM MATH & SCIENCE

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very month more books are being optioned for movies and being released to theaters. The rate that these movies are coming out could probably increase in the future.

has made more that $424 million compared to Richelle Mead’s Vampire Academy: Blood Sisters pulling in $8 million. Another movie from The Hunger Games series opens in November.

Just this year, several book-inspired movies and best-selling young adult novels, including The Giver, The Maze Runner and The Fault in Our Stars are set to hit theaters. Earlier this year the movie Divergent was released and got a lot of publicity. The movie, so far, has tallied more than $145 million and was published by HarperCollins just three years ago. A couple of months ago, Dreamworks announced that it had bought the film rights to the popular contemporary book, Eleanor and Park by Rainbow Rowell. The book was published in February 2013.

The book-to-movie adaptations also have merchandise that features things like characters and photo stills from the movies on T-shirts. For example, The Mortal Instruments: City of Bones by Cassandra Clare had a clothing line designed by Tripp NYC and was sold at the Californiabased retail store Hot Topic.

Some of the book-to-movie adaptations have been very successful like The Hunger Games: Catching Fire. As of March 30th, according to IMDB.com, The Hunger Games: Catching Fire 28 TRUE STAR JR.

The good news about books being made into movies is that adaptations can serve to benefit people by encouraging those who don’t like reading to pick up a book. The movie also allows the readers to see a book they like through a different medium. On the other hand, for those seeing the movie who have not read the book, it can be confusing, and if the movie has made major changes from the book, the readers tend to dislike the movie.


Should Students Be Taught

Better Behavior From TEACHERS? BY DIOVION GALLIMORE, LINDBLOM MATH & SCIENCE

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hould students be subjected to educators teaching them better behavior? A lot of behavioral problems, including referral, grades and improper hallway behavior have been occurring at Lindblom Math and Science Academy recently, however, is this enough to make teachers instruct proper behavior? Classes usually start with a syllabus and class rules, but should there be another step in which teachers teach students “proper” ways of behaving in school? Instead of giving multiple detentions, maybe a class that teaches the “proper” ways of acting during school is what students may need. “Teachers teaching better behavior is overstepping the school’s boundaries. Parents raise their children in a certain way,” said 8th grade Lindblom student Jaelyn Evans, 14. “And it is up to the school to discipline the child if

they see fit. If a child was taught something that the parent didn’t agree with, we would have a very big issue on our hands. Parents raise the children, schools teach the children.” Ms. Mays, a teacher and substitute for 13 years, has argued that, “[Teachers teaching students better behavior] is a great idea. Sometimes, students don’t know what they’re doing is wrong, and as a teacher, whose job is to teach, I believe that teaching them better behavior is a part of the job. There could be a room for detention, but instead of doing nothing, the students will be learning about proper etiquette.” Teachers are leaning towards the idea of mentors teaching students proper behavior. What do you think of teachers teaching better behavior to students? TRUE STAR JR. 29


Llorenz Meliton

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7th Grade Math Champ

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BY DIOVION GALLIMORE LINDBLOM MATH & SCIENCE

hitney Young Academic Center student Llorenz Meliton recently won first place in the Chicago Junior Mathematic League (CJML), scoring 56 total points! Meliton had the highest score in divisions A and B for 7th grade.

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“I feel pretty good. I’m really proud of it. My friends are also proud of it. [The Chicago Junior Mathematics League] was a great experience for me,” Meliton told True Star Jr. The CJML is a Chicago Public Schools sponsored program that seeks to encourage students to challenge themselves mathematically. “It wasn’t really about scoring the highest score, but doing the best I could in the competition.” When asked why he participated in the event Meliton replied, “I love math. The CJML is great for me to practice those skills.” At 13 Meliton, has support and guidance around him, and his intelligence is key. He prepared for the CJML with math team meets after school. The participants practiced problems that they struggled with, and got the help needed to learn and memorize the concepts for the tournament. Meliton, who transferred from Edison Regional Gifted Center to attend Whitney Young because he thought it would be “a great experience,” advised asking for help with what you don’t know. He believes that if you get stuck you need to keep trying. If you don’t get it the first time, he said, take a break and come back to the problem. 30 TRUE STAR JR.

Although, Meliton works hard during school, he still manages to be a regular kid. He enjoys playing video games, playing the piano, writing poems, and practicing martial arts. He is inspired to work hard because of not only scientist, great inventors, and philosophers, but because of his parents too. They have taught him values that are important in life. He also describes them as awesome. Meliton describes himself as intelligent, and wants to be a scientist who helps the world develop through technology. He wants

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to leave a mark on the world by doing something worth remembering. Llorenz Meltion is doing a great job, and here at True Star we wish him the best in his studies!

+ –  Chicago Junior Mathematics League ×  ÷   


Medgar Evers gets New Computer Lab BY AURIELLE DRUMMER AND KAYLAH WRIGHT, U.C. WOODSON

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ew computers provided by a former student were recently given to Medgar Evers Elementary School. Students at the Washington Heights school were excited to receive the gift given by Derrick Taylor, a former student at Evers and now proud owner of several McDonald’s restaurants in Chicago. Taylor surprised the students at a special event at Evers inside of the school’s new computer lab named after him. “I’ve never forgotten where I came from and when given the chance, I always do what I can to give back to the school. The teachers there have had an impact in my life and I want to help give the same to the students there now,” Taylor told True Star Jr. His gift is the biggest the school has ever received. He got a little emotional when presenting the computers to the school because he was surprised the lab was named in his honor.

“It was nice to see how appreciated I am and how I was able to touch many lives. And seeing some of the kids get emotional and personally thank me made it hard for me to not get emotional about it,” he said. Taylor owns six McDonald’s on the South Side and is on the board of the Black McDonald’s Operators Association of Chicago and Northwest Indiana. He said it’s important for him to provide jobs to young people working their way through high school and college. “It provides them with the necessary starting tools, such as discipline and responsibility, to take that next step in the real world,” Taylor said. In addition to giving back to his school and running his businesses, he also finds time to mentor youth. “Sometimes a person needs someone in their corner to let them know when they are going off track and to let them know they care about them. Mentoring someone can make a great difference in their life,” he said. TRUE STAR JR. 31


KEEPIN’ SCORE

Noah TIME

BY JEREMIAH SMITH PERSPECTIVES MIDDLE ACADEMY

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oakim Noah was born on born February 25, 1985, to father Yannick Noah, the1983 winner of the French Open, and mother Cecilila Bodhe, who was crowned Miss Sweden in1978.

Profile Stats: Career Per Game Average: *12.5 POINTS *11.10 REBOUNDS *5.2 ASSISTS Career Total: *4608 POINTS *4387 REBOUNDS *1226 ASSISTS

College Life: *Helped lead the University of Florida to back-to-back national championships in 2006 and 2007 *Named Most Outstanding Player of the 2006 NCAA Tournament Final Four *Was Second Team All-America as a junior and named First Team All-SEC his sophomore and junior year 32 TRUE STAR JR.

*Set the NCAA Tournament record for blocked shots in a single tournament with 29 * Ended his college career with 1,124 points, good for 34th in Florida’s record books *Finished ranked second all-time at Florida in career field goal percentage (.612) and rejections (186) *Recorded 15 double-doubles as a Gator

Fun Facts: · Noah plays for the French National team (even though he was also eligible for the American and Swedish teams) · With his mother he runs the “Noah’s Arc Foundation” · During the off-season Noah divides his time between Chicago and Florida · Noah is the second player in Chicago Bulls history to win the Defensive Player of the Year Award (1st was Michael Jordan)


Another Y Year Without

DERRICK ROSE BY OLIVIA SMITH, PARK MANOR ELEMENTARY

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hicago Bulls fans held their breath when point guard Derrick Rose suffered a second knee injury just 19 months after the first knee injury. Rose tore the medial meniscus in his right knee. Two seasons ago he tore his ACL and has played in a total of 10 games and 311 minutes. Rose, who suffered the injury in late November, could return to action sooner than expected. He has been jogging on a treadmill and his head coach Tom Thibodeau said Rose could be healthy enough to practice with the team by the end of the season. Thibodeau also wants Rose to play for Team USA at the FIBA World Cup this summer.

Despite losing Rose for the season, the Bulls still made the playoffs as one of the top seeds in the Eastern Conference. Media was on fire with talks of the Bulls’ soulful Center Joakim Noah being named Defensive Player of the Year, D.J. Augustine possibly picking up Most Improved Player and Taj Gibson perhaps getting the Sixth Man of the Year Award. While Augustine and Gibson were both worthy contenders, Noah was the only one to bring additional honor to the city. Noah is the 2014 Defensive Player of the Year. Let’s hope for a powerful 2014-2015 season for the Bulls! TRUE STAR JR. 33


The C Cost of Contact Sports

BY AVERY BOLDEN, SKINNER WEST

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ost people enjoy watching football and soccer, right? There’s nothing like turning on ESPN and seeing that your favorite team won their game last night, but what’s not being broadcast are the risks of concussions from sports such as football and soccer. About 1.1 million kids play football or soccer in the U.S. and 5 to 10 percent of athletes get concussions -- temporary unconsciousness caused by a blow to the head -- each year. In any given year, 220,000 kids get concussions or other traumatic brain injuries (TBI) each year just from soccer and football. Raven D is a female soccer player on an all-male team. The 13-year-old is a member of a new generation of soccer players who are turning soccer into a contact sport. She has already sustained two concussions. “I got both of my concussions from head butts during games, but I don’t think they will have long-lasting effects,” she said. From head butting, to blatant fouls committed by professionals and minors alike, European fútbol is becoming more and more like American football. According to the Centers for Disease 34 TRUE STAR JR.

Control and Prevention, “Each year, U.S. emergency departments treat an estimated 173,285 sports- and recreation-related TBIs, including concussions, among children and adolescents, from birth to 19 years. Children and teens are more likely to get a concussion and take longer to recover than adults.” Alraynita Coleman, the mother of a football player for the Hyde Park Jr. Spartans, said she worries all the time about her 10-year-old son getting hurt. “Alejandro loves playing football and we take all the precautions to make sure he doesn’t get too hurt. The coaches are good about teaching them how to play as safe as possible. Luckily, he’s been fine while playing,” said Coleman. Concussion Prevention Tips: *Wear the proper helmet for the sport you’re playing. *Avoid head-first contact in sports. In football, hit with the shoulder instead of the head/helmet. *Build up your neck muscle strength to help absorb a hit to the head. Source: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention


CREATIVE CORNER

Echo House

(BASED OFF “TEEN WOLF” SEASON 3 EPISODE 20) BY RIAN DUNN, LINDBLOM MATH & SCIENCE

I want to be free, I need to get out. Too many people and screams about. Just yesterday a girl yelled into a phone with no ring, just like microwaving food, but it had no ding. Echnor house or Echo is what they call it, but to me it is just like an empty black pit. Echo and Echnor don’t go together at all, then I heard someone running down the hall. “Need to be free” that’s all I heard. I’m gonna soar and fly because I’m a bird. Tying a thick rope around a banister, I tried to stop him, oh wait it was a her. She flung herself over the banister thinking she could fly, but she jerked quickly back, snapping her neck, she did die. I kept hearing her screams all the way back to my room, this place is for nothing but bringing people to their doom. This place is an insane asylum, I know that now, Evil is coming, and yes, I know how. Through me. It bangs on doors yelling for me to let it in, but I can’t do that. No, I won’t let it win. One day I said, “Enough! I can’t take it anymore!” Then I walked up to the evil and opened the door. It seeped into me quicker than a little brown mouse. That night I was told you could hear my screams echo through Echnor house. TRUE STAR JR. 35


Hope or Darkness BY DIOVION GALLIMORE LINDBLOM MATH & SCIENCE Do you know how it feels, To be something you’re not? Well, it’s a big deal, It matters a lot. Some days you want a hug. You’re happy from the start. You’re feeling all smug, No anger in your heart. Happier than a child, With a smile that’s huge. With the urge to run wild, You’re in such a great mood. But that’s not the case. You know you’re really sad, But it doesn’t show on your face. That’s what makes you mad. You’re tired of the lying. Nothing to live for. Tired of continually trying, You can give no more. People all around you. So many people you can hardly breathe So, like you’re an outsider, You just decide to leave. We might be just kids, But hope is a lie. Although, some of us live, We all have to die. This is how it feels, To be something you’re not. See, it’s a big deal, And it matters a lot.

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Graffiti:Art or Vandalism?

BY TIA SMITH, LINDBLOM MATH & SCIENCE

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o some, graffiti is considered art, to others it’s is considered a crime. In the dictionary graffiti is described as writing or drawings scribbled, scratched or sprayed illicitly on a wall or other surface in a public place. Many people in society don’t consider graffiti art, but vandalism. The fact that most graffiti is done on public property might be the reason why so many people are against it. According to Establishing Graffiti Emissions as a Nonpoint Source Sector, an article written by Algirdas M. Leskys stated, “Ten percent of graffiti is gang related.” Even though the rest of the 90 percent is not associated with gangs, it is still frowned upon by many, but not by everyone. “Doing graffiti stopped me from going down the wrong path. It saved my life,” said seasoned graffiti artist Rahmaan Statik. He said that since he started doing graffiti things have changed. “At this point graffiti as an art form is highly lucrative because it is used as a visual component for marketing products to youth. Graffiti has always been around. Graffiti is still a young art movement that has a lot of development to do.”

Statik went on to say that there are a couple of things he feels are important about graffiti. “Graffiti is a movement of art, a movement of typography and a movement of culture. It is art created by the youth and done on the street. It helps brighten urban environment.” The Chicago Transit Authority (CTA) and the Chicago Police Department (CPD) think of graffiti as vandalism, especially when committed on public property, and plan to crack down on those who tag thanks to an expanding security network. The tagging costs $1 million to clean and repair last year. The CTA plans to file lawsuits against parents if their child is caught tagging trains, buses and other transit properties. So far this year, 60 people have been arrested. In April, the agency filed four anti-graffiti lawsuits “totaling $13,109 against the parents or legal guardians of eight minors, ages 14 to 17, all charged with misdemeanor criminal defacement to property,” the CTA said. TRUE STAR JR. 37


CREATIVE CORNER

Face Paint By Tia Smith LINDBLOM MATH & SCIENCE

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ART BY Brittany Alexander B

WWW.CHATNO2.WEBS.COM

rittany Alexander, born August 9, 2001, has been drawing since pre-school. She enjoys drawing comics the most, with her favorite style of art being Anime. Alexander finds music, books and Naruto to be a great source of inspiration. When she grows up Alexander aspires to be either a scientist, author or cartoonist.

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True Star Junior Summer 2014  

True Star Junior Summer 2014