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SUMMER

2013

NEW! ADVICE COLUMN:

ASK SYDNEY BOBBIE

E

GROWING UP A FOSTER CHILD E

DISHES ON THEIR FAVORITES ‘AROUND THE WORLD’

SUMMER FITNESS

F R

MINDLESS BEHAVIOR


Are You A

TRUESTAR?

REAL TEENS

REAL ISSUES STYLE TRENDS

CELEBRITY INTERVIEWS

HEALTH,

NEWS, SPORTS

AND MORE! CHECK OUT WWW.TRUESTARIS.COM


CONTENTS EXPOSE’

6: CHICAGO VIOLENCE: STAYING SAFE THIS SUMMER BY KYLA WHITE 7: GROWING UP A FOSTER CHILD BY DEVENE PARKER

4EVER YOUNG

8: ASK SYDNEY BOBBIE 9: EXPLORING SIX FLAGS BY DAIJA HOLLINS 10: TOP 10 PLACES TO GO THIS SUMMER BY CLARISSA WASHINGTON 11: HOW TO STAY OUT OF TROUBLE THIS SUMMER BY LAUREN NOISETTE 12: RAP LYRICS INFLUENCING TEENS BEHAVIOR BY GABRIEL SANDERS 13: TURNING THE BIG 13! BY BREANNA BECK 14: CLASH OF THE VIDEO GAMES: VINTAGE VS NEW BY CAMERON THOMAS 15: ARE YOU A LEADER? BY RIKYAH WRIGHT

HOT OFF THE PRESS

16: DUSAN BROWN BY SYDNEY TENTON 17: CATCHING UP WITH MAX SCHNEIDER BY JANEA TAYLOR 18: K-PHI 9 DANCE TROUPE BY SIDNEY TENTON 19: ARI SLAUGHTER’S MIX VIDEO OF BASKETBALL BY KAYLAH WRIGHT 20-21: MINDLESS BEHAVIOR BY CAMRY MOORE / KAYLEN POINDEXTER

FASHION

32: NEW WORDS ON THE STREET BY EMANUEL THOMAS 33: DO THE WRITE THING WRITING CONTEST WINNERS ANNOUNCED BY TAYLOR MIGGINS

KEEPIN’ SCORE

34: SPORTING ACTIVITIES IN CHICAGO THIS SUMMER BY DIAMOND BURTON 34: SWIMMING SAFETY TIPS BY NASIR JOHNSON 35: MURRAY HOOP SQUAD BY KAYLAH WRIGHT 36: FITNESS TIPS FOR KIDS BY KYLA WHITE 37: HOW FOOTBALL BUILDS CHARACTER BY BRENDYN JONES

CREATIVE CORNER

38: SUMMERTIME WORD SEARCH BY JAYLN WILLIAMS 39: SUMMER TIME COOL DOWN BY JAYLN WILLIAMS 39: GOSSIP GIRLS BY NAOMI SMITH 40: LIFE LESSONS BY BRITTANY HULL

SCHOOL SPIRIT

41: GROWING AS A JOURNALIST AT LINDBLOM BY SYDNEY TENTON 42: HISTORY FAIR AT U. C. WOODSON BY KAYLAH WRIGHT 43: MORGAN PARK’S SPRING BEAK TRIPS BY CAMERON THOMAS, AKILAH SMITH AND RONALD THOMPSON

22 – 25: FASHION

DEEPER THAN SKIN

26: MAINTAINING HEALTHY SKIN BY AKILAH SMITH 27: PROTECT YOURSELF FROM THE SUMMER SUN BY DEJAHNAE GOLDSMITH 27: BEAT THE SUMMER HEAT BY EDEN STRONG 28: BOYS AND SELF-ESTEEM BY VAUGHN BROWN 29: WHO YOU CALLING A B****? BY KYLA WHITE

TALKIN’ NERDY

30: ½ PINT POETICS BY AMBER FRY 31: TIPS ON HOW TO KEEP YOUR BRAIN ACTIVE THIS SUMMER BY STACIE TAYLOR 31: SUMMER READS FOR 2013 BY TAYLOR MIGGINS

EXECUTIVE DIRECTORS DEANNA MCLEARY & J. NA-TAE’ THOMPSON MANAGING EDITOR MARTI PARHAM EDITORIAL COORDINATORS MARTI PARHAM , KATHY CHANEY & VERONICA HARRISON WEB CONTENT & MARKETING MANAGER JOI MITCHELL WEB CONTENT ASSISTANT HENRY COLLINS ART DIRECTION DESIGN AND ILLUSTRATION ANGEL D’AMICO-BAUER PHOTO COORDINATOR DESHAUN ADAMS SPECIAL PROJECTS MANAGER DESHAUN ADAMS & PHILISTINE THOMPSON CELEBRITY BOOKER RANDY BONDS

TRUESTARIS.COM TO DONATE TO TRUE STAR FOUNDATION, VISIT TRUESTARFOUNDATION.ORG


CONTRIBUTORS

U.C.-Woodson Khalen Meeks, Kaelan Dowdy, Kendall Ferguson, Ahmad Chaney, Kaylah Wright, Justin O’Hara, Vaughn Brown, Randell Morgan, Brittany Hull, Kenyon Atterberry ,Joseph Williams, Aymeul Millsapp, Not pictured: Kyla White and Daija Hollins

Morgan Park 7th Grade Brendyn Anthony Jones, Taylor Miggins, Stephen Excellent, Imani Davis, Rikyah Wright, Daniel Quin, Dejahnae Goldsmith, Nasir Johnson,Ezekiel Stevens, Eden Strong, Toriano Clinton, Tyler Willis, Lauren Noisette, Stacie Taylor, Breanna Beck. Not Pictured: Jayln Williams and Corey Alderson

Morgan Park 8th Grade Robert Martin, Gregory Diggins, Ronald Thompson, David Street, Cameron Gardner, Emanuel Thomas, Eugene Gutter, Damone Seals-Templeton, K’Lynn Brown, Cameron Thomas, Roderick Anderson, Emanuel White, Ari Slaughter, Xavion Meye, Amani Fashola, India Everett, Gabriel Sanders, Carla Jones, Charday Goosby, Pierce Thompson, Janea Taylor, Kapri Dowdell, Taylor Ivory, Sydney Guillory, Kayla Holmes, Toni Allen, Frederick McGee, Akilah Smith, Camry Moore, Kaylen Poindexter

Lindblom Math & Science Academy Amber Fry, Diamond Burton and Sydney Tenton. Not pictured: Clarissa Washington.


STUDENT EDITORS

LINDBLOM MATH AND SCIENCE ACADEMY

SYDNEY TENTON EDITOR

MORGAN PARK

TAYLOR MIGGINS EDITOR

GRAPHIC DESIGN CONTRIBUTORS: CORLISS HIGH SCHOOL INSTRUCTOR : POLINA ZIONTS STUDENT ART DIRECTOR & TEACHING ASSISTANT : ANSHAUNTI HILLERY STUDENT DESIGNER: SAKINA LEMON PLEASE LET US KNOW YOUR THOUGHTS ON TRUE STAR JR. MAGAZINE CONTACT US: LETTERS TO TRUE STAR JR. 1130 SOUTH WABASH, SUITE 302 CHICAGO, IL 60605-2717

U.C. WOODSON

EMAIL: TRUESTARJR@TRUESTARMAGAZINE.COM

KAYLAH WRIGHT EDITOR

TRUE STAR JR. 5


EXPOSE’

Chicago Violence:

STAYING SAFE DURING

The Summer BY KYLA WHITE, U. C. - WOODSON

Y

ou wake up Monday morning to get ready for school and you hear the news in the background. “Five dead and 20 wounded in shootings overnight,” or “Weekend violence claims 10 shooting victims across Chicago.”

Cortez, 12, who lives in the Auburn-Gresham area, said, “I will not be in my neighborhood. It’s rough around here.”

It seems like violence is increasing day by day, and sometimes by young people. But why? Some say the teens are protecting themselves by joining gangs. They carry guns, use them and innocent people are being gunned down for no reason. Several kids -- ages 12 to 14 -- said to stay safe when the school year ends this month, they’ll either visit family in another state, play sports, get a job, stay in the house most of the time or make sure they’re in the house at a certain time each day. “I will have a summer job which will help me stay away from the violence,” said Daniel, 14.

6 TRUE STAR JR.

Dejah, 12, who also lives in Auburn-Gresham, said she can time when it’s safe to be outside in her neighborhood and when it’s not. “People around my house do stuff at a certain time. And, when I see certain people around I go in the house,” said Dejah. Dwayne, 13, said he’ll stay

in the house on his computer, and Gloria said she’ll spend the summer in Kansas.


Growing Up

A Foster Child BY DEVENE PARK, BARTON ELEMENTARY SCHOOL

B

eing taken away from your family isn’t easy. You’re sent away to live with strangers, and, if you have brothers or sisters, they might not be able to come with you. You all may be split up and not reunited for years. You instantly have a new family, a new school and new friends. And, this may happen every few years. Two children in the foster care system explain how life has been the last six years with more than one foster family.

*Denise said moving from family to family is an “emotional rollercoaster.”

have to move, it’s tough. When you’ve found a best friend at a school and then have to leave them it’s sad,” she said. When things get tough Denise wishes she had someone to talk to. “I try to stay strong, keep a smile on my face and talk to a therapist. If it gets too bad, I’ll ask the therapist to call the hotline,” Denise said. *Marsha experienced some of the same things as Denise, but said she’s been to homes where the families were very mean. “They’ve hurt my feelings and they didn’t care about me at all,” said Marsha.

“It’s not the best thing to go through, but you have a family to rely on, but not everyone in the family is always nice,” said Denise.

Changing schools for Marsha hasn’t been that difficult, but she wishes her brother was able to be at the same school.

The longest she’s been with a foster family was three years.

“When you don’t have your family with you, you

“When you get attached to one family and then

*The name has been changed.

feel lonely,” she said.

TRUE STAR JR. 7


4EVER YOUNG

Advice Column: Ask Sydney Bobbie BY SYDNEY TENTON, LINDBLOM MATH & SCIENCE ACADEMY Q: How can you protect yourself with confidence when those around you seem intimidating? A: This is something teens struggle with every day. There’s always that one person who intimidates you. The key is confidence. You have to be confident in yourself, otherwise no one else will be. Don’t lose insight of who you are just because someone makes you feel a little “off.” One way I make myself feel better is by looking in the mirror and telling myself, “I’m fabulous no matter what anybody else thinks.” Don’t let anyone think you’re a push over. Even if it’s not in your nature, sometimes you have to put your foot down and let people know you’re not a puppet to be strung along. If you let them do so, they’ll think it’s okay and will continue. If you put your foot down and they don’t take you seriously, then those aren’t the type of people you need to be around. 8 TRUE STAR JR.

Q: How can I not look like an easy target for a bully? A: Easy—show people you’re not one to be messed with. This is easier said than done. Show you are confident and strong. Also show that you don’t take any mess from anybody, even if they intimidate you. Don’t show fear because when you do, that’s their opportunity to bully you. Bullies often go after certain targets. If they consider you their target, then prove the stereotype of “people who get bullied can’t fight nor stand up for themselves” wrong and stand up for yourself. Avoid fighting, but stand your ground. If they don’t take you seriously, then don’t give up. Eventually they’ll get the message and want to move on. Show you’re strong and not a coward.


Exploring Six Flags

BY DAIJA HOLLINS, U.C.-WOODSON

S

ix Flags Great America in Gurnee, IL, is one of the most popular places to go to have fun as a family and with your friends. There’s so much to do and it all can’t be done in just one day; you’ll need two full days to experience all Six Flags has to offer. During your next trip to the amusement park, don’t miss these rides: Batman, Whizzer, Orbit, Ricochet or Condor. Don’t pass up the water park or Hurricane Harbor either. You should visit Great America before school gets out for the summer. Father’s Day weekend is also a good time to take a trip there to have fun. Also, in June they have the Six Flags Mardi Gras Festival. To celebrate Independence Day there’s a July 4th Fest from July 4th – 7th.

Daily admission to Great America is $61.99 and $41.99 for children under 48 inches tall; children age 2 and under get in free. To save some money on the admission price, purchase your tickets online for $41.99, print them at home and present them at the gate. The online ticket price is good until Sept. 14. Parking cost $22 per day and meals average $13 per person. Please don’t forget one of the most enjoyable things about visiting Gurnee – the Key Lime Cove Indoor Waterpark Resort. When you’re looking for the perfect family weekend getaway that’s not far away, Key Lime Cove is the place. Visit www.keylimecove.com to see which package deals work best for your family. TRUE STAR JR. 9


Top 10 Places to Go this SUMMER! BY CLARISSA WASHINGTON, LINDBLOM MATH & SCIENCE ACADEMY

A

re you tired of going to the same places each year and doing the same old things? Change it up and try these places:

1. Willis Tower (Chicago):

Go to the top floor and get the best view of the city.

2. Legoland Discovery Centre (Schaumburg): You’re never too old to play with Legos.

6. Illinois State Museum (Springfield): Learn more about the state you live in. The subject may come up in History or Social Studies class.

7. Vertical Endeavors (Warrenville): Interested in climbing to new heights? Try climbing different types of walls.

8. Shedd Aquarium (Chicago): Check

out all the amphibians and catch a performance by the animals.

3. Navy Pier (Chicago): Finally 9. Odyssey Fun World (Tinley Park): Go with a few friends take a ride on the big 150-foot high Ferris wheel. Go in the morning so you can have enough time to walk through the entire place to eat, play and shop.

4. Mexican Fine Arts Center Museum (Chicago):

Learn about someone else’s history. You’ll never know when you’ll have a project at school about another culture. Be prepared.

5. UP Comedy Club (Chicago): Check out a comedy show featuring youths.

10 TRUE STAR JR.

to have fun playing video games, going on rides and meeting new people.

10. DuSable Museum of African American History (Chicago): Did you know that Jean Baptiste Pointe DuSable, a black man, is credited with founding Chicago? Learn more about the history of African-Americans at this famous museum.


How To Stay Out of Trouble This Summer

BY LAUREN NOISETTE, MORGAN PARK

A

fter being cooped up in school all year most teens try and loosen up once the summertime hits. Some people tend to loosen up too much and find themselves getting into lots of trouble. One of the main reasons kids get into trouble is because they don’t want to obey rules. Some of the rules that teens tend to disobey the most have to do with listening to grownups. It feels like at every turn there is an adult telling us what to do and what not to do, which doesn’t always work within our personal plans. That’s usually when the drama starts. The best way to stay out of trouble could be to basically just follow the rules of your parents.

Rules are made for a reason, and if you just stopped trying to break the rules you might find out that they were made with your best interest in mind. But, rules are made to be broken. If you strongly disagree with something your parents are enforcing you should be allowed to say so. To avoid family drama as much as possible the website Kidshealth.org recommends talking calmly with your parents about your feelings so that they understand your point of view clearly. Following the rules is taking the easy route, which will allow you to have more fun because that way no adults will be on your back 247. Basically, if you don’t want to get into trouble just do what you’re told. That way everyone wins. TRUE STAR JR. 11


On My Mind:

RAP LYRICS

Influence Teens’ Behavior

BY GABRIEL SANDERS, MORGAN PARK

M

any teens listen to rap music with explicit lyrics describing illegal activities that teens somehow find “cool,” mainly because it’s their favorite rapper who’s spitting the lyrics. For example, Trinidad James rapped about popping a Molly. Now, it seems everyone thinks it’s cool and wants to pop one to see how much they’ll sweat. Rappers put their music out without thinking about the influence it’ll have on their audience. Someone who looks up to Chicago-born rapper Chief Keef may go around disrespecting a gang that Chief Keef disrespects in his songs, 12 TRUE STAR JR.

but because the fan is young and doesn’t fully understand what’s being said, they wouldn’t see the harm in mimicking Chief Keef. As a result, they’ll go around repeating Chief Keef’s lyrics and may face deadly consequences. But, you will have some fans of these negative rappers who know exactly what’s being said and they won’t care how detrimental it could be. They just want to fit in. Rappers carry a lot of influence and they really should think about the messages they put out. It could mean life or death for someone.


Turning the Big 13! BY BREANNA BECK, MORGAN PARK

H

ave you ever thought about what it means to go from a pre-teen to a full-fledge teenager? Turning 13 brings with it new responsibilities and new challenges. Your parents usually have high expectations of you, but when you become an actual teenager they get higher. They will now assume that you will behave more maturely, do your own laundry, take the trash out, and do the dishes. There are also benefits such as staying up later, and more social interactions, such as parties. Turning 13 is challenging yet exciting. Parents have a major role in the process. Most parents tell you that you are entering the early stages of young adulthood, and they tell you that a lot of changes will be occurring physically and mentally. Parents explain the facts of life in detail emphasizing things you didn’t relate to or understand before.

At this age you will be trusted to make more important decisions on your own. Learn to trust your instincts and ask more questions. As you get older it’s more important not to fall into peer pressure; be a positive role model for yourself. Things that you do wrong carry more weight because you should’ve learned from previous mistakes. Brooklyn Irvin, 12, a student at Schmid Elementary, can’t wait to turn 13 on July 12th. She believes when that magical day comes she should be able to do things she couldn’t do at 12. She wants to hang out with friends without parental supervision and stay up later. “When I become a teenager I think people in my family should treat me like a young adult instead of a 2-year-old,” Irvin explains. “I’m not a baby anymore so stop treating me like one.” Many other 12 year olds turning 13 feel the same way. TRUE STAR JR. 13


Clash of the Video Games:

Vintage vs. New

BY CAMERON THOMAS, MORGAN PARK

E

Have you forgotten the blasts from the past? In the 1980s and 1990s there was no Xbox or PlayStation. You couldn’t go online and play games against players you didn’t know. You

personal versions of these video games you take with you instead of always waiting until you get home to play video games or going to the arcade with friends to play. Here’s a list of what was played in the early days: Donkey Kong, Pac-Man, Centipede, Frogger, Asteroids, Legend of Zelda, Super Mario and Tekken, to name a few.

played against people who had to be in the same place as you.

Now, we’re playing NBA 2K13 and Madden

veryone’s busy playing NBA 2K13, Madden NFL, Wii and some of the other new school video games.

From the 1970s to 1990s video games were played on Odyssey, Atari, Sega Genesis and Nintendo. In the mid-1990s to 2000s the Nintendo got an upgrade and the Xbox, PlayStation and Wii came out. There are even 14 TRUE STAR JR.

13. We’re exercising and playing life-like sports on Wii. We’re playing violent video games that seem real. What did your parents play? What are you playing now?


Are Y You a Leader or Just Dress Like One? RIKYAH WRIGHT, MORGAN PARK

H

as someone ever told you to “be a leader, not a follower” at some point in your life? Do you actually know what a leader is? The Merriam-Webster Dictionary definition of “leader” is “A person who leads or commands a group organization, or country; a person followed by others.”

Truth, Respect…” and “Finally, we believe that we are here to show our community – young and old – how to succeed and become entrepreneurial leaders themselves.” The creators of this clothing send a message of being a leader. Are the people wearing it sending a message as well?

Some people think if you have nice material things and money, you’re a leader. They even go as far as flaunting it on their clothing. The clothing line “Leaders 1354” is a line that was established in 2002 and has become very popular. A lot of kids wear these crewnecks and caps thinking they are “leaders,” although they don’t even know the true meaning of the clothing line.

Being a leader is about helping people, contributing to your world and making a way for others, not just yourself. Adriane L. Hanes, the Academic Center Counselor and Coordinator for Morgan Park Academic Center, says “To be a leader means not being afraid to be different… and not only being able to lead others in the right direction, but also being able to follow others or directions when necessary.” She adds, “Leaders aren’t born they are bred.”

In the clothing line’s mission statement on their website, they say “We believe in the essence and qualities that define a leader: Integrity, Commitment to being the best, Loyalty… Honor,

So, the question is: Are you a leader or just dress like one? TRUE STAR JR. 15


HOT OFF THE PRESS

42:Behind the Scenes WITH CHICAGO’S

Dusan Brown BY SYDNEY TENTON, LINDBLOM MATH & SCIENCE ACADEMY

J

TSJ: What made you go after this role? Brown: I got a call and went to the audition and

True Star Jr. caught up with 11-year-old Dusan Brown, who played the young Ed Charles in the movie, about his first role on the big screen.

TSJ: What was the process of getting the part like? Brown: The process was complicated. I thought there were about three auditions, but there were about twenty.

ack Roosevelt “Jackie” Robinson was an American baseball player who became the first African-American to play in Major League Baseball. The movie “42” depicts the struggles and achievements of Robinson.

Brown, one of Chicago’s own, began modeling and acting at a young age. When he was 5-weeks-old he booked his first modeling job. By the time he was 2, he appeared in more than 15 print campaigns. Continuing to follow in his older brother Dante’s footsteps, he also started acting. He’s auditioned for Oprah Winfrey’s amazing kids show and “Funny & Talented Kids” with Jay Leno, to name a few. He’s also been in several commercials. 16 TRUE STAR JR.

while I was there I went in and did what I was supposed to do. I thought about [it] and prayed. I kept trying.

TSJ: How does it feel to be a part of such a big project? Brown: This is my first big project and it feels energizing and it makes me feel all fuzzy on the inside. TSJ: What do you have planned for the future after this? Brown: I have a Nick Jr. show coming out.


Catching up with

Max Schneider

BY JANEA TAYLOR, MORGAN PARK

A

ctor-singer-songwriter Max Schneider, best known from Nickelodeon’s “How to Rock,” recently finished a tour with Victoria Justice and hasn’t slowed down from the music scene. One day before his debut album came out in May, True Star Jr. caught up with Schneider to find out how he got started in the business and to learn more about his latest project. After seeing his first Broadway show at age 4, Schneider said he “fell in love” with entertainment. “I re-enacted the show in my living room after I got home and I’ve been in love with it ever since,” said Schneider who is from New York. Throughout the years he’s performed in several plays and auditioned for a few roles for Nickelodeon shows before getting “How to

Rock.” While doing the show he continued to write songs and eventually formed a band called “The Babes.”

“MY BAND CAME TOGETHER BECAUSE I DIDN’T WANT TO PERFORM BY MYSELF,” HE SAID ABOUT HOW THE OPPORTUNITY CAME FOR HIM TO OPEN FOR VICTORIA JUSTICE ON TOUR. “IT WAS AMAZING. IT WAS MY FIRST TOUR AND I WENT TO MANY PLACES THAT I’VE NEVER BEEN.” The inspiration for the songs Schneider and The Babes perform come from “personal experiences.” When he goes into recording sessions he uses his “voice memos” in his phone to recall specific moments. “The songs are about personal experiences that others can relate to,” Schneider said, adding he’s excited to share music he’s been writing for the last year. TRUE STAR JR. 17


K-Phi-9

Dance Troupe

BY SYDNEY TENTON, LINDBLOM MATH & SCIENCE ACADEMY

S

tarted in the early 1990s, K-Phi-9 was an inner city fraternity step organization co-founded by Rodney Miller, Cornelius Stribling and Marcus Hendrix. The troupe grew from six members to more than 90 over the years. Their first show was at Carver Park and they came in 2nd place. From there K-Phi-9 won numerous talent shows throughout the Chicagoland area and surrounding suburbs. The troupe gained notoriety and was soon a force to be reckoned with.

THEY’VE OPENED UP FOR SUCH STARS AS R. KELLY, IMMATURE, COMMON, BRIAN MCKNIGHT AND THE LATE COMEDIAN BERNIE MAC. 18 TRUE STAR JR.

While they are a dance troupe, it’s not all about performing. “Good grades are required. Basically, honor grades. I ensure safety for the members. We pray before and after shows and practices. I want my group positively influencing others. Good leaders get good followers. We definitely try to be a positive influence,” said Hendrix. In 2002 the group grew apart due to the older age of the members. In 2010 Hendrix had a vision and put a plan together to bring K-Phi-9 back. With the help of its alumni the group became a reality again. The current membership is younger and mostly female, ages 5 to 13. In 2012, K-Phi-9 became the Bud Billiken Day Parade champions in their category.


Basketball Video Highlights

ARI SLAUGHTER’S

Hoop Skills

BY KAYLAH WRIGHT, U.C.-WOODSON

M

organ Park Academic Center’s Ari Slaughter is one of the top point guards in the country. The 8th grader has put together highlights of his basketball career, from 2011 to now, on YouTube and his views are rising. Slaughter, usually the shortest one on the court, has played in his church league, French Fry league and for Morgan Park. The highlights show him whizzing past men in the church league, shooting 3-pointers and layups. He’s helped his French Fry league’s Senior Fry division win the championship this year and he’s only heating up. He’s going to be one of the top high school players in the nation. “I’ve been playing since I was little. I love the game and look forward to playing in the summer

before I go to high school,” Slaughter told True Star Jr.

GO TO YOUTUBE AND USE THE KEYWORDS “ARI SLAUGHTER.” YOU’LL SEE TWO VIDEOS; ONE FROM 2011 IS 2:33 MINUTES, AND THE HIGHLIGHTS FROM HIS CHURCH LEAGUE PLAY TO ERIC B. & RAKIM’S “FOLLOW THE LEADER.” The second video is about five minutes long with highlights from French Fry and MPAC. Slaughter said it’s important to have videos of your games and make a highlights mix video so it’s easier to show to potential coaches in high school and other scouts. TRUE STAR JR. 19


GOING ‘ALL AROUND THE WORLD’ WITH

Mindless Behavior BY CAMRY MOORE AND KAYLEN POINDEXTER, MORGAN PARK

F

rom looking for their “#1 Girl” to going “All Around the World,” teen quartet Mindless Behavior has burned up the stages in hundreds of cities and most recently was seen on the big screen in their movie about their musical beginning and life on the road to success. When they started several years ago, they were just hitting their teen years and “My Girl” was topping the charts. They’ve even had a chance to tour with big names such as Janet Jackson. Now, years later, they’re headlining their own tours. They’ve put out their sophomore album “All Around the World” earlier this year, which coincided with the release of their movie of the same title. True Star Jr. spent time with MB during their recent stop in Chicago to promote anti-violence initiatives and meet fans at the Ford City Shopping Mall. “We’ve grown quite a bit since our first album,” said Ray Ray. “We’ve grown individually and as a group. With the new album, we’re taking it to the next level.” 20 TRUE STAR JR.

FEEDING OFF THE FANS’ ENERGY IS WHAT MAKES THEM GIVE IT THEIR ALL WHEN THEY’RE PERFORMING, SAID PRODIGY AND ROC ROYAL. “There’s nothing like the fans all into the music and passing that to you. It’s infectious. That’s a great feeling and one of the best parts about being on tour. You get a different, but similar, energy from each city you’re in. It’s great. We love our fans,” said Roc Royal. Their songs are relatable to many teens and the group shared that they getting more involved in the writing process. “We pitch in our ideas to come up with the concept of a song,” said Prodigy. “Sometimes I’ll hear a catchy tune and get some ideas. I’ll then take it to our manager for approval. We definitely want to get more involved with writing our songs.” The “World” tour will stop in Chicago in August to give fans more of what they yearn for.


FUN FACTS

FAVORITE SONG(S) ON “All Around the World”

FAVORITE FOODS *Ray Ray – Tacos

*Ray Ray - “Your Favorite Song” & “Band-Aid” *Princeton - “Bright Side” & “House Party” *Roc Royal - “Used to Be” & “Your Favorite Song”

FAVORITE TV SHOW *Princeton - “American Dad” *Prodigy - “Robot Chicken”

TRUE STAR JR. 21


SUMMER WARDROBE CHECKLIST 22 TRUE STAR JR.


BRIGHTS & COLORED JEANS...A MUST!

TRUE STAR JR. 23


PATTERNED & TEXTURED SUNGLASSES THAT ADD SPICE

24 TRUE STAR JR.


CAMO EVERYTHING IS COOL: BACKPACKS, CAPS, SHOES, SHIRTS, SKIRTS, LEGGINS AND JEANS

TRUE STAR JR. 25


DEEPER THAN SKIN

Maintaining Healthy Skin BY AKILAH SMITH, MORGAN PARK

K

eeping your body healthy is important for survival and one of the most important things in that equation is healthy skin. Your skin is typically the first thing someone sees when they look at you.

wash your face

Always when you wake up and before you go to sleep. Use soap that’s safe for your face.

hands off your face

Keep your . You touch many things throughout the course of your day and you can’t keep your hands clean all the time. Touching your face with dirty hands can transfer all kinds of bacteria to your skin, which can cause breakouts and rashes.

use sunscreen. Being physically active is good for Always

your skin. WebMD reports that by increasing blood flow, exercise helps nourish skin cells and keep them vital, making your skin more radiant.

sleep

The appropriate amount of each day can help you maintain healthy skin too. According to the American Sleep Disorder Association, the average teens needs about 9.5 hours of sleep per night. Here are foods that help promote healthy skin

*Mangos *Yogurt *Almonds *Flaxseed

Sources: Kidshealth.org and iVillage.com 26 TRUE STAR JR.


Protect Yourself FROM THE SUMMER SUN BY DE’JAHNAE GOLDSMITH, MORGAN PARK

When you go out in the summer sun

chances are you are wearing very little clothes in order to keep cool. That means your skin is exposed to the sun. You need to use a product to protect your skin from being burned and prevent skin cancer. Ashley Muhammad, a 7th grader at Morgan Park Academic Center, doesn’t spend a lot of time in the sun but when she does, she admits that she doesn’t wear sunscreen on her skin because she believes dark skin people can’t burn. “You rarely see any dark person’s skin peeling from being sunburned,” says Muhammad. The truth is that brown and darker skin people burn just like lighter skin people. No matter what your complexion may be its important to protect

yourself. Foxnews.com suggests using products that are labeled SPF 30 and have UVA and UVB protection. Also, be sure that the product is “water resistant,” not waterproof.

Beat The SUMMER HEAT BY EDEN STRONG, MORGAN PARK

If you’ve ever felt so hot during the summer

months that you thought you may pass out, you could have been in the beginning stages of heat stroke. Heat stroke is when your body gets so hot, usually 104 degrees Fahrenheit or higher, that it becomes unable to regulate its own temperature, according to the Mayo Clinic website. This can cause symptoms such as dizziness, feeling faint, headache, muscle spasms and nausea. Heat stroke is caused mainly from being dehydrated, which is when the body is in need of fluids. Extreme dehydration can even cause death. Not death like, “OMG my social life is over,” but death like a casket being lowered into the ground.

To prevent heat related illnesses the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention suggests:

*Drinking plenty of fluids throughout the day *Wearing loose fitting/light colored clothing *Limiting outdoor activities to mornings and evenings Stay safe this summer and remember to hydrate your face.

TRUE STAR JR. 27


Boys and Self-esteem BY VAUGHN BROWN, U.C.-WOODSON

T

hinking highly of yourself. Having confidence in yourself. That’s having high selfesteem. But, when you feel self-conscious about your weight, your hair or even your height, your self-esteem can lower. According to DoSomething.org, low self-esteem is a thinking disorder in which an individual views him/herself as inadequate, unworthy, unlovable, and/or incompetent. Once formed, this negative view of self permeates every thought, producing faulty assumptions and ongoing self-defeating behavior. While you mostly hear self-esteem talk in reference to girls, boys suffer from self-esteem issues as well. Some boys are overweight, have gray hair before they become teenagers and are bothered they are shorter than other boys. As a result they are sad a lot of times and sometimes stay in their rooms crying. “I get teased about my eyes,” said *Derrick, 11. “They are different and when people look at me they sometimes stare or ask me why they don’t move. I get sad when people talk about me.” 28 TRUE STAR JR.

Derrick said when he was 2 years old his mother noticed something wrong with his eyes. He’s been teased about his eyes ever since.

*RILEY, 14, SAID HIS FEET ARE BIGGER THAN ALL THE BOYS IN HIS CLASS AND HE GETS TEASED ABOUT IT. “When they talk about my shoe size, it bothers me a little. When I am getting teased, I try to hide being mad by finding something to tease them about,” Riley said. DoSomething.org states: among high school students 15 percent of guys are attempting to lose weight. Low self-esteem can also lead to depression or using drugs to boost their image. About 20 percent of teens will experience depression before they reach adulthood and 38 percent of boys in middle school and high school reported using protein supplements, and nearly 6 percent admitted to experimenting with steroids, according to the website. *The name has been changed.


Who you Calling a B****?!

BY KYLA WHITE, U.C. - WOODSON

T

he definition of a b**** is a female dog. A dog is an animal, not a human being. Yet, girls feel comfortable calling another girl a “b.”

said my name wrong. But, I really should just be

It’s mostly done out of anger while some use it as a friendly term with their buddies. It bothers many and doesn’t matter to some.

Domonique said being called that word doesn’t bother her at all.

“I’ve called another girl the “b” word because she was irritating me and that was the word that popped in my head so I just said it. I say whatever is on my mind,” said Shakira, who added it wouldn’t matter to her if she was called that word because “it isn’t a hurtful word. Almost everyone says it.” Shakuanzah feels the same way. “I sometimes call another the “b” word because of what they said to me that I didn’t like or they

playing with them because that’s my personality,” said Shakuanzah.

“I know I’m not a female dog. I know I’m a human being,” said Domonique. Most girls, when asked what was the main motivation behind the word ever coming out of their mouths, all said retaliation. Some, however, see no need for the word if girls simply viewed each other differently.

“IF WE COULD ALL JUST LEARN TO RESPECT EACH OTHER,” SAID DONYELL, “WE’D NEVER HAVE TO CALL EACH OTHER OUT OUR NAMES.” TRUE STAR JR. 29


TALKING NERDY

½

Pint Poetics Contest

Crowns A Winner

BY AMBER FRY, LINDBLOM MATH & SCIENCE ACADEMY

A

poem about a woman getting pregnant at an early age and wanting to have an abortion was one of four winners at the recent ½ Pint Poetics Contest held at DePaul University.

Kuumba Lynx has four core areas: Drop In Arts, Arts Residencies and Workshops, Kuumba Lynx Performance Ensemble and Community Cultural Events.

Sejahari Saulter-Villegas said his “The Night Shines Bright” poem about the pregnant woman was written as he thought about “what if no one

Saulter-Villegas, a 14-year-old 8th grader who attends Kenwood Academy, has been involved with Kuumba Lynx since the 4th grade.

wanted children.” The ½ Pint Poetics program is part of the 17-yearold Kuumba Lynx organization. The arts and education organization was founded by three women – J. Villegas, L. Garcia and J. Bullie. 30 TRUE STAR JR.

At the Clarendon Park Community Center, 4501 N. Clarendon Ave., the organization provides free Drop In Art. For more information visit www.kuumbalynx.org.


Tips on How to KEEP YOUR BRAIN ACTIVE BY STACIE TAYLOR, MORGAN PARK

It is common for kids to forget some of the things

going on websites like www.khanacademy.com

they learned during the school year while on summer break. As a result, beginning-of-the-year test scores may be low. That’s why it is important to make a plan to keep your brain active. By doing this you will prevent “brain drain” and even gain more knowledge than you had at the beginning of the summer.

that teach you different subjects.

To keep your brain stimulated challenge yourself to play some mind games on your cell phone like Scrabble, Ruzzle or 4 Pics 1 Word. Also try

So, this summer take time to keep your brain active. Who knows, what you learn may actually stick.

Another game that keeps the mind pumping is chess, which makes you strategize and learn to make fast, hard decisions. You can also try playing Sudoku. This game challenges you with numbers.

What Are You READING THIS SUMMER? BY TAYLOR MIGGINS, MORGAN PARK

Believe it or not, reading can be fun! You just

have to find a book that interests you. Here are a couple of good ones to check out:

Slam!

By: Walter D. Myers Greg Harris is good at playing basketball. He knows he has the possibility of making it to the top. But when he starts slipping in school, his teachers are on his back. It’s a man-vs.-self situation now that Greg realizes that having bad grades can affect his future.

Unremembered

By: Jessica Brody When a plane crashes, a 16-year-old girl is found among the debris. No one was expected to survive this deadly crash, which is why this girl is headlining the news. She doesn’t know her identity, and her DNA isn’t in any database in the world. Now she struggles with putting her life back together. She was told by a charming boy that they were in love, which happens to be one thing she remembers. TRUE STAR JR. 31


A DIFFERENT DICTIONARY: NEW WORDS ON THE STREET BY EMANUEL THOMAS

HAVE YOU BEEN HEARING WORDS THAT DON’T MAKE SENSE OR SOME THAT SEEM OUT OF PLACE WHEN YOU DO HEAR THEM? WELL, YOU MAY BE HEARING THE LATEST OF A BATCH OF NEW WORDS WIDELY USED BY YOUTH AND YOUNG ADULTS. SOME OF THOSE WORDS ARE:

“Bag” = Money “Thot” = A girl that gets

around, and not in a nice way.

t! o th

“Dope” = Everything’s Good “Twerk” = A Dance “Daddy” = how some refer to each other when speaking.

THE NEW, OR ENHANCED, TERMS ARE GENERALLY MADE UP BY HIGH SCHOOL KIDS AND PASSED ON TO YOUNGER KIDS. SOON, EVERYONE’S USING THEM.

32 TRUE STAR JR.


Cusic and Seavers Win

2013 Do The Write Thing

WRITING CONTEST BY TAYLOR MIGGINS, MORGAN PARK

O

n May 7, 2013, the winners of the “Do The Write Thing” (DTWT) writing competition were announced at the University of Illinois at Chicago Student Services Center. The winners are 8th grade students Sydney Cusic from St. John de la Salle Catholic Academy and Daniel Seavers from William Preparatory Academy. DTWT is a product of the National Campaign to Stop Violence. Robin Hulshizer, Co-Chair of Chicago’s Do The Right Thing Contest, commented on why the event is necessary. “We need to break the cycle of violence and that takes people committed to change, committed to making a difference, one person at a time,” said Hulshizer. “DTWT is designed to jumpstart that effort at the middle school level…” According to the DTWT website, www.dothewritethingchicago.org, the program ultimately seeks to empower youth to reduce violence in their homes, schools and neighborhoods. The two student winners will be flown to Washington, D.C. to participate in the National Awards Ceremony as Chicago’s ambassadors. Each winner shared their ideas about how to prevent violence. “In my essay I wrote about a girl creating a website to help stop youth violence,” Cusic

DANIEL SEAVERS, 8TH GRADE WILLIAMS PREPARATORY ACADEMY SYDNEY CUSIC, 8TH GRADE ST. JOHN DE LA SALLE CATHOLIC ACADEMY

explained. “I think that’s one way to prevent violence. Another way is to start more youth groups, to keep kids off the streets.” Seavers believes that with some support even kids have the power to change things. “Most of the violence is done by the youth, but one person can change everything – just one person. If that person has the network and the right people, that one person can help prevent violence.” TRUE STAR JR. 33


KEEPIN’ SCORE

Sports Activities FOR THE SUMMER

BY DIAMOND BURTON, LINDBLOM MATH & SCIENCE ACADEMY

You don’t just want to sit inside and play

video games during the summer break do you? Of course not. Jump on that skateboard and go to one of several skate parks in the city and Chicagoland area. You can go to Phillips Park in Aurora; Central Park in Bolingbrook; Commissioner’s Skate Park in Calumet City; Yukich Park in Evergreen Park; Bud Mohr Skate Park in Forest Park; and the following parks in Chicago: Wilson Beach, Narragansett and Vittum. Why not try archery at Pulaski Park or swimming at the YMCA? Also at the YMCA you can try water polo.

Check your nearby park district to see if it offers gymnastics, judo, tennis, volleyball, basketball, baseball or softball. Many parks also offer soccer as well. You can also join an AAU (Amateur Athletic Union) basketball team or a sports camp for girls and boys to meet new friends. With all these activities to choose from, there is little chance that you’ll put much use to your video games this summer. Get out and enjoy the warm weather while you can.

Swimming Pool SAFETY TIPS BY NASIR JOHNSON, MORGAN PARK

Going to the pool is fun because you get to

be in the water and don’t have to worry about being hot on super warm days, but there are a few rules at the pool that need to be followed so nobody gets hurt. Rule number one is if you can’t swim or don’t swim well, don’t go in the deep end of the water. Until you have taken lessons and feel comfortable with you swimming abilities it is important that you stay on the shallow end of the pool (There is no shame in just splashing around.). And you should always be sure to have an adult around to watch you whether you are at a public pool or swimming in your backyard, because you never know if an accident will happen. 34 TRUE STAR JR.

Speaking of accidents, an easy way to avoid one is to not run around the pool; walk slowly instead. Wet services are slippery and can lead to broken bones or head injuries if you are not careful. The website Kidshealth.org also tells swimmers to test the water temperature before jumping in a pool. Cold water can shock your body and raise your blood pressure and heart rate. Plus, your muscles move slower in cold water, making it more challenging to swim. While playing around in the pool try not to jump or push others under the water. You could end up seriously hurting yourself or someone else. The next time you decide to take a dip in the pool have fun, but be safe.


Murray Wildcats are

HOOP Champs BY KAYLAH WRIGHT, U.C.-WOODSON

T

he boys basketball teams at Murray Language Academy are the reigning champions in the St. Columbanus Catholic League and the 7th-8th grade team also captured the Chicago Public Schools title. Murray’s Athletic Director, Coach Jackson, said, “We’re proud of our teams and know they’ll continue to bring home the titles.” The Wildcats have played in both leagues, Chicago Public Schools and St. Columbanus Catholic League, for the last several years. Led by Coach Larry Stewart, the 5th-6th grade team defeated Beasley for the catholic league title in March, but unfortunately lost to Beasley for the public school league championship.

Head Coach Tony Alston, the coach for the 7th8th grade team who was also named “Coach of the Year,” led the team to the catholic and public school league titles. Alston said the 7th-8th grade team also won Brooks’ Thanksgiving Tournament. “The boys worked hard each year and proved they deserved to be the champions they are,” said Coach Alston. During the summer members of the teams often play on different AAU (Amateur Athletic Union) teams to keep their skills tight while school is out of session. They also sometimes meet up on the summer break to practice together. The “Coach of the Year” said he’s looking forward to both teams repeating the victories for the 2013-2014 school year. TRUE STAR JR. 35


Fitness Tips

FOR KIDS BY KYLA WHITE, U.C.–WOODSON

S

ummer is almost here and now is the perfect time to get in shape and maintain your physical condition before another new school year starts. There’s no limit to the activities you can do to shed pounds or help keep yourself toned. First, you need to turn off the TV and get up. Helping do chores around the house such as sweeping, mowing the lawn, watering the grass and raking, surprisingly provides you with cardio exercise you need. Riding your bike, jumping rope, using hand weights and even hoola hooping can give you a good workout. While you are using these methods to stay fit, ask your parents to get you a pedometer to track your steps daily and see how many calories you’ve burned during your quest to stay fit. Before you know it you will be shedding those unwanted pounds and happy you made the effort to do it.

36 TRUE STAR JR.


How Football

Builds Character

BY BRENDYN JONES, MORGAN PARK

M

any of you would much rather play Madden than real contact football in the summer practice season, but if you dream to catch like Victor Cruz, tackle like Ray Lewis, or throw like Drew Brees, you’re going to have to put away the video games and play in the real world. The benefit to playing real football is that besides keeping you in shape it helps build character and does it in a few ways. One of those ways is through team work.

“FOOTBALL TEACHES YOU TEAM WORK BECAUSE TO DO PLAYS, YOU NEED TO WORK TOGETHER TO MAKE THE PLAYS WORK” SAYS ETHAN JONES, A LITTLE LEAGUE FOOTBALL PLAYER WITH THE BRIDGEPORT HUSKIES. Jones adds that “teamwork also inspires friendship,” which is another way the game helps builds character. “Football builds friendship because there is a certain level of trust that there has to be to work as a team on the field,” Jones explains. The third and probably most important reason that football builds character is because it teaches you to be humble. Most kids go to football the first day of practice in August thinking they will be the best kid out there, but in reality you will probably miss lots of catches, unless you’re a natural, which you’re probably not. Learning to take the good with the bad is all a part of playing the game.

To become the best player you can be you need to practice, which means you must be determined; even on the days you don’t go home a winner. Being a part of an actual football team has its advantages. By the end of the season you will have learned how to work well with and trust others, humble yourself and gain selfdetermination. All qualities to make you an even better person. TRUE STAR JR. 37


CREATIVE CORNER

BY JAYLN MORGAN PARK By Jaylin WILLIAMS, Williams, Morgan Park Designed By Sakina Lemon, Corliss STEM High School

38 TRUE STAR JR.


Summertime Cooldown BY JAYLN WILLIAMS, MORGAN PARK

Ice cream cone; lick it ‘til it’s gone Frosty, shakes; they’re great Freezy pops; Cookie shops Buy and eat; Sugary sweets Corner store shopping Popcorn popping Rain dropping Enjoying TV Don’t miss that show Riding bikes on the go In love with a Snicker The peanuts, the chocolate; The way that it melts in my pocket In love with summer Can’t wait for another!

Gossip Girls BY NAOMI E. SMITH, SUTHERLAND ELEMENTARY SCHOOL

Gossip girls, how do you do?

They talk about me, they talk about you. They even talk about my shoes.

Their words spread like wild fleas.

They’re like wild hounds looking for something to gossip about, please. Their words erupting

like some lava in a pit. I dislike gossip like I dislike broccoli. Do you dislike it?

Well take a stand against it! TRUE STAR JR. 39


Life Lesson: Live for YOURSELF and not someone else BY BRITTANY HULL, U.C.-WOODSON

A girl was once asked these simple questions:

Why do you not try to fit in? Why are you not phony like the rest of the people at school? Why don’t you instigate fights? Why are you so nice to people who are so mean? Why don’t you have many friends? Why have just two to five real friends instead of 100 friends? Her reply: Because I am me for me and nobody else. I am not on Earth just to entertain people. I am on Earth to enjoy life as it is and live every day like it is my last. Not waste my time on people that are not worthy of it. 40 TRUE STAR JR.


SCHOOL SPIRIT

Growing

as a Journalist at Lindblom BY SYDNEY TENTON,LINDBLOM MATH & SCIENCE ACADEMY

I

n the last two years I’ve been able to voice my talents through True Star Jr.

many interviews, informative articles and I’ve recently been given my own advice column.

When I first joined in 7th grade, I was nervous and wasn’t sure about journalism or if I would do well as a journalist. However, as time grew I quickly adapted to the environment around me. Growing up, I loved writing and True Star Jr. gave me the opportunity to voice my thoughts.

Working with True Star Jr. has prepared me for the work I will soon be doing with True Star and it has helped me grow as a writer.

Since I’ve been working with the magazine that gives a voice to middle school students, I’ve done

As I transition from True Star Jr. magazine to True Star magazine for teens considering I’ll be a sophomore the next school year, I’ll definitely miss working with the Jr. team.

TRUE STAR JR. 41


U.C.-Woodson

History Fair A Big Hit BY KAYLAH WRIGHT, U.C.-WOODSON

B

efore school let out for a two-week spring break, U.C.-Woodson students treated the faculty, family and friends to their annual History Fair. Story-boards and digital projects were on display and the topics ranged from everywhere from women in sports to the iconic “Soul Train� dance show. The history of the Chicago Transit Authority, the recent blizzard and the Chicago riots in the 60s were just a few of the stories, among others, that were told at the fair. 42 TRUE STAR JR.


Morgan Park’s

Spring Break Trips BY CAMERON THOMAS, AKILAH SMITH AND RONALD THOMPSON, MORGAN PARK

A

bout 25 8th graders embarked on a trip to Atlanta during this past spring break. For those who didn’t attend the Atlanta trip, they went on a trip to the Lincoln Park Zoo and the Museum of Science and Industry (MSI) along with some 7th graders. At the Lincoln Park Zoo we visited the reptile house. While at the MSI we learned how tornados were formed; the changes that occur during pregnancy; what happens during an avalanche; and the how the body looks inside. We also saw the battleship photo exhibit and Lost at Sea. In Atlanta we visited the CNN Center and learned more about the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. during a visit to the memorial center, his home and his former place of worship – Ebenezer Baptist Church. We also went inside the Apex Museum and visited the campuses of Clark Atlanta University, Morehouse College and Spelman College. TRUE STAR JR. 43


44 TRUE STAR JR.

Profile for Angel D'Amico-Bauer

Tsjrsummmer13  

True Star Foundation is a nonprofit organization that provides a creative outlet in the form of literary and professional development progra...

Tsjrsummmer13  

True Star Foundation is a nonprofit organization that provides a creative outlet in the form of literary and professional development progra...

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