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SAUSAGES

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HISTORY . CULTURE . INFLUENCE . EVOLUTION

The manufacture of sausages began over two thousand years ago, and it is still a growing industry. While some of its basic practices are almost as old as civilisation, the industry is constantly adopting new developments in processing in the light of later scientific and technical knowledge. Sausage has been an important item in man’s diet for twenty centuries. The first recognisable mention of this meat food is found in a Greek play called “The Orya,” or “The Sausage,” written about 500 B.C. Thereafter the word for sausage occurs with frequency in Greek writings. It’s also a favourite food of the Romans, at one time becoming so popular for festive occasions that it was placed under the ban of the early church.

The modern word “sausage” is derived from the Latin ~salsus~, meaning salted. The term was probably originally applied to cured or salted meat generally. In the days of old people did not have refrigeration to preserve their meat and so making sausage was a way of overcoming this problem.

Sausage making is a logical outcome of efficient butchery.

Dry sausage was born as a result of the discovery of new spices, which helped to enhance, flavour and preserve the meat. Different countries and different cities within those countries started producing their own distinctive types of sausage, both fresh and dry. These different types of sausage were mostly influenced by the availability of ingredients as well as the climate. Some parts of the world with periods of cold climate, such as northern Europe were able to keep their fresh sausage without refrigeration, during the cold months. They also developed a process of smoking the sausage to help preserve the meat during the warmer months. The hotter climates in the south of Europe developed dry sausage, which did not need refrigeration at all.


DEVELOPMENT & EVOLUTION Cooked sausages are made with fresh meats, and then fully cooked. They are either eaten immediately after cooking or must be refrigerated. Examples include hot dogs, Braunschweiger, and liver sausage. Cooked smoked sausages are cooked and then smoked or smoke-cooked. They are eaten hot or cold, but need to be refrigerated. Examples include kielbasa and mortadella. Some are slow cooked while smoking, in which case the process takes several days or longer, such as the case for Gyulai kolbĂĄsz.

morcela

Fresh sausages are made from meats that have not been previously cured. They must be refrigerated and thoroughly cooked before eating. Examples include Boerewors, Italian pork sausage, siskonmakkara, and breakfast sausage. Fresh smoked sausages are fresh sausages that are smoked and cured. They do not normally require refrigeration and do not require any further cooking before eating. Examples include Mettwurst and Teewurst which are meat preparations packed in sausage casing but squeezed out of it.

land jager

Bulk sausage, or sometimes sausage meat, refers to raw, ground, spiced meat, usually sold without any casing. Vegetarian sausage refers to sausages made without meat, for example, with soya protein or with tofu or with herbs and spices. Vegetarian sausages are frequently sold in supermarkets, they might not be vegan, for they may contain ingredients such as eggs. Raw sausages are made with raw meat and are not cooked. They are preserved by lactic acid fermentation, and they may be dried, brined or smoked. Most raw sausages will keep for a long time. Examples include Mettwurst and salami.

hot dog

cervelat

Cooked sausages may include water and emulsifiers and are always cooked. They will not keep long. Examples include cervelat, Jagdwurst, and WeiĂ&#x;wurst. Pre-cooked sausages (Kochwurst) are made with cooked meat but may also include raw organ meat. They may be heated after casing, and they will keep only for a few days. Examples include Saumagen and Blutwurst.

merguez

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sucuk

oaxacan

lukanka

blutwurst


keilbasa

lap cheong

boerowors

szynkowa

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sondae

haggis

krajanska

kulen


saucisson

mettwurst

boudin blanc

morcilla

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PROCESS


METHOD & CASING

The most basic sausage consists of meat, cut into pieces or ground, and filled into a casing. The meat may be from any animal, but traditionally is pork, beef, or veal. The meat to fat ratio is dependent upon the style and producer. Traditionally, sausage casings were made of the cleaned intestines, or stomachs in the case of haggis and other traditional puddings. Today, however, natural casings are often replaced by collagen, cellulose, or even plastic casings, especially in the case of industrially manufactured sausages. Some forms of sausage, such as sliced sausage, are prepared without a casing. Additionally, luncheon meat and sausage meat are now available without casings in tin cans and jars.

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PERCEPTION

The gradual progression of the five human senses in sequence: visual, smell, texture, sound, and taste. To question the visual perception of an object when in disguised, to suggest the truth but do not ensure it. Food imagery where form determines how we perceive things and repackaging makes a huge difference. A simulation of what is real, but its actually not.


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THE T HE F FLUFF LUFF SAUSAGE SAUSAGE


CONCEPT The essence of a sausage lies in the way it is made: stripped down to its core idea that comprises of minced meat, carefully stuffed and rolled in a skin bag, designed approximately two thousand years ago as a meat preservation technique. The sausage skin plays a functional role in the making of sausages as a mould, a layer which holds the meat in place. This hollow homemade sausage pushes the boundaries of the existing qualities of the skin, through a careful analysis which led to the discovery of 3 key ideas :

visibility, taste, & texture of the skin.

DESIGN INTENT

To change the composition of the meat to skin ratio 30 skin : 40 meat : 30 skin , replacing it with new food types to replace the conventional sausage skin which serves no aesthetic or taste purposes. This will enhance the taste, texture, aesthetic, and open up new preparation and serving techniques.

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TEXTURE & MATERIALITY

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30 : 40 : 30 ‘ ‘ ‘

to change resistance contrast between surface and filling gives support and structure to meat

skin

meat

skin

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CONCEPTUAL DIAGRAM

stacking & overlapping

hollow core structure


SECTIONAL PERSPECTIVE

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PROCESS & METHODOLOGY


“Minced in a skin. The essence lies of sausage lies in the process in which it is made.�

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Shiyin Chee