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2012

Launching our long-term impact strategy


There are 13,500 high schools in the United States.

Half of the dropouts come from just over 10 percent of schools.

The dropout crisis is solvable.


Spring 2013

Dear Friends, This year, our largest corps ever reaches 150,000 students every day in 247 of America’s highest-need schools. These young AmeriCorps members serve students and schools that are among the most challenged in the nation. Wearing their signature jackets, diverse teams of corps members arrive before the bell rings and stay until the last student goes home from extended day programs, helping transform a school’s culture with passion, energy and idealism. They get training and support to help students deal with tough challenges. They know how to spot and respond to critical early warning signs that a student is at risk of dropping out — the “ABCs” of poor attendance, behavior and course performance. City Year’s AmeriCorps members are there for students, all day, year after year, providing individualized academic and developmental support. Corps members fill a critical gap that exists between the needs of the students in these schools and the school’s ability to meet those needs. It is our moral obligation as a nation to ensure that all children, regardless of their zip code, have the opportunity to succeed and meet their full potential. In 2012, City Year unveiled a bold and exciting plan, a Long-Term Impact strategy, to do our part to address the dropout crisis and turn around low-performing schools. We seek to ensure at least 80% of the students in the schools we serve reach the tenth grade on track to graduate, effectively doubling the current rate. At full scale, City Year corps members will reach nearly a million students every day in more than 1,200 high-need urban schools. Simply put, our goal is to challenge the high school graduation status quo in America, dramatically increase the urban graduation pipeline and transform the future for thousands of students nationwide. The Long-Term Impact strategy is our path forward, bringing this critical resource to more students than ever before. The 2012 Annual Report is a testament to the partnerships and philanthropic support that make this work possible. Your support is critical to our ability to achieve these goals for the students we serve. It is with profound gratitude and appreciation that we present this report to you. Yours in Service,

Michael Brown CEO & Co-Founder City Year, Inc.

Stephen G. Woodsum Chair City Year, Inc. Board of Trustees

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Table of Contents

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A Special Message from City Year CEO and Co-Founder Michael Brown

Impact 15

Partners

16

Our Impact

32

Teacher profile: Cristin Barnett

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WHERE WE SERVE

34

Interview with Dr. Carol Johnson

36

Diplomas Now

38

Interview with Wendy Spencer

40

School District Partners

18 Q & A with Jim Balfanz and Stephanie Wu 20

Corps member profile: Fatmia Ruiz

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Student profile: Raymell

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ALUMNA PROFILE: SHAJENA ERAZO

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International Work

28

Media Highlights

Donors + Sponsors 43 44

Partner Profile: Deloitte

46 Champion profile: John and Tashia Morgridge 48 Partner Profile: Luis UbiÑas and the ford foundation 50

Champion Profile: Julie Uihlein

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Leadership + Financials 70

Board of Trustees

72

Board Chairs

74

Senior Leadership Team

75

Executive Directors

69

76 Financials

52 Champion profile: Stephen G. Woodsum and Anne Lovett 54

National Leadership Sponsors

58

In-Kind Sponsors

60

Team Sponsor Program

62 Donors

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OUR COMMITMENT

To help end the nation’s

HIGH SCHOOL

A Special Message about our Long-Term Impact Goals By City Year CEO and Co-Founder Michael Brown

I will never forget July 21, 1969. I was eight years old. My parents woke me at 10:56 pm to watch the first astronaut walk on the moon. A great national challenge issued by President John F. Kennedy had been met: we had sent a man to the moon and returned him safely to earth before the decade was out.

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Dropout Crisis The Moon Shot: Vital, Transformational, With a Clear Metric for Success

and send students from kindergarten safely through high school graduation before the decade is out.

It has become cliché to compare every great objective to a "moon shot," or perhaps more commonly to lament, "If they can put a man on the moon, why can't they do X?"

There is little doubt that ending the dropout crisis would be transformational for the country, both in terms of economic cost and our moral commitments.

But President Kennedy's 1962 challenge to put a man on the moon provides powerful insights into what national cause is worthy of a "moon shot" – and what it takes to achieve it.

For an individual student who gives up on school – as nearly one million do each year – dropping out is a fast track to an underclass: dropouts are eight times more likely to be incarcerated and three times more likely to be in poor health and unemployed than high school graduates.

First, President Kennedy presented the "moon shot" as vital to our national security, our national character and our national purpose. Second, he set a bold transformational goal – grand but achievable – with a clear metric for success. Finally, success would depend, he noted, on developing imaginative new technologies and the heroism of a select cohort of Americans, our astronauts. An Education Moon Shot

If there is any area of our public life that cries out for a new moon shot, it the alarming number of young people who drop out of high school in America, one every 26 seconds. We need to end this dropout crisis

By 2020, it is projected that 123 million high-skill, high-wage jobs will be available, but only 50 million American workers will be qualified to fill them. It’s essential that our students graduate high school college and career ready. Like President Kennedy's challenge, there's a clear metric for success: raise the national graduation rate to 90 percent. That's the bipartisan goal put forward by President Obama and the Building a GradNation report, released by the Alliance for Excellent Education, America’s Promise Alliance, Civic Enterprises, and the Everyone Graduates Center at Johns Hopkins University.

A Special Message from Michael Brown

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Every child is born with

potential

“Potential� is an animated video about our Long-Term Impact strategy. Watch it at youtube.com/cityyear.

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City Year is “all in” Like the moon landing, it will take new technologies to solve the dropout crisis. To reach the moon, Kennedy predicted, we would need "new metal alloys, some of which have not yet been invented" and heat shields that could withstand "half that of the temperature of the sun." Many of the educational equivalents to the new metal alloys and heat shields needed to solve the dropout crisis are being invented by innovative public and charter schools, nonprofits, academics and education practitioners: extended learning time, high intensity tutoring, rigorous use of student data, and breakthrough attendance and social and emotional learning initiatives The Need for Extra People Power

As a country, we need to work together to achieve this goal. To land on the moon, it took a few extraordinary Americans with “the right stuff.” To solve the dropout crisis, it will take many ordinary Americans with an extraordinary commitment to do the right things. Turning this crisis around begins with an effective, committed teacher – but in high-poverty schools it often takes so much more.

What’s needed is a dramatic increase in the human capital – the extra people power – needed to take effective education reforms and school-based innovations to scale. National service is an ideal resource to meet this need. Americans are applying to serve in AmeriCorps in record numbers – 582,000 applications last year alone for just 80,000 opportunities to serve. AmeriCorps should be expanded and deployed to help students and schools succeed. City Year is “All In” on Solving the Dropout Crisis

Across sectors, organizations are collaborating to end the dropout crisis. We at City Year are proud to be doing our part to achieve this education moon shot. Getting to school well before the first bell, City Year corps members cheer for every student and teacher who walks in the door. Throughout the day, they partner with teachers to provide evidence-based academic, attendance and social-emotional supports. After school, they help students with homework and lead enrichment activities that extend the learning day. Throughout the

A Special Message from Michael Brown

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The direction City Year is going is

breathtaking The idea of quadrupling the number of corps members, the idea of just taking on systemically this dropout challenge with great partners, I think It will transform educational opportunity in this country – hopefully for decades to come. - U.S. Secretary of Education Arne Duncan

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of the students in the schools CiT Y Year Serves reach 10th gr ade on tr ack and on time. we pl an to nearly double that r ate

year, they lead school-wide initiatives to improve school culture. By addressing students’ early-warning indicators, City Year AmeriCorps members are helping students stay in school in on track – or get back on track – to graduate. City Year’s Long-Term Impact Goal

We are committed to scaling our impact to help more at-risk students unlock their potential, succeed in school, and achieve their part of the American dream. In May of 2012, we gathered with our community of stakeholders, national education leaders and leading philanthropists at our National Leadership Summit to announce City Year’s own moon shot to address the nation’s dropout crisis. Joined by U.S. Secretary of Education Arne Duncan, we announced In School & On Track: City Year’s LongTerm Impact Strategy, designed to challenge the high school graduation status quo in America, dramatically increase the urban graduation pipeline, and transform the future for thousands of students nationwide. Focusing on the schools where the urban graduation challenge is most concentrated, and tapping the civic energy and talents of young adults in national service,

the goals of City Year’s ten-year strategy are to help promote 80% of students to 10th grade on time and ontrack in the schools where City Year serves – effectively doubling the current rate of on track performance; to serve a majority of the off-track students in the communities we serve; and to serve cities that account for two thirds of the nation’s urban dropouts. At full scale, we will serve in more than 1,200 highneed schools and reach nearly one million students a day, with a corps that’s 14,000 strong. Students who are off track in elementary, middle and high school will receive multiple years of City Year interventions and supports.

A Special Message from Michael Brown

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Students who reach 10th grade with their peers are

four times more

likely to graduate.

City Year’s

Long-Term Impact strategy is a ten-year plan to nearly double the number of students who reach tenth grade on track and on time in the schools we serve

By 2023:

80%

of the students in the schools City Year serves will reach 10th grade on track and on time

We will Serve

We will serve in the cities that account for

of the off-track students in City Year communities

of the nation’s urban dropouts

50%

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At full scale, City Year will reach nearly one million students every day in more than 1,200 schools.


[The dropout crisis] is the number one economic problem we have...

...And it’s an American problem we can solve - Jonathan Lavine

systemically this dropout challenge with great partners, I think will transform educational opportunity in this country – hopefully for decades to come.” City Year Trustee and Managing Director of Sankaty Advisors, Jonathan Lavine, also made a special announcement at our 2012 Summit: he and his wife Jeannie pledged a gift of $10 million to enable City Year to begin to build the capacities needed for achieving our impact and scale goals.

City Year Trustee and Managing Director of Sankaty Advisors, Jonathan Lavine and his wife jeannie pledged a gift of $10 million

City Year has identified two key accelerators for achieving its long-term impact goal: 1) cultivating systemic change to enable the optimal conditions in partner schools; and 2) developing a robust strategy for mobilizing the organization’s nearly 17,000 alumni to influence high school graduation rates. “The direction City Year is going is breathtaking,” Secretary Duncan said. “The idea of quadrupling the number of corps members, the idea of just taking on

The dropout crisis “is the number one economic problem we have,” he said. “It’s a civil rights problem. It’s an economic problem. It’s a fairness problem. And it’s an American problem we can solve. You can’t be a bystander, you must be an upstander. With our gift, we are delighted to be standing with City Year.” “We must be bold” – Together

I co-founded City Year nearly 25 years ago because I believed passionately then – and even more so now – in the power of young adults to “give a year and change the world.” It is time to challenge the nation’s young adults to stand up, reach back and help raise up the generation emerging just below theirs.

A Special Message from Michael Brown

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CLOSING THE IMPLEMENTATION GAP:

Leveraging City Year and National Service as a New Human Capital Strategy to Transform Low-Performing Schools

A Report by City Year, Inc. Sponsored by: Deloitte Written by Jim Balfanz William Andrekopoulos Allison Hertz Carolyn Trager Kliman July 2012

Research has pinpointed which interventions and supports are effective with struggling students. But, in spite of all we know, there is often a gap between what students require and what schools in their current form have the staff time and resources to deliver. Closing the Implementation Gap, co-authored by City Year President Jim Balfanz, with support from Deloitte, takes a look at the challenges facing schools and highlights the role national service can play to improve student achievement in our lowest performing schools. Read the report on our website at www.cityyear.org/closingthegap. 12


we must be bold together Whenever I talk to a City Year corps member, I always ask the same question: “How do you know you are making a difference?” I hear about exciting statistics – raised test scores, higher grades and dramatically improved attendance. But what inspires me the most are their stories.

young adults will lift the heads, lift the spirits and lift the sights of Sarah and David and hundreds of thousands of more students who have enormous potential to succeed and help our nation flourish.

Ali Bueno, serving in City Year San Jose, told me about Sarah*, who read only four words a minute in the fifth grade. Ali worked intensively with Sarah every day. By year end, Sarah read 70-80 words per minute. City Year Rhode Island corps member Amelia Lavin told me about David*, a sixth grader, who spent every day with his head down on the desk, too frustrated, too far behind to participate in class. “I sat down next to him for the next ten months and talked to the hood until it was finally lifted, and then his head lifted off his desk” she said. “And then his grades lifted – from a D to an A – and finally his confidence.” If we unleash the idealism of America’s young adults to serve at the scale required, with the training needed, in the nation’s highest need urban schools, our nation’s

“To do all this, and do it right, and do it first before this decade is out,” President Kennedy said of the goal to reach the moon, “then we must be bold.” Our Long-Term Impact Strategy is ambitious, but it is also attainable. To get there, it is certain that we must be bold. More importantly, we must be bold together.

*Students’ names have been changed to protect their privacy

A Special Message from Michael Brown

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Our Impact

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WHERE WE SERVE

18 Q & A with Jim Balfanz and Stephanie Wu

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Corps member profile: Fatmia Ruiz

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Student profile: Raymell

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ALUMNA PROFILE: SHAJENA ERAZO

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International Work

28

Media Highlights


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Our Impact

City Year’s school-based model is called Whole School Whole Child. Corps members tutor students, serve as an

additional resource for teachers in classrooms and lead after school programs and school-wide initiatives to improve student achievement and school culture. City Year works in partnership with school staff to monitor student

performance on the early warning indicators — attendance, behavior and course performance, the ABC’s — which research shows can identify students at risk of dropping out as early as sixth grade.

88%

of teachers agreed or strongly agreed that corps members helped improve the overall academic performance of their students (n=1024)

91%

84%

of principals/liaisons were satisfied or very satisfied with the overall experience of working with City Year (n=423).

of students in grades 3-5 improved scores on literacy assessments (n=1754)

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Where we serve

247 Schools 24 urban communities

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Interview

Q &A Jim Balfanz President Stephanie Wu Chief Program Design & Evaluation Officer

City Year President and alumnus Jim Balfanz has led the design and implementation of the organization’s scaled impact strategy to address the nation’s urban education challenge, while Stephanie Wu, has the led the ongoing design and delivery of our school-based model, Whole School Whole Child. Together, the two are chief architects of City Year’s Long-Term Impact Strategy (LTI), announced in May 2012. The ten-year plan calls for: 80 percent of the students in schools City Year serves to reach 10th grade on track and on time (which is about the twice the current average of 44 percent), for City Year to serve the majority of the off-track students in our locations, and to serve in the communities that account for twothirds of the nation’s urban dropouts. By 2023, we will reach 700,000 students a day, up from 150,000 today.

Why did City Year decide to launch its LongTerm Impact Strategy in 2012?

SW: As a country, we have a goal to achieve a national high school graduation rate of 90 percent by 2020. To get there, we have to improve the graduation rate in our lowest performing schools. The LTI is our rallying cry. It’s requiring people across our organization to ask if we’re implementing the practices we know make a difference with quality and rigor. It also enables us to do a gap analysis of where our performance stands right now against the goal, and test and quantify our assumptions of what we think is going to drive student change. JB: We’re on a mission to help unlock kids’ potential. Right now, we know kids are going to schools that aren’t designed to help them overcome the challenges of growing up in poverty. And over time, we’ve learned that there’s a unique role for young adults – in national service – to support students. We want to do everything we can to help address the urban education challenge. We think this is the optimal contribution that City Year corps members can make to a collective effort to address what is arguably the most daunting challenge the country faces.

To achieve the ambitious goals laid out in the LTI, we need strong partners. Can you talk a little bit about the importance of partnerships at City Year? JB: The only way we are successful is if schools and students are successful. We know we can’t do it alone, so in a way, the LTI is forcing us to

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develop the discipline and the muscle to build thoughtful, comprehensive partnerships. They’re really at the heart of our strategy to continue to remove barriers and help kids succeed. We think about partnerships in three categories. The first is our partnerships with schools. We want to make sure we’re working in the right schools and that schools understand how to leverage teams of corps members. But we also want school leaders to consider what they could do with 10, 15 or 20 corps members, year after year. We want principals to be thinking: Are there things I want to do, in terms of how my school is organized to support the individual needs of students, that I haven’t been able to do because I haven’t had that additional people power? The second is a value-add partnership, like Diplomas Now. Together our three organizations [City Year, Johns Hopkins’ Talent Development Secondary and Communities In Schools] achieve things for kids that even under the best circumstances we couldn’t alone. In this case, one + one + one is six, not three. The third type includes partnerships with organizations that provide services for students we know are important, but we aren’t well positioned to provide. Summer time learning is a great example: students need summertime learning programs so they don’t have learning loss, but we don’t provide it because we use the summer to prepare or corps for when school starts. So for us, developing partnerships with summertime learning programs is good, smart strategy.

Sometimes we talk about our work as providing a “continuum of care,” a term often used in public health. How does it apply to City Year’s service in schools? SW: At the classroom and school level our corps members face issues that stem from students feeling that school is irrelevant. That feeling develops in part because they learn to feel helpless in the context of poverty—and it is reinforced by the inconsistency and unreliability that is part of

almost every aspect of their school life. So, they stop having expectations. When they do that they stop trying. And then a cycle of failure begins, making them feel worse. Corps members are there to create consistency. They’re present, all day, every day, from year to year in elementary through high school – that’s the continuum. City Year begins to understand students’ stories and help students make the connection between their stories— especially their aspirations—and school. Whole School Whole Child is a program that supports students in skill development - social, emotional management and academic skills – but also helps to build a narrative for students’ school life: Who do I want to be? Where do I belong? Do I matter?

The LTI includes aggressive goals in terms of impact and growth. What makes you optimistic about our chances to achieve these goals? SW: I think it’s the organization’s ability to change from year to year. We went from seven schools implementing Whole School Whole Child six years ago, to more than 200 schools this year. When we make a focused investment, we’re showing an ability to post results. That’s what makes me feel like we have a shot at this, because we do have a lot of discipline when it comes to making priorities, investing in them and then, being able to execute.

JB: Steph nailed it – being a learning organization gives me a lot of confidence. Spending time with the corps and students also gives me tremendous confidence. The energy, the beautiful sense of the possible that the corps instinctively bring to their work, matches up with the possibility inherent in every student. There are so many challenges, but everywhere I go there are breakthroughs – a light bulb goes off, a kid realizes how talented he is. This gives us confidence, but it’s also a tremendous burden because we know costs of failure are so high. When you know and see everyday the potential of these students and you see how hard they’re working, it puts a lot of pressure on us to help them achieve their potential.

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Corps member profile At 21, Fatima Ruiz has already endured hardships that most couldn’t fathom. The deportation letter her parents received when she was 13, and subsequent legal battle and loss of their home, would turn many hearts hard and bitter. But Fatima found inspiration. She saw the risks her parents took in leaving their native Mexico to come to the United States and how that journey benefitted her life. “The sacrifices that my parents have made to give us a better life – that was something that motivated me,” she said.

Fatima Ruiz

In 2012, Fatima earned her bachelor’s degree in history from the University of the Pacific in her hometown of Stockton, Calif. She was the first in her family to graduate. Fatima’s father had attended college but never earned his degree due to financial issues; he urged Fatima to finish. “He always emphasized the importance of an education to us,” Fatima said. “It’s the only way to make it in life – if we educate ourselves – so that was always a priority.” Undoubtedly influenced by her family’s ordeal, Fatima aspires to earn a law degree and practice as an immigration attorney. Without her parents’ encouragement and insistence on her completing school, she might have met the same unfortunate fate that befalls 41% of students in Stockton schools who drop out before graduation. This all-toocommon occurrence in communities like hers inspired Fatima to join City Year Sacramento. Fatima began her service at Father Keith B. Kenny Elementary School in September 2012. At the Kenny School, 100% of students qualify to receive lunch for free or at a reduced cost. In the 2011-2012 school year, 56% of students did not score proficient in English and Language Arts on the California Standards Test, while 51% didn’t score proficient in math.

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Fatima was struck by a conversation with two fourth-grade boys about their career aspirations. One proudly declared his intent to work for the FBI. The other, Eddie*, admitted he didn’t have any career aspirations. Fatima knew by 13 that she wanted to go to law school. For Eddie to have no dreams for the future seemed unimaginable. “It pushed me to want to help them see farther,” she said, “make them realize their potential.” In a small group with Eddie and three of his classmates, Fatima encouraged the students to write down their long-term and short-term goals. Eddie refused, saying he wasn’t interested. Days later he approached Fatima to say he wanted to work together on the goals assignment. He proudly announced that he hoped to become a professional football player. Not an academic goal, but a start. “It was nice to see that he was thinking about something further in the future,” Fatima said. Together, Fatima and Eddie, age 9, discussed the steps he would have to take to achieve this dream. Chief among them were to do well in school and go to college. Since they started working together, Fatima has noticed a marked difference in Eddie’s classroom behavior. Eddie used to come to class unprepared and uninterested: he would zone out, putting his head down on his desk. Now, he’s engaged and enthusiastic.

She’s like a silent warrior when it comes to service. She’s very quiet, she’s very humble but her work with her students since day one has been very powerful.

“I see him raising his hand constantly,” she said. “There’s a difference happening already.” While Fatima’s relationship with Eddie may be special, it isn’t unique. Paul Willis, the City Year program manager who oversees Fatima’s team, says that Fatima’s made many connections at Kenny Elementary School. “She’s like a silent warrior when it comes to service. She’s very quiet, she’s very humble, but her work with her students since day one has been very powerful,” he said. * Name changed to protect the student’s privacy.

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Student Profile

Raymell At first, Raymell is shy and reserved. The 9-year-old fourth-grade student doesn’t make much eye contact and speaks in terse, monosyllabic answers. Once he warms up to you, though, a wide, beaming smile spreads across his face, revealing gaps between new teeth where baby ones used to be. He takes time answering questions and gives thoughtful responses. Ask him what he wants to be when he grows up and the reply is instant: a lawyer. Raymell has talked about this goal with City Year San Jose corps member Gabe Sehringer and knows all the steps he has to take to get there. “First, finish fourth grade, then fifth grade, then middle school, then high school, then college and then finally law school,” Raymell said. Raymell attends Cesar Chavez Elementary School in the Mayfair Park neighborhood in San Jose’s Alum Rock section. At the Cesar Chavez, 64 percent of students are English language learners;

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the school employs a universal free breakfast and lunch system because the majority of students take advantage of it. Together, Gabe and Raymell work on math, spelling and handwriting skills. They first met during City Year San Jose’s summer learning program. Then, Raymell’s behavior resembled little of the well-behaved, studious boy he is now. “It used to be a good day if I could get him to sit quietly in his seat, let alone take in any information,” Gabe, 18, said of Raymell.


Raymell has become much more selfreflective...He realizes he has trouble with things and he fixes them.

In the past, Raymell would call out, and act up in the classroom, sometimes getting up to walk around and refusing to sit down. Mrs. Erin Amchan, Raymell’s fourth-grade teacher, knew that Raymell and Gabe had bonded during the summer and asked Gabe to work with Raymell on his behavior.

Gabe, in turn, said that Raymell is a good listener, a motivated student who’s driven by his own success, and someone who is very proud of the work he does.

Now, Gabe notices a marked difference in Raymell’s classroom conduct. “He’s sits quietly taking notes in the front of the classroom and he doesn’t even look back when I open the door,” Gabe said. Raymell’s academics have improved right along with his behavior. When the school year began, he could read 64 words a minute. Now he’s improved to 104 words a minute. When Gabe and Raymell first met over the summer, Raymell struggled with simple addition problems. Now, Raymell said, he’s really enjoying multiplication. True to his thoughtful nature, Raymell deliberated long and hard before landing on three traits to describe his corps member, Gabe. He settled on funny and nice, said Gabe was “a good City Year person” and added that Gabe helps him a lot in school.

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Alumna profile

ShajenA Erazo Three years ago, Shajena Erazo laced up her Timberland boots and zipped her red jacket every morning before joining her City Year Washington D.C. team at Malcolm X Elementary School in Southeast Washington, DC. This year, Sha, now a teacher with a classroom of her own, was named one of three finalists for the 2013 District of Columbia Teacher of the Year award. This seemingly stratospheric leap isn’t surprising to anyone who knew Sha as a corps member during the 2009-2010 school year. “She was always driven,” City Year’s Senior Vice President and Dean Charlie Rose said. “Driven to search for answers, driven to make everything around her better.” When Sha graduated from the University of Miami in 2009 with an English degree, she had an inkling that she wanted to be a teacher. She grew up in Miami, but her mother and father came to the United States from Puerto Rico and Honduras, respectively. Sha traveled the thousand miles north to our nation’s capital to begin her service year at Malcolm X, a decision that cemented her drive to become an educator.

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“It definitely confirmed I want to be in the classroom and I can definitely make an impact,” she said. Three days after completing her corps year, Sha eschewed a well-deserved break and reported to Teach For America, another AmeriCorps program, to continue her dream of working in the classroom long-term. Now, after two years with TFA and a Master of Arts in teaching from American University, Sha runs her ninth and tenth grade classes at Ballou Senior High School, in DC’s Southeast quadrant, with tough love and wisdom beyond her 26 years. “I don’t give them what they want. I give them what they need,” she said. “They believe I have their best interests at heart.” Only 50 percent of students at Ballou graduate within four years, which is almost 25 percentage points below the national average, but on par with our nation’s largest urban school districts where the dropout crisis is most concentrated. The vast majority of Sha’s students live in poverty and many regularly experience violent crime: she has seen a student pass away, students become parents and students get arrested. Naturally, Sha has also had students drop out.


My job is to empower my students to empower themselves.

In those cases, her biggest fear is “not having done enough,” she said.

“My job is to empower my students to empower themselves,” Sha said.

Sha uses the ABCs (attendance, behavior and course performance) she learned during her City Year corps year to help keep track of her current students. Every night, she spends two hours calling the homes of students who had been absent. Her experience as City Year team’s behavior coordinator has helped her recognize the behavior – acting out, disrespecting teachers and peers – that she’s seen precede a student’s decision to drop out. In her English classes, Sha introduces her 130 students to iconic works of literature like Romeo and Juliet. Her favorite book to teach is Chinua Achebe’s Things Fall Apart because many students can identify with the protagonist, Okonwko, and his struggles with his ancestors and the inevitable changes to his pre-colonial African village.

Outside of school, Sha volunteers her time as cochair of the City Year Washington DC Alumni Association, which brings past corps members together for networking opportunities and service with the current corps. Nearly a quarter of City Year corps members say they want to become professional teachers, so Sha is in good company. While she enjoys networking and socializing with her fellow alumni, Sha would love to interact more with City Year corps members – in the hallways and classrooms of Ballou. “I’m waiting for the day City Year comes here,” she said.

Working at Malcolm X as a City Year AmeriCorps member taught Sha patience and humility. She teaches and inspires students who hail from neighborhoods rife with violence and poverty, but doesn’t envision herself as a savior of any kind.

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City Year South Africa service leaders (the position equivalent to a corps members in the U.S.)

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President Clinton and Chelsea Clinton joined City Year South Africa for a service day in Soweto. Photo Credit: The Clinton Foundation


City Year London corps members work with primary and secondary students on academics, behavior and attendance initiatives in order to improve student performance.

City Year London corps members celebrate the end of their service year.

In addition to the 24 City Year locations in the United States, young men and women also serve with City Year in South Africa and in the United Kingdom.

City Year London is rapidly gaining recognition as a leading youth and education nonprofit in London, with 11 teams operating in 12 schools across the city. Since its launch in 2010, City Year London has doubled the size of its original corps and will expand its service footprint by launching in a second UK city in September 2013. “London is one of the greatest cities in the world, but we have shocking education inequalities between rich and poor children. Our mission is to tackle this injustice so that every child has a better chance of reaching their potential,” says Sophie Livingstone, CEO. “Our unique blend of national service, culture of civic idealism and youth-led mentoring is having a transformational impact on children, and of course, on our young volunteers.” City Year London corps members delivered 100,000 hours of service during the 2011-2012 school year.

The roots of City Year’s international work stems from the deep commitment shared by former Presidents Nelson Mandela and Bill Clinton to citizen service as a means of strengthening democracy. In 2002, City Year was invited to join a U.S. delegation attending the Civil Society Conference in Cape Town by Presidents Clinton and Mandela, to speak to the powerful role young people in full-time service could play in helping to address pressing social problems. This conference ultimately led to the launch of the Clinton Democracy Fellows program, which brought promising young civic leaders from South Africa to Boston to learn from and build connections with social entrepreneurs in the United States, and then, the founding of City Year South Africa in 2005. Since then, more than 1,300 young people have served with City Year South Africa, providing nearly a million hours of service to the children and families of Johannesburg. This year, more than 120 young South Africans served in 10 schools from Johannesburg to Soweto, providing afterschool programming and classroom support to primary and secondary students.

“All of us at City Year are deeply inspired by the tremendous impact our affiliates in London and Johannesburg are having on the idealistic young leaders who are putting on their red jackets with the energy and passion, and on the students they serve,” says AnnMaura Connolly, a City Year London and City Year South Africa Trustee, and Chief Strategy Officer & Executive Vice President of City Year, Inc. “We share their belief that young people can change the world and that every student deserves a chance to reach their full potential.” 27


CBS DENVER ‘City Year’ Keeps Kids On Track to Graduate February 12, 2012

“City Year kicks off mission to mentor Denver students” September 27, 2011

“More high school kids graduating in Miami-Dade” December 12, 2011

“Say yes to the idealism of America’s young people.” February 15, 2012

“Can service unite a country and create solutions? Michael Brown says it can.” April 26, 2011

“City Year program gives students that extra boost” March 24, 2012


City Year makes a difference in Tobin School

December 28, 2011

“A Narrower Focus Helps City Year Win Grants and Increase Its Impact” December 4, 2011

City Year Milwaukee Executive Jason Holton is leading a corps volunteers that will work with M students this school year.

Back to School by NaN Bialek | photography by DaN Bishop

Jason M. Holton knows it’s going to take a lot of time, a lot of work and a lo but he believes it can be done — so he and a group of 60 young volunteers up their sleeves to help at-risk Milwaukee students stay on the road to grad The 17- to 24-year-old volunteers have signed up for City Year, a nation organization affiliated with AmeriCorps. Holton has been associated with the or for five years and is now executive director of Milwaukee City Year. The 2010-11 school year will be the first time Milwaukee students will hav corps members in the classroom. Holton promises the volunteers will “put th helping kids remain on track. “They want to change the world,” he says. “They want to have the effects tha to 10 years to change, but they want to do it in 10 months. And I love that ab They will be concentrating on middle and high school students who are o of achievement, but have at least one risk factor that could derail their succe 22

M

| September 2010

“Why volunteer programs like City Year, the Peace Corps and Teach for America reward children” February 2, 2012

points to a Johns Hopkins University s found if a child has one “off-track” — such as spotty attendance, behavi or difficulty performing in the core su English and math — the student is 75 “Aaron Clark Beat the Odds, more likely to drop out of high schoo There is often a stigma attached to Now Helps Other Kids Succeed” extra help in school, Holton says, but June 14, 2012 mentors are “Near Peers.” They are old to command students’ respect and enough to understand what makes kid “Getting tutored by a corps member cool,” Holton explains. “And it’s anot


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Teacher profile: Cristin Barnett

34

Interview with Dr. Carol Johnson

36

Diplomas Now

38

Interview with Wendy Spencer

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School District Partners


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Teacher Profile

Cristin Barnett Cristin Barnett, a 35-year-old teacher with 10 years of experience, speaks with a charming twang that radiates affection and concern for her students. Ms. Barnett has 122 students divided among five sections of seventh grade English at Mabelvale Magnet Middle School in Arkansas’s Little Rock School District. With just one of her and so many of them, things can get a little hectic. But not when Matt’s around. For several of Ms. Barnett’s classes each day, City Year AmeriCorps member Matt Denis joins her, doubling the number of caring adults in her classroom. “They know that they have somebody else in class who is here for them and that’s huge,” she said. Matt, 24, takes advantage of being relatively close in age to Mabelvale’s pupils to connect with Barnett’s students as a mentor and tutor. “If we’re doing an activity and she’s teaching a lesson as students are working, I’m looking around to see if students aren’t getting it,” Matt said. “I help them oneon-one so she can keep teaching.” With assistance from Matt, Ms. Barnett can differentiate her instruction, pausing to help struggling students or offering more challenging material to students who are more advanced. For example, during an in-class lesson comparing Robert Louis Stevenson’s Treasure Island to its film counterpart, Matt took a student aside to work on his essay. If a situation calls for Ms. Barnett’s special attention, Matt uses his academic background (he has a BA in English) to carry on the class discussion, so she can tend to a student’s needs. “Matt was an English major so he jumps right in,” Ms. Barnett said. 32

Matt and Omari Holt, who worked with Ms. Barnett last year but now leads the team of City Year corps members at Mabelvale Magnet, have leveraged their near-peer position to relate to students. Ms. Barnett credits them with bridging a gap she could not. “We’re in southwest Little Rock and many students have had behavioral, home or economic issues,” she said. “Having Omari there was the biggest help ever. He could talk to these boys on a more personal level that they could relate to.” In December, Ms. Barnett and Omari hosted a workshop for Mabelvale Magnet teachers about how best to use corps members in the classroom. For Ms. Barnett, Omari and Matt have served as valued colleagues and as confidants for her students – in a “personal but professional” manner, she said. “They keep me up to date on students’ lives so I understand that if somebody’s shutting down in class there could be a situation at home,” Ms. Barnett said. “Together, we sit down and think ‘let’s do what we can to help that student succeed in the classroom.’”


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Interview

Q&A with

Dr. Carol Dr. Carol Johnson was appointed superintendent of Boston Public Schools in 2007. In partnership with Boston Mayor Thomas M. Menino and the Boston School Committee, Dr. Johnson and her team have enacted a series of strategies and reform initiatives coupled with new investments from Mayor Menino that have led to increased student achievement and the highest fouryear graduation rate on record while reaching the lowest dropout rate in decades. One of the initiatives included engaging City Year Boston as a strategic partner in turnaround schools. 34

What challenges are you and other superintendents of urban districts facing?

We face funding challenges, of course, as targeted federal and state resources decline even as mandated spending and costs increase. But the real challenge has to do with a perceived lack of opportunity. Many children, especially in urban areas, can feel cut off from the same opportunities that families in wealthier communities are able to offer their children. This is why Mayor Menino has challenged me and my team to expand opportunities for students and why we have worked so hard to expand summer learning and afterschool opportunities – because our schools must be the ones to offer tutoring, arts, music, exploratory field trips and other enrichment activities that upper-middle-class and wealthier families offer their children outside of school.


There are no shortage of organizations – nonprofit and for profit – interested in working with BPS. What do you look for in a partner? We look for someone who is willing and able to take on every challenge – and this means engaging every family, no matter what language they speak or income level they may be a part of. Our partners must connect meaningfully with every child, whether he or she has a learning disability or a physical impairment or just struggles every day with challenges in and out of school. We demand that our partners see an opportunity for excellence in every student. We also look for proven performance. City Year has a strong track record of success both here in Boston and around the nation and uses data to identify areas of success and adjusts its model to drive performance even higher.

Boston has 12 Turnaround Schools and City Year is a partner in each one. Why?

We prioritize our partnerships based on where we believe they will be most effective. We want to ensure every student gets a great education in every school, and in these schools, we know that hasn’t been happening. Thanks in large part to the efforts of Mayor Menino, our Turnaround Schools have critical new flexibilities around staffing, leadership and have longer school days – and the strategy is proving successful with higher test scores, stronger attendance and a 44 percent increase in the number of families choosing these schools than in the past. We believe that City Year has not only helped us lift many of these metrics, but they have also given our teachers new partners to help ensure classroom instruction is successful.

Johnson Superintendent, Boston Public Schools

When people ask, “Why are you partnering with City Year?” what do you say?

City Year corps members don’t just bring energy and enthusiasm to our schools. They also bring experience, credibility and respect that our students can quickly see. Many corps members are BPS graduates themselves, or they grew up confronting the kinds of challenges that have prepared them to understand what our students need. We have placed corps members in every one of our most-struggling schools to focus on things like improving attendance and adding after-school support. For teachers and school leaders, City Year has become an important tool to ensure our students get the very most out of every precious minute in the classroom.

What’s your dream for the Boston Public Schools?

To welcome and educate every child, regardless of ability, and get them ready for college and career success. Our schools are becoming centers of excellence that families see as safe and welcoming places where their children can learn and grow as they explore the world beyond the classroom walls. We have great teachers who tailor instruction for every child and who partner with the community to extend learning time and ensure all our children are well-prepared to learn every day.

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the number of students with < 85% attendance

45% decrease

68%

decrease

Diplomas Now is an innovative school turnaround model that unites three nonprofit organizations – City Year, Communities In Schools and Johns Hopkins’ Talent Development Secondary – to work with the nation’s most challenged middle and high schools.

provides homework help and engages students in service and enrichment programs. For the neediest students, Communities In Schools provides case management and connects them with community resources, such as counseling, health care, housing, food and clothing.

Diplomas Now partners with the school community so each student at risk has the support of caring adults, and those adults have the tools to improve student success. An early warning system identifies struggling students, and the Diplomas Now team creates a plan for each student.

During the 2011-2012 school year, Diplomas Now was being implemented in 11 cities:

Working with administrators and teachers, Talent Development Secondary organizes and supports schools to strengthen achievement and engagement while providing curriculum, teacher coaching and student support. City Year corps members welcome students to school (and call students when they don’t show up), provide tutoring in math and English, and celebrate positive behavior. After school, City Year

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the number of suspended students

Baton Rouge Boston Chicago Detroit Los Angeles Miami New Orleans New York City Philadelphia Seattle Washington, DC


the number of students failing English

the number of students failing math

61%

52%

decrease

Investing in Innovation (i3) Grant

In August 2010, the U.S. Department of Education awarded Diplomas Now a $30 million Investing in Innovation (i3) Validation Grant, which made it the only secondary school-focused turnaround model with national reach to receive an i3 award. As a result of the grant, Diplomas Now has recruited 62 schools to participate in a rigorous third-party randomized control study of the model. Thirty-two of these schools are implementing the Diplomas Now model, while 30 schools are participating in the study as control schools. The PepsiCo Foundation, the founding investor of Diplomas Now, generously provided the $6 million match funds required by the Department of Education for the i3 grant to be formally awarded.

decrease

The 2011-2012 school year was the first year of Diplomas Now program implementation through the i3. Research shows that students who are atrisk of dropping out can be identified by three early warning indicators or ABCs: poor attendance, disruptive behavior and course failure. Diplomas Now works with students to improve their performance in those early warning indicators. The following results were seen for students that were identified as off-track at any point during the year: • • • •

45% decrease in the number of students with less than 85% attendance 68% decrease in the number of suspended students

61% decrease in the number of students failing English

52% decrease in the number of students failing math

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Interview When Wendy Spencer enters a room, it’s clear she’s on a mission. Her energy and passion for service is surpassed only by her encyclopedic knowledge of the programs under her watch as the nation’s top service advocate. She leads the Corporation for National and Community Service, the federal agency that administers AmeriCorps. Spencer can best be described as a dynamo, particularly as she crisscrosses the nation, making the case for investment now in the low-cost, high-yield solutions that national service can offer to some of our nation’s most pressing challenges.

InTERVIEW WITH CY: What is it about national service that makes you so passionate about it?

WS: I think it is such a unique American idea that we engage citizens formally to address local problems. There are so many things right about that. With national service, you make a conscious choice to commit one year of your life for a cause. I call it a year of sacrifice to support others. To focus Americans’ time on a community problem is something that money just can’t buy. There is so much that comes with the contribution of one’s time: life experiences, surrounding influences, energy, thoughtfulness, concern. That personal connection that service members achieve, you just can’t put a price tag on it.

CY: How can national service have the greatest impact in schools?

WS: 50 years ago schools were prepared to handle around 15% of kids that were off track. But today children have so many problems that schools aren’t equipped to address. A program like City Year - an AmeriCorps program - can come in and be the implementation partner for those 38

additional supports for children with chronic problems. Principals, counselors and teachers know the children that could use this added support by name, but they don’t always have the time or resources to do it. So AmeriCorps members can come in and address those children, providing direct support, mentoring, tutoring, and emotional support to help them overcome the problems they face, closing the gap for those children so they can have an equal opportunity to learn.

CY: You’ve mentioned that there’s no better time to invest in national service than right now. Why?

WS: We are seeing record applications for AmeriCorps. We turned down a half a million applications last year. I think that’s because people see AmeriCorps as a pathway to other opportunities. National service is perfectly placed to meet that need, now more than ever. But it’s also never been better for other organizations that can benefit from the human capital resources that AmeriCorps can provide. It’s a great cost-effective benefit, not to mention a great benefit for the community.


Wendy Spencer Chief Executive Officer of the Corporation for National and Community Service

CY: If there’s one thing about national service that you wish everyone knew, what is it?

WS: I was sitting at a City Year graduation after the first year in Miami, seated next to a principal at a school. When I asked her about her experience, I expected her to respond with the measurable impact statistics – how many students’ grades had grown, and how many students were back on track in attendance. She told me all those things. But she surprised me when she added, ‘I didn’t expect it to change the entire environment in my school, and it did. We have a real can-do spirit in this school thanks to City Year that I just couldn’t foresee when we started.’ I hear that in programs all over the country. I see it in Hurricane Sandy response. I see in conservation programs. These AmeriCorps members are lifting everyone up around them, and that’s contagious.

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School District Partners We are proud to partner with the following school districts and their leaders

Baton Rouge East Baton Rouge Parish School Board – Dr. Bernard Taylor, Jr. Superintendent

Jacksonville Duval County Public Schools – Dr. Nikolai P. Vitti Superintendent

Boston Boston Public Schools – Dr. Carol R. Johnson Superintendent

Little Rock/N. Little Rock Little Rock School District – Dr. Morris Holmes Superintendent

Chicago Chicago Public Schools – Barbara Byrd Bennett Chief Executive Officer for Chicago Public Schools

Los Angeles Los Angeles Unified School District – Dr. John E. Deasy Superintendent Partnership for Los Angeles Schools (PLAS) – Marshall Tuck Chief Executive Officer of the Partnership for Los Angeles Schools

Cleveland Cleveland Metropolitan School District – Eric S. Gordon Chief Executive Officer of Cleveland Metropolitan School District Columbia Richland County School District One – Percy A. Mack, Ph.D Superintendent Lexington School District Four – Dr. Linda G. Lavender Superintendent

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Miami Miami-Dade County Public Schools – Alberto M. Carvalho Superintendent Milwaukee Milwaukee Public Schools – Dr. Gregory E. Thornton Superintendent

Columbus Columbus City Schools – Dr. Gene T. Harris Superintendent/CEO, Columbus City Schools

New Hampshire Manchester School District – Dr. Thomas J. Brennan Superintendent

Denver Denver Public Schools – Tom Boasberg Superintendent

New Orleans First Line Charter Schools – Jay Altman Co-Founder and CEO

Detroit Harper Woods School District – Todd Biederwolf Superintendent River Rouge School District – Darrick R. Coleman Superintendent Taylor School District – Diane Allen Superintendent Educational Achievement Authority of the State of Michigan – John Wm Covington, Ed.D Chancellor Detroit Public Schools – Roy S. Roberts Emergency Manager

New York New York City Department of Education – Dennis M. Walcott Chancellor Orlando Orange County Public Schools – Barbara M. Jenkins Superintendent


Greater Philadelphia The School District of Philadelphia – William R. Hite, Jr., Ed.D Superintendent Universal Companies/Charter – Janis C. Butler, Ed.D EVP Education Mastery Charter Schools – Scott Gordon Chief Executive Officer Rhode Island Providence Public School District – Susan F. Lusi, Ph.D. Superintendent Sacramento Sacramento Unified School District – Jonathon P. Raymond Superintendent San Antonio North East Independent School District – Brian G. Gottardy, Ed.D Superintendent San Antonio Independent School District – Dr. Sylvester Perez Interim Superintendent San José/Silicon Valley Alum Rock Union Elementary School District – José L. Manzo Superintendent Seattle/King County Seattle Public Schools – José Banda Superintendent Washington, DC District of Columbia Public Schools – K aya Henderson Chancellor of DC Public Schools

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Partner Profile: Deloitte

46 Champion profile: John and Tashia Morgridge 48 Partner Profile: Luis UbiĂ&#x2018;as and the ford foundation 50

Champion Profile: Julie Uihlein

52 Champion profile: Stephen G. Woodsum and Anne Lovett 54

National Leadership Sponsors

58

In-Kind Sponsors

60

Team Sponsor Program

62 Donors

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Partner Profile

Deloitte & City Year

“Buying a suit to wear to my job interview with Deloitte was the biggest investment I made as a City Year corps member,” Staci Carney says with a laugh. More than the suit, though, it was the skills she perfected during her corps year that helped her land and succeed in her dream job as a Business Analyst in Deloitte’s consulting practice. “Having that experience at City Year has truly been invaluable. The skills that I use every single day here are skills that I learned at City Year, and City Year not only helped me refine and build these skills, but also gave me the confidence to know I was good at them.” 44


As a corps member, Carney also benefited from an innovative mentoring program Deloitte and City Year launched five years ago – a program she now helps lead in Deloitte’s Philadelphia office. She lists project planning, working in a team environment, leading people and projects, and the ability to manage up as skills that she learned at City Year and honed with her mentor from Deloitte. The mentoring program pairs nearly 250 Deloitte professionals from all levels of the company with City Year AmeriCorps members. Together with their mentor, they prepare for the next phase of their lives, such as entering the workforce, moving on to graduate school, or serving their community in another way. “We all have so much respect and appreciation for what City Year corps members do each day,” says Alison McCourt, a manager in Deloitte Consulting LLP, who has played a lead role on the majority of Deloitte-City Year pro bono projects to date. “When mentoring corps members, we share insights that help corps members plan and prepare for life after City Year.” This program is just one example of the growing relationship between Deloitte and City Year. “It really started with local leaders in our Deloitte U.S. firms who were personally passionate about City Year,” said Evan Hochberg, who leads Deloitte’s National Community Involvement programs. “Their enthusiasm and commitment caught the attention of our national leaders. It became clear that City Year’s mission and outcomes-focused approach align with our strategic view of making the greatest possible impact with the resources we provide. Over the past few years, working with City Year, we believe we’ve contributed toward substantive change in our communities.” Deloitte has provided City Year over $4 million in cash and pro bono resources to date, and currently engages 13 Deloitte leaders on City Year’s local boards and Jessica Blume, Deloitte’s U.S. Public Sector Leader, serves on City Year’s national Board of Trustees. Deloitte’s pro bono services have helped City Year complete the transition from an organization providing general community service to

one that is laser-focused on ending the dropout crisis. “That City Year has built this capacity to be a national leader in both service and in education is extraordinary, and I think highlights what is exceptional about City Year,” notes Hochberg. City Year’s Long-Term Impact strategy, the ten-year plan to dramatically increase the number of students who are on track to graduate, is the product of two years of intense pro bono engagement between City Year, a team of consultants from Deloitte Consulting LLP, and other strategic stakeholders. The strategy helps focus the entire organization on achieving these bold goals, an output that is indicative of the larger partnership. From City Year’s operating model, to the development of new sites, to the strategic direction of the organization, Deloitte’s contribution has helped City Year shape its mission, and build the capacity to achieve it. “As a professional services organization, exceptional talent and leadership are critical to the success of Deloitte,” says Hochberg. “City Year also places the utmost value on talent and leadership, and that has strengthened our relationship even further.” These common values have led to Deloitte and City Year’s latest collaboration – an initiative that provides a pathway for corps members, like Staci Carney, to pursue full time jobs. “When corps members are in the middle of their year of service and so focused on their work, it can be difficult to focus on what’s next,” Carney explained. “Now, I see every day how that experience has made me better at my job. I am thankful for that support and the opportunity to build a career at Deloitte.” McCourt added, “This relationship extends beyond the relationships you typically see between companies and nonprofits. Our work together has impacted both our organization and our people in a positive way, and City Year’s mission is truly a personal passion for so many of us. We look forward to what’s next for City Year and Deloitte.” 45


Champion Profile

John MOrgridge CHairman Emeritus, CIsco

and Tashia Morgridge

“Education is one of the few ways you can influence the future…it’s a foundational undertaking.” John and Tashia Morgridge recently returned from a trip to Antarctica. They were traveling with students from Stanford’s Graduate School of Business, where John is a lecturer (he’s also an alum, class of 1957). Polar explorer Sir Ernest Shackleton figures large in Morgridge’s syllabus, so the voyage to the South Pole was a field trip. But the Morgridges are known for these sorts of adventures: at sixty-three, they biked cross-country; and at seventy-three, they hiked the Long Trail in Vermont. They’ll both turn eighty in 2013.

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John Morgridge is the Chairman Emeritus of Cisco, one of the world’s largest developers and manufacturers of networking equipment. He first learned about City Year in 1993, five years into his tenure as CEO and Chairman, and just after Cisco moved its headquarters to San Jose. He jokes that he and City Year Co-founder and CEO Michael Brown clicked right away because he immediately committed Cisco to a substantial gift. “It was a one-call close, as we say in the trade,” he says. The gift that helped found City Year San Jose grew into a partnership between the Morgridges, Cisco and City Year that now spans twenty years. Since 1993, Cisco and the Cisco Foundation have contributed more than $9.2 million in products and cash grants to help City Year expand and enhance its programs and upgrade its technology infrastructure and network capabilities, improving communication across the organization. And in 2006, in the early development phases of City Year’s school-based model, Whole School Whole Child (WSWC), Cisco affirmed its commitment as an essential strategic partner. Cisco and the Cisco Foundation have since granted millions of dollars to support the delivery, implementation and evaluation of WSWC. John witnessed – and helped guide – the evolution of City Year from a national service organization working in education, to an education-focused organization leveraging national service. “I think change is part of the health of an organization,” Morgridge says. “It’s the continual realigning to the realities of your own capabilities and modifying your model as the environment you work in changes, which of course it will always do.” John and Tashia have also remained personally committed to the organization, making substantial gifts to City Year sites in San Jose, New Hampshire and Milwaukee. High quality education has always been a priority for the Morgridges: they both attended public schools in Wauwatosa, WI and graduated from the University of Wisconsin-Madison, and both

of John’s parents were teachers. “Education is one of the few ways you can influence the future,” Morgridge says. “If you have that innate desire, as I think Michael [Brown] does, to have an impact, not only on today, but on tomorrow and the day after that, education is one of the most important. It’s a foundational undertaking.” Unless someone clued you in, you’d never know John Morgridge is one of America’s leading philanthropists. He’s happy to talk about the series of unglamorous jobs he had as a young man: digging storm sewers, working road construction, moonlighting as a brakeman on the Chicago Northwestern Railroad. The Morgridges, whose family foundation is called the Tosa Foundation, signed the Giving Pledge in July 2010, a commitment to donate at least half their net worth to charity. In the letter announcing their decision, they wrote: “Early on we learned the art of giving small checks to causes important to us. Through hard work, good fortune and the opportunities offered by our amazing country and the world, we have prospered beyond all expectation. As a result, we have been able to add many zeros to the amounts of the checks we are now able to write.” That idea, to write small checks, is the advice Morgridge passes on today, to his MBA students and City Year corps members who aspire to a life of service and leadership. “Make sure the causes you get involved with are life-long passions,” he advises. “And maintain a level of commitment to it throughout your whole life.” Morgridge believes that commitment to something bigger than yourself is what makes life interesting. “I don’t know if this extends your life, but it certainly enriches your life,” he says. “I just think it makes for a much more fulfilling life than shooting eighty [in golf] in your eighties.” The occasional polar adventure probably doesn’t hurt either.

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Partner Profile

Luis UbiÑas

President, Ford Foundation

City Year and the How do we restore the belief in limitless opportunity that has always defined our unique American experience? How do we make sure every American, rich or poor, new or old, knows that if he or she is willing to work hard, this country is impatient for their contribution? These are the questions that drive Luis Ubiñas, the Ford Foundation’s eighth president. In an interview, Ubiñas told us. Four years into his tenure, he continues to be inspired by the social justice mission of his foundation: “We believe all people should have the opportunity to reach their full potential, contribute to society and have a voice in the decisions that affect them.” City Year has been proud to call the Ford Foundation a partner since 2008, when it helped to strengthen the organization’s capacity to partner with school district and policy leaders. Ford most recently supported our work in Detroit by funding Diplomas Now, an innovative school turnaround collaborative that operates in some of our nation’s lowest performing middle and high schools. 48

“City Year exemplifies how a wide range of adults can contribute to the educational success of the nation’s most vulnerable students,” Ubiñas says. “Corps members provide important support as near peers in schools with expanded learning time, forging supportive relationships with students that personalize their schooling.” Ford has long been an advocate for extending the school day in neighborhoods of concentrated poverty. But when the Foundation began working in this space, there were questions about whether more time for children to learn was even possible, and whether it would get results. Those questions are now answered. Research by the National Center on Time and Learning, by Harvard economist Roland Fryer and others demonstrates that when kids spend more time in school, they’re more likely to be successful. Ubiñas sees City Year as a partner in this work. “We think the program has the potential to serve as an innovative model for others on implementing expanded learning time for our students,” he explains. “By partnering with educators, corp members offer a creative


City Year exemplifies how a wide range of adults can contribute to the educational success of the nation’s most vulnerable students.

Ford foundation and cost-effective way to make more and better learning time a reality for students, an approach that has the potential to be replicated across the nation.” Ubiñas grew up in the South Bronx, about one hundred blocks north of Ford’s offices, which sit on the east side of mid-town Manhattan. He attended Harvard for his undergraduate and graduate degrees, and has worked in the public and private sectors, including time at the March of Dimes in Boston and 18 years at McKinsey & Company. He sees it as part of his life’s work to ensure that the world has the chance to benefit from the knowledge, potential and skills kids in the South Bronx have to offer. And to do that he says, “We need to ensure that all kids have a voice and a chance to contribute.” Ubiñas believes young people, especially, have an important role to play in solving some of our world’s seemingly intractable problems. But he also knows that achieving lasting change takes time,

patience and resolve, which is part the value he sees in City Year corps members’ commitment to a year full-time of service. “They add tremendous value simply by being there for the long haul, by sticking with kids through days of challenge and triumph,” he says. “That long-term commitment is incredibly valuable to the students, but also for the corps member, who can bring this perspective to everything they do in the years ahead.” Ford distributed $450 million in grants during FY11, and recently celebrated its 75th anniversary. As Ubiñas looks toward the Foundation’s 100th anniversary he acknowledges how much progress has been made in a creating a more equitable world, but is also keenly aware of the poverty, exploitation and injustice that remains. “The challenge is to shape and influence the remarkable forces defining our world so that they benefit all people,” he says.

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Champion profile

Julie UIhlein

Board Chair, City Year Milwaukee Adjunct Professor, Medical College of Wisconsin

At City Year Milwaukee events, it’s not uncommon to find board chair Julie Uihlein joking around with corps members during a few minutes of downtime, or engaged in deep conversation with a young staffer on the team. “Have you heard what they call me?” she asks. “Mama City Year. I just get the biggest kick out of that.” It’s hard to believe that Uihlein (pronounced e-line) hadn’t even heard of City Year six years ago. She

“City year is a first learned about City Year when her youngest son, who now teaches honors world history in a Milwaukee high school, served with the Chicago corps during the 2006-2007 school year. Uihlein believes her city is going through a renaissance, but says it’s no secret that too many children are living in poverty, that many schools are struggling and that people are without access to basic services, such as health care. After a trip to Chicago to visit her son, she thought to herself, “If ever there was a city that could use City Year it would be Milwaukee.” And then she spearheaded the effort to make it happen: City Year Milwaukee opened in 2010.

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But, she says, the startup process wasn’t easy. Uihlein, like all people interested in bringing City Year to their communities, was required to meet a series of benchmarks that ensure new sites are set up for success. Uihlein cultivated partnerships with Milwaukee Public Schools, the City of Milwaukee and other local foundations, and started meeting regularly with Jason Holton, a Milwaukee-native who would become City Year Milwaukee’s Executive Director. Their favorite meeting spot was a coffee house in the city’s historic third ward, where they discussed potential partners and started making plans for making City Year a reality.


In six years, the organization grew from an idea, to a high-impact partner in eight of Milwaukee’s most challenged public schools, and she’s loved seeing the organization grow and mature. “I can’t even begin to describe the honor and the pride I feel, all wrapped up in one, when I see our 60 corps members,” she says. “City Year is a double win. It’s a win for the kids who are being mentored and being offered opportunities they might not normally have access to, and it’s a win

helps her stay centered. She sees a clear connection between corps members’ commitment to service and the desires of her young medical students to care for patients. “It’s all about service,” she says. “Caring enough about humanity to really, really give of yourself is the same for corps members as it is for my students.” We often ask our donors and supporters what advice they have for corps members who aspire to

double win” for the whole city of Milwaukee, which gets these incredibly idealistic, bright, energetic young people who are engaged in the community and often stay; their commitment doesn’t stop after just one year.” Her next passion? To help City Year Milwaukee grow, to reach more schools and more students.

lead a lifetime of service and leadership. Without any hesitation she replies: “Never give up no matter how many times you hear no; and assume you can learn anything, that you can do anything.” Great advice from Mama City Year.

Uihlein is quick to explain that her greatest joys in life are her three children, and a growing brood of grandkids. But she is also passionate about her work as adjunct professor of medical humanities, bioethics and pediatrics at the Medical College of Wisconsin where she teaches classes and studies the social determinants of children’s health. She’s also been a regular practitioner of mindfulness meditation and yoga for 38 years, which she says

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Champion Profile

Stephen G. Woodsum Chair, CIty Year Board of Trustees

and Anne Lovett Steve Woodsum and City Year CEO Michael Brown have attended countless meetings together in the 25 years since they first met in 1988 – but their first was perhaps the most auspicious. “We were just starting out, looking for a few people in the private sector to take a risk on getting behind a nonprofit start up, and us,” says Brown, who was fresh out of Harvard Law School at the time. Brown and fellow City Year co-founder Alan Khazei, as social entrepreneurs, thought venture capitalists were a natural starting point to support their new social enterprise. “We started dialing venture firms in Boston – every one a cold call,” Brown says. 52


“And then I made the mistake of answering my own phone,” Woodsum says, laughing. Within a few days, City Year’s co-founders were in Woodsum’s office at Summit Partners, a private equity firm where he is a founding managing partner. By the end of that first meeting, he’d committed to being a member of City Year’s founding Board and to sponsoring a team of corps members in Boston. “It struck me as incredible that these young guys were willing to forgo potentially very lucrative careers to pursue this little-bitcrazy entrepreneurial idea to change the world,” Woodsum says. Since then, Woodsum has been with City Year every step of the way – mentor and advisor, team sponsor, major gift donor, committee chair, and for the past six years, Chair of the Board of Trustees. In September 2013, when his tenure as Chair ends, the organization will have doubled in size under his board leadership, both in the number of corps members and overall revenue; all while pivoting the organization’s efforts to address the nation’s high school dropout crisis.” Steve’s wisdom, all-in commitment, and gracious leadership style have been game-changing for City Year,” says Brown. Meanwhile, Anne Lovett, Steve’s wife of thirty years, is a dedicated City Year supporter as well. She’s always been at the ready for City Year: whether organizing a visit to a school for friends to see City Year in action, hosting the Summit Partners Team for dinner in their home, or helping City Year think through an organizational issue. “Anne is a leader of City Year’s kitchen cabinet,” Brown says. “Every time we chat, I say, ‘Anne, I want you to give me one idea a day for improving the City Year program’ – and sometimes I get two.” Anne and Steve are also City Year parents: their daughter, Alexandra, served as a corps member in San Antonio. “I’m so excited one of my children became a corps member,” Steve says. “I think it’s changed her life.” Anne adds, “Hearing about Alexandra’s experiences and the impact she was having was incredibly moving; but so was hearing about the challenges she faced. I think that’s part of the magic of City Year: how the experience impacts corps members.”

Lovett and Woodsum’s philanthropy has always been driven by their commitment to helping young people succeed, and they were early champions of City Year’s decision to focus its efforts in high-need schools. “The gap between lower income students and higher income students is significant and has gotten worse,” Woodsum says. “I think it’s created a divide that we need to eliminate. City Year offers a great solution to address this crisis; it’s one piece of the puzzle, but I think a really critical piece.” Steve and Anne contribute a tremendous amount of time and energy to organizations and causes they care about. In addition to City Year, Steve is on the boards of Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston’s Museum of Fine Arts and the Boys and Girls Clubs of Boston. Anne is a director of Peer Health Exchange and president of its Board of Overseers, and oversees the couple’s family foundation, which supports organizations working on behalf of education and building stronger communities. “To me, our philanthropy is about hope, for a better education, a better salary, a more secure living situation, a more secure food situation, a path to a better future” Anne says. “That’s what City Year does: corps members help students succeed, pushing them towards greater opportunity.” In the late 1980s, when Woodsum, Brown and Khazei first met, City Year’s offices had just moved out of a Harvard dormitory. Almost twenty years later, Lovett and Woodsum played a critical role in ensuring City Year could establish a permanent national headquarters where it is today, at the tip of Boston’s South End. The lobby of the building is named in their honor. “It’s fitting that Steve and Anne have such a presence in our lobby,” Michael says. “They’ve been so essential to our development – literally opening the doors at every stage of City Year’s journey for 25 years. I smile every time I walk into the Lovett-Woodsum Lobby.”

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National Leadership Sponsors

ARAMARK

The City Year and ARAMARK partnership leverages their shared dedication to enrich communities through engaging employees in high impact volunteer service as part of ARAMARK Building Community, the company’s signature global philanthropic and volunteer program. ARAMARK and City Year also work together to build strong school partnerships and recruitment campaigns leveraging relationships on college campuses to recruit young adults join City Year for a year of service. As City Year’s Official Apparel Partner, ARAMARK provides uniform apparel to our corps members serving in schools, as well as uniform components dedicated exclusively for physical service

Bank of America

As City Year’s National Student Leadership Development Sponsor, Bank of America supports programs focused on helping underserved middle and high schools students graduate with the education and life skills needed to access post-secondary educational opportunities. Bank of America has supported City Year and young people who make positive change in their schools and communities for more than 20 years. In 1988, predecessor institution Bank of Boston became a founding sponsor of City Year, Inc. and was the first company in the nation to sponsor a City Year team. Bank of America has served as Presenting Sponsor of City Year’s annual convention and its 15th anniversary, and played a pivotal role in the purchase and development of City Year’s national headquarters by supporting tax-exempt bond financing and bridge financing for the project.

Cisco

Cisco first partnered with City Year in 1993, and has been an instrumental supporter of City Year’s Whole School, Whole Child model for school-based service and after-school programs. This partnership is an example of what a leading technology company and national non-profit organization can accomplish together. The partnership has allowed City Year to further its mission of keeping students in school and on track to graduation by using Cisco’s technologies to facilitate collaborative training and communication nationwide.

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Comcast NBCUniversal

Comcast NBCUniversal is City Year’s Leadership Development and Training Partner. Comcast NBCUniversal supports City Year’s leadership development programs and recognizes the accomplishments of City Year alumni who have continued their dedication to community service through the conferring of the annual Comcast NBCUniversal Leadership Awards. Comcast NBCUniversal is also the National Opening Day Sponsor, Presenting Sponsor of our National Leadership Summit and Presenting Sponsor of City Year’s annual training academy, as well as a multi-site team sponsor. Comcast NBCUniversal donates significant communication and broadcasting resources to help City Year raise awareness about its mission and focus areas by reaching more young people across the country through cable and internet. Comcast NBCUniversal’s investment in City Year makes it possible for thousands of corps members to help improve the lives of students while creating sustainable solutions for social change.

CSX Transportation

As City Year’s largest team sponsor, CSX demonstrates a shared commitment to service and the positive role it plays in transforming neighborhoods and communities. CSX partners with City Year’s Care Force® team to engage employees, customers and community members in service days throughout the year. To support Care Force® service days across the country, CSX donated two tractortrailers to transport tools and materials to service events across the country. CSX is also a co-sponsor of City Year’s National Leadership Summit, and as City Year’s Lead Safety Partner, CSX provides first aid and CPR training for all corps and staff members.

Deloitte

Deloitte invests financial resources along with the intellectual capital of its professionals to strengthen City Year’s capacity and reach nationwide. Deloitte’s pro bono services help City Year transform, scale and support the design and delivery of its services nationwide. Beyond pro bono, Deloitte professionals play a leadership role at the local and national level through their participation on City Year’s boards and as mentors to corps members. Together, Deloitte and City Year are building the nation’s graduation pipeline to help create the business and civic leaders of tomorrow.

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Microsoft

Microsoft is City Year’s newest National Leadership Sponsor, but we are long-time partners. Microsoft has been one of City Year’s National In-Kind Sponsors for the past 13 years and Microsoft will continue its in-kind support of City Year by providing over $12.3 million worth of software to enhance our IT infrastructure. As a result of Microsoft’s support, City Year will be able to expand its math tutoring program to reach nearly 8,500 students, and City Year’s math curriculum designers will be able to carry out key activities, including preparing online content, field-testing activities, packaging site-specific best practices for national distribution and creating a framework for our resource library. Microsoft also sponsors City Year teams in three Diplomas Now schools in New York City, Chicago and Seattle. Microsoft will help City Year reach an unprecedented number of youth in high-poverty schools nationwide, ensuring the right students receive the right interventions at the right time.

Pepsi

Pepsi and City Year share a deep commitment to youth empowerment and diversity. The collaboration began in 2001 with community service projects that engaged PepsiCo employees in transforming communities across the country. Since then, Pepsi had dedicated resources toward increasing awareness of City Year among young adults of all backgrounds. In 2008, the PepsiCo Foundation provided the initial seed funding to support Diplomas Now, a collaborative school turnaround model. The Foundation has increased its funding and strategic partnership to catalyze Diplomas Now into a national network of 26 schools in 11 cities, and matched the funding that helped secure the competitive and prestigious U.S. Department of Education’s Investing in Innovation (i3) grant.

Walmart

The Walmart Foundation supports a comprehensive national training program for City Year’s corps members, including an intensive summer training academy and expert in-service trainings during the school year to improve student performance – especially in literacy, in high-poverty middle schools across the country. Through its philanthropic programs and partnerships, Walmart and the Walmart Foundation fund initiatives focus on creating opportunities in education, workforce development, economic opportunity, environmental sustainability, and health and wellness.

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In-Kind Sponsors KPMG

KPMG is an international firm that specializes in audit, tax and advisory services. For KPMG, community involvement is an integral part of its corporate mission. The firm has developed successful global strategies for working with clients and its employees and is now developing a global approach to community activities that builds upon the active local involvement of its member firms. City Year is privileged to have KPMG prepare our financial audits and provide tax review counsel at a discounted rate.

WilmerHale

WilmerHale offers unparalleled legal representation across a comprehensive range of practice areas that are critical to the success of their clients. Community service and pro bono representation have been long traditions at the heart of WilmerHale and City Year is grateful to be one of their pro bono clients. The firm generously donates its time and expertise, providing critical legal services to City Year on an ongoing basis. In 2006, WilmerHale was officially named City Year’s “National Legal Counsel” and in 2010, WilmerHale received a “20th Anniversary Leadership Award” for its extraordinary, long-standing partnership with City Year. In addition to their generous investments as National Leadership Sponsors, these companies provide City Year with in-kind donations:

ARAMARK

ARAMARK works with its college partners across the country to help increase awareness of City Year through on-campus recruitment marketing campaigns. ARAMARK’s uniform division partners with City Year to provide City Year branded uniform components, including the iconic red jacket, to City Year’s staff and corps members.

Cisco

Cisco generously donated essential equipment to build computer networks across the country to better equip our sites staff and corps members.

CSX Transportation

CSX donated Care Force® One and Care Force® Two, co-branded rail containers that transport City Year’s Care Force® equipment to service events across the country.

Deloitte

From helping City Year to design its operating model to assisting the organization in refining its approach for selecting new sites, Deloitte’s pro bono contribution continues to help City Year shape its strategy and build the organization’s capacity to achieve it.

Microsoft

The Microsoft Corporation is committed to serving communities and working responsibly. Through partnerships, Microsoft technology innovations, people and resources help solve societal challenges and create economic opportunities on both a global and a local scale. Microsoft has been a critical partner of City Year since 1999. Their software and technology helps connect the national City Year network

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through standardized communications tools and interconnected Web-based information systems. Additionally, Microsoft employees volunteer with City Year and provide leadership development and technical trainings to corps members across the country. Thanks to Microsoftâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s investment, City Year corps members have the technical resources they need to help students learn.

Timberland

As City Yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Official Footwear Provider, Timberland provides boots to all of our staff and corps members.

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2011-2012 Team Sponsors The Team Sponsor Program is a unique opportunity for our partners to engage with City Year corps members. Through their generous support, Team Sponsors partner with a team of eight to 12 corps members for an entire school year and make a difference in their community by investing time, resources and talent. Team Sponsors further the critical work of City Year corps members to keep students in school and on track to graduate. Throughout the service year, Team Sponsors join their team of diverse young men and women, who proudly wear their sponsorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s logo on their uniform, to participate in high-impact service projects, transform schools and contribute to the individual leadership and professional development of the corps members they sponsor.

Multi-Team Sponsors

Alcoa Foundation (2) Aramark (2) Bain & Company (2) Bank of America Charitable Foundation (4) Comcast NBCUniversal (9) Credit Suisse Americas Foundation (2) CSX Transportation (14) Deloitte (4) JPMorgan Chase & Co. (3) MFS Investment Management (2) National Grid (3) Walmart (3)

Single Team Sponsors

AAR Corporation Albemarle Foundation Allstate Foundation Applied Materials, Inc. Bain Capital Childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Charity Ballard Spahr LLP Baton Rouge Area Foundation BMO Harris Bank Brewers Community Foundation CareFirst BlueCross BlueShield Chicago Transit Authority Chicago White Sox 60


Cisco Systems Foundation City of Little Rock CVS Caremark Charity Classic, Inc. CVS Caremark Corporation David’s Bridal DePuy Synthes Companies of Johnson & Johnson Deutsche Bank - Philadelphia DISPATCH Drinker Biddle & Reath LLP Duane Morris Eagles Youth Partnership Ernst & Young LLP Exelon Foundation Firstrust Bank Ford Motor Company Fund Foundation for New Education Initiatives, Inc. Foundation To Be Named Later Goldman Sachs Gives Harvard Pilgrim Health Care, Inc. Hasbro Children’s Fund Heinemann Henry Ford Health System Houghton Mifflin Harcourt HSBC Irene W. and C.B. Pennington Foundation Jewish Communal Fund Lincoln Financial Foundation MAPP Construction Miami Marlins Microsoft Morgan Family Foundation Northern Trust OneWest Foundation Patrick F. Taylor Foundation PTC Rackspace Foundation Robert R. McCormick Foundation Rockwell Automation RPM International Inc. RSF Endowment San Francisco Forty Niners Foundation Schneider Electric Silicon Valley Community Foundation Silver & Black Give Back Foundation Sisters of Charity SC Foundation Sony Corporation of America Sony Pictures Entertainment

Summit Partners Sunoco, Inc. TEVA The Acacia Foundation The Alter Group The Boston Foundation The Case Foundation The Christian R. and Mary F. Lindback Foundation The Community Foundation for the National Capital Region The Glenmede Trust Company The Red Sox Foundation The Seinfeld Family Foundation The Sunoco Foundation The Timberland Company T-Mobile USA United Way for Southeastern Michigan United Way of Metropolitan Chicago Impact Fund, a McCormick Foundation Fund Univision Management Company USA Funds Warner Bros. Studios Westfield Capital Management Wiener Family Future Foundation Wm. Wrigley Jr. Company

For more information about the Team Sponsor Program, please contact Itai Dinour at idinour@cityyear.org 61


Donors

Individuals and Family Foundations Gifts from July 1, 2011 through June 30, 2012.

Million Dollar Circle

Champions Circle

$1,000,000+

$50,000 – $99,999

Anonymous Einhorn Family Charitable Trust Jeannie and Jonathan Lavine

Founders Circle $500,000 – $999,999

Anonymous The Hauptman Family Foundation Lovett-Woodsum Family Foundation The Michael & Kim Ward Foundation

$250,000 – $499,999

Anonymous The Goldhirsh Foundation, Inc. Carolyn and Jeffrey Leonard Marion and David Mussafer The Rapier Family Foundation David and Julia Uihlein Charitable Foundation The Walton Family Foundation

$100,000 – $249,999

Anonymous Ellen and Michael Alter The Anschutz Foundation The Lynde and Harry Bradley Foundation, Inc. Amy and Ed Brakeman Jean and Steve Case Chowdhury Family Foundation Compulink Business Systems / Link Wilson The Edgerley Family Foundation The Horning Family Foundation Lenfest Foundation, Inc. Gail and David Mixer Brooke and Will Muggia Lisa and Todd Owens Merice “Boo” Johnson Grigsby Family Foundation Fred Poses Phillip Scott Tracy and Gene Sykes/GS Gives Morgan Family Foundation Susan and Matthew Weatherbie

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Anonymous Crown Philanthropies Barbara and Bill Burgess Julie and Kevin Callaghan John and Jeri Cerullo Charina Endowment Fund Diane and Neil Exter Anne Herrmann and John A. Herrmann, Jr. Jill and Ken Iscol Floyd and Delores Jones Family Foundation The Kaplen Foundation Leonard and Hilda Kaplan Charitable Foundation Cori Flam Meltzer & Brad Meltzer Richard Menschel The Najim Family Foundation The Rosenthal Family Foundation The Seinfeld Family Foundation Stamps Family Charitable Foundation, Inc. Robert and Tona White Jeffrey and Mary Zients

$25,000 – $49,999

Brenda and Richard Battista The Bell Family Foundation Dale and Max Berger Tere Blanca and Javier Juncadella Braman Family Charitable Foundation Catherine and Paul Buttenwieser David and Barbara Caplan John and Letitia Carter Caroline and Howard Cayne Patricia & Thomas Cornish David and Victoria Croll, The Croll Foundation David Geffen Foundation Holly Davidson Elizabeth Bixby Janeway Foundation Corinne and Tim Ferguson Laura Fox and Ben Van de Bunt Granholm Mulhern Family Fund Richard J. Green Horner Foundation Beth and Michael Jones Dawn and Roger Kafker Andrew Kerin Kirstein Family Foundation Dianne and Bill Ledingham

Diana and Thomas Lewis Loeb Family Charitable Foundations Lois G. Roy Dickerman Charitable Foundation Louis and Anne Abrons Foundation, Inc. Lubar Family Foundation Chris Malachowsky The Marc Haas Foundation The McGrath Abrams Family Foundation Holly McGrath Bruce and David Bruce, Highland Street Foundation Patricia and David Mordas Courtney Clark Pastrick and Scott Pastrick Pickard Family Fund Jennifer and Sean Reilly Fund Stacey Snider and Gary Jones Martin H. Stein Robert Stein Nancy and Arn Tellem Alan and Elaine Weiler Mike and Missy Young

$10,000 – $24,999

Anonymous Abby and David Kohl Charitable Foundation Daniel Abraham Florachel Addy Andreeff Foundation The Annie E. Casey Foundation Anonymous (2) Apfelbaum Family Foundation Bill and Bonnie Apfelbaum Kristen and Jim Atwood Melora and Andrew Balson Helaine and Joe Banner Charles D. Barksdale Jr. Deborah and Steven Barnes Susan Bazett and Rom Watson Henry W. Bedford Marjorie Belliotti Brian Berger Bernard & Anne Spitzer Charitable Trust, Inc. Andi and Tom Bernstein Jessica Blume Jennifer W. Bogoni Rita and Charles Bronfman Colin and Sarah Bryar LeRoy Bunyon Phyllis J. and Bill Campbell Tushara Canekeratne Kathleen and Robert Carniaux The Carol & James Collins Foundation


Christine and William Carr William Carr and Lynn Miller Carr Charles Lamar Family Foundation The Chernin Family Foundation Emily Griset and Andrew Chin Peter Y. Chung Gary and Judy Clare General (ret.) Wesley Clark and Mrs. Clark Lee Cockerell David and Rhonda Cohen Evan and Tammy Cohen Bertram and Barbara Cohn Nancy Colon-Anderson Stephanie and John Connaughton David Cooper Teresa A. Cooper Cherice Corley Matt Cross Gay and Barry Curtiss-Lusher Linda Beech Cutler Aileen Daly Kent and Elizabeth Dauten Diana Davis Spencer Foundation Sandra and Kevin Delbridge Manuel A. Diaz, Esq. Beth and Gerard du Toit Michael Eagles Barbara and Michael Eisenson Tom Ellefson The George Link, Jr. Foundation, Inc. William George Carol and Stephen Geremia Ann and Robert W. Gillespie Anne Helgen and Michael Gilligan Mr. Norman M. Goldberger Goldring Family Foundation Carol Goldring Jeffrey Goldstein Gordon Hartman Family Foundation Beth and Lawrence Greenberg Corissa Groves Dianne McKeever and Shreyas Gupta Gillian and Jason Haberman April Harris Gordon Hartman Terence Hayes Julie and Jordan Hitch Regina and Joe Hitchery Melanie and Stephen Hoffmeister Ilene and Richard Jacobs Dr. Aart de Geus & Esther John Chambrel Jones James Kastenholz and Jennifer Steans

Kenneth and Donna Keller Kathryn and Luke Kissam William Klesse Evelyn and Ronald Krancer Lori Landew Cindy and Seth Lawry The Lefkofsky Family Foundation Ted and Lynn Leonsis Serena and Shawn Levy Shelly London and Larry Kanter Ian and Isabelle Loring Veronda D. Majett Linda Malizia Lisa Mancini Alex and Marie Manoogian Foundation Dominic Mariani Lisa and Robert Markey Jean Martin and Warren Weinstein Fred Maynard Josh and Alexandra McCall Keith Carlson and Kathleen McGirr Mead Family Foundation Sharon Meadows Shyamli and Robert Milam Harrison B. Miller Zanelle N. Miller Jesse Minor Paul and Sandra Montrone Robert and Colin Moore Stephanie Mudick Elin and Larry Neiterman David and Suzu Neithercut Jon D. Neuhaus Pamela Norton Keith D. Nosbusch Denise V. Noufe Kathleen Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Brien Judith and Stephen Pagliuca Marsha and Alan Paller Lynne and Timothy Palmer Hope and Mike Pascucci Walter Paulson Randa and Michael Pehl The Petersmeyer Foundation, Inc. Gregg and Julie Petersmeyer Kenneth Porrello and Sherry McFall The Querrey Simpson Charitable Foundation Samuel S. Reid The Reilly Family Foundation Winifred and Kevin P. Reilly Jr. Fund Jamie and Nick Renwick Clare and Gerard Richer The Roberta Lund Advised Fund

Gwenn and Dave Rosener Roth Family Foundation Rohini and Ravinder Sakhuja The San Francisco Foundation Lesa Scott and Philip Jackson Scott and Carin Sharp The Siemer Family Foundation Steven Silvestro Louis A. Simpson Brian and Johanna Snyder Elizabeth and Thomas Sorbo Winnie and Fred Spar Mike and Pat Splinter Lois and Harrison Steans John S. Swartley Sandra and Robert Taylor Jennifer Tharpe-Hall Kathy and William Truscott The Tsujihara Family Terry and Robert Wadsworth Gail and Lois Warden Thomas Wasmer The Wasserman Foundation Louise and David Weinberg Sally Hulsman and Jennifer Wells Graham Weston Wiener Family Future Foundation Karie Willyerd Woldenberg Foundation Mariann and Andrew Youniss Kenneth G. Zeferes Stacey Zelten Zilber Family Foundation, Inc.

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Foundations and Non-profits Gifts from July 1, 2011 through June 30, 2012.

$500,000 – $999,999

The Ford Foundation United Way for Southeastern Michigan

$250,000 – $499,999

Anonymous (2) Barr Foundation Daniels Fund The Eli and Edythe Broad Foundation The Starr Foundation Windsong Trust

$100,000 – $249,999

Anonymous Bloomberg Philanthropies The Case Foundation The Charles Hayden Foundation Hillel Irene W. and C.B. Pennington Foundation Jane Bradley Pettit Foundation W.M. Keck Foundation Robert R. McCormick Foundation Patrick F. Taylor Foundation Pinkerton Foundation The Rhode Island Foundation Sacramento Region Community Foundation The Skillman Foundation United Way of Greater Philadelphia and Southern New Jersey United Way of Metropolitan Chicago Impact Fund, a McCormick Foundation Fund USA Funds Weingart FoundationNon-Profit William J. Clinton Foundation Metro TeenAIDS Philadelphia Education Fund United Way of Greater Cleveland United Way of Southeastern Pennsylvania

$50,000 – $99,999

The Lloyd G. Balfour Foundation Centerbridge Foundation Anonymous Communities in Schools CVS Caremark Charity Classic, Inc. David V. Uihlein Sr. Foundation The Ellison Foundation The Frances L. and Edwin L. Cummings Memorial Fund Huey and Angelina Wilson Foundation

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Mile High United Way Morris and Gwendolyn Cafritz Foundation The Ralph M. Parsons Foundation Polk Bros. Foundation The Richard & Ethel Herzfeld Foundation RosaMary Foundation Sisters of Charity SC Foundation Sobrato Family Foundation United Way of Central Ohio United Way of Greater Los Angeles United Way of San Antonio and Bexar County Yawkey Foundation II

$25,000 – $49,999

The Abington Foundation Norwin & Elizabeth Bean Foundation The Boston Foundation Clark Charitable Foundation The Cleveland Foundation The Columbus Foundation Community Foundation for Southeast Michigan The Community Foundation for the National Capital Region The Community Foundation in Jacksonville DC Children and Youth Investment Trust Corporation Dwight Stuart Youth Fund Foundation To Be Named Later The George Gund Foundation George W. Brackenridge Foundation Granite United Way Greater Milwaukee Foundation The Greater New Orleans Foundation Evan and Marion Helfaer Foundation Ilitch Charities for Children Kelben Foundation The Kent H. Smith Charitable Trust Limited Brands Foundation The Lynch Foundation Medina Foundation Providence After School Alliance The Reinberger Foundation San Antonio Area Foundation The Seattle Foundation Solon E. Summerfield Foundation United Way of Greater Cleveland United Way of Greater Milwaukee United Way of The Midlands Woodcock Foundation

$10,000 – $24,999

Adolph Coors Foundation Angel Foundation Arata Brothers Trust The Batchelor Foundation Inc. Boston Celtics Shamrock Foundation Eva L. & Joseph M. Bruening Foundation Cogswell Benevolent Trust Credit Bureau of Baton Rouge Foundation Dolfinger-McMahon Foundation Easton Community Foundation Edward Wisner Donation Elizabeth Elser Doolittle Charitable Trusts Fordham Street Foundation Fred Darragh Foundation The Harry C. Moores Foundation Harvard Pilgrim Health Care Foundation Henrietta Lange Burk Fund The Herb Block Foundation Anonymous KPAI - Korean American Professionals in Automotive Industry Lily Auchincloss Foundation, Inc. The Christian R. and Mary F. Lindback Foundation National Center for Learning Disabilities New Hampshire Charitable Foundation Participant Productions Powell Group Fund Pro Bono Publico Foundation Samuel S. Fels Fund Sasha Bruce Youthwork, Inc. The Schrafft Charitable Trust The Share Fund Third Federal Foundation The Thomas H. White Foundation ThursdayNights Timothy and Bernadette Marquez Foundation TOSA Foundation United Way for the Greater New Orleans Area United Way of the National Capital Area The William Bannerman Foundation William G. McGowan Charitable Fund, Inc.


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Corporations Gifts from July 1, 2011 through June 30, 2012.

$1,000,000+

ARAMARK Comcast NBCUniversal CSX Transportation PepsiCo Foundation Walmart Foundation

$500,000 – $999,999

Bank of America Charitable Foundation Cisco Learning Institute Cisco Systems, Inc. Deloitte

$250,000 – $499,999

Bain & Company Goldman Sachs Philanthropy Fund MetLife Foundation MFS Investment Management® National Grid NVIDIA Corporation T-Mobile USA Universal Companies

$100,000 – $249,999

The Acacia Foundation Alcoa Foundation The Alter Group American Express Foundation Applied Materials, Inc. Bain Capital Children’s Charity Barclays Capital The Baupost Group, L.L.C. BMO Harris Bank Capital One CareFirst BlueCross BlueShield Chicago White Sox Corporate Executive Board Credit Suisse Americas Foundation David’s Bridal DISPATCH Eagles Youth Partnership Entergy Corporation - New Orleans Exelon Foundation Ford Motor Company Fund Harvard Pilgrim Health Care, Inc. HSBC Microsoft Corporation OneWest Foundation Rockwell Automation San Francisco Forty Niners Foundation

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Sony Corporation of America & Sony Pictures Entertainment The Starbucks Foundation State Street Foundation Synopsys, Inc. TEVA Warner Bros. Home Entertainment Group Wells Fargo Westfield Capital Management Wm. Wrigley Jr. Company

$50,000 – $99,999

AAR Corporation Albemarle Foundation Allstate Foundation AT&T Inc. Ballard Spahr LLP Brewers Community Foundation Chevron Corporate Headquarters CVS Caremark Charity Classic, Inc. Davis Polk & Wardwell DePuy Synthes Companies of Johnson & Johnson Drinker Biddle & Reath LLP Firstrust Bank The Glenmede Trust Company Harvard Pilgrim Healthcare, Inc. Hasbro Children’s Fund Hyatt JC Penney, Inc. JP Morgan Chase & Co. Kasowitz Benson Torres & Friedman LLP Liberty Mutual Group Lincoln Financial Foundation Miami Marlins Northern Trust Charitable Trust PTC Rackspace Foundation RPM International Inc. SAP America, Inc. Schneider Electric Social Venture Partners Sacramento State Farm Insurance Headquarters Sunoco, Inc. SunTrust Bank The Timberland Company US Bank The Walt Disney Company

$25,000 – $49,999

AEG American International Group The Amgen Foundation Banner & Witcoff, Ltd Beats Electronic, LLC Bernstein, Litowitz, Berger, & Grossmann LLP Blanca Commercial Real Estate, Inc. The Boeing Company Catholic Medical Center Clifford Chance US LLP Comerica Bank Dartmouth Hitchcock Medical Center Deluxe Entertainment Services Group Inc. Deutsche Bank Discovery Communications DreamWorks Studios Duane Morris Energy BBDO Ernst & Young LLP Fidelity Investments Fisker Automotive, Inc. Food Network Heinemann Hewlett-Packard Company Independence Blue Cross Intel J Brand Jeans, Inc. JP Morgan Chase Foundation Keker & Van Nest LLP KeyBank Foundation Macy’s Corporate Services, Inc. ManpowerGroup Mintz, Levin, Cohn, Ferris, Glovsky and Popeo P.C. NFL Ventures LP Northwestern Mutual Old Oaks Country Club OPI Products Inc. People Magazine Pepper Hamilton LLP PricewaterhouseCoopers LLP RSF Endowment Safeco Insurance Foundation San Jose Sharks Foundation Skadden, Arps, Slate, Meagher & Flom LLP State Street Corporation Sutherland Asbill & Brennan LLP TD Charitable Foundation Technicolor Inc. TJX Companies


Twentieth Century Fox Universal Music Group Univision Management Company Valero Energy Corporation Weil, Gotshal & Manges LLP White & Case LLP Willkie Farr & Gallagher LLP

$10,000 – $24,999

American Express American Financial Warranty Corp Anthem Blue Cross Blue Shield Aon Foundation Arnold & Porter Assurant, Inc. Atlantic Media Company Baird Foundation, Inc. Baptist Health System BBDO Blank Rome LLP Bloomberg Blue Cross Blue Shield of Massachusetts BNSF Foundation Brady Sullivan Properties Brunswick Group LLC Bulger Capital Partners Caliber Collision Centers Carothers DiSante & Freudenberger LLP Cathay Bank Foundation Central Arkansas Nursing Center Michael Morton Charter Manufacturing Company Foundation CIGNA Citizens Bank Foundation City National Bank Clark Construction Group, LLC The Cohen Group Comerica Charitable Foundation Computer Solutions Con Edison The Cozen O’Connor Foundation Inc. Creative Artists Agency Crescent Bank & Trust Crowell & Moring LLP CTIA CVS Caremark Corporation Davis Wright Tremaine LLP DaVita Dimension Data DLA Piper Dreamhost Dynamic Network Services Encana Oil & Gas USA

Entergy Louisiana Enterprise Holdings Foundation Florida Power & Light Company Forest City Enterprises, Inc. The Garden City Group, Inc The Gas Company General Wesley Clark, Retired, and Mrs. Clark Global Infrastructure Partners Goldman Sachs & Co. The Grainger Foundation Gravestar, Inc. Greenlight Capital Grosvenor Capital Management, L.P. Hangley Aronchick Segal & Pudlin The Harley-Davidson Foundation, Inc. Health Partners Heidrick & Struggles International, Inc. Henry Crown and Company Henry Ford Health System Heyday Films The Higley Fund Hiscox Foundation USA Hixon Properties Horning Brothers Corporation Houghton Mifflin Harcourt HTC America, Inc. Huawei Huntington National Bank IBEW Local Union 98 IMA Foundation ING Financial Services Corporation Jack Morton Worldwide Jenner & Block LLP JMC Leasing Inc. Jones Day Kessler Topaz Meltzer & Check, LLP KPMG LLP Lamar Advertising Company Legendary Pictures Entertainment Loeb & Loeb LLP Loomis Sayles & Company, LP Macquarie Group Foundation Madison Dearborn Partners MAPP Construction McDonald’s Corporation McGlinchey Stafford PLLC McLarty Companies Mercedes-Benz USA Merrill Lynch Montgomery & Co. Morgan, Lewis & Bockius MacDonald’s Mullen Advertising

Nestle Waters North America News Corporation Foundation Nordstrom Northeast Delta Dental Northrop Grumman O’Melveny & Myers, LLP Omnicom Media Group Inc. Packer Cafe Inc. Paul, Weiss, Rifkind, Wharton & Garrison Pearlmark Real Estate Partners Philadelphia Eagles Salem Partners Public Service of New Hampshire Publix Super Markets, Inc. Putnam Investments R.J. Finlay & Co Raising Cane’s RealNetworks, Inc. Recognize This, LLC Reserve Telecommunications RiverStone Resources LLC Royal Caribbean Cruises LTD. SAFE Credit Union Safra National Bank of New York SanDisk SEI Investments Showtime Networks, Inc. Silver & Black Give Back Foundation SMG, Verizon Wireless Arena Sun Life Financial TD Bank The Telx Group, Inc Textron Charitable Trust TIAA-CREF TrueCar, Inc. United Way of New York City UTA Variety Foundation The Washington Redskins Waste Management Wilkinson Barker Knauer, LLP Wintrust Financial Corporation WME Woodcock Washburn

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70

Board of Trustees

72

Board Chairs

74

Senior Leadership Team

75

Executive Directors

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Leadership

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Board of Trustees

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Stephen G. Woodsum* Chair of the Board Founding Managing Director Summit Partners

13. David Gergen † Professor of Public Service and Director of the Center for Public Leadership Harvard Kennedy School

23. C. Gregg Petersmeyer Vice Chair America’s Promise Alliance Chair and CEO Personal Pathways LLC

2. Kristen Atwood* Co-Chair of the International Committee Founding Staff Member City Year, Inc.

14. Andrew Hauptman Chair, City Year Los Angeles Board Chairman Andell, LLC

3. Joe Banner* Chair of the National Leadership Council Chair of the Site and Program Committee CEO Cleveland Browns

15. Ilene Jacobs* Vice Chair of the Board Chair of the Finance Committee Former Executive Vice President, Human Resources Fidelity Investments

25. Jennifer Eplett Reilly* Co-Chair of the International Committee Founder of City Year Louisiana Co-Founder City Year, Inc.

16. Hubie Jones † Social Justice Entrepreneur-in-Residence City Year, Inc. Dean Emeritus Boston University School of Social Work

26. Shirley Sagawa Co-Founder Sagawa/Jospin

4. Josh Bekenstein* Chair of the Investment Committee Managing Director Bain Capital, LLC 5.

Jessica L. Blume National Managing Principal, Research & Innovation Deloitte Consulting, LLP

6. John Bridgeland President and CEO Civic Enterprises 7.

Michael Brown* CEO and Co-Founder City Year, Inc.

17. Rosabeth Moss Kanter Ernest L. Arbuckle Professor Harvard Business School Chair & Director Harvard University Advanced Leadership Initiative 18. Alan Khazei † Co-Founder of City Year, Inc. Founder and CEO The Action Tank, LLC

8. Michele Cahill Vice President, National Programs and Program Director, Urban Education Carnegie Corporation of New York

19. Jonathan S. Lavine* Chair of the Development Committee Managing Partner Sankaty Advisors, LLC

9.

20. Andrea Encamacao Martin Co-Chair, National Alumni Advisory Board Guidance Counselor Boston Latin School

David L. Cohen* Chair of the Governance Committee Executive Vice President Comcast NBCUniversal

10. Mayor Manny Diaz Former Mayor of Miami Partner Lydecker Diaz, LLP 11. Sandy Edgerley Trustee Edgerley Family Foundation

21. Rick Menell Chairman The Carrick Foundation

24. Denny Marie Post Senior Vice President and Chief Marketing Officer Red Robin International, Inc.

27. Jeff Shames* Chair of the Audit Committee Executive in Residence MIT Sloan School of Management 28. Secretary Rodney Slater † Former U.S. Secretary of Transportation Partner Patton Boggs, LLP 29. Richard Stengel † Managing Editor TIME 30. Jeffrey Swartz † Former President and CEO The Timberland Company 31. Michael J. Ward Founding Member, City Year Jacksonville Board President, Chairman and CEO CSX Corporation 32. Tom Ward, Clerk Partner WilmerHale, LLP

22. Susan Nokes Senior Vice President, Customer Solutions Asurion

12. Corinne Ferguson Chair, City Year Boston Board *Executive Committee Member †Charter Trustee

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Board Chairs Baton Rouge Laura C. PochĂŠ Vice President, Private Wealth JP Morgan Chase

Little Rock/N. Little Rock Bruce Moore City Manager City of Little Rock

Boston Corinne Ferguson

Stephanie S. Streett Executive Director William J. Clinton Foundation

Chicago Casey Keller Regional President, N.A. Wm. Wrigley Jr. Company Cleveland Robert Gillespie Chairman Emeritus KeyCorp Mayor Bruce H. Akers (Vice Chair) City of Pepper Pike (retired) Columbia Marcia Bensen Senior Vice President for Corporate Banking Bank of America James T. Irvin III, Esq. (Jim) Partner Nelson Mullins Riley & Scarborough Columbus Rusty Orben Director of Public Affairs-Ohio Region CSX Transportation Denver Ben Walton Board Member Walton Family Foundation State Senator Mike Johnston State of Colorado Detroit Daniel E. Little, Ph.D. Chancellor University of Michigan â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Dearborn N. Charles Anderson (Vice Chair) Urban League of Detroit and Southeastern Michigan Jacksonville Kim Ward Trustee and Managing Director Michael & Kim Ward Foundation

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Los Angeles Andrew Hauptman Chairman Andell Holdings, LLC Miami Brad Meltzer Author Cori Flam Meltzer (Vice Chair) Milwaukee Julie A. Uihlein Vice President David & Julia Uihlein Charitable Foundation New Hampshire Lesa Scott President Heinemann Beth Roberts (Vice Chair) Vice President, Northern New England Harvard Pilgrim Healthcare New Orleans Diana Lewis New York Stephanie Mudick Executive Vice President JP Morgan Chase & Co. David Caplan (Vice Chair) Dean City Year New York Greater Philadelphia Art Block Senior Vice President, General Counsel & Secretary Comcast NBCUniversal Karen Keating Mara President Keating Mara & Associates LLC Rhode Island Alan Harlam Director of Social Innovation Initiative Brown University


Sacramento Kathy McKim Vice President, External Affairs AT&T San Antonio Craig Berkowitch Senior Manager Deloitte San JosĂŠ/Silicon Valley Sharon Matthews President & CEO eLynx Todd Achilles (Vice Chair) Hewlett Packard Seattle/King County Jennifer Wells Vice President Point B. Sarah Bryar General Manager Rivet & Sway Washington, DC Jeffrey Leonard CEO Global Environment Fund

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Senior Leadership Team

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Michael Brown Chief Executive Officer & Co-Founder

Mithra Irani Ramaley Senior Vice President, Regional and Site Operations

2. Jim Balfanz President

10. Charlie Rose Senior Vice President & Dean

3. Evelyn Barnes Executive Vice President & Chief Financial and Administrative Officer

11. Nancy Routh Senior Vice President & Chief People Officer

4. AnnMaura Connolly Executive Vice President & Chief Strategy Officer 5.

Itai Dinour Senior Vice President & Chief Organizational Advancement and Alumni Officer

6. Welles C. Hatch Senior Vice President & Chief Information Officer 7.

Sean Holleran Executive Vice President & Chief Operating Officer

8. Sandra Lopez Burke Vice President & Executive Director of City Year Boston

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12. Gillian Smith Senior Vice President & Chief Marketing Officer 13. Stephanie Wu Senior Vice President & Chief Program Design and Evaluation Officer 14. Christine Morin Senior Vice President, Site Growth & New Site Development 15. Jeff Jablow Senior Vice President, Strategy & Operations


Executive Directors

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Laura Hamm Baton Rouge

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Jay Thompson (Start-up Director) Jacksonville

17. Jordan Plante Orlando

2. Sandra Lopez Burke Boston

10. Sarah Roberson Little Rock/North Little Rock

18. R ic Ramsey Greater Philadelphia

3. Lisa Morrison Butler Chicago

11. Allison Graff-Weisner Los Angeles

19. Jennie Johnson Rhode Island

4. Phillip Robinson Cleveland

12. Saif Ishoof Miami

20. Jake Mossawir Sacramento

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13. Jason Holton Milwaukee

21. Paul Garro San Antonio

6. Todd Tuney Columbus

14. Pawn Nitichan New Hampshire

22. Toni Burke San JosĂŠ/Silicon Valley

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Jeff Park Denver

15. Peggy Mendoza New Orleans

23. Simon Amiel Seattle/King County

8. Penny Bailer Detroit

16. Erica Hamilton New York

24. Jeffrey Franco Washington, DC

Gail Wilson-Giarratano Columbia

All Executive Directors are also Vice Presidents of City Year, Inc.

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2012 Financial Summary

Statement of Financial Position

Year ended June 30, 2012

Assets Cash and equivalents Government grants receivable, net Contributions receivable, net Other assets Investments, at fair value Property and equipment, net

$

22,632,565 7,402,609 5,910,069 789,586 8,920,356 18,567,525

Total Assets

$

64,222,710

$

3,294,196 1,347,312 1,457,394 8,215,000 14,313,902

Liabilities and Net Assets Liabilities: Accounts payable and accrued expenses Accrued payroll and related expenses Interest rate swaps Bonds payable Total liabilities Net Assets: Unrestricted Temporarily restricted Permanently restricted Total net assets Total liabilities and net assets

Statement of Activities

29,862,796 14,614,359 5,431,653 49,908,808 $

64,222,710

Year ended June 30, 2012

Operating Revenue and Other Support Contributions and private grants Federal grants â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Corporation for National and Community Service School districts and other local government grants Investment return utilized for operations Other income

$

52,395,963 23,418,912 18,935,613 334,493 385,752

Total operating revenues and other support

$

95,470,733

Program services Support services: Organizational support Fundraising

$

71,583,977

Total operating expenses

$

90,899,760

$

4,570,973 36,803 2,648,558 250,000 2,209,218

Operating Expenses

10,684,438 8,631,345

Increase in Net Assets Unrestricted net assets from operations Unrestricted net assets from nonoperating transactions Temporarily restricted net assets Permanently restricted net assets Net assets Net assets, beginning of year

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Net assets, end of year

47,699,590 $

49,908,808


20%

25%

School Districts and other local government grants

Foundations

4%

Revenue

In-Kind

$95.5 million

8% Individuals

25%

18%

AmeriCorps

Corporations

9% Fundraising Expenses

Expenses

79%

$90.8 million

Program Services

12% Organizational Support

Charity Navigator Highest Ranking Charity Navigator is Americaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s premier charity evaluator. Since 2003, City Year has earned Charity Navigatorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s highest rating, certifying our commitment to accountability, transparency and responsible fiscal management. Only 1% of rated organizations have received this distinction for eight consecutive years, placing City Year among the most 77 trustworthy nonprofits in America.


City Year Locations Baton Rouge

New Orleans

Boston

New York

Chicago

Orlando

Cleveland

Greater Philadelphia

Columbia

Rhode Island

Columbus

Sacramento

Denver

San Antonio

Detroit

San JosĂŠ/Silicon Valley

Jacksonville

Seattle/King County

Little Rock/North Little Rock

Washington, DC

Los Angeles Miami Milwaukee New Hampshire

International Affiliates Johannesburg, South Africa London, England

cit y yea r.org City Year is an education-focused, nonprofit organization founded in 1988 that partners with public schools to help keep students in school and on track to graduate. This innovative public-private partnership brings together teams of young AmeriCorps members who commit to a year of full-time service in schools. Corps members support students by focusing on attendance, behavior, and course performance through in-class tutoring, mentoring, and after school programs.

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Profile for City Year, Inc.

City Year's 2012 Annual Report  

A summary of our 2011-2012 year of service.

City Year's 2012 Annual Report  

A summary of our 2011-2012 year of service.

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