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FOR ENVIRONMENTAL EDUCA


SCHUYLKILL CENTER FOR ENVIRONMENTAL EDUCATION PHILADELPHIA, PA SPRING 1998 LARP 702 Studio Landscape Architect~re and!~~giiqnal: Graduate School of Fine Art&'c ';' ' "

University of Pennsylvania

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TABLE OF CONTENTS PREFACE a. Letter from the Director, Tracy R. Kay b. Letter from Andropogon Associates, Ltd.

I.

INTRODUCTION f ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS a. Introduction . .. b. Acknowledgements c. Student List.

II.

MISSION a. Mission Statement. b. Guiding Principles. c. Key Institutional Directives. 1. Education 2. Land Management 3. Facilities 4. Regional Connections

III.

3

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5

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INVENTORY AND EVALUATION a. Historical Information .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . U 1. 1968 Aerial Photo 2. 1990 Aerial Photo b. Regional Connections. . c. Site Description. . . . 1. Existing Site 2. Physiography 3. Aspect 4. Vegetation i. Successional Status ii. Canopy Condition d. Educational Programs.

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IV.

SITE ORGANIZATION AND MANAGEMENT a. Master Plan Directives. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . b. Concept Plan. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1. CoreArea 2. Forest Reserve 3. Grassland Reserve 4. Young Woodland 5. Riparian Corridor 6. Historic Farm Landscape 7. Residential Areas

V.

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INFRASTRUCTURE AND FACILITIES a. Roadway Entrance . . . . . . . . . 1. Analysis 2. Proposal b. Trails . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1. Agricultural Trails 2. McLaughlin Farm Trails 3. Ravine Loop 4. Upper Field Trail 5. Widener Trail c. Facilities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1. Discovery Courtyard 2. Butterfly House and Meadow 3. Living Memorials Program

VI.

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43

ORGANIZATIONAL STRUCTURE a. EXisting Structure .

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i. Staff ii. Membership iii. Volunteers iv. Funding b. Recommendations.

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VII.

PHASING . .... .

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VIII.

AERIAL PHOTO 2000 . ........ .

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IX.

APPENDIX - Contact List . ...... .

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LETTER FROM THE DIRECTOR Februruy 26, 1998

To whom it may concern: The Schuylkill Center for Environmental Education occupies a 500 acre natural area in the Upper Roxborough section of Philadelphia. Since its inception in 1965, the staff, Board members and volunteers have actively worked to promote the preservation and improvement of our natural environment. Noted nationally as a leader in urban environmental education, the Schuylkill Center provides a vast array of environmental science programs for pre-k through grade 12. It also conducts graduate degree programs in environmental education for Beaver College and Temple University, and has published Curriculum Earth, a classroom based environmental education program developed by and for teachers. In addition to providing environmental education programs to students and in-service training for teachers, The Center is visited annually by nearly 50,000 people, who take advantage of The Center's family programs and special events. Following a transition in leadership in 1997, The Center is undergoing an extensive review of its existing programs and identification of new opportunities that will maintain The Center's leadership role in environmental education in the years ahead. We are truly excited by the opportunity afforded by the Penn Studio to help us begin to focus our thoughts within the context of a master plan. Although the studio course is just a short six-week exercise for the students, it has produced great enthusiasm among our staff, Board members, and neighbors. Furthermore, while the course was just an academic exercise, the students should be credited for insights and ideas that will be implemented within the next fewmonths. We appreciate the work they have done and hope it has been as much of a learning experience for them as it has been for us. On behalf ofthe staff and Board members, I extend our thanks to the students and their instructors.

Sincerely,

TracyR. Kay Executive Director


LETTER FROM ANDROPOG ON il:'I!:U.L.i!311E1I;AiOOliIli.i . •.kJlJ. ,.i.l iiJlI

Andropogon Associates, Ltd. Hell/ogif'::/ PT:lJUfillg & Dt>ign

374 SFiun f.A"" Phi/adelphia P.4 19128

25 February 1998

Tracy Kay Schuylkill Center for Em";.ronmental Education 8480 Hagg's Mill Road Philadelphia PA 19128 Dear Tracy: We are very happy to offer this Master Plan f.or the Schuylklll Center for Environrrumtal Education which was prepared as a product for a 3Id year studio in the Department of Landscape Architecture and Regional Planning in the Graduate School afFine Arts at the University of Pennsylvania. As studio masters, our goal was to give these soon·tograduate students a working experience thaI: was more similar to an office te~m effort, rather than individual studio projects, by having a real client and a single integrated master plan as the primary product of the studio. During studio time, the students met for a project meeting and work session every Morulay and visited the site for field study and a client review meeting every Wednesday. The timing of this project has been singularly fortu.ltotls. 1t has followed on the heels of "Futures Workshop" that set new directions for the institution and the appointment of a new director, Tracy Kay. We were privileged to work with staff and volunteers eager for change and growth and motivated to .work closely with the students throughout this half-semester. Their efforts were enonnously helpfuJ to the students. We cannot imagine a more vital and involved client than you have been. Altogether, this master planning effort has created a great deal of excitement and momentum at the Center as wen as for the students, despite the very short time frame-just seven weeks-and the fact that it rained on nearly every site visit. It is 'With great sadness that Vole note the passing of Riehard James, the Center's founding director, during the course of this studio. We 'Wish he could have seen this project completed and owe him a debt of gratitude fot creating the special opportunjties. that we have enjoyed this semester at the Sc::huylkill Center for Environmental Ed?Ation. /

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Yours sincerely,

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Carol Franklin for Andropogon Associates, Ltd.

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PREFACE a. letter from the Director, Tracy R. Kay b. Letterfrom AndropogonAssociates, LId.

I. INTRODUCTION I ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS a.lntroduction b. Acknowledgements

c. Student list 11. MISSION a. Mission Statement b. Guiding Principles

c. Key Institutional Directives 1. Education 2. Land Management

INTRODUCTION

3. Facilities 4. Regional Connections III. INVENTORY AND EVALUATION

a. Historicallnfonnation 1. 1958 Aerial Photo

AND

2. 1990AerialPhoto b. Regional Connections c. Site Description 1. Existing Site

2. Physiography 3. Aspect

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

4. Vegetation

i. Successional Status Ii. Canopy Condition d. Educational Programs IV. SITE ORGANIZATION AND MANAGEMENT a. Master Plan Directives

b. Concept Plan i. Core Area 2. Forest Reserve

3. Grassland Reserve 4. Young Woodland 5, Riparian Corridor 6. Historic Fann Landscape 7. Residential Areas

V. INFRASTRUCTURE AND FACllmES 8. Roadway Entrance 1. Analysis 2. Proposal b. Trails 1. Agricultura!Trails 2 McLaughlin Farm Trails 3. Ravine Loop 4. Upper Field Trail 5. WidenerTrail c. Facilities 1. Discovery Courtyard 2. ButterflyHouseandMeadow 3. Living Memorials Program

VI. ORGANIZATIONAL STRUCTURE a. Existing Structure

1. Staff 2. Membership 3. Volunteers 4. Funding b. Recommendations

VII. PROJECT PHASING Vlll. AERIAL PHOTO 2000 V. APPENDIX - Contact list


INTRODUCTION This master plan for the Schuylkill Center for Environmental Education is a joint venture between the University of Pennsylvania's Department of Landscape Architecture and Regional Planning 702 Spring Studio under the guidance of Carol Franklin and Leslie Sauer ofAndropogon Associates, Ltd. and the Schuylkill Center staff and members led by the Executive Director, Tracy Kay. For the students this is a chance to develop a strategic ecological master plan, have the opportunity to work with a client and a community, and replicate an office work process. For the Schuylkill Center staff and community, this project provides the chance to work closely with planners and landscape architects to review the current problems and opportunities while examining solutions. It is hoped that this joint venture has been a part of the learning process that will benefit all the parties involved.

SUMMARY A master plan is an instrument for purposeful growth and change. Its function is to capture ideas and possibilities, build consensus and plan strategies to meet long term goals. With an agreed upon master plan, in times of growth, each new project builds purposely on the previous enterprises and these projects are firmly linked to a program of education, maintenance, fund raising and staffing. In times of crisis, the master plan provides a solid guiding base for meeting the unexpected.

The Schuylkill Center for Environmental Education has recently hired a new director and is seeking to renew its site and mission statement. There is a new impetus by everyone involved with the centerto work together in initiating new programs, revitalizing old ones, renewing focus and forming new strategies. The center is struggling to survive, thrive and grow, and seeks to capture its share of visitors and funds in the Philadelphia region. In order to do this, the institution will have to have a clear and focused theme, offer experiences that are not available elsewhere in the Philadelphia region and provide valued knowledge and understanding.


The Center benefits by owning one of the largest privately held open spaces in Philadelphia. Its

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specific location in conjunction with its strong local community gives the Center a unique opportunity to develop several regional connections which can link many parts of the city together. To capitalize on this opportunity, means creating an identity for the center by designing a site specific boundary where the visitors are consciously aware of the Schuylkill Center and its relationship to the rest of the region.

This Center must resolve issues of educational programs without a clear focus or cohesive themes which lack interpretation of the exhibits and the ground. They also have to deal with issues of deferred landscape maintenance, use of the site for a dumping ground, and inadequate, non-hierarchical circulation on the site, all of which create poor initial impressions for visitors while causing enviromnental degradation. Another issue is the lack of community involvement with the Center. The resources of the Schuylkill Center have been seen and treated as separate entities with separate locations on the site. These entities lack the scale both in program and use that is necessary for proper understanding of the site as an example of a stable and diverse environment.

Most of the ideas in this proposed master plan will not be realized immediately but will develop in a series of stages that will be actualized as' funding allows. The process will depend on the commitment and determination of the institution including its director, staff and members. By targeting a local understanding and attitude of regional pride, the Center can become a special place which is visible within the larger community. All of the changes proposed in this master plan suggest an overall vision that it seeks to promote, through education and example, the preservation and understanding of indigenous and diverse habitats and cultural heritage of the Philadelphia region.

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ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS f:wm)

The Landscape Architecture and Regional Planning students at the University of Pennsylvania would like to thank the Schuylkill Center for Environmental Education for giving us this exciting opportunity to work with them. The willingness ofthe Center's staff and the neighbors in giving us information and welcoming us to undertake this project with them was greatly appreciated. We would especially like to thank: IracyKay

Barbara Schaeffer

Eileen Bedara

Katie Shepard

Andrew Brundage

Karen Spottiswood

Claire HoImes

Joan Squadrito

Andy James

Bob Iomassioni

Holly Kadis

Gayle Whittle

AI Kaufmano

Eddie WIlliams Chris McCabe Susan Hadden Chuck Hetzel

Carol Magers Crystal Nardone Irish O'Connell

It has been a learning experience to work closely with an organization which was able to give us insights into the process of institution building.

Last but least, we would like to thank Carol Franklin and Leslie Sauer for their guidance, support, all the cakes they have given us, and for helping us to work as a team towards creating an ecologically sensitive and creative design.

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STUDENTS Department of Landscape Architecture and Regional Planning Graduate School of Fine Arts University of Pennsylvania

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Studio 702 Spring 1998 Critics: Carol Franklin and Leslie Sauer Andropogon Associates, Ltd.

SuvarnaApte Jin-Hyung Chon Shih-Jen Chu Dorothy Daly EricHusta

Yu-TingLee Charles Neer Steven Sattler Worrasit Tantinipankul AnyaZmudzka

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PREFACE a.letterfromtheDirector, TracyR. Kay

b.letterfromAndropogon Associates, Ltd. INTRODUCTION IACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

a.lntroduction b. Acknowledgements

c. Student List

a. Mission Statement b. Guiding Principles c. Key Institutional Directives 1. Educa'Jon

2. land Management 3. Facilities 4. Regional Connedions

MISSION

III. INVENTORY AND EVALUATION

a. Historical Infonnation 1.1958AeriaIPhoio 2. 1990Aerial Photo

b. Regional Connections c. Site Description 1. Existing Site 2. Physiography 3. Aspect 4. Vegetaflon i. Successional Status ii. canopy Cond~ion

d. Educational Programs IV. SITE ORGANIZATION AND MANAGEMENT a. MasterPlan Directives b. Concept Plan

1. CoreAJea 2. Forest Reserve 3, Grassland Reserve 4. Young Woodland 5_ Riparian Corridor 6. Historic Fann Landscape 7. Residential Areas

V.INFRASTRUCTUREAND FACILITIES

a Roadway Entrance 1. Analysis 2. Proposal b. Trails 1. AgriculturalTrails 2. Mclaughlin Farm Trails 3. Ravine loop 4. Upper Field Trail 5. WidenerTrail c. Facilities 1. Discovery Courtyard 2. BulterflyHouseandMeadow 3. living Memorials Program VI. ORGANlZAllONAl STRUCTURE a. Existing Struc:ure 1. Staff 2. Membership 3. Volunteers 4. Funding

D. Recommendations VI!. PROJECT PHASING VIII. AERIAL PHOTO 2000

v. APPENDIX - Contact list


MISSION STATEMENT

Original Mission Statement: "The mission of The Schuylkill Center is to promote, through environmental education, the preservation and improvement of our natural environment by fostering appreciation, understanding and responsible use of the ecosystem; by disseminating information on current environmental issues; and by encouraging appropriate public response to environmental problems."

Land Management

Environmental Education

Educational Center

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Dislocation: Schuylkill Center for Environmental Education 20th Century


Proposed Mission Statement:

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The mission of the Schuylkill Center for Environmental Education is to promote through education and example, the preservation and understanding ofthe indigenous and diverse habitats and cultural heritage of the Philadelphia Region, especially the RoxboroughlManayunk area.

Facilities and10grams clearly linke to the education pr gram

,en1al Education ary focus which is ly linked to the site

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Integration: Schuylkill Center for Environmental Education 21 st Centruy 6


NEEDS AND GUIDING PRINCIPLES

Needs: •

Restoration ofthe landscape to a sustainable level of diversified habitats through an appropiate land management program

Integration of all facilities and programs into a unified educational program

Strengthening of cOlmections with the surrounding region

Raising of awareness and appreciation for the cultural history of the site

Development of crtieria for boundaries and for present and proposed facilities and landscape exhibits

Guiding Principles: I. Preservation and enhancement of the 500 acres Schuylkill Center property is crucial ifit is to remain a significant natural habitat within the urban setting of Philadelphia 2. Education is the primary focus of the institution. 3. The site and its management provide some ofthe most significant educational resources ofthe Schuylkill Center. 4. Restoration of the historical features of the site preserves the rich cultural heritage of Upper Roxborough.

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KEY

INSTITUTIONAL DIRECTIVES '1!'

EDUCATION 1.

Set up a system of TRAILS I OUTDOOR EXHIBITS: -highlight and demonstrate ecological relationships by utilizing themed trails which integrate education with sensory experiences and interesting journeys: I. Overview trail- allows walker to get the big picture ofthe entire site II. Historical trail- connects historical elements of site and makes explicit the III. Development of the landscape over time IV. Systems trails - themed trails related to specific systems in the landscape (aquatics, food chains, succession, restoration I disturbance) V. Accommodate various types of users (i.e. little kids, physically/mentally disabled, those not prepared for hiking) -plan for walks of different lengths of time and degrees of difficulty -create a hierarchy oftrails with several levels of access to minimize disturbance and

prevent over-use

2.

Extend the DISCOVERY ROOM I INDOOR EXHIBITS: -create an indoor/outdoor transition by extending the exhibits into a courtyard and reinforcing trail exhibits in the Discovery Room -increase the number of activities, including a gallery space for photos and artwork by children. (graciously donated cameras and film could be provided for them to record their experiences while providing documention for a database.) -provide computers for the use of smaller children

3.

Expand the BUTTERFLY HOUSE into a multi-level educational exhibit integrated with the surrounding systems and habitats of the Center

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KEY INSTITUTIONAL DIRECTIVES LAND MANAGEMENT GUIDELINES

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1.

Set up a structure for a LANDSCAPE RESTORATION PROGRAM: -delineate a protected area as a bio-reserve in the least disturbed portion of the site -disclose areas of contrast between the restored and degraded landscape for educational, motivational, and funding purposes

2.

Create LAND MANAGEMENT GUIDELINES AND TRAINING PROGRAM for the staff.

3.

Enhance AQUATIC AND WETLAND HABITATS: -locate ponds in appropriate bottomland environments and connect all wetlands into a system -design ponds with habitats that support a diversity of aquatic life -accommodate the large numbers and wide varieties of activities which take place

4.

CLARIFY VEGETATIVE PATTERNS existing on the site: -bring out agricultural pat/ems of hedgerows, fences, orchards, and mowed meadows -create a large grassland habitat for meadowlarks and other birds -retain the woodland character of the ravines and side slopes through management of exotic species

5.

The idea of FOUNDERS' GROVE can be used as an opportunity to commemorate-


KEY INSTITUTIONAL DIRECTIVES FACILITIES IMPROVEMENTS I.

Restore the RIVER HOUSE as a MUSEUM AND RESTAURANT which would be not only a source of revenue, but an educational facility as well: -the museum could pay tribute to the Schuylkill River Valley and serve as headquarters for the Schuylkill River Greenway and other local organizations -the restaurant could house an upscale dining area as well as a casual section which could be utilized as a coffeehouse and/or a bicycle rest area -the space could be rented out for catered events and meetings such as weddings

2.

Enhance the CENTRAL FACILITY to provide a richer and more interactive leaming environment: -take care of the immediate maintenance problems such as the leaking roof -set up a small cafe in the main building to enhance the visiors' experience and promote lengthier visits -integrate the Discovery Room with the adjacent outdoor courryardwhich serves as an exhibit and rest area for

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visitors

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Redesign the ENTRANCE SEQUENCE AND PARKING AREA to provide a welcoming and enticing introduction to the site: -create an entrance drive which is more expressive o/the landscape while orienting the visitor -enhance entry gates and sign to welcome visitor -integrate parking into a pedestrian friendly, inviting building entrance

4.

Set up a COMPOSTING FACILITY to manage the organic waste from the site: -utilize this facility as an environmental education tool and incorporate into the indoor/outdoor activity program

-integrate with new management policies which do not allow dumping organics in the woods

5.

Provide more SITE INFORMATION to orient and inform the visitor: -create interpretrive brochures about the site -integrate the brocures with trail map signs of the "you are here" type -create an isometric overview map of the site and its significant features

6.

Restore and utilize the surviving mSTORICAL FEATURES of the site to illustrate the development of the Roxborough and the Schuylkill River Valley: -link tlzefeatures along trails to create historical journeys through the site -preserve cultural landscape features such as architectural artifacts, hedgerow/field patterns, old orchards, and fences -provide information about historical places o/interest in the Roxborough area

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KEY INSTITUTIONAL DIRECTIVES REGIONAL CONNECTIONS 1.

Expand and improve the Center's INTERNET SITE to fully exploit this tool:

-the information about the mission, educational programs and events, and regional connections of the Center can be advertised easily to a wide audience -a database of site infonnation can be made accessible to other enviromnental centers as well as the general public -it can become an important educational tool for schools, both before and after their trips, providing continued education

-direct links to sites of other regional organizations can be provided -on-line membership subscriptions can be set up -the internet can be used to address a younger audience and solicit younger members

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2.

Initiate a program of NEIGHBORHOOD LANDSCAPING TUTORIALS for the local community: -empowering neighbors to make a difference on their O\VI1 property may provide incentive for change on a larger scale -more appropriate landscapes surrounding the Center helps create more continuous habitats around the Center -neighborhood properties could serve as residential scale demonstrations

3.

Dedicate a new section of the QUILL newsletter to address regional issues: - regional information could keep the members and the neighbors up-to-date and get them involved in issues affecting their local enviromnent -the newsletter could seek corporate sponsors interested in supporting the Center and its mission

4.

Provide an updated MAP WITH DIRECTIONS to the Schuylkill Center: -attract a broader range of visitors by enclosing infonnation on the alternative modes of transportation -include maps showing links with biking alld !liking trails in the region

5.

Consider utilizing the SHAWMONT PUMPING STATION in order to provide a closer link between the Schuylkill Center and the river: -use as a monitoring station for the collection water quality and flow data -create a boat house and another bike rest area in conjunction with the Schuylkill River Greenway

6.

Convince the Saul School to use the Fairmount Park property to PROPAGATE AND GROW INDIGENOUS PLANTS as part of an urban agriculture program: -this program could feed directly into a restoration plan for the Schuylkill Center -kids would participate in the restoratioll of their local environment while learning other valuable skills -the school could sell plants to local community gardeners, garden centers and the Center's native plant sale -nurseryipropagation program may have less impact on local groundwater quality than cattle fanning.


PREFACE a. Letter from the Director, Tracy R. Kay b.letterfrom .A.ndropogonAssociates, Ltd.

I. INTRODUCTION I ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS a.lntroduction b. Acknowledgements

c. Student List II. MISSION

a. Mission Statement b. Guiding Principles c. Key Institutional Directives

1. Education

2. Land Management 3. Facilities 4. Regional Connections

INVENTORY

III. INVENTORY AND EVALUATION a. Historical Information 1. 1938 Aerial Photo 2. 1990Aerial Photo

AND EVALUATION

b. Regional Connections c. Site Description 1. Existing Site 2. Physiogr.ophy 3. Aspect 4. Vegetation i. Successional Status Ii. Canopy Condition

d. Educational Programs IV. SITE ORGANIZATION AND MANAGEMENT

a. MasterPlan Directives b. Concept Plan 1. CoreAIea

2. Forest Reserve 3. Grassland ReselVe

4. YoungWoodland 5. Riparian Corridor

6. Historic Fann Landscape 7. Residential Areas

V.INFRASTRUCTURE AND FACILITIES a. Roadway Entrance 1. Analysis

2. Proposal b. Trails 1. AgriculturalTrai1s 2. McLaughlin Farm Trails 3. Ravine Loop 4. Upper Field Trail 5. WldenerTraiJ c. Facilities 1. Discovery Courtyard 2. ButterliyHouseandMeadow 3. Living Memorials Program

VI. ORGANIZATIONAL STRUCTURE a. Existing Structure

1. Staff 2. Membership

3. Volunteers 4. Funding b. Recommendations

VII. PROJECT PHASING VHf. AERIAL PHOTO 2000

V. APPENDIX路 Contact List


AERIAL PHOTOS

1968: - Farmland pallern along norlhern edge of Cenler's Property is clearly defined.

- Existing 路woodland is free of invasive vegetation and in relatively good heallh. - Sile is surrounded primarily by farmland.

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AERIAL PHOTOS

1990: - Fannland pattern along northern edge of Center's Property is beginning to disappear. - Hedgerows and fields are starti ng to succeed to young woodlands and woody old fields. - New development established with detention basin on Center's property adjacent to entrance road.

- Fields within forested area are reestablished as young wood lands. - Most new growth consists primarily of invasive exotic species.

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REGIONAL CONNECTIONS

LEGEND

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UNDEVELOPED LAND

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RECREATIONAL TRAIL ROUTES PROPOSED TRAIL UNKS

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HISTORIC BUILDINGS I SITES

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-STABLE Native Vegetation

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-DEGRADED No native vegetation remainM ing

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EDUCATIONAL PROGRAMS

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PREFACE

a. letter from the Director, Tracy R Kay b. Letter from Andropogon Associates, Ltd.

I. INTRODUCTION I ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS a. Introduction b.Acknowiedgements c. Student List 11. MISSION 8.

Mission Statement

b. Guiding Principles c. Key Institutional Directives 1 Education 2 land Management 3 Facilities 4_ Regional Connections III. INVENTORY AND EVALUATION 8. Historical Information 1. 1968Aerial Photo 2. 1990 Aerial Photo b. Regional Connections

SITE

c. Site Description 1. Existing Site 2. Physiography 3. Aspect

4. Vegetation

ORGANIZATION

i. Successional Status ii. Canopy Condition d. Educationa! Programs

IV. SITE ORGANIZATION AND MANAGEMENT

AND

a. Master Plan Directives

b. Concept Plan 1. CareAraa

2. Forest Reserve

MANAGEMENT

3. Grassland ReseNe

4. Historic Farm landscape S. Young Woodland

6. Riparian Corridor 7. Residential Areas V. INFRASTRUCTURE AND FACIliTIES a. Roadway Entrance 1. Analysis 2. Proposal b. Trails 1. Agricultural Trails 2. Mclaughlin Farm Trails 3. Ravine loop 4. Upper Field Trail 5. Widener Trail c. Facilities 1 Discovery Courtyard 2. Butterfly House and Meadow 3. living Memorials Program

VI. Organizational Structure a. Existing Structure 1. Staff 2. Membership 3. Volunteers 4. Funding b. Recommendations

VII. Project PhaSing Vlll. Aerial Photo 2000 v. APPENDIX路 Contact List


MASTER PLAN DIRECTIVES

The Master Plan consolidates issues that are important on the whole of the site, as well as to provide a way to pinpoint those issues that are important for each habitat of the site. The landscape at the Schuylkill Center is currently fragmented, although each of the areas possesses very distinct characteristics. The Master Plan's purpose is to restore the natural patterns

ofthe landscape and to provide a consolidated plan for maintenance and management of the site. There have been seven separate habitats identified. All of these areas possess characteristics which contribute to the uniqueness of the Center and enhance its level of diversity. Identification of these habitats becomes an educational tool helping the visitors realize the interrelationship between man and the landscape. The seven habitats are the Historic Farm

Landscape, Grassland, Forest Reserve, Young Woodland, Riparian Corridor, Residential Area and the Core Area. Each of these will be addressed separately in the following pages, with management and maintenance guidelines. The facilities are currently disjunct and unorganized. Our goal is to diminish the impact of management of exotic plant species, deer and people. The Master Plan helps to set clear management guidelines and to set priorities on management issues. The habitat preservation issues that are being addressed by the Master Plan results from looking at the best qualities of each of the habitats and focusing on the potential that each of these areas possess, working ultimately for bio-diversity on the site.

21


CONCEPT PLAN ORGANIZATIONAL CONCEPT

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Grassland Reserve

Young Woodland

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CORE AREA Management goal: Establish a core around the Center itself which conveys a common The establishment of this particular habitat will allow

theme and links program elements like the butterfly house, core educational trails, and parking.

Maintenance techniques:

the Center to begin developing a more intense centralized mission as well to concentrate management for greater efficiency. UnifYing the educational programs, core educational trails, parking areas, butterfly house and meadow into a more cohesive unit will allow the Schuylkill Center to more effectively communicate its message to

Butterfly House I Meadow The meadow could be maintained by fire which temporarily increases the pH to favor seed germination, therefore increasing the biodiversity Parking area Maintaining hedgerows between the parking areas provides a visual and protective buffer and carries the forest landscape through this area. Plant trees in some of the parking spaces to dissolve the parking into the woods, providing a nicer entry experience. Core Educational Area Reduce the turf area to minimize runoff and erosion and decrease maintenance. Maintaining a buffer strip of meadow between the building and woodland slows runoff into sensitive woodland slopes and increases infiltration. Bring native landscape edges closer to the building, cutting back on the areas that are covered with turf. Mowing the lawn at about 5 inches in height decreases maintenance time while slowing runoff.

both visitors and members. Specialized management techniques in this area would allow the Center to successfully accommodate increased usage and intense traffic.

Mossy areas around the building might be encouraged by not mowing and adding pelletized sulfur to the soil. This is only recommended where there is little foot traffic because moss will tolerate limited, but not heavy, use. Decomposing leaf litter provides the only nutrient source for vegetation, even in turf areas. Leaves should be raked only where moss is desirable. Leaves in lawn areas can be shredded at the time of mowing and allowed to decompose in place. Reduce erosion and runoff where downspouts release water by creating rough stone drainage areas to slow water.

23


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FOREST RESERVE The Forest Reserve is the area of the Schuylkill Center with least disturbance where native species dominate. However, different levels of disturbance occur here due to past land use, pollution, invasive exotics, and overbrowsing by deer. Specialized management must be implemented to prevent further damage. Restoration of the understory and ground layer characteristic of this Piedmont-Upland forest could occur in conjunction with a deer management program.

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Management goal: Encourage the development and preservation of mature forest through a policy of restricted access and habitat restoration. Maintenance guidelines: Remove all exotic vegetation and replant the gaps with native species, by promoting plant propagation, potentially joining up with Saul and Lankenau schools. Restrict trail access to pedestrians only, including trail maintenance activities, except in emergencies. Fence the boundary of the Reserve to prevent further deer damage and restore the understory and ground layers. Leave dead wood on the forest floor to encourage fungal and invertebrate populations in the soil.

Mature beech forest.


GRASSLAND RESERVE Management goal: To maintain an uninterrupted grassland area of approximately 20 acres because there are currently no other major grasslands in the Roxborough area. Schedule mowing in consultation with an area ornithologist and lepidopterist. (Bird and Butterfly specialists .)

The Center owns about 10 acres of unimpeded open grassland at its northern boundary. An adjoining field owned by Fairmount Park between the organic gardens

Mown path through meadow.

Maintenance techniques:

and the Center's existing

Remove all woody vegetation within the grassland, including trees along Hagy's Mill Road.

grassland could be managed

Maintain by mowing or burning according to the meadow maintenance guidelines with the exception that grasses are to be mowed no less than 8 - 12 inches high.

policies to increase the total

in accordance with these area to about 20 acres. This Grassland Reserve would provide a large expanse of open space which is required for certain bird species such as meadow larks. These species feel secure only in open areas where they can see predators from long distances.

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YOUNG WOODLAND The young woodlands of the Schuylkill Center help to tell the story of the site and its history. These once farmed and later "abandoned" areas have achieved some level of

Management goal: Maintain a buffer between the forest and the historic farm landscapes while 路 also accommodating the eventual expansion of the Forest Reserve as the young woodland matures. Maintenance techniques: Remove all exotic vegetation (in stages).

succession over the past 30 years. The character of these areas is unique because they are mostly single species, even aged "pole" stands. These woodlands are maintained as a buffer or transition area between meadows and

The dead wood should be left on the floor of the Forest to encourage fungal decomposition of the organic material. Debris of the exotic vegetation should be burned to destroy seeds. Disturbance of all woodland areas should be minimized to prevent opportunities for exotics to take hold. This includes trampling, even for maintenance activities.

the Forest Reserve.

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Stratified young woods.


RIPARIAN CORRIDOR Management goal: Protect wetland habitats which express the qualities of the bottomland by providing a buffer between human activity and the streambanks.

The site is basically com-

Maintenance techniques:

stream valleys. Maintaining a

Re-vegetate streambanks and wetlands to stabilize banks.

riparian corridor is essential

Remove all exotic vegetation.

posed of three ridges and two

to the health of these fragile systems. Appropriate man-

Vehicles are prohibited in these areas .

agement techniques will

Bridges and boardwalks should be constructed over wet areas to protect soils from compaction and erosion while allowing unimpeded water flow.

protect these areas from erosion and the resulting exotic vegetation invasion.

Stream at the Schuylkill Centel:

28


HISTORIC FARM LANDSCAPE Management goal: To maintain the historic farmMost of the upland areas throughout the Schuylkill Center and the surrounding region were farmland at one time. Upon

land character of linear hedgerows, open meadows, woody old fields , and orchards.

Maintenance techniques: Linear hedgerows: Prune creeping hedgerows back to a linear planting of stratified vegetation and remove exotic vegetation.

entering the Center, one can see the remnants of these farming activities where hedgerows now border once tilled land. To revitalize and maintain these historic landscapes would allow the Center to begin telling the story of the region 's past.

Open meadows: Mow or burn herbaceous plants at the beginning of each spring to revitalize and maintain grasses and flowering herbaceous vegetation. Mow once a year. Mowing should not take place if the ground is wet. There are two possible mowing tirnes. Ideally, mowing should take place in the Spring, while the ground is still frozen. This allows the dry stems to remain standing during the winter, giving the meadow more texture and interest while providing winter food for birds. Mowing may also take place in the Fall, afterthe grasses have set seed and before they go into dormancy (after Halloween). If a second mow is required , it should be in mid-summer around the 4 th of July when the ground nesting bird season is over. Burning should be done in the Summer. However, to prevent uncontrollable fires, Spring may be more appropriate time. Firebreaks should be created with grass paths and sand breaks. Varying the burning time, fire temperature, and spatial patterns encourages species diversity.

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Old fields: Identify management goal for individual fields and selectively remove woody vegetation for aestheticqualities or wildlife cover and food. Removal can be done by hand, by seasonal mowing, or both. Orchards: Prune each year in late winter to promote new growth and remove dead and diseased wood . Maintain undergrowth according to mowing regimen for meadows. Maintain woodland boundaries to prevent encroachment. 'z:J

Hedgerow example.


RESIDENTIAL AREAS Management goal: Establish a working relationship with surrounding neighbors to foster the development of a common landscape vision.

Privately owed properties exist within and on the boundaries of

Maintenance guidelines: Offer tutorials for neighbors about appropriate landscape management practices for their residential properties.

the Center's property. These landscapes seem out of context and are maintained in ways that may have detrimental effects on the habitat ofthe Schuylkill Center. It is imperative that the Schuylkill Center create positive dialogues with its neighbors

Layered f orest edge.

to develop common goals concerning environmental and aesthetic issues and it is therefore an opportunity for the Center to demonstrate better home landscaping for forest restoration.

Hedgerow at property edge.

30


PREFACE a.letterfrom the Director, Tracy R Kay b. LetterfromAndropogonAssoclates, ltd.

I. INTRODUCTION I ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS a. Introduction b. Acknowledgements

c. Student Ust II. MISSION

a. Mission Statement b. Guiding Principles c. Key Institutional Directives 1. Education 2. land Management 3. Facilities

4. Regional Connections III. INVENTORY AND EVALUATION a. Historicallnforrnation 1. 1968Aerial Photo 2. 1990AeriaiPhoto

INFRASTRUCTURE

b. Regional Connections c. Site Description

1. Existing Site

2. Physiogfaphy 3.~

AND

4. Vegetation 1. Successional Status if. Canopy Condition

d. Educational Programs IV. SITE ORGANIZATlONAND MANAGEMENT

FACILITIES

a. Master Plan Directives b. Concept Plan 1. Core Area

2. Forest Reserve 3. Grassland Reserve

4. YoungWoodlanci S. Riparian Corridor 6. Historic Farm Landscape 7. ResicientialAreas

b. Trails 1. AgriculturalTrai!s 2. Mclaughlin Farm Trails

3. Ravine Loop 4. UpperFieldTrai! 5, Widener Trail c. Facilities 1. DiscoveryCourtyard

2. Butterfly House and Meadow 3. Living Memorials Program

VI. Organizational Structure a Existing Structure 1. Staff 2. Membership 3. Vo!uoteeJs 4. Funding

b. Recommendatioos VII. Project Phasing

VIlI. Aerial Photo 2000

v. APPENDIX - Contact List


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PREFACE a. Letterfrom the Director, Tracy R Kay b.letterfromAndropogon Associates,ltd. I. INTRODUCTION I ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS a. Introduction b. Acknowledgements c. Student List

II. MISSION a. Mission Statement

b. Guiding Principles c. Key institutional Directives 1. Education 2- land Management 3. Facilities 4. Regional Connections

III. INVENTORY AND EVALUATION a. Historical Information 1. 1968 Aerial Photo

INFRASTRUCTURE

2. 1990AerialPhoto b. Regional Connections c. Site Description 1. Existing Site

2. Physiography 3.Aspect 4. Vegetation i. Successional Status

AND

ii Canopy Condition d. Educational Programs

IV. SITE ORGANIZATION AND MANAGEMENT a Master Plan Directives b. Concept Plan

FACILITIES

1. CoreAtea

2. Forest Reserve 3. Grassland Reserve 4.YoungWoodland 5. Riparian Corridor 6. Historic Farm Landscape

7. Residential Areas

V.INFRASTRUCTUREAND FACILITIES a Roadway Entrance 1. Analysis 2. Proposal

C. Facilities

1. Discovery Courtyard 2. 8utterl!y House and Meadow 3. living Memorials Program

VI. Organizational Structure a. Existing Structure 1. Staff 2 Membership 3. Volunteers 4. Funding b. Rerommendations

VII. Project Phasing VIII. Aerial Photo 2000 v. APPENDIX路 Contact list


AGRICULTURAL TRAILS Mileage: 1.7 miles Time: approx. 2 hrs

OBJECTIVES: •

Reveal the story of both the Scbuylkill Center's and the surrounding region's past by exposing visitors to the nature of farming and agricultural life through the display of cultural artifacts and historic land use

Narrative: These trails will reveal the history of agricultural land use in this region. The visitor may understand vegetative patterns indicative of the farm landscape with features such as freestanding hedgerows, "lone wolf" trees (that may have been used by farmers for their cattle), old orchards and historic fa rm fields. The trails wind through these features giving the visitor a chance to experience expansive views of the open, sunny, wind blown meadows and the dark and quiet Larch plantations. The Agricultural Trails also allow access to farm ruins including old wells and left over walls . One trail also extends to the edge of the grassland reserve where there is ample habitat for grassland birds and other wildlife species.

Management: • •

patterns.

Provide a point of access for

Lankanau High School. • •

Allow visitors to experience

the rectilinear spaces made by the hedgerows and meadows with the c10sing and opening views of this landscape.

33

Mow trails within the meadows to a width of 25' and a minimum height of 2% to 3". Mow meadows once a year in the spring before the ground thaws, thereby leaving the grasses long and flowing during the winter months. Prune the remaining tree s of the historic orchards for form and health. Remove water sprouts, crossing branches, and dead or diseased wood . Maintain the ruin walls as cultural artifacts. This includes: - removing vegetation which may be speeding their decay. - possible restoration of the ruin walls. - covering well and basement openings for safety purposes.

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McLAUGHLIN FARM TRAIL Mileage: .3 miles Time:l0 to 60 mins

OBJECTIVES:

Provide a condensed educational experience that is easily accessed and studied within a specific time requirement. especially for smaller children and first time visitors to the Center. Expose visitors to cultural artifacts indicative of past farming and cultural land

Narrative: Entering from the Center, the trail will wind its way down the slope to the McLaughlin Farm ruins. In front of the spring house a proposed pond illustrates the historic function of the original spring house while providing an aquatic habitat to study. The disturbed landscape around the ruins could be a place for interpretation and restoration. This trail is designed to provide an educational experience for small children and first time users of the site. It encourages them to engage the different types of habitats along the way. They are exposed to water, vegetation and historic ruins, all of which provide both a hands-on leaming experience, but a chance to start to see natural processes as well.

Management: •

Clean up the vines along the trail and provide edge buffers of grasses between the road and the forest.

The trail has been graded already, but requires cleaning up and possibly some pruning of vegetation.

Reconstruct stone retaining walls.

Redesign and replace stairs to other trails and slopes.

uses.

• •

Allow access to the Forest Reserve. Restore relic farm road to replace two flanking trails.

VIEWS OF EXISTING TRAIL

35


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RAVINE LOOP Mileage: 1.3 miles Time: 1. 5 hours

OBJECTIVES: •

Provide an experience of the

two ravines, streams, and ridges, which are the basic topographic elements of the Center's property. •

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Provide a trail which will target younger users by providing a longer more rigorous trail. Allow visitors to see the larger connections of the Schuylkill River and Center City from the ridge at River House.

Narrative: The Ravine Loop Trail begins atthe Upper Fields Trail and at the Springhouse Pond. It continues around the wetlands and next to the stream. Exposed areas of the schist are found here. The visitor moves by the historic barn site, the back of the River House where there are long views to a large rock outcrop, Center City, and the Schuylkill River. The trail continues back into the woods, taking advantage of an old farm road along the ridge where there are expansive views across the northern ravine. The steep slopes should provide a feeling of adventure for the visitors, especially teenagers. The trail carries visitors across the stream to the Mill House where there is a relic trout pond and historic ruins. The visitor then winds back up the hill, and returns to the lower parking area and the Center' entrance.

Management: •

Remove vines and other exotics from the area.

To prevent erosion along the steepest part of the tratl zones between the trail and the forest edge.

Clean up the area behind and around the River vines and exotic plant species.


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UPPER FIELD TRAIL Mileage: .5 miles Time:approx. 30 mins

OBJECTIVES:

Provide access to the Butterfly House from the Center and foster appreciation for the surrounding butterfly habitat.

Capitalize on the views which situate the visitor in relation to Center City.

Provide access to Polliwog Pond.

Provide a connection hetween the McLaughlin Trail and the Ravine Loop.

Connect to the River House through the Forest Reserve.

39

Narrative: The trail will start from the Center and takes the visitor through a woodland of Tulip Poplars through which the meadow beyond may be seen. Upon reaching the meadowthe visitor gets wonderful views across the sloping meadow. These views provide the visitor with a context and sense of place by allowing them to see the city. Immediately after reaching the far end of the field, the trail splits. The path to the right leads one down toward the Schuylkill River and joins the Ravine! Adventure Trail. This path also serves as a connection between the Center and the River House. The second path which leads to the left, is used for longer educational tours for both the visitors and young school children. The Upper Fields Trail also serves as a barrier- free accessible entrance to the Butterfly House and an educational loop appropriate for short visits.

Management: •

Periodic mowing of the 2S'wide trail to a height no less than 2 Yz to 3" will allow access while minimizing site damage.


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WIDENER TRAIL Mileage: .9 miles Time: approx. 1 hour

OBJECTIVES: •

Provide a "barrier-free" accessible trail which traverses a variety of different habitat.

To incorporate the existing trail into a larger and more interactive loop.

Provide interesting experiences for all trail users while allowing those with disabilities to access a larger portion of the site.

41

Narrative: The trail will utilize the entrance to the existing Widener Trail. The visitor will be led away from the Forest Reserve into a young woodland where the mixed deciduous canopy layer and stratified understory give way to dense stands of evenly aged trees such as Aspen, Tulip Poplar and Sassafras. Once through the young woodland , the visitor is led through a series of habitats from a gently sloping, south facing "bowl", to the edge of a woody old field, and eventually to a bird·blind overlooking the field at the entrance to the Center. From there, one is turned directly into the heart of a silent, calm, and dark Pine plantation where the light defines the boundary between inside and outside the grove. The Widener Trail will eventually lead back along a hedgerow between a field and a young woodland where there will be ample opportunities to experience the spaces along, inside, and through the hedgerow. The trail then connects back on itself, returning the visitor to the Center.

Management: •

The existing asphalt road and curb will be replaced with another surface that creates a barrier-free trail, and has less vi sual impact. Some suggestions include porous paving and soil cement.


PREFACE a. Letterfrom the Director, Tracy R. Kay b. Letterfrom AndropogonAssociales, Ltd.

I. INTRODUCTION I ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS a.lntroduction b. Acknowfedgements

c. Student Ust II. MISSION

8. Mission Statement b. Guiding Principles

c. Key Institutional Directives 1. Education 2. land Management 3. Facilities 4. Regional Connections

III. INVENTORY AND EVALUATION a. Historicalinfonnation

1. 1968AerialPhoto

INFRASTRUCTURE AND

2. 1990AerialPhoto b. Regional Connections c. Site Description

1. Existing Site 2. Physiography

3. Aspect 4. Vegetation i. Successional Status if. CanopyConditfon d. Educational Programs IV. SITEORGANlZATION AND MANAGEMENT

FACILITIES

a. MasterPlan Directives b. Concept Plan 1. Core Area 2. Forest ReselVe 3. Grassland Reserve

4. Young Woodland 5. Riparian Corridor 6. HistoricFann landscape

7. Residential Areas

~INFRASTRUCTUREAND

FACILITIES 8. Roadway Entrance 1. Analysis 2. Proposal b. Trails 1. Agricultural Trails 2. McLaughlin Farm Trails

3 Ravine Loop

4. UpperFieldTran 5. WidenerTrai!

VI. Organizational Structure 8. Existing Structure

1 Staff 2. Membership

3. Volunteers 4. Funding b. Recommendations VII. Project Phasing VIII. Aerial Photo 2000 V. APPENDIX - Contact list


DISCOVERY COURTYARD This area will serve as an outdoor extension of the Discovery Room that will:

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- Exhibit the stratifiedforest character which was indicative of the Schuylkill Center's forest before overbrowsing by deer. - Utilize indigenous species which were historically present at the Schuylkill Center.

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BUTTERFLY HOUSE Through talking with the Center's staff and investigating several alternatives, we are proposing to site the Butterfly House and accompanying meadow habitat at the edge of the Upper Field, across from the maintenance building. We chose this site for several reasons: 1. Integrating the Butterfly House into a natural system reflects the educational mission of the center, creating a relationship between the butterflies and their natural habitat.

2. It is the largest existing meadow that connects immediately to the Forest Reserve, focusing attention on maintaining a section of the reserve which can be restored.

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4. Proposed short loop paths contain concentrated experiences that are reflected in the longer paths around the site. The placement of the Butterfly House would put it next to the Bio-reserve while allowing easy visitor access via the short loop paths. 5. The Butterfly House could be permanent, multiple purpose facility, thereby utilizing staff time and operational costs more efficiently. For example, using it as a propagation facility for meadow species which attract butterfl ies for future meadow planting.

45


LIVING MEMORIALS PROGRAM OPERATIONAL DIRECTIVES:

DESIGN GIDDELINES:

The donations and their markers must be in alignment to the Center's Mission Statement concerning enviromnental preservation and education.

Restoration projects, such as the improvement of specific protected habitats could be commemorated when funded from donations.

The commemorative interventions must aid the iroprovement and restoration of the site.

The creation of such features as the Discovery Room Courtyard could become popular commemorative projects.

All the trees planted in the commemorative areas, as well as any herbaceous and understory plants, must be native to the Schuylkill Valley. Specific areas of the forest could be fenced in to provide for the establishment and reproduction of the multiple layers of vegetation. The memorials funded by the donors should be sited in appropriate multiple locations throughout the Center's property, rather than concentrating in one place.

Funding of commissions for artist-made landscape elements such as gates delineating different landscapes, including a new entrance gate could also prove to be a successful idea. A ready-to-mail pamphlet, describing possible restoration projects and site areas available for adopting as a commemorative intervention, as well as a list of desired plant species, should be organized in order to facilitate with the rise and the subsequent creation of these interventions. The names of the donors and the specific projects sponsored by them could be listed in the pamphlet.

THE EXISTING GROVE: The exotic species currently planted in the Founders Grove could be moved to a designated area at the River House where their ornamental characteristics would be more in keeping with the scenic quality of the place. Those trees in the existing Founders Grove which are too large to transplant would remain there, gracefully joining the surrounding area

"RIIl!I The intent of the Living Memorials Program is to generate donations for the restoration of the site and to commemorate these with visible markers in the landscape. It is a powerful idea with a potential of creating strong links between people, the site and the Center's environmental message. The character and placement of the existing Founder's Grove does not seem to reflect this goal. Instead, it is a high-maintenance, park-like environment filled with exotic vegetation, which does not reinforce the Schuylkill Center's mission. As we learned from our interviews, the Grove does not seem to be utilized as the contemplative refuge that it was intended to become. In order to improve, and to fully benefit from it, we are putting forward the following suggestions concerning the Founder's Grove for your consideration and comments. 46


MEMORIAL GATES

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Gates could be designed and constructed by commissioned artists with particular habitats in mind. These gates could serve several functions: - Individually crafted gates could mark specific habitat restoration projects - Gates constructed at specific entry points along the boundaries of the Schuylkill Center send an important message to neighbors and visitors that they are welcome and that they are entering a special place.

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PREFACE a.lelterfrom lhe Director, Tracy R. Kay b. Letterfrom AIldropogon Associates, ltd.

I. INTRODUCTION I ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS a. Introduction b. Acknowledgements

c. Student list II. MISSION a. Mission Statement b. Guiding Principles c. Key Institutional Directives 1. Education 2. land Management 3. Facilities

4. Regional Connections

ORGANIZATIONAL STRUCTURE

nr.INVENTORYAND EVALUATION a. Historical Information 1. 1968 Aerial Photo 2. 1990 Aerial Photo b. Regional Connections c. Site Description 1. Existing Site 2- Physiography 3.Asped 4. Vegetation i. Successional Status ii. Canopy Condition d. Educational Programs IV. SITE ORGANIZATION ANO MANAGEMENT a. Master Plan Directives

b. Concept Plan 1. Core Area

2. Forest Reserve 3. Grassland Reserve

4. Young Woodland

5. Riparian Corridor 6. Historic Farm Landscape 7. Residential Areas V.1NFRASTRUCTUREAND FACILITIES

a. RoadYJay Entrance 1. Analysis

2. Proposal b. Trails 1. AgrlculturalTrai!s 2. MclaughiinFa1lTlTraiJs 3. Ravine Loop 4. Upper Field Trail S.1NidenerTrail c. Facilities Discovery Courtyard 2. Butterfly House and Meadow 3. Living Memorials Program

VI. ORGANIZATIONAL STRUCTURE a. Existing Structure 1. Staff 2. Membership 3. Volunteers 4. Funding b. Recommendations VII. PROJECT PHASING VIII. AERIAL PHOTO 2000

V. APPENDIX - Contact List


EXISTING STRUCTURE 1. Existing staff "The Schuylkill Center's extensive programming is conducted by a diverse staff including an executive director,

a director of Education, three environmental educators, a director of finance and administration, a developmental officer, a graphic artist, a bookstore manager, a land manager, a resource specialist, a wildlife rebabilitation, interns and two secretaries."

2. Cnrrent Membership: The total number of members is estimated at 1,800. The Schuylkill Center's projected goal is to raise membership to about 6,000. A membership survey from 101 respondents pointed out some of the problems that need to be addressed to raise membership support, the number of members who are actually utilizing the Center's activities or even visiting the site, and the times of the visits these are occurring. The membership survey also indicated that only 17% of those who responded actually come the site. This membership survey also indicated that the most popular times to visit the Center are weekday evenings, and weekend mornings and afternoons. At the present time the Center's hours are Monday through Saturday 8:30 AM to 5:00 PM and Sunday I :00 PM to 5:00 PM.

AGE 15 and Under 16- 20 21-30 31- 40 40- 50 51- 60 61-70 70+ Total

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# of Membership Response

% of Membership Response

0 0 3 7 28 17

0 0 3.9 9.1 36.3 22.l 14.3 14.3 100

11 11 77


3. Volunteers "Volunteers play an important role in helping The Center meet its ever changing needs. Volunteers have the opportunity to participate in The Center's programs in a variety of ways. The most important of these is the teaching of school children. Other areas in which The Center needs volunteer assistance include helping with library work, hosting special events, assisting at the Wildlife Rehab Center, and preparing exhibits and other public relations materials." The following programs have volunteer opportunities: Education Special Events Photography Natural History! Birding Business Administration

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ADMINISTRATIVE RECOMMENDATIONS New Staff The Master Plan involves an ambitious program of restoration and management that cannot be accomplished without adding to the existing staff. It is important. for example, to have a special position solely for the purpose of habitat restoration, separating it from the task of facilities management. This individual can work with volunteers and eventually additional crew members who are guided by and work towards achieving the goals of the new Master Plan. The new positions would be as follows: Habitat Restoration Specialist Additional crew members River House Management and staff - There may be the option of a partnership or leasing arrangement where the renovation is accomplished by allowing a long- term lease.

Expanded Membership METHODS: Increase participation in the Center's events and further utilize the facilities. Attract a new population of young members to insure a Membership base. Increase the hours of operation to accommodate the members who would like to visit the site during early morning and late afternoon hours. There can also be programs such as special early hours a few times a week for birdwatchers. Some of the major changes and suggestions that the Master Plan offers will provide excellent opportunities to attract new membership. The changes will be structured to accommodate and encourage community involvement.

Community participation will begin to create a sense of belonging to the Schuylkill Center while helping to realize the potential of the new Master Plan.

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Increase the visibility of the site and make it about the programs and activities that are being offered by making them readily accessible. TIIECENTER COULD INCREASE ITS VISIBlLITYBY: New entry road, signage and edge management the River House Restaurant/Museum Bike Route Butterfly House and Meadow Landscape seminars for neighbors Raising its profile through participation in and sponsorship of community/regional

:1*;&82&

~

events and conferences Watching/participating in controlled burns ofthe meadows Renovation of Core Area landscape with major clean-up and consolidation of maintenance activities.

Volunteers Increasing volunteer participation requires an investtnent by the Center for generating interest, empowering people. getting projects accomplished, and educating a larger community. TIIEFOLLOWING VOLUN1EERPROGRAMS COULD BEADDED:

Maintenance: Vine removal Trail maintenance Carpentry, masonry, specialized projects Historic Ruin Preservation - Possibly connect with the Departtnent of Historic Preservation at the University of Pennsylvania. Replanting / Restoration Cultural: Guides and Story Tellers Fundraising: Outreach The Center can ask Members to participate in these activities or to gain membership by promoting these activities.

Funding: Corporate sponsorship of the Quill to subsidize production of the newsletter Sponsorship of projects and activities Increased Public Relations Grants

Donations for specific projects - time, money, or materials

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ORGANIZATIONAL

STRUCTURE

EXISTING STRUCTURE

ENDOWNMENTS

GRANTSIOONATIONS WILDLIFE REHABILITATION

CENTER

AUDITORIUM & CLASSROOMS

I

I

EVENTS

FOUNDERS

FALL FEST

OFFICERS

WINTER FEST

BOARD OF TRUSTEES

FRIENDS & FELLOWS

ADVISORY COMMITEE

I HALLOWEEN HIKES I

TEACHER WORKSHOP

STAFF

CAMFIRES &

SPECIAL TEACHER

RESOURCES

EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR

HAYRIDES

SKY PARTIES

BEAVER COLLEGE

I

GIFTUST

GIFT SHOP

DIRECTOR OF EDUCATION

COURSE MEMBERSHIP LAND MANAGEMENT BUILDING

EARTH JOURNEYS

STORY BOOK STROLL RIVER HOUSE

,

ENVIRONMENTAL EDUCATORS

i DIRECTOR OF FINANCE AND ADM1NISTRAllON BIRTHDAY PARTIES

FOUNDER'S GROVE BIRDSEED SALES ,HISTORIC FEATURES!

TRAilS

BOOKSTORE MANAGER

i BIRD BLINDS

LAND MANAGER RESOURCE SPECIALIST .m~'

,~~~~,

..

~"

.~

.....".

2 SECRETARIES

INTERNS VOLUNTEERS

53


I

ORGANIZATIONAL

STRUCTURE PROPOSED ORGANIZATION EDUCATION

EVENTS FALL FEST COMPUTERS

TRAVELLING CLASSES TEACHER WORKSHOP

GiFTlrS~ AUDITORIUM & CLASSROOMS

lAND MANAGEMENT BUILDING

SPECIAL TEACHER RESOURCES

SKY PARTIES

BEAVER COLLEGE COURSE

EARTH JOURNEYS

ENVIRONMENTAL EDUCATORS

DIRECTOR OF FINANCE AND ADMINISTRATION

ALL EDUCATIONAL PROGRAMS ARE DRIVEN BY THE MISSION STATEMENT AND MANAGMENT OBJECTIVE

54


PHASING DIAGRAMS PHASE I: SHORT TERM PRIORITIES - Construct new entrance drive - Hire restoration specialist - Establish and begin to restore forest reserve - Clean core area and consolidate maintenance facilities - Develop core trails McLaughlin and Upper Field - Bring deer population under control - Establish working relationships with neigh bors and community organizations - Increase volunteer base and commence member

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PHASING DIAGRAMS PHASE II: MID-TERM PRIORITIES - Construct parking lot with new entrance courtyard and Discovery Courtyard - Restore Historic Farm Landscape and develop Agricultural Trails - Construct Grassland Reserve - Remove exotics from Young Woodlands - Restore Riparian Corridors - Construct new Widener Trail

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PHASEITI: LONG-TERM PRIORITIES - Continue to follow maintenance plan - Restore and develop River House and Living Memorial Program - Establish Greenwayl Bike Trail connections - Enlarge and plant retention basin and Wind Dance Pond as diverse habitats - Maintain optimal deer population - Never sell any property

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PREFACE a. le!terfrom the Director, Tracy R Kay

b.letterfromAndropogon Associates, Ud. I. INTRODUCTION I ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS a. Introduction b. Acknowledgements

c. Student List II. MISSION 3. Mission Statement b. Guiding Principles c. Keylnstitutiona! Directives 1. Education 2. Land Management

3. Facilities 4. Regional Connections

AERIAL

Ill. INVENTORY AND EVALUATION 8. Historicallnfonnation 1. 1968 Aerial Photo

2. 1990 Aerial Photo b. Regional Connections c. Site Description

PHOTO 2000

1. Existing Site 2. Physiography 3. Aspect 4. Vegetation i. Successional Status iI. Canopy Condition d. Educational Programs IV. SITE ORGANIZATION AND MANAGEMENT a. MasterPlan Directives b. Concept Plan 1. CoreAtea 2. Forest Reserve 3. Grassland Reserve 4. YoungWoodland 5. Riparian Corridor 6. Historic Farm Landscape 7. Residential Areas V.INFRASTRUCTURE AND FACILITIES a. Roadway Entrance 1. Analysis 2. Proposal b. Trails 1. Agricultural Trai\s 2. Mclaughlin Farm Trails 3. Ravine loop 4. Upper Field Trail 5. WidenerTrail

c. Facilities 1 Discovery Courtyard 2. ButterHy House and Meadow

3. Living Memorials Program VI. ORGANIZATIONAL STRUCTURE a. Existing Structure 1. Staff 2. Membership 3. Volunteers 4. Funding b. Recommendations VII. PROJECT PHASING

V. APPENDiX - Contact list


AERIAL PHOTOS

2000: - Fannland pattern along northern edge of Center's Property is restored to clearly illustrate site's past uses. - Forest reserve consists of mature species with no invasive exotic species.

- New entry road along top of ridge provides overview of the transition from farmland to young woodlands to forest reserve. - New arrivallparkiog sequence provides more clearly defined entry experience. - Maintenance complex behind Schuylkill Center provides definitive boundaries for storage of equipment and materials. - Butterfly house situated at top of upper field serves as both study habitat and entry gate to core trail areas. - Fire pond and Wind dance pond are increased in size to provide more dramatic wetland habitat experiences.

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PREFACE a.letterfrom the Director, Tracy R. Kay b. letter from Plndropogon Associates, Ltd.

I. INTRODUCTION I ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

a.introduction b. Acknowledgements c. Student Ust

II. MISSION a. Mission Statement b. Guiding Principles c. Key Institutional Directives

1. Education 2. Land Management 3. Facilities 4. Regional Connections

APPENDIX

Ill. INVENTORY AND EVALUAnON a. Historicailnfonnation 1. 1958AerialPhoto 2. 1990 Aerial Photo b. Regional Connections

c. Site Description 1. Existing Site 2. Physiography 3. Aspect 4. Vegetation i. Successional Status Ii. Canopy Condition d. EducatiOnal Programs IV. SITE ORGANIZATION AND MANAGEMENT a MasterPlan Directives

b. Concept Plan 1. Core Area

2. Forest Reserve 3. Grassland Reserve 4. YoungWoodland 5. Riparian Corridor 6. Historic Farm Landscape 7. ResidentiaiAreas V.INFRASTRUCTURE AND FACILITIES a Roadway Entrance 1. Analysis 2. Proposal b. Trails 1. AgriculturalTrails

2. McLaugh!lnFarmTrai!s 3. RavineLoop 4. UpperFleldTrai! 5. WidenerTrai! c. Facilities 1. Disoovel)'Courtyard 2. Butterfly House and Meadow 3. Living Memorials Program Vl ORGANIZATIONAL STRUCTURE

a. Existing Structure 1. Staff 2. Membership 3. Volunteers 4. Funding b. Recommendatiorls VII. PROJECT PHASING V!!l AERIAl PHOTO 2000


CONTACT LIST

'E.Ei ........ l l£hiiJ&.•JillIX . L. : _

The Schuylkill Center for Environmental Education 8480 Hagy's Mill Road Philadelphia PA 19128 (215) 482-7300 Fax: (215) 482-8158 scee@erols.com STAFF Tracy Kay Eileen Bedara Amanda Booth Andrew Brundage Claire Holmes Andy James Holly Kadis AI Kaufmann Carol Magers Crystal Nardone Trish O'Connell Barbara Schaeffer Katie Shepard Karen Spottiswood Joan Squadrito Bob Tomassioni Gayle Whittle Eddie Williams

Board of Trustees Executive Director Business and Finance Director Environmental Educator Development and Membership Services Director Executive Secreta ry Land Manager Bookstore Director EcoVan driver Graphic Artist Resource Specialist Wildlife Rehabilitation Center Director (215) 482-8217 Weekend Receptionist Education, Quill Editor Education Director Receptionist Custodian Environmental Educator Land Management Assistant

John A. Affleck Dennis P. Capella Mrs. Carl S. Cross Thomas F. Daubert Caroline Farr Mrs. B Graeme Frazier, IV Susan J. Hadden Charles T. Lee III Mrs. George J. Lincoln, III Robert L. McNeil, III Henry H. Meigs William E. Mifflin Mrs. James S. Morris Franklin T. Osgood, Jr. George M. Riter, Esq. Raymond W. Rose, Ph.D. L. Scott Schultz Thomas S. Stewart Clifford S. Swain, Esq. Mrs. John Unland William G. Walkup Kent Willing, III

Neighbors Chris McCabe Susan Hadden Chuck Hetzel

Neighbor (Naturalist) Neighbor 150 Spring Lane hetzel@auhs.edu

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Landscape master plan schuylkill center  
Landscape master plan schuylkill center