Page 1

03/27/08

'own founder,:

Hudson Land Co., Inc. 4171 Pike Road Montaomery. AL 96064 9340215.1551

Urban Villages, Inc. 1530 16th Street 6th Floor Denver, CO 80202 720.904.0928

02008 Dover. Kohl & Parlll8r1


, OUR VISION:

HUDSON LAND CO., INC. town founders I.

.\

Chris Hudson Fitz Hudson Meriwether Morris Will Hudson

Hudson fosters connections among people, and re-engagement with the natural world . We embody the very best principles and practices of Sustainable Urbanism to honor and integrate nature, local culture , and the built environment. Through everyday experiences at Hudson , residents create a dynamic spirit of place and community.

URBAN VILLAGES, INC. town founders Stina Johnson

Nick Koncilja Grant McCargo Tom McCargo Nick Murray

Frost Rollins Andy Schlauch

-- Hudson Land Co. / Urban Vii/ages

PROJECT TEAM:

03/27/08

ANDROPOGON ASSOCOOES, LTD.

DOVER, KOHL & PARTNERS

JEFF SPECK, AICP

landscape architecture

town planning

Chad Adams Carol Franklin Colin Franklin

town planning / development advisor

Victor Dover

AUBURN UNIVERSITY, SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE architecture / landscape architecture Siping Chen

Joe Kohl Dan Banks Edward Castillo James Dougherty Amy Groves Andrew Zitofsky

Scott Finn

town founder.:

Hudson Land Co., Inc. Urban Villages, Inc.

LILA FILMS video documentary Deborah Fryer

MILESBRAND branding

Michael Robinson Joao Miguel Andres Xavier

ECOS

Jackie Benson

placemaking

CHAEL, COOPER & ASSOCOOES, INC.

Seth Frankel Michelle Wolf

David Miles Oliver Miles Matt Thompson

GOODWYN, MILLS & CAWOOD

SOTTILE AND SOTTILE

architecture Marice Chael

CMTECH, INC. sustainable design / civil engineering

local civil engineering

architecture

Galen Thackston Max Vaughn

Christian Sottile

HALL PLANNING & ENGINEERING, INC

ZIMMERMAN I YOLK ASSOCOOES, INC.

Tony Sease

Page 2

02008 Dover, Kohl & Partners

transportation planning

housing analysis

Rick Hall Tracy Hegler

Todd Zimmerman


INTRODUCTION

TOWN FOUNDERS CORE VALUES;

The Hudson site, located in eastern Montgomery, Alabama, is formed by several parcels of land totaling approximately 2100 acres. It is immediately adjacent to Pike Road, an important north-south road connection running through the City, Montgomery County, and Town of Pike Road. The recently adopted City of Montgomery Smartcode promotes the development of the property as a new community consisting of a series of neighborhoods which follow a set of prescribed rules based on traditional neighborhood design (TND). The Smartcode proposes that new communities be compact, pedestrian-oriented, and mixed-use, in contrast to the single-use conventional suburban development which is prevalent in eastern Montgomery. Creating whole neighborhoods and towns, rather than pockets of suburban development, is a vital step towards creating a sustainable development footprint.

1. Taking the Long View

From June 20 - 28, 2007, a design charrette was held to plan the future of the Hudson site A team of town planners, landscape architects, architects, transportation and civil engineers, and marketing and "lifemaking" experts were assembled by the town founders, Hudson Land Co., Inc. and Urban Villages, Inc. The Hudson Family is a fourth generation Montgomery family; Jerry Hudson began assembling the current property as a cattie and horse ranch in 1973. Urban Villages, founded by Grant and Tom McCargo, is a real estate investment and development group based in Denver, Colorado. Their organization has a multi-generational outlook, and embraces timeless design, long-term investment horizons, and environmentally responsible building practices. The following Guiding Principles and Core Values were presented by the founders at the commencement of the charrette, to direct and inspire the work of the project team.

The planning, design, and construction of Hudson is anticipated to last for generations. The founders are committed to staying involved and doing right by the land; realizing that extensive front end planning is key to long term success, they have assembled an interdiSCiplinary team of national experts in their fields to create the plan for the future.

2. Caring for the Land A deep knowledge and understanding of the site will serve as the foundation for planning and design. The best thinking and sustainable development practices will drive deSign, build-out, and long-term functioning of the community. More than half of the acreage will be conserved for open space and natural areas. The preservation and enhancement of distinctive "landmarks" such as trees, hollows, hedgerows, barns, and fences will maintain the site's unique character.

3. Reconnecting People to Nature Planning and design of the new town will provide for easy access to natural areas and multiple opportunities to experience nature. Aspects of the sites's rural feel and use will be maintained, blending the soul of the place with the soul of the people. PrinCiples, codes, and regulations will allow for and encourage unstructured and un-programmed play and creativity in natural areas, along trails and in the many unbuilt neighborhood "edges" and connectors.

4. Embracing the Broader Community The design of entrances and edges will be inviting for nonresidents; public events will create a presence in the collective memory of the eastern Montgomery community. Local culture and traditions will serve as a basis for all aspects of the project, including design and amenity selection. Land use decisions on the site will be crafted with respect to local conditions, as well as with a broader regional ecosystem context.

B ue Ridge

03/27/08 J/~

5. Creating a Model Sustainable Community Development Hudson should be recognized as a precedent nationally and internationally. The timeless vernacular design of the Montgomery river region, planned to be replicated on the site, is intrinsically sustainable. Low environmental impact design treatments such as high density living areas and light imprint infrastructure will be utilized. The plan should be adaptable, to accommodate future uses and an evolving community vision.

• .~

'own founder.: Montgomery

Hudson Land Co., Inc. Urban Villages, Inc.

Page 3

02008 Dover. Kohl" Partner.


HOW THIS PLAN WAS CREATED

BIG IDEAS:

Upon arrival the design team began its task with tours of the site and surrounding areas. An Architectural Study Tour of local precedents consisted of the historic neighborhoods of the City of Montgomery; such as Old Cloverdale, Cottage Hill, and Capitol Heights. The team also traveled to other traditional Alabama towns, including Selma, Marion, Union Springs, and Eufaula. Elements of these historic towns and neighborhoods were studied, including landscape and street design details, the relationship of buildings to street, and the mixture of uses and building types. Details of Alabama River Region architectural styles were documented and photographed. The study tour informed the design team and provided useful precedents for the Hudson settlement.

1. The old Pike Road crossroads town is revitalized &

The design team then studied the site itself. Andropogon Associates (national experts on sustainability and landscape design) first briefed the team on important site details, such as soil conditions, hydrologic and topographic features, and existing landscape elements that will impact any future design. The team then set out to examine the site first-hand, by car and on foot. Certain elements, such as the beauty of the land and large trees in the northern portion of the site, the soil conditions of the prairie, the variety of character of the natural rooms created by hedgerows and fences, and the rural charm of the existing structures, such as the bams and the Kirksey Store, were noted and admired by the team.

03/27/08

,01Dn founder.:

Hudson Land Co., Inc. Urban Villages, Inc.

Page 4

02008 Dover, Kohl & Partners

Following the site tour the design team began putting their thoughts on paper, sketching quickly, and comparing ideas. A temporary design studio was set up for a week at the Hudson residence, allowing the team to work on the site and re-check site conditions as ideas emerged. The setting of the design studio facilitated the evolution of the plan by encouraging interaction among the many participants and specialists present throughout the week. Lunchtime presentations focused on different topics which helped to inform the plan, such as marketing, branding and lifemaking, traditional neighborhood design, and the creation of a CSA (Community Supported Agriculture) farm on-site. In addition, technical meetings were held during the week to focus on topics such as transportation, engineering, and architectural design ideas. Pin-up review sessions allowed the team to come together and discuss new ideas. By the end of the week a draft plan emerged, and the following Big Ideas were established. Although the plan will certainly evolve as new details are worked out and resolved, these ideas can be used to guide future development of the town of Hudson.

expanded The "downtown" of Pike Road has long been associated with the intersection of Pike Road and the railroad tracks, and the Kirksey general store. The plan for Hudson resumes work on this crossroads town, a large portion of which is on Hudson property. A network of new blocks and streets, similar in scale to other traditional Alabama towns, can be established along with lots designated for a mixture of uses (including new civic, commercial, and residential) . At the appropriate time, additional pieces of this neighborhood can be built by others on adjacent properties, to complete the regeneration of Pike Road's downtown.

2. A new compact, complete, connected town is established on the highest, most suitable ground A new town, consisting of multiple new neighborhoods, will be established at Hudson. The placement of the neighborhoods was determined after careful study of the site's natural features, including the landscape, hydrology, and topography. The center of town will be located on the natural ridgeline which generally runs east-west across the site. The location of development can maintain and improve the function of natural systems such as drainage channels, ponds, and wetlands located on lower grounds. Building on the high ground will also give prominence to the new town from surrounding viewpoints.

3. A greenbelt surrounds the towns, comprised of varied farmlands, restored landscapes, & water cleansing habitats The new town will be surrounded by a greenbelt, which will give access to natural areas from all neighborhoods, and opportunities for future residents to interact with nature. This greenbelt will be used for multiple purposes, and provide many different types of environments. Some examples of potential uses include areas dedicated to farming activities (such as a CSA, or horse or cattle operations), improvements to natural amenities such as the ponds and wetland systems, reforestation, and new sustainable infrastructures such as constructed wetlands for wastewater treatment.

4. Both towns are made up of walkable, traditional, mixed-use neighborhoods with centers & edges Traditional towns are comprised of complete neighborhoods of approximately V, mile in diameter. These neighborhoods have a diverse mix of uses and housing types; they have a recognizable center with a full mix of civic, commercial, and residential uses at higher densities, and an edge with a predominantly residential character and lower densities. Providing a full range of uses and housing types within each neighborhood makes it appealing and accessible for multiple age groups and income ranges. Using the neighborhood as the building block to make a town creates true community.

5. Portions of the greenbelt are organized as potential urban reserve lands which can be settled as neighborhoods when/if appropriate Hudson is anticipated to grow and change over time, similar to any other town. If and when the time is suitable for the town to expand, a portion of the greenbelt can be utilized for an additional neighborhood. By using a compact, complete neighborhood (and its mixture of uses and housing types) as the building block for any new development, the sustainable pattern of traditional neighborhood design can be continued.

6. The pattern of neighborhoods, quarters, and fields is based on the spatial "rooms" formed by hedgerows & forests The existing system of hedgerows, fields, and forest creates an identifiable pattern on the site, and recognizable rooms of varied characters. These "lines of force" were utilized as natural boundaries and space definers, and are evident in the plan for the new town.


7. A web of routes is established, integrating new eastwest & north-south connections across the site Creating an interconnected network of streets helps to distribute traffic, and lessens the load at anyone particular intersection or street. This is important internal to the new town, to allow ease of circulation for both vehicles and pedestrians, but also important from a regional view, to allow multiple options for neighbors in east Montgomery to get across the property to their destinations. Building a network of connections east-west and north-south lessens the pressure to add additional lanes on the existing scenic two-lane rural roads of east Montgomery.

8. The rural character is preserved on Pike Road & Wallahatchie Road In addition to the new street network and connections which will help to lessen the traffic burden for both Pike and Wallahatchie Roads, the master plan proposes long views across open spaces and agricultural uses along much of the frontage of these existing roadways. This design strategy is intended to preserve the rural character on these roadways for next generations.

9. The long open view across prairie grass contrasts with the town on the high ground in the distance The plan for Hudson creates a variery of places and experiences. The heart of town will include urban buildings, and a mix of uses for residents to enjoy. In sharp contrast, the greenbelt will provide the best natural elements found in rural Alabama, including rural prairie grasses and open spaces. By building densely in the neighborhoods, a greenbelt large enough to contain real natural habitats can be prOvided for future generations to enjoy. The juxtaposition of town and country at Hudson will be most evident in the long views across the open prairies toward the new town.

10. The CSA & farm village are showcased & nurtured on the town's north end as a first phase The first phases of development are planned be to the north (at the extension of Ray Thorington Road), and include a CSA farm. Providing a working farm as one of the flfSt amenities on site illustrates the long commitment of the founders to the vision for the property, and will allow new community members the opportuniry to interact with each other and with nature, and become actively engaged with agricultural lifestyle.

11. The heart of town is grown in later phases, in a central location, at the confluence of significant routes The heart of town is formed proximate to several neighborhoods, at the intersection of important north-south and east-west connections. It is planned to be located on the site's high point, easily accessible to all community members, and highly visible from many vantage points. It will be constructed in later phases, when there is enough of a new communiry presence already established at Hudson to support a true town center.

15. Simple playfields are positioned alongside each neighborhood The green network will provide opportunities for both structured and un-structured recreation. Playfields will be provided for each neighborhood, within walking distance of residential homes. In addition to providing a space for organized recreation, sustainable communities often utilize playfields as dry retention zones, which contribute to the overall site stormwater retention system.

12. A landmark steeple is silhouetted on the skyline, rising above roofs and trees Landmark buildings placed on prominent sites are easily identifiable in the landscape and create identiry for towns. Distinctive buildings should be permitted to have special design features, such as church steeples, which exceed the heights of all surrounding structures. These distinctive features create memorable towns.

13. A range of public spaces are created, widely varying in formality & size A range of public spaces will be created, including formal squares and plazas, and informal greens, parks, and playgrounds. These public spaces are intended to provide areas for community gatherings and events, areas for reflection and relaxation, and spaces for recreation.

14. Green elements weave in & through, cleansing water, softening neighborhood edges, lengthening views & connecting awareness of nature The green elements of the property range in size, function, and formality. Consisting of both existing and constructed natural features, the green network shapes and defines the neighborhoods of the town.

16. Prominently positioned civic sites are reserved within each neighborhood, including day care centers Prominently positioned civic buildings and sites will become the heart and soul of the new town. Sites for civic purposes will be reserved even before there is a need for them to be constructed. The uses of these buildings may change over time as the needs of the community evolve.

17. Street geometry is simplified to aid wayfinding, yet manipulated to aid traffic calming and give uniqueness to addresses Providing a simple network of north-south and east-west roads aids in the navigation through town; providing subtle cranks and varying street designs will slow traffic, and will create unique addresses for new homes and businesses.

03/27/08

town founder.:

Hudson Land Co., Inc. Urban Villages, Inc.

18.A major school campus is positioned where accessible to all neighbors' The master plan reserves a space for a school campus; this campus surrounded by the neighborhoods of town, and will within walking distance for many homes. It is prominently located within the town, and should become a strong civic presence.

PagoS

02008 Dover, Kohl & Partner.


03/27/08

eown founder.:

Hudson Land Co., Inc. Urban Villages, Inc.

Pase6

02008 Dover, Kohl &: Parlner.


03/27/08

:r•

town founder.:

I

Hudson Land Co., Inc. Urban Villages, Inc.

u

c5 Page' 02008 Dover, Kohl & Partner.


03/27/08

town founder.:

Hudson Land Co., Inc. Urban Villages, Inc.

Page 8

02008 Dover, Kohl &: ~artner.


03/27/08

town founder.:

Hudson Land Co., Inc. Urban Villages, Inc.

02008 Dover, Kohl" Parl.ora


SITE OVERVIEW The site analysis sought to understand as completely as possible the form, patterns and processes of this region and the site. Through research, site visits and analysis with geographic information systems (GIS) the special character and unique challenges and opportunities of at Hudson were discovered. One major goal of the site analysis was to determine how best to balance human settlement with the array of other goals set forth by the project team. Issues of sustainability, minimizing impacts to the natural environment, and maximizing healthy, productive, meaningful lifestyles for future residents guided the analysis of existing conditions at the site.

NATURAL INFRASTRUCTURE PLAN The result of the analysis was a natural infrastructure plan. The plan demarcates areas of the site which should remain unbuilt, or that types of building be carefully considered to fit with the land. The interaction between soil, water and vegetatlon, along WIth views noise microclimate and adjacencies played a strong role in determining both the location and form of the communIty. The analy~is rev~aled complex relationships between these factors, and the plan is not simply a reductionist constraint map. The plan maximizes the opportunities afforded by working with these interconnected site processes and allows natural areas to weave mto the urban fabric of the community. This plan shows primary natural drainage channels surrounded by buffer areas required to manage stormwater. If possible, no building should occur within the blue areas. The area indicated in light green is intended to be the area managed under the CSA and Equestrian programs. I

/

.~

The following core values were central to the creation of the Hudson plan: • • • • • •

//1.

Acknowledge limits to the natural, social and built systems upon which we depend View society, economy and environment as interrelated, interconnected systems Conserve and rehabilitate ecological integrity and biodiversity Distribute resources and opportunities effiCiently Commit to best management practices Ensure these benefits and results for present and future generations

jL.J

/I

The maps and diagrams that follow illustrate the analysis conducted at the site and a summary of findings.

SITE HISTORY

03/27/08

'011111

foullder.:

Hudson Land Co., Inc. Urban Villqea, Inc.

.,.10 ',Oelll 00 .t, Kolal of lIart.e ...

At the time of European settlement, the prairie soils of Hudson had a thick surface layer of '" sod,'" a mixture of the roots of grasses and forbs, with the organic matter from dead plants and animals that had built up over millennia. Deep, spongy and rich in nutrients this soil was '" prime agricultural soil. '" The sod layer-both created and held in place by the dense root systems of the native grasses and forbs-allowed water to soak in and recharge ground water. When the sod was broken by the plow, this retentive surface layer was lost. With cotton farming , and the practice of maintaining weed-free rows, large amounts of soil were eroded and deposited in the valleys and streams. Presently the land is used for cattle ranching . Shallow-rooted European grasses grow on an impoverished soil with little or no organic layer, exposing the clayey sub-soil. This sub-soil is very susceptible to drying out and cracking and can be very slippery when wet. This phenomena common to most clays is known as '"shrinkswell '" and effects water absorption, the bearing capacity of the soils and the establishment of vegetation .

/

II I /


PHYSIOGRAPHY / LANDSCAPE STRUCTURE

LANDSCAPE SPACES

The form and structure of the land dictates many of the physical processes that occur upon it, This map shows the central ridge that divides the property, fingers of upland and lowland interwoven with drainage! floodplain areas, and the general pattern of vegetation, This basic structure is useful in siting elements on the development plan so they "work with" the land,

This map shows the "landscape rooms" that are formed by the relationship of landform and vegetation on the site, It also indicates the primary and secondary visual corridors experienced by drivers along Pike Road,

.'

PHYSIOGRAPHY / LANDSCAPE STRUCTURE

,t

legend

..

ridge

-

upland

LANDSCAPE SPACES legend

;

...... •

visual corridor _

boundary vegetation twoodlands

-

landscape rooms

lowland woodland I hedgerows

ponds

~

drainage I floodplain

,.~

,.

I

.t i I,

'1..,

1)

• _. ,f ..

I

;-

t. o

~

\ \

t

,

. '1..,

•l I .

\

I.

1(,

J'

,' I ~ •

,"

;

.

;-

03/27/08

..• ;".

ll

town founder.,

Hudson Land Co., Inc.

'~..".... -~ , - . ~ :.; ~' . .

'.

- I

,J

~.~

~

""'~~ , :, )

\ \ ~

\ r.:

\

Urban Villages, Inc.

=-'-,.If . ""~ ' . • ,f'- ~~~;.,. . !,. ..... ••

..

.1,. ·

;;;:;;

\

,.

~

,

),

\

~

Pase 11 02008 Dover, Kohl &: Partnero


SOILS

DRAINAGE General drainage patterns are indicated on this drawing. T· age direction and volume are important to understand to a the property, causing surface water to flow into three sepru for stormwater management on this site is to capture and Smaller collection areas should occur in the headwaters, v leaves the property.

DRAINAGE

.

• •

-

central ridge ridge head water collection areas large stormwater collection areas

..J!!;' drainage patterns

-. ,

.

Blackland Prairie soils are extremely challenging to work with. The weathering of chalk bedrock are an impermeable barrier to water. ' either to have a dangerously slick surface or to shrink, swell and CI

or

.,-

Montgomery Solis W2 ~.()I.Iot_""""'CII)~ _ " .

... J ~

,

.,.&1'1,_

HaSl HoIttton d., _

.... wty _

SmC, SUrrttf W I. ....

Sm81. $umItt (My ......'.11 ~ ",arty Ir..eI ph...

S.n82 S...,.., C»y• •

C062

,eI, trod..:! "'Y 0tfI0y ~ pl\alt

_

.

~\Ir;B

~~ WtlLpoin!Clly

CIl

...... 'I--'tilop..atlylwelpll:oMl

It""

~

eao"d.I,

r. . . -- . ,.

Gt~IM<lt.oItAr"""'m""""1s a..-I¥I" _rNt! .......

(if

u:

l..,....,dlq

~. KNnIll dII, INm

va:o.n..,. <I., ...... !"'IM

\IIr,4,

vt&

vaA.

..... 82

_n_tit,..an:l, ""'" .........I"'" v."'~W1 ..oOtd

...Irly Ir44 ~

loam.

v"'*'

~

oded .......

0:.82 Ohbbthl ""- MrI<t/ lOaM

wo, l,I"'e<I .t.MlllInd "'... ,.... oc!lox.tI ............ \'1'. .........

fOUln

founder.:

Hudson Land Co., Inc. Urban Villages, Inc.

Page 12

02008 Donr, Kohl &< PerIne..

1

".,.'ty ....1pnu.,

~bbbtI\a d.y "OCI'~. ntllt, IeVII pNH

~--1

pills.

1'Iy ..... 111....

Vl6 va.stn Me IoIfldV 1Oam.",ar1y "~I p/I.M

03/27/08

Is, and lere is of the The ed the hrough-

ell, .......t,._.--.. 9*'IY ~

-

n

. soils

The map shows some surface vruriation in soil types. The brown co the greens, acidic soils. The lighter the color, the more permeable almost no permeability, this variation is slight. The ph values are r soils potential use on this site. The alkaline soils favor grasslands, acidic soils tend to be in shallow pockets lying on top of the alkal Blackland Prairie, a broad expanse of tall grasses with small patel out .

ODe) 0..-""

legend

_

;

)f this, draindge divides nt strategy e as possible. : the water

. , _. _I'

...... pNKt


VEGETATION

WATERSHEDS

This map shows the existing vegetation on the site. The height of the vegetation is represented by a color range from light yellow (highest) to dark green (lowest) . The patterns on the site can be characterized as mixed hardwood forest patches, clumps of significant individual trees, hedgerows, and limited riparian (stream bank) vegetation. The distribution and form of these patterns are created by a combination of soil conditions and land management. The forests favor the patches of acid soils that are slightly more permeable.

All rainwater falling on the surface of land must flow downhill. Watersheds are the divides in the land between drainage basins and may be subdivided into many smaller sub-watersheds. This map shows the watersheds of the site, the drainage pattern within the watersheds, and the outlet points (as asterisks) where each watershed terminates.

Cattle ranching dictates the appearance of most of the vegetation on the site. The hedgerows are formed by birds dropping seeds along fences. The cattle browse the trees as high and as far as they can reach over and through the fences. It should be noted that if the cattle are removed from the hedgerow areas, the lower branches and understory vegetation will begin to fill in. The map also shows the drainage of the site. The blue lines represent the direction and relative volume of surface water flows.

.'

~" \

.

The bold numbers indicate the approximate volume of srormwater which "runs off" each watershed after a 2-yr/24-hr rainfall event of approximately 4.75 inches of rain in 24 hours. The units of volume are acrefeet, or the amount of water necessary to cover one acre of land with one foot of water. Because of the flat topography, impermeable clay soils, and limited forest cover, storm events may flood broad expanses of the bottom of each watershed, particularly if the outlet points are undersized or compromised by blockage. By adopting a strategy of managing the storm water near its source, in smaller distributed systems, flood potential can be reduced, and improvements seen in water quality, habitat, and visual appearance of the land.

.!1IIt

â&#x20AC;˘

r

'[ . jI"

17

I

I

03/27/08

town founder.:

Hudson Land Co., Inc. Urban Villages, Inc.

'I"

~ Page 13

02008 Dover, Kohl & Parln ...


PIKE ROAD NOISE

PIKE ROAD VISIBILITY

Road noise can carry significant distances based upon vehicle rype and speed, road surface, intervening landforms and obstacles and atmospheric conditions. As it is undesirable, particularly in the peaceful rural countryside, it is useful to model its effects.

This analysis shows the views from cars driving on Pike Road (and toward those cars from the site). Vegetation and landforms limit the visual distances significantly. Visibility is measured as an orange to yellow color range, with orange areas being the most visible from the road . Green areas either are hidden or filtered by trees and hedgerows.

This diagram is the model of noise from Pike Road. Noise is indicated by a red to yellow color spectrum, with red representing the greatest noise impacts. Green indicates noise "shadows", where the perception of road noise would be minimal. The proposed community location takes advantage of these areas.

o

'I"-

,

,~

'1

-

.. ____L ..

/

/

'" n.

,~

03/27/08

i

'own founder.: <

'" "0'6

Hudson Land Co., Inc. Urban Villages. Inc.

Page 14

02008 Dover. Kohl & Pertne ..

... ---~~----.,'~ '" '"

,.

... ".

.,.

'.

"


SOLAR GAIN / MICROCLIMATE Microclimate is an important concept in sustainable development. Capitalizing on favorable sun and shade, as well as wind patterns can reap significant energy savings on heating and cooling and help create desirable places. Measurement of solar radiation as it reaches the earth's surface over a period of time can help to fmd desirable building sites. Solar gain is measured in watt-hours per square meter. This map accurately shows the actual energy reaching the ground on this site during the summer of 2006, including variance for cloud cover. Actual landform, vegetation and structures are modeled to create "shadows". The lightest colors represent the most energy (hottest) and the darkest the least energy (coolest). The basic message one can infer is that the closer one is to trees, the more favorable the summertime temperatures will be. This temperature change can be measured on the site as differences in the 15 - 20 degree range. The proposed design keeps as many existing trees as possible - to immediately reap some benefits.

_ ., SOLAR GAIN - SUMMER '

:i

• <to.

RADIANT ENERG Y (WHlM2 )

".

HIGH

I,OlU4S

l OW S7.02'1

It- ",' . .'

'4)

...

;,

,~

)( h •

'"~

,0

eo "

r

-

.

03/27/08

H,

eo W

n

founder.:

Hudson Land Co., Inc. Urban Villages, Inc. m

k . . .,. ~

'"

.,.

,

m

,

'"

..

,

'" ,~

", '"

Page 15

"" '" 02008 Dover, Kohl & PartDero


03/27/08

town founder.:

Hudson Land Co., Inc. Urban Villages, Inc.

Paael6

02008 Do ..... Kohl. partners


03/27/08

town lounder.:

Hudson Land Co., Inc. Urban Villages, Inc.

02008 Dover, Kobl & Partner.


Large trees are preserved , and new trees added to the forested northern portion of the site; walking trails allow residents to enjoy this amenity

The CSA & farm village located at the entrance to town

A new compact, complete, connected town of several new neighborhoods is established on the highest, most suitable ground

Playfields are positioned alongside neighborhoods

Ray, :r.ho •

.

h "llIgton noad

Civic sites (including day care locations) are reserved at prominent locations

The heart of town is grown along the natural ridge, at the confluence of significant streets

Community greens are located in each neighborhood

~-~-~jf-------;-~l~~~~!~~~=

lished integrating eastA web, of streets is new estabwest & north·south connection s across the site

03/27/08

Hudson Land Co., Inc.

i

·

nearby neighbors Natural systems, including hedgerows and drainage channels , shape and define neighborhoods

A landmark steeple is placed on the ridge and silhouetted on the skyline, rising above roofs and trees

'own founder.:

~~~~i1~~~~~~

~:~~------...:~--;-~~~----- Apositioned major school campus accessible to is

By surrounding the town with~.,...--"":'.L::i....::":~:-:~-""::'i greenbelt, the rural character along Pike and Waliahatchie Roads can be maintained

A greenbelt surrounds the town, comprised of varied farmlands, restored landscapes, & water cleansing habitats

Urban Villages, Inc.

crossrc)ads--..L--::Q.--¥g:~~tr:':';~~~~~~:;~"~

Old Pike Road town is revitalized & expanded

,.18 01'1008 bOYero kohl'

',tt.....

The long open views across prairie grass are preserved


:

I

_._._._.~

....!...._._.L-.-,- __ -+- _ 1 .

1 1•

I

r·-·-·-· J - - - -IT 1 ·1

I

I

II

I

1 1 I

I

-- + --- i --- 1Htt II II II II

1

I I I I

I I I I

I I I I

+- ~ -

-

I

I

~

I

-

-

I

r-- - ~ -r- It It It

I

---~ - I ------!---II

----- -# t ,/// II 1 // II

: Tn~ ;~== =­ -r-f ++~ _ - --- -~ 1(""" -, I

III

L

..l 1

I

~_ -L.l __

~I

i

I

03127/08 :

- - - - - - ---I

I I

-r=-

tOliln

I I

Hudson Land Co., Inc.

I

IL - - - - - - - - t - - - -

'", 'I-~f ,-

~

I

--,

:IIII~-y_---?r I ;t = = = i-+ - :. -=- -=- J- II I I I

j

~

\- -

',\- I" I

"

_f:- - - -

-

-

.- -,

-- -

I

~

~

\

--,-.

1/""'1 71-

,'~

I

I

I

I

I

I

I

I. I

l._

,~7r ~

-

TS

Town Center

T4-0 Neighborhood General Open

Urban Villages, Inc.

T4-R Neighborhood General Restricted

I

._._.-.J-------- f- - - - - - - - - + - - -

,

founder.:

~ ~

T3

Neighborhood Edge

T2

Rural Edge

~ Neighborhood Civic Space

Paae 19


Apalac hicola, FL

Baldwin Pal<, Orlando, FL

03/27/08

town founder.:

Hudson Land Co., Inc. Urban Villages, Inc.

Page 20

02008 Dover, Kohl & Partners


Charleston, SC

Savannah, GA

Fairhope, AL

,

iiiiiilii

~• • • • • • •I

~• • • • • • • I

~• • • • • • • I

•.....tf..'+.~ ..~~~::::::.l •••••••

•• I!!!!I I- I---••••••• •••••• =~~~~

1

1

Cloverdale, Montgomery, AL

Montgomery, AL

~

Seaside, FL 03/27/08

town founders:

Hudson Land Co., Inc. Urban Villages, Inc.

Page 21

Eufaula, AL

Mt. Laurel, Birmingham, AL

The Waters, Montgomery, AL

02008 Dover, Kohl & Partnera


PRIMARY STREET NETWORK

PRIMARY + SECONDARY STREET NETWORK

This diagram shows the network of primary streets that connect the neighborhoods within Hudson to each other and to the surrounding area. By providing multiple routes, traffic can be distributed more efficiently than in the conventional suburban pattern, which is characterized by culs-de-sac that empty traffic onto fewer large streets. Traffic distribution results in multiple 2-lane roadways, rather than multiple lanes on any single route.

This diagram shows the additional street connections within the plan. Providing a network of interconnected streets allows for an even greater distribution of traffic. The interconnected network also provides alternative routes in case of a road closure or increased traffic, or the desire to take a different way, whether driving, biking, or walking.

,, ,, H-

I ~

I~

ri 1

,-

I- I I

'._._._._._'_'_'_._._.1-.-, I

:

~

.-.-._.

__

._'_._'_ ._._._'-'-'

I I I

I I I

r-'-'-'-'.J-

r-'-'-'-'.J-

I I I

I I I

,, _J r ___I ~_ ... ____ oJ .

I--

1

,,

~

-I

~

.L

r - - .. - - .. - - -

-I

-

l _I r

~ ... ____ J .

,

I

I

I

.L r - - -

_ _ _

, I 1-

,

-

-

-

.. -

, , I

:L ____ ...... 03/27/08

I

j

'

,'" -t----!hMt";'f:iYJ.::.'b""......01- _______ _

:

,'" -t----Mr'1htl"'f.C!:'f'.HF

n'"'4-...;.,I- ------- ~ I '"

L _ _ _ _ ... _ . ' I

I

'own founder.:

" ,' "

Hudson Land Co., Inc. Urban Villages, Inc.

,,

,, ,, \ \I \

02008 Do .. er. Kobl It: 'arlDera

\ II \

,

,

II

II

'I I

i

.

"'".


ALLEY NETWORK

TRAIL, ALLEY, AND PEDESTRIAN PATH NETWORKS

In addition to the street network, this diagram shows the alleys that provide rear access to homes and businesses, and pedestrian paths that provide access at mid-block locations Providing a system of rear alleys reduces curb cuts along streets, providing a pedestrian-friendly environment. In addition, the alleys and mid-block pedestrian paths can serve as secondary means of pedestrian circulation through town.

In addition to the alleys and mid-block pedestrian paths, this diagram shows the network of trails that run through the new neighborhoods of Hudson. The trail system will provide access to the open space amenities on the site, as well as provide opportunities for recreation.

- -

I

~

I,

-

T

,

~

I If

,- -

'-

I

J

._._._._._._' '-'-'~'-r I I

~~. A)

-

r

, I

I

I

J

I

I

___

J

LI

~ ~~~-

,. -

I

-

11

-

I I

-

-

~

1

I

r ·_·_·_·-1

I I I

I I

+ I

-

I t I

r·_·_·_·-1

I

I I

:- __ J I I _ __ .1

-

-,

I I I

t- 1-

r

, ' . _ . _ .I _ . , ._._._._._ ._

!

~

-

- l-~mmff\-JII.~

- ~

r

r --- ,

"

"

"

"

J 03/27/08

I'I II I

town founder.:

I I

I I "0

II

.1

Hudson Land Co., Inc. Urban Villages, Inc.

,-

II

I I I

I I I I \ II \

I I

I

I I

I

"I, 'I I,

\ 1\ \

I

I

,,\

I I I

I I

I

"

"'I

..

~,

-\

I,

Page 23

02008 Dover. Kobl & Parlne,.


GREEN NETWORK & CIVIC BUILDINGS

NEIGHBORHOODS

This diagram shows rhe network of neighborhood parks and open spaces which togerher make up the open space network. Over 50% of the site is intended to be open space, and will include open prairies, farmlands , reforested areas, ponds, streams, and drainage channels, and water cleansing habitats. In addition, within the urbanized area, civic spaces (such as neighborhood greens, squares, and plazas) will provide opportunities for both formal and informal gatherings. Civic buildings, such as daycares, schools, a town hall and post office, and churches will also be provided in each neighborhood.

Each neighborhood in Hudson is approximately a 5 minute walk from center to edge. The 'I. mile radius is a benchmark for creating neighborhoods rhat are inherently walkable. As a general rule, most people are willing to walk a distance of approximately '14 mile (1320 feet or 5 minutes) before turning back or opting to drive or ride a bike rarher rhan walk. The neighborhoods at Hudson are often divided by natural features, such as hedgerows or streams.

,

,

,_J

T

~

,.

_

J

I

r'T 1

-, ,

,

I

1- -, I r

L

+-

-

,

l-

,,

i

路1 I f-

II

r

1

II

I

I

III I I

I

II , ,

II I

I

I

II I

I

I

" I

I

"

I I

"

I

11-+ -

t:-:~r' "

T 1

"

,. I

-j

II

LA.

+l--l

-t -

I

;r':~'-~'

I

I I r -

I I

~ I

.

I ,;:-..~,

.L

"

"

"

""

"

J 03/27/08

'own founder.:

I

" "

-

, I

Hudson Land Co., Inc.

I

,

Urban Villages, Inc. I I I

I I I

I I

I

,I

I "

"'I

'.

Page 24

02008 Dover, Kohl" Partners

\

I

"

,

'I

i

.,


03/27/08

'own founders:

Hudson Land Co., Inc. Urban Villages, Inc. , ,,, ,, ,,

., ........,....,,, ~

,, ,

I:

~

,, "

:, ,,

, ,,\ .... _ - -

PagelS

j

02008 Dover, Kohl & Partn...


03/27/08

'OWR

fouRder.:

Hudson Land Co., Inc. Urban Villages, Inc.

02008 Do ...... Kob(,* Pjrtller.


03/27/08

,

Hudson Land Co., Inc.

,

,

'own founder.:

Urban Villages, Inc •

Pagel7

02008 Donr. Kohl

a: Par'Dfr'


OS/27/08

'own founder.: Hudson Land Co., Inc. Urban Villages, Inc.


03/27/08

town founder.:

Hudson Land Co., Inc. Urban Villages, Inc.

Page 29

02008 Dover, Kohl" Partner.


03/27/08

'own founder.:

Hudson Land Co., Inc. Urban Villages, Inc.

Pa&e3O 02008 DOYe1", Kohl It Partner.

â&#x20AC;˘


03/27/08

'own founder.: Hudson Land Co., Inc. Urban Villages, Inc.

Page 31

02008 Dover, Kohl &< Partaerl


03/27/08

'own founder.: Hud80n Land Co., Inc.

Urban Village8,lne.

~32

02008 Dner. k.hl

a ....i-taer.


-

·... \~.

-

...--- .•. ~

I

03/27/08

town founder.: ~"

Hudson Land Co., Inc. Urban Villages, Inc. ).'

,'/

Page 33

C2008 Dover, Kohl & Partner.


THE LONG VIEW One of the most captivating elements of the Hudson site is the "long view" over the grasslands to the hedgerows and forests beyond. The long view can also be thought of in terms of a sustainable development process that relates both to the place and to the economic market forces acting upon it. From the perspective of town growth, we believe that sustainability may best be achieved by the action principles identified below. By integrating the physical form of the town with the land, and the daily rhythms of the residents with the resulting community, a real place is defined.

ACTION PRINCIPLES OF TilE LONG VIEW: Minimize the carbon footprint Source, treat and re-use water and sewer on site Attain energy self-sufficiency Create a local food web Demonstrate climate-responsive architecture Privilege open space â&#x20AC;˘

Grow live-work space, resurrect the master trade model, and create green business opportunities Partner with the broader community Create multi-generational housing

03127/08

'olDn founder.:

Hudson Land Co., Inc. Urban Vdlap,lnc.

01008 Dove.., Itolil

a: t,rtaer.


LANDSCAPE GUIDELINES OVERVIEW The basic concept for development at Hudson revolves around the relationship between water, soils, and vegetation. The soils are highly expansive clays that crack when dry and are slick when wet. They are impenetrable to water and highly erosive. As a result, inadequately vegetated areas rapidly erode downstream as stormwater sheets across the surface. Conversely, frequent rainfall (or irrigation) is important because it maintains soil moisture at a level which is neither too dry nor too wet. These soils will irreversibly compact under heavy loads (even cattle create Significant compaction). While the soils are very productive and rich in nutrients, their other characteristics make them very challenging to farm, landscape or build upon. Alterations to the topography for construction must be carefully considered as changing the surface water behavior will have broad implications for vegetation health, erosion and flooding. Use of heavy construction equipment must be confined precisely to areas that will be paved, as their tracks will destroy all of the limited soil porosity. This has significant implications for the localized survival or loss of existing trees, as the hydrology can be so quickly altered. Specialized construction techniques are required to work in these soils - for buildings, roads, pathways, utilities, agriculture, and even landscaping. Consider, for example that all "landscaped" spaces will have to have remediated soil. Restoration of a prairie ecosystem will help to change the relationships between soil, water and vegetation into a more stable and workable system. The deep rooted clumps of prairie grasses will build organic matter back into the soil and allow for greater water-holding capacity. Rotational grazing with buffalo may be used to manage these grasslands, as their browsing habits and pointed hooves that help aerate soil evolved in concert with this place. Controlled bums will also help to re-establish nutrient and species balance in the system. This "new" landscape will explode with biodiversity, particularly bird species, and create a vibrant and beautiful setting for the town. 03/27/08

town founder.:

Hudson Land Co., Inc. Urban Villages, Inc.

Page3S

02008 Dover, Kohl & Partnera


WATER, SOIL, AND VEGETATION WATER Heavy annual rainfall combined with minimal infiltration creates a problem of flooding. Farming and grazing practices of the past encouraged the use of every possible piece of land, resulting in the removal of most of the vegetation lining the streams and swales. Regionally (in heavy clay soils), water infiltrates more easily where eroded sediments are deposited. At present, the denuded channels neither slow nor infiltrate storm water. When water does not soak into the ground where it falls, the water table is lowered. Lower water table combined with periodic droughts stress vegetation and put added burdens on potable water from wells. These problems have been exacerbated by the increasing development in the Montgomery growth corridor.

WATER MANAGEMENT This diagram indicates location and general spatial requirements for both stormwater and wastewater treatment on the site. The orange area is the generalized development envelope, with blue swales connecting 2-year storm retention areas (blue boxes) to larger habitat! retention areas (hatched green boxes). Constructed wetland systems for wastewater treatment are indicated by connected series of green boxes. Arrows indicate pumping of cleaned stormwater back up hill to pond storage facilities for re- use on site. Both stormwater and wastewater systems are located to capture the polluted water as close to its origin as possible and to have multiple, redundant, distributed systems that can be stacked and sized as the community grows.

/

Although the site appears almost flat, a major central ridge divides the site into three different watersheds. The development strategy puts a compact new town on the high ground, which allows the management of storm water to be exceptionally straightforward: • The proposed hydrologic system can mimic the naturally evolved site system and is therefore the most cost effective and most efficient • Storm water is intercepted and managed close to the developed areas. Buildings avoid areas susceptible to seasonal flooding • There is ample room to manage storm water within the open space system. The proposed stormwater management system, like the roads, is fundamentally a distributed system. Rather than concentrating storm water, this distributed system will even out storm flows. This system will also provide a high level of water treatment for the runoff from the developed area. There are several levels of storm water management that correspond to the development transect across the site:

03/27/08

'own founder.:

Hudson Land Co., Inc. Urban Villape, Inc.

2. Interception, collection and distribution areas within nei~hborhoods include re-graded and replanted swales, ditches at the edges of roads, rain gardens and cisterns on individual lots, bigger rain gardens and small balanced-life ponds in neighborhood parks. All these areas would need to be managed as "gardens." Individual Lots should encourage: , Use of covered or underground cisterns to harvest and reuse water from roof and paved surfaces for irrigation , Drip rather than spray irrigation • Shade • Subsurface drainage should not be permitted.

,..36 01008 Dover, Kolal

1. Interception, collection and distribution within the town core would include more formal and decorative water features: pools, fountains, cisterns and channels/gutters that store, direct and clean water. Cisterns must be covered, pools should have fountains and/or water walls to move water, ensuring that mosquitoes do not breed. Water for the water features would come from recycled stormwater occasionally topped up with water from storage systems, wells or city water.

a: J!irl.erl

W

Developed Areas


STORMWM'ER MANAGEMENT

This is a refinement of the water management diagram which shows routing of water within the community fabric as well as the relative sizes of the required retention areas. Comparison of this diagram with the existing natural drainage patterns shows that water is kept to the greatest feasible extent close to where it falls on the ground.

,I

- '- ' - '- '

P'-'

._.- .. _._.

.....", I I

.I /

I

I

(

. -_._._.-"""'"

:\

3. Interception, collection and distribution at the edge of the developed area and the adjoining public open space. includes larger swales with check dams and storage ponds with significant wetland habitat. These ponds will be designed to meet the requirements for holding the 1-2 year storm (the most frequent storm). At present swales in the proposed public, open space are degraded. Protecting these swales from cattle grazing and from erosion and sedimentation with check dams and new planting will enable healthy riparian vegetation to be reestablished. The planting of native grass meadows over large portions of this area will increase storm water infiltration and further protect these swales. Grass paths should be re-mown in a new pattern and location on new and healthier soils each year. Changing the location of these paths will foster the soil building program and minimize compaction, slippery or cracked surfaces and soil erosion. Paths can be used as part of a check dam system where they cross swales . 4. Interception, collection and distribution at the northeastern corner of the site (at the points of discharge from the site) include large ponds/ lakes with wooded swamp. Since these areas serve as both habitat and as a regional recreational amenity, care must be taken to provide water access that is safe from snakes. Working with wildlife specialists appropriate solutions will be designed. These ponds will be designed to hold the 10-25 year storm (as determined by regulation). Should the new expressway be built, these swamps will partially protect the site from noise and visual intrusion.

I

In addition to these improvements on the east side of Pike Road, on the west side (on the southwestern corner of the site), the large drainage that goes through the Hudson property may require additional retention in the ''back forty."

ROAD AND SIDEWALK CONSTRUCTION:

I

I

I

I

I

-'~!. /

_' , I.

I

I

I

~ I I I -_..I . :.;.. ..'... I

I

- / ,,"

I

I ,,

.;

1

1

.......

...... .... /

I

I

I

I, :,

,

1

'1

1

1

1

I

I

I

\

~,

f! I \

'

:

r! \' I

I

I

I

'-

--

1

I

,

I

I

1

1-

/

(

.........'

,r-路'路 . ~ , ....... . . . . ..:.......

, ~"

~ ....

/

,

1

'-'- '-J

?

!

Given the heavy clay soils of the site, if the soil underneath the road is excavated and filled with gravel, this area will become a "bathtub" when it rains, causing the pavement to heave. If tree roots are allowed to penetrate this gravel. they will suck out water during a drought causing the pavement to subside. To avoid these problems and foster the stability of town roads . guidelines for sidewalk and road construction include: All pavements should be elevated ; Load bearing pavements will require geo-textiles; A flexible mat should be created underneath the elevated pavement. as follows: 1. Level existing soil but keep as close as possible to existing grade 2. Put down a layer of geo-textile 3. Fill halfway with large, graduated gravel 4. Put down a second layer of geo-textile 5. Fill with large, graduated gravel to desired grade 6. Top surface with sand colored asphalt or smaller graduated gravel . bound with clay or particularly for sidewalks unit pavers such as brick. Brick pavers are suburban in character but recycled historic bricks will provide _________ ._ patina. Sidewalks may only require one layer.of geo-textile and gravel.

03/27/08

lown lounder.:

Hudson Land Co., Inc. Urban Villages, Inc.

Page 37

02008 Dover, Kohl & PUlaor.


SOILS Building healthy soil is critical to both the storm water management strategy and to successful replanting of the site. There are four essential parts to this program.

During construction the area of 2 times canopy diameter should be fenced with orange construction fence (where possible), monitored and repaired daily. There will be circumstances where it is not possible to protect 2 times canopy width all around an element. Exceptions can be made, but more stringent remedial measures will then be required. The constructor should be required to post a bond of $4,000 per tree, $15,000 per grove and $30,000 per hedgerow impacted, to cover any damages and to encourage strict adherence to the no grading/trespass within the construction fence rule. No trash, construction debris, movement of vehicles or trespass of any kind should be allowed within the fence during construction. During a drought, the tree/ grove or hedgerow should be deepwatered by a qualified arborist. After construction, the tree/ grove or hedgerow should be carefully pruned to remove any dead or broken branches and 1/8'" of the total foliage, to minimize stress. The tree/ grove or hedgerow impacted by construction should be monitored on a quarterly basis for one year after construction.

Slowing stormwater and minimizing the amount of runoff to protect from erosion and sedimentation. 2. Re-establishing a native tall grass and wildflower meadow in the public, open space to re-build a "sod layer," increase organic matter in the soil, and encourage water penetration through deep root channels. 3. Pulsed grazing with a rotating cattle/chicken operation in the CSA to increase organic matter in the soil. 4. Composting organic wastes as a part of the CSA, for use in community and individual gardens and for soil building in neighborhood parks. The Equestrian facilities should produce considerable material for the composting operation. 1.

Soil amendments will be necessary for street tree and hedgerow planting, and the improvement of soil conditions in individual lots and parks within the urban core and the neighborhoods. Plants do not thrive under conditions of abrupt change. There should be no hard distinction berween the existing soil and the amended soil. A transitional area should be created made up of '/2 existing soil and % amended soil, where plant roots can acclimate to more rigorous conditions and be encouraged to move beyond amended soils (into the real world).

Planting Due to the heavy clay soils, only vigorous, well rooted, relatively young plants should be used, so that they will better adapt to the difficult conditions. As with the extended protection area, extended planting areas are the key to success. Lists of plants appropriate to the variety of habitats (open and forested) will be available. These lists are not generalized "native plant species" lists but will be specific to each proposed type of meadow, grove, hedgerow and wetland and to the forests on site.

VEGETATION-PROTECTION, NEW PLANTING AND LANDSCAPE MANAGEMENT

Street Trees Traditionally street trees are a single species planted in a row at a uniform distance berween trees. Different tree species are planted at different spatial intervals depending on their width at maturity.

Protection

03127/08

'own lounder.:

HumoD Land Co., Inc. Urban VdIagea,lne.

02008 DO'I'el'. Kolil â&#x20AC;˘

tDerl

Large Individual 1l-ees, Groves and Hedgerows There are a number of large, mature, freestanding trees and minigroves within the open areas of the site. Sometimes known as "lone wolves," these majestic oaks, elms and hickories are often left in a pasture to provide shade for the cattle and are typical of the agriculturallandscape. Large sculptural elements silhouetted against the grass and sky, both individual trees and small groves are a major component of the prairie landscape and an important component of the site aesthetic.

In the natural landscape, trees do not obey these rules. Trees in the groves, hedgerows and forests of Hudson often grow no more than rwo feet apart. Less conventional planting patterns for street trees may be used in certain areas, for variety and a less laborintensive planting solution adapted specifically to heavy clay soils. Lines of trees could be accommodated within "tree trenches", a continuous line of amended soils (see soil section for the need for soil transitions). Within these trenches, trees could be grouped into mini-groves, clumped into a demi-hedgerow or planted at tighter (on-center) spacing intervals. Alternatively, trees could be grouped at Significant junctions in the street pattern and used in the same fashion as church spires. This would enable them to be planted in

In heavy clay soils, changes of grade compact the soils, causing to lose their air and water holding capacity. Grading also disrupts the surface and subsurface flows of water. Where possible, avoid grade changes within rwo times the diameter of the canopy. It is better to sacrifice the tree/ grove or hedgerow if grade changes are required for critical architectural components, rather than leave a severely impaired tree to die. Final adjustments of the town plan should be made to accommodate these splendid, landscape features, where desirable. Alternatively, significant large trees can be moved if necessary, with specialized equipment and techniques.

one large "extended pit."

Existing hedgerows.


Hedgerows

Ponds, Rain Gardens, Swales, Ditches and Planted Channels within the Town Core and Neighborhoods

In the existing landscape hedgerows are boundary markers. In the new landscape new hedgerows should be planted at the boundaries of small parks and athletic fields, along neighborhood roads and between larger lots. Hedgerows are characterized by clumps of trees, unevenly spaced; individual trees often have multiple trunks. The pattern is one of a dance and should be used as a counterpoint to the clean, regular lines of the architectural elements. Nothing says "country" more than an animal fence and a hedgerow and the two are often found together as birds sitting on the fence often "plant" the hedgerow. There are many possible types of hedgerows. Each type creates a different aesthetic effect and has different screening potentials. Every variation should be experimented to provide a diversiry of experience. Some examples are: 1. Canopy trees only (many different species possible); 2. Canopy trees and flowering understory; 3. Understory trees only; 4. Canopy trees, understory and shrubs with a grass and wildflower ground layer; 5. Vines only.

Wetland gardens are an opportunity to have a continuous display of handsome and showy flowers from April to November. Again, within the core and the neighborhoods, these elements should look particularly attractive and well cared for. Since they will be created from scratch, they will need to be managed afterwards on a continuing basis. Management will be primarily weeding (removing unwanted plants) and replacing dead or damaged ones. Prairie within the Public Open Space

Existing edgerows.

Management of the prairie should include small controlled burns, working closely with the Montgomery City Fire Department. Fire is a natural process and essential to return nutrients to prairie soils and provide new seed beds. Fire is generally permitted under an educational permit. Heavily douse the riparian vegetation and savanna islands with water before the controlled burns to prevent damage to trees. Burns at different seasons and of different intensities are desirable but difficult to permit. Varied bums foster a diverse grass and forb landscape with many rare and endangered species. All eastern red cedars, Juniperus virginiana, should be removed from the prairie. Forest

Management Within the town core and the neighborhoods every landscape element-individual trees, street trees, groves, hedgerows, ponds, swales, ditches and planted channels will require management. At the edges of the development, some lesser management will also be required. Management will involve additional planting, replacement planting, weeding and pruning. It is critical that these landscape components look dramatic, attractive and well cared for - both for the presentation of the communiry to the public and to overcome the horticultural preference for exotic species, rather than native plants. Hedgerows within the Town Core and Neighborhoods

Existing hedgerows should be pruned to bring out their character and to make them acceptable to the general pUblic. The easiest treatment of existing hedgerows is to simply keep them as an irregular line of canopy trees and to enrich the ground underneath them with ground cover in the town core and selected elegant, native, tall grasses and wildflowers in the neighborhoods. Ground cover will need to be weeded and tall grasses and wildflowers cut at least once a year in mid-fall. Missing elements (dead and damaged trees) should be removed and replanted. At that time, a decision can be made on "improving" the quality of the hedgerow with oaks, hickories and other mature forest species, or continuing them as predominantly trees of the field-osage orange and hackberry.

Manage the forest by removing any invasive exotics and building forest soils. Never use compost in the forest as this will bring worms and destroy the forest soils. Leaf litter is an acceptable soil additive, spread evenly and never thicker than 1 inch deep. The forest and its ground and low shrub layers are particularly vulnerable to browsing by deer. Forest areas can be protected with a 12 foot high deer fence. This fence can be heavy black plastic mesh attached to trees just within the perimeter. It must be buried in the ground a minimum of six inches and securely attached as deer will push under a fence. Frequent monitoring and repair of the deer fence is critical to its success.

03/27/08

town founder.:

Hudson Land Co., Inc. Urban Villages, Inc.

Pase39

02008 Dover, Kobl &: PUllter.


-i Elevation Village Center Rowhouse

Elevation Neighborhood Rowhouse

H , I

,

1--

I

'--i

~

1-

L

1

03/27/08

tOWII

foullder,:

Hudson Land Co., Inc. Urban Villages, Inc. ---"I

Âť

Page 40

0 2008 Dovor, Kohl &: PJrlner.

Plan Village Center Rowhouse (25' X 100')

L Plan Neighborhood Rowhouse (30' X 110')

T


Elevation Village Center Cottage House

Elevation Village Center Cottage House

r

r

路 --- 路路-1

~~

I

~_i l

1

03/27/08

town founder.:

Hudson Land Co., Inc. Urban Villages, Inc.

Page 41

Plan - Village Center Cottage House (35' X 100') Single Story

Plan - Village Center Cottage House (35' X 100') Two Story

02008 Dover, Kohl & Partnero


Elevation Neighborhood Cottage House

Elevation Neighborhood Cottage House (design by Scott Finn)

-

I I

..

.Of!:cj I

JI

..

,

l'

.

I /...

,

L

-\

Q

I

03/27/08

town founder.:

I

~r

o

Hudson Land Co., Inc. \I0

.

., CD~

?>7

\70;0

~q I'f

+ to/UI\Page 42

0 2008 Dover, Kohl & Partnors

Plan - Neighborhood Cottage House (40' X 110') Single Story (design by Scott Finn)

Plan - Neighborhood Cottage House (40' X 110') Two Story

tI

I I

- -i - -

t

<-

Urban Villages, Inc.

JI:. _

~

l

~


Elevation Large Neighborhood House

Elevation Neighborhood House - ' .

-_-

路..: 1.....1

t

I

It -+-

-t

-t

t, :1

.Jj i

,

., '1 1

03/27/08

,own founder.:

Hudson Land Co., Inc. Urban Villages, Inc.

Page 43 Plan Neighborhood House (50' X 110')

Plan Large Neighborhood House (55' X 110')

Cl2008 Dover, Kohl & PerIne ..


Elevation Mansion Apartment

Elevation Mixed-Use Building

1

,I

I I

1\

=Y ,-, ,

~

I

03/27/08

'own founder.:

Hudson Land Co., Inc. Urban Villages, Inc.

)

~, J S. \

(

~I, I' "

J

'T '

,<),-- :== -9 , ~ ~'. -J...~ <;)/ ~" ' : : / " " " " L - I

'-:$"~

~ "

:.,..

I

-•

. ~

'

Page 44

L _____________ ~~~~ ___________._J

0 2008 Dover. Kobl " 'IIrta ...

Plan Mansion Apartment

Plan Mixed-Use Building

-


School Elevation , ~--- )- 路 l路路~

....... _.::...... -,- '-::...J~ - --f- =>ot-

,

!

!

~,n :

i(:/

,V I

/ / Jl

.

,,

, ,

, \ (~

~;j

I

,I ,,, ,,,

I

,

.

03/27/08

Ii '

I

\

I

.

town founder.:

Hudson Land Co., Inc. Urban Villages, Inc.

I

I

!

-..~. ~:-:~ -~'JJJ ' .. "

/R.f\

~~ Go路:,.. ::7. - .:.,-, W' --;--. ") School Building and Site Plan

Page4S

02008 Dover, Kohl &: Partn...


Elevation

I ,I

03/27/08

lown founder.:

Hudson Land Co., Inc.

t

Urban Village8, Inc.

10 Ul lj

f'o~5

Page 46

~ 00'\"'!5 ,

,(,

..I

o~"~

:L"~~

02008 Dover, Kohl &: Partaerl

Senior Living Facility - First Floor Plan

Typical Upper Level Plan


""""""'" -

~, ~

-

- ~~,

--'--~vl '" M~tl'-':1

Precedent Sketchbook Christian Sottile

I

-i

~

t ,/

t

Craftsman Detailing

f- -

Neo-Classical Detailing

-- "., ...... '''''

I"

-t

-~~l'~"-'f -~"'11'l ' "l

(1--

03/27/08

'~I

town founder.: ~.â&#x20AC;˘J\

r

Hudson Land Co., Inc. Urhan Villages, Inc.

Craftsman I Bungalow Detailing

English I Thdor Detailing

Pagc 47

C 200B Dover, Kohl & Partne ..


1D

路 a 路 tW ".

..,

.

<

W . '路

r

I,

.

,

Chapel and Post . Office Scott Fmn

., . ......

03/27/08

;

"

" ';

'0 w n

/ 0

.'

"

.. ,'

u n d e r, :

Rud80n Land Co., Inc. Urban Villages, Inc.

Pap 48

02008 Dover, Ko hI .t Part.ero

Farm BunkHouse .

Farm Manager's . House

Gary Justice

Scott Fmn


/ T2

Cl41.zt 7I1an

I

Cil lO.,. 111011017

NIA

.......

.. _ 7nz

I

UI _

111MO

N IA

I I I

T5

T3

111M'"

BY

'8-"

711211111217

N IA

OU1'" 11M DR .....

1NW7

N IA

DR4N1

7111111

I

ST 40· 17 7/1 0 ST 45·23

11811

N IA

NIA

ST 52-30

1/l1li7

ST 42·22 22

I I I I

DR

I

>

1 ' - '- '

N IA

NIA

ST 47·27

21

........

....... 1/1

N IA

03/27/08

1/1

LA 20·12 12

NIA

NIA

Hudson Land Co., Inc.

N IA

Urban Villages, Inc. . .0

:J

02008 Dover. Kohl

a: Partller.


[JUr

I

-

us 60-34

us

I

I I I

I

60-34

,

~ T2

T3

I I

T5 CI.r-28 7"217

ca .....

N/A

711011017

.......

.......7no

711111.

N /A

,,

,,

7110Men

I

"

8V'l-tl 711211111217

N/A

I

I

I

DR.7..t1 7/111 011 . . . . 7_

N/A

011...., Tltll"

IT 40-17 7110 ST 45-23

71'"

N/A

N /A

ST 52-30

711N7

8T 42-22 22

03127/08

N/ A

8H1-27

" ' 0 ID

n

f

00 ..... III

ounder.:

Rulis0 D Land Co., Inc. Urban Village., Inc.

02008 Do•• ~, Ito hI • P,artaero

00 .... III

us

....1fr"DR4:7.2~!!I!!!!i!!!~l."" ..__

.--.--.-- .--.--.--

I I

.-- .J

N /A

LA 20·12

" N/A

. .0

N /A


S[bS

Pavement Width Right of Way Width Streetscape Type

t

47'

t

I 13 ' 7' 12' 7' 8'1

STREETSCAPE TYPES BV: AV: CS: US: ST: RD: AL: LA: PA:

t- t-'--t- l

Boulevard Avenue Commercial Street Urban Street Street Road Rear Alley Rear Lane Path

t

60'

45'

t

t

I 13' 7' 10' 10 ' 7' 13' I

t----i-t-t- Hi

J

1

CS 47路26

CS 60路34

US 45路19

T4-0, TS

T4-0, TS

T4-R, T4-0, TS

Commercial Street

Commercial Street

Urban Street

Movement

Free movement

Free movement

Free movement

Traffic Lanes

One one-wa~

Two lanes

One one-way

Parking Lanes

Two sides @ 7 feet marked

Two sides @ 7 feet marked

One side @ 7 feet marked

R.O.w. Width

47 feet

60 feet

4S feet

Pavement Width

26 feet

34 feet

19 feet

Curb Radius

'IS feet

IS feet

I Sfeet

Vehicular Design Speed

2SMPH

2SMPH

2SMPH

Pedestrian Crossing Time

S.7 seconds

7.S seconds

4.2 seconds

Sidewalk Width

13 feet/ 8 feet

13 feet

6 feet

Planter Width

4'x4' planters

4'x4' planters

7 feet

Varies

Varies

Varies

Trees at 30' o.C. Avg.

Treesat 30' o.C. Avg.

Trees at 30' o.C. Avg.

Transect Type

Road Edge Treatment Planting

03/27/08

tow

II

fouBder.:

Hudson Land Co., Inc. Urban Villages, Inc.

PageSI

02008 Dover, Kohl & Partner.


5T-57-20

ll=

Pavement Width Right of Way Width 60' or S3 '

'---- - Streetscape Type

7S'

t

t

BV: AV: CS: US: ST: RD: AL: LA: PA:

03/27/08

town founder.:

Hudson Land Co., Inc. Urban Villages, Inc.

Page 52

Boulevard Avenue Commercial Street Urban Street Street Road Rear Alley Rear Lane Path

is'6'7' g' g' 7'6'si

j --t-

j

t-t-t-r

1

1

1

t

j j

t-i-ti-I1

.J

US 53-27 or US 60-34

BV 75-19

DR 47-25 or DR 54-32

Transect

T4-R, T4-0, T5

T4-R, T4-0, T5

T3, T4-R, T4-0, T5

Type

Urban Street

Boulevard

Drive

Movement

Free movement

Free movement

Slow movement

Traffic lanes

Two lanes

Two lanes

Two lanes

Two sides @ 7 feet marked

One side @ 7 feet marked or Two sides @ 7 feet marked

Parking lanes

One side

@ 7 feet

marked or Two sides

@ 7 feet

marked

R.O.w. Width

53 feet or 60 feet

75 feet

47 feet or 54 feet

Pavement Width

27 feet or 34 feet

19 feet and 19 feet

25 feet or 32 feet

Curb Radius

15 feet

15 feet

15 feet

Vehicular Design Speed

25 MPH

25MPH

20 MPH

Pedestrian Crossing Time

6 seconds or 7.5 seconds

4.2 seconds Ito medianl

5.5 seconds or 7 seconds

Sidewalk Width

6 feet

6 feet

5 feet or 11 feet

Planter Width

7 feet

7 feet

6 feet or 4'x4' planters

Road Edge Treatment

Varies

Varies

Vanes

Trees at 30' o.c. Avg.

Trees at 30' o.c. Avg.

Trees at 30' o.c. Avg.

Planting 02008 Dover, Kohl &: Partner.

1

16' 7' 7' 12' 11' 12' 7' 7' 6'1

t-t-t

STREETSCAPE TYPES

54' or 47'

t'- - - -t


SITS

Pavement Width Right of Way Width Streetscape Type

~

49'

I

• I

15'6 ' 10' 10' 7' 6'5 1

li i-i-t-t-t-II

t

40'

t

15'6 ' 7' 10 ' 7' 5 1

t

52 ' or 45'

t

15'6' 7' 8 ' 8' 7 ' 6 ' 51

ti -t-t-H-r

tt-t-t----t- t-t-t1

DR 49·27

ST 40·17

ST 45·23 or ST 52·30

T3, T4-R, T4-0, T5

T3, T4-R, T4-0

T3, T4-R, T4-0

Drive

Street

Street

Movement

Free movement

Slow movement

Slow movement

Traffic Lanes

Two lanes

One one-wa~

Two lanes

Parking Lanes

One side @ 7 feet marked

One side @ 7 feet marked

One side @ 7 feet marked or Two sides@ 7 feet marked

R,O'w, Width

49 feet

40 feet

45 feet or 52 feet

Pavement Width

27 feet

17 feet

23 feet or 30 feet

Curb Radius

15 feet

25 feet if swale, 15 feet if curb

25 feet if swale, 15 feet if curb

Vehicular Design Speed

20 MPH

15MPH

15MPH

Pedestrian Crossing TIme

5,5 seconds or 7 seconds

3.7 seconds

5,1seconds or 6,6 seconds

Sidewalk Width

5 feet

5 feet

5 feet

Planter Width

7 feet

6 feet/ 7 feet

6 feet

Road Edge Treatment

Varies

Varies

Varies

Trees at 30' o,c, Avg,

Trees at 30' o.C. Avg.

Trees at 30' o.C. Avg.

STREETSCAPE TYPES BV: AV: CS: US: ST: RD: AL: LA: PA:

Boulevard Avenue Commercial Street Urban Street Street Road Rear Alley Rear Lane Path

Transect Type

Planting

I

1

03/27/08

town founder.:

Hudson Land Co., Inc. Urban Villages, Inc.

PageS3

02008 Dover. Kohl & Partner.

Hudson alabama  
Hudson alabama