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THE CHICAGO STUDIO COLLABORATION INTERDISCIPLINARY VISIONS FOR THE CENTRAL MANUFACTURING DISTRICT


THE CHICAGO STUDIO COLLABORATION INTERDISCIPLINARY VISIONS FOR THE CENTRAL MANUFACTURING DISTRICT

University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign School of Architecture Department of Landscape Architecture Department of Urban and Regional Planning


Copyright The Chicago Studio Collaboration: Interdisciplinary Visions For The Central Manufacturing District Copyright © 2018 Faculty and students of the following studios: ARCH 574: The Urban Studio - Kevin Hinders LA 537: The Chicago Studio Conor O’Shea UP 494: Chicago Planning Studio - Robert Olshansky Published by the Illinois School of Architecture University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign 611 Lorado Taft Drive, Champaign, IL 61820 Printed in the United States of America All rights reserved. ISBN: ###-#-###-#####-# Library of Congress Control Number: ########## Graphic Design: Andreé Sahakian


Acknowledgments The Chicago Studio would like to thank the City of Chicago, Stantec, the professional design and planning firms, and other organizations who supported our academic investigations throughout the course of the studio. In addition, we are grateful for our fruitful collaboration with Professor Kheir Al-Kodmany and his students. Adrian Smith + Gordon Gill Architecture Alderman Patrick D. Thompson, 11th Ward Booth Hansen CA Ventures CannonDesign Chicago Metropolitan Agency for Planning Design Workshop Farr Associates Gensler Goettsch Partners Hammersley Architecture Hoerr Schaudt Landscape Architects Houseal Lavigne Associates llinois Institute of Technology The City of Chicago Department of Planning and Development The University of Illinois College of Fine and Applied Arts

Klein and Hoffman LISC Chicago Magnusson Klemencic Associates Metropolitan Planning Council OKW Architects Perkins + Will RATIO Rivetna Architects SCB and Associates Sheehan, Nagle Hartray Architects SmithGroupJJR SOM The John Buck Company Woodhouse Tinucci Architects


About What is the future of Chicago’s Central Manufacturing District? During the fall 2017 academic semester, the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign School of Architecture, Department of Landscape Architecture, and Department of Urban and Regional Planning worked in five interdisciplinary teams to produce speculative visions of Chicago’s Central Manufacturing District. A team of graduate students from UIC’s Department of Urban Planning and Policy led by Prof. Kheir Al-Kodmany worked alongside the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign teams. Illinois School of Architecture students, led by Prof. Kevin Hinders, were based in Chicago, and took theory and professional practice coursework alongside studio. Department of Landscape Architecture and Department of Urban and Regional Planning students, taught by Prof. Conor O’Shea and Prof. Rob Olshansky, respectively, made five trips to Chicago over the course of the semester. Collaboration occurred in face-to-face meetings, charrettes, and also relied heavily on the use of virtual communication platforms. Trips to Chicago included a kickoff meeting with representatives from the City of Chicago, the Metropolitan Planning Council, and LISC Chicago on September 1, 2017. Subsequent trips included a group charrette, midterm review, final review, and open house, all attended by Chicago-area practitioners and City officials. This book collects final student proposals from the Chicago Studio Open House Gallery, which took place on December 15, 2017 in the Chicago Studio space housed within Stantec’s offices in the Railway Exchange Building in downtown Chicago.


Table of Contents 10

Timeline

28

Research

46

Proposals


Proposals 4

3

PLANTS FOR PHYTOREMEDIATION AND BIOMASS

SWITCHGRASS

SWITCHGRASS

POPLAR TREE

MISCANTHUS SINESIS

WILLOW TREE

E AV

4

5

5

6

48

66

A

84

102

120

SOUTH BRANCH DISTRICT

URBAN PALIMPSEST

EDU-WALK

Amenitizing Bubbly Creek and Reviving the CMD

Introducing the Art Manufacturing District

ALGAE-ING THE FUTURE

An Urban Energy Lab

Bridging Work, Community and Environment

Xiangyun Cao Yuting Gao Huaixuan Li Andreé Sahakian Manman Shao Richa Singh

Osiel Guzman Zhengge Jiang Sebastian Koth Claudlène Saint Vil Lei Wang Sijia Yang

Kalyani Agnihotri Yizhen Ding Eva Temporal Durán Ying ‘Yoda’ Li Marc Ponce Litong Zeng

Saloni Chawla Dijia Chen David O’Donoghue Sara Hadavi Shuyu Yin Ye Yuan

RAPESEED

7

B

W 35TH ST

8

6 2

1

S MORGAN STREET

8

7

S RACINE STREET

S ASHLAND AVE

W 37TH STREET

S IRON STREET

ER

CH

W 38th STREET

LOOP IT IN W PERSHING ROAD

Carol Brobeck David Huang Yun Huang Erika Johannessen Patricia McKissack Himangshu Kedia


Timeline


1. Frameworks

2. Research 3. Design Strategy 4. Design De

1

Weeks 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10

Fr i.

.2 0

ct

es i

gn

id te rm

|D

|M

Se p. 22

O

Fr i.

C

ha rre tte

Se M p. on 1 .S |K ep ic . 4 kof La f M bo ee r D tin ay g | S

Fr i.

ite

Vi si t


evelopment and Documentation

11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18

N

R ev i ew

Fr i.

D

ec .

15

pe n

|O

H

ou se

ov .1 11 7 .2 | 011 Fin al .2 R 4 Fa evi e ll Br w ea k

Fr i.

m


The Chicago Studio Collaboration

Design Charette Landscape Architecture and Urban Planning students generate preliminary ideas during the design charrette.

14


Timeline

15


The Chicago Studio Collaboration

Site Visit Bridgeport Art Center is a new art hub built from an old warehouse building. It is adjacent to the South Fork of the South Branch of the Chicago River, nicknamed ‘Bubbly Creek.’ 16


Timeline

17


The Chicago Studio Collaboration

18


Timeline

19


The Chicago Studio Collaboration

Design Charrette Students and faculty from all four studios meet to brainstorm and form teams.

20


Timeline

21


The Chicago Studio Collaboration

Midterm Review Teams present to multiple groups of professionals and academics from Chicago and Champaign-Urbana.

22


Timeline

23


The Chicago Studio Collaboration

Final Review 11th Ward Alderman Patrick D. Thompson and City of Chicago Department of Planning and Development Commissioner David Reifman discuss proposals. 24


Timeline

25


The Chicago Studio Collaboration

Open House Work presented at the November final review was refined and presented in gallery format during.

26


Timeline

27


Research


The Chicago Studio Collaboration

1920 Figure-ground

30


Research

1912's constructions 2017's constructions

FIGURE GROUND 2017 - 1912 E - 200':1''

Plan Overlay: 2017 | 1912

31


The Chicago Studio Collaboration

2017 Google Maps Satellite

32


Research

31ST ST

18 13

BRIDGEPORT

BU

ASHLAND AVE

CH AR

RACINE AVE

4

ST ER

BB EK

RE

MORGAN ST

C LY

7 9

16

3

35TH ST BUBBLY

17

8

15

ST

13

BRIDGEPORT

EK

RE

10

C LY

BB

BU

7

17

9

16

3

35TH ST

17

14

PERSHING RD 10 11

N

PERSHING RD

5

1

STOCKYARDS INDUSTRIAL PARK Total Area Owned & Average Value Per Acre

12

6

9

1

2

15

HALSTED ST

CENTRAL MANUFACTURING DISTRICT

5

1

17

8

2

CREEK

1

2

11

BUBBLY

9

MCKINLEY PARK

MCKINLEY PARK

14

HALSTED ST MORGAN ST

ER

CH AR

31ST ST

18 4 ASHLAND AVE

CENTRAL MANUFACTURING DISTRICT

12

6

RACINE AVE

CREEK

2

N

STOCKYARDS INDUSTRIAL PARK

400 FEET

400 FEET

MAJOR LANDOWNERS: TOTAL AREA OWNED & AVERAGE VALUE PER ACRE 1

City of Chicago 24.7 Acres. Value N/A

7

2

Averis & Associates Inc 24.2 Acres X $64,934/Acre

8 Commonwealth Edison 13.1 Acres X $8,183/Acre

14 Stockyards Brick & Timber 7.2 Acres X $53,121/Acre

Pepsi Co

Pure Metal Recycling

Thunderbird Catering

Vanek Brothers Trucking Co

The Miniat Companies

R4 Services Inc

Mark IV Realty 14.3 Acres X $58,273/Acre

Lexington Homes LLC 13 7.2 Acres X $24,850/Acre

MAJOR LANDOWNERS: TOTAL AREA OWNED & AVERAGE VALUE PER ACRE 1

City of Chicago 24.7 Acres. Value N/A

7

2

Averis & Associates Inc 24.2 Acres X $64,934/Acre

11 5 17.2 Acres X $43,747/Acre Brick &17Timber 6.3 Acres X $122,176/Acre 8.8 Acres X $100,906/Acre 14 Stockyards 8 Commonwealth Edison Peoples Gas Schulze & Burch Biscuit Co Tripp Lite Manufacturing 7.2 Acres X $53,121/Acre 13.1 Acres X $8,183/Acre 18 12 6 5.8 Acres X $58,992/Acre 16.6 Acres X $51,400/Acre 7.3 Acres X $209,715/Acre

3

Pepsi Co

9

3 17.7 Acres X $153,140/Acre Lexington 15 7.0 Acres X $68,603/Acre 9 13.0 Acres X $77,633/Acre Homes LLC Mark IV Realty 13 7.2Joslyn First Washington Mgmt. Prairie Management & Development Manufacturing Acres X $24,850/Acre 14.3 Acres X $58,273/Acre 4 17.5 Acres X $330,901/Acre 10 16 6.4 Acres X $285,251/Acre 12.7 Acres X $21,956/Acre

Pure Metal Recycling

15

Thunderbird Catering

33


PROPERTY VALUE PER ACRE

VACANT

The Chicago Studio Collaboration

HALSTED ST

MORGAN ST

RACINE AVE

ASHLAND AVE

35TH ST

PERSHING RD

Property Value Per Acre

$141,422 - $345,294 $345,294 - $693,673 $693,674 - $1,788,504

$0 34

$141,422 - $345,294

Z


VACANT LAND, VALUE EXEMPT & NO OWNERSHIPVACANT Research PROPERTY PER PROPERTY ACRE LAND, EX

MORGAN ST

ASHLAND AVE

HALSTED ST

HALSTED ST

RACINE AVE

294

MORGAN ST

RACINE AVE

ASHLAND AVE

ASHLAND AVE

35TH ST

35TH ST

PERSHING RD

PERSHING RD

$0

$141,422 - $345,294

Z

< $49,603

$345,294 - $693,673

400

Vacant Land, Exempt Property & No Ownership

$49,603 - $141,422

Z

VACANT LAND (LOTS & RIGHT-OF-WAY)

Analysis of Cook County Assessor data, 2016

35TH ST

Vacant Land (Lots and Right-of-Way)

$693,673 - $1,788,504

FEET

VACANT LA (LOTS & RIG

VACANT W IMPROVEM

Vacant with Minor Improvements

Railroad/ Exempt

RAILROAD/EXEMPT (Right-of-Way, Gov’t, Etc.) No CurrentGOV'T, Owner (RIGHT-OF-WAY, ETC) (Owner is ‘Taxpayer Of’)

35


The Chicago Studio Collaboration

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CONNECTIVITY, LIVABILITY Sara Hadavi

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倀愀氀漀猀 T爀愀椀氀 匀y猀琀攀m (U渀瀀愀瘀攀搀)

M愀j漀爀 T愀y氀漀爀 T爀愀椀氀 (倀愀瘀攀搀)

G爀攀攀渀 渀攀琀w漀爀k猀 愀琀 爀攀最椀漀渀愀氀 猀c愀氀攀 匀漀u爀c攀猀: ⴀ T爀愀椀氀猀 爀攀瀀爀漀搀uc攀搀 f爀漀m 琀栀攀 椀渀琀攀爀愀c琀椀瘀攀 m愀瀀 漀f F漀爀攀猀琀 倀爀攀猀攀爀瘀攀猀 漀f C漀漀k C漀u渀琀y: 栀琀琀瀀猀://m愀瀀⸀f瀀搀cc⸀c漀m/# ⴀ B椀k攀w愀y猀 愀渀搀 倀愀爀k猀: C椀琀y 漀f C栀椀最漀 G䤀匀/D愀琀愀: 栀琀琀瀀猀://www⸀c椀琀y漀fc栀椀c愀最漀⸀漀爀最/c椀琀y/攀渀/搀攀瀀琀猀/搀漀椀琀/瀀爀漀ⴀ 瘀搀爀猀/最椀猀/猀瘀c猀/m愀瀀猀ⴀⴀⴀ最椀猀ⴀ搀愀琀愀⸀栀琀m氀 ⴀ 䤀m愀最攀猀: G漀漀最氀攀 M愀瀀

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The Chicago Studio Collaboration Source: Basemap from Mapbox.com Retail location from http://www.viennabeef.com/where-to-buy-eat Drive area from https://www.trulia.com/

$5 million subsidy

Lincoln Park Zoo

Old Plant

Vienna’s old plant located at 2501 N. Damen Ave. The 6-way intersection always encountered severe congestion, which triggered a reconstruction with the reconfigured Elston Avenue cutting right in front of Vienna’s front door.

Move

The city offered Vienna Beef 5 million dollars subsidy for the moving. The north plant operates as factory store & corporate offices. In return of the subsidy, Vienna Beef has to occupy the south plant for the next 15 years and employ a minimum of 250 full-time employees.

Source: “Vienna Beef Move to Bridgeport Gets $5M City TIF Subsidy”, by Casey Cora, DNAinfo. “RIP, North Side manufacturing”, by Joe Cahill, Crain’s Chcago Business. Damen-Elston-Fullerton intersection improvement, Chicago Department of Transportation

United Center

Soldier Field

New Plant

Guaranteed Rate Field

Midway International Airport

Vienna’s new plant locates at 1000 W. Pershing Rd., which becomes their major manufacturing & distribution facility. They also have a factory store opened across the street.

Employee 250 Production 2000-3000 pounds/ week Distribution 50% Chicagoland / 50% National

LOCAL FOOD Vienna Beef

Source: Direct contact

David Huang

Vienna Beef is the most well-known local food brand in Chicago. Through its 120-year dedication, Chicago style hotdog becomes an iconic phenomenon. This study uses its south plant as a case study in order to have a fundamental awareness of Chicago’s urban process. Before moving to the south plant, the headquarter of Vienna Beef used to locate at 2501 N. Damen Ave, to the west of Lincoln Park. Vienna Beef took residence at this place since 1972 until a rerouting project for the increasingly congested North Damen, North Elston and West Fullerton avenue intersection. By the increasing influxes of professionals and the residential expansion, “Streets once use mainly by semi-trailers shuttling to and from local factories are now clogged with commuters Range Rovers and Priuses”, said Joe Cahill, Crain's Chicago Business. The rerouted Elston Ave cut right into Vienna Beef’s property, resulting in its south move which is funded $5 million by the city. In return of the $5 million subsidy, Vienna Beef guaranteed to occupy their new place at least 15 years and employ 250 full-time employees. To the opposite side of what Vienna Beef encountered in north Chicago, it is so welcome in south Chicago. The less-occupied road, the easy access to the freeway, the potential employees in the nearby neighborhood, and less population density all make this place a fertile soil for this new plant.

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Business Parter Plant Distribution Route 20 munite-drive Scope

N 0

0.5

1 mi.


Research

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The Chicago Studio Collaboration

C栀椀c愀最漀 匀漀u琀栀 刀椀瘀攀爀 H椀猀琀漀爀椀c愀氀 M愀瀀, ㄀㠀㠀㤀 匀漀u爀c攀: www⸀氀椀b⸀uc栀椀c愀最漀⸀攀搀u/攀/c漀氀氀攀c琀椀漀渀猀/m愀瀀猀/c栀椀最漀瘀

C椀琀y C漀渀猀um瀀琀椀漀渀 漀f 圀愀琀攀爀

匀椀琀攀 C漀渀猀um瀀琀椀漀渀 漀f 圀愀琀攀爀

匀漀u爀c攀: 匀u猀琀愀椀渀愀b氀攀 圀愀琀攀爀 U猀攀 椀渀 C椀琀椀攀猀 愀渀搀 䤀渀搀u猀琀爀y: Fu琀u爀攀 C栀愀氀氀攀渀最攀猀 愀渀搀 倀爀漀m椀猀椀渀最 匀琀爀愀琀攀最椀攀猀 by K椀mb攀爀氀攀y 䄀⸀ G爀愀y

C栀椀c愀最漀 匀漀u琀栀 刀椀瘀攀爀 M愀瀀 w椀琀栀 L愀渀搀 U猀攀, ㈀ ㄀㌀ 匀漀u爀c攀: www⸀cm愀瀀⸀椀氀氀椀渀漀椀猀⸀最漀瘀/搀愀琀愀/氀愀渀搀ⴀu猀攀/椀渀瘀攀渀琀漀爀y , C漀u爀猀攀 F漀氀搀攀爀

䤀渀搀u猀琀爀椀愀氀 刀攀猀椀搀攀渀琀椀愀氀 C漀mm攀爀c椀愀氀 䤀渀猀琀椀琀u琀椀漀渀愀氀 倀愀爀k猀 愀渀搀 F愀c椀氀椀琀椀攀猀 匀漀u爀c攀: www⸀最漀漀最氀攀⸀c漀m/bubb氀y c爀攀攀k

匀琀漀爀m 圀愀琀攀爀 愀渀搀 圀愀猀琀攀 圀愀琀攀爀

WATER: FUNCTIONS AND CHALLENGES Saloni Chawla, Aaron (Zhengge) Jiang, Manman Shao

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㄀ m椀氀氀椀漀渀 ⴀ㄀   m椀氀氀椀漀渀 最愀氀氀漀渀 漀瘀攀爀f氀漀w/y爀 ㄀   m椀氀氀椀漀渀 ⴀ㄀ b椀氀氀椀漀渀 最愀氀氀漀渀 漀瘀攀爀f氀漀w/y爀 ㄀ b椀氀氀椀漀渀 最愀氀氀漀渀 漀爀 m漀爀攀 漀瘀攀爀f氀漀w/y爀 刀愀c椀渀攀 倀um瀀椀渀最 匀琀愀琀椀漀渀 圀攀琀氀愀渀搀猀 F氀漀漀搀 䄀ff攀c琀攀搀 䄀爀攀愀猀 匀琀漀爀m圀愀琀攀爀 圀愀猀琀攀圀愀琀攀爀 N椀琀爀漀最攀渀/倀栀漀猀瀀栀漀爀u猀 B愀c琀攀爀椀愀

匀漀u爀c攀: w愀琀攀爀⸀u猀最猀⸀最漀瘀 , www⸀c栀椀c愀最漀琀爀椀bu渀攀⸀c漀m/渀攀w猀, 匀漀u爀攀 www⸀䤀爀c⸀u猀愀c攀⸀愀爀my⸀m椀氀/M椀猀猀椀漀渀猀/C椀瘀椀氀ⴀ圀漀爀k猀ⴀ倀爀漀j攀c琀猀/ Bubb氀yⴀC爀攀攀k

M愀j漀爀 倀漀氀氀u琀愀渀琀猀


Research

WATER: MOVEMENT AND ISSUES

Saloni Chawla, Aaron (Zhengge) Jiang, Manman Shao

The board focused on the water system and water movement. In Chicago, fresh water comes from the Lake Michigan, and after usage, it will be discharged to the Mississippi river system. But the river diversion was different from what it looks like today before 1900. At that time, Chicago’s sewage was discharged into Chicago river and thence into Lake Michigan—the source of Chicago’s drinking water. In 1885, 90,000 people died in Chicago from cholera as a result of this situation. The Bureau of Water Supply provides just under one billion gallons of water a day to Chicago and neighboring suburban communities. And most of them are surface water, from lake Michigan. Like most cities in this area, Chicago built one underground system that combines both wastewater and stormwater and moves them away from people toward treatment plants. And to deal with combined sewer overflow, Tunnel and Reservoir Plan was put into construction. As a result of global climate change, rainfall will occur in more intense storms, and today, 60% of Chicago’s land area is paved with hard covers, the rainwater is not allowed for infiltration as most are designed to drained as fast as possible. And water flow is the main source of water pollution. Apart from digging deeply, green stormwater infrastructures are more and more strengthened. Like green roof, permeable pavement, parks and open spaces.

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The Chicago Studio Collaboration

44


Research

OTHER AGGREGATES

METAL

ON

PY EX LO

S

I OM

EN

V TE

ST

FOOD

S

S LUMBER

31st ST

FULL OR PARTIAL TRUCK RESTRICTIONS

DAMEN AVE

VERTICAL CLEARANCES 12’0” - 13’5” S LOWE AVE TO S STATE ST.

Companies that manufacture and wholesale raw materials were analyzed and placed into five different categories: Food (not including resturants), Lumber, Metal, Aggregates, and Other. Companies considered “Other” include window, chemical, and mirror manufacturers.

MARIANO’S GROCER

BRIDGEPORT

33rd ST ASHLAND AVE

References: GIS Data set ChicagoIndustrialBuildings Google Earth

RACINE AVE

Figure 2: Raw Material Breakdown in the Central Manufacturing District

CRYSTAL WINDOW & DOOR II

M

35th ST SCHULZE & BURCH BISCUIT BAKED GOODS MANUFACTURING

FORMER WRIGLEY GUM FACTORY (SEE FIG. 4)

CENTRAL MANUFACTURING DISTRICT

VULCAN MATERIALS CO. DISTRIBUTION YARD CENTRAL MANUFACTURING DISTRICT

M

MARKETSQUARE FURNITURE STORE FORMER WHITE STOKES CO. CANDY MANUFACTURING (SEE FIG. 4)

M

YING FAT SEAFOOD WHOLESALER

HIGHWAY ROUTE RAIL LINES

MCKINLEY PARK

T2 CABINET CABINET SHOWROOM

MASTER PAPER BOX CO. PACKAGING SUPPLY

M

M

HIGGIN’S BROS INDUSTRIAL CONTAINER WHOLESALE

M

TREJO’S IRON WORKS IRON & STEEL DISTRIBUTION

THUNDERBIRD CATERING FOOD TRUCKS

LA GUADALUPANA WHOLESALE LATINO DISHES

GRIFFITH FOODS SPECIALTY FOODS DEVELOPER

HART DAVIS WINE COMPANY WINE RETAILER

MIDLAND METAL PRODUCTS CO. METAL FABRICATION

M

MEXICALI FOOD PRODUCTS INC. WHOLESALE GROCER

M COLUMBIA PIPE & SUPPLY CO. MIXED METAL DISTRIBUTION

M GRAND A INTERNATIONAL CO. ALUMINUM & PLASTIC MANUFACTURING

This map depicts the assumed train and truck transportation routes for one of Chicago’s leading construction aggregate companies located within the Central Manufacturing District.

UNICHEM CHEMICAL MANUFACTURING

PURE METAL RECYCLING

SAND & GRAVEL PIT

Figure 3: Transportation Route of Aggregates for Vulcan Materials Co.

D & H GRANITE & MARBLE SUPPLY

VIENNA BEEF

INDUSTRIAL MAINTENANCE WELD MACHINE WELDING & REPAIR

BACK OF THE YARDS

MOBILITY: RAW MATERIAL

SOUTH CHICAGO PACKING BLENDED OIL MANUFACTURING

PERSHING RD

VULCAN MATERIALS CO. AGGREGATE DISTRIBUTOR

References: GIS Data set VulcanAllAssets, May 2017 BNSF_UP_CHI Basemap: World Dark Grey Canvas Base Google Maps

METAL MAGIC SPECIALTY METAL PRODUCTS

M

INFINITE HERBS HERBAL WHOLESALE

MORGAN ST

ALL INDUSTRIES MIRROR MANUFACTURING

DISTRIBUTION CENTER STONE QUARRY

VERTICAL CLEARANCES 12’0” - 13’5” S LOWE AVE TO S STATE ST.

Erika Johannesen

The Merriam-Webster definition of Manufacture is “something made from raw materials by hand or by machine.” From this definition, links to businesses within the Central Manufacturing District that work with raw materials were sought out to better understand how raw materials are used within the site. These companies were divided into five material categories: Food (not including restaurants), Lumber, Metal, Aggregates, and Other (See Fig 2). The biggest use of raw materials on site go into the production and wholesale of foods, with metal being a close second. Of the 28 companies identified, only 9 are manufacturing businesses, the rest use raw materials in pre-processed forms (See Fig. 1). An important aspect in dealing with raw materials is the transportation of them; heavier products may require train transport, whereas others benefit from the speed and convenience of truck delivery. Using Chicago Freight System Planning maps, truck access was determined on site, allowing a look into the importance of these truck routes and the design limitations these cause (noise, traffic, smell). From Ashland Ave, arterial routes were determined outlining the likely truck routes from the Stevenson Expressway to each company (See Fig. 1). The status of active and inactive rail lines are also determined; inactive lines may have design potential for walking or biking trails, as many of these forgotten lines are dismantled or simply forgotten. Other potential on this site lies in the form of two historic manufacturing plants: the former Wrigley Gum Factory, and the former White Stokes Company. Current owners of the Wrigley Gum Factory plan to one day add a grocery store to the building in order to anchor what is to become a lively new shopping center. The White Stokes Co. Factory on the other hand is seeking new ownership. Both factory buildings have locations on and near Ashland Ave. that provide big freight transportation potential (See Fig 4).

A HL AS

ND

E AV

Truck Access: Full (Ashland Ave) Limited to Full Restrictions Limited Size Restrictions

35TH ST FORMER WRIGLEY GUM FACTORY

Transportation Use: Heavy Little

Company Type: M Manufacturing Wholesale / Distribution

Rail Line Status: In Use Not in Use / Demolished

Figure 1: Raw Material Flow Networks FORMER WHITE STOKES CO. ABANDONED RAIL LINE

This map shows the geographic locations of manufacturing and wholesale companies who produce and sell raw materials in the Central Manufacturing District. Companies are sorted into five different material categories: Food (not including restaurants), Lumber, Aggregates, Metal, and Other. Also depicted are freight travel routes and restrictions for trucks and trains.

Figure 4: Opportunity in Historic Structures

Although Manufacturing has ceased within both the former Wrigley Gum Factory (left) and White Stokes Co. (right), the buildings have tremendous opportunity to revitalize the area. References: GIS Data sets: ChicagoIndustrialBuildings dnainfo.com: “What’s Going on with the Old Wrigley Gum Factory?” Loopnet.com: For Sale Property Listing on White Stokes Co. Google Earth

References: GIS Data sets: ChicagoIndustrialBuildings BNSF_UP_CHI (Rail Lines) CMAP: City of Chicago Freight System Planning Map CMAP: Region Freight System Planning Info Google Earth MapBox

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Proposals


Loop It In Carol Brobeck David Huang Yun Huang Erika Johannessen Patricia McKissack Himangshu Kedia

This proposal serves is aa urban redevelopment plan that uses and redirects existing regional and local wastes to enhance and reinvigorate the Central Manufacturing District (CMD). This waste includes food from grocers and manufacturers, outdated and underutilized infrastructure, and contaminated sludge from the bottom of Bubbly Creek. The strategy begins with the construction of an anaerobic digester on site. The digester processes food and contaminated sludge wastes, turning them into energy and heat. Next, roads and walkways are reconfigured, creating efficient and accessible waste loops to improve waste transportation. Following this, we recommend revitalizing buildings through renovation, adaptive reuse, and infill construction. Reallocating land uses across the site through zoning recommendations will strengthen existing industries and establish clusters for new businesses and research facilities. In order to enhance walkability, new walking trails run along abandoned railways, inviting the public into the site to explore this historic place. New businesses have the opportunity to engage with these processes, leading to the creation of new jobs and neighborhood amenities. A rehabilitated historic Old Wrigley Gum Factory one the corner of Ashland Avenue and 35th Street supports a new mixed-use commercial and research corridor, provides a constant source of food waste, and connects to the rest of the site through railway walking trails. Looking ahead to the next 40 years, this intervention will leave the CMD with a clean and accessible Bubbly Creek, a reduction in the dependence on landfills, and a revitalized economy designed for sustainable commercial, manufacturing, and recreational use.


The Chicago Studio Collaboration

[LOOP] IT IN Carol Brobeck Himangshu Kedia Erika Johannesen Yun Huang David Huang Patricia McKissack

The City of Chicago is world famous, known for its architecture, food, and innovation. The Central Manufacturing District (CMD), located in the south of the Bridgeport community, is reminiscent of the architecture and innovation of the

REGINAL FOOD WASTE MAP

RESEARCH

JOBS

once prosperous manufacturing and industrial hub. Today, Chicago produces 330,000 tons of food waste each year and the CMD currently houses a number of food manufacturing businesses. We see this as a huge opportunity for a

an opportunity to re-use waste || organic + spatial

new wave of innovation in the CMD.

TRAINING

Many areas of Chicago have seen regeneration and reinvigoration in Chicago, our proposal shows the potential of the CMD. While several buildings still stand, the District feels like a ghost town, with abandoned rail lines, vacant lots, and curious industries. We see the future of the CMD as the preeminent example of innovation in sustainable adaptation recreating an organized and desirable community through targeted planning and design interventions. The existing urban fabric of the CMD and its relationship to the processes that occur there have become strained over the years as businesses left or closed and the remnants of the past have cemented the site as a hub of contamination and waste.

PROCESS

MATERIAL

Our proposal centers around incorporating an anaerobic digester into the fabric of the CMD, turning waste into an asset in the Chicago area, rather than an environmental and economic burden.

PRODUCT

- Tackling Food Waste Landfills are responsible for one-third of all methane emissions in the United States, a potent greenhouse gas with 21 times the global warming potential of carbon dioxide. Each month in Chicago, 55 million pounds of food is taken directly from homes and businesses and straight into landfills more than 100 miles away. This waste contributes to

WELL-BEING

environmental costs in other communities, and costs the city just to move it. In [year], the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) set the

TOURISM

first-ever national food waste reduction goal, which aimed to reduce food waste by 50 percent by 2030. Food waste is the second greatest source of municipal solid waste and the need for innovative strategies in handling these outputs within the realm of food manufacturing, distribution, and consumption is more apparent than ever. Our proposal offers

CONSUMPTION

a way not only to divert this waste, but a way to make it productive. - Tackling River Contamination “Bubbly Creek”, a leg of the Chicago River that terminates at the CMD, has earned its nickname due to the concentration of contaminants resulting from a long history of pollution. Used historically as a means of transportation for

WEIGHT OF WASTE DIVERTED TO LANDFILLS 80,000 TONS = 8 EIFFEL TOWERS

local industries, the Chicago River has recently been transformed into a recreational amenity in Downtown, but Bubbly Creek is a liability for the CMD. In October of 2017, an oil spill caused closure to the south fork of the river. Twelve pollutants are concentrated on site including Formaldehyde and Arsenic and will be address first through sludge removal from the riverbed and then through plantings that can safely take up pollutants. The sludge and harvested

= 2,600 SINGLE FAMILY HOMES

plantings can be used in the anaerobic digester. We see that the City of Chicago and residents are already tackling

Manufacturing

these issues through the use of anaerobic digesters at the Calumet Water Reclamation District, in the Auburn Gresham

Food Facilities

central location in the city and an environment where the digester would act as a catalyst for reinvigoration of the CMD.

Warehouses number of structures

Other

spatial usage per type

Offices Opportunities (Vacancies) Opportunities (Connections)

SPATIAL USAGE PER BUILDING BY TYPE

Neighborhood and at the business Bubbly Dynamics. We feel that the CMD is a logical location for another given its Pre-settlement

- Why It Will Work -

Early 1900’s

Wetland Habitat

Late 1900’s

Aging sewers still overflow River Cleanup efforts for recreation Bubbly Creek became an have improved wildlife habitat industrial waste dumping ground bacteria-laden sewage and stormwater runoff into Bubbly along the banks and bottom of the for chemicals and blood and Creek creek. However, decomposition entrails from the local from old waste and sewer overflow meatpacking industry still causes methane and hydrogen sulfide gas to bubble up

There is a high concentration of food distributors on site, restaurants nearby, and bio solid waste supplied by Bubbly Creek. It will create renewable energy which can be used on site along with solid and liquid fertilizers to be used for farms and gardens, potentially also on site. Improved circulation centered around the digester will reroute waste traffic on site to create spaces of community engagement separate from waste disposal and production.

Capacity: 80,000 tons of Waste per year

New businesses will have the opportunity to synthesize with existing processes creating new jobs and neighborhood amenities. We are confident that this process will stimulate the economy, incentivizing business to move to the CMD

Dredging

for heat, electric, and waste removal cost savings.

wn

UT Canal Origins Park

Palmisano Park

e lin

IL IZ

AT IO

Buildu

Air Dry Station / Storage

S H

H

STAGE 4 O

C O

O

H H C H H

S H

H

O

C O

H H C H H

p of

FO

RG

Pre-treatment

Biogas Treatment

H

Anima de l and hyd compo sewag rog en se cau e waste sulfide sin be g gasesmetha gins to to bune an bble d up

AN

IC

WA S

TE

H

POLLUTANTS FOUND ON SITE red line Rate Field

+ Old & new manufacturing businesses operating on site + Bridgeport Arts Center & Zhou B Gallery provide a draw to the site for visitors & residents + Adjacent complimentary businesses to site + Significant organic waste generation on site/nearby; can be used to create renewable energy

Food Manufacturers Educational Facilities

+ Circulation is poor on site; Pedestrian/Bike Infrastructure on

Mckinley Park

Recreation Facilities

and around site are poor + The CMD site extends farther west, straining cohesion + Soil contamination on site

Creek Corridor

Connections

+ Multi-modal safety & accessibility needs improvement

+ Old rail lines no longer in use; vacant land & buildings

Food Manufacturers

+ Site is nestled between residential areas + Variety of uses on site provides potential for semi-closed loop system of production/re-use + PMD-8 Zoning encourages light manufacturing & research/ training facilities

Recreation Facilities

STOCKYARDS Educational Facilities

+ Many landowners own significant clusters of parcels, especially at key locations + Bubbly Creek is contaminated, inhibiting incorporation of recreational opportunities + Trucking routes along major arterials, bordering the site

CONNECTIONS || FOOD + RECREATION + EDUCATION

50

Highly Dense Restaurant Area Transfer Station Serving Area Current Food Waste Flow

disincentivize walkability Proposed Food Waste Flow

4.4 kW / kg 10.2 kW / kg 4.5 kW / kg 3.8 kW / kg 4.6 kW / kg

(Source: PYROMEX AG: Waste to Energy. http://www.sludgefacts.org/Ref87_2.pdf)

STAGE 2 3 4,473 ft of Sludge

Sewer overflow and sludge gets treated and used for energy production in Anaerobic Digester

STAGE 1 3 2,944 ft of Sludge Food Waste

Food Waste

Food Waste Combined Sewer

Combined Sewer

Food Waste

Combined Sewer

up

Toxic waste is dredged, removing hazardous materials from creek bottom

Sludge

Sludge

4 MONTHS

BRIDGEPORT

Cardboard Oil Sludge Paper Sewer Sludge (dried) Grass / Reeds

STAGE 3 3 2,151 ft of Sludge

H H C H H

Some return ed, vegeta but tox tion an ic wa d ste fish ha still bubbve les

Cogeneration power station

Calorific Values of Waste Types: Coffee Bean Shells 6.8 kW / kg Food Waste / Compost 4.8 kW / kg Corn 5.1 kW / kg Olive Oil Press residues 8.4 kW / kg

S

tox and ic wa bene ste ficial kills veg bacte eta tion ria

NO

New vegetation grown along creek banks remediates soil, aids in breaking down contaminants, and will be harvested as biofuel

O

Combined Sewer

MCKINLEY

Energy generation of up to 24,000,000 kwh per year

new opportunities for soil remediation research and how such plants can be included within anaerobic digestion.

H H C H H

e

Post Bubbly Creek dredging and Anaerobic Digester

biofuel farms in buildings renovated for improved uses. Contaminated soils from the riverbed of Bubbly Creek provide

& Ba con cteria tam ina break nts do

ng

2030

Research and job training will be encouraged to partake in the waste cycle process within newly established indoor

Vege tation

ora

1970-2017

Sludge


Loop It In

B

A

WEST 35TH STREET

Chicagoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Central Manufacturing District || 2060

DIGESTER PLAZA

WILLOW TREE

POPLAR

2018

2022

2020

2018

2020

2018

2020

2018

2020

2022

2024

2030

2024

Adaptive Re-Use--Wrigley Gum Factory RailRe-Use--Wrigley to Trail Construction Adaptive Gum Factory

2022

2024

Adaptive Re-Use/New Construction Rail to Trail Construction

2040

2050

2060

2030

2040

2050

2060

2030

2040

2050

2060

2030

2040

2050

2060

Adaptive Re-Use/New Construction Adaptive Re-Use--Wrigley Gum Factory

WEST 36TH TRAIL

Rail to Trail Construction 2022 2024 Adaptive Re-Use/New Construction

CULTURAL CENTER Adaptive Re-Use--Wrigley Gum Factory Rail to Trail Construction

Adaptive Re-Use/New Construction

AMERICAN ELM

NANNYBERRY

WEST 37TH STREET

Land Acquisition & Preparation Dredge Creek Land Acquisition & Preparation Build & Market Digester Dredge Creek Environmental Education-Bubbly Creek Remediation Environmental Education-Cultural Center Construction Bubbly Creek Remediation Land Acquisition & Preparation Dredge Creek

Land Acquisition &&Preparation Market Digester Land Acquisition &Build Preparation

Cultural CenterDigester Construction Build & Market Land Acquisition & Preparation Land Acquisition & Preparation

IMPROVED SIGNAGE

Environmental Education-Bubbly Creek Remediation

DredgeCultural Creek Center Construction

2018

2020

Build & Market Digester

2022

Environmental Education-2030 Bubbly Creek Remediation

2024

Land Acquisition & Preparation

2040

2050

2060

RAILS TO TRAILS Cultural Center Construction Adaptive Re-Use--Wrigley Gum Factory Rail to Trail Construction

Adaptive Re-Use/New Construction

INFORMATION KIOSK

PHYTOREMEDIATION

DOGWOOD

BICYCLE PARKING

POPLAR MAPLE

WASTE RECEPTACLES: FOOD / RECYCLING / WASTE Land Acquisition & Preparation Dredge Creek Land Acquisition & Preparation & Market Digester DredgeBuild Creek

HEAVY DUTY TRUCK PAVING

Digester--Creek Wastes Digester--Food Waste & Biofuel Plants Digester--Creek Wastes Habitat Plantings Along Creek Digester--Food Waste & Biofuel Plants

BiofuelBuild Planting Remediation Market DigesterBegins Land Acquisition &&Preparation

Biofuel Planting Remediation2024 Begins Digester--Creek Wastes Creek 2022 2020 2018 Dredge

Habitat Plantings Along Creek 2030

2040

2050

2060

Build & Market Digester Digester--Food Waste & Biofuel Plants Adaptive Re-Use--Wrigley Gum Factory Land Land Acquisition Acquisition && Preparation Preparation Habitat Plantings Along Creek Biofuel Planting Remediation Begins Rail to Trail Construction Digester--Creek Wastes DredgeDredge Creek Creek Re-Use/New Construction & Adaptive Market Digester Build Build & Market Digester Digester--Food Waste & Biofuel Plants Environmental Education-Bubbly Creek Remediation Habitat Plantings Along Creek

Land Acquisition & PreparationBegins Biofuel Planting Remediation

Cultural Center Construction

Land Acquisition & Preparation Dredge Creek Build & Market Digester

Environmental Education-Bubbly Creek Remediation

Land Acquisition & Preparation Cultural Center Construction Land Acquisition & Preparation Dredge Creek Build & Market Digester Biofuel Planting Remediation Begins

Digester--Creek Wastes Digester--Food Waste & Biofuel Plants Habitat Plantings Along Creek

51


The Chicago Studio Collaboration

[LOOP] IT IN an opportunity to re-use waste || organic + spatial

52


Loop It In

Manufacturing Food Facilities Warehouses Number of structures

Other

Spatial usage per type

Offices Opportunities (Vacancies) Opportunities (Connections)

SPATIAL USAGE PER BUILDING BY TYPE

53


The Chicago Studio Collaboration EX

IST

IN

G

Existing Buildings

Running Track

Proposed Buildings

Plazas and Trails

Revitalized Buildings

Blocks

Rail to Trail

Roadway and Parking

Bike lane

Digester Facillites

Board Walk

EX

TE

IN

RIO

TE

R

RE

RI

OR

B

-U

W 35TH ST

A

SE

AD

DIT

IO

N

S ASHLAND AVE

MORPHOLOGY + TYPOLOGY

S RACINE STREET

tW 38th STREET

W PERSHING ROAD

MASTER PLAN

54

S MORGAN STREET

S IRON STREET

W 37TH STREET


s

Loop It In

Canal Origins Park

Palmisano Park

BRIDGEPORT MCKINLEY

Rate Field

Mckinley Park

Food Manufacturers

Recreation Facilities

STOCKYARDS

Educational Facilities

55


The Chicago Studio Collaboration

+ Old & new manufacturing businesses operating on site + Bridgeport Arts Center & Zhou B Gallery provide a draw to the site for visitors & residents + Adjacent complimentary businesses to site + Significant organic waste generation on site/nearby; can be used to create renewable energy

+ Circulation is poor on site; Pedestrian/Bike Infrastructure on and around site are poor + The CMD site extends farther west, straining cohesion + Soil contamination on site + Multi-modal safety & accessibility needs improvement

+ Old rail lines no longer in use; vacant land & buildings + Site is nestled between residential areas + Variety of uses on site provides potential for semi-closed loop system of production/re-use + PMD-8 Zoning encourages light manufacturing & research/ training facilities

+ Many landowners own significant clusters of parcels, especially at key locations + Bubbly Creek is contaminated, inhibiting incorporation of recreational opportunities + Trucking routes along major arterials, bordering the site disincentive walkability

56


Loop It In RESEARCH

JOBS

TRAINING

MATERIAL

PROCESS

PRODUCT

WELL-BEING

TOURISM CONSUMPTION

WEIGHT OF WASTE DIVERTED TO LANDFILLS 80,000 TONS = 8 EIFFEL TOWERS = 2,600 SINGLE FAMILY HOMES

Pre-settlement Wetland Habitat

Early 1900’s

Late 1900’s

1970-2017

Bubbly Creek became an Aging sewers still overflow River Cleanup efforts for recreation industrial waste dumping ground bacteria-laden sewage and have improved wildlife habitat for chemicals and blood and stormwater runoff into Bubbly along the banks and bottom of the entrails from the local Creek creek. However, decomposition meatpacking industry from old waste and sewer overflow still causes methane and hydrogen sulfide gas to bubble up

2030

Post Bubbly Creek dredging and Anaerobic Digester

Capacity: 80,000 tons of Waste per year

Dredging H H C H H

Veg et

atio

n& B cont acteria am inan break dow ts n

Air Dry Station / Storage

S H

H

STAGE 4 O

Bui ldup

C O

O

H H C H H

of to and xic was bene te ficia kills ve l ba ge cter tatio ia n

S H

H

O

C O

New vegetation grown along creek banks remediates soil, aids in breaking down contaminants, and will be harvested as biofuel

O

H H C H H

Pre-treatment

Biogas Treatment

H

Cardboard Oil Sludge Paper Sewer Sludge (dried) Grass / Reeds

4.4 10.2 4.5 3.8 4.6

kW / kg kW / kg kW / kg kW / kg kW / kg

(Source: PYROMEX AG: Waste to Energy. http://www.sludgefacts.org/Ref87_2.pdf)

STAGE 3 3 2,151 ft of Sludge

STAGE 2 3 4,473 ft of Sludge

H H C H H

retu Some rned vege , bu ta t to tion xic an was d fis te st h ha ill bu ve bble s

Cogeneration power station

Calorific Values of Waste Types: Coffee Bean Shells 6.8 kW / kg Food Waste / Compost 4.8 kW / kg Corn 5.1 kW / kg Olive Oil Press residues 8.4 kW / kg

S H

Ani mal de and hydrcompo sewag ogen se ca e w sulfi usin aste be g de gase metha gins s to ne an to bubb d le up

Energy generation of up to 24,000,000 kwh per year

Sewer overflow and sludge gets treated and used for energy production in Anaerobic Digester

STAGE 1 3 2,944 ft of Sludge Food Waste

Food Waste

Food Waste Combined Sewer

Combined Sewer

Food Waste

Combined Sewer

up Toxic waste is dredged, removing hazardous materials from creek bottom

Sludge

Sludge

Sludge

Combined Sewer

4 MONTHS

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ASHLAND AVE

The Chicago Studio Collaboration

VE

E ST

N

O NS

VE

CH

DAMEN AVE

AR

HALSTED

A ER

RACINE

31ST

35TH

PERSHING RD

Redevelopment Boundary TIF District Zoning Changes New Green Space 58

Rail Trail Adaptive ReUse/Construction Digester Biofuel/Habitat Plantings


Loop It In 1970

1996

2000

2018 2021

2030

2060

Tunnel and Reservoir Project (TARP)

Projected completion in 2030, will take excess stormwater and sewer overflow from Bubbly Creek

35th/Halsted TIF District, expires 2021

Extend TIF, expires 2033 PMD-8 Zoning Changes

PMD-8 to be split into three areas to denote focus on research, light manufacturing, and general manufacturing

Digester--Stage 1

Begin dredging Bubbly Creek, Prepare to dry sludge, Begin Digestor Construction, Begin Marketing for Digestor = JOBS

PMD Marketing Plan Focus on 8B & 8C Zones

Manufacturing 35TH

Digester--Stage 2

Open Digestor and begin digesting creek wastes, Biofuel Plantings begin to remediate soil and fuel Digester = JOBS

Cultural Center

Research & Training

Light/Artisan Manufacturing Mixed-Use Commercial & Research

Adaptive Re-Use--Wrigley Gum Factory

Begin rehabilitation of factory, including commercial uses and significant landscape improvements= JOBS

Manufacturing Manufacturing

Community Green Space

Cultural Center Construction

Begin construction of new cultural/education center to focus on Bubbly Creek Remediation = JOBS

Digester

Rail to Trail Construction

Begin rehabilitation of abandoned rail lines as multi-modal trails = JOBS

PERSHING

Miles 0.2

Adaptive Re-Use/New Construction Assess current facilities/buildings Assess brownfields/vacant lot area/acreage Assess property ownership and policies

targeted intervention of built environment targeted intervention of environment relationships targeted intervention of feasible revitalization

Identify: prime locations for (re)development, expansion, or adaptive (re)use ideal industry, likely partners among property owners, financial assistance & incentives

Resulting from marketing of CMD, focused in 8B & 8C = JOBS

Expansion of R&D, Artisan Manufacturing, Job Training on Site Resulting from marketing of CMD, focused in 8B & 8C = JOBS

Digester - Stage 3

Digester fueled with food waste & Biofuel Plants; Habitat Plantings replace Biofuel Plantings once soil/creek amended

59


The Chicago Studio Collaboration A

60

B


Loop It In

IMPROVED SIGNAGE

PHYTOREMEDIATION

HEAVY DUTY TRUCK PAVING

61


The Chicago Studio Collaboration

Land Acquisition & Preparation

2018

2020

2022

Dredge Creek

2024

2030

Build & Market Digester Gum Factory Adaptive Re-Use--Wrigley Environmental Education-Bubbly Creek Remediation Land Acquisition & Preparation Rail to Trail Construction Cultural Center Re-Use/New Construction Construction Adaptive

2018

2020

2022

2024

2030

Adaptive Re-Use--Wrigley Gum Factory Rail to Trail Construction Adaptive Re-Use/New Construction

Land Acquisition & Preparation Dredge Creek Build & Market Digester

Environmental Education-Bubbly Creek Remediation

Land Acquisition & Preparation Cultural Center Construction

2018

2020

2022

2024

2030

Adaptive Re-Use--Wrigley Gum Factory Rail to Trail Construction Adaptive Re-Use/New Construction

Land Acquisition & Preparation Dredge Creek & Market Digester Land Acquisition &Build Preparation Land Acquisition Dredge Creek & Preparation

Environmental Education-Bubbly Creek Remediation Digester--Creek Wastes

Center Construction Build &Cultural Market Digester

Digester--Food Waste & Biofuel Plants

Land Acquisition & Preparation Biofuel Planting Remediation Begins

2018

Dredge Creek

2020

2022

2024

Build & Market Digester

Habitat Plantings Along Creek

2030

Environmental Education-Bubbly Creek Remediation Adaptive Re-Use--Wrigley Gum Factory Land Acquisition & Preparation Cultural Center Construction Rail to Trail Construction

62

Adaptive Re-Use/New Construction


Loop It In

DIGESTER PLAZA

CULTURAL CENTER

RAILS TO TRAILS

63


Loop It In

65


South Branch District Amenitizing Bubbly Creek and Reviving the CMD Xiangyun Cao Yuting Gao Huaixuan Li Andreé Sahakian Manman Shao Richa Singh

This​ ​project​ ​combines​ ​green​ ​networks,​ ​the​ ​water​ ​treatment​ ​process,​ ​and​ ​connective circulation​ ​into​ ​one​ ​ system​ ​to​ ​contribute​ ​to​ ​a​ ​beneficial​ ​environment​ ​across​ ​different​ ​land uses. The​ ​four​ ​strategies​ ​address​​ serious​ ​pollution​ ​and​ ​fragmentary​ ​block​ ​issues.​ ​The​ ​project provides​ ​educational​ ​and​ ​recreational​ ​experiences​ ​ for​ ​residents,​ ​laborers​ ​and​ ​tourists,​ ​which attracts​ ​more​ ​investment​ ​and​ ​increases​ ​job​ ​opportunities​ ​within​ ​the​ ​ area. The​ ​green​ ​networks​ ​consist​ ​of​ ​different​ ​types​ ​of​ ​buffers.​ ​This​ ​project​ ​uses​ ​buffers​ ​to​ ​address the​ ​possible​ ​air​ ​ and​ ​runoff​ ​contamination​ ​issues​ ​and​ ​protects​ ​the​ ​Bubbly​ ​Creek​ ​from​ ​external pollution​ ​to​ ​improve​ ​surrounding​ ​ environments.​ ​The​ ​water​ ​treatment​ ​strategies​ ​can​ ​be divided​ ​into​ ​two​ ​phases,​ ​to​ ​address​ ​contamination​ ​ from​ ​combined​ ​sewage​ ​overflows​ ​and then​ ​purify​ ​water​ ​runoff.​​After​ ​remediation,​ ​the​ ​water​ ​can​ ​be​ ​used​ ​for​​ recreational​ ​activities. To​ ​increase​ ​the​ ​connectivity​ ​between​ ​east​ ​and​ ​west​ ​portions of the​ Central Manufacturing Distruct,​ ​the​ ​project​ ​provides​ ​a pedestrian​ ​path​ ​system​ ​for​ ​walking​ ​and​ ​biking​ ​to​ ​provide​ ​special​ ​journey​ ​ experiences. The​ ​proposal​ ​is​ ​divided​ ​into​ ​three​ ​phases​ ​of​ ​5,​ ​15,​ ​and​ ​25​ ​years.​ ​The​ ​phases​ ​in sequence​ ​will​ ​provide​ ​river​ ​ remediation,​​tour​​experiences,​​and​​building​​foundations.​​The​​first phase​​focuses​​on​​water​​remediation​​and​​the​​ treatment​​process​​will​​be​​exposed​​to​​the​​public. The​​second​​phase​​is​​defined​​by​​the​​completion​​of​​the​​deep​​ tunnel​​system.​​At​​this​​point,​​the river​​will​​be​​a​​much​​cleaner​​environment​​and​​the​​filtration​​system​​can​​turn​​into​​ a​ ​working public​ ​park.​ ​The​ ​third​ ​phase​ ​will​ ​also​ ​focus​ ​on​ ​residential​ ​construction​ ​north​ ​of​ ​35th​ ​Street. Green​ ​ corridors​ ​will​ ​be​ ​introduced​ ​to​ ​connect​ ​the​ ​new​ ​construction​ ​with​ ​the​ ​newly​ ​opened park.


The Chicago Studio Collaboration

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South Branch District

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The Chicago Studio Collaboration

THE CHICAGO STUDIO COLLABORATION 70


South Branch District

SOUTH BRANCH DISTRICT

71 71


The Chicago Studio Collaboration

3 PHASE MIXED-USE DEVELOPMENT 72


South Branch District

73


The Chicago Studio Collaboration

RESIDENTIAL BLOCK 74


South Branch District

COMMERCIAL BLOCK

NEW INDUSTRY BLOCK 75


The Chicago Studio Collaboration

ORIGINAL FIGURE-GROUND

PROPOSED FIGURE-GROUND 76


Research

77


The Chicago Studio Collaboration

REMEDIATION PARK DETAIL PLAN 78


South Branch District

TOPOGRAPHY AND WATER FLOW ANALYSIS 79


The Chicago Studio Collaboration

WASTEWATER MANAGEMENT 80


Research

81


The Chicago Studio Collaboration

THE CHICAGO STUDIO COLLABORATION 82


South Branch District

SOUTH BRANCH DISTRICT

83 83


Urban Palimpsest Introducing the Art Manufacturing District Osiel Guzman Zhengge Jiang Sebastian Koth Claudlène Saint Vil Lei Wang Sijia Yang

Recognized as the first planned manufacturing district in the United States, the Central Manufacturing District (CMD) was home to small and large-scale manufacturing businesses. Currently, within a landscape of underutilized industrial corridors, the south and west forks of the South Branch of the Chicago River, which runs through the center of the district, is underappreciated and environmentally mismanaged. Moreover, the few functioning industries in the districts are surrounded by vacant lots and vacant buildings. Business owners and users of the CMD revealed that it is unappealing to developers. This confirms that the culture of CMD is slowly degrading. Therefore, an intervention is needed to revitalize it before it is too late. Hence, upon getting to know the CMD and the surrounding neighborhood, one element that stood out the most to us was the Bridgeport Art Center (BAC). BAC has grown to become an important asset in the neighborhood. This inspired us to use the same strategy of adaptively reusing this type of development, while also implementing something new to the area by creating a missing identity and an amenity. We aimed at reusing ‘found objects’ to combine with art and manufacturing. The strategy is to start our development in between the district and let the ripple effect of the growth towards the main streets. With an end goal of creating an attractive place filled with amenities not only for entrepreneurs of small and medium sized companies but also for the inhabitants of the surrounding areas, the project will be completed in 4 phases which includes creating a pedestrian-friendly district, developing the ARTMAN, a sub-district where artists and manufacturers can cohabitate, retrofitting the vacant buildings which are going to be converted into incubators, and cleaning the river.


The Chicago Studio Collaboration

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Urban Palimpsest

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The Chicago Studio Collaboration

URBAN PALIMPSEST Osiel GUZMAN, Zhengge JIANG, Sebastian Clark KOTH, Claudlene SAINT VIL, Lei WANG, Sijia YANG

Recognized as the first planned manufacturing district in the United States, the Chicago Manufacturing District (CMD) was home to small and large-scale manufacturing businesses. Business owners of the CMD and nearby residents revealed that it is unappealing to developers. This confirms that the culture of the CMD is slowly degrading; therefore, an intervention is needed to revitalize it before it is too late. Hence, upon getting to know the CMD and the surrounding neighborhood, one element that stood out the most to us was the Bridgeport Art Center (BAC). BAC has grown to become an important asset in the neighborhood. This inspired us to use the same strategy of adaptively reusing the typology, while implementing something new to the area, by creating a missing identity and an amenity. We aimed at reusing ‘found objects’ to combine with art and manufacturing. The strategy is to start our development in between the district and let the ripple effect of the growth towards the main streets. With an end goal of creating an attractive place filled with amenities not only for entrepreneurs of small and medium sized companies but also for the inhabitants of the surrounding areas and tourists. The project will be completed in 4 phases which includes creating a pedestrian-friendly district, developing the ARTMAN, a sub-district where artists and manufacturers can cohabitate, retrofitting the vacant buildings which are going to be converted into incubators and cleaning the river.

JOINING MACHINING

FORMING MOULDING

PLASTIC

Background

BUILDING UNDER CONSTRUCTION (REUSED MATERIAL SUPPLY)

RECYCLING CENTRE (REUSED MATERIAL SUPPLY)

GLASS SUPPLY

PLASTIC SUPPLY

METAL SUPPLY

MUSEUM & GALLERY

ART SCHOOL

SITE

88

METAL

GLASS

OTHERS


Urban Palimpsest

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The Chicago Studio Collaboration SCHEMATIC PLANTING DESIGN

CONSTRUCTION PROCESS

Landscape Inspiration Artwork Material Collecting Plants Reuse Crafting

nd

ssla

Gra grey squirrel cooper hawk

cottontail rabbit butterfly

nd tla We cedar waxwing blue jay red-winged blackbird snapping turtle

raccoon beaver American crow common reed Indian grass

COMMUNITY PARK PHASE 1

COMMUNITY PARK PHASE 2

COMMUNITY PARK PHASE 3

RIVERWALK PHASE 1

RIVERWALK PHASE 2

RIVERWALK PHASE 3

{2} SUCCESSION ADAPTIVENESS

Indian grass

{3} WATER INFILTRATION

common reed

90


Urban Palimpsest

CONCEPT: ART+MANUFACTURING

INPUT

OUTPUT

91


The Chicago Studio Collaboration

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Urban Palimpsest

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The Chicago Studio Collaboration

Productive Space

ADAPTIVE ARCHITECTURE AND LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE TYPOLOGIES

Inc

ub Te ato ch r o n Re olo fce se gy arc c h l ent ab er /m us e TECHNOLOGY CENTER

INCUBATOR OFFICE

um

RESEARCH LAB/MUSEUM

COMMUNITY GARDEN CULTURAL LANDSCAPE

ADAPTIVE REUSE

G

URIN ACT NUF L MA CIA MER M CO

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Urban Palimpsest

Interactive Surface

e ac p s e nt cap e Ev nds rm la fo al lat r ltu ng p u C ni a Tr CO M

ME

RC

IAL

MER

COM

L

CIA

DWELLER WORKER TOURIST ARTIST

ADAPTIVE REUSE

ADAPTIVE REUSE

S FICE /OF OP TOR ORKSH UBA /W INC IO D STU L T R A CIA MER COM

ADAPTIVE REUSE

MER

COM

L

CIA

ART

HOP

RKS

/WO

DIO

STU

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The Chicago Studio Collaboration

Community Landscape

LANDSCAPE INSPIRATION Artwork Material Collecting

common reed

Plants Reuse Crafting Pla ys Co cap m e m Fa un rm ity er â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s m gar ar den ke t/l oc

d

lan

ass Gr

d

an

tl We

Indian grass

cedar waxwing

red-winged blackbird

al

pr od

snapping turtle

uc

grey squirrel

ts

butterfly cottontail rabbit

blue jay

cooper hawk

EXHIBITION CORRIDOR ADAPTIVE REUSE

S FICE /OF OP TOR ORKSH UBA /W INC IO D STU L T R A CIA MER COM

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PLAYSCAPE

GREENWAY


Urban Palimpsest

{3} WATER INFILTRATION common reed

Indian grass

lk wa r ve y Ri nwa ee m Gr seu u M / ab

L

se

JOGGING TRAIL

EVENT SPACE

ch ar

Ecological Landscape

{2} SUCCESSION ADAPTIVENESS

Re

RIVERWALK

PERFORMANCE SPACE

BIRD HABITAT PRESERVATION

97


The Chicago Studio Collaboration

TRANSPORTATION

PEDESTRIAN BIKE LANE

PROGRAMING

INTERACTIVE PROGRAM COMMUNITY LANDSCAPE PRODUCTION SPACE ECOLOGICAL LANDSCAPE

BUILDING

NEW DEVELOPMENT

SOFTSCAPE RESTORATION URBAN LANDSCAPE NATURAL ECOSYSTEM INTERATIVE LANDSCAPE

98


Urban Palimpsest

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The Chicago Studio Collaboration

Artist would have a space to create and they would be able to buy their materials in the ARTMAN district. IEPA thinks it is brilliant to have training programs in green cleaning, waste management and building operation and maintenance. Residents who live near the CMD, would have the opportunity to find a jod in the district, which will reduce their commute time. School teachers are happy to see the city invest in green infrastructure and its effort to clean the river to make the neighborhood more appealing. Business owners in the Food Processing sector will now have the resources necessary to expand their investment in the Food Processing sector in the CMD.

100

The incubators in the district would serve aspiring small and medium business ownwers to start their businesses.

The new development would attract tourists who would have the opportunity tosee the work of the artists and more. Kayakers would be able to move across and joggers would have the opportunity to jog along the south and west forks of the South Branch of the Chicago River. The district environment would be inviting to birds whichcould come and enjoy what it has to offer.


Urban Palimpsest

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Algae-ing the Future An Urban Energy Lab Kalyani Agnihotri Yizhen Ding Eva Temporal Durán Ying ‘Yoda’ Li Marc Ponce Litong Zeng

Our proposal uses algae as the key factor to boost development in the Central Manufacturing District (CMD). In addition, it helps the broader civic goal of meeting Chicago’s plan to use 100% renewable energy in its public buildings by 2025. Algae is currently gaining attention from researchers for its high efficiency in generating energy and clean wastewater. We see the potential for algae production facilities to be installed in the CMD. Thus, we intend to make the site into a laboratory and a field experiment site. Testing the combination of algae production plants with the environmental remediation process will help reveal how to integrate energy production into healthy urban environments elsewhere. We propose three main functions for the site. The first one is investigation and research, through which research activities help transform local brownfield conditions. Policies and infrastructure to support research institutions conducting renewable energy and phytoremediation will also be explored. The second function is energy generation. Although this is not emphasized as much when the project is first launched, its importance will increase over time. The third one focuses on social engagement, cultural production, public education, and recreation. We will combine renewable energy production with public landscapes the make the process visible and interactive, providing spaces for events like exhibitions and markets. We aim to help the community foster a new culture of renewable energy production.


The Chicago Studio Collaboration

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Algae-ing the Future

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Algae-ing the Future

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The Chicago Studio Collaboration

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Algae-ing the Future

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The Chicago Studio Collaboration

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Algae-ing the Future

䛰勰䇰䷰䗰⃰台䏰䗰仰䇰勰䧰俰台

䄀䴀倀䠀䤀吀䠀䔀䄀吀刀䔀

倀䰀䄀夀 䄀刀䔀䄀

倀䄀刀䬀䤀一䜀 䰀伀吀

䄀䰀䜀䄀䔀 倀伀刀䌀䠀

倀䄀刀䬀䤀一䜀 䰀伀吀 䤀䤀

伀唀吀䐀伀伀刀 䄀唀䐀䤀吀伀刀䤀唀䴀

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The Chicago Studio Collaboration

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Algae-ing the Future

仰旰懰狰⃰台槰瓰旰⃰勰旰珰濰痰狰揰旰珰

㄀ ㈀

㄀ⴀ 唀渀椀瘀攀爀猀椀琀礀 漀昀 䌀栀椀挀愀最漀 ㈀ⴀ 䤀氀氀椀渀漀椀猀 渀猀琀椀琀甀琀 漀昀 吀攀挀栀渀漀氀漀最礀 ㌀ⴀ 唀渀椀瘀攀爀猀椀琀礀 漀昀 䤀氀氀椀渀漀椀猀 愀琀 䌀栀椀挀愀最漀 㐀ⴀ 匀挀栀漀漀氀 漀昀 琀栀攀 䄀爀琀 椀渀猀琀椀琀甀琀攀 漀昀 䌀栀椀挀愀最漀

一愀琀甀爀愀氀 䜀愀猀 倀愀氀渀琀猀

匀漀氀愀爀 倀氀愀渀琀猀

䠀礀搀爀漀 倀氀愀渀琀猀

圀椀渀搀 吀甀爀戀椀渀攀

䈀椀漀洀愀猀猀 倀氀愀渀琀猀

䠀椀最栀攀爀 䔀搀甀挀愀琀椀漀渀愀氀 䤀渀猀琀椀琀甀琀椀漀渀

䈀椀漀洀愀猀猀 刀攀猀椀搀甀攀

䈀椀漀洀愀猀猀 倀漀眀攀爀 倀氀愀渀琀猀

圀椀渀搀 倀漀眀攀爀 倀氀愀渀琀猀

匀漀氀愀爀 倀漀眀攀爀 倀氀愀渀琀猀

䔀猀琀椀洀愀琀攀搀 唀⸀唀 䔀渀攀爀最礀 䌀漀渀猀甀洀瀀琀椀漀渀 椀渀 ㈀ ㄀㘀

䘀爀漀洀 ㈀ ㄀㄀ 琀漀 ㈀ ㄀㘀Ⰰ 琀栀攀 挀漀渀猀甀洀瀀琀椀漀渀 漀昀 爀攀渀攀眀愀氀 攀渀攀爀最礀 椀渀挀爀攀愀猀攀搀Ⰰ  椀渀挀氀甀搀椀渀最 琀栀攀 戀椀漀洀愀猀猀⸀  䠀搀爀漀 倀漀眀攀爀 倀氀愀渀琀猀

一甀挀氀攀愀爀 倀漀眀攀爀 倀氀愀渀琀猀

113


The Chicago Studio Collaboration

俰嗰勰⃰䇰䳰䟰䇰䗰⃰台哰勰䇰哰䗰䟰姰

䏰䳰䗰䇰仰䧰仰䟰⃰哰䣰䗰⃰勰䧰困䗰勰

伀甀爀 瀀爀椀渀挀椀瀀愀氀 猀琀爀愀琀攀最椀攀猀 琀漀 挀氀攀愀渀 琀栀攀 爀椀瘀攀爀  愀渀搀 椀洀瀀氀攀洀攀渀琀 漀甀爀 愀氀最愀攀 猀椀猀琀攀洀 愀爀攀㨀  ㄀开 倀伀一䐀匀㨀 䴀甀氀琀椀瀀氀攀 瀀漀渀搀猀  挀漀渀琀攀渀琀猀 眀愀猀琀攀  眀愀琀攀爀 愀渀搀 挀漀渀瘀攀爀琀  琀栀愀琀 椀渀 挀氀攀愀渀 眀愀琀攀爀  挀椀爀挀甀氀愀琀椀渀最 愀氀氀 漀瘀攀爀  琀栀攀 瀀爀漀挀攀猀猀 甀渀琀椀氀氀  爀攀琀甀爀渀 椀琀 琀漀 琀栀攀  爀椀瘀攀 爀椀瘀攀爀⸀  

㐀开 䐀䤀䜀䔀匀吀伀刀匀 圀椀琀栀 琀栀愀琀 猀椀猀琀攀洀 眀眀攀 猀漀氀瘀攀搀 琀栀攀 瀀爀漀戀氀攀洀 眀椀琀栀 琀栀攀  眀愀猀琀攀 昀漀漀搀 昀爀洀 栀攀 渀攀愀爀 昀漀漀搀 洀愀渀甀昀愀挀琀甀爀攀猀 愀渀搀  洀愀欀攀 愀 猀攀搀椀洀攀渀琀 琀爀愀琀愀洀攀渀琀 昀漀爀 琀栀攀 戀甀戀戀氀礀 挀爀攀攀欀⸀  吀栀愀琀 搀攀瀀漀猀椀琀猀 挀爀攀愀琀攀 愀 渀攀眀 琀漀瀀漀最爀愀瀀栀礀 愀渀搀  昀愀瘀漀爀愀琀椀渀最 琀栀攀 挀爀攀愀琀椀漀渀 漀昀 渀攀眀 爀攀挀爀攀愀琀椀漀渀 愀爀攀愀猀⸀    

㈀开 倀䤀倀䔀匀 刀攀甀猀椀渀最 琀栀攀 漀氀搀  爀愀椀氀眀愀礀猀Ⰰ眀攀  最攀渀攀爀愀琀攀 愀 渀攀眀  挀椀爀挀甀椀琀 漀昀 瀀椀瀀攀猀  甀渀搀攀爀 琀栀攀  渀攀椀最戀漀爀栀漀漀搀 琀漀 琀栀攀  爀椀瘀攀爀⸀ 

114

㌀开 匀吀伀刀䴀 圀䄀吀䔀刀

㐀开 䄀䰀䜀䄀䔀 䈀䄀䜀匀

圀椀琀栀 琀栀攀 猀琀漀爀洀 眀愀琀攀爀 愀渀搀  琀栀攀 渀攀眀 瀀攀搀攀猀琀爀椀愀渀  猀攀挀琀椀漀渀Ⰰ 眀攀 挀爀攀愀琀 愀 渀攀眀  甀猀攀 昀爀漀琀栀攀 猀琀漀爀洀 眀愀琀攀爀  愀渀搀 爀攀挀椀爀挀甀氀愀琀攀 椀琀 琀漀 琀栀攀  爀椀瘀攀爀 漀爀 琀漀 眀愀琀攀爀 琀愀渀挀欀猀 昀漀爀  搀漀洀攀猀琀椀挀愀氀 甀猀攀⸀ 

吀漀 挀漀渀渀攀挀琀 琀栀攀  渀攀椀最栀戀漀漀爀栀漀搀 愀渀搀 挀爀攀愀琀攀  愀 渀攀眀 愀琀洀漀猀瀀栀攀爀攀 愀渀搀  瀀爀漀搀甀挀琀椀漀渀 眀攀 瀀甀琀 琀栀愀琀  戀愀最猀 愀氀氀 愀爀爀漀甀渀搀 椀琀 愀渀搀  爀攀挀椀爀挀甀氀愀琀攀 挀氀攀愀渀 眀愀琀攀爀 琀漀  琀栀攀 爀椀瘀攀爀⸀  


Algae-ing the Future

俰嗰勰⃰䇰䳰䟰䇰䗰⃰台哰勰䇰哰䗰䟰姰 䏰俰仰仰䗰䏰哰䧰仰䟰⃰哰䣰䗰⃰仰䗰䧰䟰䋰俰勰䣰俰俰䓰

䄀䴀䔀刀䤀䌀䄀一 䜀刀䤀䐀

䄀氀最愀攀 戀愀最猀  瀀爀漀搀甀挀琀椀漀渀

 䄀洀猀琀攀爀搀愀洀 伀爀瀀栀愀渀愀最攀 倀氀愀渀⸀ 䄀氀搀漀 嘀愀渀 䔀礀挀欀

㄀ 洀椀氀攀 砀 ㄀ 洀椀氀攀

刀漀琀愀琀椀漀渀 

㌀⼀㐀 洀椀氀攀 砀 ㌀⼀㐀 洀椀氀攀

匀唀䈀䐀䤀嘀䤀匀䤀伀一

䜀爀攀攀渀 䠀漀甀猀攀  匀椀猀琀攀洀

䤀䴀倀䰀䔀䴀䔀一吀䄀吀䤀伀一 

倀刀䔀䌀䔀䐀䔀一吀 

䘀刀䄀䴀䔀 䤀一匀䔀刀吀䤀伀一

匀琀攀攀氀 匀琀爀甀挀琀甀爀攀

䜀爀攀攀渀攀爀礀

㄀⼀㈀ 洀椀氀攀 砀 ㄀⼀㈀ 洀椀氀攀

匀䔀䰀䔀䌀吀䤀伀一

匀甀瀀攀爀瀀漀猀椀琀椀漀渀 

㄀⼀㐀 洀椀氀攀 砀 ㄀⼀㐀 洀椀氀攀

䘀椀渀愀氀氀礀 䄀氀最愀攀  匀琀爀甀挀琀甀爀攀 115


The Chicago Studio Collaboration

116


Research

117


The Chicago Studio Collaboration

118


Algae-ing the Future

119


Edu-Walk Bridging Work, Community, and Environment Saloni Chawla Dijia Chen David Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Donoghue Sara Hadavi Shuyu Yin Ye Yuan

The Central Manufacturing District is an industrial site full of opportunities, while suffering from issues including seclusion, vacant buildings, water pollution, storm water overflow, and aesthetically unpleasant environment. Taking a people-oriented approach, we address these issues to revitalize this industrial site ecologically, economically, and socially. We propose learning as a tool to strengthen the bond between people and the site, which results in community engagement and job creation. The learning process includes both formal education (indoor/outdoor classrooms) to support innovation and training for industries, as well as a broader dynamic experience of learning that comes with site exploration and engagement with the surroundings. We have three zones of intervention: eco-industrial zone, mixed-use zone, and eco-recreational corridor. They are functionally interconnected through symbiosis of materials, energy, and ideas, leading to a cohesive coexistence of work, community and environment. The eco-industrial zone is an orderly system of manufacturing, research, and workforce training. The mixeduse zone celebrates the communityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s diversity and creativity through a food hub, urban farming, local food markets, and incubators. The eco-recreational corridor is the central attraction of our site along the bubbly creek making physical and functional connections between the other two zones. It incorporates a water treatment system that adds ecological and educational values to the site. The featured boardwalk connects the south and north ends of the site while adding multiple east-west connections, engaging people with the river and the environment. Through these connections established by the boardwalk, the site is transformed from a monotonous industry-dominated workplace to a dynamic urban eco-system with a lively social character, diminishing the barriers between industries and people through knowledge, engagement and recreation.


The Chicago Studio Collaboration

EDU-WALK: Bridging Work, Communityand Environment

North Entrance

PHASE 1

PHASE 2

PHASE 3

Neighborhood Facilities

SaloniChawla Dijia Chen SaraHadavi David L O'Donoghue ShuyuYin Ye Yuan

Food Hub

The Central Manufacturing District is an industrial site full of opportunities, while suffering from manyissues includingseclusion, vacant buildings, water pollution, storm water overflow,and aesthetically unpleasant environment. Taking a people-oriented approach, weaddress these issuesto revitalize this industrial site ecologically, economically, and socially. We propose learningas a tool to strengthen the bond between people and the industrial site, which results in community engagement and job creation.

The eco-industrial zoneis an orderly system of manufacturing, research, and workforce training. The mixed-use zone celebrates the communityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s diversity and creativity through a food hub, urban farming, local food markets, and incubators. The eco-recreational corridor is thecentral attraction of our sitealong the bubbly creek making physical and functional connections between the other two zones. It incorporates a water treatment system that adds ecological and educationalvalues to the site. The featured boardwalk connects the south and north ends of the sitewhile adding multiple east-west connections, engaging people with the river and the environment. Through these connections established by the boardwalk, the site is transformed from a monotonous industry-dominated workplace to a dynamic urban eco-system with a lively social character, diminishing the barriersbetween industries and people through knowledge, engagement and recreation.

The learning process includes both formal education(indoor/outdoor classrooms)to support innovation and trainingfor industries,as well asa broader dynamic experience of learningthat comes with siteexplorationand engagementwith the surroundings. We have three zonesof intervention: eco-industrial zone, mixed-usezone, and eco-recreationalcorridor. They are functionally interconnected through symbiosis of materials, energy, and ideas, leading toa cohesive coexistence of work, community and environment.

Innovation

Eco-Industrial

Filtration Zone

Regional Map

N

No Change

Art Center

Zoning Map

CTA Rail Station

South Entrance Filteration Zone

Eco/Recreational Corridor

Art/Recreational Zone Light Industries + Office, Creative Space Markets

High Tech + Heaby Industries

Processing + Distribution

Industrial Core

Incubators Urban Farm +Green House

Research & Design

Distribution + Warehouses

Environmental Education & Community Center

Mixed-used Zone

N

122

0

250

500

750

1000 ft

New

Rehabilitated

Demolished

N

Changed in First Phase

New

Rehabilitated

Chan


nged in Second Phase

Edu-Walk

N 0

New

25

50

75

100(ft)

Rehabilitated

123


The Chicago Studio Collaboration

CTA Rail Station

Filteration Zone

Eco/Recreational Corridor

Art/Recreational Zone Light Industries + Office, Creative Space Markets

High Tech + Heaby Industries

Processing + Distribution

Urban Farm +Green House

Research & Design

Distribution + Warehouses

Industrial Core

124

Incubators

Environmental Education & Community Center

Mixed-used Zone


North Entrance

Edu-Walk

Neighborhood Facilities

Food Hub

Filtration Zone Innovation

Eco-Industrial

Art Center

South Entrance

500'

1000'

125


The Chicago Studio Collaboration

Educational Program

126


Edu-Walk

127


The Chicago Studio Collaboration

Boardwalk Viewshed Experience and Seasonal Activities Summer

Rainfall

Winter

128


Edu-Walk

129


The Chicago Studio Collaboration

PHASE I

PHASE II

New

Rehabilitated

Demolished

Changed in First Phase

Urban Farming

YEARS

New

Rehabilitated

Community Gardening

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

BUILD CHLORINATION TANK DEVELOP SWALES AND BIO-REMEDIATION PLANTATION BOARDWALK I: 35TH - PERSHING & 37TH

RIVER

ECO-VATION CENTER I: ENGAGEMENT REHAB BUILDINGS ALONG ASHLAND: MIXED COMMERCIAL + LIGHT INDUSTRIAL DEMOLISH BUILDINGS ALONG SOUTHWEST CREEK & RELOCATE BUSINESSES BIKE PATH ALONG IRON ST REHAB BUILDINGS ALONG 37TH: BUSINESS INCUBATORS

INDUSTRIAL ZONE FOOD HUB FUTURE IMPACTS PLANNING

130

URBAN FARM & GREEN HOUSES FOOD PROCESSING CENTER PROJECT SCOPING COMMUNITY OUTREACH

NORTH CREEK EXPANSION & RIPARIAN VEGETATION BOARDWALK II: 35TH - CANAL ORIGINS & 31ST ECO-VATION CENTER 2: RESEARCH

REHAB BUILDINGS ON THE EAST SIDE OF INDUSTRIAL CORE NEW STREET GRIDS IN INDUSTRIAL CORE EXPAND BIKE PATH TO THE NORTH 35TH & MORGAN ST: STREETSCAPE IMPROVEMENTS & INF


Edu-Walk

PHASE III

PHASE IV

Changed in Second Phase

New

Changed in Third Phase

Rehabilitated

Industrial Core

10

11

New

Industrial Core

12

13

14

15

25

FULLY DEVELOPED INDUSTRIAL CORE

FILL FOOD MARKET PEPSI SITE REDEVELOPMENT RIVERFRONT SHOPPING

131


The Chicago Studio Collaboration

North Entrance

Filtration Zone

Art Center

South Entrance 132


Edu-Walk

133


The Chicago Studio Collaboration

High-Tech Industrial Research Complex

134

Research/Community Center


Edu-Walk

135


Boardwalk Experience: Openness

Boardwalk Experience: Enclosure


Edu-Walk

Water Remediation System

Vegetation Detail 137


Contributors University of Illinois at Chicago

University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Department of Urban Planning and Policy UPP 556 Urban Planning and Policy

School of Architecture ARCH 574 The Urban Studio

Prof. Kheir Al-Kodmany Merav Argov Don Lee Nivedha Jawahar Lukas Kucinski Meaghan O’Connor Kalindi Parikh Michael Podgers Saadia Shah Yunlong Shan Pratichha Wagle

Prof. Kevin Hinders Eva Temporal Durán Osiel Guzman Himangshu Kedia Sebastian Koth Huaixuan Li Patricia McKissack David L. O’Donoghue Marc Ponce Andree Sahakian


Department of Landscape Architecture LA 537 Studio V – The Chicago Studio

Department of Urban and Regional Planning UP 494 Chicago Planning Studio

Prof. Conor O’Shea TA: Kyung-Kuhn Lee Xiangyun Cao Saloni Chawla Yizhen Ding Yuting Gao Sara Hadavi David Huang Yun Huang Zhengge Jiang Erika Johannesen Ying “Yoda” Li Manman Shao Lei Wang Sijia Yang Shuyu Yin Ye Yuan Litong Zeng

Prof. Robert Olshansky Kalyani Agnihotri Carol Brobeck Dijia Chen Claudlène Saint Vil Richa Singh


College of Fine and Applied Arts, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Peter Mortenson, Interim Dean faa.illinois.edu Illinois School of Architecture Jeffrey S. Poss, Interim Director arch.illinois.edu Department of Landscape Architecture William Sullivan, Head landarch.illinois.edu Department of Urban and Regional Planning Daniel W. Schneider, Interim Head urban.illinois.edu College of Urban Planning and Urban Affairs, University of Illinois at Chicago Michael A. Pagano, Dean cuppa.uic.edu Department of Urban Planning and Policy Zorica NedoviÄ&#x2021;-BudiÄ&#x2021;, Head cuppa.uic.edu/academics/upp/


A strategic alliance between Academia and Practice has been established in downtown Chicago. This collaborative â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;intersectionâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; has yielded The Chicago Studio of the Illinois School of Architecture at the University of Illinois Urbana Champaign. This collaborative alliance has resulted in the unique projects and experiences illustrated in this book.

Chicago Studio Collaboration  
Chicago Studio Collaboration  
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