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A N D R E A

L O P A k1726073

PM7000 Portfolio


CONTENTS


01 CREATIVE FUTURES: E D E & R AV E N S C R O F T 02C A P S T O N E

PROJECT: C OLLECTIN G CULTURES

03C R E A T I V E OVERVIEW

PRACTICE


1: CREATIVE FUTURES


CREATIVE FUTURES : CLIENT BRIEF

Ede and Ravenscroft’s

Pa s t, P r e s e n t , Fu t u r e ; E x p lo r in g t h e h e r i t a g e , b r a n d D N A a n d f u t u r e h ou s e s ty l e o f E d e & Ra ve ns c r o f t .

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BRAND DNA STUDIES AND RESEARCH

1: CREATIVE FUTURES


THE DESIGN BRIEF After exploring the brand DNA of Ede & Ravenscroft, we were given the brief to design textiles for both Men and Women, I decided to put focus on the male client as I wanted the challenge and explore menswear design as someone who is more used to womenswear.

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INITIAL DESIGNS

1: CREATIVE FUTURES


I tried multiple techniques from hand drawing illustrations of repeating prints, collaging and painting. An initial inspiration was “british things� hence the umbrella pattern. It was a challenge for me as i was unfamiliar with the adobe illustrator application but with exploration and knowledge in photoshop I managed to experiment on more digital techniques. Eagerly playing around with illustrator i got overwhelmed with color and upon receiving positive feedback from my tutors and print designer kit neal on my handworked studies, I took a step back and decided to hold off on mixing colors for my prints and stick to the colors that was organically created in my research and experiments.

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1: CREATIVE FUTURES


INSPIRATION FROM PRIMARY RESEARCH My main inspiration moving forward with the print designs as you can see in these photos are the tiles, pavement and escalator steps from the Underground tube. I then manipulated this idea into my own recreated studies of paper cut outs, hole punchers and paint. By creating these studies I further developed them into graphics on illustrator and photoshop to create patterns fit for the client.

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PROCESS

DEVELOPMENTS

1: CREATIVE FUTURES


paper cut outs, hole punchers, collage and paint techniques digitized prints of illutrations and collages

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1: CREATIVE FUTURES


Thr o u g h th i s p r o c e s s o f c ol l age an d c u t o u ts i wan te d to re c re ate my o w n ve r s ion s o f tr a d i tional p rin ts l ik e p in strip e s an d p o l k ado ts and mak i n g th e m a pp e a r d i f f e re n t fro m ho w yo u wo u l d n o rmal ly s e e t h em f i xe d i n li n e or a gr i d . O f c o u rs e stil l thin k in g o f the c l ie n t t h es e p r i n ts a r e m e an t to m ain tain the b ran d’s dna thro u gh it’s s u bt l e k e y e l e m e n ts , b o th i n p rin t an d c u ltu re . T hro u gh the s e d es ig ns I wan t to b e a b l e to e xp lo re the ide a o f lo o k in g in to the br and’ s f utu r e a i m s . T h e s e p rin ts c o u l d b e u s e d fo r p o c k e t s Q uare s , t i es , cr avats an d li n i n gs i n as s o rte d c o lo r c o mb ination s . I b e l ie ve t h e st o r y th at w e n t i n to th e p ro c e s s o f c re atin g the s e p rin ts wil l g i ve a f r e s h loo k i n to d e ta i ls fo r the E de an d Rave n s c ro ft g ent l eman an d c o u l d w or k ac ro s s diffe re n t de mo grap hic s .

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PRINTS

1: CREATIVE FUTURES


COLOR & DETAIL. I chose to stick to muted colors and pick out heavy grays and browns from the photographs of the collage studies and underground itself. As the prints are already irregular and non-traditional, i decided to maintain that subtleness in color which allows the print to be used for different features in design but also can be wearable at any given season. This also gives an illusion therefore gives a nice surprise when you notice the details; dots, waves and lines. Like any other print colors can still be manipulated to fit a certain client. ALL PRINTS ARE DIGITALLY PRINTED ON ORGANIC COTTON JERSEY

ABOVE (L-R): “Mind The Gap” ; “Behind the yellow line Polkadots” ; “Underground” ; “Rush Hour” BELOW (L-R) : “DUE TO LIne DISRUPTIONS” “DUE TO LINE DISRUPTIONS V.2”

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THE MODERN GENTLEMAN After exploring the BRAND DNA, I wanted to give focus on the current clientele

of

the

brand

instead

of

recreating

something

from

its

history. I looked into exploring the english gentleman for inspiration and the everyday lifestyle he leads, this then led me to seeing everyday details of what is often overlooked on his daily commute. I wanted to incorporate the elements of the London Underground into my design to take the brand’s DNA and give it a touch of modernity but still representing culture that is truly british.

1: CREATIVE FUTURES


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1: CREATIVE FUTURES


OVERVIEW As a creative it is very challenging to put yourself in a position where you don’t have much control over a project especially when you are trying to deal with clients. I personally enjoyed taking on this project as it gave me an insight to what it would be like if I were to deal with a client of this calibre. Not only did I have to think about the client I was designing for but it was also for their clientele as well. Through this brief and the process I underwent, it affirmed my knowledge that the industry I am in and is not only cut throat but goes through many deliberation and thought. Something as simple as an underground map can tell a story of culture and can mean so much to the process and the design as a whole. One of the challenges I faced and have learned from is in printing these designs on fabrics. Just like any other project you need to look at the timeline and make tests as there are always different effects and turnouts especially on different fibers. There are also so many ways to do it from screen printing to digital printing. If given the chance to have more time to develop these prints again and make edits I would have liked to try to screen print my designs as well to see a more handmade and organic quality to the prints. I also was able to learn how to use adobe illustrator and see the possibilities there are in print design which are endless and it takes a lot of attention to detail. Observing the british culture and being surrounded in it has definitely influenced my designs and at the same time crossed over to my capstone project wherein I take a step back and look into my own culture and see it from an outsider’s perspective.

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2 : CAPSTONE PROJECT


C APSTONE PROJECT : STARTING POINT

Collecting Cultures AIM: REDISCOVERING AND REINVENTNG TRADITIONAL SILHOUETTES AND TECHNIQUES TO SHOWCASE THE SIGNIFICANT INFLUENCE OF CULTURE TO DESIGN.

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BRIEF

FILIPINIANA

TRADITIONAL COSTUME FROM THE PHILIPPINES GREATLY INFLUENCED BY SPANISH, AMERICAN AND JAPANESE COLONIAL ERA.

Early - late 19th Centur y Photos

2 : CAPSTONE PROJECT


grandparents wedding photos late 1950’s

In the beginning of my capstone project I gave a lot of my focus on my own personal cultural heritage. Being filipino and of chinese and japanese descent, I have been greatly influenced by my diverse ancestry. This then led me to explore my own journey of finding my own identity.

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With this project I wanted to break out of my comfort zone and discover even more cultures as I am experienced moving away from home and studying abroad. A key part of the inspiration of this project comes from the numerous people I have met since starting the course . Through observation, I noticed that everyone in London live in their coats, I wanted to somehow strip them of these “shells� or layers and find out who they really are underneath. I then did a survey and went up to peers in school and tried to find out how culture affects the way they dress. I wanted to somehow reinvent the stereotype of traditional costumes and modernize this to attract and introduce my cultural background to a wider audience.

2 : CAPSTONE PROJECT


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Throughout the research process and the brainstorming of ideas, one of the triggers that kept me going was after seeing the Balenciaga: Shaping Fashion exhibition at the Victoria and Albert Museum. This gave me a new perspective on the word “influence� and how we merely do not copy from masters of our craft but we are taught and influenced by their works. This pulled me out of creative block and definitely removed my fears of not being original enough.

2 : CAPSTONE PROJECT


Afterwards, I developed samples of the traditional filipino Terno sleeve which is very much symbolic of the Filipiniana costume. I made alterations to its length and played with oversizing the sleeve and methods of smocking as well. The likes of Delpozo, Comme des Garcons, Simone Rocha and Molly Goddard just to mention my favorites had garments exhibited along side the works of Balenciaga and this motivated and aspired me to allow my designs to show their influence on me as they have been influenced by their own masters in design.

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SMOCKING TERNO TOILE on CATERINA

Whilst developing the toiles I also designed a cropped jacket for a film collaboration I did with a filipino film student, Ram Mendoza. His film focused on the colonialism mentality of filipinos living abroad and this work has made me realize how affected I am by this and especially being away from my home country I am looking into it with a different perspective and seeing it from the eyes of people who have no knowledge of it. Thus the reason why I wanted to further develop this idea of unearthing what is underneath all our layers of clothing and somehow giving a new take on tradition as well as removing the misconceptions and first impressions.

Dogeater, Dir. R. Mend

2 : CAPSTONE PROJECT


TERNO BLAZER SAMPLE FOR A FILM COLLABORATION on TUTU

doza, 2018 London Film School

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VISUALIZING THE SLEEVE / STUDIES

2 : CAPSTONE PROJECT


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FINDING RELATION TO BRITISH CULTURE / THE MACINTOSH / TRENCH COAT

Vestiges: “A trace or remnant of something that is dissapearing or longer exists.”

2 : CAPSTONE PROJECT


Further onto developing my ideas I then discovered that my process in design has been greatly influenced by my travels and current surroundings. I wanted to find something traditional to the culture I was currently living in and thus going into more research about the british trench. Here I found newspaper clippings from when it was first used in the military and I also broke down each element of how it is constructed. One of the key elements that stuck out to me was the eapaulette, which during the time of the war was designed for function and now is design feature to represent history.

no

STUDIES ON THE TRENCH COAT AND MIXING TRADITIONAL SHAPES TOGETHER

MAX MARA, MIU MIU AND BURBERRY COATS WERE MAINLY WHERE I TOOK SILHOUETTE INSPIRATION FROM.

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Upon getting feedback from my tutor and peers my next task was to find a material that I could use to create the coat design that would represent my aim in this project. I wanted to somehow encapsulate my ideas in this one garment and “see-through� the wearer of the coat. When my tutor suggested I work on PVC this very much intrigued me but I knew it was going to be a major challenge which I still took on. For my first sample seen here on the right, It was a very thick and crunchy pvc normally used as table covers and not only sewing this was a challenge but having to fold and transport and have someone wear it was difficult. Finding the right thickness and softness to the plastic material especially working around a budget taught me how to be more resourceful and practical with the materials I sourced and purchased. I managed to find better quality pvc that fit my budget later on to then develop my final garment. Above are samples of prototype closure elements of the coat: belt with binding, cuff and epaulette.

2 : CAPSTONE PROJECT


first prototype of the pvc coat 37


2 : CAPSTONE PROJECT


MAKING THE PVC COAT patterns were done on soft tissue paper layed above the pvc. There were times I would second guess the material not only on environmental issues but for functionality and wearability reasons as well. But then I am glad I went through with it and now I know the benefits and difficulties of working with it now. Some of the negatives are it is an unmendable material so once it breaks it is a lot harder to alter, but it does have waterrepellant capabilities.

I focused on combining the elements of the british trench, the filipiniana terno sleeves and developing the detachable interchangeable collar and hood as an adaptive function of the coat to its environment which corresponds personally to how I have adapted to moving abroad.

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2 : CAPSTONE PROJECT


“For me culture is all about heritage and the surroundings you evolve yourself in.� 41


2 : CAPSTONE PROJECT


My aim in this project was to discover my own identity and at the same time I wanted to share a story of my journey as a designer and be able to reflect on how fashion has become it’s own language in this multicultural world we live in. Through this photo story I hope to expose the world to the “unity in diversity” and open-ness of people that live in London. As a self proclaimed “local-tourist” I wanted to share my experience of moving to this city and how much this has affected my process on design. Not only do clothes need to have function but for me they need to tell a story as well. Clothes for me are the starting point to any conversation. . There are often misconceptions of people who are not just in the fashion industry but all around the world. By going out into the streets of London and exposing myself, my project and meeting people from all walks of life I hope to rid off these first impressions and somehow be able to create an inclusive and more approachable view into fashion.

Collecting Cultures PHOTOGRAPHY BY : DUNCAN STEWART PVC COAT BY : ANDREA LOPA PHOTOS TAKEN IN CORNERS OF SHOREDITCH, MOORGATE, BRIXTON, KINGSTON

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Fashion as a narrative I collaborated on this photo story with a business student named Duncan Stewart who does street photography as a hobby. I wanted to work with someone keen on the same idea of the diversity we are surrounded by and it worked out perfectly after a few messages over facebook messenger when he had mentioned he was originally from South Africa. It was a perfect overcast (typical) day out in London when I first met him and challenged him to photograph random people wearing my coat. We both thought what could be so hard, we’ve already introduced oursleves to each other, what’s a couple more strangers?

2 : CAPSTONE PROJECT


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Discover in these photographs the cultures we met and see through the coat WHO make up this multi-cultural city we all currently live in...

2 : CAPSTONE PROJECT


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DIMITRI, Greece Accountant 4 years in the city of London

2 : CAPSTONE PROJECT


JOANE, Philippines Consultant 27 years in the city of London

As expected we did get a few rejections in this social experiment but the mere fact that those who we’re keen to wear the coat caught me by surprised as we recieved positive feedback managing to approach people from all around the world who have either lived in London all their lives or just recently moved. In just a short period of time I was able to spark conversations with these people and introduce them to my cultural heritage and at the same time get to know about their own. There was something affirming when I was able to get a smile on their faces as they were wearing the coat. Once they put the coat on I felt a certain connection to them and how we could all be from different parts of the world but still have things in common. This makes us all have unique individual stories to tell. 49


JENNI, Plymouth Personal Trainer and Store Assistant 5 years in the city of London

2 : CAPSTONE PROJECT


GWEN, Carribean Retired 7 years in the city of London

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YUCHEN SONG, China Illustration Student almost 1 year in the city of London

2 : CAPSTONE PROJECT


STAV, Cypres Filmmaker Born and raised in the city of London

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DUNCAN, South Africa Business Student 11 years in the city of London

2 : CAPSTONE PROJECT


ALI, Iran Project Manager 5 years in the city of London

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MEDINA, Africa Eritrea Store Associate Born and raised in the city of London

2 : CAPSTONE PROJECT


CAMILLA, Italy Fashion Student 10 months in London

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2 : CAPSTONE PROJECT


OVERVIEW Creating my own brief for this capstone project was difficult at first because it felt like I was my own marker. It was the pressure of making the brief and already pre-empting what I had to do. With the help of my tutor and peers and brainstorming with others from outside of the school triangle I then gave focus on a rationale and this very much helped on moving forward. In one way or another my projects managed to come together and relate to one another be it in the inspiration of culture and even finding my direction and style as a designer. I then learned that it is all in doing the work first that you gain more after and you should wait to critique later on as you could get stuck thinking about all the things that could go wrong before you actually even try. As I have mentioned earlier using the PVC material, I had doubts about it but eventually after going through samples and sourcing with the time frame we had I managed to create a garment that reflected my ideas perfectly. Moving forward I would probably continue to source for better materials to represent the shape of my garment, also considering the materials that would be easily worn by the market and can be mended unlike plastic. If I were to produce a full collection based on this plastic would probably be key features instead of the main material as I found it not only challenging to construct the garment but even after it had gone through the street casting / product testing it managed to get a few wear and tears that needed to be mended. Through all of this primary and secondary research of observing, finding inspiration and experimentation, not only did I expose myself to the world but learn about myself as well. Thus this leads to what this course has done for me.

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3 : CREATIVE PRACTICE


CREATIVE PRACTICE OVERVIEW

WHAT HAS GDCP DONE FOR ME? 61


What is my practice? I AIM TO BE A SUSTAINABLE FASHION DESIGNER.

3 : CREATIVE PRACTICE


The short story is... I like making things. The longer story is... I like making things...but sometimes I doubt the things I make and question it’s

value. These questions are good because I then put

myself in a position to

think. Then again thinking too much can hurt

my head, so i find someone to talk to, which gives me the chance to

brainstorm and make connections. More often than not I also lose quite a lot of energy from socializing which means I go back into my

creative space where I make things from what I

experienced. It’s all just a never ending cycle of learning and hard work that eventually not only do you give meaning to what you make but others can learn from it as well.

And that is why I continue to

make things.

Asked about our practice, making a personal manifesto for the core class was enlightening and was an integral part of how i began to reflect and find answers to the conclusion question of what this course has done for me. 63


GDCP PM6000 3D Object Project - Smocked Jacket, 2017

3 : CREATIVE PRACTICE


repurposed denim jacket, 2017 (before the GDCP course)

Before coming to London, I had expectations on what I wanted to learn. I had created a sustainable fashion line in the Phillippines to make people aware of the environmental effects of fashion. One of the things I wanted to eventually learn from GDCP and master at the end of the course is “How can I move forward doing what I am passionate about and give it value for others as well.� One of the reasons why I decided to take this course was because I had felt this fear and frivolous feeling towards the work I had been doing. Hence, I felt very inadequate to pursue my passion. However, after the past 10 months I believe this course has given me renewed inspiration and confidence. Definitely a valuable stepping stone in my journey. Allow me to share three key lessons I gained from this course that now serve as my guide posts as I move forward.

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VALUE OF PROCESS

Through this creative practice course I have been able to get a better understanding of the value of process. The key elements of observation, inspiration and finally execution are inseparable. Observation demanded sensitivity to the things, people, and events around me. The museum visits, the live drawing exercises, random conversations with friends and strangers, made me more aware of the realities I am encountering and triggered questions that naturally pushed me to seek answers. The search for answers and the meanings of every real encounter then helped me shape the Inspiration behind the narrative I wish to share to my public. The exercises, tutorial sessions and individual learning during this course were very helpful in guiding me on my path to finding reason and justification to what design means to me. With a narrative in mind, the rigor of Execution come into play. The frustrations of failed experiments and successful trials were all full of lessons and insights. The collaboration with other experts in and out of school helped me refine my craft.

3 : CREATIVE PRACTICE


“Most things have been done, but they have not yet been done by you.� - Elizabeth Gilbert, Big Magic: Creativity Beyond Fear

There is no doubt that this creative process has boosted my confidence as a designer but at the same time it continues to question me what more there is to it. I believe that through this course I have been able to identify my strengths and weaknesses. I learned to be bolder with my ideas but always being open to new realizations that are molded by critique and mistakes. Prior to attending this course, I often hit a blank wall whenever I develop the slightest doubt of not being original in my work. In fact this fear of being called a copycat still haunted me as I started to work on my capstone project. But it was when it was impressed upon me, looking back at my earlier works before and during the course that it is my creative process or how I approached my brief that establishes the uniqueness of my work that I became more confident doing it.

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“How did we end up with fast fashion? Where did this come from? Perhaps the answer is in the ability in companies to deliver fashion faster and faster. Which satisfies a desire and need in the consumer. Consumers are driving it and perhaps that’s where change has to come from.” - Rick Ridgeway, Patagonia (The Next Black, AEG 2014) 3 : CREATIVE PRACTICE


On the left are images of a presentation I had done in my creative practice class, we had been asked to introduce our practice to the class and answer the question “Why” we do it? which then brings me to...

Capturing an Audience, Creating Co-Storytellers

It’s in projects like the Ede and Ravensbourne client brief where I became more conscious about the importance of building an audience and constituency behind my craft. I learned that a brand DNA needs to communicate a message to a certain public that compels them to want be associated with it. In a more commercial sense the public could be a market that is simply compelled to buy because they are attracted to the style, the status symbol and the legacy that a brand represents. But the course has also helped me see creative design beyond this purely commercial narrative. It has reminded me that if I want my creative practice to have an impact in society, I needed to bring a new narrative that will compel my public to not just buy the product but to also be co-storytellers of the message I wish to advocate. This therefore became a guide for me when I executed my capstone project. Beyond creating a functional garment, I wanted to communicate through the people who will wear my PVC coat the message of “Unity in Diversity”.

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The Call to Co-creation A big influence to me in continuing what I do is seeing practitioners in the same field doing good and finding solutions for society through our craft. Works of the likes of Christopher Raeburn who has shown works in Fashion Week of garments made out of parachutes and off cut materials to bigger names like Stella McCartney and Patagonia who design with sustainability as their key value. There are numerous startups like Adiff who are innovating ways of combining a lifestyle and helping refugees with wearable tents. All these inspire me to use fashion as a tool for communication and my artform to reflect my feelings towards society. It’s given me a purpose and a responsibility to use what I know to help others. But all these social and environmental advocates and entrepreneurs will be the first ones to remind me that the new fashion narrative they are espousing is easier said than done. Changing the the traditional mindset of consumers will continue to be an uphill climb. There will always be critiques that will challenge the purity of the cause. Therefore, the story tellers need to be as compelling and and transparent about their products. In my case, while I am happy to note the initial sense of my public’s receptiveness to the call to be co-storytellers, I also realize that the story I wish to tell is not complete. For instance, the PVC material, while it helped me actualize my design, is not exactly the most sustainable material. Even as it communicates my message of “Unity in Diversity”, I am sure to encounter a critique about the negative environmental impact of my creation. This made me realize the third important lesson that the course has given me, and that is that the challenge of co-creation is a never ending cycle that responds to the ever changing world.

3 : CREATIVE PRACTICE


In conclusion the Graduate Diploma in Creative Practice course has reinforced my whole journey and will continue to help me as I move forward in building and refining my craft. This essentially brings me to my Masters course in Fashion Design where I aim to continue to discover my capabilities as a co-creator in this industry. This whole experience has helped me adapt and shaped who I am as a designer not only in fashion but as a co-creator in this evolving, complex and challenging world.

Photographed on my trip to the La Sagrada De Familia, Barcelona, Spain April 2018

“Those who look for the laws of nature a support for their new works collaborate with the creator.� - Antonio Gaudi 71


CREAT IVE F UT URES Encyclopedia Britannica. (2018). Coat of arms | heraldry. [online] Available at: https://www.britannica.com/topic/coat-of-arms ROSS, D. (2018). Knights and Chivalry in Medieval England. [online] Britain Express. Available at: http://www.britainexpress.com/History/Knights_and_Fights.htm The Royal Family. (2018). The Order of the Garter. [online] Available at: https://www.royal.uk/order-garter Heraldicsculptor.com. (2018). The Most Noble Order of the Garter, its History, Ceremony, Coats of Armsand Crests.. [online] Available at: http://www.heraldicsculptor.com/Garters.html mr-slowboy IllUSTRATIONS. (2018). mr-slowboy. [online] Available at: https://www.mrslowboy.com/ Vogue.co.uk. (2018). London Fashion Week Men’s Street Style. [online] Available at: http://www.vogue.co.uk/gallery/london-fashion-week-mens-street-style Fogg, M. (2006). Print in fashion. London: Batsford. Bowles, M. (2015.). Print, make, wear. Hacket, J. (2008) Mr. Classic: Photographs by Garda Tang. Coggins, d. (2016) Men And Style: Essays, Interviews and COnsiderations.

C A P S TON E PRO JEC T Rasche, A., Morini, E. and Bellezza Rosina, M. (2011). Coats!. Milan: Skira. Foulkes, N. (2007) the Trench Book Shoben, M. (2008) Pattern cutting and making up The simple approach to modern tailoring. Vol 2. SChuman, S. (2009) The Sartorialist. Military Dress and Men’s Outdoor Leisurewear: Burberry’s Trench Coat in First World War Britain. (2011). Journal of Design History, 24(2), pp.139-156. Kingdom, B. (2018). Burberry® Official Site. [online] Burberry United Kingdom. Available at: https://uk.burberry. com/ [Accessed 20 march. 2018]. Miu Miu Trench. (2018). [image] Available at: https://cdn-images.farfetch-contents.com/miu-miu-transparentblack-trim-raincoat_12321657_10922911_800.jpg StyleLikeU. (2018). StyleLikeU - True Style is Self Acceptance.. [online] Available at: https://stylelikeu.com/ Style Is Personal Power On Display: Cathy Cooper. (2016). [video] Available at: https://www.youtube.com/ watch?v=h-90FXK6yHc&t=345s Philippine Folklife Museum Foundation | San Francisco, Ca. (2018). Evolution of Philippine Costume Archives [online] Available at: http://philippinefolklifemuseum.org/portfolio_category/evolution-of-philippine-costume/ Pastor-Roces, M., Baldovino, D. and Tysmans, W. (2000). Sinaunang habi. [Quezon City, Philippines]: N. Coseteng.

BIBLIOGRAPHY


CREAT IVE P RAC T I C E Gwilt, A. and Rissanen, T. (2012). Shaping Sustainable Fashion. Taylor & Francis. Mogi, K. (2017). The little book of Ikigai. Gilbert, E. (2016). Big Magic. Penguin USA. Matteucci, G. (2017) Philosophical perspectives on fashion Kiosoglou B. (2013) I Used to be a design student. Christopher Raeburn Spring 2018 Menswear. (2018). [image] Available at: https://www.vogue.com/fashion-shows/ spring-2018-menswear/christopher-raeburn/slideshow/collection#10 [Accessed 13 Mar. 2018]. The True Cost. (2018). The True Cost. [online] Available at: https://truecostmovie.com/ [Accessed 13 Mar. 2018]. Adiff (2016). [image] Available at: http://themarginalist.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/07/cover1.jpg [Accessed 13 Mar. 2018]. YouTube. (2018). The Next Black - A film about the Future of Clothing. [online] Available at: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XCsGLWrfE4Y [Accessed 13 Mar. 2018].

A N D R E A L O PA e: drealopa@gmail.com ig: andrea_lopa


Andrea Lopa PM7000 Portfolio  

Graduate Diploma in Creative Practice Submitted to the MA Fashion Department At Kingston School of Art April 2018

Andrea Lopa PM7000 Portfolio  

Graduate Diploma in Creative Practice Submitted to the MA Fashion Department At Kingston School of Art April 2018

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