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Anderson andersonmagazine.com May/June 2017

Nurse Practitioners:

Providing Comprehensive Care

Real Estate Market Is

Sizzling Hot Educating our homeless children

magazine


Norma Strang I was born and raised in a small town in Northern Indiana called Nappanee with a population at that time of only about 3,000. It was a great place to grow up. But times were much different then. The war came along (World War II) and changed all of our plans for the future. I didn’t attend college, but I worked in a defense plant. I made $.50 per hour, and that was considered good pay! My future husband was one of the first to enlist in the service after Pearl Harbor. He was just out of high school, but the Marines beckoned and he left for boot camp in California and was gone for three years before a serious wound finally brought him back to the U.S. to the Naval hospital in Chicago.

Over the next few years we married and had four children. I had a few different jobs including one in the musical instrument industry where I was one of only two women to be allowed to finish flutes and piccolos. After my husband died, I moved south in the early 1990s where three of our four children lived. I have now lived at The Legacy for five years and have loved every minute of it. I must say that my life, in spite of some struggles, has been a good one. I had a loving mother and father, two sisters that I was always close to. My husband was the best, and I couldn’t be more proud of my children. God has been good, and I am thankful every day for His many blessings. Call Christy Tripp today to schedule a visit, and be sure to ask about their all day dining menu!

864-276-3501

www.legacyofandersonseniorliving.com


May/June 2017

andersonmagazine.com Publisher/Editor April Cameron Advertising Sales Jeanie Campbell Kim Ellison Graphic Design Jennifer Walker Contributing Writers David Anderson Caroline Anneaux Liz Carey Lisa Marie Carter L.C. Fereira Susan Martin Jay Wright Contributing Photographers Black Truffle Photography Life is a Tripp Photography Anderson Magazine is published six times a year.

contents table of

New To You 10 Treasure Hunting at Consignment Shops Blurred Lines Combining Work & Home Space

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The River is Calling Saluda River Rally in June

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Race Across Mongolia 26 Pendleton Woman in 10-day Horse Race

Advertising Inquiries: AndersonMagJeanie@gmail.com 864-634-9191 Kim@andersonmagazine.com 864-221-2996 Editorial Inquiries: News@andersonmagazine.com 864-221-8445 Copyright: All contents of this issue ©2017, Anderson Magazine. All rights reserved. No portion of this issue may be reproduced in any manner without prior consent of the publisher. The publishers believe that the information contained in this publication is accurate. However, the information is not warranted, and Anderson Magazine does not assume any liability or responsibility for actual, consequential or incidental damages resulting from inaccurate erroneous information.

Cover Photography by Black Truffle Photography

Anderson Magazine PO Box 3848 Anderson, SC 29622 864.221.8445

Church Street Heritage Project 28 Looking Forward by Looking Back Tri County Tech Celebrates 10th Anniversary

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Habitat for Humanity’s Upcycle Art Show Raising Money for Homes

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Backyard Burger Season Tips from The Boondocks

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Let’s Get Social

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Letter from the Editor The light is at the end of the tunnel! School is almost out for summer! Most people that know me know that I love summer! I love summer for the warm weather, pool days, beach trips, cook outs and simpler schedules. I love summer for the kids to get that break! I love summer so the kids can sleep late! I love summer so I don’t have to struggle waking them up to get dressed every day! And I love summer because I don’t have to make any more lunches! You would think I make gourmet lunches every day as tired as I am of it by the end of the year, but I don’t. I just make regular turkey sandwiches and other odds and ends, but by June, I don’t want to make another turkey sandwich. EVER. What a blessing it is that I even have the opportunity to make this “complaint.” Did you know there are hundreds of students in the Anderson County public schools who are homeless and likely welcome the routine of going to school to receive a meal every day? Thanks to the commitment of professionals dedicated to these children and families within the different school districts, homeless children are receiving educational opportunities and additional care as needed to help them be successful in every way possible. You’ll enjoy reading our story about how our school systems work with our community resources in these very difficult situations. For a more light-hearted story, but one that also showcases dedication, check out the feature on Clare Summers as she prepares for the Mongol Derby, a 10-day, 1,000 kilometer horse race across the wilds of Mongolia. She’s a physical therapist from Pendleton, and is one of 34 participants from nine countries participating. Our business readers will enjoy our real estate features in this issue. We look at the residential market and trends in the area, as well as the commercial industry and a Q and A with commercial real estate realtor and Anderson Area Chamber of Commerce Chairman of the Board, John Wright, Jr. And I especially like our feature and cover story on nurse practitioners. I am personal friends with a couple of the individuals featured in the story and have used nurse practitioners for several years as part of my healthcare routine. Everyone involved in the various aspects of healthcare deserves to be recognized, and this is a great article to sing the praises of nurse practitioners. These are just a few of the highlights of this issue. There are several more great articles that I know you will enjoy! This will be a good one to read on the back deck, by the pool or pack for the first vacation of summer! Enjoy!

~April

andersonmagazine.com

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May/June 2017

My friend and healthcare provider, nurse practitoner Sarah Long.


Ask an Expert

Q. What is a Daily Money Manager and do I really need one? A Daily Money Manager (DMM) is a professional who provides a wide of personal business assistance to clients who want or need help A. range managing their day-to-day monetary affairs. DMMs often organize and

track financial and medical insurance papers, pay bills, and maintain bank accounts. Many senior citizens struggle to manage the needs of their daily finances. It may be due to physical limitations where the simple task of writing a check becomes very difficult, or organizing financial records in preparation for tax filing becomes just too overwhelming to handle.  Many older adults are being taken advantage of and are losing thousands of dollars to phone and internet scammers. Using a DMM isn’t about giving up control, it’s about helping an individual gain control and continue to live independently. And I would always encourage adult children to be included in any meeting or discussion of their parents’ financial situation if possible. This assures that everyone understands the role and duty of the DMM and that everyone is comfortable with the goals established. Although most DMMs assist the elderly population, other clients often extend beyond this. Busy professionals, those individuals that may travel extensively during the year, or even people that HATE paying bills and handling their own personal finances can benefit from having a DMM.  Aside from paying bills and balancing bank statements, household budgeting can be a great asset. How much money is spent on gas, that Starbucks coffee, or your monthly utilities and groceries? After looking at your current spending habits, a DMM can set up a budget for you that will help you get your expenses under control and potentially save you hundreds of dollars.  So, do you really need one? If you want to get control of your finances, organize your tax records, eliminate missed payments or unnecessary late fees, have someone serve as a liaison with your CPA, attorney or tax preparer – or do all that for an elderly loved one – then yes, call me at The Alliances today to discuss our Daily Money Manager options. - Sylvia Mesaros, Member, American Association of Daily Money Managers

864.401.8115

Sylvia Mesaros Owner Aging parents struggling with staying on deadlines for paying bills? We can help. Let The Alliances help your parents with daily financial tasks like monthly bill payments, organization and reconciliations. Talk to us about what system works best for your family. We’re here to make it simple and stress-free for you and your parents.

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~ Senior Care Specialists ~ Gain peace of mind & non-medical care for your loved one from C3 Elder Care. • Caring • Compassion • Companionship

Is it time for an Aging Plan? If you have a senior adult in your life, it may be time for an Aging Plan to discuss the complex topics of healthcare and life changes. The plan will evaluate living arrangements, in-home care needs, financial, legal and safety issues. Allow me to assist you in preparing for care.

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cbell@preparingforcare.com www.preparingforcare.com andersonmagazine.com 5 May/June 2017

R. Carter Knobel

First Vice President/Investments

(864) 225-7177

114 East Benson Street Anderson, South Carolina 29624 Stifel, Nicolaus & Company, Incorporated Member SIPC & NYSE | www.stifel.com


Celebrating Nurse Practitioners By Susan Martin

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May/June 2017


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“It is important to me to provide a comprehensive and holistic approach to my patients’ physical and emotional health.” ~ Nurse Practitioner, Valerie Mattingly Walker-Fleming

acing a major shoulder surgery, Violet Woody, recently visited Nurse practitioner Sarah Long for a routine pre-op appointment. Upon entering the examination room, Long recognized Woody’s apprehension and put her at ease by explaining the surgery and what to expect. Because she connects with her patients, Long embraces each person’s needs and assesses an appropriate care plan. “The best thing about my job is my patients,” Long said. “I have some patients that I have been seeing for 19 years. I know about major events that have occurred in their lives. It is great to be in a small town and see several members of the same family as patients.” Long works for Internal Medicine Associates of Anderson, with Dr. Joseph Farmer, Dr. Carl Sofley and Dr. Michael Kunkel. “Our practice was among the first practices in Anderson to hire a nurse practitioner,” Sofley said. “We were initially worried about how our patients would react to seeing a nurse practitioner at times rather than a physician.” Sofley said the vast majority of patients have been very receptive to seeing a nurse practitioner. “There is a shortage of primary care physicians nationwide and here in Anderson,” Sofley said. “Nurse practitioners are helping to fill this role. It has allowed our practice the ability to accept new patients that we would have otherwise had to turn away.” Sofley said nurse practitioners are excellent at providing patient education regarding weight loss, diabetes, and healthy life style changes. “Our patients realize that our nurse practitioners can always ask  the physicians  for advice when they  present with  more complex problems,” he said. “This gives the patients an increased level of comfort as they realize the nurse practitioners and physicians are working together collaboratively to help them. We believe that having nurse practitioners in our office allows us to provide better comprehensive care to all of our patients.” Long said providing comprehensive care is important to her. “It is a very rewarding job because I feel like I am able to make a difference in my patients’ lives both physically and mentally by diagnosing and treating numerous health issues,” she said. “I have also always enjoyed patient education. Many health issues can be prevented with diet and exercise.”  Long first fell in love with the idea of becoming a nurse practitioner as a student at East Tennessee State University where she received her bachelor of science in nursing. “Several of my instructors were nurse practitioners,” she said. “I loved the idea of diagnosing and treating patients and realized my goal was to become a nurse practitioner before I even became a registered nurse.” Long moved to Anderson in 1994 as a new nurse and planned to work for a year and then move somewhere that had a nurse practitioner program. Clemson’s program started about a year later and she received her master’s of science in nursing.


Angela Reeves has a similar story and has been a family nurse practitioner for 21 years. “I was one of the first nurse practitioners in Anderson with the type of training that I obtained,” she said. “I initially worked at Internal Medicine Associates for eight years and received valuable training from the physicians in that practice. I have been part of Primary Care Associates of Anderson since 2004 and have loved every minute of my time there.” Reeves worked as a registered nurse for 16 years before she decided to go back to school for her master’s degree and complete the family nurse practitioner program. “I was always interested as to whether I could assess, diagnose and treat the patients that I was taking care of at the hospital, thus helping them heal from their illness and most of all, keeping them well,” she said. “I did not want to be a physician. Folks think that nurse practitioners would like to be physicians. Once a nurse, always a nurse, and being a nurse practitioner allowed me the opportunity to impact my patients beyond the hospital. I am all about preventive health and this is the direction we see the healthcare industry going.” Nurse Practitioner Valerie Mattingly Walker-Fleming also approaches patient care with a focus on preventive health.

“I became a nurse practitioner to provide advanced direct patient care to the medically underserved,” Walker-Fleming said. “It is important to me to provide a comprehensive and holistic approach to my patients’ physical and emotional health.” Walker-Fleming has worked in various nursing roles for AnMed Health since 1993. She is currently employed by the Occupational Health Department of AnMed Health and contracted out to provide care to participants in the wellness program at the Glen Raven Custom Fabrics manufacturing plant. The training for a nurse practitioner, also known as an advanced practice registered nurse, involves obtaining a bachelor’s degree in nursing, then a master’s degree in nursing with a preceptorship and/or residency in the clinical setting. “Being a nurse practitioner has opened up so many opportunities for me in the city as well as at the state level,” Reeves said. “I have served on various boards with the State Board of Nursing for the last 10 years. I really enjoy discerning the needs of fellow practitioners as well as the citizens of the community and state in regards to keeping the practice of medicine and nursing the best it can be.” n

By Lisa Marie Carter

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May/June 2017

TODAY AT GUEST SERVICES


While you’re away,

let your pets play!

SnappyWash.com

Electric City Stay and Play is the resort for pets. Canine guests can take a dip in the heated, bone shaped pool and feline friends can take a romp around the floor to ceiling play room. Overnight and day play for dogs, cats, exotics, pocket pets and birds. Veterinarian owned and operated.

Now Open!

Call to schedule your free tour!

(864) 225-6440 • www.stayandplay.pet

July 24-28

Steppin’ Out Studio Summer ‘17

*Only available at our New HWY 81 location* 2117 N HWY 81 Anderson, SC 29621

120 Charley Drive • Anderson, SC

Jazz Funk- Hip Hop - Contemporary Leaps and Turns - Lyrical - Tap $25 non-refundable deposit due at time of registration *Balance due by first day of camp (July 24) *Classes run Monday-Friday *Spaces are limited!

Twinkle and Tumble Summer Dance Camp for ages 3-6

Your little dancer can enjoy a full week of fun activities full of movement and music with a different theme each day! Activities include dance, music, arts and crafts and a whole lot of fun! Perfect for curing that summer boredom!

3:00-4:30 p.m. OR 5:30-7 p.m. $65 for the week (includes daily snack)

Register TODAY! www.steppinoutasc.com 864-225-6682 andersonmagazine.com

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May/June 2017


New To

YOU a

By Susan Martin

nyone who knows Lona Kimmel would describe her as stylish and professional. When asked about her sophisticated clothing, her eyes brighten, and she describes her wardrobe as “treasure.” When hunting for that treasure, Kimmel regularly shops consignment stores. “My favorite store is Just for Ladies Consignments on Main Street in Anderson,” Kimmel said. “The prices are great and something is always on sale for even more discounts. I always find clothes there with the original tags. You never know when you’ll find a $100 pair of jeans for $20.” Just for Ladies Consignments is one of the oldest consignment stores in the area. A consignment store is a store that sells secondhand items (typically clothing or accessories, but some also sell furniture or décor) on behalf of the original owner. The original owner then receives a percentage of the selling price, as does the store owner. So not only do consignment stores benefit shoppers looking for great bargains, they also benefit the consignors who offer their goods up for sale. Sawyer Martin met Valerie Flynn, owner of Valerie’s Treasure Chest, several years ago when shopping for pageant and prom dresses. After purchasing dresses at modest prices, Martin became a consignor and sold several dresses through Flynn’s shop. When consigned merchandise sells, Flynn keeps 60 percent and the consignor receives 40 percent. “Consignors sign a contract, and merchandise is entered into a point-of-sale system. We pay out on the 15th and the 30th of the month,” Flynn said. Andrea Nelson visits Valerie’s Treasure Chest when she needs something new to wear. “I love shopping at Valerie’s,” she said. “I love that I can find great consignment pieces every time I go. And I love the fact that nobody else will be wearing what I bought.” Flynn’s faith formed the foundation for her business. “It was after many conversations with God that I opened the shop,” she said. “Since I did, he has consistently blessed me beyond measure.” andersonmagazine.com

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May/June 2017


“We have made many long-lasting relationships with our customers and dealers� Randy Ellenburg, Remnants Antiques

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May/June 2017


When Randy Ellenburg shares his consignment shop story, he too talks about God’s blessings. Ellenburg manages Remnants Antiques Gifts and Consignment located in downtown Anderson. “We are the remnants of God,” Ellenburg said. “We are a non-profit helping the ladies at Shalom House in Belton.” Shalom House is a recovery program for women with addictions. In addition to sharing the mission of the business, Ellenburg describes the way consignors earn money with the store. “We rent booth space as well as take in consignments,” he said. “Booth renters earn 90 percent commission on sales. Consignors earn 50 percent commission on sales.” In addition to furniture, Ellenburg said his store has a large, eclectic mix of old, new and anything between. And there’s a side benefit. “We have made many long-lasting relationships with our customers and dealers,” he said. Lasting relationships and friendships made at the Blue and Gold Macaw are important to owner Gina Sanders. Named after her blue and gold macaw, Gizmo, the store is located on Greenville Street. “I wanted to give the boutique a memorable name, not the predictable names you find with other resale stores,” she said. “I wanted ours to stand out, so I chose Blue and Gold Macaw. Macaws are very graceful, colorful, always well dressed, friendly, and have independent personalities: a great analogy for women in general.” andersonmagazine.com

Sanders said she specializes in better brands of ladies’ clothing, shoes, handbags, jewelry, and accessories. “The other thing we specialize in is good, old-fashioned customer service,” she said. “We still feel that’s very important and want our customers to know they will receive as much attention as they’d like.” Providing quality customer service is also important to Sharon Lee at Pazzazz Consignment Shop and Boutique, located on Main Street in downtown Anderson. “I have developed relationships with many of the consignees,” she said. “At the end of their contract, a lot of our consignees donate to charities, churches, and individuals. Another highlight is helping shoppers put their outfits together.” When it’s time to head out on your next shopping spree, check out one of the many consignment shops in Anderson County! n

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May/June 2017


Happening in BELTON and The Listening Room on Main

May 6, 2017 • 4 PM - 8 PM • Tickets: $20 at the Listening Room on Main Live Broadcasting of the Kentucky Derby Auctions • Heavy Hors d’ oeuvres & Cash Bar Chance to Win in Cash Giveaway

306 City Square, Belton

864-338-8556

beltoncenterforthearts.org

Check out our new website at

beltonmuseum.com

Rhythm on the Rails Concert Series free outdoor concerts on front lawn of the depot

May 7 May 13 May 27

BHP Jazz Band - 3pm The Combo Kings - 6:30pm Loretta Holloway - 6:30pm

Exhibit - Jazz: More Than Just the Music will be open through July 1.

Support the Museum Become a Member today

beltonmuseum@bellsouth.net 100 N. Main St. • Belton, SC 864-338-7400

Carolina Brotherhood to Cycle Through Anderson

On June 12, the Carolina Brotherhood (CBH) will be rolling out of Smithfield Fire Department in North Carolina cycling approximately 600 miles in five days to Beaufort, SC,  to honor fallen public safety officers who died in the line of duty (LODD) in both North and South Carolina. The team consists of 30 riders and 20 support staff all of whom are firefighters, paramedics, police officers or public safety family members across NC and SC stretching from Charleston, SC to Asheville, NC and everywhere in between. The group will be cycling through Anderson to honor Firefighter Ken Stanton of the Sandy Springs Fire Department and K-9 Hyco.       The group was formed in 2012 after the line-of-duty death of Captain Jeff Bowen of the Asheville FD who tragically died in a fire at a medical office building in Asheville. The mission of the Carolina Brotherhood is to raise funds for the families of fallen first responders and to honor their memories. During the ride, CBH will stop at local fire departments, police stations and communities to honor the families of the fallen by providing both financial and emotional support.     Why do they do it? Dena Ali of the Raleigh FD says, “I am a firefighter and an avid cyclist, so it just made sense for me to get involved.  I was one of the original members in 2012, and since our first ride, I make it a priority to participate each year. In 2012, we started our first ride in Asheville to support Captain Bowen and his family. Captain Bowen’s crew from the Asheville FD rode with us and each night, they would tell stories and share the memories they had about him. At the end of the ride, I got to know Jeff ’s family and now have made lifelong friends with all of them. It was then I realized that this ride is something much bigger than myself and I feel proud to honor each LODD and their families.”      How can you get involved? CBH is always looking for donations, if you would like to donate, check out their website at carolinabrotherhood.com. You can donate to the team or sponsor an individual rider. Each rider has set a personal fundraising goal, and a team goal of $30,000 has also been set. You can also find out more information about the ride, the route, the riders and track the ride live during the week of  June 12th. You can find them on social media outlets such as Twitter and Facebook. Get involved by watching for more information about when they will be in Anderson and come out to show support and welcome them as they visit our community. n andersonmagazine.com

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May/June 2017


Real Estate Market Is

Sizzling Hot By Lisa Marie Carter

12-month period spanning March 2016 through February 2017, pending sales in our region were up

overall Homes priced between $ 100,001 to $150,000 sold in an average of

69 days

Don’t hesitate. Don’t even blink if you are looking at buying a home. The housing market is hot right now, and this trend has hit full force in Anderson County. I know this, not only from the research I’ve done for this article, but from looking for a new home myself. For example, a house went up for sale on a Thursday in one of Anderson’s historic districts; I looked at it Friday, and by the end of the weekend, before we even had time to consider it, the home was under contract. In another instance, friends put their house, located off Greenville Street, up for sale as they were “considering” moving. They listed the price on the high end since they weren’t in a rush to sell, and the first weekend their house hit the market they had several bids at or above asking price. So, what’s the deal with this flash sale that appears to be taking place in the real estate market? Uptick in the economy, higher wages and reasonable interest rates seem to play a big part. In Anderson County, we are experiencing a growth spurt, and there aren’t many homes available for sale, so that makes the ones that do come on the market more appealing. According to the Western Upstate Association of Realtors located in Anderson, buyer activity is outpacing seller activity in much of the country, causing the relatively quick sales and low supply. Demand definitely remains strong. In February, new listings were up 0.3 percent to 655 and inventory shrank 5.6 percent to 2,336 units. Days on the market decreased 8.4 percent to 87 days, according to the Monthly Indicator Report by the Western Upstate Association of Realtors. Sellers are getting a generous number of offers in this market; however, the concern is that there will not be a range of homes to choose from when the seller becomes a buyer. For the 12-month period spanning March 2016 through February 2017, pending sales in our region were up 4.7 percent overall. The price range with the largest gain in sales was the $300,001 and above range, where they increased 14 percent. The overall median sales price was up 3.9 percent to $154,700. As far as price ranges with the best sales record, that would be houses in the range of $100,001 to $150,000, which were selling in an average of 69 days. The price range that tended to sell the slowest was the $300,001 and above range, at 126 days. Once you do sell, you become a buyer. You’ll need to consider if you should buy a existing home or build a new home. The median sale price of a new home in the U.S. was $322,500 in December 2016, according to the U.S. Census Bureau and the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development. The median price of an existing home was $232,200 in the same month, according to the National Association of Realtors. With home prices increasing and mortgage rates remaining on the low end, if you were thinking of a change, now might be the ideal time. andersonmagazine.com

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BUILDIN BUILDIN YOUR YOUR OW OW HOME HOME 5 PROS O BUILDIN YOUR OW HOME 55 PROS PROS OO BUYING A BUYING A EXISTIN EXISTIN HOME HOME 5 PROS O BUYING A EXISTIN HOME

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t tmight t that t ens thefirpotential fir s r fir s t r fir s r fir s t r fir s t r fir s t r fir s t r fir s t r fir s t fir s t f fir s t f fir s t f fir s t f has t s s t s s s s r of hidden costs not be s r s st r r s r r r r r fi r fi fi fi ve e er er ve ve er er ve ve e r e v e r eve r eve r ve ve er ever fi ever fi ver fi ever fi ver fi ver fi ver ore s t fore t fore t fore t fore t fore t forev t fore forev forev forev forev forev tirely r r ephase, e ore r during rev the e r r r r r r o o o o o o obvious purchasing or that can f o f o f o f t o f s f t f t t s f s f r t t f f t r s t s f t s r r t t s s rs t rs er fi ver fi ever fi ver fi ver fi ver fir ver fi ver fir ver fir er fir ver fir er fir s er fir s er fir s er fir s er fir s er fir s er fir s r fir s t r fir s r fir s t r fir s t r fir s t r fir s t veasilyv happen e r v shortly e e v v re e re e e ve ev ve after taking ownership. re re ve ev ev ve re t fo fir s t fo r s t fo r s t fo r s t fo r s t fo r s t for r s t for s t for r s t for s t for s t for s t fore s t fore s t fore t fore t fore t fore t fore t fore t fore t forev t forev forev t s s s fi fi r s r fir s s s fi r fi r s r fir s fir r fi fir fir fir r fi fir er fir r fi r fir ver fir ver fir ver fir er fir s ver fir er fi and eve reve oreve rever oreve rever rever rever rever rever rever rever rever eAppliance e er fi e v v e new e o eve orWith r r e condio o f rev foheating e foair o rev forevsavings:  o f ev f o r e o r e o f r o o f f r o r o f f o f r t o f o f t f f t f t o t f f t o t s t t o f s f t s t t s f s r t t s s r f r r s s s r s r fir fi r s r fir s fir r fir r s r fir s t fir s t fir s t fir s t fir s t fir s t s t fir s t f fir s t r fir er fir er fi er fi r fir r fitioning er fi ver e e r ve r r canrsave ar few hundred e units, you a year firs t fi er fi r firdollars o r e t f o r ev t f o r e f o r e v t f o r e v f o r ev f o r ev f o r ev f o r e v f o r e ve f o r ev f o r ev e f o r eve o r e v e o r eve o r ev e o r eve o r ev e r e v e r r ev e r eve r r ev e r r eve r r e v e r o f t o t o f f o f f o fo s t fo with s t f r s t f the fir s er fir s er fir s er fir s r fir s t er fir s r fir s t r fir s t r fir s t r fir s t r fir s t r fir s t r fir s t by r omitting r s t service r s t plan s t f an s t f rst r s t normally st f r r s t carried e v e e e v v e er fi ever fi ever fi ever fi ver fi ver fi ver fi ver fi ver fir ver fir ver fir ve ve ve ev ve e e for t fore s t fore t fore t fore t fore t fore t forev t forev forev forev forev forev older e e r r e r e e r r e r r r r r o r o with o hot fo s t fo- same rs rs rs t foheaters, rs t fowater st st t fo winrs rs st f t fo new s tsystem rs t fo fir rst t fo rst st f st f er fi rever ever fi ever fi ver fi ever fi ver fi ver fi ver fi ver fi ver fir ver fir ver fir ver fir ver fir er fir er fir er fir s er fir s er fir s er fir s er fir s er fir s r fir s t e e v r v e e e v dows etc. These tend to be more energy efficient and v r e r e v v e r r v e e v r r v o e r e v e r o r s t f r s t fo fir s t f r s t fo fir s t fo r s t fo r s t fo r s t fo r s t fo r s t fo r s t fo s t for s t for s t for s t for s t for s t fore s t fore t fore t fore t fore t fore t fore t fore r r s being swellfiras fi rhaver fithe fi r s fi s r s fi fi r r s fi r fi r fi r r fi r fi r r fi r r r fi r r fi r fi r e r fi r e fi latest technology as under warr fi r e fi e r fi e ev f o r ev o r e v f o r e v o r e v e o r ev eve foreve oreve oreve oreve oreve reve reve rever rever rever rever rever rever rever ever rever ever fi f f f o r o t for r f f r t o o o fo o fo o fo fir s r fir s t r fir s r fir s t r fir s t r fir s t r fir s t fir s t r fir s t fir s t f fir s t f fir s t f fir s t f ranty. r s t r fir s t fir s t fir s t f fir s t f fir s t f fir s t f fir s t fo fir s t f fir s t fo fir s t fo r ve r er er r r ve er er r ve r er ve r ve er fi e r ve ve er o r e s t f o r e t f o r e s t f o r e t f o r e t f o r e t f o r e v t f o r e f o r ev t f o r ev f o r ev f o r e v f o r ev f o r ev f o r ev f o r eve f o r e v e o r eve o r ev e o r eve o r ev e o r e v e o r ev e r e ve r f f r t t s r t s s rs st st rs st rs t f are done t things tf sdesign tf s t it all: From tf st t fo s t f thes t start, they er fi ver fi ever fi ver fir ver fi ver fir ver fi ver fir ver fir er fir ver fir er fir s er fir s You r fir ver fir ver fir ver fir er fir er fir s er fir s er fir s er fir s er fir s er fir s e v e v v e e v e r e e r v e e e r v v e for r r e v e v r r v e e v r o e r e v e r o r e e o r r o e f o e r r e o o f r e o f r r f o e f r r o o f f r o r t o f saves yous tfrom t fo sspending fo s t fo additional r s fir s t t f you f o s t f o s t f or s r s t fir s t t fowant. t foThat t fo r s t fir s t t fo r s t fir s t f fir s t fir s t f fir s t f fir s t f fir sway t fi s t s s fi s fi r fi r s r r r r r r r r r r r r fi r fi r r fi fi er eredoing er evertheevhome eve reve oreve reve reve rever reve rever rever rever rever ever rever efunds er fi evafter er fi evyou er fi purchase er fi everit. er fi ever fi ever fi r r v r v f r r o o fo r o fo r o r ev fo o e fo rev r s t r fir s t fir s t r fir s t fir s t f r fir s t fir s t f fir s t f fir s t f fir s t f fir s t fo fir s t fo fir s t fo fir s t fo r s t fo r s t fo r s t fo r s t fo r s t fo r s t for r s t fo r s t for r s t for s t for fi r fi fi r fi ver fi ver fi ver fi er fi er fi fir er fi ve e v e r r eve ev e r r eve eve r e v e r eve r eve r e r e v e r eve r r e r r e e r v v e r e e v e v e r v v e r r o Easier Entertaining is easier e eentertaining:  e ev rev orbecause for for r ev rev t fo t fo for for for ore t fo for ore f or t fo t fo ore ore for for for fir s er fir s er fir s er fir s r fir s t er fir s r fir s t r fir s t r fir s t r fir s t r fir s t r fir s t r fir s t r fir s t fir s t fir s t f fir s t f fir s t f fir s t f fir s t fo fir s t f fir s t fo fir s t fo r s t fo e r r fi e v new homes often have an open floor plan that supports r e e r v r e e r r v e r v e r e v v e e e r v v e e e v e v v e f o r t f o r e s t f o r t f o r e t f o r e t f o r e t f o r e f o r e t f o r e f o r e f o r e f o r ev f o r ev f o r ev f o r e v f o r ev f o r e v f o r e v o r e v o r e ve o r e v e o r e v e r e ve o r e v e t o t s f f be sbuilt t s t f every s f t s r f t t s f s r t t s s t r r s t s r t s r r t t s s t r fi r s t s r large groups. Older homes tended to with s fi r r s s fi fi r r s fi r fi r s fi s r r fi fi r r fi r fi fi r fi rst r fi r r fi fi r fi er r fi fir fir r fi e r r ev e ev e r fir er rev oreve forev oreve foreve oreve oreve reve oreve rever rever rever rever rever rever rever rever rever ever fi ever ever fi ev r o o f o f f o f r r o t f o f r o t o f room being a totally separate space, not to mention the f o f t o f o t t f t t s fo fo t r s fir s t t fo st fo tf r s fir s t f or tf tf fo tf tf fir s r fir s r fir r fir s r fir r fir s r fir s fir s fir s r fir s er fir s er fir s r fir s r fir s t r fir s t r fir s t r fir s t r fir s t r fir s t r fir s t fir r er fi e e e e e eve forev oreve foreve oreve oreve reve oreve rever reve rever rever rever one e v e ever e v may bath vbe located ev r ev revin a rbedroom. f f r ev o rev f o f rev r ev t ore o fo fo r ore r t ore fo fir s r fir s t r fir s r fir s t r fir s t r fir s t r fir s t fir s t r fir s t fir s t f fir s t f fir s t f fir s t f fir s t f fir s t f fir s t fo fir s t fo fir s t fo r s t fo r s t fo r s t fo r s t fo r s t fo r s t fo fi r r r r r r fi ver fi ver fi ver fi er fi ve e v e r eve eve r r eve eve r e v e r ev e r eve r v e o r ev e r ev e r e e e e r e e e e v v e v v r e v v r r v e v e r r e o f o fo t fo s t fo t for fo r s t fo s t fo o r t for t f or t f or t f or t f ore t f ore t fore f ore f ore f ore fore f ore f orev f rst st f s rst s s rst t r st f er fi ver fi ever fi ver fir ver fi ver fir ver fi ver fir ver fir er fir ver fir er fir s er fir s er fir s er fir s er fir s er fir s r fir s r fir s t r fir s t r fir s t r fir s t r fir s t r fir s t e e v v v e e v v r e e ore v v e r v e e ve r r e r r e r e e r r o e e ve r o e r e eve o r o r f eve eve e v e o r r o eve f o r r o o f f f t r s t fir s t r s t fir s t f fir s t fir s t f fir s t f fir s t f fir s t f r s t fo fir s t fo r s t fo r s t fo r s t fo r s t fo r s t fo r s t fo r s t for r s t for r s t for s t for s t for s t fore s fi fi r r fi r r fi r fi eve rever oreve rever reve rever rever rever rever rever rever ever rever ever fi ever fi ever fi ever fi ver fi ver fi ver fi ver fi ver fi ver fir ver fir r r r f r r o fo e o e re re o o fo fo re e o fo re o re r s t r fir s t fir s t r fir s t fir s t f r fir s t fir s t f fir s t f fir s t f fir s t f fir s t fo fir s t f fir s t fo fir s t fo r s t fo r s t fo r s t fo r s t fo r s t fo r s t fo r s t fo r s t for r s t for s t for r r r r r fi r fir er fi r fi ver fi ver fi ver fi er fi er fi er fi er fi v e ev e r r ev e ev e r r e v e e v e r e v e r e e e e e r e e e r v v v v v r v e v e e v e e v r r v e r v v e fore r o e fore o e for rev r ev f or f or t fo ore for ore for t fo ore t fo ore f or t fo ore t fo ore st f f or fir s er fir er fir s er fir s r fir s t er fir s r fir s t r fir s r fir s t r fir s t r fir s t r fir s t r fir s t r fir s t fir s t fir s t f fir s t f fir s t f fir s t f fir s t f fir s t f fir s t fo fir s t fo r s t fo e r r v e e r r e v r e e r v r e e r r v v e e v r e e v e eand e e fi for t fore s t fore t fore t fore t forev t fore forev t fore forev forev forev forev forev forev foreve foreve oreve oreve oreve orev•e115oTransactions rev of r v f orev f t oReal s t f f t t s $25 Million s f f t r s t s f t s r t t s s r t r t s s t r r s t s r t s fi r r t s s r fi r s s r s fi r fi r s s fi s t fir s t s r r er rever ever rever ver fi ever ver fi ever fi ver fi ver fi ver fi ver fi ver fi ver fi ver fir ver fir er fir er fir er fir er fir er fir Estate fi fi r Volumerin 2016 r re re o or fo or o r t f o r e t f o r e f o r e t f o r e f o r e f o r e f o r e f o r e f o r ev f o r e v f o r e v f o r ev o r e v o r eve o r e v e o r e v e o r ev r s t fir s t f fir s t f fir s t fo fir s t f fir s t fo firMember s t f r sFDIC f t t s t t s t t st s t fir s t t f r s t f • Or sver r s s t r tf tf s s r r s s r s r fi r r sbusiness r r fi r fi 85%fiof r r fi fi fi r fi r r r fi fi r e fi r fi r fir s r fir rfromr either r past eve forev oreve foreve oreve oreve reve oreve rever oreve rever rever rever rever rever rever rever rever ever fi ever fi ever ficomes e e e v v f r r o o f f r o f re f ore forev f or t o f o fo o t fir s r fir s t r fir s r fir s t r fir s t r fir s t r fir s t fir s t f r fir s t fir s t f fir s t f fir s t f fir s t f fir s t fo fir s t f fir s t fo fir s t fo r s t fo r s t fo r s t fo r s t foclients s t or referrals. s t fir s t r r e fi r fi r fi e r r fi fi r e r e fi r e e r r v e e r r e v r e e r v r v e e v v e v e e e e r eve r e v e r ore s t for t fore s t fore t fore t fore t forev t fore forev t forev forev forev forev forev forev forev foreve foreve oreve oreve oreve• #o rev forfoKeller r f f r t t f 3 Team t r s t f s for t s rs t t st st rs tf rs t s r r s t r fir s t er fi ver fi ever fi ver fir ver fi ver fir ver fi er fir ver fir er fir s ver fir er fir s er fir s er fir s er fir s er fir s er fir s r fir s r fir s t r fir s t r fir s t Williams Realty North fi fi r r v e e e v v e e v e e e v r v e e e e v v r e e e v v e r r v e e v r r v e e r v v r e o r e v e r o r e e r r o e o f r e e r o o r f e e o South r Carolina t f fir s t t f fir s t t f fir s t f r s t fo r s t f r s t fo r s t fo r s t fo r s t fo s t fo r s t fo s t fo s t fo s t for s t for s t for s t for t for and or t f ore t fo inr2016 r fi r fir s r st f fir s r r fi r s s fi r r fi r fi rs r fi fi r sRegion eve rever oreve rever oreve rever rever rever rever rever rever ever fi rever ever fi ever fi ever fi ever fi ver fi ver fi ver fi ver fi ver fi ver fir ver fir e e r r o e o f r e e o r o r f e e o r r o f o e f r r o o f f r o f r t o r f o f r o t o f f o t o f f o f o f o f t f f fo s t fo s t fo r s t r fir s fir s t r fir s fir s t r fir s fir s t r fir s t fir s t rst rst rst st f st f rst s t f • Voted rst rst fir s rst rst r s t #1rChoice r e e er fi fir ve er ve er er 2”rever ever fi ever fi ver fi ever fi ver fi ver fi ver fi ver fi ver fir ver fir ver fir ver fiRealtors vx e forfiAnderson e ore forev t fore forev t forev forev forev3.5” v e e ve r r e v e r r e r e e r r e e r r e r e e r o r eMail r r o o r r o o f r o r o f o f o f o f o o t f f t o f t o t s f o f Independent 2016 t t o o s f f t f t o s t f s f r t t s s f f t r s t s f t s r t t s s r r t t s s t r fi r s t s r t s fi r r t s s r r fi s fir s r s fi r fi r s s fi r fi r r s fi r r fi r fi r r r “Best r fi er r fi r fi ve er er r fi r fi er ver r fi er fi er fi r fir ofvAnderson” ver ver er fi er fi eve ve r er fi er fi e for t fore s t fore t fore t fore t forev t fore forev t forev forev forev forev forev foreve forev foreve foreve oreve oreve oreve oreveReaders r e f o r e v f o r ev o t s f f t f t s t f s f r t t s s t r s t s t s r t r t s s r t r t s s r t fi r s t s t r s ® r fi r t s s r fi r s fi s r s fi r fi r s s fi r fi r r s fi r r fi r fi r r fi fi r r r fi r fi r r fi e r r fi fi r e fi r fi r fi e r r fi e r what r fi ver fi v rev oreve forev oreve forev reve oreve reve oreve reve reve rever reve rever rever rever rever ever ever ever e• To eread eour v o v f e e e o r r o f o f r r or r s t fir s t for tos tsay r s t fir s t f fir s t fir s t f fir s t fir s t f fir s t f r s t fo fir s t f r s t fo r s t fo r s t fo r s t fo r s t fo r s t fo r s t fo r s t fo s t fo s t for clients foabout st f r fi r fi r s t have r fi fi r fi r fi r fi er fi r r fi fi r er fir oureZillow r out r fir ver fir eve forev oreve forev oreve foreve reve oreve rever oreve rever rever rever rever rever rever rever rever ever fi ever fi ever fius,echeck e v v f o f r t o f f fo t fo t fo s tAdvisor o o fo s t fo s t fo or t for t for t foreviews: ore t f ore t f or fir s r fir s t r fir s r fir s t r fir s t fir s t r fir s t fir s t f r fir s t fir s t f fir s t Financial t fhttps://www. st f st f s st f r s r fir r r r . r fi r e r fir s er fir s er fir s r e e e r fir ver fi ver fir ver fir er fir ver fir er fir s er fir s ezillow.com/profile/ ve eve e e v e e v e r v e v e e v v v e v v e v e r e v r e e v v v v e v ve re re or s t f o t f or s t fo t f or or ev or for ore ore t fore t Road for s t fore s t fore t fore t fore t fore t fore t fore tAlaChappelear/ r for s t f ore s t f ore s t f s r s r s t fir s t f fir s t f fir s t fo fir s t f fir s t fo fir120 s t f firScenic r s fi r s fi s s fi r s s r s fi s r r r fi r r r r r r fi r r r fi r r r fi e fi fi fi fi fi r fi er fi r r fi er fi e e r ve r e v e r ve e v e r r eve e v e r r e v e eve r ver 29621 ver ver e ver ve r rev ve r ver e rev r v eve eve foreve oreSC ve r r r ore f o r s t f o r e s t f o r e t f o r e t f o r e t f o r e t f o r e t f o r e t f o r e t f o r e v f o r ev t fo fir s t f r s t fo fir s t fo r s t fo r s t fo r s t for r s t fo s t for r s t fo s t for Anderson, f t t t s s s r t s r s fi r r s s r fi r s fi s r r s fi r fi r s s fi r fi r r fi r r fi r fi r r fi fi r r r fi e r fi r fi e r r fi fi r e fi r fi r fi e r r fi v e fi r e r e v e e e e e er eve ev/AndersonForSale e r e v e r e v e r eve r e r e ve r e v e r ev fore orev forev oreve forev reve orev reve oreve 864-222-0421 rev r e v o r ev rev r r ev r r e o f or r r f o f rev r s t r fir s t fir s t r fir s t fir s t f r fir s t fir s t f r fir s t fir s t f fir s t f fir s t fo fir s t f fir s t fo fir s t fo r s t fo fir s t fo r s t fo r s t fo r s t fo r s t fo r s t fo r s t for r s t for r s t for r fi e r fi r fi e r r fi fi www.AndersonForSale.com r e fi r fi r fi e r r fi v e fi r e r e v r e e r r v e e r r e v r v e e e r v r v e e e v v e re orev fore orev f ore orev orev or f ore t f or f ore t fore f ore e v f o r e v o r ev o r e v o r e v e o r eve r e v e r eve r e v e r e v e r eve f f f t fo f t o o t for s f t o f o st f s t f fir s t fo fir s t fo firInc. st f fir s ver fir r fir s er fir s r fir s t er fir s r fir s t er fir s r fir s t r fir s t r fir s t r fir s t r fir s t r fir s t fir s t f r fir s t fir s t Chappelear s t f fir s t f e r e e r fir ver fir ver fir& Associates, v r e e v e e r r e v r v e e r e v v e e e v v e v e v r v e e e v v e e r e e v e e v r v e e r e r e v v e A TorEev orev orev t fo s t fo r s t fo s t for r s t fo s t for s t fo t for s t for t fore s t for t fore t for t fore t fore fore t fore fore foRreE AfoLre E fSorT r r r t t r s s fi r tf r tf s s tf rs fi rs st t st rs st er fi rever ever fi rever ver fi ever fi ver fi ever fi ver fi ever fi ver fir ver fi ver fir ver fir ver fir ver fir er fir er fir er fir s er fir s er fir s er fir s er fir s er fir s v e r v e e v v r e r e v v e r o r v e e v r r o v e e r r e o f r e e r o r f e o e r r o e o f r e Ala: 864.314.9346 Craig: 864.940.1598 e o r o r f o r r o f o r r o o f f r o f o f o f t o o f f o o t f f o f t o t f o f r s t fir s t f fir s t fir s t f fir s t t t s f f t f s t fir s t fir s t f fir s t f r r fir s er fir er fir s er fir s r fir s er fir s r fir s t r fir s r fir s t r fir s t r fir s t r fir s t r fiala@andersonforsale.com r s t r fir s t fir s t r fircraig@andersonforsale.com r r r e r e e fi v e e v e r v e efrom v e e ev f o r e o r e v f o r e o r e v f o r e er evfrom er1-1-15ethru e v r eve o r e v r e ve o r e v ve reve reve reve reve *Basedreonvinformation e r e ve r ore revUpstate Multiple r v the Western for o f revListing Service r o t f o f r v 12-31-2015. r o t ore fir s r fir s t r fir s r fir s t r fir s t fir s t f r fir s t fir s t f r fir s t fir s t f fir s t f fir s t f fir s t f fir s t fo fir s t f r s t fo fir s t fo r s t fo r s t fo r s t fo r s t fo r s t fo r s t fo r s t for fi e r fi r fi e r r fi fi r e fi r fi r e fi er e r r v e r e r e v r e e r r v e e r v r e v r v e e e v v e e e v v e e v e e v r v e e e v v v ev ev ev or s t fo t fore s t for t fore s t for t fore t fore fore t fandersonmagazine.com rev ev ev rev ore t fore t fore fore15 eve ore t fore2017 r t t fMay/June s r s t f o r s t for r s t fo r s t f or r s t f or s t f or s t f or s t for s t fore s t f s t s r s s r s s r s fi r r s s fi r r s r fi r r fi r r fi r r fi fi r fi fi fi r fi r r fi r r fi r fi r r e r fi fi r fi e r fi r fi e r r fi fi r e fi r fi r e fi e r r v e r e r e v r e e r v r e e r e e e eve e e e e v f o r e o r e v f o r e o r ev f o r e er ever eve ve rev ev f o r e v o r e v f o r ev o r e v e o r ev r ev o r e v rev r ev r ev f or r f rev r ev o t f r r t ore for f

5 PROS OF BUILDING YOUR OWN HOME

5 PROS OF BUYING AN EXISTING HOME

People first.

Community first. Forever First. firstcitizens.com

Russell D Rhodes


BUILDING YOUR OW YOUR OW HOME HOME 55 PROS OF PROS OF BUILDING BUILDING YOUR OW YOUR OW HOME HOME 55 PROS OF PROS OF BUYING AN BUYING AN EXISTING EXISTING HOME HOME 55 PROS OF PROS OF BUYING AN BUYING AN EXISTING EXISTING HOME HOME SILVER STAR

Opportunity to flip your home: As we discussed in our last issue of the magazine, if you buy a home at a great price and make much-needed upgrades, you have the potential to flip the home, allowing you to roll over profits into a newer and better house.

5 PROS OF BUYING AN EXISTING HOME

Upgrade costs can be done as budgets permit: When purchasing a pre-existing home, you can take your time making upgrades as things go on sale and your budget allows. Ability to move quickly: In the majority of cases, the buyer moves in immediately after closing, removing the cost of temporary housing. You can get to know the neighborhood ahead of time: If you’re buying a home in an existing neighborhood, if you don’t already know someone there, you can find out about the neighbors, property values and other details.

Easy to visualize: You can see the floor plan and the layout of an existing home, no trying to imagine what that blueprint will actually look like once built. n

Welcome to your new lake home!

Residential • Commercial • Farm Land As a member of the Anderson community for more than 51 years, I have a unique perspective on the real estate market. Our company can assist customers in all of their real estate needs including residential, commercial and farm land properties.

It is a priority for our team to stay current on market trends and anticipate changes, and my involvement as President of the South Carolina Realtor Association helps us to have the latest information available to serve our clients’ individual needs.

$559,000 Heart of Pine flooring, antique square peg nails, vaulted wood ceilings and rock fireplace. Lake views from all rooms. Four bedrooms, granite kitchen, bonus room for storage or wine cellar. Tons of outdoor living space on multiple levels. Improved walkway to maximum size single-slip dock with extra large swim platform + boat lift and dock boxes. Water at dock for easy clean-up. Point lot 18-20’ at full pool. Enjoy lake living today!

Debbie Henderson

Real Estate, LLC

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David T. Phillips, SCR President 2017 2315 North Main Street • Suite 224 • Anderson, SC 864-225-1883 o • 864-617-5463 m

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May/June 2017


Commercial Real Estate:

Under Construction By Lisa Marie Carter

Have you noticed an influx of businesses in Anderson? Parts of the downtown area are under construction and empty spaces are filling up. North Highway 81 has boomed with new development, and there tend to be fewer “For Lease” signs and more “Coming Soon” signs going up all over Anderson County. It appears that the commercial real estate (CRE) market is keeping pace with our growing residential market. To get more information on the growing CRE, we contacted John B. Wright, Jr. of McCoy-Wright Realty, Inc. and also Chairman of the Board of the Anderson Area Chamber of Commerce. ANDERSON MAGAZINE (AM)- What are some different things happening in the commercial real estate market in Anderson County? MCCOY-WRIGHT REALTY INC, (MWR) - As far as different things happening in the Anderson market, we have seen a tremendous increase in activity over the last two to three years. We have a very strong industrial market in Anderson which has been spurred by some of the recent expansions that have happened in our county. Retail has also begun to pick up, and many of the national tenants, that four or five years ago weren’t doing anything, are now expanding again and looking for sites.  Office space has definitely been the slowest to recover, but I think we’re just now starting to see that pick up again with vacancies decreasing in our market. The problem is there hasn’t been much new inventory built, and it’s created a bit of a gap in the market because the demand hasn’t been strong enough to support it. AM - Are “shared-space” offices big in this area? MWR - Shared-spaces, better known as co-work space, have become very popular in larger markets and even locally in Greenville and Clemson.  There is not currently any kind of co-work space in Anderson that I’m aware of; however, I am involved in a project right now that is in the very early stages that will be the first one in Anderson. I’m very excited about it and feel confident it will be a big boost for our community and in keeping entrepreneurs local.

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It’s a great time to buy & list!

AM - Are new developments popping up for commercial real estate? MWR - Our firm is handling the sale of the McCants Middle School property on Highway 81/E. Greenville Street which is probably the most valuable undeveloped property in the city of Anderson. Immediately after listing the property, we received multiple inquiries and are very close to finalizing a contract on it which will be a game changer for Anderson. We are also working with a couple of other developers who are looking at some pretty sizable projects which would benefit Anderson.  AM - What sections of our county are the hottest right now? MWR - Researching the hottest spots in Anderson County area, we’re told Clemson Boulevard has always been the hottest stretch for retail in Anderson County, but recently retailers are starting to look elsewhere, specifically Highway 81.  With the hospital anchoring the south end and TTI’s new facility at the north end where I-85 comes in, I believe everything in between will continue to fill in.  You also can’t ignore the growth that’s taken place in Powdersville over the last five to 10 years. With it being positioned so close to downtown Greenville, you’re seeing an influx of people who may work in Greenville, but not necessarily want to live there. It’s very similar to what has taken place in the Fort Mill area in relationship to Charlotte, but on a smaller scale. 

It’s a great time to buy and list folks, but you need to have a Realtor that’s a “mover and shaker” to make it happen for you! Tim and Luanne are both full time Realtors that work for their clients to get’r done! We both take pride in being aggressive Realtors to get you from Contract to Closing in a professional and enjoyable manner. That’s when having a Realtor that pays attention to detail, deadlines and accounting is what you need. There are deadlines to meet and we’ll stay in continuous contact with you throughout the transaction. Contact Tim or Luanne Jones today to see how we can make your next real estate investment an enjoyable and professional venture. “Let’s Share a success story!”

Tim Jones REALTOR®

803-463-9758

TimJonesRE@gmail.com

Broker/REALTOR®

864-202-0991

LuanneJones58@gmail.com

www.coldwellbanker.com/agents/luanne-jones-29621

AM - What should one look for if wanting to lease/ purchase commercial real estate? MWR - To start, a good broker that you can trust, and that’s what we are! (Shameless Plug) To some people, visibility is important, for others it is proximity  to interstate.  I think, as a whole, you try and look for growth in a certain area in order to capitalize on appreciation. I attended a conference recently, and the speaker said, “If you’re buying or developing real estate in an area with low or no job growth, you probably won’t be doing it long.” I think the same is true for businesses, go where the growth is, and when you can be on the edge of it. n andersonmagazine.com

Luanne Jones

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Blurred Lines

Combining Work & Home Life

In our area, in addition to the movement towards downtown Anderson, a growing design trend is combining living and work space in the same building. An example of this is Ron Haskell’s State Farm Insurance office at 302 N. Main Street. This building is his work space as well as the location he and his wife Susan call home. Haskell tells us that creating a living space that fit their needs was a bit of a challenge. Susan had the requirement of a private garage-a secure spot to drive into and unload groceries, etc. - an outdoor space, and a closet where she could see all her options. But, in the end, it all came together very well. Dee Dee Waters, one of the owners of the building that houses Haskell’s office/home space, was involved with the renovations at 300 North Main and says they were very intense, including entirely gutting the building. It was full of office space that had to be torn out. Creating a unique space in downtown is what Waters says drives her to be part of renovating these buildings. Haskell explains the reasoning behind the work/home combo, “When your life revolves around two locations, an office of your own business and a home, the ownership aspect really created two ‘homes’ for me,” he said. “Often there were things that needed to be done at both locations on the same day. Life happens, and I needed stuff at the office for the home, or I needed stuff at home from the office. Now they are in the same building, saving me time and hassles!” Haskell feels downtown living is truly a joy. “When you want to buy local and help your community, downtown is where it’s at,” he said. “Every business is another small business owner like me. I want to support them, and it’s easy!” Haskell adds that having the convenience of food, theater, and events that they can walk to just make life simpler and more enjoyable. Though the Haskells admit downtown living is still an adjustment from the neighborhood

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life with a yard, they really enjoy hearing the city employees vacuuming the street in the morning, planting new flowers on Main and realizing that they no longer have to blow leaves, mow a lawn or worry about dead trees that may fall on the house. Haskell says that makes the adjustment easier. n

the office

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By: Matthew Schell and Teresa Bannister, Anderson County

For nearly a decade, Anderson County has provided the Upstate community with an interactive event to enjoy some of our area’s most underutilized natural resources. This year will be no different. On Saturday, June 3, 2017, the Saluda River Rally, sponsored by Enel Green Power North America, Inc. (EGPNA) will once again give area residents and visitors the opportunity to enjoy self-guided kayak tours of the Saluda River. Launching from M. J. “Dolly” Cooper Park in Powdersville, ending at Piedmont Dam or the Timmerman Jr. Kayak Launch Facility in Pelzer. The 9- or 15-mile paddles include shuttle service from the landing sites back to Dolly Cooper Park. The event will also offer camping at Dolly Cooper Park June 2nd and 3rd; pre-registration required. For the first time, participants can pre-register at www.SaludaRiverRally.com to schedule their launch time from Dolly Cooper Park. The rally will combine the best aspects of the event in years past into one day. Feedback from previous years led rally organizers to revamp the event to give more people more time to enjoy longer trips on the river. Based out of Andover Massachusetts, EGP-NA manages the Piedmont hydropower plant located along the route, which is adjacent to longtime rally partner Saluda River Grill. “We are thrilled to support such a wonderful community event,” said Beth Harris, Manager of EGP-NA’a Southeast hydropower operations and maintenance. “EGP-NA recognizes the impact of paddle-friendly waterways for the community and we are happy to make this possible by providing safe passage to portage around the Piedmont dam.” The event provides exclusive access to the river and access points, for not only beginner and experienced kayakers, but disabled kayakers as well. Since its inception in 2008, the rally’s primary purpose continues to promote kayaking, Saluda River recreation and Anderson County’s 48-mile ADA accessible corridor along the river. The event also serves as a Special Olympics Area 14 fundraiser to send Special Olympics athletes to the National Games. “I am excited to see the growth in this event,” said Councilman Ken Waters, Anderson County District 6. “This 15-mile paddle trip is going to be huge. I am proud each year to participate in this event and see familiar faces.” Among the many public and private partners for the event are: Anderson County Council, South Carolina Department of Natural Resources, Anderson County’s Legislative Delegation, Duke Energy, Anderson County Special Populations Recreation, Grady’s Great Outdoors, Sunrift Adventures, SC Kayak Fishing Club, Senior Solutions, Upstate Forever, Saluda River Grill, Save Our Saluda, Touch the Future, Woods and Water Outdoors, Blue Lion Digital, The Angler Magazine, Piedmont Fire Department and Powdersville Fire Departments, as well as many local residents whom return each year to volunteer their time. “This will prove to be an asset to all of our riverside towns and communities in Anderson County,” said Councilwoman Cindy Wilson, Anderson County District 7. “Witnessing the development of the Upstate SC 48-mile Blueway expand downstream is a dream come true.” andersonmagazine.com

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The EGP-NA Saluda River Rally will offer participants two paddling options: 9-mile or 15-mile with portage. Registration: $25 per boat. 9-mile (3 hour) Paddle from Dolly Cooper Park to Piedmont Dam Portage Includes: One event t-shirt – One BBQ plate at the Saluda River Grill. Shuttle service from Piedmont Dam Portage to Dolly Cooper Park. Also includes access to primitive campsites at Dolly Cooper Park June 2nd and 3rd; pre-registration required. Participants must have their own kayak and personal flotation device. FIRST LAUNCH AT 8 A.M. — FINAL LAUNCH AT 1 P.M.

15-mile (5 hour) Paddle from Dolly Cooper Park to Piedmont Dam Portage to Timmerman Jr. Kayak Launch Facility Includes: One event t-shirt – One BBQ plate at the Saluda River Grill. Shuttle service from Timmerman Jr. to Dolly Cooper Park. Also includes access to primitive campsites at Dolly Cooper Park June 2nd and 3rd; pre-registration required. Participants must have their own kayak and personal flotation device. FINAL LAUNCH FROM THE PIEDMONT DAM PORTAGE AT 2 P.M.

Saluda River Grill opens at 11 a.m. for rally guests. Take-a-break — Enjoy good food, good music, & the portage riverside.

For more information: (864)231-PARK www.SaludaRiverRally.com www.Facebook.com/SaludaRiverRally

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Junior Leadership Anderson

4 2 s s Cla The Anderson Area Chamber of Commerce is pleased to announce that thirty-four local high school juniors were selected for Class 24 of Junior Leadership Anderson (JLA). Built on the guiding principle that the youth of a community is one of its most valuable resources, JLA strives to develop the future leaders of our community by teaching leadership skills and creating awareness for community involvement and commitment. Applications for the JLA program are made available to 11th grade students through high school guidance counselors, which results in an average of 120 student applications being received annually. Completed applications undergo a blind screening process which includes student interviews conducted by a panel of local community leaders. For selected students, activities begin with a team building session followed by five fullday sessions featuring speakers, tours, and leadership experiences, and a poverty simulation exercise. JLA participants also participate in a community service project, plan their own graduation banquet, and become eligible for college scholarship opportunities. Participants of Junior Leadership Anderson Class 24 include:

Gabriella Alicea Sarah Barker Lauren Beckish Maggie Black Peyton Brown Carter Cheek AvontÊ Dawnson Katelyn Flanerty Matthew Fortner Abbey Freeman Nassaiah Hadden Tikeria Hardy Sydney Harrison Olivia Hayes Annalisa Hosea Alexis Johnston Caitlyn Jordan Christina Julien Gareth Lanford Anna Lummus Chase Maxwell Morgan Merriman Madelyn Morton Sterling Murray Allana O’Shields Mariali Perez Laura Perry Suemaya Shabaan Elizabeth Sutton Emily Taylor AnnaReid Taylor Grayson Walsh John Wilson Jaden Wright

Westside High School Wren High School Wren High School Pendleton High School Wren High School T.L. Hanna High School Pendleton High School Wren High School Cresent High School Wren High School Westside High School Westside High School Powdersville High School T.L. Hanna High School T.L. Hanna High School Pendleton High School Pendleton High School Westside High School Wren High School T.L. Hanna High School Westside High School Montessory School of Anderson Wren High School SC Connection Academy T.L. Hanna High School Westside High School Wren High School Westside High School Wren High School T.L. Hanna High School T.L. Hanna High School Wren High School Belton-Honea Path High School Westside High School

For more information about Junior Leadership Anderson, contact the Anderson Area Chamber office at 864-226-3454 or visit andersonscchamber.com. andersonmagazine.com

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The “Write” Source T By L.C. Fereira

hree years ago, a change in my husband’s job found us moving from Minnesota to Anderson. Prior to our move, I had been blogging for a couple of years and had just begun the process of building on my desire to write past my blog. While I had visions in my head of writing a New York Times best seller, I had no idea where or how to start. It was through a series of events here in Anderson that I found my way to the Foothills Writers Guild, where I not only found other writers, but also information on contests, publishing, classes and the encouragement to expand my writing. I had no idea that this group existed, nor the wealth of information that I would find to put me on the path of fulfilling my dream of writing. Recently several members of the Writers Guild felt the desire to help others who might be looking for writing resources, and as a result of their collaboration, the SC Writers Connection was formed. The SC Writers Connection is made up of a committee of volunteers from the Foothills Writers Guild and was created to fill an on-line information void for writers in the Upstate and the surrounding area. Now the questions of “Where do I start?” and “Where do I find?” can be answered with the click of a mouse. Writers in the Upstate can search for local writing guilds, contests, workshops and speakers on their own, or they can look to their public libraries to find programs and writing contests. Local colleges often have a lecture series that one can attend, and museums, bookstores and even the YMCA host events and book signings for local authors. When searching the internet it would be easy to miss many of these opportunities if you aren’t familiar with where to look or what to search for. The SC Writers Connection was created to make the search not only easier, but much more complete. When visiting the website, www.scwritersconnection. com, writers will find that a large portion of these events, opportunities, classes, conferences, contests and other writing information can be found in one central information hub. The website is a landing place where those who write and those who are interested in writing or hope to write can find all the information they need to broaden their writing horizon. The committee hopes that those who search the site will find not only information but also a community of other writers who can encourage their dreams

and goals. One way they hope to build community is with their Facebook page, SCWritersConnection. Here, those searching for answers will find a place to contribute to a dialogue about information found on the website, as well as share information about new, reputable resources and educational opportunities for writers. The SC Writers Connection’s board is made up David Anderson, Carlene Shuler Brown, Elva Martin, Pat Wood, and Jay Wright. Each of these board members are active members of the Foothills Writers Guild that meets the third Tuesday of the month at 7 p.m. in the classroom building at the Anderson University Athletic Campus (former fairgrounds building). If you have questions about the Foothills Writers Guild or the SC Writers Connection, answers can be found by emailing Jay Wright at jaystrings2@aol.com or Carlene Shuler Brown at carleneshulelrbrown@gmail.com. n

www.scwritersconnection.com andersonmagazine.com

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Race across Mongolia

Pendleton woman to race in Mongol Derby By Liz Carey There’s only one reason Clare Summers wants to risk life and limb to race across a country half a world away on a semi-wild horse. “Life is too short to watch it go by sitting on the couch,” she says. This August, Summers, a physical therapist from Pendleton, will participate in the Mongol Derby, a 10-day, 1,000-kilometer horse race across the wilds of Mongolia on the backs of semi-wild Mongol ponies. It’s something she’s wanted to do for a while, Summers says. “I love new experiences, I love meeting new people, I love riding different horses…and I love experiencing new cultures,” she says. “Everything in it is something I enjoy. Now, by day four or five, I’m sure I’ll want a shower, but that’s the breaks.” Summers does endurance racing on horses in her spare time, racing up to 100 miles in a weekend. But being on the back of a horse is just about where the similarities between the two races end. Started in 2008, the Mongol Derby isn’t a marked track where riders go round and round like that little thing in Kentucky. No, this derby is just the rider, a horse, a GPS device, and kilometer after kilometer of wild, unyielding terrain. andersonmagazine.com

There’s no hotel to stop at. There are no water stations. There are no box lunches for participants with a lovely drink at the end. There’s not even a large money prize package or a blanket of roses. But there are rough rides in temperatures as high as 100 degrees and as low as below freezing. There are 25 Mongol “urtuus”, or horse stations, where riders get new horses every 40 kilometers or so, and have the option to rest up in fabric tents called “gers” where they can enjoy mare’s milk and mutton with the local horse herders, and maybe catch a few zzz’s. That’s the good part. The horses are touted as only “semi-wild.” There’s no electricity and no running water. The route is provided to riders via GPS coordinates and the rider has to navigate on their own over vastly changing terrains. And that’s just a few of the challenges for the riders, says Liz Ampairee with The Adventurists, the group that puts the race on. “Usually, dehydration is the worst problem, especially if it is hot. The weather can throw anything at them from down to almost freezing at night, soaring temperatures in the day, plus rain etc.,” Ampairee says. “Many suffer from the food [Mongolians eat a lot of goat], and of course, from riding fitness, falls, sores, mozzi bites [mosquito bites].” 26

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Summers says there are other dangers too. “They have these rodents in Mongolia called marmots, and they dig holes in the ground. If you’re not careful, your horse could fall into one and throw you,” she says. “And everyone I’ve talked to said they were chased by wild dogs. Some people have said there are bandits out there on the trail too.” Last year, of the 40 riders that started the race, 11 dropped out due to dehydration and three dropped out due to injuries. Ampairee said the nearly 1,000 applicants are screened for their fitness and ability to race, and then interviewed before being chosen. There are currently 34 contestants from nine countries participating. For Summers, the race is the right thing, at the right time. “They say when you do this, you have to be in the best shape of your life,” she says. “And they say you’ve got to be comfortable being uncomfortable. I’ve been doing endurance racing (on horses) for about 20 years, and I’m in good shape, so this year I put in my application.” Summers will leave July 30 for Seoul, South Korea, and then on to Mongolia. She’s given herself a week

to acclimate herself to the time change, the food, the weather and the culture. On August 9, the race is on. The day after she finishes, August 18, Summers will turn 60. And her family is 100 percent behind her, she says. “My family is just excited as all get-out,” she says. “My daughter told me ‘Go for it! Glad it’s not me, but go for it, Mom.’” Aside from bragging rights and saddle sores, winners get no prize. The race raises money for CoolEarth, a charity that works to save the rainforests by providing resources to the indigenous people living in them. Riders can also raise money for their favorite charities – in Summers’s case, Miracle Hill Ministries’ addiction recovery program But prizes, glory and money are not what Summers is in it for – she’s in it for the adventure. “There are so many cool things to do on this planet, why not do as many as you can?” she says. “But, you know… if we get to day five or six and I’m near the head of the pack, who knows… I’m not really used to losing.” In Summers’s view, it’s true: “Age ain’t nothing but a number.” n

Splash into summer fun at the Anderson Area YMCA…

SUMMEART CAMPSY THE Camp Venture Full-Day Camp at Lake Hartwell for rising 1st through rising 6th graders

Opens Memorial Day weekend!

Kid Zone Half-Day Camp for ages 5-12 starting June 12th

Now accepting registrations at our Membership Services desk Visit our website for pricing and more info: andersonareaymca.org/child-development

Summer Sports Camps

Youth Sports Develop Confidence & Character Lacrosse, Soccer, Basketball, Football, and Baseball Visit andersonareaymca.org/athletics for more info

ing No jointhe fee in h of mont e Jun

Anderson Area YMCA

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www.andersonareaymca.org

201 E Reed Rd Anderson, SC andersonmagazine.com

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May/June 2017


Church Street Heritage Project: Looking Forward by Looking Back By David Anderson

From the 1940s to the 1960s, for African Americans living around Anderson, going to town on Friday or Saturday night meant going to Church Street. You could walk down the street and find restaurants with great food, pool halls, and a movie theater where you did not have to sit in the balcony. The atmosphere has been compared to Bourbon Street in New Orleans. Because of segregation, African-American residents were not able to access many basic goods and services, so they formed their own businesses to meet those needs. It was not just for a good time on the weekend, but for all of the basics: grocery stores, pharmacies, doctors’ offices, etc. In this one-block space, Dr. Bea Thompson, a member of the Anderson City Council since 1976, estimated about 300 businesses opened up from 1907 to 1980. As desegregation became widespread over the years, business declined in this district, and buildings were torn down to make a parking lot. At the time, proponents said this would help revitalize downtown. The moment was bittersweet for those who had built those businesses and their customers. It was a sign of progress that Anderson businesses had become desegregated. However, it also meant the loss of decades of a distinct and vibrant history of Anderson. Dr. Thompson, for one, was not willing to let that history be forgotten. There is a marker now with a plaque and a time capsule to honor the black pioneers who started the Church Street business community and kept the doors open. Over the years, Dr. Thompson looked for more substantive ways to remember Church Street. Finally, the idea for a park developed. The park was conceived as a combination greenspace, a palate for artwork, and an educational experience. A committee formed including Beth Batson, the marketing and communications director for the City of Anderson, and Kimberly Spears, the executive director of the Anderson Arts Center. The resulting Church Street Heritage Project is a park located in the renovated Church Street parking lot. Dr. Thompson got her colleagues in City Council to approve funding for this phase. Scott Foster, an architectural illustrator, was brought in to design it. Foster said he wanted the location to recreate the footprint of Church Street “from Main to McDuffie.” That portion completed in October, 2016. Kimberly Spears and Beth Batson have worked on getting more funding for the second phase. The andersonmagazine.com

Church Street Heritage Project public art design/build team members Scott Foster, left, and Sharon Jones, right, review Mr. Foster’s original concept drawings for the project on the Church Street Park site.

committee received grants from the Duke Energy Foundation and an Our Town Grant from the National Endowment for the Arts. The NEA grant is notoriously difficult to get. “I lost pints of blood through [the process],” Batson said. But the efforts paid off. Out of 250 applicants, Anderson was one of 60 chosen, the only place in South Carolina, to receive the grant in that budget year. The next phase involves the artwork. In January, the committee put out a national call for sculptors. Spears said 30 proposals were submitted from all over the country, including one from Spain. As of now, the Arts Center is going through the jurying process to select the sculptor. Also in the works are four story boxes, large dioramas that will recreate scenes from Church Street in its heyday. They will be placed around the circle at the center of the park. The final phase will include an animated version of the story. David Donar, a professor of animation at Clemson, is at work on that. The challenge, he says, in telling this story through animation is not to get too 28

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cute or too depressing. In the end, he wants people to come away with a sense of hope. It will start by looking backward, but end by looking forward. That is how everyone on the committee views the project. They do not want to sugarcoat the issues this history raises. A group of people created these businesses because they had to. They were proud of what they built but also rued the need for it. This situation was not unique to Anderson. However, the Heritage Project celebrates the people behind Church Street. They were doctors, lawyers, tailors, restaurateurs, morticians, pharmacists - in other words, professionals and entrepreneurs. Dr. Thompson said they succeeded because it was a supportive rather than a competitive environment. Anytime one business started, others who were already established were happy to help out and mentor them. Sharon Jones, a ceramic engineer and artist working as part of the design/build team, said, “We want people to see Church Street not just as a place in time but a state of mind.” That state of mind is a spirit of entrepreneurship, cooperation, and joy. It is not just African-American history. It is Anderson’s history. The hope is that in remembering these business pioneers, our next generation of entrepreneurs and professionals will say, “If they did it, so can I.” n

Dr. Beatrice Thompson, Kimberly Spears and Beth Batson discuss plans for the public art phase of the Church Street Heritage Project.

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AnMed Health

Partnerships spark action at AnMed Health Cancer Center Collaboration is making a difference for patients served by the AnMed Health Cancer Center. Bringing together the resources of AnMed Health, Levine Cancer Institute and the Cancer Association of Anderson has created an environment of partnership at the Cancer Center. Levine Cancer Institute, based in Charlotte and part of Carolinas HealthCare System, has recruited new personnel, including Drs. Jay Nayak and Jeffrey DeLo. Opening up new space for them also created space for some Cancer Association of Anderson efforts that complement the integrative medicine initiative of Carolinas HealthCare System Levine Cancer Institute and AnMed Health. Integrative medicine stresses wellbeing and balance in a relationship-centered approach to medical care. It incorporates both conventional and evidence based complementary therapies in caring for patients. This approach to health and wellness respects the body’s natural ability to heal itself and offers treatment for the patient – mind, body and spirit. In addition to physician care, integrative medicine can include strategies for improving quality of life such as proper nutrition, relaxation techniques and herbal therapy.

The collaboration with Cancer Association of Anderson brings art therapy, massage, yoga and aromatherapy to the AnMed Health Cancer Center for patients and their caregivers. “The integrative approach can complement standard chemotherapy treatments by utilizing a variety of therapies designed to uplift a patient’s mood, well-being and overall health,” said Dr. DeLo who is in practice with Dr. Nayak at AnMed Health Oncology and Hematology Specialists, along with Dr. David Griffin. Their practice moved to a new space on the third floor of the Cancer Center earlier this year at about the same time a new and expanded infusion center opened in the same area. AnMed Health Oncology and Hematology Specialists connects patients to a comprehensive cancer program that includes specialized nurse navigators, highly trained and certified infusion nurses, the latest research trials, powerful technology, radiation oncology and supportive care. Dr. Nayak says the comprehensive nature of the cancer program and the AnMed Health commitment to work through Carolinas HealthCare System Levine Cancer Institute attracted him to Anderson. The partnership with Levine Cancer Institute “brings cutting edge cancer care right to our door step and, when needed, an easier and faster access to the resources at Carolinas HealthCare System Levine Cancer Institute for second opinions and treatment recommendations,” he said. Some of that cancer care firepower will be on display June 25 when the AnMed Health celebration of Cancer Survivors Day is moved to a new date and location. Held at the Anderson Civic Center for the last several years, the event will take place at the AnMed Health Cancer Center. The format will also change so that attendees will have a chance to check out some of the integrative medicine components. Attendees also will be able to visit AnMed Health’s new mobile mammography bus as part of the celebration. For more information about the AnMed Health cancer program, visit www.anmedhealth.org/cancer. n

Kayla Reynolds, RN, provides care for patient Tanya Miller in the oncology infusion center at AnMed Health Cancer Center. The new infusion center opened earlier this year and doubled the number of infusion bays, which means a shorter wait time and more ease in scheduling last-minute appointments.

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Who do you think is an Inspiring Athlete? Someone that plays hard no matter the score…that encourages their teammates…keeps an optimistic attitude…plays for the team, not for self… The July/August issue of the Anderson Magazine will feature who you think is an inspiring high school athlete! Send us your nominations for consideration in the next issue of Anderson Magazine.

Nominations must include: Nominated Person Name: High School: Grade: Sport 1: Sport 2 (if applicable): Sport 3 (if applicable): Nominator Contact Info: Name: Email: Phone: Describe in 500 words or less why you think this person is an Inspiring Athlete: Email information to: April@andersonmagazine.com before June 5

Morningside of Anderson Assisted Living invites residents into our senior living community not just to live with us, but to thrive with us. We provide individualized care services based on the specific needs of our residents. You can taste the Five Star difference with a variety of entrée selections for every meal. Our Lifestyle360 program is a holistic approach to active community living that focuses on five dimensions of wellness: intellectual, social, physical, emotional, and spiritual. These five dimensions empower our residents to live a happier, healthier, well-rounded lifestyle. 

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Tri-County’s Anderson Campus Celebrates

10th Anniversary

T

ri-County Technical College marked the 10th anniversary of the opening of its first community campus – the Anderson Campus, on March 27 with a celebration of accomplishments and a look ahead to opportunities in the near future. The College’s second campus opened its doors to the Anderson community March 1, 2007, with three primary goals, said Dr. Ronnie L. Booth, president of Tri-County. “We wanted to bring our services closer to where you live and work; to increase our involvement in the Anderson community; and to expand educational opportunities Tri-County Technical College marked the 10th anniversary of the opening of its first community campus – in both credit and non-credit the Anderson Campus – March 27. Following the program, speakers and Tri-County Technical College Commissioners planted an “October Glory” Red Maple outside the rear doors. Pictured from left are programs offered at the facility.” Michelin’s Mr. Bib; Melanie McLane, facility personnel manager for Michelin’s manufacturing facilities Initially, two flagship, twoin Anderson County; Commissioners Helen Rosemond Saunders, John Powell, and Butch Harris; year programs (Associate in Arts Dr. Booth; Anderson County Council Chairman Tommy Dunn; State Rep. Brian White; Jennifer Simmons, and Associate in Science) were associate in Science major; Travis Rice, associate degree Nursing major; Commissioner offered in their entirety. They Ham Hudson; and Lucy Dunn, associate degree nursing major. were followed by Criminal Justice Technology and Early Childhood Development. Corporate and Community Education programs ANDERSON CAMPUS MILESTONES: include Commercial Truck Driving, Heavy Equipment Operation, Customized Training for Business and Technical Career Pathways Industry, Handgun Safety and Proficiency, Office Skills, The Technical Career Pathways (TCP) program Small Business Workshops and more. began at the Anderson Campus in August 2013. The Tommy Dunn, chairman of the Anderson County TCP program allows participants to graduate with a Council, said in the 10 years since the Anderson college certificate as high school seniors and transition Campus opened its doors, Anderson County has directly into an associate degree program at the College recruited $3 billion in new and existing industry and or enter the workforce. as a result, more than 6,300 jobs have been created. QuickJobs Development Center “The Anderson Campus is vital to Anderson County The Anderson Campus QuickJobs Development in terms of job creation,” he said. “Job training and Center opened October 11, 2013. It is located across other services provided here and at the main campus the street from the Anderson Campus. The Corporate and Community Education Division teaches training in Pendleton give us a major competitive edge as we work to bring business and industry to the area and courses specifically based on workforce needs. Rosenwald School to improve the overall quality of life for the citizens of The Campus also is the site of the Nation’s only fullAnderson County.” scale reproduction of a one-teacher Rosenwald School. Rep. Brian White summed it up by saying, “These These schools were built in the early 20th century for 10 years have been wonderful. We look forward to the the education of African Americans in the rural South. next 50 years. 50 is going to be fabulous.”

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Michelin, Tri-County Announce Manufacturing Scholars Program

The 10th anniversary celebration of the College’s Anderson Campus included the launch of a pilot Manufacturing Scholars Program with Michelin North America designed to build and grow the workforce of the future. Following the announcement, Mr. Bib made an appearance and joined Melanie McLane, standing, facility personnel manager for Michelin’s manufacturing facilities in Anderson County, and Tri-County President Ronnie L. Booth, seated, on stage.

The 10th anniversary celebration of Tri-County Technical College’s Anderson Campus included the launch of a pilot Manufacturing Scholars Program with Michelin North America designed to build and grow the workforce of the future. This special partnership announcement was held at the Anderson Campus, located at 511 Michelin Boulevard. “We are excited to launch our pilot of the Michelin Manufacturing Scholar program alongside our Tri-County Technical College partners,” said Melanie McLane, facility personnel manager for Michelin’s manufacturing facilities in Anderson County. “It is the first of its kind in the State and will serve as a model for the other Michelin plants and technical colleges in South Carolina,” added Dr. Ronnie L. Booth, president of Tri-County Technical College. The program will begin Fall Semester 2017. The new Michelin Manufacturing Scholars program is designed for entrylevel manufacturing professionals and is a pathway leading to manufacturing careers with Michelin North America. The one-semester program is completely customized to meet the needs Michelin has for qualified entry-level manufacturing professionals at their two plants in Tri-County Technical College’s service area – US 2 in Sandy Springs and US 8 in Starr. It includes a nine-credit-hour certificate in Manufacturing and paid work hours each week at Michelin for hands-on experience. Nearly a year ago, Michelin and Tri-County officials began working together to address a skills gap Michelin faced in hiring employees for manufacturing professional careers. In response to this need, Michelin officials worked to develop this program that aligns the daily duties of the Michelin Scholar with the curriculum developed by the Tri-County team. “Ultimately, we have a simple goal: we want to develop the workforce of the future. By doing this, we can influence the stability of our communities, economic growth in our state, and more families can enjoy the same benefits that mine has. It’s an honor and a privilege to work in a company with a high purpose. We care about giving people everywhere a better way forward,” said McLane. andersonmagazine.com

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Top 10 Reasons to Attend Tri-County Technical College 1. More than 70 majors 2. Lowest Tuition in Upstate 3. Highest Success Rate among State’s 16 Technical Colleges 4. Ranked in Top 5% Nationally for Successful Transfer 5. Nearly 80% of Students Receive Financial Assistance and Scholarships 6. 19:1 Student-Faculty Ratio 7. Four Campuses to Serve You 8. Co-ops and Internships Allow You to Learn While You Earn 9. Home to Nationally-Known Bridge to Clemson Program 10. RN, LPN Grads’ NCLEX Scores Exceed State, National Averages

www.tctc.edu 864.646.TCTC (8282) May/June 2017


Educating our homeless children By Caroline Anneaux

Red Cross and local food banks are just a few of the many agencies in Anderson who help the children out. The homeless liaisons will also assist families by getting them to the proper government agencies where the families will receive help filing for Medicaid, EBT cards (Electronic Benefit Transfer), financial help with their utilities, food banks, and other services. “Our responsibility is to educate these children,” said Butler. “Our goal is to remove the barriers that would keep a child from succeeding. When we need help beyond our grant funding, we reach out to different agencies in Anderson. We have a great relationship with all of them and could not help the children as much as we do without their support.” Children are considered homeless for a number of reasons. The family’s home may have burned down or was destroyed during a natural disaster. Some children live in cars or may be in houses where they do not have power and water. Homelessness could also be the result of families doubled up due to financial issues, medical problems, or even divorce. A child may be placed in a guardian’s home because a parent cannot take care of them, and that child will qualify for help if needed. “I have school counselors contact me immediately when they discover that a child in their school needs our services,” said Butler. “Sometimes an older child calls me in the middle of the night because a parent has been arrested, and they need a ride to school in the morning. We spread the word in our districts so the staff members, parents, and the children know we can help them. All they need to do is ask. I carry a cell phone, so I can be reached 24/7.” Anderson School District One has almost 250 homeless students in the district right now. This number fluctuates slightly every year, but remains close to this number. “Very generous private donations as well as the

Hundreds of school-age children are homeless in our Anderson County schools. Can you imagine a child showing up at school, trying to learn, who had to sleep on a floor or maybe in a car? Who hasn’t had a warm bath? Who hasn’t had breakfast? This happens every day, right here in Anderson County. Fortunately, our school districts have caring and concerned staff members ready to jump in and help as much as they possibly can. “We make sure that the [homeless] kids have everything that the other kids have,” said Lisa Butler, homeless liaison and secretary for college and career readiness and secondary instruction for Anderson School District Five. “These children need basic toiletries, transportation [in order to keep them in their school of origin], breakfast, lunch and school clothes. We are also able to help pay for sports physicals, field trips, sports equipment, and more.” District Five receives grant money through the McKinney-Vento Homeless Education Program, a federally funded program developed to protect a child’s educational rights while in a homeless situation. The money through this three-year grant is given to only 15 or 16 districts in South Carolina. Anderson School Districts One and Five are both recipients and have been for years due to the diligence of the liaisons who dedicate themselves to making sure the grants are secured for the kids. “This is the strongest program I have ever come across in my years of experience in education,” said Dr. Veta New, assistant superintendent for college and career readiness and secondary instruction in Anderson School District Five. “Lisa does an amazing job – going above and beyond to support these kids. She also goes around the state to give seminars to teach other districts better ways to reach out and help their kids.” The Salvation Army, Family Promise, American

NEARLY 18,000

CHILDHOOD HUNGER AFFECTS

STUDENTS ARE HOMELESS IN SOUTH CAROLINA

1 IN 4 CHILDREN andersonmagazine.com

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“Our goal is to remove the barriers that would keep a child from succeeding.” McKinney-Vento grant help tremendously in our district,” said Amber Monterroyo, homeless coordinator. “Just this year, Walmart donated over 200 brand new winter jackets for the children we serve. We could not have done that without their help.” Anderson School District One started a new program this year for 109 homeless elementary children who had no access to books after school and on weekends. They provide books to these children, knowing that the more they read the better they will do academically. It also gives the students something personal that they know they can keep. Monterroyo said her district has four case management meetings a year where local agencies such as the Department of Social Services and the Department of Mental Health come in to work closely with counselors in the district. “It is a great way to share resources,” said Monterroyo. “The more our counselors learn, the better equipped they are to help identify children who require the help we can provide. At the end of the year we have a meeting where staff members come together and discuss what we can do to improve for the following year. We could not do what we do without the amazing team effort we have in our district.” STUDENTS ARE HOMELESS Belton Interfaith Association and the INMinistries SOUTH CAROLINA Community Chest in Honea Path are huge supporters of homeless children in Anderson School District Two. Schools in this district have very little funding to

NEARLY 18,000

KINDERGARTEN TYPICALLY HAS THE LARGEST

NUMBER OF HOMELESS STUDENTS

andersonmagazine.com

Lisa Butler, homeless liaison for Anderson District 5, at a clothing closet to assist homeless children.

help with homeless students and must use federal Title I funds or donations from local businesses or private donors. “Our district is not large enough to qualify for the McKinney-Vento grant,” explained Carlos Brooks, homeless liaison and director of food nutrition /student services for Anderson School District Two. “In order to help the children in our district, we rely on agencies in our area. After a student talks to a guidance counselor in his or her school and tells them about their personal situation, the counselor helps the student connect with the right agencies in the community.” The schools in Anderson County are eager to accept the support you or a local business are able to give. Please contact the school near you if you or your company is willing to assist the homeless liaisons who help provide necessities to children here in your hometown. 35

May/June 2017


Hanging Together by Jay Wright

It’s that long-awaited, special time of the year – the weather is warm and school is nearly out. But, locally, this is also the time when Anderson County gets a special taste of finery once thought to be reserved for cities like Asheville, Charlotte, Charleston, or Atlanta – ART! The Anderson Arts Center recently held its special Juried Art Show, and this year was the 42nd annual event. How special? Don’t quote me, but try to find a regional juried art show in the tri-state area with anything close to a 42-year run. I couldn’t find one. And that is very important for an area that has become an artist-rich part of our country. What exactly is a juried art show? I took this question directly to Kimberly Spears, the executive director of the Anderson Arts Center. “We bring in a juror to judge the show’s artwork, someone from out of the area,” said Spears. This year’s juror was Michael Haga, associate dean at the College of Charleston School of the Arts. He has taught art history there for 20 years and has served on a number of art-related councils and boards and has judged exhibitions in the southeastern states. What is the typical juror’s reaction to the art they find here? “They all say they can’t believe the quality of the art in each year’s show,” Spears answered. “The juror bestows merit awards for paintings, photography, fine craft, and watercolor, as well as the Best in Show, second place, and third place awards. The competition seems to get tougher every year as new artists and fresh expressions find their way to Anderson. We draw artwork from regional artists – both professional and andersonmagazine.com

amateur – as well as students from a number of colleges and universities. “Our show provides opportunities for artists to exhibit and sell their work; and there were opportunities for collectors, designers, and the public to preview and purchase over 600 pieces of artwork beginning April 1st. Also, our Fifth Annual ‘Art on the Town’ event through May 26th enables works to be exhibited and sold after the jurying process. And because the Arts Center on Federal Street is in the heart of Anderson’s vibrant downtown, our art show and galleries play a major role in Anderson’s constant beautification projects. We promote and foster art appreciation for every age group.” But what if you’ve been to previous art shows? I asked. “That can only mean you’ll enjoy the next one more,” Spears replied. “Each year’s show is fresh and new. There are some new artists and all the artwork entries are original and new – all have been created in the past two years and none have been shown here before. Our competition is truly an opportunity for all who enter. In our 42 years, only one artist has ever won ‘Best in Show’ twice.” So, what happens after May 26th? It is virtually a two-month art event and it’s all over until Spring 2018, right? “Not at all, and that is another reason our Juried Art Show is unique,” Spears said. “In our partnership with the City of Anderson, up to six outdoor sculptors will be juried into a year-long display of their work around downtown Anderson in the Partnership for Public Art: Sculp Tour. And that is in addition to a $1,000 cash prize.” 36

May/June 2017


What may very well be the most special aspect of the juried art show is that it is one place where you’ll find the works of the professional and the amateur artist hanging together – literally, side-by-side. That, alone, is very validating to the amateur. It might even be a bit humbling to some professional artists. It can also be rewarding financially to the artist as well as to many local Anderson businesses who benefit from the huge influx of art lovers from early April to late May and the year-round tourism. But the real winners are those of us who live in this area. We are near the hub of a unique annual celebration of the visual arts. We can take part in the juried show, the Art on the Town events, the children’s art in the park, and we can freely enjoy sculptures all over a destination city for landscape art. We have a world-class art center where children and adults can learn from gifted professionals, where art and art appreciation are always hanging out on display. n

Some of the srtwork from previous shows.

“Our competition is truly an opportunity for all who enter. In our 42 years, only one artist has ever won ‘Best in Show’ twice.”

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The 14U National team from Vision Volleyball Academy went undefeated at The Palmetto Regional Championship in Charlotte, NC, to win the tournament and Regional Championship title as well as a bid to the National Championship in Minneapolis, MN, in June. The 14U team has won the Palmetto Regional Championship three years in a row. Front Row: Kyra Bryant, Magen Brown, Olivia Cianciolo, Ashleigh Tuttle Back Row: Kate Curtis, Megan Vickery, Anna Taylor, Rylee Moorhead, Avery Cameron, Coach Caty Wentzky (not pictured Coach Hernan Vera)

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Anderson School District 2 A great place to raise your family and educate your children!

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Learn more at www.Anderson2.org!

State Archery Tournament Winners from ASD4 Schools

The Mount Lebanon Elementary School Archery Team competed at the NASP State Tournament in March and finished 3rd in the state. They competed against 16 other elementary schools at the tournament to take home this award. Way to go Wildcats! Other ASD4 teams that took home awards were: Riverside Middle School - 2nd place, and Townville Elementary won 3rd place in the 3D tournament. andersonmagazine.com

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May/June 2017


Read It Again. . and again Book Sale

To Promote The United Way of Anderson County Early Grade Reading Initiative

Saturday, May 13, 2017 8:30 - 10:00am Presale $10.00  10:00 - 2:00 Sale  2:00 - 3:00pm Grab Bag $10.00

Anderson Mall (outside Belk entrance) Drop off your used book donations at these locations through April 2017: United Way of Anderson County Anderson Area YMCA Starbuck’s - Clemson Boulevard

Anderson Recreation Center Anderson Area Chamber of Commerce Anderson County Annex Building

Anderson County Library

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Sponsored by:


Buy A Book “With Purpose” and Read It Again…and Again By Tamara Flinchum, Chair of the United Way of Anderson County’s Education Vision Council I love a good book, and I usually hate to get rid of a good book. However, this month I have gone through my books and have actually given them away – yes GAVE them away. I am at peace parting with my beloved books, because I know I have done so with a great purpose in mind. So, how does giving away my books serve a purpose? I have donated my beloved books to the Read It Again… and Again book sale. Donated books for all ages will be resold on Saturday, May 13 at the Anderson Mall as a United Way fundraiser for early literacy efforts in Anderson County. The United Way of Anderson County is dedicated to supporting early reading in Anderson County… instilling the love of reading in young children and getting books in the hands of children that may not have easy access to books. Why? The United Way knows that early reading is a key stepping stone to future success. Children who are read to at an early age have increased language abilities, evident as early as 18 months old. A child not reading on grade level by the end of first grade has an 88 percent increase of not reading on grade level by the fourth grade. Children not proficient in reading by third grade are four times more likely to drop out of high school.* Reading opens up a world of possibilities for our children and youth. Not reading lays barriers for the future. How can you support this effort AND get yourself some good reads? You can donate your used books. Book drop off location include: The United Way of Anderson County, Starbucks on Clemson Boulevard, Anderson Area YMCA, Anderson County Main Library, Chamber of Commerce, the City Recreation Center, Anderson County Annex through May 1. Then you can join me at the sale on May 13! I will be

there getting some great deals on some great books – so that they can be read again…and then again next year! Give a book with purpose, buy a book with purpose, read a book with purpose. To learn more go to www.unitedwayofanderson. org or contact Michelle Nixon at 864-226-3438. n *Research from www.rorcarolinas.org/research.html

United Way of Anderson 604 N Murray Ave Anderson, SC 29625 (864) 226-3438

unitedwayofanderson.org andersonmagazine.com

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May/June 2017


uses upcycling to raise money for housing By Liz Carey Let’s say you found a piece of building material or old furniture – could YOU make a piece of art out of it? That’s exactly what more than 20 artists have been doing since March, all in an effort to raise money for Habitat for Humanity of Anderson County. Part of Habitat’s Upcycle Art Show and Auction, the pieces are created using materials from Habitat’s ReStore, an outlet on Murray Avenue that resells gently used furniture, home accessories, building materials and appliances to raise money for Habitat’s mission of providing affordable housing for everyone. Upcycling is defined as taking discarded materials or objects and reusing them in a way that creates something new of higher quality or value. Since April 28, the artist’s creation pieces have been on display at the Anderson Arts Center. On May 19, the pieces will move to the city of Anderson’s Garage @ Whitner for a fundraising event. Attendees will be able to view the pieces, vote on their favorites, and purchase pieces during an auction, all while dining on heavy hors d’oeuvres and enjoying the cash bar and entertainment. Limited to only 125 people, tickets to the event will cost $35 each. Kylie Herbert, director of development for Habitat, said the organization was excited to see what the artists came up with. “The artists are given up to $75 credit in our ReStore. They [took] that and [created] something from it,” she said. “There are a lot of great artists in our community. We’re excited to see the materials used in creative ways we wouldn’t have thought of.” Artists are using a wide variety of materials, such as folding screens, saw blades, plywood, an antique wooden ironing board, golf clubs, a lamp and windows, to name a few. andersonmagazine.com

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May/June 2017


Kathy Moore, an area artist and art teacher at T. L. Hanna High School, said she was excited to be part of the Upcycle event. An assemblage artist for more than six years, Moore said she uses found object to create art that usually tells a story. A member of the Anderson Artists Guild, Moore had a show at the Anderson Arts Center that ended in February, and has some permanent pieces on display there as well. So far, she’s grabbed an old radio, an old shovel with an interesting handle, the post from a four-poster bed, some hinges and an old caster. “I really haven’t started putting it all together yet.” Moore said. “I’ve gutted the radio and I may use some of the pieces. I may not. I do a lot of thinking about the piece before I start, so it will be interesting to see how it all fits together.” Proceeds from the event and auction will go to Habitat’s housing program. Each year, Habitat builds an average of two houses. These houses are built to suit the needs of the family or individual approved by Habitat to receive the house. Recipients also provide up to 300 hours of “sweat equity” helping to build the house, as well as attend financial counseling sessions and save

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May/June 2017


money to pay for the closing costs for the house. Most of the houses are three-bedroom, two-bathroom homes, said David Moore, Habitat’s executive director, but vary based on the needs of the recipients. Since the application process is based primarily on need, he said, recipients can vary from single moms with multiple children, to single women, to married couples with one child. Recipients actually buy the house from Habitat with a no-interest loan, based on their ability to pay. Selected based on their level of need, the recipients must also meet minimum qualifications including credit worthiness and income. In its 31 years in Anderson, the organization has built 64 homes, two of which were finished this spring. In the coming year, the organization hopes to add home repairs to its services. “We get a lot of calls for home repairs,” Moore said. “We’ve talked to other organizations in the area and there is way more need than can be met in the area. So many people already own their home and don’t want to leave their home, but can’t afford the maintenance and upkeep.” For more information, or to purchase tickets, contact Habitat for Humanity at (864) 375-1177, or go online to www.habitatanderson.com. n Volunteers and home recipients provide the labor to build the homes provided by Habitat.

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news briefs... Day B4 Father’s Day Car Show Anderson’s annual car show will be rolling back into town just in time to show your favorite car dude. The 18th Annual Piedmont Natural Gas Day B4 Father’s Day Car show is coming back June 17 and planners expect it to be as big as it ever was. Each year, more than 350 cars line Main Street and the courthouse square on the Saturday before Father’s Day for one of the most beloved car shows in the region, according to Carey Jones, who is with the Main Street Program. Many families celebrate Father’s Day a day early so they can go to the show, he said. Cars in the show will start lining up at 8 a.m., with the event running from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. For more information, contact Jones at (864) 940-3800.

Wilhite House gets a facelift If you haven’t seen it already, one of Anderson’s gems has gotten a bit more sparkle lately. The Wilhite House, located at the corner of River and McDuffie streets, has long sat as an abandoned, but beautiful, old mansion. Once the venue for social events and weddings, the house sat empty for several years, bankowned and falling into disrepair. But in October 2016, developer Bill Hall purchased the property and has been working to return it to its former glory. Hall has said he intends to restore the property and sell it as a single family home. He also plans to renovate other buildings on that same block by the end of the year. This is the third house in downtown Anderson he has purchased for renovation. The Wilhite House was built in the 1850s by Dr. P. A. Wilhite, an Anderson physician, credited as “the discoverer of ether.” Wilhite was born in Georgia, but moved to Anderson in the 1850s, where he served as a physician for nearly 40 years until passing away in 1892 from a sudden illness.

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Cancer Association honors Heroes of Hope and Remembrance Who is your hero? On Tuesday, May 9 at 6 p.m., the Cancer Association of Anderson will give its second annual Heroes of Hope and Remembrance Award to Bob and Carla Heritage, the inspiration and perspiration behind CAA’s annual concert. The Heritages organized the first concert in 2002 and it has grown over the years to be the largest chorale in the county—some 150 voices. It has also raised more than $1 million to help local cancer patients. The award will be given at a dinner at Tucker’s Restaurant. Tickets cost $75 and may be ordered by calling (864) 202-7093.

May/June 2017


news briefs... ANDERSON COUNTY WOMEN’s CLUB holds open house

The beautiful and stately manor at 809 W. Market Street has been a premier event venue for weddings and other social events for years, but not many get the privilege of wandering around the house just any old time. But you know you want to peak inside, don’t you? On Sunday, June 11 from 3 p.m. to 5 p.m., wanna-be brides, curious onlookers and anyone with a passion for history will get that chance when the Anderson County Woman’s Club will open the doors to its historic headquarters, giving guided tours and serving light refreshments. Built in 1883 by Dr. Samuel Marshall Orr, the house, known as “Little Arlington” or “the Marshall Orr House,” was designed to be a smaller version of the house built by Orr’s father, Governor James L. Orr. The house was deeded to the Woman’s Club in 1973, the same year it was placed on the National Register of Historic Places. Now, the house serves as the Woman’s Club headquarters, as well as a rental venue for weddings, dinner parties, social functions and other events. For more information, contact the Woman’s Club at (864) 226-7576.

Local teacher gains international attention One local teacher’s idea to help new teachers in the classroom has earned her international recognition. Theresa Hamm, an instructional coach at Pendleton High School, developed a program to help student teachers and first-year teachers with the technology in their classrooms. The program incorporates support, training and mentorship in order to help those new teachers learn how to use the technology to better facilitate classroom learning. In March, Hamm was named a participant in the Google for Education Certified Innovator Program, where she will be one of just 36 educators across the globe to participate. Hamm will receive mentoring, access to online programs and some training in London to further develop her idea during the yearlong program.

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Don’t forget, sign your team up for the Alzheimer’s Walk

The Anderson Walk to End Alzheimer’s will take place at 9 a.m. Sept. 16 in Carolina Wren Park, and organizers are already signing up teams. Teams can walk either the 2-mile route, or an optional 1-mile route. Registration is free, but participants are asked to make a personal donation and to commit to raising funds in the fight against Alzheimer’s. Individuals who raise $100 or more will get a free t-shirt! If your group, family or place of business would like to form a team to help stomp out Alzheimer’s, contact Kathy Mulz at (704) 787-5793 or via email at fncyftwk@yahoo. com. Or check out the website at act.alz.org/andersonwalk.

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May & June Events

around Anderson

May 4-14 The Great Anderson County Fair Anderson County Sports & Entertainment Center Thegreatandersoncountyfair.com May 9 Heroes of Hope & Remembrance 6:30 p.m. at 501 Clemson Blvd, Anderson. An evening to honor Anderson County residents who have greatly contributed to better care for patients battling cancer in Anderson County. www.CAAnderson.org May 10 • 7:30 a.m. Anderson Area Chamber Biscuits & Business Holiday Inn behind Tucker’s Restaurant on Clemson Boulevard in Anderson. Coffee is complementary and there is a $10 breakfast buffet. For more information, contact Monica Elmer at 864.226.3454 or melmer@andersonscchamber.com. May 11 • 7:30 a.m. Anderson Area Chamber Movers & Shakers Grow your business at this monthly networking event. The Bleckley Inn. 151 E Church St, Anderson. Event is free for Chamber members, and $5 for non-members. (No advance registration is required). Coffee and/or breakfast are optional and may be purchased at the door. May 11 • 10:30 a.m. Anderson County Museum Pre-School Hour This is an hour devoted to ages 2-4 with a caregiver. The children will learn about a piece of history in Anderson County or about a special event coming up. This is on the 2nd and 4th Thursday each month. 202 E Greenville Street, Anderson. May 13 • 10 a.m.-3 p.m. Classic Car Show in Downtown Iva townofiva.com/event May 20 & 21 Horse Play in May Horse Show T. Ed Garrison Arena, Pendleton scupstateequine.com/events/horseplay May 25 • 10:30 a.m. Anderson County Museum Pre-School Hour This is an hour devoted to ages 2-4 with a caregiver. The children will learn about a piece of history in Anderson County or about a special event coming up. This is on the 2nd and 4th Thursday each month. 202 E Greenville Street, Anderson. May 25 New Foundations Golf Tournament. Noon: Lunch & Registration; 1 p.m. tee time Newfoundationschildren.com or call 864-260-4705

June 2, 3, 4, 9, 10, 11 Hank Williams: Lost Highway at Clemson Little Theater. Directed by Jimmy O. Burdette Call 864.646.8100 for reservations. Located at 214 S. Mechanic St., Pendleton. June 8 • 10:30 a.m. Anderson County Museum Pre-School Hour This is an hour devoted to ages 2-4 with a caregiver. The children will learn about a piece of history in Anderson County or about a special event coming up. This is on the 2nd and 4th Thursday each month. 202 E Greenville Street, Anderson. June 14 • 7:30 a.m. Anderson Area Chamber Biscuits & Business Holiday Inn behind Tucker’s Restaurant on Clemson Boulevard in Anderson. Coffee is complementary and there is a $10 breakfast buffet. For more information, contact Monica Elmer at 864.226.3454 or melmer@andersonscchamber.com.

Piedmont Natural Gas Block Party Mark your calendars for every Thursday! The Piedmont Natural Gas Block Party presented by Carolina Beer Company is held every Thursday night (weather permitting) from 6 to 9 p.m. in downtown Anderson at Carolina Wren Park through August 31. Here’s the lineup of bands for May and June.

Book your parties at the arts center!

Summer Camps

ALL Summer starting in June. New Camp every week

110 Federal Street • Anderson, SC

(864) 222-2787

think.shop.buy

LOCAL

May 4: Nathan Angelo Band 11: Babe Lincoln 18: Wanda Johnson 25: Mac Arnold and Plate Full O’ Blues June 1: Combo Kings Band 8: The City Street Band 15: Hot as a Pepper 22: Anna Leigh Band 29: Those Guys

bookkeeping • payroll personal & business tax service 1211 North Main Street • Anderson SC 29621

864.226.0042

www.westsmallbusiness.com Low cost spay and neuter clinic Anderson County Humane Society P.O. Box 2262 • Anderson, SC (864) 225-9855

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May/June 2017


news briefs... Good Neighbor Cupboard starving for donations Once the kids go on summer vacation, Anderson’s oldest food bank gets hit with a double whammy – fewer donations and more mouths to feed. The Good Neighbor Cupboard, located on South Tower Street, has been serving Anderson’s needy for more than 30 years. In fact, in 2016 alone, the Good Neighbor Cupboard fed more than 13,000 people in Anderson County. But come June, donations will drop off tremendously, while children will be home needing the lunches they would normally get for free at school, says Betty Berry, the program’s executive director. To make a donation of canned or shelf-stable food, contact the Good Neighbor Cupboard at (864) 225-1701, or drop off donations between 9 and 11:30 a.m. weekdays, excluding Thursdays and federal holidays.

food s n o i t a don needed

United Way Book Sale to raise money for literacy programs Who doesn’t need more books? Especially when buying more of them could help children learn to read. Since March, the United Way of Anderson County has been accepting donations of books for its book sale scheduled from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. May 13. Held at the Anderson Mall, the book sale will help fund the United Way’s literacy programs throughout the county like the Reach Out and Read program which provides reading material for children in pediatrician offices, and at extension libraries in rural areas. To donate, contact Michelle Nixon at michelle.nixon@ uwandersoncty.com or via phone at (864) 226-3438.

Wonder Woman Day at Planet Comics “You’re a wonder, Wonder Woman!” What? A day to celebrate the most amazing woman in the DC Universe? You bet we’ll be there – with our bullet resistant bracelets and lasso of truth in tow. Planet Comics, located at 2704 North Main Street in Anderson, will host Wonder Woman Day from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. June 3 to celebrate all that is our favorite super hero chic. No word on whether or not the Invisible Plane will make an appearance. Get it? Invisible? Appearance? We crack ourselves up. andersonmagazine.com

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May/June 2017


Burgers Rule! From The Boondocks to Your Back Yard BBQs By Lisa Marie Carter The Boondocks, located at 3819 N. Highway 81, may be Anderson’s newest competitor for top burger. It’s owned by Tony Ashey, who had the “food gene” passed down from his dad, Gus Ashey, owner of Carlee’s and Tony’s on Main. Tony Ashey was always around the restaurant business growing up, as his dad owned many restaurants. So when his family decided to open a new restaurant, Ashey decided he wanted to bring a new twist to something familiar. “Burgers are an American staple food, and unique variations of the burger have become really popular in foodie places, so I figured why not Anderson,” said Ashey. “We try to do everything we can to ensure the highest quality burger in town. We don’t use a flat top grill but a char grill, our buns are baked right here in Anderson, and all of our patties are hand patted.” The menu has a wide selection that starts with your choice of meat, including a decision between a basic ground beef patty or a blend of 100 percent certified Angus beef, brisket and short ribs patty, or for those cutting back on red meat, a turkey burger. There is even a vegetarian option with their portabella burger. The selection of burger toppings has an abundance of choices as well, but no matter what you pick you really can’t go wrong…after all, it is a burger!

The Boondocks Located at 3819 N Hwy 81 Anderson, SC 29621

BACKYARD GRILL TIPS from The Boondocks for cooking your own backyard grill summer burgers: Season both sides of the patty. Make sure to put a little indention in the center of each patty before they go on the grill. This will help them to stay flat on the grill and cook evenly. DON’T push down on the burgers while they are cooking or you will lose all the juices from the meat.

Hours Tues - Sat 11-2 & 4:30-9  Sunday 10:30-3

Lastly, to take your backyard summer cookout burgers to the next level, throw a fried egg and/or some fresh avocado on them.

(864) 540-8181 theboondockssc.com

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May/June 2017


hidden history–

Blue Laws in Anderson By Liz Carey

A

s anyone from Anderson knows, if you want to throw back a cold one while watching the game on Sunday, you better buy your beverage of choice the night before. Anderson’s “Blue Laws,” prohibiting liquor sales on Sunday, are a throwback to a time when properly observing the Sabbath meant Sunday was a day of rest – for businesses as well as residents. But did you know that Anderson’s Blue Laws once forbid the sale of another “intoxicating” beverage – Coca-Cola? In January 1914, D. H. Russell, the city recorder for Anderson, stated he felt the city should begin enforcing Blue Laws that prohibited the sale of anything except necessities on Sunday. In his view, drug stores should be able to sell prescriptions, but not cigars, cigarettes, or soft drinks. And, according to the laws, everything else was to be closed. By February, the city ministerial association chimed in saying druggists who sold soft drinks on Sunday were the cause of their falling Sunday School attendance. Giving access to caffeinated sodas was too much of

andersonmagazine.com

a stimulant, the ministerial union said, and too much of an enticement for young men to hang about the streets, leaning on telephone poles instead of spending time in church. Bowing to pressure from the city recorder and the ministerial union, Anderson’s city council voted to return to enforcing Blue Laws on Feb. 13. On February 24, the Anderson Intelligencer newspaper reported the city’s first Blue Law violation. A black woman, Mary Thornly, was arrested and accused of dispensing cigars, cigarettes and certain drinks to her customers. She was tried and immediately found guilty. Frustrated, area business owners asked for clarification on the laws and accused the city council of over-reaching its authority. And while Anderson’s police chief said the laws only applied to druggists, Russell re-affirmed his stance that the only things to be sold on Sundays were necessities. By May 5, two local entrepreneurs, George and Gus Antonekos, who owned several businesses in Anderson including the Piedmont Café at 114 W. Whitner Street, had violated the law. Their employee, Norman Burris,

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May/June 2017


was charged with selling a soft drink on Sunday. He was arrested and ordered to stand trial where he faced a fine of five dollars or ten days in jail. The community was divided. Some residents wanted to be able to buy things on Sundays, but others wanted there to be a more pious observation of the sacred day. By then, at least one county official had his fill of Blue Laws. On June 7, Anderson County Sheriff Joe M.H. Ashley announced that residents should vote for whomever they thought would enforce the city’s laws. Essentially, he was wiping his hands of the whole affair. “Sheriff Joe M. H. Ashley states he is leaving the enforcement of the city’s laws to the next elected mayor,” said an article in the Anderson Intelligencer. “Ashley said that during his time in office, he has devoted a good part of his time looking after lawlessness in the city, but he has reached the conclusion that it is none of his business. He said the city has the right to pass its own laws and as much right to run its own affairs.” When Norman Burriss was brought to court July 25, the Antonekos brothers brought representatives from Chero-Cola and Coca-Cola to the courtroom to testify as experts. They told the jury that drinking soft drinks was no more stimulating than drinking tea or coffee. The jury found in favor of the Antonekos brothers, and found Burriss not guilty. Immediately, the rumors flew that the end of the Blue Laws had come. But Mayor J. H. Godfrey was quick to point out the rumors were unfounded. Interestingly enough, by February of 1915, Piedmont Café was advertising special Sunday dinners from 12 to 5 p.m. for 35 cents, including coffee, tea or water… but no soft drinks. n

Developmentally-Driven Education at its Best… A child’s quest for knowledge is best fulfilled at the Montessori School of Anderson, where children from 6 weeks of age to high school seniors are given the respect, encouragement, and independence necessary to prepare them for a lifetime of personal achievement. As one of only 33 schools of its kind in the United States, come see how the Montessori School of Anderson’s developmentally-driven approach to child-focused education can benefit your student. Call 864-226-5344 to schedule your personalized tour today.

Spring Special

Must present this offer before estimate.

www.Turnkeyroofing.net

231 West Market Street • Anderson, SC • 864.241.8133

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May/June 2017


Anderson’s Social Page

Local events held to support Meals on Wheels and the United Way. Thank you for supporting our area non-profit organizations.

The elegance and grandeur of a turn-of-the-century train station with the warmth and charm reflective of The Bleckley… THE

STAT ION A venue to accommodate a variety of meaningful events… 500 person seated banquet capacity Catering kitchen, stage, tables & chairs

864-225-7203 •

www.bleckleyinn.com • andersonmagazine.com

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Downtown Anderson, South Carolina May/June 2017


Anderson’s Social Page

McLean’s go to Washington for spring break

Easter in Anderson County Julianna and Alezsandra Thomas

Evergreen Plantation Weddings & Events

4800 Highway 187 South • Starr, SC 29684 • www.evergreen-plantation.com Jessica Faulkenberry - Event Coordinator • 864.437.3400 andersonmagazine.com

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May/June 2017


The Phone Generation

“All they do is have their heads buried in their phones.”

By April Cameron

“Whole families go to dinner and everyone just has their phone out.”

artwork by Jeanie Campbell

I have heard a variety of people say this from a variety of generations. Ok, that’s a lie. Really from only two generations. Mine and my parent’s generation. Never from my children’s generation. But, the fact remains, lots and lots of people say this. I, in fact, have said it myself. But for me and my family, we all may look at our phones, but we also share with each other what’s on our screens. Our phones are often our best conversation starters! What better way for my 14 year old and me to first enjoy carpool karaoke together? I’m quite sure she is the one who discovered it and shared it with me. Thank you, James Corden, for giving us endless hours of entertainment and laughter with some of her favorite music and mine that we can appreciate together. And do you have any idea how many sports bloopers or amazing sports replays that I get to see with my

“Do families even talk or do they just look at their phones?”

11 year old? These videos lead to conversations about favorite teams, favorite positions, college aspirations, life-long dreams…it’s so much more than just watching a video, if you’ll take the time to let it be that. I ask them to tell me about the game they may be playing – how it works, what’s the strategy. I ask to see the funny meme on Instagram. I show them pictures of their friends that a mom posts on Facebook. I don’t let them get buried in it, I make them share it. And I do the same. Although they are not nearly as interested in what my social media has to say as I am in theirs! So, the next time you are with kids who are engrossed in their phones, don’t just shake your head at this generation and their lack of communication. These little hand-held computers really can be great ways to learn about your kids’ humor, their interests and have conversations you might not otherwise have. n


Ralph Hayes Toyota

For more than 60 YEARS, all of us here at RALPH HAYES TOYOTA have been treating our customers so well, you’d think you were family! Learn what it feels like to be part of the family when you purchase a new Toyota or a select pre-owned vehicle from Ralph Hayes Toyota. We promise you’ll feel like a member of the Ralph Hayes family because we put your needs first & foremost! Check it out below to see what it means to be

part of our Family Promise Program! All of us here at Ralph Hayes Toyota sincerely appreciate the relationship we have been able to foster with our customers. We pride ourselves in offering our customers an entire staff that is knowledgeable, friendly, & above all, willing to please to ensure that you have the best car buying experience.

We hope to see you soon!

Shop online, anytime at

RalphHayesToyota.com 800-868-8066

Harrison Hayes,

FAMILY OWNED AND OPERATED SINCE 1951

your hometown superstore!

Clemson Blvd. • 800-868-8066 Sales: (888) 475-07853525 Service: (800) 868-8066 SHOWROOM HOURS: PARTS/SERVICE/BODY MON.- FRI. 7:30AM-6:30PM 8:30AM-8PM 3525 Clemson Blvd MON.-FRI. Anderson, SC 29621 SATURDAY 7:30AM-5PM SATURDAY 8:30AM-8PM


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May-June 2017  
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