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Anderson andersonmagazine.com March/April 2019

Legacy

Painting a

Foothills Community Foundation Celebrates 20 Years of Giving

magazine


March/April 2019 andersonmagazine.com Publisher/Editor April Cameron Marketing Sales Susan Culver Client Manager Jennifer Merritt Graphic Design Jennifer Walker Contributing Writers Caroline Anneaux Liz Carey Lisa Marie Carter Josh Overstreet Haley Schvaneveldt Featured Photographer Van Sullivan Photography Anderson Magazine is published six times a year. Advertising Inquiries: susan@andersonmagazine.com 706-436-8380 Client Relations jennifer@andersonmagazine.com 706-436-4979 ON THE COVER: Ruth Hopkins, a talented artist and beloved watercolor teacher to many in the Anderson community.

contents table of

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Party Planning Tips for Success

14

Foothills CAN Making a Difference

16

Preschool Selection Getting a Head Start

Meet Your Peoples Bank Family

20

Tri-County Setting up for Success

Downtown Branch,

605 N. Main Street Since 1951, The Peoples Bank has been part of this community. We’re your neighbors and friends. We know your parents and grandparents. Our children play with your children. And you can count on us to provide the same kind of service we would offer our own family.

Loyalty. Honesty. Integrity.

www.peoplesbanksc.com • 864.261.6500


Letter from the Editor One of my favorite parts of publishing Anderson Magazine is attending the photo shoots for the cover photo. While I genuinely love writing stories, I don’t quite have as much time to do that part anymore, so attending the photo shoots allows me the opportunity to get to know those individuals we feature. We did the photo shoot of our current cover “girl,” Ruth Hopkins, at her home. It was one of the most pleasurable photo shoots I’ve attended. Being at her home and seeing her interact with her husband and surrounded by her artwork really gave me a glimpse into her life. In a short period of time, I felt like a better person just for having met her! She has been an inspiration to many in the artistic world, but the truth is, she is just a sweet soul to be around. Hope you enjoy learning about Ruth and her work, as well as the rest of this jam-packed issue! n

~April

Copyright: All contents of this issue ©2019, Anderson Magazine. All rights reserved. No portion of this issue may be reproduced in any manner without prior consent of the publisher. The publishers believe that the information contained in this publication is accurate. However, the information is not warranted, and Anderson Magazine does not assume any liability or responsibility for actual, consequential or incidental damages resulting from inaccurate erroneous information.

Anderson Magazine • PO Box 3848• Anderson, SC 29622 • 864.221.8445

If you are looking to buy or sell a home, we are the team to call! We have over 34 years of experience covering Anderson County as well as the entire Upstate.

Chris Milam

864-202-1336

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March/April 2019

Judy Bader

864-221-2020

Jennifer Neal 864-356-4344


AnMed Health

AnMed Health now offers valve replacement without surgery Dr. Satish Surabhi

AnMed Health has rolled out a new procedure giving some heart patients access to more treatment options. Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement (TAVR) is a procedure that, for some heart patients in need of aortic valve replacement, provides an option that doesn’t require surgery. TAVR is a treatment for many patients who previously had no other options or were at high risk for conventional open heart surgery. With TAVR, physicians now can use a minimallyinvasive approach that provides outcomes that are as good, or sometimes better, than surgical valve replacement. Up to 1.5 million people in the United States suffer from aortic stenosis, a narrowing of the aortic valve, with an estimated 250,000 patients having severe aortic stenosis. Studies show that without an aortic valve replacement, more than 50 percent of patients with severe aortic stenosis will not survive more than an average of two years after the onset of symptoms. Although TAVR was originally for high-risk patients, it is now a promising treatment for other patients, according to Dr. Satish Surabhi, of AnMed Health Carolina Cardiology and medical director of the Cath Lab at AnMed Health Medical Center. “Over the last several years we have had studies that look at patients that are intermediate or medium-risk patients with aortic valve stenosis and we found that the transcatheter valve is as good as surgical valve replacement, and in fact may be safer,” Dr. Surabhi said. “It’s turned out to be a really great advance for these patients.” Future studies will explore TAVR as an option for low-risk patients, he said. Aortic stenosis often develops into debilitating symptoms that can restrict normal day-to-day activities such as walking short distances or climbing stairs. Some patients may experience chest pain, fainting, lightheadedness and extreme fatigue. A surgeon makes TAVR work by entering the artery at the groin and replacing the damaged valve without removing it. The replacement valve is mounted on andersonmagazine.com

Diseased OPEN

Diseased CLOSED

Healthy OPEN

Healthy CLOSED

a stent and wedged into place. Once the new valve is expanded, it pushes the old valve leaflets out of the way and the tissue in the replacement valve takes over the job of regulating blood flow. After treatment, patients typically see an immediate improvement in quality of life, and are able to resume light exercise after just one month. “You have a brand new working valve right then and there,” Surabhi said. “Most people go home within 24 to 48 hours and are back to their usual activities in about a week. It is an incredibly fascinating and fantastic development for patients not to undergo invasive and high-risk surgery and get their valves replaced this way.” 5

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Doing Good For 20+ Years The Community Foundation provides a simple, powerful and highly personal approach to giving. It exists to help people easily and effectively support the charitable organizations and causes they care deeply about – now or through their wills or other estate plans.

Donors

Give All Types of Assets

Individuals, families, businesses or organizations give through the Community Foundation to help achieve their charitable goals and leave a legacy in a way that is meaningful to them.

Donors give cash, appreciated stocks, real estate or other assets and receive maximum charitable and tax benefits. Donors 70 ½ or older also can make IRA Charitable Rollovers as a charitable and tax planning strategy.

To The Community Foundation

For Specific Funds

The Foothills Community Foundation serves Anderson, Oconee and Pickens Counties of South Carolina. It is a 501©3 public charity and is certified by the Council on Foundations as meeting all national standards for Community Foundations.

Donors can give to an existing Fund or establish a Fund in their name or in the name of their family, a specific organization or someone they wish to honor. Funds can be endowed to exist forever or non-endowed to facilitate annual contributions. There are various types of Fund options to meet the donor’s charitable intentions.

To Allow Grants For Good... Forever

Carefully Invested Funds are pooled for investment purposes, maximizing diversification opportunities and returns while lowering fees. The investment objective is for long term capital growth.

The Foothills Community Foundation can make grants on behalf of its donors to any charitable organization including churches, educational institutions, health organizations, community service groups and civic initiatives. When requested, the anonymity of the donor can be maintained.

For more information about establishing a Fund or contributing to an existing Fund, By Mike McMillan contact the Foothills Community Foundation staff or your financial advisor. andersonmagazine.com

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864.222.9096 | www.foothillsfoundation.org


Simple Steps

to Hosting the Perfect Party

By Lisa Marie Carter

Timing Budget Theme Place Food Decor

When I received this assignment from my editor, the timing couldn’t have been more perfect as I was in the midst of helping plan and host a 50th birthday surprise cocktail party! Speaking of timing, I would say that is the first and most important thing on our checklist for planning a party. Timing - One of the first things you’ll want to decide is the date and the time of day for your party. Both will set the tone for the event. With a weeknight event, you may not have to worry too much about things running late or having enough alcohol compared to a weekend event as people tend to meander and stay out later on a Friday or Saturday night. Time of day is also a big factor. Planning a day time party can mean serving lunch or just party snacks, depending on the time. Take timing into consideration when planning your budget too. If you plan a lunch time or dinner time party, you’ll want to budget a bit more money for “heavier” food vs. a mid-day or cocktail party where you would most likely just serve snacks and light appetizers. Budget – Once you settle on the day and time, try to set your budget next. Figure out how much you can allocate for the total party. It’s too easy to just keep adding things and people…and before you know it, the money you thought would cover everything ends up not even covering the food. Theme – It helps to pick a theme. And by theme I don’t necessarily mean for costumes. Themes can help direct your décor and menu. For example, take the 50th birthday party I mentioned. Once we picked the date, chose the time and budget, we selected an Aged to Perfection/Wine theme. This theme was perfect for someone turning 50 who also enjoys wine. This helped when selecting our decorations and food and also helped our guests choose the appropriate attire. Place – You’ll want to decide if this is an event you’ll host at your home or elsewhere. This, of course, will largely be decided by the budget, guest list and size of your home. If your home isn’t large enough to host your guests comfortably, consider renting space at one of the many event locations in the county. Also consider club houses and private rooms at local restaurants. When considering location, keep in mind what you’ll need for the location and what is included. If you need to bring everything, you’ll want to consider how to get such items as chairs and tables, coolers and warmers for foods and drinks, etc. Food – This category is multi-layered. First decide what type of food you’re planning -- such as light apps or full meals, buffet or sit down. Then choose the type of food: casual, fun food (like hot dogs and burgers) or more upscale food, perhaps seafood or beef. You can decide if this is something you can handle yourself or if you need to hire a caterer or even bring in a personal chef. And this all goes back to step two, your budget. If you are planning to cater the event yourself, be sure to keep in mind food safety. Plan how to keep cold items like seafoods and mayonnaise-based dishes at proper temps and how to do the same for hot foods. Décor and Extras – To me, this is the fun part, adding some spark to the event with theme-based décor. A lot of things you can make yourself, like a “wish jar” for people to put their wishes in for the guest of honor or a “favorites bucket” for people to put their favorite memories in. A DIY photo backdrop is always fun and an inexpensive addition. Pinterest can be your best friend when brainstorming décor. Another fun extra is party favors. These can be as simple as a bag of cookies or chocolates with a little note about the event or you can get a bit more involved and do something such as ordering custom-made labels and putting them on mini wine bottles for guests to take home. Finally, and most importantly, plan the event so that YOU can enjoy it too. Remember, it’s not about all the stuff as much as it’s about the time and memories you make with the friends and family that day! n andersonmagazine.com

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March/April 2019


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March/April 2019


Meet the Team Clemson at Patrick Square Assisted Living & Memory Care

Lindsey

Lindsey

Lindsey Daugherty, Principal, Role Model SC, will be leading Clemson as they open their new community in February. With over 20 years of experience in the continuum of senior care and working through each step of service beginning with the caregiver role Lindsey has a full circle understanding of the support, leadership, and guidance communities need to become the premier senior care providers. Lindsey’s mission is to change the outcomes of senior care and inspire long term care standards to be delivered at a whole new level of excellence. Lindsey and her team have a deep commitment of service to their residents, associates, families, and community. Lindsey resides in the Anderson-Clemson area with her husband, five children, and grandson.

Allen

Allen Tripp, Campus Service Director (Maintenance Director) of Dominion Upstate. He is the Anderson Senior Maintenance Director working closely with our Clemson Maintenance Director, Johnny Weatherly. Allen Tripp is a hands on, hardworking, and highly skilled professional. He has served our country leading hundreds of men and women, now he will serve our seniors and lead impact.We are so grateful to have Allen onboard and know his future with Dominion Senior Living will be bright. Allen brings a big heart, compassion, and a willingness to grow his Dominion as he serves our community through his gifts. Allen resides in Anderson with his 3 children and his lovely wife, Christy Tripp.

Erica Gillespie, Wellness Director, was raised in Athens, Georgia and has been married to her high school sweet heart for 26 years. Erica loves spending time with her fur babies, one is an English Bulldog named Munson. Her family loves to camp and spend time on Lake Keowee. They also love to travel. Erica has a strong faith in God and is thankful that he has touched her hands and heart to be the nurse that she is today. Erica is a veteran RN and has been working in the Assisted Living field for the last six years. Her career experiences include orthopedics, labor and delivery, injection/infusion, and hospice. Erica is very excited and honored to join the Dominion Family and looks forward serving our seniors in a beautiful state of the art community.

Alan

Jennifer

Alan Gall, Dining Service Director/Executive Chef, comes to us from Central, SC. He previously created wonderful dishes at a local country club. Alan has also worked in the hospitality field and owned his own deli. Food is his art, but he is actually an abstract artist as well. Alan is an avid golfer, loves the outdoors, and adores his wife Karen of 18 years. Alan says,” I love cooking and the spirit good food provides to the soul, I cook with passion from my heart”. Alan is excited to cook for another generation. His Parents are 84 and 80, he considers himself a very lucky man. Alan feels he was called to Dominion and God provided a new door for him to open. We are thrilled to welcome Alan to our Dominion Family.

Now Accepting Priority Reservations!

Jennifer, Life Enrichment Director will use her many years as an educator and experience with coordinating social events in Patrick Square to help with providing a wonderful atmosphere for our Dominion Family. Jennifer is a Clemson Graduate and happily served as an educator for 32 years. During her teaching career, she was also busy raising her son, directing children’s ministries, singing in the choir and performing for local events while coaching drama for students after school to perform locally. In 2012, she moved to Patrick Square and soon became the Co-chair of the Patrick Square Social Committee as well as the Dining and Special Events Coordinator while continuing to teach and becoming a grandmother. We are blessed to have her onboard to what we call “The perfect Dominion assignment “

CALL TODAY: 864.350.5348

100 Pershing Avenue • Clemson, SC • www.DominionClemson.com andersonmagazine.com

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March/April 2019

( photo credits to Christy Tripp)

Erica

Lindsey Thames, Business Office Director was born and raised in Florida, Lindsey moved to Upstate South Carolina in 2006. Upon completing high school, she decided to stay close to home for her college years. Lindsey’s Bachelor’s degree is from Clemson University where she majored in business management with a minor in accounting. She brings experience from the manufacturing and health care industries. In her free time, Lindsey enjoys spending time with family and friends, volunteering in her church’s children’s ministry, reading, and staying active. Highly motivated and eager to join the Dominion team, Lindsey looks forward to continuing her advancement in the senior living industry. Lindsey is involved in our Dominion Pathway Program with a goal to become an assisted living administrator.


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and The Listening Room on Main

DERBY DAYS

CELEBRATING TWENTY ARTISTIC YEARS

May 4, 2019 • 4 PM - 8 PM Tickets: $20

Live Broadcasting of the Kentucky Derby Auctions • Heavy Hors d’ oeuvres & Cash Bar Chance to Win in Cash Giveaway

306 City Square, Belton

864-338-8556

beltoncenterforthearts.org andersonmagazine.com

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March/April 2019

March 16 - Rummage & Craft Sale at Recreation Gym, 8am-1pm March 31 - A Little Bit Country exhibit opening 3-5pm April 3 - Homeschool event - 10am ages 7-12, $2 per student April 12 - Chili Pepper Golf Tournament 9am, Saluda Valley Country Club April 13 - S.C. Chili Cook-Off-10am-4pm Contact the museum for more information about any of our events.

beltonmuseum.com • beltonmuseum@bellsouth.net 100 N. Main St. • Belton, SC • 864-338-7400


Reaching all Corners of Anderson County By Teresa Bannister

Anderson County is making it easier for you to gain important county news and information through its multi-platform community channel that is operated by the County’s media team. “Anderson County has a great story to tell,” said County Administrator Rusty Burns, “and this channel will spotlight all that is exceptional about our community.” Through a community public access channel, Anderson County Media (AC Media) offers community interest stories, preparedness and safety tips, public service information; along with informative segments as it relates to your local government. The community channel is another method to communicate a countywide emergency message. Additionally, the reach of county media is potentially limitless, the channel’s availability through technology encompasses the use of multiple media outlets and apps. Anderson County provides an opportunity for visitors and others to learn more about its community.

What you can expect to see when you tune in? Governmental Transparency – At the forefront of community programming is government transparency through broadcasting public meetings and events. Economic Development – Expect to see information about new businesses starting in Anderson County: companies that are growing and expanding; and, construction updates, road improvements and more. Lifestyle Segments – Expect to see public service announcements relating to different issues, i.e., health issues, emergency preparedness, safety tips and more. You’ll hear about things that matter to you. Non-profit Spotlight – Anderson County has many charities trying to make improvements in our community. This programming reveals services offered and is an outreach for ones in need of assistance. Clemson Extension Services – From cooking to horticulture, the Clemson Extension Services offer a plethora of services to our community bringing their services right to you. n

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Celebrating its 20th anniversary, the foundation has distributed more than $16 million in grant money to the Anderson, Pickens and Oconee communities. Cindy Kibler, Donor Services Director, and Dean Woods, President

Foothills Community Foundation Celebrates 20 Years of Giving

By Josh Overstreet

I

n 1998, the late Anderson attorney, historian and statesman William Law Watkins issued a milliondollar challenge to the community: Raise $3 million and I will match it with $1 million to establish a foundation. The community met the challenge and in February of 1999, the Foothills Community Foundation was granted 501(c)(3) status by the Internal Revenue andersonmagazine.com

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Service. By October 2000, it had made its first grant, $9,000 to Cannon Memorial Hospital in Pickens. Now celebrating its 20th anniversary, the foundation has distributed more than $16 million in grant money to the Anderson, Pickens and Oconee communities and has passed the $15 million mark in total assets. “I think the foundation is exactly what my father envisioned,” said Jane Mudd, the daughter of William Law Watkins and a member of the foundation’s board of directors. That vision, according to Mudd, is that charitable donations would stay in and enrich the Anderson community and surrounding areas. Among the most visible of the initiatives the foundation supports is the To Benefit Anderson (TBA) group. “TBA privately funds projects of preservation, public art and good works benefiting the Anderson community,” said R. Dean Woods, president of the Foothills Community Foundation. TBA is made up of individuals, businesses and organizations that donate $1,000 or more per year. Those funds are channeled through the foundation to be used towards special projects. March/April 2019


The first of these was Anderson Generator Park, completed in 2008. This pocket park located at the corner of Whitner and McDuffie streets downtown is the home of the massive 50,000-pound 1911 Westinghouse generator from the old Portman Shoals Power Plant. The park celebrates Anderson’s history as The Electric City, the first city in the South to achieve long-distance transmission of electricity. It is a nice pairing with the statue of William C. Whitner, the engineer mastermind of the 1897 transmission project, which stands a block away on courthouse square. Through the Foothills Foundation, TBA opened the Anderson Downtown Dog Park on Fant Street in 2017 and is close to completing work on its next project this spring. “Partnering has been good for the city, because together we have been able to pool our resources and create something that is of public benefit,” said Linda McConnell, Anderson’s city manager and a foundation board member. Another partnership with the city was the 2002 purchase of Central Carolina Bank’s headquarters on Main Street. It now serves as the downtown Community Center Building and houses the foundation along with the Greater Anderson Musical Arts Consortium (GAMAC), the Anderson County Board of Education

and the American Red Cross. Through grants and donor-advised funds managed by the Foothills Community Foundation, several local charities are better able to operate and serve the community, such as the Anderson Emergency Kitchen, whose grocery bill has been funded through the foundation for 15 years, according to Woods. The Brighter Christmas Fund (BCF), a partnership between the foundation, the South Carolina Department of Social Services, local businesses and community donors, each year helps needy families during the holidays. In 2018, $64,000 was awarded to the BCF, allowing it to assist over 200 foster children and 150 families identified through DSS. “We have distributed over $16 million to non-profit organizations in our area, and this money is channeled directly into the community,” said Mudd. As the Foothills Community Foundation celebrates its 20th anniversary this February, its future is very bright, according to Woods. “During the next 20 years, our foundation will continue to thrive as we seek to fulfill our mission inspiring participation in philanthropy and retaining the charitable wealth in our service area to positively impact lives and improve the quality of life in all of our communities,” he said. n

Meet Your Peoples Bank Family

Iva Branch,

801 E. Front Street Since 1951, The Peoples Bank has been part of this community. We’re your neighbors and friends. We know your parents and grandparents. Our children play with your children. And you can count on us to provide the same kind of service we would offer our own family.

Loyalty. Honesty. Integrity.

www.peoplesbanksc.com • 864.348.6181 andersonmagazine.com

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March/April 2019


How CAN You Make a Difference? By Liz Carey When Mike Cannon and his family moved to new cities during his career, he and his wife faced a special challenge. The Cannon haves two sons, both on the autism spectrum, and his wife had to start anew finding resources for their special needs every time they relocated. Once they moved to Anderson, they found they had the same difficulties here. But a lunch in 2016 with friend Jimmy Kimbell, then a banker in Anderson with a special needs daughter, changed that, Cannon said. “We were talking about our friends with special needs, and it occurred to us that what we needed to do was have a single place where everyone could go to find help,” Cannon said. On Kimbell’s advice, Cannon started Foothills CAN, a network of organizations that provide assistance to families of special needs children. Like its big brother, Greenville CAN, Foothills CAN stands for Collaborative Action Network. The group covers Anderson, Pickens and Oconee counties and exists to service the needs of those with special needs. “We’re not an organization or an entity, we are a collaboration,” Cannon said. “Our mission statement is simple – to make our communities better places to live, work and play for individuals in our area with disabilities.” The network consists of people within the special needs community - such as people from South Carolina Vocational Rehabilitation, the Disabilities and Special Needs Board in Anderson County, the mayor of Seneca, representatives from Tri-County Technical College, Anderson University and Southern Wesleyan University and many others. – who come together to help connect with one another and to bring special needs services together. All of the network’s answers, outreach and activities flow through Cannon. “There’s no budget really, it’s just me running the show for all three counties,” he said. “I went to Oconee County and I said, what are the top three things you need in your special needs community, and they said, ‘Jobs for our special needs friends, transportation for our special needs friends to those jobs and awareness about what is available out there for them,’” he said. “I went to Pickens County and they said the same thing. I went to Anderson County and they said the same thing. So we started our lunchand-learns to help raise awareness.” The network meets monthly, taking turns in the three counties, and through a series of lunch-and-learn

andersonmagazine.com

programs works to provide employers, community members and other stakeholders with information about the special needs community. For example, in February, the group met at the Fred P. Hamilton Career Center in Seneca to hear Sandy Jordan with Able South Carolina discuss employment for those with special needs. At the group’s initial meeting, a “Launch and Learn” to launch the coalition, the group invited Walgreen’s to come and speak about how they had incorporated hiring adults with special needs into their operations at the Walgreen’s Distribution Center in Anderson County. “Our hope is that we can bring management in from other companies to learn what companies that employ our special needs friends are doing,” Cannon said. Some member companies, like Walgreens Distribution Center, work to provide jobs to those with special needs. Nearly 40 percent of the distribution center’s employees have special needs. “After that first Launch and Learn, I got three phone calls. One was from an employer who wanted to learn more about Walgreens. Two others were individuals who had special needs family members and didn’t know where to go,” Cannon said,. Future plans are to work with area churches to see if there is a way to use church buses, idle during the work week, to transport individuals with special needs back and forth to work. He also wants to work with economic development departments in the three counties to help bring resources and people together. For more information about Foothills CAN, contact Mike Cannon at michaelcannon@charter.net, or call him at (864) 314-2610. n 14

March/April 2019


Belton Preparatory Academy is now enrolling students for the 2019-2020 academic year.

K5-3rd GRADES

BPA is a tuition-FREE public charter school.

ENROLLING NOW. CALL TODAY: 864.392.1173 Experience the difference of Classical Education •A high-quality instruction in phonics, Latin, logic, literature, history, math, science, entrepreneurship, and free market competition •A learning environment where virtue, integrity, and character are developed and displayed We have had an AWESOME experience with Belton Prep! The staff is dedicated to providing a positive learning environment for kids. You can see the passion for the students in each staff member! We are excited to be a part of something so wonderful. - J. Taylor

My heart is overwhelmed every day when I drop Addi off. I know without a doubt that she is loved and cared for.

I am SUPER IMPRESSED with BPA! I love the related arts and hands-on activities! And I love that BPA teaches at a higher level! We are very, very happy!

-A. King

-S. Davenport

864-392-1173 • 5901 Belton Hwy • Belton, South Carolina 29627 Enroll today at www.beltonprep.us Belton Preparatory Academy is a TUITION-FREE public school open to all K5-3rd grade students in South Carolina. BPA is currently located on the campus of Second Baptist Church, 5901 Belton Hwy. in Belton, SC. andersonmagazine.com

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March/April 2019


How to Choose a Head Start By Haley Schvaneveldt

A Google search for “preschools in Anderson County” yields a map speckled with red pins. For parents on the hunt for the preschool that best fits their child, the sheer number of options may be overwhelming. Where should you start? What questions should you ask? How do you begin narrowing down the list? Why Preschool? In South Carolina, preschool education is optional. However, for many families it is a great choice. Anderson mom Ashleigh Cole described preschool as giving children a “head start on education.” For Laura Hayes, a mom from Belton, preschool is “not so much about learning concrete information… but about expanding social skills and helping children to get acquainted with how a classroom functions.” The Method to the Madness Finding a preschool that teaches using methods you agree with is essential. Education theory is not just for grade school. One of the most popular education methods that begins in preschool is the Montessori method. The Montessori School of Anderson describes this method on their website as being student-centered, allowing students to “learn at their own pace, free to complete a project or pursue a subject as deeply as they wish according to personal enthusiasm.” Several preschools in Anderson utilize this method. However, even if a school does not subscribe to a named theory like Montessori, it is important to decide if a school’s education methods are right for your child. For example, Hayes said she looked for a classroom where creative projects and time outdoors are emphasized, and technology is de-emphasized. Do not be afraid to ask a school representative what principles and practices of education they value, and to determine whether those values line up with your own.

for schools that are enrolling a lot of kids who are being raised similarly to how I’m raising mine.” Not only will her child be spending a lot of time with his classmates, she pointed out, but Hayes and her husband will likely find themselves interacting with other parents. Having common ground, “just generally makes for better relationships in and out of school and helps to create a more empathetic community for your child, Hayes said. “And from what I know, the best way to maximize learning is to pair it with lots of empathy. The sense of safety that comes with that helps the mind to open up and soak in a lot more.”

Faith and Lifestyle Religion is a factor for many parents in choosing the best form of education for their children. A large percentage of preschool programs are hosted by churches. In Anderson County there are preschools hosted by Methodist, Baptist, and Presbyterian churches, to name only a few. Choosing a school that most closely aligns with your own beliefs may be important to you. But finding a compatible school for your child goes beyond religious denominations. Hayes said, “I looked andersonmagazine.com

Plan a Visit Many preschools offer open house days or are willing to schedule visits. These events are a great opportunity to get access to information you can’t learn from a school website. When Cole visited the preschool she eventually chose for her youngest son, she observed “the environment was full of positive energy. All the teachers were sincerely engaged with children of all 16

March/April 2019


A B C

Phone a Friend “I would recommend getting many references from different people,” Cole said. She explained, “Getting perspectives from those currently enrolled as well as those that previously attended will allow you to gain insight into a school’s potential future impact on your child. We all are trying to make the best decision we can with the information we are given. Do your research.” Make Your Choice Ultimately, choosing a preschool, like any other parenting choice, is an individual decision. Every family and every child is different. The most important thing is, as Cole put it, “that they are safe and in a loving environment.” Thankfully, the wide variety of options in Anderson County means there is a place for every child to get that head start on education. n

PRESCHOOL DIRECTORY

ages, and the physical surroundings were in excellent condition. The first impression was huge, and what I saw on day one translated to the day-to-day operation as well.” Experiencing an average day in a prospective preschool can allow you to really feel out whether it is a good fit for your child.

The Development Center for Exceptional Children 864-260-4546 • dcecandersonsc.com. Christ Church Episcopal School 864.331.4223 • www.cces.org First Presbyterian Day School 864.225.2551 • dayschool@fpcandersonsc.com Belton Prepraratory Academy 864.392.1173 • www.beltonprep.us Montessori School of Anderson 864.226.5344 • www.msasc.org St. Joseph Catholic School 864.760.1619 • stjosephofanderson.com

IT’S A GREAT DAY TO

BE A CAVALIER

Find out why at our OPEN HOUSE.

March 21 at 9:30 am & 6:00 pm. Register at www.cces.org or 864.331.4223. CHRIST CHURCH EPISCOPAL SCHOOL CCES is an independent college preparatory school serving students in K5-12th grade Christ Church Episcopal School admits students of any race, color, and national or ethnic origin. andersonmagazine.com

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March/April 2019


A Loving, Nurturing, Enriching, Christian Environment for Children 8 Weeks to 4 Years Old

Each day children explore developmentally appropriate curriculum including Zoo-phonics® and other resources to spark their individual growth and curiosity. Children participate in weekly chapel, music, and P.E.

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March/April 2019


Special Olympics By Liz Carey For more than 40 years, Special Olympics in Anderson County has been showing what people with disabilities can do, instead of what they can’t. Kathy Schofield, executive director of Special Olympics, Area 14, which covers Anderson County, said the series of athletic events helps those with disabilities share in the spotlight. “This is their day,” she said. “Instead of being ignored or set aside, they are celebrated and are able to show off their accomplishments… Just watching them will leave you with your jaw on the floor when you see what they can accomplish.” On April 3, Special Olympics will hold its Spring Games at Belton-Honea Path High School, where nearly 800 Special Olympics athletes will compete for ribbons and medals in track and field events. It will be one of four meets the athletes may compete in this year. The Summer Games will be held at Fort Jackson, near Columbia, while the Fall Games will be held in Myrtle Beach. Winter Games, where athletes can compete with others regionally, will be held in Boone, N.C. It’s something the athletes train for all year. Schofield said the athletes, who range in age from

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showcases abilities, not challenges

2 to over 70, train in a variety of sports, including basketball, swimming, cheerleading, bowling, power lifting, bocce and equestrian events. Children between ages two and seven train as young athletes, and there’s a special category in bowling for those under age 20. Special Olympics is also working to bring athletic training to those with special needs who may not have the ability to come to the Special Olympics facility in the old McCants Building on Fant Street. “We’ve been working to implement a Motorized Athletic Training Program that would work to bring activities to them (special needs individuals),” Schofield said. It’s all about getting those with special needs out and into society, she said. “We want to get our group out into the community,” she said. “A lot of people are intimidated at first when they meet one of our athletes, because they don’t know how to act. But once you get to know them, you see how incredible they are. You’re going to get hugged whether you want to be or not. You begin to see that you just need to treat them like you would your best friend.” But in order to produce the games and offer all the training that is required to help the athletes on their journey, the organization needs volunteers. “We’re working with area schools to get athlete buddies who will help get athletes to their events and make sure that they have a good day,” she said. “But an event like this takes so many volunteers.” The organization has volunteers from a number of area school that are considered Unified Champion Schools, including: Powdersville Middle School, Palmetto High School, Belton-Honea Path High School, Honea Path Elementary School, Flat Rock Elementary School, Starr-Iva Middle School, Crescent High School and McCants Middle School. Volunteers from Anderson University help get athletes to and from events. But, she said, more volunteers are needed. “It’s a huge event,” she said. “We need people to help with checking athletes in, giving out awards, doing concessions, parking… there’s a number of things we need volunteers for.” To help out, head to the organization’s website, www.so-sc.org, and hover over the volunteer link. Select the Area 14 2019 games and it will show you a list of all of the volunteer positions available, Schofield said. You can also get in touch with the organization by calling (864) 260-4142, or by emailing Schofield at area14@so-sc.org, or by going to their Facebook page under “Area 14 Anderson County SC Special Olympics.” n 19

March/April 2019


Bosch’s Nick Johnson Says Tri-County Put Him on Path to Success

Nick Johnson As Senior Associate Development Specialist at Robert Bosch LLC, Nick Johnson lives for those “aha” experiences in the classroom – those magical light-bulb moments when an associate understands a concept, a skill, a strategy, or a new idea. “You see the look on an individual’s face -- like he or she ‘gets it’ now. It’s so rewarding. I live for that ‘aha’ moment and later when you can see the difference in an associate’s performance,” said Johnson. “It’s imperative that employees stay up to speed,” said Johnson, whose job is to implement and manage the assessment, training, evaluation, and tracking processes for the 1.300 hourly associates (Operators and Engineering Apprentices) at the Anderson plant. On a daily basis, he is devoted to developing processes and product expertise and tracking the outcomes. “Bosch values education and training. It’s more than just a piece of paper. You have to demonstrate and apply those skills to be successful in the workplace. That andersonmagazine.com

application is the focus of my training classes,” he said. As a senior at Westside High School in the late 1980’s, he never dreamed he would be an instructor. After graduating, he says he was unsure of a career choice. At 17 he joined the Marine Reserves and in 1988 joined the Bosch team starting as an Operator and later working in the warehouse. He served in Desert Storm from 1991 – 92. The following year, he entered Tri-County Technical College’s General Engineering Technology (GET) program and was accepted into Bosch’s Apprenticeship Program and began working as a Production Technician at the plant. “Bosch has a good relationship with TriCounty. The program was a launching pad for me. It gave me the technical skills and allowed me to develop technically and professionally. I was able to integrate the leadership skills I learned from the Marines into the business atmosphere. I always wanted to go to school, and Bosch afforded me the opportunity. College would 20

March/April 2019


have been much different for me without the Apprenticeship Program. The TriCounty classes did a good job of providing hands-on applications to support the theories. The faculty gave support outside of class, and it made a difference,” he said. The Apprenticeship Program’s requirements were high, but the payoff was worth it, said Johnson, who was selected to participate in the prestigious program that provides participants with an opportunity to begin technical training (while still in high school or as a current Bosch associate) and to enjoy career-enhancing benefits. Back then he received a weekly 40-hour paycheck for 20 hours of work while in the program. Bosch paid the tuition and all educational expenses for his two

“Education is the key to success. It removes barriers, but you still have to perform in the position. It’s about lifelong training.” ~Nick Johnson years of study. In addition, he received a Journeyman Certificate from the U.S. Department of Labor. Most importantly, he was guaranteed a position at the Anderson plant. “It was a way to go to school, to work, and to make yourself promotable,” he said. Which is exactly what he did. After four years as a Production Technician, he was named Apprentice Supervisor/Technical Trainer in 1998. “After graduation, I worked all shifts around the entire plant on different lines and received several promotions, including trainer. “I was honored to become an instructor. It’s very satisfying to watch students make progress and to become successful.” After years of teaching, he accepted a position in Central Purchasing where he managed the company’s supply bases for North America for turned parts. After four years, he is now is back in the classroom he loves. “I missed training – it’s in my blood. I missed developing folks and the personal relationships you build. I just enjoy working with people,” he said. “Education is the key to success. It removes barriers, but you still have to perform in the position. It’s about lifelong training,” he said. In addition to his GET degree, Johnson earned a bachelor’s degree in Electrical Engineering from South Carolina State University. Bosch paid for his associate degree as well as his bachelor’s degree. “I graduated from both colleges with zero loans. Bosch has a tuition reimbursement program, and I took full advantage of it. The company really makes an effort to develop its people,” said Johnson, who is the first in his family to graduate from college. “I graduated from Tri-County in 1994 with honors (cum laude). I still remember that day,” he recalled. “In high school I hadn’t thought about college and went into the Marines. But Tri-County put me on a path to success. It gave me confidence and the skills to achieve professionally. With that and some drive, you can be successful -- good thing are going to happen.” andersonmagazine.com

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March/April 2019

Top 10 Reasons to Attend Tri-County Technical College 1. More than 70 majors 2. Lowest Tuition in Upstate 3. Highest Success Rate among State’s 16 Technical Colleges 4. Ranked in Top 5% Nationally for Successful Transfer 5. Nearly 80% of Students Receive Financial Assistance and Scholarships 6. 19:1 Student-Faculty Ratio 7. Four Campuses to Serve You 8. Co-ops and Internships Allow You to Learn While You Earn 9. Home to Nationally-Known Bridge to Clemson Program 10. RN, LPN Grads’ NCLEX Scores Exceed State, National Averages

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Legacy

Painting a

By Caroline Anneaux

W

In 1982, no one in Anderson knew that the local art scene was about to receive a gift This gift was not in the usual form of a present. It was, in fact, a very sweet and incredibly talented artist named Ruth Hopkins who came to town to live. Born and raised in southern Missouri, Hopkins learned to paint when she tagged along with her grandfather when he painted houses. “My grandfather was a painter and also my babysitter,” said Hopkins. “He gave me paint and brushes on job sites, so I started painting baseboards at a very young age. I believe that must be where my love of painting began.” Fast forward to 1959, which turned out to be a busy year for Hopkins. She graduated from high school, began classes at Southeast Missouri State and married her childhood sweetheart, Mark. After the couple finished college, they moved ten times over the next 20 andersonmagazine.com

years while he pursued his career in higher education. In 1982, Mark Hopkins took a position as president of Anderson College (now Anderson University), and they were finally able to settle down in one place. Hopkins stayed busy as a homemaker while raising three children, yet craft projects continued to occupy her creative side in her spare time. She enjoyed ceramics, macramé and drawing, eventually taking classes under Carrie Brown in Greenville. Students in the classes presented art shows every third month under the name Studio South. Hopkins was challenged to create themed paintings on a deadline, so it made the classes more than just a hobby for her. The more she created, the more time she wanted to spend painting. She began teaching part-time at Anderson Christian School and Tri-County Technical College. Teaching classes meant she needed to paint samples for her students to study and draw inspiration 26

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from. It forced her to set aside time during her week to sit down and paint. “I always wanted to be prepared for my classes and painting samples was a big part of that,” said Hopkins. “It was important to me to have several pieces to show, so they could decide for themselves what they were going to create on their own canvases. As an artist, I found it easy to start an art project. New students, however, usually need something to inspire them.” In 1994, she began teaching local classes at the Anderson Arts Center. That was the beginning of an almost 25-year teaching career there, mostly watercolors, where she just recently passed the torch (or should we say brush?) on to Mary McAlister, another local art teacher. “Ruth and I have been painting together for years,” said McAlister. “She recently gave me a lot of her art materials and files to use when I teach. Ruth has always inspired her students to paint what they are compelled to paint instead of telling them what to paint. She is a joy to be around and I still enjoy our weekly painting sessions at the Anderson Arts Center on Thursdays.” As impressive as her teaching career may be, Ruth Hopkins also has artwork in various places around the area for the public to view. She won a logo contest in 1992 for the South Carolina Botanical Garden in Clemson, and her design is still sold on note cards and prints. Around 2005, she was commissioned to paint three large panels for the Onyx Ballroom of the Hilton Garden Inn. In 2007, she painted three of the large Anderson County bass fish in the “Fish Out of Water, Hooked on the Arts” promotion, and the following year she and her daughter took on five more of the fish. The fish were later auctioned off to benefit the Anderson Arts Center, so most of them ended up in businesses and homes in the area. “One funny memory I have to share is how I bartered for hair salon services,” said Hopkins. “I entered a French-themed South Carolina Water Media Society show and was given the paintings back after the show ended. I stopped by the Hair School (Carolina College of Hair Design) for a haircut, and they had a beautiful black and white theme where we thought my paintings would fit in perfectly. I gave them the paintings, and they gave me free perms and haircuts for a couple of years.”

Watercolors, poured acrylic and calendars are also part of the collection she has created over many, many years. Her home and the stand-alone art studio off the patio are filled with beautiful pieces of artwork which she has now begun to pass on to future generations. “In February of 2018, I went to the doctor about a pain in my back, and I was diagnosed with advanced cancer,” said Hopkins. “I had three surgeries and radiation treatments in my back, leg and breast before June and continue chemotherapy sessions every Monday. As a result, I decided I wanted to do something to make a positive impact on my family and in my community while I am still able to do so.” Children and grandchildren will be the recipients of multiple pieces of art in her collection. She is also painting some “special requests” for friends who have expressed an interest in having a piece of her art. One she is working on is a watercolor of a mountain scene in New Hampshire. Angie Stringer, director of the Cancer Association of Anderson, a local charity where all the donations stay in Anderson County to assist cancer patients, said Hopkins contacted her about auctioning off over 50 paintings and donating the proceeds to the Cancer Association. “I was just thrilled,” said Stringer. “We thought that would be such a unique way to honor her. People were able to call in or bid on Facebook for two weeks prior. On opening night, we celebrated with tours of the facility, wine and hors d’oeuvres and the board of directors welcoming guests. It was a very successful event, and her art raised over $6,000 for our center.” Anyone who donates considerable volunteer time, talent or over $500 to the Cancer Association of Anderson places a plate with their name on it on the Wall of Hope and Remembrance at the association’s office on Calhoun Street. Hopkins was able to do that after her very generous donation. Hopkins really misses teaching, but she still goes to weekly painting sessions on Thursdays with former art students, and she just finished ten poured acrylics and sent them to her grandchildren. “I am doing well right now and believe I owe it to the prayer support of so many people and my church friends at Concord Baptist Church,” said Hopkins. “The Lord is still in the miracle business. I am daily grateful for my abundant blessings.” And Anderson County is grateful for Ruth Hopkins. n


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A New Roof for the New Year for a Local Family Feeling a bit like Santa last December, Turn Key Roofing held a contest to give one deserving family a new roof. They recruited their social media friends and asked them to send in nominations of those that could benefit from winning a free roof. All the nominations were considered and discussed by the staff of Turn Key who had a hard job of deciding who was in the most need. After careful thought and consideration, they announced the winner was Phyllis Dean of Anderson. Peter Hall is Phyllis’s son, and he wrote that his mom had fallen behind in being able to manage her home in the three years since her husband had passed away. Home maintenance issues such as a dead and rotten tree had to be removed as well as new plumbing in the bathroom had to be replaced. In addition to those situations, wildlife needed to be removed from the attic and the air conditioner had to be replaced. This brought on a tremendous amount of financial pressure for Phyllis. After her home owner’s insurance dropped her, she could not find another company that would issue her a policy because of the condition of her roof. Peter and the family were able to buy her an extra 45 days on a small policy, but time was running out. Turn Key Roofing knew that if she was able to get the roof replaced this would keep her from experiencing more financial burdens in the future that would inevitably come from a faulty roof. Peter saw the giveaway as true blessing for his mom. Turn Key Roofing and Home Improvements is a locally owned company here in the Upstate lead by Bill Cross and Leah Winton. n

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TRUST


30 Years of Follies Fun

By Lisa Marie Carter

The Anderson Senior Follies was formed in 1989 with the first show presented in the spring of 1990. With a cast of more than 50 seniors from all walks of life performing a script written as they rehearsed, “Meet Me at the Klondike Cafe” ran two nights with 600 in the audience each night. The late Bob Klatt, an enthusiastic Follies advocate, stepped forward to help finance that first Senior Follies show. The cast, with its 70 members, of spry seniors (you must be at least 55 years young to join) dance, sing and perform comedy routines. There is another group of 60 seniors that handle the behind the scenes jobs such as creating the costumes and working on the off-stage aspects such as selling tickets and getting sponsorships. Each show is a two-hour-long original, to which the seniors have contributed their ideas. They start rehearsing in November, then in January they step it up to rehearse three days a week until showtime in March. Annette Martin, the producer/director of Senior Follies since its inception, as well as the pianist, stage choreographer and script writer (and we might mention the recipient of the Order of the Palmetto, state’s highest civilian honor) sums up the relationships the seniors form when joining the cast by saying, “We do life together.” Martin boasts about how the cast becomes family and how they often fill voids in each other’s lives as many of the members have lost a spouse or live alone. Martin points out, “the members encourage each other,” often bringing out talents they didn’t even know they had. Anderson Senior Follies has appeared on The Today Show and Good Morning America and at Piccolo Spoleto, Dolly World, Disney World and the Epcot Center. They have performed for the military both active and retired, including wounded military, most often at Fort Gordon in Augusta, Ga. The cast has also been featured entertainment on two Caribbean cruises. Senior Follies will take place March 14-17 at Anderson University’s Henderson Auditorium. Reserved seats: $20 for the front half of the auditorium; $15 for the back. Call the AU Box office at 864-231-2080 to get your ticket. Be sure to arrive at least 30 minutes early for the pre-show. For more information about the group and the shows, visit www.andersonseniorfollies.org. n andersonmagazine.com

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What if you could be the difference in someone’s day? By Heidi Charalambous When Ann Pate was recovering from back surgery, she had one thing in mind: Getting strong enough to return to her weekly rounds at AnMed Health Medical Center. Ms. Pate isn’t a doctor or a nurse, but she cares for people with the same intensity. While teams of medical professionals care for patients, Ms. Pate focuses on their caregivers. Spouses, relatives, and friends spend countless hours sitting at the bedside, keeping patients company and awaiting updates from their medical team. Every Monday morning, she arrives at the Medical Center makes a gallon of lemonade, checks her hospitality cart and starts her ascent to the seventh floor Neuroscience Center. For the next two hours, she pushes her cart from unit to unit offering snacks, crossword puzzles, magazines, and a drink to anyone who looks like they might be in need. For one patient’s wife, a pack of Lance crackers provided the first real food she’d had since arriving the night before. Like so many caregivers, she received a late night phone call, threw on clothes, and rushed to the hospital with only a book and her purse. To open the door and find a smiling face and free snack was as surprising and exciting as seeing Ed McMahon holding an oversized check. “It thrills me that I can do something so little and it means so much,” Ms. Pate said as she turned and pushed her cart to the next open door. Ms. Pate is one of a handful of volunteers who provides this free service to patients’ families and caregivers, and more are needed to make it available every day of the week. For Ms. Pate volunteering at the hospital is one way she’s making the most of a second chance at life. In the space of 15 months, Ms. Pate had two rotator cuff andersonmagazine.com

surgeries and suffered a serious heart attack. When she came to, she learned the blockage in her artery was so severe it was a miracle she survived the two previous surgeries. She laughs about how she’s keeping her guardian angels busy, but she wouldn’t have it any other way. “I can sit home and be depressed, or I can get out and be a blessing. And I’d rather do this way,” she said. Ms. Pate’s drive to serve comes from the gratitude she feels toward God and her medical team. But the reasons to volunteer are as varied as the opportunities themselves. Hospital volunteers range in age from college students to retired adults. They provide many services at both AnMed Health campuses — from driving the courtesy shuttle to pushing the hospitality cart to hosting families in the hospitals’ many waiting rooms. “Most of the time, when people come to the hospital, they are facing a challenging time in their lives,” said Jan Verbeck, director of Volunteer Services. “Being able to ease that stress with a smile, an offer of assistance, or a listening ear can make a big difference.” As a former beautician and homemaker, Ms. Pate feared she didn’t have any skills to contribute. “The only skill I have is I never meet a stranger. I can talk to anyone,” she said then let out a hearty laugh. And it turns out, that’s all she needed. The health system provides training to all hospital volunteers and can match potential volunteers with an opportunity that meets their availability, interests, and ability. To see a list of current volunteer opportunities, go to www.anmedhealth.org/Give-Back/Volunteer or call (864) 512-1263 to learn more.

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Witness the Power of the Purse

The 14th annual Power of the Purse will be held Thursday, April 4 at 6:30 p.m. at The Anderson Arts Center. The event is a live and silent purse auction hosted by Women United of The United Way of Anderson County to benefit teen pregnancy prevention efforts. The auction features purses from designers such as Kate Spade, Coach, Tory Burch, Brahmin and more. Additionally, the purses are combined into packages which include massages, gift certificates to restaurants, jewelry and much more. The success of this event has been invaluable to funding the teen pregnancy prevention programs in Anderson County School Districts Three and Four. Today, there is a teen pregnancy prevention program in all five of the Anderson County public school districts. With the assistance of the efforts led by the United Way of Anderson County, the teen birth rate which peaked in 1991 has dropped 60 percent. Tickets to the event are $35; or you can purchase a combined ticket plus a Belk gift certificate for $55 (ticket & $20 gift card, which includes a $5 Belk Charity Days card). For more information, or to purchase tickets, please contact Mary Pat Smith at 864226-3438 or marypat.smith@ uwandersoncty.com.Â

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Wendi Drennon, CFP Sorrento Pacific Financial, LLC. AVP-The Peoples Bank

864-261-6532

Investments offered through Sorrento Pacific Financial, LLC. (“SPF”) (Member FINRA / SIPC) are: not FDIC or otherwise federally insured, not guarantees or obligations of the bank, may involve investment risk including possible loss of principal. The Peoples Bank is contracted with SPF for investment services.

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March/April 2019


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Profile for April Cameron

March-April 2019  

March-April 2019  

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