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ISSUE 36 MAY 2015 - JULY 2015 $5.95

www.trainermagazine.com

Mark Casse

“I hated the real world, came home one day to the barn, smelled the horse poop and that was it”

FIRST-TIME STARTERS Remembering Bill Hartack

Rick Violette Jr

“It’s very tough to train an empty stall or a very slow horse”

THE OFFICIAL MAGAZINE OF THE


GILES ANDERSON

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Racing’s days in the spotlight

ome the evening of may 2nd, it’s a certainty that the connections of one three-year-old Thoroughbred will have their lives changed forever, as owner, trainer, breeder, and/or rider of the 2015 Kentucky Derby winner. The age-old question that fascinates seasoned professionals and casual observers alike will repeat itself on a regular basis from may 3rd until after the Preakness, and maybe even longer: will so-and-so win the Triple Crown? I ask, will that horse be under the care of one of the two trainers featured in this issue? Time, as they say, will tell. But as always, it’s the season when racing gets into the spotlight for the right reasons: The time when racing is actually covered by mainstream media, and the time for racing to court those who are embraced by its charms. When the mainstream media interests subside after the lure of the Triple Crown has passed, at least these fans will have more “outlets” than ever before to stay in touch with their newfound passion. While for many, the negative of racing losing traction within the traditional print outlets from coast to coast has been replaced by a dearth of coverage on major race days throughout the summer and fall by the national television networks, excellent digital daily radio coverage, in-depth insight from a handful of fantastic specialist news orientated websites, and one-and-a-half-digital TV networks. I say “one-and-a-half” as the new incarnation of HRTV since it was

bought by TVG won’t be winning any awards for its content anytime soon. But the point is, if you want to go looking for it, racing news and information is getting very well served by the new media outlets. That’s also on top of the personal interaction that social media sites such as Twitter and Facebook have to offer. In these pages of North American Trainer you’ll be able to learn about the new media services launched by one former track executive, a current trainer, and a former trainer. You’ll also be finding out about the varied roles undertaken in life by Rick Violette Jr., who juggles running his very successful stable while actively engaging on a dayto-day basis with the politics of New York racing. You will read, too, about how mark Casse has crossed borders to build a powerful racing stable that seems to catch the eye of many leading owners and breeders, not only on the east coast but also out west. Frances J. Karon returns from her winter writing break to examine one of the most prolific mares of her generation in Baby Zip, and Bill Heller examines how 24 trainers prepared 26 horses for their debuts on one Saturday in February. That’s not all, and over the next 95 pages I hope there is plenty to interest you between now and when our next issue comes out at the end of July. And who knows, by that time we could have cheered home a Triple Crown winner! Until then, good luck racing this late spring / early summer. n

YEAR-ROUND WORLD-CLASS HORSE RACING

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Issue 36

CONTENTS 10

Rick Violette

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Social Media

Denise Steffanus interviews the active industry leader and trainer of classic hopeful Upstart.

How social media is geared towards engaging fans new and old, by K.T. Donovan.

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Mark Casse

A look at Mark Casse, the leading Canadian trainer on seven occasions, by Ed Golden.

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Stress Fractures

Equine metabolic syndrome

Can a broodmare’s blood glucose level and body condition influence her future foal’s racing career? By Catherine Dunnett.

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Giving all a chance to shine

Melissa MacKinnon looks at stress fractures as a by-product of training and racing surfaces.

Katherine Ford takes us inside the South African Jockeys Academy.

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Total Eclipse of the sons

The work rider as one of the most important behind-the-scenes keys to racing success, by Katherine Ford.

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The Art of breathing

The concept of strengthening respiratory muscles as a method of combatting fatigue, by Dr Kate Allen and Alison McConnell.

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First-time starters

Different approaches trainers take to prepare horses for their career debuts, by Bill Heller.

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Bill Hartack

Ed Golden with a personal and humanizing remembrance of one of the all-time greatest riders in U.S. history. 2

Work riders

Baby Zip and her legacy as one of the great broodmares, by Frances J Karon.

TRAINERMAGAZINE.COM ISSUE 36

Contributors

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California Thoroughbred Trainers

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TRM Trainer of the Quarter

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Suppliers Directory

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Stakes Schedules

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The Sid Fernando column


Breeders’ Cup Dirt Mile Winner

Brilliant G1 Miler

ALBERTUS MAXIMUS

DAAHER

G1Winner & Millionaire – 1st 2YOs This Year

19% Stakes Horses – 75% Winners

Source of Superior Speed

Horse of the Year

by Albert the Great

by Awesome Again

INTIDAB

INVASOR

Sire of 20 Horses to Earn Over $100,000

Already a Graded Stakes Horse in 2015

by Phone Trick

by Candy Stripes

2015

Building Speed for the Future

SHADWELL STALLIONS

Kent Barnes, Stallion Manager I Inquiries to 859-224-4585 I 4600 Ft. Springs Rd., Lexington, KY 40513 I shadwellfarm.com


CONTRIBUTORS

Editorial Director/Publisher Giles Anderson Editor Frances Karon Designer Neil Randon

Editorial/Photo Management Louise Crampton 1 888 659 2935 Advertising Sales Giles Anderson, Sarah Miller, Scott Rion 1 888 218 4430 Photo Credits Horsephotos, Galopfotos/Frank Sorge, Steve Martine, WinStar Farm, Lou Hodges Photography, Photos By Z, Frances J Karon, Shutterstock, Dr Kate Allen, Allison McConnell, Dr Michael Ross, George D. Widener Hospital for Large Animals, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of Pennsylvania Cover Photograph Steve Martine

Dr. Kate Allen is Senior Lecturer in Equine Sports Medicine and is responsible for the clinical services at the Equine Sports Medicine Centre at Bristol University. Kate’s research interest is primarily the management of diseases that affect equine athletic performance and in particular the diagnosis, cause and management of dynamic upper respiratory tract obstructions. Alan F. Balch was hired as Executive Director of California Thoroughbred Trainers in April 2010. His professional career in racing began at Santa Anita in 1971, where he advanced to the position of Sr. Vice President-Marketing and Assistant General Manager, and was in charge of the Olympic Games Equestrian Events for Los Angeles in 1984. He retired in the early 90s to become volunteer president of the national equestrian federation of the USA, as well as of the National Horse Show at Madison Square Garden. He remains volunteer president of USA Equestrian Trust, Inc

K. T. Donovan travels the world to cover racing through writing, television and video. As a freelancer, she has written for most of the major racing publications around the world, and contributed in various capacities to live shows and documentaries on American television networks, as well as for Sky, and RTE (Irish television). She is based in Lexington, Kentucky.

An Anderson & Co Publishing Ltd publication Contact details Tel: 1 888 218 4430 Fax:1 888 218 4206 info@trainermagazine.com www.trainermagazine.com United Kingdom 14 Berwick Courtyard, Berwick St Leonard, Salisbury, Wiltshire SP3 5UA North America PO Box 13248, Lexington, KY 40583-3248 North American Trainer is the official magazine of the California Thoroughbred Trainers. It is distributed to all ‘Trainer’ members of the Thoroughbred Horsemen’s Association and all members of the Consignors and Commercial Breeders Association

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Dr. Catherine Dunnett BSc, PhD, R.Nutr. is an independent nutritionist registered with the British Nutrition Society. She has a background in equine research, in the field of nutrition and exercise physiology, with many years spent at The Animal Health Trust in Newmarket. Prior to setting up her own consultancy business, she worked in the equine feed industry on product development and technical marketing. Sid Fernando (@sidfernando) is president of eMatings LLC and Werk Thoroughbred Consultants, Inc. He is the former bloodstock editor of Daily Racing Form and also blogs about racing and breeding. Katherine Ford was brought up in a hunting and point-to-pointing environment on a farm in North Yorkshire. Following a year working in a racing yard in Middleham, she studied Modern Languages at Sheffield University, with a semester studying French in Pau. After University, Katherine completed the BHB Graduate Programme in 2000, and in 2001 started work for the International Racing Bureau’s Paris office. Three years later she moved to Equidia, France’s horseracing television channel, travelling to some of the world’s major racetracks. Katherine currently works part-time for Equidia and as a freelance journalist and translator.

Ed Golden is the author of Santa Anita’s widely acclaimed “Stable Notes,” hailed by peers as “the best in racing.” A native of Philadelphia, he earned Eclipse Award honorable mention while with the Philadelphia Daily News and has written for The Blood-Horse and USA Today. Bill Heller, Eclipse Award winner and author of 25 books including biographies of Hall of Fame jockeys Ron Turcotte, Randy Romero, and Jose Santos, is a member of the Harness Racing Hall of Fame Communications Corner. He and his wife Anna live just 30 miles south of Saratoga Race Course in Albany, where their 24-year-old son Benjamin also resides. Frances J. Karon is from Puerto Rico and graduate of Maine’s Colby College with a Bachelor of Arts degree in English. She operates Rough Shod LLC based in Lexington, Kentucky and specializes in sales, pedigree research and recommendations. Professor Celia Marr is an equine clinician at Rossdales, Newmarket. She is a RCVS and European Specialist in Equine Medicine and Honorary Professor at the Glasgow University Veterinary School. She has previously worked at veterinary schools in Glasgow, Pennsylvania, Cambridge and London and in racehorse practice in Lambourn. She is Chairman of the Horserace Betting Levy Board’s Thoroughbred Research & Consultation Group and Editor-in-Chief of Equine Veterinary Journal. Professor Alison McConnell is Professor of Applied Physiology at Brunel University. Alison’s research interests are in respiratory limitations to exercise in human beings. She is the inventor of two commercially available inspiratory muscle training products, and has pioneered the introduction of inspiratory muscle training in human athletes. One of her products is also prescribed on the NHS for the treatment of breathlessness. Dr. Melissa MacKinnon is an equine surgeon at Milton Equine Hospital in Ontario, Canada. She is boarded with the American College of Veterinary Surgeons and received her surgical training at the University of Pennsylvania’s New Bolton Center. Her clinical interests include emergency case management (colics, fractures, lacerations) and orthopaedic imaging. Denise Steffanus is a freelance writer and editor based in Cynthiana, Kentucky. A longtime contributing editor for Thoroughbred Times, she earned the prestigious Michael E. DeBakey Journalism Award and the USA Equestrian (now the U.S. Equestrian Federation) Award for Media Excellence. Steffanus, a Pitttsburgh native, is a licensed Thoroughbred racehorse trainer and a member of American Mensa.


A DV ERT ISEMEN T

DEADLY DOPING MEETS ITS MATCH: Trainers Praise Natural Alternative // BY: MARK HANSEN

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he pressure to win is so enormous that many horsemen resort to whatever it takes to get a piece of the purse or a decent sale… even if it means putting their horses’ lives in mortal danger by doping them with illegal synthetic erythropoietin (EPO) drugs to boost endurance. Veterinarian Gary Smith said, “It’s a problem all over the industry. There is no way horses should be put on (synthetic) EPO.” So how do racers win? How do you gain a competitive edge without harming your horses or risking your livelihood? The answer may be found in a safe all-natural horse supplement that supports natural EPO function. Why is EPO boosting so critical? Just like in people, a horse’s muscles require oxygen for fuel. Red blood cells are the body’s oxygen-carrying cells. A higher red blood cell count = more oxygen = more muscle energy. Elevated muscle energy

helps the horse perform harder, faster and longer during endurance events. All horses naturally produce EPO in their kidneys to stimulate production of new red blood cells from bone marrow. In short, EPO is a natural “blood builder.” With EPO doping, trainers try to boost the EPO effect to get a winning performance every time. They use a synthetic EPO (recombinant human EPO), even though the side effects can harm the horse. That’s one reason why it’s illegal. Fortunately there’s another option. EPO-Equine® is a safe, highly effective natural dietary supplement scientifically engineered for performance horses. A Kentucky trainer who refused to give out his name, said, “I don’t want my competition to know about this.” He found EPO-Equine to be so effective that he’s dead set against disclosing who he is, who his horses are, or even where he trains and races. He first started ordering a single jar of EPO-Equine®

once a month. Now he’s ordering several CASES each month. And he won’t tell BRL exactly why. He said respectfully, “Sorry – no way.” Bioengineers at U.S. based Biomedical Research Laboratories (BRL), first discovered a completely natural EPObooster for human athletes (and it’s working miracles for top athletes and amateurs around the world). Seeing these results, horse trainers contacted BRL and asked about using this natural formula for their animals. That’s when the BRL team dug deeper and discovered a proprietary, horse-friendly strain of a common herb that promotes optimal blood-building results. EPO-Equine® is based on the blood-boosting abilities of a certain strain of Echinacea that’s astounding researchers and trainers alike. (It’s not a strain you can find at the local health store.) Veterinarians at the Equine Research Centre in Ontario, Canada ran a doubleblind trial investigating the blood building properties of the active ingredient in EPOEquine in healthy horses. For 42 days, one group of horses was supplemented with the active ingredient in EPO-Equine and another group of horses was given a placebo. The supplement delivered significant blood building results, increasing red blood cell count and hemoglobin levels. Researchers also observed improved blood quality and increased oxygen transport in the supplemented horses. Improved blood levels leads to elevated exercise physiology and performance. The patent-pending formula in EPO-Equine® contains a dozen different herbs, antioxidants and anti-inflammatory components combined to promote natural red blood cell production . . . for remarkable speed, strength and stamina right out of the gate. Trainers find it easy to add just 1 scoop (3.2 grams) of EPO-Equine® to the horse’s daily feeding routine in the barn or on the road. Within a few weeks of daily use, you can expect to see increased red blood cell levels with no undesirable side effects. An increase in red blood cell levels can improve muscle performance, supercharge endurance, and enhance recovery after hard exercise. Nothing else is scientifically proven to deliver these benefits in a completely safe and natural formula. Compared to the cost of veterinarians, drugs, icing, tapping the knees, and putting the horse on Bute; or even the consequences of being banned for synthetic doping, EPO-Equine® is very affordable at the low price of just $59.95 per jar. Or save $180 if you are ready to commit to a larger trial of 12-jar case for just $539.55 with FREE shipping. EPO-Equine® can be ordered at www.EPOEquine.com or 1-800-557-9055, and comes with a 100% money-back satisfaction guarantee.


CALIFORNIA THOROUGHBRED TRAINERS

ALAN F. BALCH

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Competing?

OMPETITION is essential to sport. In our sport – the greatest of them all – we have many creatures of various descriptions and talents who actively join together in the teams competing in each race. Unique among them is the amazing non-human who naturally and instinctively competes. Anyone who has ever had the privilege of sitting on a Thoroughbred trying to catch another one, or keep another from passing, knows the pure, sheer thrill and exhilaration of the true competitive instinct. That’s the fundamental reason that publics the world over delight in betting on a great horserace. Business in our capitalistic age is also based on competition. Sadly – especially for a business based on competitive sport – our most prominent California racing leaders seem not to understand or be willing to invest in the necessary tools to compete and compete successfully. Do they not see a future for their business (which is our business, too, as horsemen)? Would they rather be in another business (real estate, for instance)? In this space in the last issue I asked why it is that these leaders are failing to wield the tools available to them, the obvious tools of advertising and pricing and marketing rightly understood. We are now, perhaps, starting to see some answers. A horseman stood up at the April meeting

of the California Horse Racing Board and made this most telling point: a convenience store owner who fails to turn on the lights and the store’s sign isn’t going to be in business very long! Similarly, the owner of a complicated and valuable enterprise like a racing association who fails to use all the tools at his command to inform and motivate the public to patronize the racetrack isn’t either. Unfortunately, the horsemen who manufacture and deliver his “product” – the races themselves – won’t be either. Track managements everywhere knew their responsibilities to the racing community writ large, or should have, when they got into our game. “The highest and best use of the real estate” is a phrase I’ve heard, respected, and understood since my earliest days in racing, 45 years ago. Those who love racing, and who understand it, have always seen the clear danger that ever-increasing real estate values present to large, valuable, properties devoted to it. Once upon a time, serious strategic planning was continually undertaken to confront those obvious threats, and included the proper respect for the perspectives of horsemen – owners and trainers alike. As Gretzky, Jobs, and Buffett counsel, our community strived to skate to where the puck was going to be, not to where it has been. Lately (and I mark the change to the passing of Santa Anita’s Robert Strub in 1993), going back about 20 years, with a

very few notable exceptions such as the leadership of Del Mar Thoroughbred Club, a succession of ownership groups in California racing have increasingly substituted a new competitive sport, mind games, for strategic business planning. This new approach appears to be based on hidden agendas, where a commitment to develop real estate has replaced the desire to market racing and compete successfully with other gaming, sporting, and recreational enterprises. Its “rules” permit blatantly ignoring written agreements and disregarding clear commitments. Here’s the latest sophistry: to compete successfully and provide a proper return on investment in their valuable land, leaders must invest in expert racing marketing and management. That requires money. But, so the current circular argument goes, we’re not making enough money to invest in marketing, and therefore we must close tracks. Or, a basic threat is advanced: we intend to start marketing, but only when various competitors or critics within our own sport are removed or overtaken. If that’s a strategy at all, it isn’t one that serves the goal of preserving racing. Success in marketing does require money. More, it depends on integrity and rigor in cost/benefit analysis. And most of all, it requires passion for what is marketed, belief in our game, and deep understanding of its appeal. The intersection of racing, horses, sport, and return on investment, has always been complex and inscrutable, never more so than now. But the mixture of sophistry, cynicism, and intimidation which has been advancing on California lately will not save our racing. It is deadly. n

Lately, a succession of ownership groups in California racing have increasingly

substituted a new competitive sport, mind games, for strategic business planning. This new approach appears to be based on hidden agendas, where a commitment to develop real estate has replaced the desire to market racing and compete successfully

with other gaming, sporting, and recreational enterprises 6

TRAINERMAGAZINE.COM ISSUE 36


Alexandra de Meric & Brandon Rice

I’m a Chatterbox

Impressive winner of the Gr.II $400,000 Fair Ground Oaks! RiceHorse Stables Breaking & Training Graduate Congratulations to Owner/Breeders Fletcher and Carolyn Gray and Trainer Larry Jones!

Brandon Rice and Alexandra de Meric are a husband and wife team that provide purchasing, training and sales services for their clients’ thoroughbred investments Whether you’re planning to race or sell, we would appreciate the opportunity to work with your champion Serita Hult

“Brandon and Alexandra Rice have shown me they can produce a ready to run racehorse. Their program focuses on developing happy minds and sound bodies.” Todd Pletcher Tibor Szlavik

“I am so impressed with Brandon Rice. He is the consummate professional and conducts his business with the diplomacy and aplomb of a much older person. Together with his talented wife Ali, they are the gold standard of how to take care of their clients best interests. I endorse them wholeheartedly to be the cog in the wheel of your business model. They will be the leaders of their generation in years to come”. Marette Farrell Serita Hult

352.817.0943 : www.ricehorse.com


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I’m a Chatterbox wins the Grade 2 Fair Grounds Oaks for Larry Jones (inset)

Trainer of the Quarter

LARRY JONES

The TRM Trainer of the Quarter award has been won by Larry Jones. Jones and his team will receive a selection of products from the internationally-acclaimed range of TRM supplements, as well as a bottle of fine Irish whiskey. WORDS: FRANCES J KARON PHOTOS: LOU HODGES PHOTOGRAPHY, FRANCES J KARON

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six-foot tall Kentucky-bred racetracker, J. Larry Jones is easy to spot in the mornings, his long legs dangling in long stirrups, straddling one of his thoroughbreds in training, or supervising his stable from a Western saddle on the back of one of his Quarter Horse ponies. it was in his capacity as exercise rider of an unraced two-year-old in his care that Jones was seriously injured in a fall at Delaware Park in April of 2014, sending him to the hospital with hematomas on his brain, a bruised lung, and fractured ribs. But it takes a lot more than that to keep a cowboy down. three weeks ahead of this year’s Kentucky oaks – a race that Jones has won with Brereton Jones homebreds Proud spell (2008), the champion three-yearold filly of her year; and Believe You Can (2012) – and just short of a year to the day of his training accident, Larry Jones has a hot hand going into Churchill Downs’s filly classic, with likely favorite i’m a Chatterbox and Lovely Maria. i’m a Chatterbox is undefeated in three sophomore starts, all at fair Grounds: the silverbulletday, the Grade 3 Rachel Alexandra, and the Grade 2 fair Grounds oaks. Lovely Maria, winner of the Grade 1 Central Bank Ashland stakes at Keeneland,


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has one loss – a second to i’m a Chatterbox in the Rachel Alexandra – in her three starts this season. the fillies are by first-season Kentucky stallions: i’m a Chatterbox is Gray and Carolyn fletcher’s homebred daughter, retained for $30,000 at the Keeneland september sale, of Ashford stud-based Munnings, while Brereton Jones’s Lovely Maria, a $5,000 Keeneland November RNA weanling, is by Majesticperfection, who stands at her owner’s Airdrie stud. their sires stood for $12,500 and $10,000, respectively, when the graded stakeswinning duo were conceived. Under Jones’s handling, the market values of i’m a Chatterbox and Lovely Maria have soared well above their RNA figures and continue to escalate with each success but as yet are nowhere near the value of 2011 Horse of the Year Havre de Grace. Jones developed that filly into a four-time Grade 1 stakes winner, including a triumph over males in the Woodward stakes, for Rick Porter’s fox Hill farm. Mandy Pope’s Whisper Hill farm bought her for $10,000,000 as a broodmare prospect at fasig-tipton in November, 2012. this from a man whose introduction to the

racetrack was as the owner of a $2,500 claimer! When he turned from farming to training in 1982, Larry Jones didn’t rocket to the top level, but once there, he’s been firmly established in that position. He trained his first winner in 1983 and his first stakes winner in 1986 – both at “the Pea Patch,” Ellis Park in Kentucky. it was 20 years before Jones notched a graded stakes winner, Ruby’s Reception in the Grade 2 fantasy at oaklawn Park in 2003 for oasis Racing stables LLC. Jones had purchased the Rubiano filly for $12,000 as a yearling, and she earned in excess of $365,000. Jones has conditioned two other fantasy winners, gray or roan fillies campaigned by fox Hill: Eight Belles (2008) and Joyful Victory (2011). since Ruby’s Reception, Jones has trained at least one graded stakes winner every year that he’s trained: 2003-2009, and 2011-2015. it was only after Eight Belles suffered her fatal injury pulling up from a second-place finish in the Kentucky Derby – marking the second consecutive year, following Hard spun, that a Jones/ fox Hill horse completed the Derby exacta

– and the quiet Jones became embroiled in a media feeding frenzy that the joys of training started to become rigors. success had expanded his barn to too many stalls for him to comfortably be a hands-on horse trainer. in 2009, he tossed the reins to his more-than-capable wife Cindy, who since 1985 has been with the stable. Under Cindy’s guidance, the Jones barn produced Grade 1 winner No such Word and Grade 2 winner Just Jenda in 2010. then, to the surprise of few who knew him, Jones – his batteries recharged from family time with his children and grandchildren – returned to training in 2011 with nine graded stakes wins and a pair of Eclipses for Havre de Grace, who was also champion older female. in total, Jones has trained nine winners of 12 Grade 1 races among 60 graded stakes wins, and he was the first to leg up a female jockey, Rosie Napravnik, on an oaks winner, Believe You Can. should it come in this edition of the Kentucky oaks or another race down the line, you had better believe that there are more graded stakes bullets in Larry Jones’s revolver. n

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ExcEllENcE iN EquiNE NuTRiTioN

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PROFILE

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TRAINERMAGAZINE.COM ISSUE 36


RICK VIOLETTE JR

Rick Violette Jr.

Leading the industry through challenging times ... as well as training a leading three-year-old ISSUE 36 TRAINERMAGAZINE.COM

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PROFILE Rick Violette Jr. with assistant trainer Melissa Cohen

Rick Violette Jr. thought about becoming a lawyer or entering politics when he was a student at Lowell University in his native Massachusetts. When he wasn’t studying or attending class, he showed hunters and jumpers for a client who also owned racehorses. That was how his romance with the racetrack began.

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WORDS: DeniSe SteffanuS PHOtOS: SteVen MaRtine, HORSePHOtOS

N Tuesday and Thursday mornings during his sophomore year, Violette mucked stalls and galloped horses at Suffolk Downs. Like everyone who has set foot on the backside, the lure of the racetrack wrapped around Violette like the wispy arm of a sultry siren, wooing him to want more. So when he completed college with a bachelor’s degree in political science, he promptly traded political horse races for the real thing.

Learned from the best

Violette took out his trainer’s license in 1977, and in 1978 he got his first job as assistant to Emile Allain at Woodbine in Canada. While he was with Allain, their trainee Kamar became the Canadian champion three-yearold filly. In 1980, Violette came back to the United States to work with two of the most outstanding trainers in the history of the sport: Racing Hall of Fame trainer Frank Whiteley Jr. and his son David, a finalist for the Hall of Fame in 2015. Frank trained 12

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legendary filly Ruffian and champions Tom Rolfe, Damascus, and Forego. Among David’s trainees were champions Revidere, Waya, and Just A Game. Violette was an assistant to David Whiteley, during which time Violette said he learned more about training Thoroughbreds than he could possibly list. “They were fanatical about attention to detail,” he said. “They never did anything that they didn’t have a specific reason for – where they put the water buckets and feed tubs in the stalls, and how they fed horses, and where they put the hay – just paying attention to everything that happens in the barn and meticulous planning coming up to a race. They just were really interested in doing what was best for the horse and recognizing what was best. “They were about hard work and giving intensity to the operation, but with a real method to their madness. I can’t say enough about how much we all learned from both David and Frank. It’s just an incredible school to go to, so to speak. If you look at David’s record, he was lifetime 33% win, and that’s a frightening figure. In your wildest

dreams you wouldn’t think it could happen. It’s just that there was nobody better.” In Violette’s barn, every horse is important, from the modest claimer to Holy Bull Stakes-G2 winner Upstart. They all deserve respect and the best care and training he and his team can provide. That is the key to his philosophy. “I think all the owners deserve that,” he said. “It’s a standard you set in the barn for the grooms so that they’re treating the stakes horses as good as the claiming horses, and they’re not ignoring the cheaper horses because they aren’t as important. You might get out of that sometimes when there’s a horse that isn’t that talented, but you get them to win a race or break their maiden, and those are pretty cool things, too. All the horses are very, very important to their owners, and you try to set that standard.” Violette regards his grooms as the unsung heroes in his success, but he said they really aren’t unsung in his operation. “My assistants and I all appreciate their hard work, and we make sure they know we do. They’re the backbone of the industry.” Many of Violette’s employees have been with him for decades, so long that he now has their children working for him, too. “We try to provide a good workplace and a good work experience for our employees,” he said. “They all work hard, we pay them as much as we can, and we reward them certainly when times are very good.” Violette doesn’t regard his methods and dedication as unique. He believes hard work


RICK VIOLETTE JR

and long hours do not equal entitlement, because most people in the industry share a similar work ethic – seven days a week, dawn until dusk. He said every trainer has his or her own way of doing the job. “For some trainers, it’s working hard in the shedrow and maybe even getting on their own horses,” he said. “There are other ways, like working on a computer, whether it’s handicapping and finding great spots or discovering diamonds in the rough. Recruiting talent is part of the equation. It’s very tough to train an empty stall or a very slow horse. You need fast horses in those stalls, and some people recruit better than others. They’re just like college coaches; there are some great tacticians and coaches, and there are great recruiters.” As of April 4, Violette-trained horses have earned $38,061,589 in 4,973 starts with 16% wins. His best year was 2007, when he took four horses to the Breeders’ Cup, including West Point Thoroughbreds, Lewis G. Lakin, and John Sikura’s Dream Rush. The then-three-year-old filly finished fifth in the Breeders’ Cup Filly and Mare Sprint-G1, which was the culmination of an outstanding year in which she won the Darley Test Stakes-G1 and Prioress Stakes-G1 and was second in the Acorn Stakes-G1, for singleseason earnings of $570,800. Violette made an appearance in last year’s Kentucky Derby-G1 with Samraat, who finished fifth; his first starter was the unplaced Read the Footnotes for Klaravich Stables, Inc. in 2004. On May 2, Violette hopes to

It’s a standard you set in the barn for the grooms so that they’re treating the stakes horses as good as the claiming horses, and they’re not ignoring the cheaper horses because they aren’t as important

have a third chance at the roses with Upstart.

Upstart

Violette’s first career win was in 1977 with Catch the Action, a Florida-bred colt who won at first asking in a maiden claiming race at Rockingham Park in New Hampshire. The winner’s share of that purse was only $2,520. Violette has come a long way from those days. The winner’s share of the Derby purse that Violette hopes Upstart will take home is $1,425,000. Upstart also won at first asking, in a 5½-furlong sprint at Saratoga on August 15, when he separated himself from a maiden special weight field by 5¼ lengths in an aggressive stretch run under Jose

Ortiz. In the Daily Racing Form chart, the footnotes described the ridgling as rank and green, and recent criticism of the horse has included being too slow at the break and his controversial disqualification to second in the Fountain of Youth Stakes-G2. Ralph Evans bought Upstart for $130,000 at the 2013 Fasig-Tipton Saratoga New York-bred yearling sale. Evans, a successful Wall Street investor, hired Violette in the early 1990s to train his meager band of horses. Until Upstart, his best horse was March Magic, an Evansville Slew mare who won the 2001 Molly Pitcher Breeders’ Cup Handicap-G2 at Monmouth Park. Violette said he didn’t realize just how much potential Upstart had until the Champagne Stakes-G1 at Belmont on October 4, when he finished second to Daredevil. The two left the others, including Derby contender El Kabeir, 12¾ lengths behind. “Numbers-wise and figures-wise, it’s one of his fastest races,” Violette said. Upstart posted a 102 Beyer Speed Figure and a 101 Brisnet Speed Rating in the Champagne. Violette and Ortiz worked with Upstart to get him to relax, a sometimes difficult task when a two-year-old must transition from being quick and aggressive at 5½ furlongs to being patient and tractable over two turns. And it can be confusing to a young horse to ask it to break fast and then relax until it’s time to make a move. “You wouldn’t think that the break is necessarily that important sometimes going ISSUE 36 TRAINERMAGAZINE.COM

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PROFILE two turns or a mile and an eighth, a mile and a quarter, but it really is,” Violette said. “It can determine the position in the race, almost at any distance, so the break is important. “I don’t tend to break them a lot in the morning, but standing them in the gate and backing them out and making sure they’re very comfortable and confident in the gate is very, very high priority.” The key to Upstart’s success is his tractability and his long run, Violette said. “He has those qualities, which is pretty cool, and you need to use them all the time. “He’s been on a bunch of different surfaces – Saratoga, Belmont, Santa Anita, and Gulfstream – and he’s run well over all those surfaces, from the wet to the very dry, so he doesn’t need to carry his racetrack with him. He’s just a very effective horse.

Recruiting talent is part of the equation. It’s very tough to train an empty stall or a very slow horse. You need fast horses in those stalls, and some people recruit better than others

“Horses have to make the grade from two to three as well. Fortunately, it looks like he has made that graduation from being a precocious two-year-old to approaching being a man in the elite end of the three-yearold crop going to the Derby.” The stretch-drive skirmish in the Fountain of Youth, when Upstart reacted to being bumped by Frosted by drifting out into the path of Itsaknockout, resulted in his number being set down to second. The ridgling had drawn clear by 2¾ lengths under the wire, and Violette argued that the incident didn’t

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affect the outcome of the race. The stewards disagreed. It was a tough day for Upstart’s connections, who lost $162,960 in purse money with the disqualification, but Violette called it “just a kick in the stomach.” He said, “The best part of it was that [Upstart] thinks he won. We did the job, and we spotted weight (6 lbs.) and we bounced and we still won, but we ended up second. So it is what it is, you just kind of move on.” A similar episode happened in the Florida Derby-G1, when Todd Pletcher-trained Materiality appeared to impede Upstart as the two battled for the wire, yet there was no objection or inquiry, so the results stood as posted. After the race, Violette said Upstart had been beaten “fair and square,” and he speculated that the outcome might have been different without Upstart’s nine-hole disadvantage. As the first Saturday in May looms on the horizon, Violette will be sizing up the competition. The four horses he’s watching are Bob Baffert trainees American Pharaoh and Dortmund, Pletcher-trained Carpe Diem, and the improving El Kabeir, conditioned by fellow New York-based trainer John Terranova II. Upstart hasn’t faced Baffert’s duo, and he proved equal to Carpe Diem in the Breeders’ Cup Juvenile-G1 when the colt edged him out for second by a flared nostril. In the Champagne, Upstart outdistanced El Kabeir by 15¼ lengths. “Horses that like to win are dangerous, and that group of four are pretty nice horses,” Violette said.

Service to the Industry

Last year, after almost 40 years in horseracing as a successful trainer, Violette found himself back in politics when his former owner, West Point Thoroughbreds’ founder and president Terry Finley, challenged him for the top spot in the New

York Thoroughbred Horsemen’s Association (NYTHA), an office Violette held unopposed since 2008. And it wasn’t pretty. During the contentious election, Finley accused Violette of violating the organization’s bylaws, appointing his own insiders to oversee the election, and disenfranchising 1,700 members of the NYTHA, and he claimed foul when presidents of five state-level Thoroughbred Horsemen’s


RICK VIOLETTE JR his life to training horses and working for the betterment of the industry. Besides his work with the NYTHA, he has been president of the national Thoroughbred Horsemen’s Association since 1998 and a board member of NYRA since 2008. But the 2014 NYTHA election was the first time he got a taste of the hard knocks of politics. Now that he has survived his baptism, would he like to move on to Albany or Washington? “No!” he said emphatically. Then laughing, he added, “Obviously, I have some masochistic tendencies for an unpaying job, but I’m very proud of what we’ve done. I also wouldn’t want to abandon the good work that we’ve done, and there’s still a lot on our plate; there’s still a lot in front of us in some very challenging times. “So, no, I wouldn’t get into politics. I like training horses.”

Upstart and exercise rider Vicki King being led out onto the track

Lasix debate Associations (THA) endorsed Violette. In the end, NYTHA members gave Violette a vote of confidence and retained him as president by a 625-to-611 vote. “Much has been made about the closeness of the election,” Violette said. “It wasn’t that close … Terry has upwards of 185 to over 200 partners, and I think he has aligned himself with a couple of other partnerships. That’s not an advantage that I had. I probably wasn’t supposed to be elected with the head start that he had.” For more than 20 years, Violette has served the NYTHA as a director, vice president, and president. For the past six years with Violette at its helm, the NYTHA took care of its owners and trainers by negotiating a sweeter revenue-sharing deal that translated into $60 million in added purse money at New York Racing Association (NYRA) tracks. It also protected $25 million in purses during the NYRA bankruptcy. Its benevolence programs have made life better for backstretch workers by co-funding the health clinics at Belmont Park and Saratoga

Race Course and the counseling services provided by the Backstretch Employee Service Team, and by offering eyeglasses and dental care. Educational programs on the backstretch offered English-language courses and the Groom Development Program. The NYTHA launched the TAKE THE LEAD Thoroughbred Retirement Program, which finds homes for horses that retire from NYRA tracks, and the TAKE2 Second Career Thoroughbred Program, which awards prize money to retired Thoroughbreds that participate in sport-horse shows. Violette and his board of directors brought the NYTHA back into solvency, and it became an influential voice for the racing industry in New York and national politics. “Medication reform literally started in New York and the Mid-Atlantic. That wasn’t by accident,” Violette said. In 2008, the NYTHA put up $50,000 for a Cornell University study on steroid use in racehorses and helped pay for special equipment to test for steroids once the 2009 ban went into effect in New York. Violette, who never married, has devoted

Lasix is a big portion on Violette’s plate as he fights to keep the medication available as a race-day therapy, through his involvement with both the national THA and the NYTHA. To Violette, Lasix is an ethical issue in the humane treatment of the racehorse. “We have so many physical issues with the horse for which we have no real remedy,” he said. “And here we have a physical issue, EIPH [exercise-induced pulmonary hemorrhage], that most horses will be challenged by, and we have a remedy that is significantly effective, incredibly safe, it’s policeable. Why would we want to let horses bleed? It’s that black and white – horses bleed, and Lasix helps. I’m a true believer on the Lasix side. I think we have that obligation to protect these horses and not pretend that they’re not suffering from this affliction. They are. And if we could find a different remedy, that’s fine if it’s equally effective. I’m all for that.” Violette said those who are interested in upholding a level playing field really aren’t concerned about Lasix; they’re concerned about methods of cheating that can be concealed from current testing.

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PROFILE “They’re worrying about regulating the unknown out there that might be really making horses run faster than they’re supposed to,” he said. “There are cheaters using high-end medications, gene doping, blood doping. Those are the real challenges that affect the integrity of the industry. And I think that’s where we should be circling the wagons and trying to get ahead of the curve and trying to catch the entities and the cheaters that might have a significant advantage. I think we just waste too much time and energy. If we got rid of Lasix, it’s not going to mean that all of a sudden the integrity of racing is fixed. It’s not even a start.” In 1995, New York was the last holdout to approve the use of Lasix. Violette remembers those days when horses raced without Lasix. He said the black-and-white evidence that Lasix has reduced by about 80% the incidence of horses pulling up during or after a race visibly in crisis while bleeding from the nostrils should be enough to convince naysayers that use of the medication is justified to protect the horse’s lungs. “PETA [People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals] should be petitioning that every horse runs on Lasix,” he said, referring to the March 2014 attack on the industry by that group. Violette was one of few industry leaders who defended racing when the New York Times splashed PETA’s allegations of widespread abuse and Jockey Club chairman Ogden Phipps said the racing industry deserved the criticism. “I think everyone knows what PETA is. They are a fringe, politically terrorist

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If we got rid of Lasix, it’s not going to mean that all of a sudden the integrity of racing is fixed. It’s not even a start

“We moved glacially before this, and now we’re moving like a dirigible. We’re simply not jetlined yet, but we’ve made huge progress.” Violette said some jurisdictions lag behind in adopting new medication rules because they are hobbled by legislative snags or their own rules that may require public hearings and periods of time to respond. Others, he said, need a “kick in the butt to get them into the 21st Century.”

group,” Violette said. “They are not trying to improve anything. They have announced a war on racing. I’m not worried about them that much. They are on the edge and a lot of people understand that. What has been disappointing is the onslaught of industry leaders who have kind of embraced them. They have kind of aided and abetted the enemy and slept with the enemy and used that as a platform to reintroduce their haloladen pontifications.” Violette is a vocal leader in the campaign for adoption of a uniform medication policy in North America. In the United States, 16 of the 38 racing jurisdictions have moved forward with medication reforms, but he said there is still much work to be done. “We’ve put so much effort behind medication reform,” Violette said. “Jurisdictions that represent over 90% of the handle across the country have acceded to the medication changes, and that’s a terrific thing. That’s within the last two years, and there have been people and entities talking about this for decades, and all we did was tread water.

Good counsel

Looking back over his career, Violette said he has been fortunate to work with many brilliant, outstanding people. Alfred Vanderbilt, a pillar of American racing, was one of his early clients. When Vanderbilt became blind in his declining years, Violette would call the Belmont and Travers Stakes for him while sitting at his side. “I’ve been blessed,” he said. “This business allows us to meet incredible people. Just in my owners – from Ralph Evans to Seth Klarman [of Klaravich] to Len Riggio [Samraat’s breeder/owner My Meadowview Farm LLC] – they’re just significant, good men with enormous intelligence and experience. And we do talk frequently. “They’re giants in their own industries and men of impeccable integrity. Those are the things that you learn well, and sometimes the other stuff you have to learn on your own. My father, who passed away in October, was very big on not only having integrity, but surrounding yourself with people of integrity, and a lot of the rest, he said, will take care of itself.” n






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For more information visit our website or call 518.388.0174 PHOTOS BY LOU HODGES, ADAM COGLIANESE, JOE LABOZETTA ©


PROFILE

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MARK CASSE

The success story of Mark Casse Mark Casse is an American success story, despite the fact that many of his achievements have come in Canada, where in April, he received his seventh Sovereign Award as that nation’s outstanding trainer. WORDS: ED GOLDEN PHOTOS: HORSEPHOTOS, FRANCES J KARON

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HROUGH diligence, dedication, and devotion, Casse has won favor with major clients who have helped make him a respected horseman at any shedrow under which his shingle hangs. Presently, that would include California, Kentucky and his home away from home, Woodbine near Toronto, where he won his eighth straight title in 2014 and his ninth overall. He won the crown at Turfway Park four times, topped the list at Churchill Downs in 1988, was champion of the 2014 Keeneland Spring meet, and was among the leaders at the 2015 Winter session at Santa Anita, no easy feat against the likes of perennial alpha males Bob Baffert, Jerry Hollendorfer, Peter Miller, Doug O’Neill, and John Sadler. Casse has made an indelible mark in Canada. In addition to his own plaque last year, he trained Queen’s Plate and Woodbine Oaks winner Lexie Lou, Canadian Horse of the Year; Dynamic Sky, champion male turf horse; Hillaby, champion female sprint winner; Conquest Typhoon, champion 2-year-old male; and Conquest Harlanate, champion 2-year-old filly. Casse’s love affair with The Great White North, as the McKenzie brothers affectionately called Canada, began years ago. He wasn’t even old enough for

Mark Casse (right) with Art Sherman, trainer of California Chrome

kindergarten when he was smitten with the Thoroughbred bug. “I always loved racing,” said Casse, 53, a native of Indianapolis, round of face with wall-to-wall teeth that form an ingratiating Cheshire cat smile. “I grew up in it with my father, Norman. We lived on a farm since I was four. My dad had a van company and we rode together in the van from Ocala to Louisville, and I watched the Kentucky Derby in 1973. “It was one reason I developed an interest in racing: the father/son relationship, the bonding, if you will. Plus, I got to see Secretariat. I didn’t realize at the time that it would be my favorite Derby. I could hardly see because our seats weren’t very good, but it was great being there with my dad. He has always been my idol.”

I got to see Secretariat. I didn’t realize at the time that it would be my favorite Derby. It was great being there with my dad. He has always been my idol

His father had a successful breeding business in Indiana before moving to one of the nation’s horse capitals, Ocala, Florida. In just six years, Mark went from mucking stalls in the sub-zero temperatures of an Indiana winter to running his father’s Cardinal Hill Farm in Ocala. At 18, Mark officially became a trainer and saddled his first winner, Joe’s Coming, at Keeneland on April 14, 1979. Casse’s annual migration to Canada was prompted in part by what he considers a haphazard racing schedule in Kentucky. “In the ’80s, I was leading trainer in Kentucky, but I was a little frustrated with their circuit,” he said. “It’s still kind of broken up. “I went to Canada one summer in the mid-’80s, I guess it was, and I just liked it. It was nice for me because they usually run from about April until December, which meant I got to spend the winters in Ocala, which was home. “We built things up and had success, but this seventh Sovereign was a long time in coming. It didn’t happen overnight. We had to work hard to win our first one. Things kind of snowballed as we got better and better horses. We were lucky.” Humility aside, Casse recognizes the significance of currently having a veritable Who’s Who of blue blood owners, among them, Gary Barber, Conquest Stables, ISSUE 36 TRAINERMAGAZINE.COM

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PROFILE Calumet, Cheyenne Stables, Gabe Grossberg, Live Oak, Robert Masterson, John Oxley, Mike Rutherford, Spendthrift Farm, Stonestreet, Three Chimneys Farm, and highly-regarded newcomer John Malone, who races as Bridlewood Farm, an existing expanse in Ocala that Malone recently purchased. “He owns the Atlanta Braves,” Casse said, “and he’s the largest private landowner in North America. He bought a weanling in November for $3 million. “We have some great, great owners, prominent men and women, who are very smart and very wealthy,” Casse said. “I’m very proud of that.” He should be, as he should be, too, of his valued principles. Casse adheres to an honesty-is-the-best-policy philosophy, and, without giving away trade secrets, has a great eye for a horse, an advantage at any sale. “It’s not really one thing over another,” Casse said. “There are horses that appeal to me and horses that don’t. I like an athletictype and I like a really refined neck and a strong shoulder. I look for a strong back, as well. “Honestly, I just be myself,” he said of his credo with clients. “I’ve been fortunate over the years in working with some very smart men and women who trust me, and it’s something I’m very proud of . . . In this business, there are a lot of good people and a lot of bad people. I just have a real, true love of the game and I feel like I represent it and I take it very personally. “Unfortunately, so many good people are run off because they encounter the wrong people who take advantage of them. That’s really disturbing and upsetting to me. It’s not something I do. I’m a straightforward person and I tell it the way it is.” Like any stable, large or small, care is a constant and can’t happen without good help. Casse has that from coast to coast. In California, the day-to-day operation is in the capable hands of 43-yearold Randi Melton, who has been with Casse going on six years, Melton was once a jockey but has long ago outgrown the wardrobe of silks and tight white pants, but her experience and work ethic remain of infinite value. “I grew up on a farm in a town called Sparr, north of Ocala, in Florida’s horse country,” Melton said. “My father trained racehorses, my parents got divorced and my mom ended up marrying Mark’s dad, so we’re stepsiblings. “I went to college at an 22

He’s the best. You could call him with bad news, which we inevitably have to do at some point, but he handles it Randi Melton

art institute in Ft. Lauderdale. I hated the real world, came home one day to the barn, smelled the horse poop and that was it. I knew I was home. I was working for an architect and I’m like, ‘I wasn’t happy.’ “Ever since I was a kid I wanted to be a jockey and it took me about four or five years. I took my time, did other things, worked as a vet’s assistant – you name it. “I started riding at 25 and tacked 107 pounds when I was the leading apprentice at Calder in 1999. In 1998 I won the first race I ever rode, on a 30-1 shot at Tampa Bay Downs – Chilka. “I just rode for a little bit because I got hurt a lot since I had to reduce so much. I worked for Mark on and off for years and

assisted Al Stall for three years during the period Blame beat Zenyatta in the 2010 Breeders’ Cup Classic. “I was part-time assistant for Mark in the winter and Al in the summer, and it worked out that I could stay with Mark full time, and it was the best thing that ever happened, a blessing.” With 100 horses in training, understandably there are days when news is not good. One way or the other, Casse copes with it admirably. “He’s the best,” Melton said. “You could call him with bad news, which we inevitably have to do at some point, but he handles it. He doesn’t micro-manage, but he knows everything going on with every horse, and he wants to know, and that’s what I love about working for him. “He’s so savvy with the horses. He can tell me over the phone, ‘Randi, I think it’s this,’ and it’ll turn out to be that, and I’m like, ‘Mark, you really irritate me sometimes. Why are you always right?’” Mark Edward Casse, meanwhile, despite the rigors of his profession, makes time to enjoy the best of both worlds, business and pleasure. His wife, Tina, and two of his seven children, Norman and Colby, lend their support, moral and physical, at various levels of the operation. “This has only come about in the last 10 years,” Casse said, “but it’s really nice when your family is so closely involved. I don’t take myself too seriously, but I understand it’s a business and it’s important, but not near as important as your health and your family. “People ask me how I handle the pressure of it, but the pressure is usually put on by myself. Any pressure that exists is because I have all these wonderful people who put so much confidence in me and I don’t want to let them down. In the end, it’s about my family being happy and healthy. That’s the most important thing.” Casse’s priorities are in order. His Sovereign Awards and other glitzy hardware accumulated through the years look nothing like Broadway’s Great White Way or the neon overkill on the Vegas Strip.

Conquest Two Step, with Joe Talamo up, wins the G2 Palos Verdes Stakes at Santa Anita

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PROFILE Casse’s son Norman Norman (center), here with Shaun Bridgmohan in John C. Oxley’s colors

“We hardly keep any trophies,” Casse said. “If you came to our house (in Ocala), you would see four pictures. Three of them are of our first Kentucky Derby runner, Seaside Retreat, who ran against Barbaro in 2006. We haven’t even gotten the fourth one yet, but it’s framed and it’s of Lexie Lou winning the Queen’s Plate. “I have maybe one trophy in my office, and that’s the Sovereign Award. Any of the others are all in our office on our farm in

Ocala, where our home is, as well. We have 85 acres. For us, it’s kind of paradise. “I like to fish, but I don’t really have time to do it, so we built a pond in our front yard about 10 years ago and we stocked it. It’s about an acre and it’s beautiful. When I get a little tired, I go out and fish for 15 minutes or so, then go back in and do some work. “Sometimes after dinner I’ll go and fish for a while. That’s my only little diversion. The rest of my day is all consumed by horses.

“Our day starts at five o’clock in the morning. Normally, before cell phones and all this social media, it used to be we’d start the day around five, and about 10 o’clock, you could kind of take a breath and say, ‘Hey, we don’t have anything going on till around 3 o’clock. We don’t have to worry.’ “But now with the California division, activity starts three hours earlier than on the East Coast, so you’re kind of always on pins and needles when the phone rings. Or if I’m in California, as soon as training is over, instead of taking a break and going home, training is starting in the east, and we have horses running there. “It’s a long day, but I love it and wouldn’t trade it for anything. I don’t tweet and I’m not on Facebook. If I don’t read my e-mails for a few hours, I may have 30 or 40 to answer. With today’s technology, most of my owners don’t have to be told when their horses are running. They get their entries and their work reports, so things have changed a lot since I started 35 years ago.” In the future, changes, be they ill or good, will continue. “I think racing has leveled off,” Casse said. “I think the strong tracks will continue to do just fine, but things are a lot different than they used to be when racing was the only game in town. It’s not that way any more, with all the gambling online and all the casinos and everything. “My son, Norman, who’s 31 or 32, is one of my main assistants. I feel good about his future. My youngest son, Colby, is 12, and of all my kids, he probably loves horseracing at this age more than any of them did at this point in time. I think the business will be there for him, too. “It’s a great sport.” n

CASSE GRADED STAKES WINNERS GRADE 1 Dark Ending Exciting Story (champion) My Conquestadory Pool Play Spring in the Air (champion) GRADE 2 Conquest Harlanate (champion) Conquest Two Step Conquest Typhoon (champion) Funny Proposition Higher World Hillaby (champion) Kaigun Marchfield (champion) Prospective Roxy Gap (champion) Royal Oath Seaside Retreat Skyway Spring Venture Uncaptured (champion)

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GRADE 3 Added Edge (champion) Arch Hall Blue Laser Clearly Foxy Delegation Delightful Mary (champion) Dixie Strike Dynamic Impact Dynamic Sky (champion) Florida Won Laugh Track Lexie Lou (champion) Madly Truly Northern Passion Officer Cherrie Ol’ Fashion Gal Precise End Raja’s Shark Sealy Hill (champion) Sisterly Love Skip Code Sky Captain Sprung Stealcase

Kaigun wins the 2014 G2 Seabiscuit Handicap at Del Mar

Tepin Top Notch Lady Turf War Sovereign Award Outstanding Trainer 2006, 2007, 2008, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

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VETERINARY

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STRESS FRACTURES

STRESS FRACTURES

Are they linked to training surfaces? ISSUE 36 TRAINERMAGAZINE.COM

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VETERINARY

Stress fractures not only lead to training interruptions but if they are not identified early and managed appropriately, they can be associated with subsequent catastrophic fractures. WORDS: MeliSSa MacKinnOn PHOTOS: cOuRTeSy Of DR. MicHael ROSS, GeORGe D. WiDeneR HOSPiTal fOR laRGe aniMalS, ScHOOl Of VeTeRinaRy MeDicine, uniVeRSiTy Of PennSylVania

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Here the nuclear scintigraphic image will be a side view of the right front lower limb. The left forelimb is being shielded to prevent any signal from it distorting the right limb images

TRESS fractures are a late stage on a pathway of stress-related bone injury, and those of the humerus, tibia, ilium, and cannon bone (a.k.a. third metacarpal bone, or McIII) are most common. During race training, bone undergoes repetitive cyclical loading leading to a high rate of microcrack formation and in turn, an intense remodeling response occurs. If bone repair lags behind microcrack formation, microcracks can coalesce to form stress fractures (macrocracks).

Nuclear scintigraphy the optimal tool for detection of stress fractures

Nuclear scintigraphy is the most commonly used and sensitive method to detect long bone and pelvic stress fractures while dorsal McIII stress fractures are usually diagnosed by palpation and radiography. With nuclear scintigraphy, a radioactive marker that is attracted to damaged bone is injected into the horse, and then a gamma camera is used to screen the limbs and identify sites of damage. It is particularly useful for finding stress fractures because the whole limb, or if relevant, the whole skeleton, can be scanned in one exam ensuring that the full extent of bone injury can be detected.

The New Bolton Center training surface study

Numerous factors contribute to musculoskeletal injury during racing and training. Although the type of training surface is a very obvious potential culprit, to date, there has not been very much scientific evidence to support that theory. There is evidence that there is higher race-day fatality rate data on synthetic surfaces, but the effect of track surface on non-fatal racing and training injuries requires investigations. Many trainers will attest that patterns of 26

For hindlimb nuclear scintigraphic imaging, the camera is positioned behind the sedated patient while the forelimbs are shielded

injury change when horses switch from dirt to synthetic track surface and in particular there is speculation that hindlimb lameness and tibial stress fractures are more common on synthetic tracks. Researchers based at the University of Pennsylvania’s New Bolton Center have completed a study, recently published in Equine Veterinary Journal, addressing this issue. To evaluate the impact of training track surface on the proportion of long bone and pelvic stress fractures, the researchers reviewed nuclear scintigraphy (bone scan) records from two hospitals over two time periods for Thoroughbreds in flat race training. For confidentiality reasons, we will call the Hospitals A and B. Hospital A had records spanning 2003-2009 and Hospital B had records available 1994-2006. Horses from trainers using Hospital A trained at a single track at which the main training surface

changed from dirt to synthetic on August 27, 2006. Two distinct populations typically attended Hospital B: horses that trained on dirt (numerous trainers) and those that trained on turf (single trainer). This large-scale study involved 1,075 scintigraphic records, with a stress fracture diagnosed in 18.6% of the cases. At Hospital A, there were 528 examinations, comprised of 257 horses trained on dirt and 271 trained on synthetic. At Hospital B, there were 547 scintigraphic examinations, with 349 horses trained on dirt, and 198 trained on turf by a single trainer. Age and sex of the horse did not impact the diagnosis of stress fractures but there were significantly more stress fractures diagnosed at Hospital A (27.5%) than at Hospital B (10.1%). Two-thirds of the cases involved diagnosis of a single stress fracture at one site, but the other third had multiple sites. And of those

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DARBY DAN F A R M

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VETERINARY

To image the full lower limb it must be flexed at positioned towards the center of nuclear scintigraphy camera

A dedicated examination room where the nuclear scitigraphic images are obtained with the gamma camera is suspended from an overhead gantry, allowing easy positioning around the standing, sedated patient

Nuclear scintigraphic image being obtained from the pelvic region. This area is extremely difficult to image with older technologies like conventional x-ray but can be easily scanned with scintigraphy

In this radiograph of the same stifle region (front to back view) from the horse in images below left, there is new bone formation around the outside of the upper tibia in the area of the tibial stress fracture

horses that had more than one fracture, 86.6% had two stress fractures, 9.0% had three stress fractures, and 4.3% had four stress fractures.

A unique opportunity to examine the impact of a change from dirt to synthetic surface

Nuclear scintigraphic images showing the intense area of increased radiopharmaceutical uptake creates a black area in the proximolateral (upper and outside) tibia. These images confirm a tibial stress fracture is present 28

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The researchers took advantage of the change from dirt to synthetic surface on the main training and racing track next to Hospital A, which created a unique population of horses for study. There were numerous trainers using Hospital A so it is unlikely that trainers’ differing methods could have influenced the observations. There was a smaller backstretch dirt track that remained in use after the change of surface on the main racetrack and therefore should not impact results. The most important factor that differentiated the two groups at Hospital A was training track surface. Looking specifically at the Hospital A population,


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VETERINARY overall there were more stress fractures diagnosed after the switch to synthetic surface (31.7%) when compared to horses trained on dirt (23%). And looking at specific fracture types, some interesting patterns emerged. The proportion of horses diagnosed with a hindlimb or pelvic stress fracture was greater in horses from the synthetic trained group (38.4%) than the dirt trained group (22.9%), and there was a greater proportion of tibial stress fractures in horses from the synthetictrained group (25.5%) than the dirt-trained group (13.3%).

Was anything discovered about the impact of turf?

The study was not designed to determine the impact of training on turf. In the Hospital B population, there was a significantly higher proportion of stress fractures diagnosed in horses trained by 59 trainers on dirt (14.6%) compared to the horses trained on turf (2%)

by a single trainer. However, because only one trainer used turf, it is very likely that other factors contributed to the differences in the proportion of stress fractures in this subgroup. Clearly, track surface was different but this is unlikely to be the only factor accounting for the lower proportion of stress fractures. Nevertheless, this turf-trained group does highlight the importance of characterizing training philosophy in future studies, so it was a valuable if not immediately conclusive element of the overall research.

Was surface the only factor influencing stress fracture?

The New Bolton Center team acknowledged that there might be confounding variables that were not examined or detected in the analyses. The study relied on nuclear scintigraphy records, and the proportion of stress fractures diagnosed using nuclear scintigraphy is greatly influenced by how easy or difficult it is for trainers to access this tool. Factors including the proximity of the hospital and ease of referral will vary from one training center to another. Horse-related factors such as age, racing schedule, and Left: Nuclear scintigraphic image showing the intense area black area of radiopharmaceutical uptake in the proximal humerus. This image confirms a humeral stress fracture. Below: Nuclear scintigraphic images showing the intense black areas in the ilial bones. The images confirm bilateral ilial stress fractures

perceived or actual value could be important. Synthetic surface is not necessarily identical from track to track, and maintenance, temperature, and moisture levels will mean that it will be different between locations.

Why might race-day and training injuries be affected by surface in different ways?

The New Bolton Center study focused specifically on training injuries. There is already a substantial body of research evaluating the influence of track surface on race-day fatal and non-fatal musculoskeletal injury in racehorses. These studies have reported contradictory results, emphasizing the difficulty of comparing results from different racetracks. In California, a 37% decrease in raceday fatalities after the main racetracks were converted from dirt to a synthetic surface was reported. It’s important to emphasize that race-day fatality data measures the catastrophic end result of accumulated stress-related bone injuries rather than the influence of surface on the development of stress-related bone injury, since it is the training surface that has the most profound influence on this. Studies on the influence of training track surface on non-fatal musculoskeletal injuries are scarce, which is why the New Bolton Center study was so valuable. The next challenge is to look at why a synthetic surface may have contributed to the development of stress fractures. Future research aimed at uncovering a reason for this apparent association between synthetic surfaces and increased risk of stress fracture is required.

The bottom line

All the evidence to date has shown that race-day fatality rates may be reduced by the change to synthetic surfaces. However, when considering the effects of a synthetic surface on training, it is important to understand the condition of the surface, the distinct horse populations, and training philosophy. The latest research suggests that the proportion of stress fractures in horses training on synthetic surfaces may be higher than in horses training on other surfaces, emphasizing that a more extensive investigation of training effects from synthetic surfaces is needed. n

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BABY ZIP

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1

Baby Zip and her legacy

N a higher-traffic section of the Adena Springs facility, Baby Zip’s Horse of the Year and Breeders’ Cup Classic-winning son Ghostzapper, a Hall of Famer sired by Stronach’s homebred Awesome Again, is midway through his tenth breeding season, which comes off daughter Judy the Beauty’s Eclipse Award as champion sprint female. Judy the Beauty (bred but not raced by Adena Springs) was voted champion of her division by a landslide margin of 261-4 after ending her season with a win in the Breeders’ Cup Filly & Mare Sprint. Meanwhile, at Lane’s End Farm in Versailles, Ghostzapper’s older, Grade 1-winning half-brother City Zip, by Carson City, is into breeding season number 14 off the success of his best-ever year, capped with

The unassuming, blaze-faced bay mare Baby Zip shares a pasture on a secluded section of Frank Stronach’s 2,400-acre Adena Springs Farm in Paris, Kentucky, with other retirees, including 26-year-old Cargo, the dam of Preakness Stakes winner Red Bullet; and Grade 1 winner/producer Magical Maiden, also 26. Years on from earning the 2005 Broodmare of the Year award, 24-year-old Baby Zip is enjoying the contented, unfussy life of a pensioner, leaving it to her sons and their progeny to earn accolades and awards. WORDS AND PHOTOS: FRANCES J KARON

four individual Grade 1 winners – no N.A.based sire had more – and represented by two Eclipse champions and two Breeders’ Cup winners: Dayatthespa (female turf horse with 260 votes; first in the Filly & Mare Turf) and Work All Week (male sprinter; first in the Sprint). A Broodmare of the Year honor would have seemed an unlikely future for young Baby Zip, an early maturing daughter of Relaunch and tough stakes mare Thirty Zip (a half-sister by Tri Jet to the dam of Kentucky Derby winner Lil E. Tee). Trained by Tim Ritchey and racing primarily on the Midlantic circuit, the J. Robert Harris Jr. homebred won three-of-four juvenile starts,

including the six-furlong Kattegat’s Pride S. by a nose at Laurel Park, in 1993 and at three ran third in Laurel’s Listed Marshua S. on New Year’s Day. In another 11 lifetime races, Baby Zip won just once more, a six-furlong allowance at Pimlico, with no additional black-type. By January of her four-year-old season, she was dropped into a high-end claimer at Laurel Park for what would be her last race, and John Lenzini Sr. haltered her for $47,500 on behalf of Kentucky-based trader David Mullins of Doninga Bloodstock. The claiming price was not much less than her lifetime earnings of $60,395. Mullins immediately sold Baby Zip privately to Stronach. Under the Adena Springs banner – winner of seven Eclipse and five Sovereign Awards as leading breeder in the U.S. and Canada, respectively

Baby Zip’s Horse of the Year Ghostzapper sired 14 stakes winners last year

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RACING Left: City Zip, half-brother to Ghostzapper, had his best-ever year in 2014 with four individual Grade 1 winners including two Eclipse champions and two Breeders’ Cup winners: Dayatthespa (center) and Work All Week (bottom)

– Stronach, who is also a leading owner in both countries, bred all 14 of the mare’s foals, orchestrating her rise to elite broodmare ranks with a distinction unequalled by any other living mare. For despite being the dam of two Grade 1 winners and Grade 3 winner City Wolf (a Giant’s Causeway horse with first foals of 2015, standing at Adena Springs South in Florida), Baby Zip’s accomplishments rose to a new level when two of her sons sired individual Eclipse Award champions in 2014. Half-brothers producing Eclipse winners in the same year is not a singular feat, but it is an exclusive club: From 1971, when the first Eclipses were handed out, only Glorious Song – an Eclipse champion in 1980 (as well as a multiple Sovereign champion) – has done it previously, through her sons Rahy and Singspiel in 2007. As a side note, Glorious Song’s full brother Saint Ballado sired two champions – Saint Liam and Ashado – in 2005 and another full brother, Devil’s Bag, was a champion in 1983.

Baby Zip’s accomplishments rose to a new level when two of her sons sired individual Eclipse Award champions in 2014

Other broodmares to produce two Eclipse Award-siring sons, though not in the same year, are Flower Bowl (Graustark and His Majesty); Eclipse champion Miesque (Kingmambo and Miesque’s Son); Pocahontas (Chieftain and Tom Rolfe); and Weekend Surprise, whose A.P. Indy and Summer Squall have sired a combined total of six Eclipse Award winners. Two of these mares were, like Baby Zip, Broodmares of the Year: Pocahontas – her classic winner Tom Rolfe was a preEclipse Award era champion – in 1965; and Weekend Surprise, the dam of two classic winners, in 1992. Baby Zip isn’t Stronach’s first Broodmare of the Year, and Ghostzapper is the product of two of them. Primal Force – the dam of Ghostzapper’s sire, Breeders’ Cup Classic winner Awesome Again; and of champion Breeders’ Cup Juvenile winner Macho Uno – was the award recipient in 2000, the year Stronach’s Primarily won the Sovereign for Outstanding Broodmare. Her days in the spotlight may be over, but Baby Zip’s star power shines bright. n 34

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VETERINARY

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VETERINARY

THE ART OF BREATHING

Do the muscles of the respiratory system affect performance?

H

OWEVER, until recently, the role of breathing in exercise performance in both human and equine athletes was largely unknown, as was the response of the respiratory system to training. Although it has been understood for many years that human lungs do not adapt to the rigors of aerobic training, it was only recently discovered that the respiratory pump muscles (rib cage, diaphragm, and abdominal wall) can be improved by training, and the degree to which an individual is able to adapt to training influences performance. Because current knowledge regarding the contribution of respiratory muscle performance in human athletes is very relevant to horses, HBLB is funding research by the Equine Sports Medicine Centre at Bristol University in which techniques established in humans are applied to the Thoroughbred racehorse. The respiratory system is divided into the upper respiratory tract – from the nostrils to the trachea (windpipe); and the lower respiratory tract – from the trachea to the lungs.

lower respiratory tract What are the muscles influencing the respiratory tract?

The muscles influencing the lower respiratory tract provide the pumping action that draws air into the lungs. The main respiratory muscle is the diaphragm, but there are accessory muscles in the rib cage (intercostals) and neck. When the muscles of the ribcage and the diaphragm act to expand the chest cavity, air is sucked in (inspiration). During expiration, the ‘elastic’ lungs and rib cage recoil, reducing the size of the chest cavity, which forces air out. The muscles of the abdominal wall also

Over the last two decades the Horserace Betting Levy Board (HBLB) in England has funded substantial research to understand how various body systems respond to training. For example, because of this HBLB investment we now know that the hearts of Thoroughbred racehorses get bigger as a response to athletic training and that big hearts are typically associated with better performers. We also know that bones respond to training by remodeling and hence become better prepared for the strains associated with galloping. WORDS: DR. Kate allen, aliSOn MccOnnell PHOtOS: FRanK SORGe

contribute to expiration during exercise, when high breathing rates are required.

What happens to breathing during exercise?

At rest both humans and horses breathe at approximately 12 breaths per minute; in horses the breath volume is around 6 liters, while in humans it is around 0.5 of a liter. As the horse exercises, breathing frequency increases, and during canter and gallop it becomes linked to stride frequency – so that one breath occurs every one stride. At gallop breathing frequency increases to on average 120 breaths per minute, with volumes in the region of 13 liters. Minute ventilation is the amount of air inhaled per minute, and in the Thoroughbred at gallop it reaches values between 1500 - 2000 liters per minute. In contrast, humans are not obliged to breathe in synchrony with running stride, so breathing frequency rarely exceeds 50 breaths per minute and ventilation is typically around 150 liters

per minute at peak exercise in the average man, but can be as high as 250 in elite male athletes. In both species, the movement of such relatively large volumes of air so rapidly imposes a huge demand upon the respiratory pump muscles, so much so that in humans the diaphragm can exhibit fatigue during intense exercise. The horse is very interesting in that during gallop the ribcage doesn’t actually change size very much – you will have noticed this when riding in that when the horse is galloping you don’t actually feel the ribcage expanding and contracting. What actually happens is that the muscles of the ribcage act to splint or stabilize the chest cavity and most of the work of breathing is done by the diaphragm. As we can’t see the diaphragm it is difficult to appreciate how hard this muscle is working, but we know that it is actually one of the major muscles involved in high-speed exercise.

Differences between human and equine athletes

There are substantial differences between the respiratory systems of human and equine athletes. The majority of humans can maintain blood oxygen levels in the arteries close to resting levels during strenuous exercise, whereas in the Thoroughbred ISSUE 36 TRAINERMAGAZINE.COM

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VETERINARY racehorse, arterial oxygen levels actually fall during strenuous exercise and carbon dioxide levels increase. This is because the lungs of the horse are not able to provide sufficient oxygen to fully saturate the huge amount of blood pumped through the lungs; in evolutionary terms, the equine heart appears to have ‘outgrown’ the equine lungs. It is for this reason that the respiratory system is thought to be the limiting factor to exercise in racehorses.

Respiratory muscle fatigue

The respiratory tract has two main regions: in the upper airways muscles of the nostrils, pharynx, and larynx contribute to function while in the lower respiratory tract, the intercostal muscles in the rib cage and the muscle of the diaphragm act as the respiratory pump. Just like the muscles in the limb, respiratory muscles may become “fitter” with training Athlete using an inspiratory muscle trainer. The device imposes a resistance to inhalation and can be likened to lifting a weight

It has recently been shown that fatigue of the respiratory muscles can occur during intense exercise in humans and, more importantly, that this fatigue limits performance. Of particular significance is a cardiovascular reflex originating within the major respiratory muscles, such as the diaphragm. When exercise is sufficient to exhaust the diaphragm this induces a reflex that constricts the blood supply to the exercising limb muscles. The reduction in blood supply to the limb muscles reduces delivery of oxygen, hastens limb fatigue, and results in a decrease in exercise performance. Fatigue of the respiratory muscles may also result in a reduction in airflow in and out of the lungs and an increase in the perceived effort of exercise. These factors further reduce exercise performance. In humans, research has shown that specific training of the breathing muscles prevents this cascade of events, thereby improving performance. Currently, the extent to which respiratory muscle fatigue might affect exercise performance in racehorses is unknown. However, as the racehorse’s respiratory system is already considered to be an important limiting factor, it is highly likely that these mechanisms could play an important role in fatigue on the racetrack.

Current research on horses

Research at Bristol’s Equine Sports Medicine Centre is attempting to understand whether and if so to what extent respiratory muscle fatigue occurs in horses. The challenge was to develop a diagnostic tool to measure the strength of equine respiratory muscles. In humans, respiratory strength is assessed during a single maximal voluntary inspiratory effort – but because we can’t order a horse to take a deep breath on command, this inability to undertake maximal voluntary breaths is the main factor to overcome. Methods used in human ICU patients on life support have been adapted in order to estimate the strength of equine inspiratory muscles. Once this tool has been further validated, it will be used to assess how conventional racehorse training programs increase respiratory strength and to what degree, if any, respiratory fatigue occurs during racing. An important practical benefit from this HBLB-funded research will be to contribute to the development of specific 38

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VETERINARY methods for increasing the strength, power, and endurance of respiratory muscles, which will hopefully improve race performance in horses prone to respiratory fatigue.

The dynamic endoscopy image shows dorsal displacement of the soft palate, which causes a ‘gurgling’ or ‘choking’ noise. The soft palate is now positioned above the epiglottis so that the epiglottis cannot be seen

Upper respiratory tract What are the muscles of the upper respiratory tract?

The upper respiratory tract is essentially a floppy tube that connects the lungs to the outside world. During inspiration, the pressure inside the lungs and upper airway is negative, but whereas the lungs expand during inspiration, the negative pressure in the upper airway can cause it to collapse. There are three areas of the upper airway where muscle activity is key to opposing the pressure gradient and maintaining an open airway. These are the nostrils, the pharynx, and the larynx. The horse’s ability to maintain a dilated upper airway in the face of the extreme negative pressures created by the diaphragm during gallop occurs because of the complex activity of a multitude of muscles within the upper airway.

Soft palate

Paralyzed arytenoid cartilage of larynx

The dynamic endoscopy image shows laryngeal paralysis, which causes a ‘roaring’ noise. One side of the larynx is paralyzed and instead of being in an open position can be seen hanging in the midline

Upper airway obstructions

A high proportion of racehorses suffer from collapse of the upper airways during strenuous exercise. The vast majority of these types of collapse affect the pharynx and larynx. Collapse of the upper airways leads to airway obstruction, which results in abnormal respiratory noise and poor performance. Upper airway obstructions occur because the muscles of the upper airway are too weak or fatigued to keep the airway stable when exposed to the very negative pressures that occur when galloping. In many cases the cause of the muscle weakness is not known but is likely to involve multiple factors – with genetic, infectious, and training factors all playing a role. Most ‘wind’ surgeries attempt to provide a mechanical solution, and at the moment, there is no specific method of increasing the strength of the upper airway muscles. Some of the current surgical options are known to have only limited benefits while others can

be associated with long-term complications.

Current research

Obviously, it is well known that the locomotor muscles show responses to athletic training, and it would be reasonable to expect the muscles of the upper airway to also respond to a training stimulus. Research at the Equine Sports Medicine Centre is exploring the extent to which the muscles of the equine upper airway respond to training, and which training techniques could maximize this response. Up until now there has been no data to show whether the upper airway muscles of the horse respond to training, but it

is known that the upper airway muscles in other species are trainable. Trainers often report that some two-year-olds stop ‘gurgling’ on the gallops as their fitness levels increase – and this suggests there must be a training-induced increase in the strength of the upper airway muscles. We do know that in human athletes, specific forms of upper airway collapse – such as vocal cord collapse – can be successfully treated with specific training of the respiratory muscles. The research challenge now is to identify whether these techniques might be applicable in either prevention or treatment of upper airway collapse in athletic horses. n

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TRAINING

FIRST-TIME STARTERS How trainers prepare for a debut run

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FIRST-TIME STARTERS

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H

oRSERAcING is seldom boring. Three maiden sprint races for three-year-olds teeming with first-time starters on the same afternoon, February 21st, at three different tracks offered a window to see how those trainers prepared their horses. collectively, 24 trainers entered 26 first-time starters in those three races. At Gulfstream Park, 11 of the 14 horses entered in a 6½-furlong sprint were firsters. In a six-furlong race at Fair Grounds, six of 12 horses were making their debut, as were eight of 12 in a 5½-furlong sprint at Santa Anita. The trainers and their firsters in postposition order, except for entries: At Gulfstream Park: Todd Pletcher (Element and catanova); Roderick Rodriguez (Tommy Macho); Bill Mott (canadian Flyer); Juan Arias (Just Watch); chad Brown (Data Driven); Kiaran McLaughlin (Rediscover); George Weaver (Fourth of July); Mike Hushion (Japan); Eddie Kenneally (Bent on Bourbon); Bobby Ribaudo (cred). [Note: Japan’s owner Barry Schwartz, the former cEo of the New York Racing Association, was gracious enough to speak for his long-time trainer, Mike Hushion, who entered the hospital with a serious illness just days after saddling Japan.] At Fair Grounds: Bret calhoun (Adele

TRAINING

Ask two dozen trainers how they prepare horses for their first career start and you’ll get 24 different answers. Variety, as California trainer Peter Miller points out, may be a good thing: “If it was all the same, it would be quite boring.” WORDS: BILL HELLER PHOTOS: HORSEPHOTOS

Dazeem); Larry Jones (Expressive Story); Al Stall (Relevant); Michael Stidham (candy cate); Tom Amoss (Lunar Graze, who was scratched); Neil Howard (Ahh chocolate). At Santa Anita: Jerry Hollendorfer (She’soverthemoon and All That Glitters); Tom Proctor (Dancing Lucy); clifford Sise Jr. (Darling Grace); Peter Eurton (Ya Ya Girl); Kristin Mulhall (Mahee); Phil D’Amato (Sensitively); Simon callaghan (This Is War); Peter Miller (Pammy Whammy, an also-eligible who was scratched).

All the information you need?

The workouts listed in the Daily Racing Form and each track’s racing programs are the only sources of information available to the public. For this story, the workout information was taken from the Daily Racing Form.

If you think about it, clocking hundreds of horses working for dozens of trainers every morning is an extremely difficult task. Just how difficult was mentioned by several trainers, who said some workouts were missed or recorded inaccurately. Asked if the six published workouts were the only ones for Lunar Graze, trainer Tom Amoss said, “I don’t think it’s accurate. If it’s early in the morning – and we do work our horses early – sometimes it’s in the dark.” of course, those workouts are never recorded. “It’s not deception; that’s just the way it is,” Amoss said. Japan’s owner Barry Schwartz said, “Every work doesn’t show up.” Then he mentioned an important factor not available in the published workouts: “When you look at the Racing Form, you don’t know if a jockey worked the horse or a 150-pound exercise rider. There’s a big difference.” When asked why Adele Dazeem’s first two works were at four furlongs instead of three, Bret calhoun said they weren’t. “Sometimes, they (the clockers) don’t get them right. Normally, you’ll see me working up the ladder up to the distance they’re going to run.” Both trainer chad Brown and Peter Miller bristled at the notion that their horse’s first workout was listed at four furlongs. “They must have missed his first work,” Brown said. “I never start a horse at a half-mile. It’s not accurate. I would never do that.” Miller said likewise: “I think sometimes the clockers get it wrong. Mistakes get made. I would never work a horse a half-mile for the first time.” other trainers do.

Foundation?

Bret Calhoun’s Adele Dazeem was inaccurately clocked to have worked over four furlongs

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Trainers sometimes receive horses in their barns who have already worked three furlongs or longer. That is why Al Stall, who saddled 6¾-length debut winner Yockey’s Warrior at the Fair Grounds the same afternoon Relevant made her debut, let Relevant work four furlongs in her first breeze for him. “She had come from a training center and she’d gone a half-mile on a deep track there, so we didn’t need to back her down. She came ready to go. There’s a great foundation there and we don’t have to do all the grunt work. We try to organize it that way.” Juan Arias said of Just Watch, whose first published workout was at four furlongs: “When she got to me, she was up to a threeeighths of a mile breeze. She came to me with a pretty good foundation. When a horse has that much foundation, you don’t have to do as much. I had to do gate works.” Larry Jones explained why Expressive Story’s first workout was at four furlongs: “This one came in ready and we didn’t work her three. She was from calumet Farm. She had a foundation.” Bret calhoun on why Adele Dazeem’s first work was four furlongs: “She had some works before I got her. She was prepared at Stonestreet Farm in Florida.”

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TRAINING Mahee’s first work for Kristin Mulhall was at five furlongs, the second at four. “I didn’t start with threes,” she said. “It depends on what stage they come to me in. Her first five-eighths, she didn’t gallop out good. Then I backed off.”

The numbers

Seventeen of the 26 horses worked 10 times; six worked nine times, one worked eight, one worked six, and one worked five times. Roderick Rodriguez worked his firster, Tommy Macho, just five times. “It depends on the style of the trainer,” he said. “Me? I believe there’s another way to do it. Some of these other trainers are hard on their horses. I give them a strong foundation with long gallops instead of breezing. My owners never saw that before and they were concerned, but the horses stay sound better and longer. I think you hear a lot of the big trainers, their horses don’t last long. And they’re good horses. It puts a lot of strain on the horse.”

East vs. West, two different approaches

Even a quick look at workouts reveals a huge difference in approach in the East coast and the West coast. california trainers tend to work their horses faster and at longer distances than those in New York. Interestingly, the name of Bob Baffert, who usually trains his horses extremely fast but didn’t have a first-time starter in the February 21st maiden race at Santa Anita, popped up three times. “We put more emphasis on workouts here in california than they do on the East coast,” Peter Miller said. “That’s kind of the way it is. They put the emphasis on longer, stronger gallops. We put emphasis on longer, fast works. It’s just a different style of training. I think it may trace back to charlie Whittingham. He’d work a horse a mile. You almost never see that.” Michael Stidham, who has trained on both coasts as well as in the Midwest, offered his take: “I think the reason, probably, that the trainers in california work longer distances is because the tracks out there are much faster. Their horses don’t have to work that hard. In the East coast, they’re a bit deeper. The Midwest tends to be somewhere in the middle.” clifford Sise Jr. offered his take on the difference between coasts: “on the East coast, they’ll gallop out a lot a lot. They go half a mile and gallop out further. Tracks are a little deeper back there, especially the training tracks. on the West coast, what we do is work from the three-quarter pole and let them gallop out. You can’t train like Bob Baffert back East. In our workouts, we know whether the horses can run or not. Not so in the East. Different style of training. on the West coast, everybody wants to win first out. out here, it’s fine. If they did that in the East, they wouldn’t stay sound.” Phil D’Amato offered a similar sentiment: “I worked back in the East for years in 46

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Jerry Hollendorfer likes to work first-time starters progressively in distance

Kentucky, New York, and Florida. I know how they train over there vs. how they train here. It’s just a totally different method of training. The West coast is more speed oriented. The East coast is more stamina. When you see speed horses in the East, they open up. They don’t drill their horses a lot from the gate. We want our horses ready to run. If you want to win short here, you have to compete with the Bob Bafferts of the world and you better have them ready.” Florida/New York-based George Weaver said, “I don’t really know why there’s a difference with california. When I look at the West coast, it’s amazing. They have a much stronger work pattern. Bob Baffert trains his horses fast. Part of that is the caliber of horses he’s given.”

Progression – or not

Bobby Ribaudo’s cred had a three-furlong initial work followed by nine at four furlongs, including one from the gate and one on turf. “You very seldom see many of ours work more than a half-mile,” he said. only three of the 26 firsters entered had a straight progression in workout distance without any cutback. Two were trained by Jerry Hollendorfer in california, and

I think sometimes the clockers get it wrong. Mistakes get made. I would never work a horse a half-mile for the first time

Peter Miller

the third by Stidham at Fair Grounds. Hollendorfer’s She’soverthemoon worked three furlongs once, three times at four, two twice at five, and three times at six. All That Glitters worked three furlongs once, four furlongs twice, five furlongs twice, and six furlongs four times. “I thought they were ready to do it,” Hollendorfer said. “If the horse has a problem you have to go back (in distance). ordinarily, I don’t do that.” Stidham worked candy cate three times at three furlongs, four times at four, and three times at five. “I like to bring a horse up that way,” he said. “It doesn’t always go that way because sickness or injuries throw you off schedule. She went through her works progressively. There was no reason to back up. She has natural speed.” Phil D’Amato’s Sensitively had an interesting work pattern: two threes, then just one at four. He then worked Sensitively five times at five, once at six, and back to five, her only regression. “In the half-mile work, I remember she did it so easily, so effortless,” he said. “I decided she didn’t need to go another half-mile. I didn’t think she’d get anything from it. I went up to five. She just did it with ease.”

Gate works

All 24 trainers gave their 26 first-time starters at least one gate work. Eleven horses had one gate work; 11 had two gate works; three had three, and one had four. Pletcher gave one of his, Element, two gate works, one of them his final work, but catanova just one, his eighth of 10 works. “We don’t always do the same thing,” Pletcher said. “I don’t mind the last work from the gate, but generally, I don’t like to work them five furlongs from the gate. We let him go four and gallop out.” Juan Arias gave his firster three gate works out of eight total works, his fifth, seventh, and eighth moves. The seventh was at three furlongs; the eighth at five furlongs. “The three was from the gate,” he said. “I usually like my final work with a horse with a good foundation to sharpen them up (at three). Then the following work, I did a five from the gate.” George Weaver’s Fourth of July worked three furlongs from the gate, then a five, then a four from the gate, then another five followed by a four from the gate and a final work at five. “A lot of times the first gate work is real easy,” he said. “It’s really more about gate education. A time is put down, but it’s not done whipping and driving. It’s more about the gate education than the distance and the time. I like to work my horses at least twice from the gate before they run. Some horses show good speed from the gate and don’t need as many. I thought three was adequate for him to go over there and run. You just don’t know. There’s no magic to it. You have to have an open mind.” At Fair Grounds, Larry Jones gave Expressive Story two gate works, both at


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TRAINING five furlongs. “They were having trouble with her on the gate,” Jones said. “We had to work with her and get her over her gate phobia. Every horse is different.” At Santa Anita, Peter Eurton gave Ya Ya Girl a five-furlong gate work before her final work, also at five furlongs. “I don’t overdo gates,” he said. “I’m not a prominent gate trainer.” Kristin Mulhall worked Mahee twice from the gate, a five furlong one and a four furlong one, followed by a final work of five furlongs. “Some horses I work one time out of the gate,” she said. “If I’m happy with the way they break and they work well, I won’t do another gate work.” Jerry Hollendorfer worked She’soverthemoon four times from the gate, but entrymate All That Glitters three times. “I work each horse as an individual,” he said. “The problem for every trainer is finding the race the horse belongs in. If it’s not there, you might race at a different distance sooner because you don’t want to have to wait.”

Flexibility

Neil Howard said he could have gone a different way preparing Ahh chocolate, who worked twice at three furlongs, twice at four, four times at five and, finally, a threefurlong gate blowout.

ground. She had very strong gallop-outs. I thought this was a filly who could be ready to run her race the first time, not like an A.P. Indy or Dynaformer that you know aren’t going to be sprinters.” Flexibility can also entail not racing your firster. “We always have to pay attention to seeing a horse showing the effects of a work,” Tom Amoss said about Lunar Gaze. “The bottom line was that the last fivefurlong was in company, and after that work, she started not eating well. So we scratched. Trainers are always monitoring how they handle their work.”

Turf workouts for a dirt debut?

Bill Mott will sometimes work a turf horse on dirt and vice versa

“Usually with first-timers, a lot of it depends on the horse,” he said. “Anyone can go :36, :37. once you get to a couple halves, then you start finding out. I try to really pay attention to the first handful of works to see how precocious your horse is going to be. In this case, I was a little bit on the fence. She’s a big candy Ride, leggytype. As a rule, they’re bred to go a route of

THREE RACES ON THE SAME DAY WITH FIRST-TIME STARTERS

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Working a firster on turf for a debut on dirt is an option available only to those trainers based at tracks or training centers that allow grass works. Eddie Kenneally and Kiaran McLaughlin had that opportunity and took advantage of it with their firsters, Bent on Bourbon and Rediscover, respectively. Bent on Bourbon’s first five works were on grass and Rediscover, after an initial three-furlong work on dirt, put in three turf works in a row. Kenneally explained, “He worked last summer as a two-year-old then went to the farm, where he worked on dirt last summer.


FIRST-TIME STARTERS I thought of him on turf because I felt like he was such a beautiful mover. He has great action. I wanted to explore all his options. Palm Meadows gives him that opportunity to try turf without being in a race. He did well. Then on dirt, he went really well, too. It seemed he was equally talented on dirt. He’s by Arch, who’s produced both on dirt and turf.” Kenneally chose dirt for Bent on Bourbon’s first start. “We felt we needed somewhere to start,” he said. McLaughlin commented, “We have the opportunity at Palm Meadows to work on turf. Sometimes we’re looking at their pedigree and we work them on turf. Then, sometimes we run on dirt just to get him started. We ran him on dirt mainly because he’s by Bernardini and his dam was by Touch Gold.” Both Bobby Ribaudo and chad Brown gave their firsters a single grass work in the middle of many dirt works. “That’s the nice thing about being at Palm Meadows,” Ribaudo said. “At Saratoga or Palm Meadows, you have that option. Most racetracks don’t have that. You should work on turf at least once with a young horse. As many as six of our 10 races are on grass. You should try every horse on it. It just opens so many more doors. You can find turf in

I think the reason, probably, that the trainers in California work longer distances is because the tracks out there are much faster

Michael Stidham almost every pedigree you look at.” chad Brown said, “I had bought [Data Driven] at a track that had a synthetic track. As I was training him down, I wanted to experiment if he could handle grass. I didn’t feel his grass work was as good as his dirt one. So he’ll stay on dirt.” Todd Pletcher gave one of his two firsters, catanova, a grass work, but not the other, Element. With catanova, he was being practical, saying, “We tried turf because he wasn’t doing well on dirt.” canadian Flyer’s lone grass work for Bill Mott was his final work. “It’s always beneficial to see them on turf,” Mott said. “I had the opportunity to see how he

Charts reproduced courtesy of Daily Racing Form

handles turf, and he handled it well. But he had worked well on dirt, too. There are more opportunities on dirt. You have to start somewhere. To have a turf horse, they don’t have to work on turf. It’s nice to have that option. It’s a luxury when you have a turf course you can train on.”

Six furlongs or not; the importance of the gallop-out

The only firsters to work six furlongs for their debut were at Santa Anita, which had the shortest of the three maiden sprints on February 21 at 5½ furlongs. The Fair Grounds race was six furlongs and the one at Gulfstream Park 6½. Hollendorfer gave both She’soverthemoon and All That Glitter four six-furlong works. “You don’t know what is in the book until it comes out,” he said. “It’s a two-week book. If I knew it was going to be a 5½ furlong race, I might not have gone six.” Both clifford Sise and Kristin Mulhall gave their firsters a pair of six-furlong works, while Phil D’Amato gave his one. “I didn’t know what race I was pointing at,” Sise said. “I was thinking of going longer.” So was Mulhall. “I was trying to run her a little further, but the longer races weren’t filling.” D’Amato’s Sensitively’s last two works were at six, then five out of the gate. “Sometimes you don’t know what type of race it is until the condition book comes out,” he said. “Hers was 5½. I just wanted her to shorten up. In 5½ furlongs, everybody sends.” Tom Proctor didn’t work his firster Dancing Lucy at six, but said, “There’s a lot more horses working six furlongs than you think. I’m the kind of guy who does mile works, slow miles. Some of them need more work. It depends: colts vs. fillies, weight, how they’re eating.” Peter Eurton had a reason for not working Ya Ya Girl six furlongs: “I don’t think they always have to do that. once horses are fit, I don’t think you need to work the distance you’re going to race.” Another california-based trainer, Simon callaghan, said, “I don’t think I’ve ever worked a horse six furlongs. I don’t think it’s necessary. I think you get a lot out of five-furlong workouts. Maybe I’d win more races, but it’s about developing a horse for his career, not winning first-time out.” Back East, Bill Mott rarely gives his horses works longer than five furlongs. “We very seldom go six or seven furlongs,” he said. He gave canadian Flyer four three-furlong works to begin his training, but his education in those works continued after three furlongs. “It’s not like they’re stopping at the end of three,” he said. “When they’re galloping out real strong, they gallop a half-mile anyway. I’ve had horses that galloped out five from a three-furlong work. We just try to make sure they’re fit. We’re training on a deep racetrack. It’s a bit deeper than some other racetracks.” Japan’s owner Barry Schwartz said, “We ISSUE 36 TRAINERMAGAZINE.COM

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TRAINING

I like to work them as far as they’re going to run. There’s a lot of different theories. We make an effort to win first time out

Bret Calhoun never work six furlongs in the East. There’s the gallop-out. With Japan, we got him up to five. We didn’t have to do more. Mike [Hushion] trains brilliantly.” Kiaran McLaughlin offered a similar assessment: “We’re not three-quarters of a mile people. In california, everyone works further and faster. They’re different out West. We do five furlongs with the gallop-out.” The gallop-out is crucial in Bobby Ribaudo’s training. “our gallop-outs are much stronger than usual,” he said. “We stress with our riders how fast to gallop out and how far to gallop out. cred’s pedigree is for running longer. You get a comfort level. My guys buy yearlings every year. You buy pedigrees thinking a mile, a mile and a sixteenth.” Sometimes, a sprint debut helps horses reach that distance. “We’re not supposed to give our horses a race, but with some horses for six or 6½, it’s really a prep,” Ribaudo said. “It’s a progression.” At Fair Grounds, Tom Amoss stresses five-furlongs with strong gallop-outs for his firsters. “I need at least two significant fivefurlong works with a good gallop-out,” he said. “Six furlongs is not my m.o. There is a difference in philosophies. There is a fine line, getting her ready to run without taking too much out of her.” 50

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california trainer Kristin Mulhall worked her firster twice at six furlongs but sounded just like Amoss when she said, “I’m not comfortable running them until they give me a good five-eighths when they gallop out good.” Neil Howard used a similar approach with Ahh chocolate: “once I got her to the five-eighths work, with me, her gallop-outs were indicative that she didn’t have to work six. She galloped out in 1:14 and change or 1:15. To me, and I’m not alone here, I put great emphasis on the gallop-out. You’re looking to get as much air in their lungs and as much stamina as you can. She’s a big, long filly. I was able to get nice two-minute licks into her. I was able to get a good bottom on her.” Bent on Bourbon didn’t have a sixfurlong work and had just one at five. “We treat them all as individuals,” trainer Eddie Kenneally said. “Some of those half-mile works were longer. He galloped out. When he worked five, he went about seven with the gallop-out. He got a lot out of those works.” Adele Dazeem also had beneficial gallopouts. “Actually, one of those five-eighths was three-quarters,” Bret calhoun said. “I like to work them as far as they’re going to run. There’s a lot of different theories. We make an effort to win first time out.”

Blowout or not?

Neil Howard, Bret calhoun, Simon callaghan, and Peter Miller were the only trainers out of 24 who made their firster’s final two workouts a five-furlong one followed by a classic three-furlong blowout. “I don’t always do it, but I wanted her to be on her game a little bit,” Howard said. “I wanted her to be a little sharpened up. I used to do it more than now. You’re always worried about doing too much too close to the race. I still think it’s a good tool. You go with your gut.” calhoun explained, “You’re just taking a little of the speed away from them before that. cutting back sharpens them, freshens them up. I compare that to football players on two-a-days.” callaghan said, “Hers was a blowout from the gate to kind of sharpen her up. I don’t always do it.” Neither does Miller. “It depends on the horse. It depends on the situation. Some horses, I like to blow out. I worked for charlie Whittingham. He’d blow a lot of them out, one, two or three days before a race. I saw him work a horse three furlongs the day before the race.”

A final thought

Many trainers mentioned that they treat all their horses as individuals. Yet they have their individual methods of developing them. “There are a hundred ways to skin a cat,” Peter Miller said. “Whatever works for you, you do it. There’s not a right or a wrong. It’s different strokes for different folks.” n


PROFILE Bill Hartack won the Kentucky Derby five times during his career

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BILL HARTACK

REMEMBERING BILL HARTACK

O

NE of two exceptions was the late Joe Hirsch, who carried himself with class bordering on elitism, walking the backstretch in suit and tie while writing about racing with a velvet glove. His rare columns of criticism were so deft and discreet, the subject would have thought he was about to receive an award. Another granted an audience was the late Russ Harris, a sensitive and superstitious handicapper who would go ballistic when a horse he bet on had an eight-length lead with 70 yards to go and one of his press box peers would shout, “He’s home!” eliciting loud groans of “Don’t jinx me!” from Harris. Hartack’s most spiteful protagonist was a gnome-like writer from the Newark News named Willie Ratner, who always took it upon himself to refer to Hartack in print as “Willie,” reasoning perhaps that if it was good enough for him, it was good enough for Hartack. I had my own affair to remember at Garden State Park, now long flat-lined, replaced by dwellings and a sprawling shopping center in Cherry Hill, New Jersey. Hartack had just finished out of the money on a favorite in a turf stakes, victimized by a bad start. Fresh out of my teens, I was the track’s pool reporter, gathering post-race quotes from relevant jockeys for distribution to those who didn’t want to be burdened with the task. I was young but I knew of Hartack’s reputation and his standing order of not talking to the press. Tossing naivete aside, I sidled up and said, “Bill, do you mind if I ask you a question?” His response was instantaneous, coinciding with his glower. “Yeah, I f------- do mind,” he said. “It’s none of your f------ business.” But the core of Hartack’s story is more than being a thorn in the side of the media. Much more. That’s why trainer Michael Stidham and friends established the Bill Hartack Charitable Foundation in 2008, a year after Hartack died at 74. He was found

Bill Hartack didn’t suffer fools well. And he hated to be called Willie. Legend has it that it was because he was no fan of his contemporary, the great Willie Shoemaker. On an equal plain of disdain was the media. Hartack had no time for the press. He dealt with members of the Fourth Estate like Obama deals with Congress. He dismissed it. WORDS: ED GOLDEN PHOTOS: BILL HARTACK CHARITABLE FOUNDATION

dead on November 26 in a cabin near Freer, Texas, a town with a population of 3,241. Hartack reportedly was set to go on an annual hunting trip when he died from an apparent heart attack. He won the Kentucky Derby five times from 12 rides. Eddie Arcaro is the only other jockey to win five, but he needed 21 rides. Hartack won the Derby on Iron Liege (1957), Venetian Way (1960), Decidedly (1962), Northern Dancer (1964), and Majestic Prince (1969). He won 4,272 races from 21,535 mounts – nearly 20 percent – and twice led the nation in purse earnings. In 1957, he became the first rider whose earnings reached $3,060,501, a mark that stood for 10 years. He twice made the cover of Sports Illustrated, in 1956 and 1964, and graced the cover of Time in 1958. He was elected to the Hall of Fame in 1959 at the age of 26, the youngest person ever to be so honored. Stidham, 57, a high-percentage training presence for more than three decades, got

I think he was pretty well understood. He was the kind of guy who when he was riding, was all business. There was no play involved Michael Stidham

on the Hartack bandwagon through his late father, George, a jockey and trainer who served as Hartack’s business manager and part-time agent before becoming a trainer. George Stidham died at 78 on April 1, 2005. Michael Stidham learned the ropes from his father, starting as a hotwalker and groom before becoming an assistant trainer and ultimately a full-fledged trainer. “Our main base is the Fair Grounds in the winter,” said Stidham, born in Neptune, New Jersey, hard by Asbury Park, the home of Bruce Springsteen’s E Street Band, and a few furlongs from Oceanport, site of Monmouth Park. “We’re at Keeneland in April and October, and during the summer, we’ve been based at Arlington, but we race all through the Midwest: Churchill, Iowa, Prairie Meadows, Indiana Downs. Usually, we have between 60 and 70 in training.” Among the syndicates Stidham trains for are the Dare to Dream Stable; Team Valor and Barry Irwin; and West Point Thoroughbreds. His biggest clients are Ike and Dawn Thrash, who had horses in California with John Sadler a few years back, but since they’re from Mississippi, they now race primarily in the Midwest exclusively with Stidham. “My dad rode back in the ’50s and ’60s,” Stidham related. “I was raised in Miami and was around my dad and Hartack all my early years growing up around the track.” Stidham saddled his first winner in 1979, moved to California in the early 1980s and trained for two heavyweights of that era, Elmendorf Farm when it was owned by Max Gluck, and two years later in Florida as private trainer for the LaCroix family’s Meadowbrook Farm. ISSUE 36 TRAINERMAGAZINE.COM

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“I was real lucky to get started there,” he said. “But in the ’70s, I was growing up around Gulfstream and Hialeah and that was the heyday for racing back in Florida. That was prime time. “I was in Southern California during the entire ’80s – [Charlie] Whittingham, [Laz] Barrera, Gary Jones, [Richard] Mandella, [Neil] Drysdale – all those guys. I was around the best of racing for sure, while also being around Bill and my dad.”

A lot of people didn’t like his manner of riding, because he used to bounce on the horses. But horses would really run for him

Laffit Pincay Jr

Bill Hartack on Dedicate during the Woodward Stakes in 1957, upsetting favorites Gallant Man and Bold Ruler 54

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Stidham had a string at Del Mar last summer and plans to race there this summer, but he was non-committal on bringing a division out west full time. “I wouldn’t say that I’d be based in Southern California on a regular basis in the future,” he said, “but we’re definitely getting involved again during the Del Mar meet.” Stidham would like to see racing get “involved” as a mainstream sport again. “I think getting all the states on board in a centralized program will strengthen the business rather than hurt it,” he said. “As a trainer, I hope they don’t do away with the therapeutic drugs and Lasix, because I think it’s a benefit to the horses. We race differently here than they do in Europe. We’re racing basically 365 days a year on some level, and I think these therapeutic drugs are a benefit to the horses, not a detriment. “Ultimately, I think the game is going to shrink, meaning that some of the smaller tracks are going to fade away, but I think too things will get better, because the bigger, stronger tracks are going to improve and benefit from what we’re going through right now. “It’s a time of change that’s probably needed in the business to help it get better.” In addition to countless hours consumed by training, Stidham makes time for Hartack, lest records, or even memories, of his ground-breaking achievements are forgotten. Hartack’s reputation preceded him, but he was not a helter skelter firebrand. He was a rebel with a cause. “I don’t think he was misunderstood, not really,” Stidham said of Hartack, a lookalike of World War II hero Audie Murphy with a sneer. “I think he was pretty well understood. He was the kind of guy


PROFILE who when he was riding, was all business. There was no play involved. Anybody who asked him what he considered to be a stupid question, he would just fire back at them and say, ‘Hey, don’t bother me with those kinds of questions.’ “Obviously, the business has changed now, but back in the day when a rider thought a horse was sore and he was going to scratch him at the gate, the jocks were frowned upon for that. Basically, Hartack’s attitude was, ‘Hey, if you don’t think this horse is sore, you come ride him. I’m not riding him.’ “That was just the way he was. Nowadays, it’s the other way around. Jocks are trying to let horses run and track vets and state vets are scratching them because of liability and the negative perception it creates with the public, but Bill wasn’t afraid to stand up, stick to his guns and go with his beliefs and what he thought was right, and he was right. “The most important thing I learned being around Bill was that it was all about winning; do whatever you have to do to win. I can remember stories when I was growing up in Miami Springs and Bill would have won like four on the day, he’d come to our house and we’d be waiting for my mom (Anita) to cook dinner and he wouldn’t speak to anybody. “I’d be like, ‘Dad, what’s wrong with Bill?’ My Dad said, ‘He won four but he rode six and he’s pissed off that he didn’t win all six of them.’ That was the way he was.”

The Hartack Foundation became a reality through Eddie Sapir and Tad Dowd. They got together after Bill passed away and contacted me to do something to keep Bill’s name alive Michael Stidham

Style was not Hartack’s strong suit; winning was. He was not poetry in motion on a horse, but as an athlete, he was an overachiever, sort of a Pete Rose with scruples. “A lot of people didn’t like his manner of riding, because he used to bounce on the horses,” recalled retired Hall of Fame great Laffit Pincay Jr. “But horses would really run for him and he was a very good stakes rider. For any rider to win five Derbies is unbelievable. He was a good friend . . . We 56

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Bill Hartack with Dr. Mario Mercado’s The Kid after riding one of Puerto Rico’s winningest Thoroughbreds to victory in San Juan

would get together for dinner, but he was a very opinionated guy. “He had his own ideas and I’ll tell you, he could have been a lawyer. Nobody could beat him in an argument.” Hartack retired from riding in the United States in 1974. Battling North American weight limitations, he would ride heavier in Hong Kong before finally hanging up his tack in 1981. “The Hartack Foundation [visit www. billhartackfoundation.org for information] became a reality through Eddie Sapir, an attorney and retired law judge in New Orleans, and Tad Dowd,” Stidham said. “They were close friends of Bill’s. They got together after Bill passed away and contacted me to do something to keep Bill’s name alive. “I totally agreed. Racing is changing so much that a lot of young people starting in the business don’t even know who Hartack was.

“A good example of that was Victor Espinoza. We presented him and Art Sherman with the 2015 Hartack and Neiman Award at Santa Anita on April 2 and Victor, who first rode in the U.S. in 1993, didn’t even know who Hartack was, and he was getting an award named for him. “That’s why we felt it was worth doing something to keep Bill’s name out there, and along the way raise some money for race track-related charities, and that’s what we’ve been doing, even though it’s on a small level. “But the most important thing is reminding people of Bill’s achievements and keeping his name alive.” In a sport rich in tradition for more than two centuries, history sits high on a majestic pedestal in racing. Surely, William John Hartack Jr. deserves his place in the sun. It would be unjust to lose his legacy in anonymity. n


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RACING

SoCIAl MedIA ANd RACING

How the sport has been forced to move with the times

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oung people don’t feel you’re relevant until you have a huge social media presence creating a buzz around events and promotions, educating others and sharing experiences. Millennials, the largest generation in America, represent one-third of the population. Born between 1980 and 2005, for most of their lives this group has had wide access to cell phones and Internet, and they will be the major economic force setting trends for decades to come. They engage with and influence others through social media, creating their own content to share. So, without a clear national marketing strategy, racing fans and participants took control. Everyone has a blog, anyone with a smartphone can take a photo or video, and when people couldn’t find what they wanted, they started to create the content themselves. Racing has always been behind the times when it comes to marketing itself. The now-defunct Thoroughbred Times resisted putting content on its website even into the 2000s, believing that if people could access the full article on the site, they wouldn’t buy the hard copy of the newsmagazine. By refusing to give people what they wanted, they found that potential readers just clicked over to a different site, and the brand crumbled. one executive was paying attention. Mark Midland spent 15 years at Churchill Downs, Harrah’s Louisiana Downs, and YouBet.com, and he found that “there’s not enough innovation in horseracing.” He began Horse Racing nation, an interactive go-to starting point for reference material on horses or their connections, as well as an aggregator of articles and comments. “Horse Racing nation is providing a 58

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What Emma Stone’s character says in Birdman could be what fans are saying to the powers that be in horseracing: Things are happening in a place that you willfully ignore, a place that has already forgotten you. I mean, who are you? You hate bloggers. You make fun of Twitter. You don’t even have a Facebook page. You’re the one who doesn’t exist! WORDS: K.T. DONOVAN PHOTOS: HORSEPHOTOS, WINSTAR FARM

service for an interest that wasn’t being provided,” Midland explains. “It started when Curlin was running in 2008 and you could google Curlin, and there was no Curlin page. Peyton Manning has a Fantasy Football page, a page on ESPn, a page on the nFL website, but racing had nothing for its biggest star. So we wanted to create a place where horses had their pages, and not just current ones – Secretariat has a page – and they can be added to.” The independence from any organization or track allows Horse Racing nation to be available yearround, creating fans where the fans are, not where the horses or tracks are. “The Internet is perfect for horseracing,” Midland says. “For those of us who are passionate about it, we find that our spouses, neighbors, friends don’t care. It’s made for connecting on the Internet, and that comes in different forms. Social media has the ability to reach people specifically. They can be reached where they are, with a community to lean on.” Because horseracing is a niche sport, it lends itself well to fans feeling that they are part of an exclusive club, a passionate insider group. WinStar Farm tapped into that, recognizing that whereas racehorses start and finish their careers on a farm, most fans never have access to that side of things. Lifting the veil on this mystery,

WinStar uses social media to engage fans with exclusive behind-the-scenes information, influencing how the public views racing. WinStar raises approximately 140 foals, their own and clients’, annually; stands 20 stallions; and has its own training center. owner Kenny Troutt emphasizes to his team that part of the farm’s mission is to show people that the main point of horseracing is the horse, and a major part of the horse’s life is at the farm. Marketing coordinator Kaitlin Christopherson sees social media as a great use of the budget, as the costs to reach thousands of people are minimal. “We started on Facebook in 2008 and have 35,000 likes; 3,000 on Instagram, which we started in 2013; 12,000 followers on Twitter, which started in 2009. We’ve tripled since we started. “This is how we get to know our fans, and use the feedback to see what we’re doing right. We have a supportive fan base, and we can interact with them through our various social media platforms. This is a way for us to control the message of our stallions and their progeny, and share race results. It’s also a way to publicly recognize breeders and the horse’s connections, and buyers. “We market stallions and their progeny through social media, and are finding different ways to use social media all


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Grade 1 Winstar Stablemate members with Elliott Walden at their 2013 Saratoga Weekend

the time. This is the way this and future generations communicate, so we’re engaging with a newer generation, saying ‘We’re here, we’re listening to you, this is what we do,’ and it lets people be part of it.” In March of 2011, WinStar President elliott Walden’s brainchild WinStar Stablemates launched to broaden interaction with fans and lift the profile of racing in a positive way. The “exclusive 60

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club” membership at different levels plays into one of the successful strategies of social media platforms, making the niche aspect of horseracing an advantage and promoting the sharing of special, privileged experiences across Twitter, Instagram, and Facebook among fellow passionate followers of the sport and of individual horses. This feature of sharing users’ creations or causes and beliefs promises growth,

reaching people who otherwise might not even know about the original platform, and historically is the key strategy of the most successful social media outlets. WinStar Stablemates’s slogan “Be a part of one of the biggest and most prestigious farms in Kentucky!” makes fans feel literally like they are there, with cameras bringing the inner workings of the farm to them. Among the perks of membership, depending on the level, are photo ops with stallions, contests for seats at Keeneland and Churchill downs, parties, memorabilia, naming a yearling, a tour with a picnic, and diaries from management and the farm trainer. The G1 level becomes very exclusive indeed, from watching a foal being born, to a personal video on the website, and the ability to buy a retired WinStar runner. This level is designed to introduce people to actual ownership, the investment of a few thousand dollars to join being a good barometer of desire and ability to afford the care a racehorse requires. Stablemates Coordinator Giulia Mattarello says that WinStar doesn’t make money off of Stablemates, but is focused on long-term awareness and education. “We act like a liaison between the fans and what happens at a farm,” she says, “letting people know about the work of training, working on a farm. Not everyone can be a part of a farm. This gives people a chance to do so vicariously, and talk with other people who are as crazy about the horses as we are!” Mattarello cross-promotes Stablemates with other parts of the industry, like partnering with the Breeders’ Cup in January to have Breeders’ Cup Classic winner


SoCIAl MedIA drosselmeyer take over the organization’s Twitter account for a day, and are looking to do some contests with America’s Best Racing. “It’s the right thing to do. The horses are the fuel behind racing, so you can’t forget the horse,” Mattarello says. After the 2011 McKinsey Report pointed out the obvious, that the industry needs to communicate across generations to younger audiences, the Jockey Club responded by

launching its own fan program, America’s Best Racing (ABR), in the spring of 2012. The site offers fashion from social media director Penelope Miller and news from Melissa Bauer-Herzog. Articles are short, easily read dispatches with lots of pictures or gifs, and often with what insiders would call “fluff.” Miller says the mission of ABR is to hook people into racing, so there is something for everyone. They present lifestyle and fashion,

the parts that usually aren’t seen or easily accessible, but social media has allowed racing to connect to people with these other aspects of the sport even if they aren’t at the track. “For a lot of people, their parents took them to the races for their first experience,” Miller explains. “This generation doesn’t have that, so our content provides it. It might not appeal to the longtime fans or insiders, but we still have interviews and

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RACING Jockey Calvin Borel with WinStar StableMate G1 members Jeff and Angie Brown

Having started its Facebook page in 2008 and its Twitter feed in 2009, WinStar Farm launched WinStar StableMates in 2011. The brainchild of WinStar president Elliott Walden, the idea was to broaden the farm’s interaction with race fans

articles that they might like, because we use all the different facets of racing. “Racing is a visually stunning sport, and social media is increasingly visual. Google+ never took off because there was no way to share visuals. Racing has astounding visuals to share, and that has helped us connect to fans through social media.” In the desire to make racing fun and understandable, Miller gave this analysis of how ABR uses different social media platforms to reach different people: Facebook – share regular content, try to tell the story behind racing; Instagram – visual way to reach younger fans; Twitter – moment-to-moment way to relay 62

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SoCIAl MedIA breaking news, share an experience as it happens; Pinterest – we can reach young women with fashion, images of wonder and beauty; YouTube – gives us a chance to put fans on the backstretch where they can watch Zenyatta drinking a Guiness, so fans can share in inside experiences. We have a team of digital videomakers, and in January launched ABR Films, which is a longform of the Breeders’ Cup experience, and currently showing the Road to the Triple Crown (#RoadtoTC). Miller relies on the interaction to determine if they are reaching new fans, and points them to other resources to learn more at their pace. “It’s our job to give timely, enthusiastic answers to questions like ‘Is Belmont Park running right now?’ or ‘What is a gelding?’” she says. “We are part of equibase, through

Not everyone can be a part of a farm. This gives people a chance to do so vicariously, and talk with other people who are as crazy about the horses as we are!

Giulia Mattarello

the Jockey Club, which shows graded stakes races from 2010 to the present, which also helps people learn about the sport, at least recent history. derby Jackpot sponsors ABR and is our online game that’s on Facebook and Twitter, so is pointed to as a way to access gambling events and teach people about gambling. ABR helps organize viewing parties, and leads people to BloodHorse, TdN, expressBet, TwinSpires – wherever they feel it could lead to traction for someone. “We also do profiles on syndicates, in case people want to get involved with ownership, not just wagering or attending the races. We encourage fractional ownership as a way to get started.” ABR used to travel in a bus around the country, but now has two ambassadors in NYC, two in lA, one in Miami, and one in

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RACING Chicago to talk to people year-round about racing, to keep interest alive when the tracks there aren’t running. The most surprising thing that Miller has discovered is how enthusiastic young people are to embrace horseracing. “I’ve found that it’s more about not being aware of where a nearby racetrack is, or how to bet, or where to watch, than not wanting to do it. Whenever we get people out to a track for the first time, they loVe IT and want to share it with their friends.” That is all well and good, but still, the races are the central product, and wagering keeps that product in demand. In 2011, two years after Horse Racing Nation launched, Midland partnered with National Handicapping Championship

Racing is a visually stunning sport, and social media is increasingly visual. Racing has astounding visuals to share, and that has helped us connect to fans through social media Penelope Miller

Top: America’s Best Racing (ABR) website was launched by the Jockey Club in 2012 with a wide range of topics, from racing news to fashion. Center: ABR’s Twitter page, showing the latest video footage of California Chrome ridden for the first time at Newmarket in England. Below: ABR’s Facebook page

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winner John doyle to create derby Wars, a handicapping contest forum with built-in chat rooms where players can talk to each other while handicapping, keeping it social. “derby Wars teaches players how to engage in wagering on racing in a nonintimidating environment,” Midland says of his creation. “They can play in games at different levels for free, and converse with others while playing. It’s a beginner step. Contests are an easier way to engage in handicapping. AdWs are complex, all these different wagers. “When players see that nine other people also picked your horse, you don’t feel like you don’t know what you’re doing,” he said. “There’s camaraderie, and you aren’t overwhelmed by how much there is to know. Betting is 50% handicapping and 50% wagering. Contests are just the handicapping. It’s like fantasy sports, and people are used to playing those games. Now they are looking at races.” derby Wars modifies the prize with the size of the contests, and on weekends participants can win $5,000. They play 800 games a week, different size tracks and fields, offer rewards points and choices, and contestant pools can get in for $1-to-$475 entry fees. Midland has no doubt that it’s brought in new fans, not the same people on a new


SoCIAl MedIA site, and says it definitely skews younger whenever they use Facebook or Twitter. The comfortable nature of derby Wars for new handicappers was an innovation that tracks weren’t trying. “We’re a startup, we have investors, and we want it to succeed. We’re creating jobs, coverage of racing, opportunities for growth. We don’t see that in many places in racing. How many companies are spending tech dollars? They like their AdW, and that’s it. “We have 10 employees and growing, and are supported 100% by advertising. I think we get great support from advertisers because of the younger demographic, and they are growing in the sport and might not have chosen an AdW yet.” Trainer Kenny McPeek’s outlook mirrors Midland’s, but he sees a breakdown in the distribution of races as the major impediment to bringing in new people or to keeping existing fans happy and interested. McPeek felt the same frustration that many racing fans did, that there was no quick, free access to race videos. He asked everyone from organizations to racetracks, and no one saw the need for it, or felt that if they had it, it should be attached to their AdW only. His vision was that it shouldn’t be about the wagering and excluding anyone not signed up for that AdW or satellite television package, but about inclusivity, opening access to everyone, for free. “I wanted to create something positive and creative to help the sport,” he says simply. “We’ve got to do this for the horses. If the economics of racing thrive, then horses do well. We are reconnecting the fan to the horse. We need new ideas and ways to expand the fan base. A rising tide lifts all boats, and this opens it up for everybody.” McPeek is so adamant that distribution of the sport’s product is the key to new fans understanding and following racing that he put up his own money to develop Horse Races NoW with former Microsoft executive Chris Carper in 2013. “The problem is that fans have a difficult time accessing races,” McPeek declared. “even to watch on TV, you have to get a satellite dish and sign up for that package. The sport is never going to grow unless you open it to everyone. This app reaches across all demographics. even kids younger than 14 love this app because it’s easy to use.” despite an enviable training career filled with major wins, one of McPeek’s most satisfying moments came when a small group of 14-year-olds approached him in the paddock at Keeneland last year and in starstruck fashion asked if he was the guy who developed Horse Races NoW. When he said yes, they gushed how much they loved it, how they could follow their favorite horses, and find others who shared their passion, watching the races together virtually. The app can be found on iTunes, Android, or Xbox 360, includes a hugely

In Derby Wars players can handicap horses and interact with other players in chat rooms

popular daily Newsletter, and the ability for users to chat with each other. “If I love American Pharoah, I can get on and chat with other fans of American Pharoah, and discuss his upcoming race, then watch the race together, because you get alerts for when your horse is going in the gate, and when the results come through, too,” McPeek enthuses. “Then you can talk about the race with your fellow fans.” McPeek complements the app with a lively Facebook presence, where more than 11,000 core fans interact, under the direction of marketing director Jessica Peterson, while partner and former wife Sue lustig McPeek handles customer service

Derby Wars teaches players how to engage in wagering on racing in a non-intimidating environment. They can play for free, and converse with others while playing. It’s a beginner step

Mark Midland

for the 280,000-plus users. Sue’s long-term vision is for eventual profits to go toward racing charities like the Thoroughbred Incentive Program, which finds new homes and purposes for retired Thoroughbreds. Horse Races NoW has an AdW license to receive the satellite signals from 62 of the 88 North American tracks, but not all tracks, like those owned by Churchill downs Inc., and the Stronach Group, are on board. When radio first started to broadcast sports, baseball franchises of the 1930s thought people wouldn’t go to the stadium if they could stay home and listen to the games, but the broader, free access to the sport increased the number of fans by reaching out to those who couldn’t make it to the ballpark. In the 1960s when television came knocking, baseball and football eagerly jumped in, but racing was reluctant. With no national governing body, each track succumbed to fears that decades earlier other sports had dispelled. Racing still suffers from this mistake and continues to wallow in marketing ideas that are 30 years behind the times. echoing the lines from Birdman, McPeek argues that social media must drive horseracing into the forefront of young people’s lives to be relevant in other media, or it will not survive. “Horseracing doesn’t exist – we need to be right there in the thick of AppleTV, TV packages, where all sports are. Horse Races NoW gets 10,000 new users a month. ISSUE 36 TRAINERMAGAZINE.COM

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RACING

Trainer Kenny McPeek created the Horse Races NOW app and gets 10,000 new users every month

Compare that to the TdN, or Blood-Horse. That’s how many people want to get their daily news on their phone. Twitter took a year to get to 100,000, but it was funded. “There are 100 football apps, and 50 baseball apps. Why not more horseracing apps? With capital raised, we could take it to the moon. We are a classic startup company, looking to raise capital. We’re multilingual, and already available in 186 countries.” The most successful apps and sites have taken the niche market and made it like a club, turning what could have been a negative into a positive. Many, like WinStar Stablemates and Horse Races Now, provide the starting point where users can get their voices heard on their platform. The long-term viability of racing depends on such change. Midland, the former track executive, lauds the effort. “Horse Races NoW is innovative,” he says. “Kenny McPeek has done a terrific job of creating a fun and useful app. As an industry, the fact that it comes from a trainer, this is why I say the tracks are lacking in innovation. I salute him, and feel that the industry should give him a lot more credit and support than he has received.” While social media attracts and entertains new fans, is it only for novices? Not according to Tat Yakutis, a sales consignor and media expert based in Southern California handling Twitter for 66

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California Chrome and his connections. “The beauty of social media is when there is an important change in schedule or update that is newsworthy, it can be reported quickly via social,” she notes, and found it particularly useful when California Chrome went to dubai. “Horseshow management also uses social media now extensively for this reason. It is a very cost effective way to send updates and images from overseas. It was pretty informal actually, and sometimes that is the beauty of social media on the whole. We primarily use Twitter in situations like this.” Yakutis had to fight off bogus sites that erupted last spring and clear the official Facebook and Twitter accounts with Churchill downs, an indication of the desire of fans to use these platforms to discuss their favorite horses. She has seen a correlation between the growth of social media by del

Social media is connecting fans to the sport on their terms. It is there any time of any day

Tat Yakutis

Mar and Santa Anita and young people attending the races in California. “Social media is connecting fans to the sport on their terms. It is there any time of any day. People check in on their time, never having to rely on some broadcast schedule. It allows consumers to be a part of the story. Just look at what Churchill downs did last May with the integration of Twitter to their big new video board, or what the Today Show does in their orange Room on the daily morning telecast. one can survey a huge populous in minutes and even accumulate images that build upon the experience and archive an event.” A new fan can start by learning about racing through ABR, follow their favorite horse with Horse Racing Nation, move on to derby Wars to learn how to bet, watch races on Horse Races NoW, and join WinStar Stablemates to glimpse the farm life that their favorite horses will enjoy after racing and see how their progeny will continue the cycle, all while sharing information and their experiences on Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter. “Social media is tremendous for fans of racing and handicapping. There are lots of opportunities, especially as tracks have smaller marketing teams,” Midland says, while indicating that he has more ideas coming to fruition this year. Miller agrees. “There is a lot more about to happen in social media that is going to benefit horseracing even more in the future.” n


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NUTRITION

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EQUINE METABOLIC SYNDROME The disease and its relevance to racing

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NUTRITION

Equine metabolic syndrome (EMS) is a disease characterized by three main features, namely obesity, insulin resistance, and a propensity towards laminitis. Nutrition, while not necessarily the root cause, is regularly seen as a common denominator in EMS. WORDS: DR. CATHERINE DUNNETT BSC, PHD, R.NUTR PHOTO: SHUTTERSTOCK

I

NAppROpRIATE nutrition will contribute to all three factors. Calorie excess can soon lead to horses becoming overweight, but the extreme and often prolonged obesity associated with EMS is characterized by significant localized fat pads forming particularly in the tail head and in the crest of the neck. While some horses with EMS are not considered overweight they may still show these critical localized fat pads.

Insulin’s call to action is reduced with insensitivity

With insulin resistance, horses are unable to normally regulate circulating glucose, leading to an elevated level in the blood. The hormone insulin encourages the tissue cells to take up circulating glucose. Sometimes this ‘call to action’ by insulin is slow or ignored and so glucose uptake is reduced. This is known as insulin insensitivity. In this situation, more insulin is initially produced to try to resolve the issue and normalize blood glucose but this can result in an abnormally elevated blood insulin concentration. Certain breeds and type appear to be more at risk of EMS than others and these are typically ponies, particularly native breeds; Warmbloods; Morgan horses; and any other horse commonly regarded as a ‘good doer’ or ‘easy keeper.’ Certainly Thoroughbreds, Arabians, Standardbreds, or Quarter Horses would not be historically regarded as prime candidates for EMS. On the other hand, we are all familiar with the devastation caused by laminitis, which is frequently but not always linked to EMS. Laminitis is a disease that readily crosses breed boundaries. I have often come across Thoroughbred and Arabian broodmares afflicted by laminitis, and the condition has also been a nemesis for many a stallion.

A racehorse in training is an unlikely candidate for EMS

Racehorses in training of whichever breed would rarely be described as obese, nor would they typically exhibit extravagantly cresty necks or fat pads. Elevated blood glucose and/or insulin concentrations would rarely be seen during routine blood screens. In addition, exercise – particularly fast exercise – is regarded as a potent stimulant to improve insulin sensitivity. 70

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So while EMS is a fascinating area of veterinary medicine and represents an intriguing biochemical mystery to resolve, does it have any relevance for horses in training? Intuitively, I would say that horses in full race training are very unlikely to suffer from EMS, however, the relevance for racing might be found much earlier in a racehorse’s life and perhaps even before they were born.

Broodmares in the spotlight

An almost unabated supply of fresh and often lush pasture, as well as abundant concentrate feed, has led many broodmares to become obese. According to some veterinary centers, the severity of laminitis in broodmares can be high. Obesity in broodmares is relatively common and often tolerated, if not seen to cause any direct problems with the resultant foals or during foaling.

An almost unabated supply of fresh and often lush pasture, as well as abundant concentrate feed, has led many broodmares to become obese

The odds are stacked against broodmares in this respect, as is relatively difficult to maintain a largely inactive horse in good but not overweight condition when there is no shortage of grass and concentrate feed is required to sustain the quality protein and micronutrient requirements of the incumbent foal. In addition, the hormonal milieu of pregnancy may increase the chance of EMS and resultant laminitis. Nature very cleverly makes the mother, whether a human, horse or dog, become significantly resistant to insulin during pregnancy, as this facilitates better delivery of glucose to the growing offspring. This is well documented in humans, where sensitivity to insulin may reduce by up to 60%. A proportion of mothers will tip over into what is termed gestational diabetes. In Thoroughbreds, a transient gestational decrease in insulin sensitivity has also been

reported in pregnant verses non-pregnant mares. Certainly, it is suggested that the risk of laminitis, due to the increased metabolic stress of pregnancy, is increased in mares that are insulin-resistant with EMS prior to pregnancy.

What are the issues with EMS?

Clearly one of the major issues with EMS is its close association with laminitis, which can be life threatening. Broodmares with EMS have been suggested to show irregular cycling and be more difficult to get in foal. Recent studies have failed to show a clear link between either obesity or EMS and fertility issues in mares. In contrast, obese women are three times more likely to have difficulty conceiving. It is also known that obese mothers, especially those that tip over into gestational diabetes, can produce large babies, with a heightened risk of placental abruptions, infarctions, and pre-eclampsia. Increased delivery of glucose to the baby at the expense of the mother due to her insulin insensitivity fuels ‘large baby syndrome.’ In addition, the incidence of a slow initiation of lactation and then poor lactation is increased in obese mothers. The relevance of this hormonal mystery for young horses in training is that in the in utero environment, hormonal balance and delivery of nutrients to the growing foal is likely to have far reaching effects on its longterm health and performance. In a study of 191 yearlings and their respective dams, researchers from Australia’s University of Queensland in 2012 reported some interesting findings in relation to skeletal development. They presented data showing that the mares that gave birth to foals that subsequently went on to develop osteochondrotic lesions or other bone abnormalities had a significantly higher circulating blood glucose and greater body condition scores during pregnancy compared to the mares whose foals had no issues as yearlings.

Feeding and management

One of the key factors in warding off laminitis and EMS in broodmares is to ensure that they remain at a sensible body condition throughout pregnancy. Where mares are already severely overweight, slow but steady weight loss needs to be encouraged during the early-to-middle trimester, depending on whether there is a foal at foot. The time-honored combination of energy restriction and increased energy expenditure through gentle exercise is


EMS successful. Restriction of grazing may be needed. Restricting grazing by area, or through the use of a grazing muzzle, is usually more successful than restricting the time at pasture. It is, however, vitally important that protein quality is maintained and vitamin and mineral needs are still met. A more concentrated ‘balancer’ type of feed may need to be employed. Balancer products that are specifically designed for breeding and growth must be used in order to provide a correct balance of nutrients, minerals, and vitamins. For mares who remain obese and are at risk of EMS and/or laminitis, the choice of concentrate feed is vitally important when moving into the latter stages of pregnancy. Look for feeds designed for breeding that have a low non-structural carbohydrate content (NSC), which includes hydrolysable carbohydrate (starch and sugars), as well as fermentable carbohydrate (fructan, pectins, etc.). NCS is typically recommended to be less than 12% for these horses. There are a number of ‘stud’ and ‘youngstock’ feeds that have moved away from cereals as the main energy source to produce what’s termed a ‘low glycemic’ feed. Severely

insulin-resistant animals, or those with an ongoing history of laminitis, should have grass severely restricted or even removed from their diet altogether. Where hay is fed the same rules need to apply, although some loss of sugars can be achieved through soaking hay prior to feeding.

Interesting additives for EMS

There is no doubt that attention to energy intake as well as the source of that energy within the diet is vital in managing a horse with EMS. However, there is also interest in the use of additives, which may have a positive effect on insulin sensitivity. One such additive is resveratrol, a natural compound found in low concentrations in grapes, peanuts, and blueberries. A recent meta-analysis published on humans (in an independent review of published studies) concluded that resveratrol significantly improved glucose control and insulin sensitivity in people with diabetes, although there was no similar effect in non-diabetic individuals. An initial study in broodmares showed no effect on insulin dynamics or other reproductive parameters. However, a more recent study (as yet unpublished) carried

out at the University of Kentucky Maxwell H. Gluck Equine Research Center using the resveratrol-derived product Equithrive Metabarol revealed more positive results. Dr. patrick Lawless of Equithrive described a significant decrease in serum insulin concentration of near to 30% following a glucose challenge test, as well as a reduction in concentration of serum leptin (a hormone that regulates fat storage and drives appetite). There is also a suggestion that omega-3 containing oil from either fish oil, algae, or linseed may have a positive impact on insulin sensitivity, although further work in insulin-resistant horses is required for confirmation. Whilst this is an emerging area of research, the early indications are that although EMS may not be a direct issue within horses in training, it is likely that its impact may be made much earlier in a racehorse’s life, potentially even in utero. Body condition and metabolism in broodmares could be shown to have far reaching consequences for their offspring in later life. However, the wheels of research move slowly, and only time will tell. n

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N winning the Vodacom Durban July, the 28-year-old Zulu became the first black jockey in history to win South Africa’s most famous race. The timing could not have been better. As the 20 runners headed down towards the ten-furlong start, the minds of the 55,000-strong Greyville crowd were far from a last-minute flutter on this prestigious Group 1 contest. When the horses disappeared out of sight, the stands were called to join together in a 67-second silence of tribute to the former President Mandela. However, the silence did not last for long, as spontaneous cheers and applause rang out to acknowledge a series of photos of Mandela, the father of the nation, displayed on the giant screens. Just minutes later, the spirit of Mandela was still felt on the track. Cheering redoubled as Khumalo stormed to victory in the Durban July Handicap aboard the Sean Tarry-trained Heavy Metal. This was the second top-level success of the day for Khumalo in the colors of owner Chris

RACING

“I dedicate this win to Madiba. If it wasn’t for him, I wouldn’t be here.” Almost twenty years after the end of apartheid and as a then-ailing Nelson Mandela – or “Madiba,” as he was respectfully known – lay gravely ill in a Pretoria hospital five months before his death in December of 2013, jockey S’manga Khumalo marked the beginning of a new era for South African racing. WORDS: KATHERINE FORD PHOTOS: LIESL KING, KATHERINE FORD

Van Niekerk, who could be seen wiping away tears as he waited to welcome his winner. “Two wins in a row, on a day that we think of Madiba. And young S’manga Khumalo, a young Zulu man… there’s something in the story that makes me emotional,” admitted Van Niekerk. Van Niekerk is no stranger to big wins in South Africa, and he had lifted the Durban July twelve months earlier with another Sean Tarry trainee, Pomodoro. But it was evident that this moment meant more than an ordinary Group 1 success for both the owner and the sport as a whole. “The

S’manga Khumalo celebrates victory in the Durban July Handicap on Heavy Metal

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demographics of South African racing are still not what they should be. To have guys like him coming through helps the cause immensely.” Sean Tarry agreed. “It’s wonderful, while Madiba is still here, that a first black jockey has won the Durban July. I’m sure that the huge reaction from the crowd had a lot to do with it being S’manga riding him. This could have a massive impact.” Just days later, S’manga Khumalo was on his way to becoming a household name. Instead of jetting off to the beach to relax and celebrate during what could be considered a well-timed suspension just after his major career win, the rider’s diary was chock-full of media engagements. He said, “It’s been great, I’ve had a lot of interviews with newspapers, magazines, and also the TV. I still can’t believe it.” Nicknamed “Bling” for his penchant for flashy jewelry and dyed-blond hair (perhaps as a nod to Tarry’s first-string jockey, Piere Strydom), Khumalo is living the dream. “My idols are Frankie Dettori and Christophe Soumillon,” he said, “but I’ve already been punished here for copying Soumillon’s style and being too flamboyant after a win!” The Khumalo version of Dettori’s flying dismount poses no problem to the authorities, and as with his Italian counterpart, just adds to the appeal of the popular rider. After posing for yet another photo in the Turffontein training stables, Khumalo reflected, “I never thought that all this would be for me, looking back to where I grew up.” Reluctant to dwell on the exact circumstances of his background, it is clear that he was raised closer to the townships than the rich suburbs. His life was turned around by a chance visit during his schooldays. “A gentleman was sent by the South African Jockeys Academy to go to black schools and look for guys that wanted to be jockeys and have the physique to be a jockey. He approached me and I decided to give it a go. I had never seen horses before and I was very nervous. At that time I was very tiny and I just kept myself as far away from the horses as I could…” Based in the Summervelt training center just outside Durban, the South African Jockeys Academy is renowned as one of the world’s most successful producers of jockeys. Khumalo soon found his feet and an affinity with the Thoroughbreds, although he remembers that it was not easy to make his mark. “During my apprenticeship, there


SOUTH AFRICAN JOCKEYS ACADEMY

The crowd at Greyville joined together for a 67-second silence in tribute to former South African President ‘Madiba’ Nelson Mandela

were others with a horse background; their fathers or uncles who were trainers, or jockeys. They didn’t get it as hard as we did. They were already riding races while we were still learning.” He shrugged, “Looking at it now, I think I’ve achieved more than them by being a hard worker. They knew more, but I wanted to learn more. It was hard because they had big, well-known surnames, but hard work and dedication has paid off.” Now that Khumalo achieved his first ambition, his next goal is to become the first black champion jockey in South Africa. He may well receive support from across the industry in realizing this objective, as all sectors are conscious of the boost a highprofile black jockey could give the sport. Indeed, top trainer Mike de Kock dedicated a 2013 blog post to the rider, titling it “S’manga’s Time Has Come” and pledging support in Khumalo’s bid to lift a National Jockeys’ Title. No part of the racing community will be keener to see Khumalo succeed than the stable staff. It is extremely rare to see a white stable worker in South Africa, and those who ensure the day-to-day care and exercise of the equine athletes regard Khumalo as an inspiration. Even though the South African Jockeys Academy makes a conscious effort to recruit as many black and colored youngsters as possible, it took until 2013 for a member of the underprivileged black community to hit the racing headlines. In the background, one man has been

fighting with quiet determination for the empowerment of stable staff since the late 1990s. James Maree’s Thoroughbred Racing Development Centre is a unique establishment in the racing world. Launched in August 1999, its purpose is to improve the skills of stable workers, with the ultimate goal of participating in reserved work riders’ races and maybe even becoming professional jockeys. Maree, a professional trainer in the Highveld region just outside Johannesburg, shouted out instructions to his riders: “Relax! You’re there to help him!” The cry applied perfectly to the mission of Maree, who explained the background of his initiative. “Horses were becoming very

My idols are Frankie Dettori and Christophe Soumillon, but I’ve already been punished here for copying Soumillon’s style and being too flamboyant after a win!

S’manga Khumalo

expensive and it was sad to see some of the grooms riding the way they were, sitting in the wrong place, etc. I felt that if we were paying huge sums for a horse, we needed to improve their skills in general.” Initially Maree did not meet with overwhelming enthusiasm from the establishment. “It was a battle in the beginning. I had a lot of reluctance from a lot of people… I was told by quite a prominent bloke, ‘A black can’t ride a horse!’ but anyhow that’s been proved wrong and it just shows if you really want to do something and you’re passionate about it, you can get there.” Passion and resolve won the day and James Maree’s private training center now doubles as a racing school for the underprivileged, fully supported by Phumelela (racing operator and tote betting organization), the Racing Trust, Racing Association, and National Horseracing Authority. The course exists in two parts: the first is a three-month “Work Rider Course,” consisting of basic horsemanship plus basic and advanced work riding. Completion of all three stages allows riders to don their silks and line up on the racecourse proper, but only to race on a straight track. Maree is a great advocate of a quiet and relaxed riding style and gives practical advice unlikely to be heard in riding schools elsewhere in the world. “It’s so important to put your weight in the right place. It’s the same as when you put a bucket of water on your head – put it in the middle, then you can carry it!” ISSUE 36 TRAINERMAGAZINE.COM

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Above and opposite: James Maree with students at his Thoroughbred Racing Development Centre

The South African Jockeys Academy visit schools in search of potential jockeys of the future

The “Advanced Race Riding Course” involves technical race tactics, and riders are monitored by representatives of the Jockey Club of South Africa and Maree himself before being judged competent to race around a turn. Sessions take place twice a week, and upon the suggestion and agreement of their employers, stable staff are shipped in on minibuses from the training centers of Turffontein and the Vaal once they have 76

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finished their morning duties. Behind the relaxed atmosphere, a quiet determination reigns as the thirty or so riders listen intently to Maree and his assistant, jockey Marthinius Mienie. They are aware that completing the two courses can be a life-changing achievement, as in South Africa future jockeys must pass through the stringent five-year apprentice course proposed by the South African Jockeys Academy in order to obtain a license.

The Thoroughbred Racing Development Centre offers a second chance for these workers to show their prowess on the track with a schedule of four reserved races per month, plus three entire race days for work riders. Patrick Davis, racing executive for Phumelela, explained, “They compete as fully-fledged jockeys in these races, earning on the same basis as apprentice jockeys (riding fee of approx $50, plus 6% of winning stakes). In the ten years plus that these races have been happening, we have had very few accidents and the stipendiary stewards comment that their race riding has improved beyond recognition in recent years. But it’s not just about riding; the program also includes a life skills course to try and give these guys a lift up in life.” The top earner in the 2012/2013 work rider standings was Francis Semela, who with thirteen successes from 57 rides during the season will have pocketed 52,000 Rand ($5,150) plus the equivalent of a further $2,500 in riding fees. This figure exceeds the average annual income for a black household (2012 figures), whose earnings are still six times less than whites, nineteen years after the end of apartheid. As Maree pointed out, “One successful work rider might support fifty other people. The spin-off to the rest of their community, family, and friends is just great.” One of the handful of work riders to make the transition to the professional ranks is Louis Nhlapo. The winner of over 200 races, Nhlapo remembers with gratitude the chance that was offered to him. “I was a farrier and Mr. Maree got me an opportunity as a work rider through his school. As long as you listen, and respect people, that is when you have a


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RACING chance to become a professional jockey. He taught me from scratch to be something.” The next generation is hard at work at the Eikenhof stable. Each one rides a retired racehorse in a fast piece of work up the sand track, under the watchful eye of Maree and Mienie and their video camera. At the end of the morning, a detailed debrief is given in an improvised classroom adorned with photos of Maree’s career as a champion jockey and training successes of the stable. “Mr. James” – as some of the students call Maree – “is an expert,” said Siyabonga Duma, who in the summer of 2013 still attended the training school after about a dozen rides in public. “He was one of the best back in the day, and every day here you learn something new. Riding in work riders’ races helps to earn some pocket money but I’m actually on a mission to become a top jockey. It gives us enthusiasm to see that if S’manga Khumalo can do it, we can succeed too.” Another aspiring jockey, Sandiso Jelwana, was working in James Maree’s yard while completing the Basic riding course. “When I was still very young it was my dream to become a jockey one day. I didn’t know anything about horses, or where to go. They told me to go to Mr. Maree, that he is the one who is going to give me information and an opportunity to be successful in life. He is very strict. When he says you must do something, you must do it each and every time, but he’s a good trainer. I haven’t passed the course yet but I can see where I am going now for the future.” Times have changed in the Rainbow Nation since the Mandela era. As ever, horseracing has not been at the forefront of change, but with S’manga Khumalo leading the way and a host of dedicated workers behind, the sport could finally be on its way to becoming a rainbow sport. n

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ISSUE 36 TRAINERMAGAZINE.COM

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WoRK RIDERs the winning home team

A

s south Africa’s James Maree from the Work Riders Development Programme put it, “I know and all trainers know that if you get to the track in the morning and you haven’t got a decent work rider, you may as well go home. Without that, you just can’t do anything.” trainers rely on their morning pilots to follow instructions, as weeks of preparation can be wasted if a strategic gallop does not go to plan. this applies both in the short term before a race engagement or in the long term, notably for a difficult horse whose career can be made or broken depending upon the skills of his morning partner. French handler Freddy head is well placed to analyze the situation. As a former top jockey, he rode plenty of champions on the gallops before hanging up his boots to 80

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Trainers around the world have widely varying ideas on training methods, feeding regimes, and riding tactics, and these opinions can even differ between neighboring professionals using the same facilities. But one thing that handlers will unanimously agree upon is the vital importance of a competent team of work riders. WORDS: KATHERINE FORD PHOTOS: cAROLINE NORRIS, APRH, HORSEPHOTOS, MARK ROSE

become a leading trainer, famously of 14time Group/Grade 1 winner Goldikova and of another high-class filly in Moonlight Cloud, the winner of six Group 1s. For head, a sensitive rider is a must. “they must have good hands to be kind to the horse’s mouth. the opposite, a brutal rider, can destroy a horse and his racing career. Most of my team have been with me

for a long time, although there are always some changeovers and more and more girls. My team is now around 50% feminine and in general I notice that the girls are more gentle riders and are more attached to the horses. they ride very well and I am sure that one day soon we will see a champion lady jockey.” head explained that he rarely calls on jockeys to gallop his horses in training,


WoRK RIDERs

More than 50 per cent of Freddy Head’s work riders are female as he believes they are gentler and become more attached to the horses

preferring to rely upon his regular team who are familiar with his working methods. however, many of the staff have racing experience. “A lot of my work riders are former jockeys, who have retired from race riding or after a short career. they are lightweight and experienced and ride most of the fast work for me.” A second career as a work rider is a logical one for many former jockeys as it allows them to remain connected with the racing game and maintain that all-important contact with thoroughbreds without the demands of setting up as a trainer. Former top-level jump jockey Dean Gallagher retired from the saddle aged 40 in 2009 and is now an important member of the Ballydoyle team. the Irishman was seen putting future Breeders’ Cup Classic third Declaration of War through his paces at santa Anita in 2013, and Gallagher relishes his hands-on role. Ex-jockeys have the advantage of raceriding experience, and once they adapt to the requirements of training rather than a win-at-all-costs approach, their value is evident for trainers. Newcomers to racing in Europe have often graduated from the racing schools such as the AFAsEC (Association de Formation et d’Action sociale des Ecuries de Courses) in France, the British Racing school (BRs) or Northern Racing College in the uK, and RACE (Racing Academy and Centre of Education) in Ireland. Many youngsters will have enrolled at such schools with the dream of becoming a jockey but didn’t make the grade following their training and apprenticeship; but at least they have a grounding in horsemanship and riding, which stands them in good stead as

exercise riders. since 2007, Newmarket’s British Racing school has even offered two specific “Riding Work Courses” with the aim of improving work riding skills. the objective of the first course is to introduce stable staff to the particularities of riding fast work, and the second gives advanced coaching to more experienced riders and advises them on giving allimportant feedback to trainers. the BRs also proposes a made-tomeasure service, sending its coach to a trainer’s stable. James Given is full of praise for this initiative, saying, “I’ve always felt that if you took your best member of staff and cloned them, your horses would be prepared better and you would therefore train more winners, attract more owners, and be able to earn more through training fees. “that’s the reason why sir Michael stoute employs some of the best riders in Newmarket. however, if you can’t

I’ve always felt that if you took your best member of staff and cloned them, your horses would be prepared better and you would therefore train more winners James Given

get involved in ‘buying’ you have to do something else – you have to train your staff.” It is no coincidence that many of Freddy head’s remarks are shared by hall of Fame trainer shug McGaughey, who said, “It’s very important for my stable to have good work riders, and above all, riders I am familiar with. ” Interviewed prior to the 2013 Breeders’ Cup turf, in which he saddled second favorite Point of Entry, McGaughey said, “the rider I have here [on Point of Entry] has been with me since 1983, and none of my riders has worked for me for less than five years. We think the same way and I know their riding styles.” horsemanship is imperative for McGaughey’s staff, and he explained, “A lot of the girls who work for me know horses as they have come through the showing or equestrian circuits, while most of the boys wanted to be jockeys and haven’t made it for various reasons.” A recurrent problem throughout the racing world is a shortage of competent stable personnel, and notably work riders. In Europe trainers employ more and more staff from Eastern Europe and Asia, with all the immigration regulations and difficulties this entails, while in the u.s., Central and Latin America provide a huge source of stable workers and indeed a good proportion of the continent’s jockeys. Alan Balch of the California horseracing Board said, “We don’t have a problem with finding stable staff in California as there are so many Central and south Americans looking for work. But each role is defined and you’re unlikely to find an exercise rider taking a turn at hotwalking or vice versa.” California-based Frenchman Leonard ISSUE 36 TRAINERMAGAZINE.COM

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Breeders’ Cup Marathon winner, Calidoscopio, is ridden bareback during exercise

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Powell, who has enjoyed a successful season from hollywood Park in 2013, concurred. “I have three categories of staff: grooms who take care of the horses and their stables; hotwalkers; and finally, exercise riders. I’ve adapted to the American system and all my riders carry walkie-talkies so I can tell them the time of the first part of a gallop and they can adapt their speed if necessary.” Across the u.s., exercise riders are required to hold a license issued by the horseracing board in whichever state they’re working. In California, an annual physical examination, as requested by the Jockey and Driver Welfare Committee, was introduced for all work riders in 2013. there are no such regulations in south America. At the 2012 Breeders’ Cup, future Marathon hero Calidoscopio was the focus of much amused attention during the buildup to the race as he was ridden bareback in all but his serious gallops. this is the norm in his native Argentina, as leading trainer Juan Carlos Etchechoury said. “this is our traditional way of training and a matter of organization and also of relaxation for the horse. When they have a saddle on their back, they know that it is for a gallop or a race and they become nervous. Without saddles, they remain calm.” south America, and notably Argentina and uruguay, are known for their gaucho culture, and there is little formal training of any kind for jockeys or stable staff except for a makeshift jockeys’ school at san Isidro, where apprentices are coached during the afternoons. Alfredo Gaitán Dassié, who scored a rare hat-trick at the Group 1 “Estrellas” meeting – similar to the Breeders’ Cup – in san Isidro in 2013, said, “Most of my work riders were jockeys in the past. others work in my yard but they need a lot of experience to be good. the job of jockey and work rider is very different, and a good jockey is not always a good rider for the morning.” It appears that trainers around the world are faced with the same difficulties and rewards concerning exercise riders. A team of reliable and talented riders can make the difference between success and failure for a stable and they deserve all the recognition they receive, and often more. n


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STAKES SCHEDULES

RACES

STAKES SCHEDULES COPYRIGHT

Races are divided by distance and the relevant surface is indicated as follows: AWT - All Weather Track D - Dirt T - Turf The indexes cover all graded races in North America over $50,000 in value, where information was available at the time of publication. Races highlighted in purple indicate the race is a Breeders’ Cup win and you’re in race. Stakes Schedules are now updated monthly – visit trainermagazine.com

Under Copyright law, no part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means. This includes but is not limited to: photocopying for commercial redistribution and or facsimile recording without the prior permission of the copyright holder, application for which should be addressed to the publisher.

DISCLAIMER

Whilst every effort has been made to publish correct information, the publishers will not be held liable for any omission, mistake or change to the races listed in all published indexes.

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Track Charles Town Mountaineer Charles Town Charles Town Charles Town

Race Name & (Sponsor) Fancy Buckles St West Virginia Legislature Chairman’s Cup Henry Mercer Memorial Rachel’s Turn St Its Only Money S

Breeders’ Cup

Class S S S

Race Date 23-May-2015 1-Aug-2015 19-Sep-2015 19-Sep-2015 19-Sep-2015

Value $50,000 $100,000 $50,000 $50,000 $50,000

4.5f (900m) Age 3+ FM 3+ 2 2F 3+

Surface D D D D D

Metres 900 900 900 900 900

Furlongs 4.5 4.5 4.5 4.5 4.5

Stakes Schedules updated online monthly USA USA USA USA USA USA USA USA USA GB USA CAN CAN USA USA USA USA CAN JPN USA USA GB FR

Evangeline Downs Churchill Downs Evangeline Downs Pimlico Pimlico Canterbury Evangeline Downs Penn National Golden Gate Fields Royal Ascot Ruidoso Downs Woodbine Woodbine Gulfstream Park Lone Star Park Lone Star Park Indiana Downs Fort Erie Niigata Monmouth Park Monmouth Park York Longchamp

Tellike St Twin Spires Turf Sprint St Need for Speed St Jim McKay Turf Sprint The Very One St Honor the Hero St Turf Sprint Pennsylvania Governor’s Cup Albany St King’s Stand St Mountain Top Futurity Victoria S My Dear S Bob Umphrey Turf Sprint H’cap TTA Sales Futurity - C&G Div TTA Sales Futurity - Filly Div Brandywine S Rainbow Connection S Ibis Summer Dash Tyro St Colleen St Nunthorpe St (Coolmore) Prix de l’Abbaye de Longchamp (Qatar)

Gr 3 S

Gp 1 S

R R S Gr 3

Turf Sprint

Gp 1 Gp 1

1-May-2015 1-May-2015 2-May-2015 15-May-2015 16-May-2015 25-May-2015 30-May-2015 30-May-2015 13-Jun-2015 16-Jun-2015 20-Jun-2015 20-Jun-2015 28-Jun-2015 5-Jul-2015 11-Jul-2015 11-Jul-2015 17-Jul-2015 28-Jul-2015 2-Aug-2015 9-Aug-2015 16-Aug-2015 21-Aug-2015 4-Oct-2015

$60,000 $150,000 $60,000 $100,000 $100,000 $75,000 $300,000 $150,000 $50,000 £375,000 $175,000 CAN125,000+ CAN125,000+ $75,000 $100,000 $100,000 $65,000 CAN 75,000 $685,000 $60,000 $60,000 £250,000 ˆ 350,000

5f (1000m) 3+ FM 3+ 3+ 3+ 3+ FM 3+ 3+ 3+ 3+ 3+ 2 2 2F 3+ 2 CG 2F 3+ FM 3+ F&M 3+ 2 2F 2+ 2+

T T T T T T T T T T D AWT AWT T D D D T T D T T T

1000 1000 1000 1000 1000 1000 1000 1000 1000 1000 1000 1000 1000 1000 1000 1000 1000 1000 1000 1000 1000 1000 1000

5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5

Check out Stakes Schedules online - trainermagazine.com/schedules USA USA USA USA USA USA USA USA USA USA USA USA USA USA CAN USA USA USA USA CAN USA USA USA USA USA USA USA USA USA USA USA USA USA USA

Albuquerque Albuquerque Belmont Park Belmont Park Monmouth Park Monmouth Park Presque Isle Downs Presque Isle Downs Arapahoe Park Evangeline Downs Evangeline Downs Prairie Meadows Gulfstream Park Gulfstream Park Woodbine Evangeline Downs Evangeline Downs Arapahoe Park Belterra Park Woodbine Monmouth Park Prairie Meadows Prairie Meadows Thistledown Ruidoso Downs Arapahoe Park Arapahoe Park Ruidoso Downs Saratoga Arapahoe Park Arapahoe Park Saratoga Saratoga Saratoga

84

Casey Darnell Pony Express Duke City Sprint Astoria Tremont Crank It Up St John McSorley St Satin & Lace S Karl Boyes Mem S CTBA Derby Louisiana Legends Ladies Sprint Louisiana Legends Sprint - La Bred Iowa Stallion Futurity Birdonthewire St Cassidy St Clarendon S D.S. Shine Young Memorial Futurity - La Bred D.S. Shine Young Memorial Futurity - La Bred Colorado Derby Hoover St Shady Well S Klassy Briefcase St Prairie Gold Juvenile Prairie Gold Lassie Miss Ohio St Rio Grande Senorita Futurity Columbine S Mount Elbert S Rio Grande Senor Futurity Lucky Coin Silver Cup Futurity Colts and Geldings Division Silver Cup Futurity Filly Division Caress Coronation Cup Quick Call

TRAINERMAGAZINE.COM ISSUE 36

S S R

S S S

S

S S

S

9-May-2015 16-May-2015 4-Jun-2015 5-Jun-2015 6-Jun-2015 7-Jun-2015 14-Jun-2015 15-Jun-2015 27-Jun-2015 4-Jul-2015 4-Jul-2015 5-Jul-2015 5-Jul-2015 5-Jul-2015 5-Jul-2015 11-Jul-2015 11-Jul-2015 12-Jul-2015 12-Jul-2015 12-Jul-2015 12-Jul-2015 18-Jul-2015 18-Jul-2015 25-Jul-2015 25-Jul-2015 26-Jul-2015 26-Jul-2015 26-Jul-2015 27-Jul-2015 1-Aug-2015 1-Aug-2015 2-Aug-2015 3-Aug-2015 6-Aug-2015

$60,000 $55,000 $250,000 $250,000 $60,000 $60,000 $100,000 $100,000 $40,000 $100,000 $100,000 $60,000 $75,000 $75,000 CAN150,000 $100,000 $100,000 $40,000 $75,000 CAN150,000 $60,000 $75,000 $75,000 $75,000 $175,000 $40,000 $40,000 $175,000 $100,000 $35,000 $35,000 $100,000 $100,000 $100,000

Closing 13-May-2015 20-Jul-2015 9-Sep-2015 9-Sep-2015 9-Sep-2015

3+ 3 2F 2 3F 3+ 3+ F&M 3+ 3 3 + FM 3+ 2 2 2F 2 2F 2 CG 3 2 2F 3+ FM 2 2F 2 F (OH Bred) 2F 3+FM 3+ 2 4+ 2 C&G 2F 4 + FM 3F 3

18-Apr-2015 8-Apr-2015 18-Apr-2015 5-May-2015 5-May-2015 17-May-2015 9-May-2015 20-May-2015 4-Jun-2015 21-Apr-2015 1-Feb-2015 3-Jun-2015 10-Jun-2015 21-Jun-2015 1-May-2015 1-May-2015 24-Jun-2015 9-Jul-2015 23-Jun-2015 31-Jul-2015 7-Aug-2015 23-Jun-2015 26-Aug-2015

5.5f (1100m) D D D D T T AWT AWT T D D D D D AWT D D T T AWT T D D D D T T D T T T T T T

1100 1100 1100 1100 1100 1100 1100 1100 1100 1100 1100 1100 1100 1100 1100 1100 1100 1100 1100 1100 1100 1100 1100 1100 1100 1100 1100 1100 1100 1100 1100 1100 1100 1100

5.5 5.5 5.5 5.5 5.5 5.5 5.5 5.5 5.5 5.5 5.5 5.5 5.5 5.5 5.5 5.5 5.5 5.5 5.5 5.5 5.5 5.5 5.5 5.5 5.5 5.5 5.5 5.5 5.5 5.5 5.5 5.5 5.5 5.5

25-Apr-2015 6-May-2015 23-May-2015 23-May-2015 29-May-2015 29-May-2015 3-Jun-2015 3-Jun-2015 13-Jun-2015 13-Jun-2015 21/06/2015 21-Jun-2015 17-Jun-2015 20-Jun-2015 20-Jun-2015 2-Jul-2015 24-Jun-2015 3-Jul-2015 10-Jul-2015 10-Jul-2015 1-Feb-2015

1-Feb-2015 11-Jul-2015

18-Jul-2015 18-Jul-2015 25-Jul-2015


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Track Monmouth Park Arapahoe Park Saratoga Saratoga Saratoga Keeneland

Race Name & (Sponsor) My Frenchman St Spicy S Schenectady Troy St Smart N Fancy BC Turf Sprint

Breeders’ Cup

Class

Gr 1

Race Date 8-Aug-2015 15-Aug-2015 21-Aug-2015 22-Aug-2015 30-Aug-2015 31-Oct-2015

Value $60,000 $40,000 $100,000 $100,000 $100,000 $1,000,000

5.5f (1100m) Age 3+ 3 + FM 2 3+ 3 + FM 3+

Surface T T T T T T

Metres 1100 1100 1100 1100 1100 1100

Furlongs 5.5 5.5 5.5 5.5 5.5 5.5

Call us on 1 888 659 2935 to subscribe from $20 USA USA USA USA USA USA USA USA USA USA USA CAN USA USA USA USA USA USA CAN USA USA USA CAN CAN USA CAN CAN USA USA USA USA USA USA USA USA USA USA USA USA USA USA USA USA USA USA USA USA USA USA CAN USA USA USA GB GB USA JPN USA USA USA USA USA USA CAN USA USA CAN JPN USA USA GB USA USA USA USA

Prairie Meadows Belmont Park Belmont Park Belterra Park Thistledown Belmont Park Prairie Meadows Prairie Meadows Albuquerque Albuquerque Monmouth Park Woodbine Emerald Downs Belmont Park Canterbury Pimlico Pimlico Pimlico Northlands Park Canterbury Thistledown Pimlico Northlands Park Woodbine Presque Isle Downs Northlands Park Northlands Park Prairie Meadows Arapahoe Park Prairie Meadows Arapahoe Park Arapahoe Park Churchill Downs Prairie Meadows Prairie Meadows Finger Lakes Monmouth Park Churchill Downs Monmouth Park Belmont Park Belmont Park Finger Lakes Belmont Park Thistledown Indiana Downs Indiana Downs Penn National Arapahoe Park Penn National Woodbine Arapahoe Park Monmouth Park Indiana Downs Royal Ascot Royal Ascot Monmouth Park Hakodate Prairie Meadows Churchill Downs Monmouth Park Belmont Park Canterbury Canterbury Woodbine Gulfstream Park Gulfstream Park Woodbine Hanshin Lone Star Park Arapahoe Park Newmarket Arapahoe Park Indiana Downs Belmont Park Emerald Downs

Golden Circle Gold Fever License Fee Babst/Palacios Memorial H’cap Dr TF Classen Memorial St Affirmed Success Mamie Eisenhower John Wayne Albuquerque Journal S Bank of Albuquerque S Decathlon St New Providence S Hastings H’cap Diablo S 10,000 Lakes St Adena Stallions’ Miss Preakness St Skipat St The Maryland Sprint Handicap Wild Rose Lady Slipper St Michael F Rowland Memorial H’cap Chick Lang St The Journal Ballade St Tom Ridge S Chariot Chaser The Western Canada Prairie Rose Inaugural S Ed Skinner Memorial Arapahoe Park Sprint Ingrid Knotts S Winning Colors St Bob Bryant Gray’s Lake Susan B Anthony H’cap John J Reilly H’cap Aristides St Open Mind H’cap Jersey Girl True North S George W Barker H’cap Jaipur Invitational Angenora St Swiftly Sired Fillies S Sagamore Sired S Danzig S Aspen S New Start Bold Ruckus S Molly Brown S LC William Henry Harrison Commonwealth Cup Diamond Jubilee St Red Cross St Hakodate Sprint St Iowa Sprint H’cap Bashford Manor St The Mr Prospector St Dancin Renee Victor Myers St Frances Genter Achievement S Smile Sprint H’cap Princess Rooney H’cap Highlander S CBC Sho Valor Farms St CTBA Lassie July Cup (Darley) CTBA Futurity Shelby County S Rockville Centre Emerald Express

S S S S S S R

Gr 3

S

R

Gr 3 S S S Gr 3

Gr 2 S Gr 3 S

R

R

R Gp 1 Gp 1 Gr 3 Gr 3

Sprint F&M Sprint

S Gr 2 Gr 2 Gr 2 Gr 3 S Gp 1 R

1-May-2015 1-May-2015 1-May-2015 2-May-2015 2-May-2015 3-May-2015 9-May-2015 9-May-2015 9-May-2015 9-May-2015 9-May-2015 10-May-2015 10-May-2015 10-May-2015 15-May-2015 15-May-2015 15-May-2015 16-May-2015 16-May-2015 16-May-2015 16-May-2015 16-May-2015 18-May-2015 18-May-2015 18-May-2015 22-May-2015 23-May-2015 23-May-2015 23-May-2015 23-May-2015 24-May-2015 25-May-2015 25-May-2015 29-May-2015 29-May-2015 29-May-2015 30-May-2015 30-May-2015 31-May-2015 5-Jun-2015 5-Jun-2015 5-Jun-2015 6-Jun-2015 6-Jun-2015 10-Jun-2015 10-Jun-2015 13-Jun-2015 13-Jun-2015 13-Jun-2015 13-Jun-2015 14-Jun-2015 14-Jun-2015 16-Jun-2015 19-Jun-2015 20-Jun-2015 20-Jun-2015 21-Jun-2015 26-Jun-2015 27-Jun-2015 28-Jun-2015 28-Jun-2015 4-Jul-2015 4-Jul-2015 4-Jul-2015 5-Jul-2015 5-Jul-2015 5-Jul-2015 5-Jul-2015 11-Jul-2015 11-Jul-2015 11-Jul-2015 12-Jul-2015 18-Jul-2015 18-Jul-2015 19-Jul-2015

Closing 31-Jul-2015 8-Aug-2015 8-Aug-2015 15-Aug-2015 19-Oct-2015

6f (1200m)

$75,000 3 $100,000 3 $100,000 4 + FM $75,000 3+ (OH Reg) $75,000 3+ FM (OH Bred) $100,000 4+ $70,000 4+ F&M (IA Bred) $70,000 4+ C&G (IA Bred) $60,000 3 $60,000 3F $75,000 3+ 3+ CAN125,000 $50,000 3+ FM $100,000 4+ $60,000 3+ C&G $150,000 3F $100,000 3+ FM $150,000 3+ CAN50,000 3+ F&M $60,000 3+F&M $75,000 3+ (OH Bred) $100,000 3 CAN50,000 3+ CAN125,000 3+ F&M $100,000 3 CAN50,000 3F CAN50,000 3 $45,000 3+ F&M $40,000 3 $75,000 3+ $40,000 3+ $40,000 3+FM $100,000 3+ FM $60,000 3 F (IA Bred) $60,000 3 C&G (IA Bred) $50,000 3+ FM $60,000 3+ (NJ Bred) $100,000 3+ $60,000 3+ FM (NJ Bred) $150,000 3F $250,000 4+ $50,000 3+ $300,000 4+ $75,000 3+ FM (OH Bred) $85,000 3F $85,000 3 $75,000 3 $40,000 3+ $75,000 3 F (PA Bred) CAN125,000 3 $40,000 3+FM $75,000 3 $85,000 3+ £385,000 3 £525,000 4+ $100,000 3+ FM $685,000 3+ $125,000 3+ $100,000 2 $75,000 3+ $100,000 3+ FM $60,000 3 + CG $60,000 3 F (Min Bred) CAN150,000 3 $250,000 3+ $250,000 3+ FM CAN200,000+ 3+ $685,000 3+ $50,000 3+ FM (TX Bred) $40,000 2F £500,000 3+ $40,000 2 $85,000 3+ F&M $125,000 2 NY Bred $50,000 2 C&G

D D T D D D D D D D D AWT D D D D D D D D D D D AWT AWT D D D T T T T D D D D D D D D D D T D D D D T T T T D D T T D T D D D D D D AWT D D T T D T T T D D D

1200 1200 1200 1200 1200 1200 1200 1200 1200 1200 1200 1200 1200 1200 1200 1200 1200 1200 1200 1200 1200 1200 1200 1200 1200 1200 1200 1200 1200 1200 1200 1200 1200 1200 1200 1200 1200 1200 1200 1200 1200 1200 1200 1200 1200 1200 1200 1200 1200 1200 1200 1200 1200 1200 1200 1200 1200 1200 1200 1200 1200 1200 1200 1200 1200 1200 1200 1200 1200 1200 1200 1200 1200 1200 1200

6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6

ISSUE 36 TRAINERMAGAZINE.COM

18-Apr-2015 18-Apr-2015 18-Apr-2015 22-Apr-2015 18-Apr-2015 1-May-2015 1-May-2015 25-Apr-2015 25-Apr-2015 1-May-2015 22-Apr-2015 25-Apr-2015 8-May-2015 5-May-2015 5-May-2015 5-May-2015 9-May-2015 5-May-2015 29-Apr-2015 6-May-2015

15-May-2015 15-May-2015

9-May-2015 1-Mar-2015 1-Mar-2015 22-May-2015 16-May-2015 22-May-2015 23-May-2015 23-May-2015 CLOSED 27-May-2015 27-May-2015 4-Jun-2015 4-Jun-2015 27-May-2015 5-Jun-2015 1-Jul-2015 20-Apr-2015 20-Apr-2015 12-Jun-2015 12-May-2015 13-Jun-2015 13-Jun-2015 20-Jun-2015 13-Jun-2015 19-Jun-2015 19-Jun-2015 17-Jun-2015 21-Jun-2015 21-Jun-2015 17-Jun-2015 26-May-2015 2-Jul-2015 5-Jul-2015

4-Jul-2015

85


STAKES SCHEDULES Stakes Schedules updated online monthly Country USA USA CAN USA CAN USA CAN USA CAN JPN USA USA USA USA USA USA USA USA USA USA USA USA USA CAN USA USA USA USA USA USA USA USA USA IRE CAN USA CAN USA USA USA CAN USA USA FR JPN USA USA USA JPN CAN GB USA USA USA USA USA USA JPN USA USA USA USA USA USA JPN USA USA USA USA USA GB GB USA USA USA CAN USA USA USA USA USA USA USA

Track Belmont Park Monmouth Park Northlands Park Monmouth Park Northlands Park Saratoga Woodbine Del Mar Woodbine Hakodate Emerald Downs Saratoga Finger Lakes Saratoga Arlington Park Arlington Park Mountaineer Mountaineer Mountaineer Mountaineer Saratoga Monmouth Park Monmouth Park Woodbine Louisiana Downs Louisiana Downs Thistledown Gulfstream Park Gulfstream Park Prairie Meadows Prairie Meadows Louisiana Downs Louisiana Downs Curragh Woodbine Finger Lakes Woodbine Thistledown Monmouth Park Arapahoe Park Hastings Racecourse Finger Lakes Saratoga Deauville Kokura Evangeline Downs Belterra Park Evangeline Downs Sapporo Woodbine Haydock Park Saratoga Presque Isle Downs Canterbury Canterbury Canterbury Canterbury Kokura Belterra Park Canterbury Monmouth Park Monmouth Park Emerald Downs Emerald Downs Hanshin Finger Lakes Finger Lakes Thistledown Presque Isle Belmont Park Newmarket Newmarket Monmouth Park Emerald Downs Albuquerque Woodbine Indiana Downs Indiana Downs Indiana Downs Indiana Downs Indiana Downs Keeneland Finger Lakes

86

Race Name & (Sponsor) Lynbrook Miss Woodford St Princess Margaret Jersey Shore St Edmonton Juv Sanford St Colin S Bing Crosby S Royal North S Hakodate Nisai St Angie C St Honorable Miss H’cap Arctic Queen H’cap Amsterdam St Isaac Murphy St Addison Cammack The Senator Robert C Byrd Memorial St Mountaineer Juvenile Fillies St Mountaineer Juvenile St West Virginia Secretary of State St Alfred G Vanderbilt H’cap Regret St Teddy Drone St Nandi S Louisiana Cup Filly and Mare Sprint Louisiana Cup Sprint Cleveland Kindergarten St Florida Stallion St - Desert Vixen Division Florida Stallion St - Dr. Fager Division Iowa Cradle S Iowa Sorority Louisiana Cup Juvenile Louisiana Cup Juvenile Fillies Phoenix Sprint St (Keeneland) Ontario Debutante S Niagara St Vandal S Honey Jay St Blue Sparkler St Gold Rush Futurity New Westminster (AlwS) Ontario County St Tale of the Cat Prix Morny (Darley) Kitakyushu Kinen Evangeline Downs Starlet Tah Dah St Evangeline Downs Star Keeneland Cup Kenora S Sprint Cup (Betfred) Prioress The Mark Mcdermott St MN Distaff Sprint Championship MN Sprint Championship Northern Lights Debutante St Northern Lights Futurity St Kokura Nisai St Loyalty St Shakopee Juvenile Stakes New Jersey Breeders H Eleven North H’cap Northwest Farms St Captain Condo St Centaur St Aspirant St Lady Fingers St Scarlet & Gray H’cap Mrs Henry D. Paxson mem St Vosburgh Invitational Cheveley Park St Middle Park St Jersey Juvenile NWSS Cahill Road Stakes Camino Real Futurity Bull Page S Merrillville S Brickyard S The Crown Ambassador S City of Anderson S Hillsdale S Stoll Keenon Ogden Phoenix Leon Reed Memorial H’cap

TRAINERMAGAZINE.COM ISSUE 36

Breeders’ Cup

Class

Gr 3 Gr 3 Sprint

Gr 1 Gr 3 Gr 3 R Gr 2 S Gr 2 S S

Gr 1

R S S S R R S S S S Gp 1 S S S

S Gp 1 Gr 3 R

Gr 3 R Gp 1 Gr 1 S S S S S Gr 3

Sprint

Sprint

Gr 2 S S S R Gr 1 Gp 1 Gp 1 S

R S S S S S Gr 3 S

Race Date 19-Jul-2015 19-Jul-2015 24-Jul-2015 25-Jul-2015 25-Jul-2015 25-Jul-2015 25-Jul-2015 26-Jul-2015 26-Jul-2015 26-Jul-2015 26-Jul-2015 29-Jul-2015 31-Jul-2015 1-Aug-2015 1-Aug-2015 1-Aug-2015 1-Aug-2015 1-Aug-2015 1-Aug-2015 1-Aug-2015 1-Aug-2015 1-Aug-2015 2-Aug-2015 3-Aug-2015 8-Aug-2015 8-Aug-2015 8-Aug-2015 8-Aug-2015 8-Aug-2015 8-Aug-2015 8-Aug-2015 8-Aug-2015 8-Aug-2015 9-Aug-2015 9-Aug-2015 14-Aug-2015 15-Aug-2015 15-Aug-2015 15-Aug-2015 16-Aug-2015 21-Aug-2015 21-Aug-2015 23-Aug-2015 23-Aug-2015 23-Aug-2015 29-Aug-2015 29-Aug-2015 29-Aug-2015 30-Aug-2015 2-Sep-2015 5-Sep-2015 6-Sep-2015 6-Sep-2015 6-Sep-2015 6-Sep-2015 6-Sep-2015 6-Sep-2015 6-Sep-2015 12-Sep-2015 12-Sep-2015 12-Sep-2015 12-Sep-2015 13-Sep-2015 13-Sep-2015 13-Sep-2015 18-Sep-2015 18-Sep-2015 19-Sep-2015 20-Sep-2015 26-Sep-2015 26-Sep-2015 26-Sep-2015 26-Sep-2015 27-Sep-2015 27-Sep-2015 27-Sep-2015 30-Sep-2015 30-Sep-2015 30-Sep-2015 30-Sep-2015 30-Sep-2015 2-Oct-2015 2-Oct-2015

Value Age $125,000 2F $60,000 3F CAN50,000 2F $100,000 3 CAN50,000 2 C&G $150,000 2 CAN125,000 2 $300,000 3+ CAN150,000 3+ F&M $542,000 2 $50,000 2F $200,000 3+ FM $50,000 3+ FM $200,000 3 $75,000 3+ FM $75,000 3+ $100,000 3+ $100,000 2F $100,000 2 $100,000 3+ FM $350,000 3+ $75,000 3+ FM $100,000 3+ CAN125,000 2F $50,000 3+ F&M (LA Bred) $50,000 3+ ( LA Bred) $75,000 2 (OH Bred) $200,000 2F $200,000 2 $75,000 2 C&G (IA bred) $75,000 2F $50,000 2 (LA Bred) $50,000 2 F (LA Bred) ˆ 60000 3+ CAN125,000 2F $50,000 3F CAN150,000 2 $75,000 3+ (OH Bred) $60,000 3+ FM $100,000 2 CAN50,000 2 $50,000 3 $100,000 3+ ˆ 350,000 2 CF $685,000 3+ $75,000 2 $75,000 2F $75,000 2F $723,000 3+ CAN125,000 3+ £250,000 3+ $300,000 3F 2 $75,000 $60,000 3 FM $60,000 3 $80000 2F $80000 2 $542,000 2 $75,000 2 $75,000 2 USD60,000.00 3+ $60,000 3+ FM $50,000 2F $50,000 2 C&G $1,030,000 3+ $100,000 2 C&G $100,000 2F $75,000 3+ FM (OH Reg) $75,000 2F $400,000 3+ £170,000 2F £170,000 2C $60,000 2 (NJ bred) $50,000 2 WA $100,000 2 CAN125,000 2 C&G $85,000 3+ F&M $85,000 3+ $85,000 2 $85,000 2F $85,000 2 $200,000 3+ $50,000 3+

6f (1200m) Surface D D D D D D AWT AWT T T D D D D AWT AWT D D D D D D D AWT D D D D D D D D D T AWT D AWT D D T D D D T T T T D T AWT T D AWT D D D D T T D T D D D T D D D AWT D T T D D D AWT D D D D D AWT D

Metres 1200 1200 1200 1200 1200 1200 1200 1200 1200 1200 1200 1200 1200 1200 1200 1200 1200 1200 1200 1200 1200 1200 1200 1200 1200 1200 1200 1200 1200 1200 1200 1200 1200 1200 1200 1200 1200 1200 1200 1200 1200 1200 1200 1200 1200 1200 1200 1200 1200 1200 1200 1200 1200 1200 1200 1200 1200 1200 1200 1200 1200 1200 1200 1200 1200 1200 1200 1200 1200 1200 1200 1200 1200 1200 1200 1200 1200 1200 1200 1200 1200 1200 1200

Furlongs 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6

Closing 4-Jul-2015 10-Jul-2015 10-Jul-2015 11-Jul-2015 8-Jul-2015 16-Jul-2015 8-Jul-2015 9-Jun-2015 18-Jul-2015 18-Jul-2015 22-Jul-2015 22-Jul-2015 20-Jul-2015 20-Jul-2015 20-Jul-2015 20-Jul-2015 18-Jul-2015 24-Jul-2015 24-Jul-2015 15-Jul-2015 25-Jul-2015 25/07/2015 3-Mar-2015 3-Mar-2015

25-Jul-2015 25-Jul-2015 1-Jul-2015 22-Jul-2015 29-Jul-2015 7-Aug-2015 15-Aug-2015 8-Aug-2015 29-Jul-2015 7-Jul-2015 8-Aug-2015 19-Aug-2015 21-Jul-2015 12-Aug-2015 7-Jul-2015 22-Aug-2015 26-Aug-2015 26-Aug-2015 26-Aug-2015

21-Jul-2015 2-Sep-2015 3-Sep-2015 4-Sep-2015 4-Sep-2015

4-Aug-2015

9-Sep-2015 15-Sep-2015 21-Jul-2015 21-Jul-2015 18-Sep-2015 CLOSED 9-Sep-2015 16-Sep-2015 16-Sep-2015 16-Sep-2015 16-Sep-2015 16-Sep-2015 16-Sep-2015


STAKES SCHEDULES Check out Stakes Schedules online - trainermagazine.com/schedules Country USA JPN CAN USA GB USA CAN CAN USA CAN USA USA USA USA USA USA USA CAN USA USA JPN USA JPN

Track Keeneland Niigata Woodbine Thistledown Ascot Finger Lakes Woodbine Woodbine Thistledown Woodbine Thistledown Mahoning Valley Mahoning Valley Keeneland Finger Lakes Mahoning Valley Mahoning Valley Woodbine Penn National Penn National Kyoto Beulah Park Nakayama

Race Name & (Sponsor) Thoroughbred Club of America S Sprinters St Victorian Queen S Best of Ohio Sprint H’cap QIPCO British Champions Sprint S New York Breeders’ Futurity Nearctic S Ontario Fashion S Diana St Fanfreluche S Cardinal H Cardinal H Emerald Necklace S BC Sprint Shesastonecoldfox S First Lady St Glacial Princess St Kennedy Road S The Fabulous Strike H’Cap Blue Mountain S Keihan Hai Joshua Radosevich Memorial S Capella St

Breeders’ Cup F&M Sprint

Turf Sprint

Class Gr 2 Gr 1 R S Gp 1 S Gr 2 Gr 3 S

Gr 1 S

Gr 2 R Gr 3 R Gr 3

Race Date 3-Oct-2015 4-Oct-2015 10-Oct-2015 10-Oct-2015 17-Oct-2015 17-Oct-2015 18-Oct-2015 18-Oct-2015 24-Oct-2015 25-Oct-2015 31-Oct-2015 31-Oct-2015 31-Oct-2015 31-Oct-2015 6-Nov-2015 21-Nov-2015 21-Nov-2015 22-Nov-2015 25-Nov-2015 25-Nov-2015 29-Nov-2015 5-Dec-2015 13-Dec-2015

Value Age $200,000 3+ F&M $1,718,000 3+ CAN125,000 2F $150,000 3+ (OH Bred) £600,000 3+ $200,000 2 CAN300,000+ 3+ CAN150,000+ 3+ F&M $75,000 3 + FM (Ohio bred) CAN150,000 2F $50,000 3 + (Ohio bred) $75,000 3+ $75,000 2F $1,500,000 3+ $50,000 2F $75,000 3F $75,000 2 F (Ohio bred) CAN200,000+ 3+ $200,000 3+ $75,000 2 F (PA bred) $685,000 3+ $75,000 2 (OH Acc) $633,000 3+

6f (1200m)

Surface AWT T AWT D T D T AWT T AWT T D D D D T T AWT D D T D D

Metres 1200 1200 1200 1200 1200 1200 1200 1200 1200 1200 1200 1200 1200 1200 1200 1200 1200 1200 1200 1200 1200 1200 1200

Furlongs 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6

Call us on 1 888 659 2935 to subscribe from $20 USA CAN CAN USA USA CAN USA USA CAN USA USA USA USA CAN CAN USA USA USA CAN CAN CAN CAN CAN FR CAN USA USA USA USA USA CAN USA USA CAN CAN CAN CAN CAN CAN USA USA CAN CAN CAN CAN CAN USA

Albuquerque Hastings Racecourse Hastings Racecourse Albuquerque Belterra Park Woodbine Belmont Park Emerald Downs Hastings Racecourse Emerald Downs Emerald Downs Emerald Downs Canterbury Northlands Park Northlands Park Belmont Park Canterbury Saratoga Hastings Racecourse Hastings Racecourse Woodbine Northlands Park Northlands Park Deauville Northlands Park Emerald Downs Emerald Downs Saratoga Saratoga Saratoga Hastings Racecourse Saratoga Saratoga Woodbine Woodbine Northlands Park Northlands Park Hastings Racecourse Hastings Racecourse Presque Isle Downs Emerald Downs Woodbine Northlands Park Northlands Park Hastings Racecourse Hastings Racecourse Presque Isle Downs

Budweiser Special Ross Mcleod Jim Coleman Province (AlwS) Carlos Salazar Tall Stack St Hendrie S Vagrancy H’cap Governor’s H’cap The John Longden 6000 Auburn H’cap Seattle H’cap WA State Legislators Stakes Dark Star Cup Sales Stakes (fillies) Sales Stakes Victory Ride St MTA Stallion Auction S John Morrissey St British Columbia Cup Debutante (AlwS) British Columbia Cup Nursery (AlwS) Shepperton S Sales Stakes Fillies Sales Stakes Prix Maurice de Gheest Sun Sprint St WTBOA Lads St Barbara Shinpoch St Adirondack St Saratoga Special Union Avenue St Hard Rock Casino Vancouver Funny Cide Seeking the Ante Simcoe S Muskoka S Bird of Pay St Birdcatcher St CTHS Sales (AlwS) CTHS Sales (AlwS) Presque Isle Downs Masters S Chinook Pass Sprint St Bold Venture S Red Diamond St Premier’s Futurity Jack Diamond Sadie Diamond Fitz Dixon Mem S

USA USA USA CAN CAN USA JPN CAN USA

Churchill Downs Churchill Downs Churchill Downs Woodbine Woodbine Belmont Park Tokyo Woodbine Belmont Park

Eight Belles St Humana Distaff Churchill Downs St Queenston S Fury S Wait a While S Keio Hai Spring Cup Vigil S Paradise Creek S

S S Gr 3 Gr 3

Gr 3 S S S R

Gp 1

Gr 2 Gr 2 S

R R

S S Gr 2 Gr 3 S S S S

2-May-2015 3-May-2015 3-May-2015 9-May-2015 9-May-2015 9-May-2015 16-May-2015 17-May-2015 18-May-2015 24-May-2015 31-May-2015 7-Jun-2015 21-Jun-2015 1-Jul-2015 1-Jul-2015 4-Jul-2015 19-Jul-2015 30-Jul-2015 3-Aug-2015 3-Aug-2015 3-Aug-2015 8-Aug-2015 8-Aug-2015 9-Aug-2015 15-Aug-2015 15-Aug-2015 15-Aug-2015 16-Aug-2015 16-Aug-2015 20-Aug-2015 21-Aug-2015 28-Aug-2015 28-Aug-2015 2-Sep-2015 2-Sep-2015 4-Sep-2015 5-Sep-2015 7-Sep-2015 7-Sep-2015 7-Sep-2015 13-Sep-2015 13-Sep-2015 19-Sep-2015 19-Sep-2015 20-Sep-2015 20-Sep-2015 1-Oct-2015

$55,000 CAN50,000 CAN50,000 $60,000 $75,000 CAN150,000+ $150,000 $50,000 CAN50,000 $50,000 $50,000 $50,000 $75,000 CAN50,000 CAN50,000 $150,000 $55,000 $100,000 CAN50,000 CAN50,000 CAN125,000 CAN50,000 CAN50,000 ˆ 250000 CAN50,000 $50,000 $50,000 $200,000 $200,000 $100,000 CAN50,000 $200,000 $200,000 CAN 200,000 CAN 200,000 CAN50,000 CAN50,000 CAN50,000 CAN50,000 $400,000 $50,000 CAN150,000 CAN50,000 CAN50,000 CAN 100,000 CAN 100,000 $100,000

Gr 2 Gr 3

1-May-2015 2-May-2015 2-May-2015 2-May-2015 3-May-2015 16-May-2015 16-May-2015 17-May-2015 23-May-2015

$200,000 $300,000 $500,000 CAN150,000 CAN150,000 $100,000 $1,030,000 CAN150,000+ $100,000

3-Aug-2015 30-Sep-2015 30-Sep-2015 7-Oct-2015 29-Oct-2014

19-Oct-2015

4-Nov-2015 18-Nov-2015 18-Nov-2015 13-Oct-2015 27-Oct-2015

6.5f (1300m)

3+ 3F 3 3+ F&M 3 4+ F&M 4+ FM 3+ 3+ 3 CG 3F 3+ F&M 3+ 3 & 4 F 3&4 C&G 3F 3 3+ (NY bred) 2F 2 CG (BC Bred) 3+ 2F 2 C&G 3+ 3+ 2 CG 2F 2F 2 3+ FM (NY bred) 2F 2 2F 2 C&G 2F 2F 2 C&G 2F 2C&G 3+ F&M 3+ 3+ 3+ 2 2 CG 2F 2

D D D D T AWT D D D D D D D D D D D D D D AWT T T T D D D D D D D D D AWT AWT D D D D AWT D AWT D D D D AWT

1300 1300 1300 1300 1300 1300 1300 1300 1300 1300 1300 1300 1300 1300 1300 1300 1300 1300 1300 1300 1300 1300 1300 1300 1300 1300 1300 1300 1300 1300 1300 1300 1300 1300 1300 1300 1300 1300 1300 1300 1300 1300 1300 1300 1300 1300 1300

6.5 6.5 6.5 6.5 6.5 6.5 6.5 6.5 6.5 6.5 6.5 6.5 6.5 6.5 6.5 6.5 6.5 6.5 6.5 6.5 6.5 6.5 6.5 6.5 6.5 6.5 6.5 6.5 6.5 6.5 6.5 6.5 6.5 6.5 6.5 6.5 6.5 6.5 6.5 6.5 6.5 6.5 6.5 6.5 6.5 6.5 6.5

3F 4+ FM 4+ 3 3F 3F 4+ 4+ 3

D D D AWT AWT T T AWT T

1400 1400 1400 1400 1400 1400 1400 1400 1400

7 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 7

Stakes Schedules updated online monthly Gr 3 Gr 2 Gr 2 S S

Closing 16-Sep-2015 18-Aug-2015 23-Sep-2015

22-Apr-2015 25-Apr-2015 25-Apr-2015 25-Apr-2015 29-Apr-2015 22-Apr-2015 2-May-2015 9-May-2015

14-Jun-2015 20-Jun-2015 12-Jul-2015 18-Jul-2015 25-Jul-2015 25-Jul-2015 15-Jul-2015

15-Jul-2015

1-Aug-2015 1-Aug-2015 8-Aug-2015 21-Aug-2015 15-Aug-2015 15-Aug-2015 12-Aug-2015 12-Aug-2015

29-Aug-2015 29-Aug-2015 26-Aug-2015 26-Aug-2015

12-Sep-2015 12-Sep-2015 21-Sep-2015

7f (1400m)

ISSUE 36 TRAINERMAGAZINE.COM

8-Apr-2015 8-Apr-2015 8-Apr-2015 15-Apr-2015 15-Apr-2015 2-May-2015 31-Mar-2015 29-Apr-2015 9-May-2015

87


STAKES SCHEDULES Check out Stakes Schedules online - trainermagazine.com/schedules Country USA USA CAN USA USA CAN USA USA USA USA USA USA USA USA USA USA USA CAN JPN CAN CAN GB USA USA USA USA USA USA USA CAN USA USA USA USA CAN USA USA USA USA USA USA USA CAN USA USA USA IRE IRE CAN USA USA USA FR FR GB USA USA JPN CAN JPN JPN CAN CAN CAN USA USA JPN

Track Belmont Park Belmont Park Woodbine Evangeline Downs Evangeline Downs Woodbine Belmont Park Belmont Park Albuquerque Belmont Park Belmont Park Belmont Park Arapahoe Park Belmont Park Gulfstream Park Gulstream Arapahoe Park Woodbine Chukyo Woodbine Woodbine Ascot Charles Town Pimlico Saratoga Gulfstream Park Charles Town Calder Saratoga Woodbine Charles Town Arlington Park Charles Town Del Mar Woodbine Saratoga Arlington Park Saratoga Saratoga Saratoga Gulfstream Park Gulfstream Park Woodbine Saratoga Louisiana Downs Louisiana Downs Curragh Curragh Woodbine Charles Town Charles Town Charles Town Longchamp Longchamp Newmarket Charles Town Keeneland Kyoto Woodbine Tokyo Kyoto Woodbine Woodbine Woodbine Charles Town Charles Town Hanshin

Race Name & (Sponsor) Bouwerie St Mike Lee St Connaught Cup S The Acadiana St - La Bred Lafayette St Lady Angela S Intercontinental Woody Stephens St Univ of NM H’cap Bed o’ Roses (H’cap) New York Stallion Series - Cupecoy’s Joy Division New York Stallion Series - Spectacular Bid Division Front Range S Belmont Sprint Championship Carry Back St Azalaea St George Wafer Mem Passing Mood S Procyon St Duchess S Deputy Minister S Winkfield St Robert G Leavitt St Shine Again St Shine Again The Florida Sire St - Unbridled Div. Sadie Hawkins St Florida Sire St - Three Rings Div. Test Seaway S Frank Gall Memorial Arlington-Washington Futurity Sylvia Bishop Memorial Pat O’Brien H’cap Play the King S King’s Bishop Arlington-Washington Lassie Ballerina St Forego Spinaway St Florida Stallion St - Affirmed Division Florida Stallion St - Susan’s Girl Division Swynford S Hopeful St LA Stallions S LA Stallions S Moyglare Stud St National St (Goffs Vincent O’Brien) Overskate S Pink Ribbon St Charles Town Oaks Wild and Wonderful St Prix de la Foret (Qatar) Prix Jean-Luc Lagardere-Grand Criterium Dewhurst St Tri-State Futurity BC Filly & Mare Sprint Swan St Frost King S Keio Hai Nisai St Fantasy St Jammed Lovely S Bessarabian S Glorious Song S West Virginia Futurity (WV) Eleanor Casey Memorial Hanshin Cup

USA USA USA

Indiana Downs Indiana Downs Lone Star Park

PDJF S Indy Star Lane’s End Stallion Scholarship St

Breeders’ Cup

Class S S Gr 2

R Gr 2 S Gr 3 R R Gr 3 Gr 3 Gr 3 R Gr 3

R S R R S

Dirt Mile

F&M Sprint Sprint Juv F

Juv F Turf

Mile Juv Turf

Gr 1 Gr 3 S Gr 3 S Gr 2 Gr 2 Gr 1 Gr 3 Gr 1 Gr 1 Gr 1 R R Gr 1 S S Gp 1 Gp 1 R

Gp 1 Gp 1 Gp 1 R Gr 1 Gr 2 R Gr 2 Gr 3 S Gr 2

S Gr 2

Race Date 25-May-2015 25-May-2015 30-May-2015 30-May-2015 30-May-2015 31-May-2015 4-Jun-2015 6-Jun-2015 17-Jun-2015 20-Jun-2015 21-Jun-2015 21-Jun-2015 28-Jun-2015 4-Jul-2015 5-Jul-2015 5-Jul-2015 5-Jul-2015 11-Jul-2015 12-Jul-2015 19-Jul-2015 22-Jul-2015 25-Jul-2015 1-Aug-2015 5-Aug-2015 5-Aug-2015 8-Aug-2015 8-Aug-2015 8-Aug-2015 8-Aug-2015 8-Aug-2015 15-Aug-2015 22-Aug-2015 22-Aug-2015 22-Aug-2015 23-Aug-2015 29-Aug-2015 29-Aug-2015 29-Aug-2015 29-Aug-2015 5-Sep-2015 5-Sep-2015 5-Sep-2015 5-Sep-2015 7-Sep-2015 12-Sep-2015 12-Sep-2015 13-Sep-2015 14-Sep-2015 19-Sep-2015 19-Sep-2015 19-Sep-2015 19-Sep-2015 4-Oct-2015 4-Oct-2015 10-Oct-2015 31-Oct-2015 31-Oct-2015 31-Oct-2015 4-Nov-2015 7-Nov-2015 7-Nov-2015 7-Nov-2015 15-Nov-2015 21-Nov-2015 21-Nov-2015 12-Dec-2015 26-Dec-2015

Value $125,000 $125,000 CAN200,000+ $70,000 $70,000 CAN125,000 $150,000 $500,000 $60,000 $150,000 $100,000 $100,000 $40,000 $400,000 $150,000 $150,000 $40,000 CAN125,000 $633,000 CAN125,000 CAN125,000 £30,000 $50,000 $100,000 $100,000 $150,000 $50,000 $150,000 $500,000 CAN150,000 $50,000 $100,000 $50,000 $250,000 CAN200,000+ $500,000 $75,000 $600,000 $700,000 $350,000 $300,000 $300,000 CAN125,000 $350,000 $100,000 $100,000 ˆ 300,000 ˆ 200,000 CAN125,000 $100,000 $350,000 $100,000 ˆ 300,000 ˆ 350,000 £5,000,000 $50,000 $1,000,000 $1,030,000 CAN125,000 $647,000 $504,000 CAN150,000 CAN150,000+ CAN125,000 $50,000 $50,000 $1,173,000

Age 3 F (NY bred) 3 (NY bred) 4+ 3F 2 3F 4+ FM 3 3+ 4+ F&M 3 F (NY Bred) 3 (NY Bred) 3+ 3+ 3 3 3F 3F 3+ 3F 3 2 3 3+ FM 3 + FM 3 3+ F&M 3F 3F 3+ F&M 3+ 2 3F 3+ 3+ 3 2F 3+ FM 3+ 2F 2 2F 2 2 2 C&G (LA Bred) 2 F (LA Bred) 2F 2 CF 3+ 3+ FM 3F 3+ 3+ 2 CF 2 2 3+ F&M 3+ 2 2 2F 3F 3+ F&M 2F 2 2F 3+

7f (1400m)

Surface D D T D T AWT T D D D T T T D D D T T D AWT AWT T D D D D D D D AWT D AWT D AWT T D AWT D D D D D AWT D D D T T AWT D D D T T T D D T AWT T T AWT AWT AWT D D T

Metres 1400 1400 1400 1400 1400 1400 1400 1400 1400 1400 1400 1400 1400 1400 1400 1400 1400 1400 1400 1400 1400 1400 1400 1400 1400 1400 1400 1400 1400 1400 1400 1400 1400 1400 1400 1400 1400 1400 1400 1400 1400 1400 1400 1400 1400 1400 1400 1400 1400 1400 1400 1400 1400 1400 1400 1400 1400 1400 1400 1400 1400 1400 1400 1400 1400 1400 1400

Furlongs 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 7

D D T

1500 1500 1500

7.5 7.5 7.5

Call us on 1 888 659 2935 to subscribe from $20 R

30-May-2015 30-May-2015 20-Jun-2015

$65,000 $65,000 $50,000

Churchill Downs Will Rogers Downs Will Rogers Downs Gulfstream Park Newmarket Churchill Downs Belmont Park Newmarket Belmont Park

88

Pat Day Mile Oklahoma Stallion Colts & Geldings Division Oklahoma Stallion Fillies Division The Honey Ryder 2000 Guineas St (Qipco) Churchill Distaff Turf Mile Westchester H’cap 1000 Guineas St (Qipco) Ruffian H’cap

TRAINERMAGAZINE.COM ISSUE 36

Gr 3 S S

Gp 1 Gr 2 Gr 3 Gp 1 Gr 2

2-May-2015 2-May-2015 2-May-2015 2-May-2015 2-May-2015 2-May-2015 2-May-2015 3-May-2015 9-May-2015

$200,000 $50,000 $50,000 $75,000 £400,000 $300,000 $150,000 £400,000 $250,000

20-Jun-2015 21-Jun-2015 21-Jun-2015 24-Jun-2015 26-May-2015 1-Jul-2015 1-Jul-2015 19-Jul-2015 22-Jul-2015 25-Jul-2015 3-Mar-2015 29-Jul-2015 3-Mar-2015 25-Jul-2105 22-Jul-2015 5-Aug-2015 12-Aug-2015 12-Aug-2015 13-Aug-2015 5-Aug-2015 15-Aug-2015 19-Aug-2015 15-Aug-2015 15-Aug-2015 22-Aug-2015 3-Mar-2015 3-Mar-2015 19-Aug-2015 22-Aug-2015 CLOSED CLOSED 27-May-2015 27-May-2015 2-Sep-2015 5-Sep-2015 29-Aug-2015 5-Sep-2015 26-Aug-2015 26-Aug-2015 4-Aug-2015 19-Oct-2015 15-Sep-2015 14-Oct-2015 29-Sep-2015 29-Sep-2015 21-Oct-2015 28-Oct-2015 4-Nov-2015 2-Dec-2015 10-Nov-2015

7.5f (1500m) 3 3F 3+ FM

Check out Stakes Schedules online - trainermagazine.com/schedules USA USA USA USA GB USA USA GB USA

Closing 9-May-2015 9-May-2015 13-May-2015 16-May-2015 16-May-2015 13-May-2015 23-May-2015 23-May-2015 7-Jun-2015 6-Jun-2015 CLOSED CLOSED

3 3 CG 3F 3F 3 C&F 4+ FM 4+ 3F 4+ FM

20-May-2015 20-May-2015 11-Jun-2015

8f (1600m) D D D T T T D T D

1600 1600 1600 1600 1600 1600 1600 1600 1600

8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8

8-Apr-2015 21-Apr-2015 21-Apr-2015 19-Apr-2015 3-Mar-2015 8-Apr-2015 18-Apr-2015 3-Mar-2015 25-Apr-2015


STAKES SCHEDULES Stakes Schedules updated online monthly Country USA USA USA FR FR JPN USA GB USA JPN CAN USA USA IRE IRE USA USA USA USA USA USA USA USA USA USA USA USA USA USA USA USA USA USA USA JPN CAN USA CAN USA USA GB GB GB CAN GB CAN CAN USA USA USA JPN USA USA USA USA USA USA USA USA USA USA USA GB USA USA USA USA USA USA USA FR USA USA USA CAN USA USA CAN USA USA USA JPN USA

Track Lone Star Park Lone Star Park Golden Gate Fields Longchamp Longchamp Tokyo Pimlico Newbury Monmouth Park Tokyo Woodbine Monmouth Park Albuquerque Curragh Curragh Golden Gate Fields Will Rogers Downs Belmont Park Belmont Park Belmont Park Belmont Park Will Rogers Downs Evangeline Downs Evangeline Downs Prairie Meadows Prairie Meadows Penn National Penn National Canterbury Canterbury Albuquerque Belmont Park Belmont Park Belmont Park Tokyo Northlands Park Santa Anita Northlands Park Belmont Park Emerald Downs Belmont Park Royal Ascot Royal Ascot Northlands Park Royal Ascot Northlands Park Woodbine Monmouth Park Emerald Downs Canterbury Tokyo Churchill Downs Emerald Downs Belmont Park Belmont Park Evangeline Downs Evangeline Downs Evangeline Downs Arlington Park Monmouth Park Emerald Downs Monmouth Park Newmarket Lone Star Park Belmont Park Canterbury Canterbury Presque Isle Downs Presque Isle Downs Belmont Park Chantilly Indiana Downs Indiana Downs Indiana Downs Northlands Park Indiana Downs Indiana Downs Woodbine Arlington Park Arlington Park Arapahoe Park Chukyo Monmouth Park

Race Name & (Sponsor) Texas Stallion St - Stymie Division Texas Stallion St - Got Koko Division Alcatraz St Poule d’Essai des Poulains Poule d’Essai des Pouliches NHK Mile Cup James W Murphy S Lockinge St (Al Shaqab) Red Bank St Victoria Mile Nassau S Majestic Light S Albuquerque Distaff Irish 2000 Guineas (Tattersalls) Irish 1000 Guineas (Etihad Airways) All American RPDC Classic Distaff Kingston H’cap Mount Vernon H’cap Commentator Critical Eye Cherokee Nation Classic Cup Opelousas St Evangeline Mile Prairie Mile Panthers Penn Mile Penn Oaks Brooks Fields St HBPA Distaff Charles Taylor Derby Metropolitan H’Cap Acorn St Just a Game St Yasuda Kinen John Patrick H Shoemaker Mile Spangled Jimmy H Poker H’cap Budweiser H’cap Wild Applause St James’s Palace St Queen Anne St Red Smith Coronation St Ky Alta H King Edward S The Dan Horn H’Cap Coca-Cola H’cap Northbound Pride Oaks Unicorn St Firecracker H’cap Irish Day H’cap Perfect Sting Dwyer St Louisiana Legends Distaff Louisiana Legends Soiree - La Bred Fillies Louisiana Legends Cheval - La Bred C&G Purple Violet St Elkwood St Boeing H’cap Salvator Mile Falmouth Assault St Forbidden Apple Lady Canterbury St Mystic Lake Mile Leematt S Northern Fling S Manila Prix Jean Prat Ellen’s Lucky Star Snack St Shelby County Boys & Girls Club S Northlands Oaks Ta Wee S Girls, Inc. Shelby County Ontario Damsel S Hanshin Cup Springfield St CTBA Breeders Oaks Chukyo Kinen Little Silver St

Breeders’ Cup

Class R R Gp 1 Gp 1 Gr 1 Gp 1 Gr 3 Gr 1 Gr 2

Gp 1 Gp 1 Gr 3 S S S

S S

Dirt Mile

Gr 1 Gr 1 Gr 1 Gr 1

Mile

Gr 1 Gr 3

Gp 1 Gp 1 Gp 1 Gr 2

Gr 3 Gr 2

Gr 3 S S S S

Gr 3 Gp 1 R

S S Gp 1 R R S

S S Gr 3 S Gr 3

Race Date 9-May-2015 9-May-2015 10-May-2015 10-May-2015 10-May-2015 10-May-2015 16-May-2015 16-May-2015 16-May-2015 17-May-2015 23-May-2015 23-May-2015 23-May-2015 23-May-2015 24-May-2015 25-May-2015 25-May-2015 25-May-2015 25-May-2015 25-May-2015 25-May-2015 26-May-2015 30-May-2015 30-May-2015 30-May-2015 30-May-2015 30-May-2015 30-May-2015 6-Jun-2015 6-Jun-2015 6-Jun-2015 6-Jun-2015 6-Jun-2015 6-Jun-2015 7-Jun-2015 12-Jun-2015 13-Jun-2015 13-Jun-2015 13-Jun-2015 14-Jun-2015 14-Jun-2015 16-Jun-2015 16-Jun-2015 19-Jun-2015 19-Jun-2015 20-Jun-2015 21-Jun-2015 21-Jun-2015 21-Jun-2015 21-Jun-2015 21-Jun-2015 27-Jun-2015 28-Jun-2015 3-Jul-2015 4-Jul-2015 4-Jul-2015 4-Jul-2015 4-Jul-2015 4-Jul-2015 4-Jul-2015 5-Jul-2015 5-Jul-2015 10-Jul-2015 11-Jul-2015 11-Jul-2015 11-Jul-2015 11-Jul-2015 12-Jul-2015 12-Jul-2015 12-Jul-2015 12-Jul-2015 15-Jul-2015 15-Jul-2015 16-Jul-2015 17-Jul-2015 17-Jul-2015 18-Jul-2015 18-Jul-2015 18-Jul-2015 25-Jul-2015 25-Jul-2015 26-Jul-2015 26-Jul-2015

Value $75,000 $75,000 $75,000 ˆ 450,000 ˆ 450,000 $1,667,000 $100,000 £180,000 $100,000 $1,636,000 CAN200,000+ $75,000 $55,000 ˆ 300,000 ˆ 300,000 $100,000 $55,000 $125,000 $125,000 $200,000 $200,000 $55,000 $100,000 $100,000 $75,000 $75,000 $50,000 $150,000 $75,000 $75,000 $55,000 $1,250,000 $750,000 $700,000 $1,808,000 CAN50,000 $400,000 CAN50,000 $300,000 $50,000 $100,000 £375,000 £375,000 CAN50,000 £385,000 CAN50,000 CAN200,000 $60,000 $50,000 $75,000 $618,000 $200,000 $50,000 $100,000 $500,000 $100,000 $100,000 $100,000 $75,000 $75,000 $50,000 $150,000 £160,000 $50,000 $150,000 $100,000 $100,000 $75,000 $75,000 $100,000 ˆ 400,000 $85,000 $85,000 $100,000 CAN50,000 $100,000 $100,000 CAN150,000 $100,000 $75,000 $40,000 $685,000 $60,000

8f (1600m) Age 3 CG 3F 3 3C 3F 3 3 4+ 3+ 4+ F&M 3+ F&M 3+ 3 + FM 3 CF 3F 3+ 3+ FM 3+ (NY Bred) 3+ FM (NY Bred) 3 + (NY Bred) 3+ FM 3+ 3 + FM 3+ 3 3F 3 3F 3+ 3+FM 3 3+ FM 3F 4+ FM 3+ 3+ F&M 3+ 3+ 4+ 3+ 3F 3C 4+ 3F 3F 3 3+ 3+ 3 CG 3F 3 3+ 3F 4+ F&M 3 3+ F&M 3F 3 3F 3+ 3+ FM 3+ 3+ F 3+ (TX Bred) 4+ 3+ FM 3+ 3+ 3+ F&M 3 3 CF 3F 3 F 4+ 3F 3F 4+ F&M 3F 3+ 3 3F 3+ 3F

Surface D D T T T T T T T T T D D T T AWT D T T D D D T D D D T T T T D D D T T D T D T D T T T D T D T T D T D T D T D D D D AWT T D D T D T T T AWT AWT T T T T T D D T T AWT AWT T T T

Metres 1600 1600 1600 1600 1600 1600 1600 1600 1600 1600 1600 1600 1600 1600 1600 1600 1600 1600 1600 1600 1600 1600 1600 1600 1600 1600 1600 1600 1600 1600 1600 1600 1600 1600 1600 1600 1600 1600 1600 1600 1600 1600 1600 1600 1600 1600 1600 1600 1600 1600 1600 1600 1600 1600 1600 1600 1600 1600 1600 1800 1600 1600 1600 1600 1600 1600 1600 1600 1600 1600 1600 1600 1600 1600 1600 1600 1600 1600 1600 1600 1600 1600 1600

Furlongs 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8

ISSUE 36 TRAINERMAGAZINE.COM

Closing

30-Apr-2015 CLOSED CLOSED 31-Mar-2015 5-May-2015 31-Mar-2015 4-May-2015 31-Mar-2015 6-May-2015 15-May-2015 13-May-2015 CLOSED CLOSED 14-May-2015 15-May-2015 9-May-2015 9-May-2015 9-May-2015 9-May-2015 16-May-2015 9-May-2015 9-May-2015 22-May-2015 22-May-2015 20-May-2015 20-May-2015 30-May-2015 30-May-2015 27-May-2015 23-May-2015 23-May-2015 23-May-2015 28-Apr-2015 4-Jun-2015 30-May-2015 30-May-2015 21-Apr-2015 21-Apr-2015 20-Apr-2015 3-Jun-2015 12-Jun-2015 14-Jun-2015 12-May-2015 13-Jun-2015 20-Jun-2015 20-Jun-2015 13-Jun-2015 13-Jun-2015 13-Jun-2015 24-Jun-2015 26-Jun-2015 20-Jun-2015 16-Jun-2015 2-Jul-2015 27-Jun-2015 4-Jul-2015 4-Jul-2015 1-Jul-2015 1-Jul-2015 27-Jun-2015 24-Jun-2015 1-Jul-2015 1-Jul-2015 1-Jul-2015 24-Jun-2015 1-Jul-2015 1-Jul-2015 8-Jul-2015 15-Jul-2015 9-Jun-2015 17-Jul-2015

89


STAKES SCHEDULES Call us on 1 888 659 2935 to subscribe from $20 Country GB FR USA USA USA USA USA USA USA USA USA USA FR JPN CAN USA USA JPN CAN USA CAN USA USA USA USA USA IRE CAN CAN USA FR CAN JPN USA USA CAN ITY USA USA USA USA USA GB FR GB CAN GB CAN CAN GB JPN USA USA USA JPN USA USA USA FR JPN JPN JPN JPN JPN

Track Goodwood Deauville Saratoga Prairie Meadows Gulfstream Park Saratoga Saratoga Indiana Downs Indiana Downs Saratoga Saratoga Emerald Downs Deauville Niigata Woodbine Canterbury Saratoga Niigata Woodbine Saratoga Woodbine Gulfstream Park Gulfstream Park Indiana Downs Louisiana Downs Louisiana Downs Leopardstown Woodbine Woodbine Emerald Downs Longchamp Woodbine Niigata Louisiana Downs Louisiana Downs Woodbine Milan Belmont Park Belmont Park Keeneland Gulfstream Park Gulfstream Park Newmarket Longchamp Newmarket Woodbine Ascot Northlands Park Northlands Park Doncaster Tokyo Keeneland Keeneland Keeneland Tokyo Indiana Downs Indiana Downs Keeneland Saint-Cloud Kyoto Tokyo Kyoto Hanshin Hanshin

Race Name & (Sponsor) Breeders’ Cup Sussex (Quipco) Mile Prix de Rothschild Shuvee H’cap Prairie Meadows Juvenile Mile Soaring Softly De La Rose St New York Stallion Series - Cab Calloway Division Indiana First Lady Governor’s St New York Stallion Series - Statue of Liberty Division Fourstardave H’cap Longacres Mile H’cap Prix Jacques le Marois (Haras de Fresnay-Le-Buffard) Mile Sekiya Kinen Ontario Colleen S Mystic Lake Derby Riskaverse Niigata Nisai St Vice Regent S Better Talk Now Halton S Florida Sire St - Jewell Princess Div. Florida Sire St - Prized Div. Centaur S Happy Ticket Sunday Silence Matron St (Coolmore) F&M Turf Summer S Juv Turf Natalma S Juv F Turf Comcast Sports New St Prix du Moulin de Longchamp Ricoh Woodbine Mile Mile Keisei Hai Autumn H’cap A L Red Erwin S Elge Rasberry S La Prevoyante S Premio Vittorio di Capua Foxwoods Champagne Juv Frizette St Juv F Shadwell Turf Mile Mile Armed Forces Our Dear Peggy Sun Chariot St (Kingdom of Bahrain) Prix Marcel Boussac Juv F Turf Fillies’ Mile (Dubai) Bunty Lawless S Queen Elizabeth II St (Qipco) Freedom of the City St Canadian Juvenile St Trophy (Racing Post) Saudi Arabia Royal Cup Fuji St BC Juvenile Fillies Turf Championship BC Dirt Mile BC Juvenile Turf Artemis S Indiana Futurity Miss Indiana S BC Mile Criterium International Daily Hai Nisai St Musashino St Mile Championship Hanshin Juvenile Fillies Asahi Hai Futurity St

Class Gp 1 Gp 1 Gr 3

R R R R Gr 2 Gr 3 Gp 1 Gr 3 Gr 3

Gr 3 R R

S

Gp 1 Gr 2 Gr 2 S Gp 1 Gr 1 Gr 3 R/S R/S R Gp 1 Gr 1 Gr 1 Gr 1

Gp 1 Gp 1 Gp 1 R Gp 1

Gp 1 Gr 3 Gr 1 Gr 1 Gr 2 Gr 3 S S Gr 1 Gp 1 Gr 2 Gr 3 Gr 1 Gr 1 Gr 1

Race Date 29-Jul-2015 2-Aug-2015 2-Aug-2015 7-Aug-2015 8-Aug-2015 8-Aug-2015 10-Aug-2015 12-Aug-2015 12-Aug-2015 13-Aug-2015 15-Aug-2015 16-Aug-2015 16-Aug-2015 16-Aug-2015 22-Aug-2015 23-Aug-2015 27-Aug-2015 30-Aug-2015 30-Aug-2015 31-Aug-2015 2-Sep-2015 5-Sep-2015 5-Sep-2015 9-Sep-2015 12-Sep-2015 12-Sep-2015 12-Sep-2015 12-Sep-2015 12-Sep-2015 13-Sep-2015 13-Sep-2015 13-Sep-2015 13-Sep-2015 19-Sep-2015 19-Sep-2015 26-Sep-2015 27-Sep-2015 3-Oct-2015 3-Oct-2015 3-Oct-2015 3-Oct-2015 3-Oct-2015 3-Oct-2015 4-Oct-2015 9-Oct-2015 11-Oct-2015 17-Oct-2015 23-Oct-2015 24-Oct-2015 24-Oct-2015 24-Oct-2015 30-Oct-2015 30-Oct-2015 30-Oct-2015 31-Oct-2015 31-Oct-2015 31-Oct-2015 31-Oct-2015 1-Nov-2015 14-Nov-2015 15-Nov-2015 22-Nov-2015 13-Dec-2015 20-Dec-2015

Value £300,000 ˆ 300,000 $200,000 $60,000 $75,000 $100,000 $100,000 $150,000 $150,000 $100,000 $500,000 $200,000 ˆ 600,000 $685,000 CAN150,000+ $200,000 $100,000 $542,000 CAN125,000 $100,000 CAN125,000 $150,000 $150,000 $200,000 $75,000 $75,000 ˆ 300,000 CAN200,000+ CAN200,000+ $35,000 ˆ 450,000 CAN1,000,000+ $685,000 $150,000 $150,000 CAN125,000 ˆ 242,000 $400,000 $400,000 $750,000 $75,000 $75,000 £160,000 ˆ 300,000 £500,000 CAN125,000 £1,000,000 CAN50,000 CAN50,000 £200,000 $723,000 $1,000,000 $1,000,000 $1,000,000 $504,000 $85,000 $85,000 $2,000,000 ˆ 275000 $647,000 $671000 $1,8080000 $1,173,000 $1,274,000

8f (1600m) Age 3+ 3+ F 3+ FM 2 3+ FM 4 + FM 3 3F 3 3F 3+ 3+ 3+ CF 3+ 3F 3 3F 2 3 3 3+ 3F 3+ 3 2F 2 3+ F 2 2F 3 F WA bred 3 + CF 3+ 3+ 3 (LA Bred) 3 F (LA Bred) 3F 3+ 2 2F 3+ 2 2F 3+ F 2F 2F 3+ 3+ 2F 2 2 C&F 3+ 2F 3+ 2 CG 2F 2 C&G 2 F (IN Bred) 3+ 2 CF 2 3+ 3+ 2F 2 No G

Surface T T D D T T T D D T T D T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T D T T T T T T T D D T T T T T T T T D D T T T D T T D D T T T D T T T

Metres 1600 1600 1600 1600 1600 1600 1600 1600 1600 1600 1600 1600 1600 1600 1600 1600 1600 1600 1600 1600 1600 1600 1600 1600 1600 1600 1600 1600 1600 1600 1600 1600 1600 1600 1600 1600 1600 1600 1600 1600 1600 1600 1600 1600 1600 1600 1600 1600 1600 1600 1600 1600 1600 1600 1600 1600 1600 1600 1600 1600 1600 1600 1600 1600

Check out Stakes Schedules online - trainermagazine.com/schedules USA

Presque Isle Downs

HBPA S

1-Oct-2015

$100,000

3+ F&M

Monmouth Park Mountaineer Mountaineer Prairie Meadows Prairie Meadows Canterbury Canterbury

Monmouth Beach St West Virginia House of Delegates Speaker’s Cup West Virginia Senate President’s Breeders’ Cup St Donna Reed Iowa Breeders’ Oaks Minnesota Derby Minnesota Oaks

S S S S

24-May-2015 1-Aug-2015 1-Aug-2015 8-Aug-2015 8-Aug-2015 8-Aug-2015 8-Aug-2015

$75,000 $100,000 $100,000 $85,000 $80,000 $80000 $80000

AWT

1664

8.25

Churchill Downs Churchill Downs Churchill Downs Gulfstream Park Churchill Downs

90

Edgewood St La Troienne St Alysheba St The English Channel American Turf St

TRAINERMAGAZINE.COM ISSUE 36

Gr 3 Gr 2 Gr 2 Gr 2

1-May-2015 1-May-2015 1-May-2015 2-May-2015 2-May-2015

$150,000 $300,000 $400,000 $75,000 $250,000

29-Jul-2015 1-Aug-2015 22-Jul-2015 7-Jul-2015 5-Aug-2015 16-Aug-2015 15-Aug-2015 21-Jul-2015 12-Aug-2015 15-Aug-2015 12-Aug-2015 3-Mar-2015 3-Mar-2015 26-Aug-2015 29-Aug-2015 29-Aug-2015 3-Jul-2015 26-Aug-2015 26-Aug-2015 26-Aug-2015 26-Aug-2015 4-Aug-2015 CLOSED CLOSED 9-Sep-2015 3-Sep-2015 20-Sep-2015 19-Sep-2015 16-Sep-2015 20-Sep-2015 20-Sep-2015 4-Aug-2015 26-Aug-2015 4-Aug-2015 23-Sep-2015 3-Aug-2015

11-Aug-2015 15-Sep-2015 19-Oct-2015 19-Oct-2015 19-Oct-2015 15-Sep-2015 14-Oct-2015 14-Oct-2015 19-Oct-2015 14-Oct-2015 29-Sep-2015 29-Sep-2015 29-Sep-2015 27-Oct-2015 10-Nov-2015

21-Sep-2015

8.32f (1664m) 3+ FM 3+ 3+ FM 4+ F&M (IA Bred) 3 F (IA bred) 3 CG 3F

D T T D D D D

1664 1664 1664 1664 1664 1664 1664

8.32 8.32 8.32 8.32 8.32 8.32 8.32

Call us on 1 888 659 2935 to subscribe from $20 USA USA USA USA USA

Closing 26-May-2015 8-Jul-2015 18-Jul-2015 25-Jul-2015 26-Jul-2015 25-Jul-2015

8.25f (1650m)

Stakes Schedules updated online monthly USA USA USA USA USA USA USA

Furlongs 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8

15-May-2015 20-Jul-2015 20-Jul-2015 31-Jul-2015

8.5f (1700m) 3F 4+ FM 4+ 3 3

T D D T T

1700 1700 1700 1700 1700

8.5 8.5 8.5 8.5 8.5

8-Apr-2015 8-Apr-2015 8-Apr-2015 19-Apr-2015 8-Apr-2015


STAKES SCHEDULES Check out Stakes Schedules online - trainermagazine.com/schedules Country USA USA USA USA USA USA CAN CAN CAN USA CAN USA USA USA USA USA USA CAN CAN CAN USA USA CAN CAN CAN USA USA USA USA USA USA USA USA USA USA USA CAN CAN CAN CAN CAN USA USA USA USA USA USA USA USA CAN USA USA CAN USA USA USA CAN CAN USA GB USA USA CAN USA USA CAN USA CAN USA USA CAN USA USA CAN CAN USA USA USA USA USA USA USA USA

Track Belmont Park Albuquerque Golden Gate Fields Pimlico Pimlico Pimlico Woodbine Woodbine Hastings Racecourse Belterra Park Woodbine Lone Star Park Prairie Meadows Prairie Meadows Penn National Belterra Park Belmont Park Woodbine Hastings Racecourse Hastings Racecourse Belmont Park Churchill Downs Woodbine Hastings Racecourse Hastings Racecourse Churchill Downs Prairie Meadows Prairie Meadows Belterra Park Monmouth Park Prairie Meadows Belmont Park Monmouth Park Prairie Meadows Prairie Meadows Thistledown Woodbine Hastings Racecourse Hastings Racecourse Hastings Racecourse Hastings Racecourse Monmouth Park Finger Lakes Finger Lakes Canterbury Canterbury Evangeline Downs Evangeline Downs Evangeline Downs Woodbine Emerald Downs Belterra Park Northlands Park Indiana Downs Indiana Downs Monmouth Park Northlands Park Northlands Park Emerald Downs Belmont Park Emerald Downs Saratoga Woodbine Louisiana Downs Prairie Meadows Woodbine Del Mar Woodbine Mountaineer Monmouth Park Woodbine Monmouth Park Monmouth Park Hastings Racecourse Hastings Racecourse Prairie Meadows Prairie Meadows Arlington Park Arlington Park Louisiana Downs Saratoga Gulfstream Park Presque Isle Downs

Race Name & (Sponsor) Beaugay The Lineage Classic Golden Poppy St Allaire DuPont Distaff St Hilltop St Gallorette H’cap Sir Barton S Marine S Strawberry Morn H’cap Tomboy St Selene S Lone Star Park H’cap Jim Rasmussen Mem Wild Rose The Lyphard Green Carpet St Ogden Phipps H’cap Steady Growth S River Rock Casino (AlwS) Emerald Downs (AlwS) Easy Goer Old Forester Mint Julep H’cap Eclipse S Sir Winston Churchill H’cap Vancouver Sun H’cap Matt Winn St Hawkeyes Handicap Cyclones Handicap Sydney Gendelman Memorial H’cap Pegasus S Iowa Distaff Mother Goose St Eatontown St Iowa Derby Iowa Oaks J William Petro Memorial H’cap Dominion Day S The Monashee Chris Loseth Lt Governors’ H’cap Supernaturel St Molly Pitcher St New York Derby New York Oaks Blair’s Cove St Princess Elaine St Louisiana Showcase Starter St Louisiana Legends Classic - La Bred Louisiana Legends Turf Bison City S Seattle Slew H’cap Cincinnatian St Madamoiselle H Indiana Oaks Indiana Derby Lamplighter St Count Lathum St Fred Jones S Kent Handicap Saginaw Mt Rainier H’cap Lake George St Ontario Matron S Louisiana Cup Turf Classic Prairie Meadows H’cap Eternal Search S Clement L. Hirsch S Victoriana S West Virginia Governor’s St Oceanport St Seagram Cup S Lady’s Secret St Monmouth Cup British Columbia Cup Dogwood St British Columbia Cup Stellar’s Jay St Iowa Breeders’ Derby Ralph Hayes Black Tie Affair H’cap Lincoln Heritage H’cap Super Derby Prelude Lure Eight Miles East Malvern Rose S

Breeders’ Cup

Class Gr 3 S Gr 3 Gr 3 S

Gr 3 Gr 3

R Distaff

Gr 1 R

Gr 3 Gr 2

Gr 3 S S Gr 3 Gr 1 Gr 3 Gr 3 Gr 3 S Gr 3

Gr 2 S S S S R S R

Gr 2 Gr 2

Gr 2 Gr 3 S

Distaff

R Gr 1 R Gr 3 Gr 3 Gr 2 S S S S S S

S

Race Date 9-May-2015 9-May-2015 9-May-2015 15-May-2015 15-May-2015 16-May-2015 16-May-2015 16-May-2015 18-May-2015 18-May-2015 24-May-2015 25-May-2015 25-May-2015 25-May-2015 30-May-2015 31-May-2015 6-Jun-2015 6-Jun-2015 6-Jun-2015 6-Jun-2015 6-Jun-2015 6-Jun-2015 7-Jun-2015 7-Jun-2015 7-Jun-2015 13-Jun-2015 13-Jun-2015 13-Jun-2015 14-Jun-2015 21-Jun-2015 26-Jun-2015 27-Jun-2015 27-Jun-2015 27-Jun-2015 27-Jun-2015 27-Jun-2015 1-Jul-2015 1-Jul-2015 1-Jul-2015 1-Jul-2015 1-Jul-2015 3-Jul-2015 3-Jul-2015 3-Jul-2015 3-Jul-2015 3-Jul-2015 4-Jul-2015 4-Jul-2015 4-Jul-2015 12-Jul-2015 12-Jul-2015 12-Jul-2015 17-Jul-2015 18-Jul-2015 18-Jul-2015 18-Jul-2015 18-Jul-2015 18-Jul-2015 18-Jul-2015 18-Jul-2015 19-Jul-2015 24-Jul-2015 25-Jul-2015 25-Jul-2015 25-Jul-2015 29-Jul-2015 1-Aug-2015 1-Aug-2015 1-Aug-2015 2-Aug-2015 2-Aug-2015 2-Aug-2015 2-Aug-2015 3-Aug-2015 3-Aug-2015 8-Aug-2015 8-Aug-2015 8-Aug-2015 8-Aug-2015 8-Aug-2015 8-Aug-2015 8-Aug-2015 9-Aug-2015

Value $150,000 $60,000 $50,000 $150,000 $100,000 $150,000 CAN100,000 CAN125,000+ CAN50,000 $75,000 CAN150,000 $200,000 $75,000 $50,000 $75,000 + $75,000 $100,0000 CAN125,000 CAN50,000 CAN50,000 $150,000 $100,000 CAN200,000+ CAN50,000 CAN50,000 $100,000 $75,000 $75,000 $75,000 $150,000 $100,000 $300,000 $100,000 $250,000 $300,000 $75,000 CAN150,000 CAN50,000 CAN50,000 CAN50,000 CAN50,000 $150,000 $150,000 $75,000 $60,000 $60,000 $50,000 $125,000 $100,000 CAN250,000 $50,000 $75,000 CAN50,000 $200,000 $500,000 $60,000 CAN50,000 CAN50,000 $50,000 $100,000 $50,000 $200,000 CAN150,000+ $75,000 $75,000 CAN125,000 $300,000 CAN125,000 $200,000 $150,000 CAN150,000+ $100,000 $200,000 CAN50,000 CAN50,000 $80,000 $85,000 $75,000 $75,000 $100,000 $100,000 $75,000 $75,000

Age 4+ FM 3+ 3+ FM 3+ FM 3F 3+ FM 3+ 3 3+ FM 3F 3F 3+ 3+ 3+ F&M 3+ F&M 3 4+ FM 3+ 3 3F 3 3+ FM 4+ 3+ FM 3 3+ F&M (IA Bred) 3+ (IA Bred) 3+ 3 3+ F&M 3F 3+ FM 3 3F 3+ FM (OH Bred) 3+ 3+ 3 3+ 3F 3+ FM 3 (NY Bred) 3F 3+ CG 3+ FM 3+ (La Bred) 3+ 3+ La bred 3F 3 CG 3F 3+ F&M 3F 3 3 3 3+ 3F 4+ 3+ 3F 3+ F&M 3+ (LA Bred) 3+ 3F 3+ F&M 3+ F&M 3+ 3+ 3+ 3+ FM 3+ 3F 3 CG 3 4+ C&G (IA Bred) 3+ 3+ FM 3 4+ 3+ 3F

Surface T D T D T T AWT AWT D T AWT D D D T T D AWT D D D T AWT D D D D D T D D D T D D D AWT D D D D D D D T T T D T AWT D T D D D T D D D D D T AWT T D AWT AWT T D T AWT D D D D D D T T T T T AWT

8.5f (1700m) Metres 1700 1700 1700 1700 1700 1700 1700 1700 1700 1700 1700 1700 1700 1700 1700 1700 1700 1700 1700 1700 1700 1700 1700 1700 1700 1700 1700 1700 1700 1700 1700 1700 1700 1700 1700 1700 1700 1700 1700 1700 1700 1700 1700 1700 1700 1700 1700 1700 1700 1700 1700 1700 1700 1700 1700 1700 1700 1700 1700 1900 1700 1700 1700 1700 1700 1700 1700 1700 1700 1700 1700 1700 1700 1700 1700 1700 1700 1700 1700 1700 1700 1700 1700

Furlongs 8.5 8.5 8.5 8.5 8.5 8.5 8.5 8.5 8.5 8.5 8.5 8.5 8.5 8.5 8.5 8.5 8.5 8.5 8.5 8.5 8.5 8.5 8.5 8.5 8.5 8.5 8.5 8.5 8.5 8.5 8.5 8.5 8.5 8.5 8.5 8.5 8.5 8.5 8.5 8.5 8.5 8.5 8.5 8.5 8.5 8.5 8.5 8.5 8.5 8.5 8.5 8.5 8.5 8.5 8.5 8.5 8.5 8.5 8.5 8.5 8.5 8.5 8.5 8.5 8.5 8.5 8.5 8.5 8.5 8.5 8.5 8.5 8.5 8.5 8.5 8.5 8.5 8.5 8.5 8.5 8.5 8.5 8.5

ISSUE3635 TRAINERMAGAZINE.COM

Closing 25-Apr-2015 25-Apr-2015 30-Apr-2015 5-May-2015 5-May-2015 5-May-2015 5-May-2015 29-Apr-2015 9-May-2015 7-May-2015 6-May-2015 14-May-2015 16-May-2015 16-May-2015 20-May-2015 21-May-2015 23-May-2015 20-May-2015 30-May-2015 30-May-2015 23-May-2015 23-May-2015 20-May-2015 30-May-2015 30-May-2015 30-May-2015 5-Jun-2015 5-Jun-2015 4-Jun-2015 7-Jun-2015 13-Jun-2015 13-Jun-2015 12-Jun-2015 13-Jun-2015 13-Jun-2015 10-Jun-2015 20-Jun-2015 20-Jun-2015 20-Jun-2015 20-Jun-2015 20-Jun-2015

19-Jun-2015 19-Jun-2014 13-Jun-2015 13-Jun-2015 24-Jun-2015 2-Jul-2015

24-Jun-2015 10-Jul-2015

4-Jul-2015 11-Jul-2015 8-Jul-2015 25-Jul-2015 17-Jul-2015 8-Jul-2015 23-Jul-2015 15-Jul-2015 20-Jul-2015 19-Ju-2014 15-Jul-2015 24-Jul-2015 19-Jul-2015 25-Jul-2015 25-Jul-2015 31-Jul-2015 29-Jul-2015 29-Jul-2015 25-Jul-2015 25-Jul-2015 26-Jul-2015 29-Jul-2015

91


STAKES SCHEDULES Stakes Schedules updated online monthly Country USA USA CAN CAN CAN CAN CAN USA USA USA USA USA USA USA USA USA CAN CAN USA USA USA USA USA USA USA USA CAN CAN USA USA USA USA USA USA USA USA USA USA CAN CAN CAN CAN CAN CAN USA USA USA USA USA USA USA USA CAN CAN USA USA USA USA USA USA USA CAN CAN CAN CAN CAN USA USA USA USA CAN USA CAN CAN USA CAN CAN CAN USA

Track Belterra Park Belterra Park Northlands Park Northlands Park Northlands Park Hastings Racecourse Hastings Racecourse Monmouth Park Penn National Monmouth Park Saratoga Saratoga Saratoga Monmouth Park Thistledown Saratoga Woodbine Woodbine Saratoga Churchill Downs Monmouth Park Churchill Downs Gulfstream Park Gulfstream Park Canterbury Canterbury Hastings Racecourse Hastings Racecourse Monmouth Park Indiana Downs Indiana Downs Finger Lakes Louisiana Downs Louisiana Downs Monmouth Park Monmouth Park Emerald Downs Emerald Downs Hastings Racecourse Hastings Racecourse Northlands Park Northlands Park Northlands Park Woodbine Finger Lakes Thistledown Emerald Downs Keeneland Gulfstream Park Gulfstream Park Gulfstream Park Gulfstream Park Woodbine Woodbine Keeneland Indiana Downs Indiana Downs Indiana Downs Indiana Downs Keeneland Thistledown Northlands Park Woodbine Hastings Racecourse Hastings Racecourse Northlands Park Keeneland Keeneland Indiana Downs Indiana Downs Woodbine Mahoning Valley Woodbine Woodbine Penn National Woodbine Woodbine Woodbine Mahoning Valley

Race Name & (Sponsor) Horizon St Vivacious H’cap City of Edmonton Distaff St Sonoma St Westerner St Richmond Derby Trial Hong Kong Jockey Club H’cap Monmouth Oaks Robellino S Cliff Hanger St West Point H’cap Yaddo H’cap Ballston Spa The Violet St Pay the Man S With Anticipation St Algoma S Elgin S P.G. Johnson St Pocahontas St Boiling Springs St Iroquois St The Wasted Tears The Vid MN Classic Championship MN Distaff Classic Championship CTHS Sales CTHS Sales Lighthouse St A J Foyt Florence Henderson Genesee Valley Breeders’ H’cap River Cities Unbridled Hcap Jersey Girl H’cap Charles Hesse H’cap Pegasus Training Center St Muckleshoot Tribal Classic Champions Starters Series Final Champions Distaff Starters Series Final Breeders’ H’cap Fall Classic Distaff Beaufort St La Lorgnette S Jack Betta Be Rite H’cap Catlaunch Stakes Gottstein Futurity Darley Alcibiades S Florida Stallion St - My Dear Girl Division Florida Stallion St - In Reality Division Florida Sire St - Foolish Pleasure Div. Forida Sire St - Meadow Star Div. Mazarine BC S Grey BC S Dixiana Bourbon S The Richmond S Gus Grissom S Hoosier Breeders Sophomore S Hoosier Breeders Sophomore S JP Morgan Chase Jessamine S Juvenile St Duchess of York St Cup and Saucer S Ascot Graduation St Fantasy St Harvest Gold Plate BC Juvenile Fillies BC Juvenile Francis Slocum S Too Much Coffee S Princess Elizabeth S Ohio Debutante H Autumn S South Ocean S The Swatara Ontario Lassie S Kingarvie S Display S Bobbie Bricker Memorial H’cap

USA USA USA USA

Churchill Downs Belmont Park Churchill Downs Belmont Park

Kentucky Oaks Fort Marcy Woodford Reserve Turf Classic Peter Pan St

Breeders’ Cup

Class

Gr 3 R Gr 3 S S Gr 2 Gr 3 Gr 2 R R Juv F Juv

Gr 2 Gr 3 Gr 3

S S

R S S

S S

S S S S

Juv F

Juv Turf

Juv F Turf

R Gr 1 R R

Gr 3 Gr 3 Gr 3 S S S S Gr 3 S R

Gr 1 Gr 1 S S R Gr 2 S S S

Race Date 9-Aug-2015 9-Aug-2015 14-Aug-2015 15-Aug-2015 15-Aug-2015 21-Aug-2015 21-Aug-2015 22-Aug-2015 22-Aug-2015 23-Aug-2015 28-Aug-2015 28-Aug-2015 29-Aug-2015 29-Aug-2015 29-Aug-2015 2-Sep-2015 2-Sep-2015 2-Sep-2015 3-Sep-2015 5-Sep-2015 5-Sep-2015 5-Sep-2015 5-Sep-2015 5-Sep-2015 6-Sep-2015 6-Sep-2015 7-Sep-2015 7-Sep-2015 7-Sep-2015 9-Sep-2015 9-Sep-2015 11-Sep-2015 12-Sep-2015 12-Sep-2015 12-Sep-2015 12-Sep-2015 13-Sep-2015 13-Sep-2015 13-Sep-2015 13-Sep-2015 19-Sep-2015 19-Sep-2015 19-Sep-2015 20-Sep-2015 25-Sep-2015 26-Sep-2015 27-Sep-2015 2-Oct-2015 3-Oct-2015 3-Oct-2015 3-Oct-2015 3-Oct-2015 4-Oct-2015 4-Oct-2015 4-Oct-2015 7-Oct-2015 7-Oct-2015 7-Oct-2015 7-Oct-2015 8-Oct-2015 10-Oct-2015 10-Oct-2015 11-Oct-2015 12-Oct-2015 12-Oct-2015 12-Oct-2015 31-Oct-2015 31-Oct-2015 31-Oct-2015 31-Oct-2015 1-Nov-2015 7-Nov-2015 8-Nov-2015 14-Nov-2015 25-Nov-2015 28-Nov-2015 28-Nov-2015 29-Nov-2015 5-Dec-2015

8.5f (1700m)

Value Age $75,000 3 $75,000 3 + FM CAN 75,000 3+ F&M CAN50,000 3F CAN50,000 3+ CAN50,000 3 CAN50,000 3F $100,000 3F $75,000 3+ $100,000 3+ $150,000 3+ (NY bred) $150,000 3+ FM (NY bred) $400,000 3+ FM $100,000 3+ F&M $75,000 3 + FM $200,000 2 CAN125,000 3+ F&M CAN125,000 3+ C&G $100,000 2F $150,000 2F $100,000 3F $150,000 2 $75,000 3+ FM $75,000 3+ $60,000 3+ $60,000 3+ FM CAN50,000 3 CG CAN50,000 3F $75,000 3+ FM $85,000 3+ $85,000 3+ F&M $50,000 3+ $75,000 3+ F&M $75,000 3+ $60,000 3+ FM $60,000 3+ $50,000 3+ FM WA bred $50,000 3+ WA Bred CAN50,000 3+ CAN50,000 3+ FM CAN50,000 3+ CAN50,000 3+ F&M CAN50,000 3 CAN125,000 3F $50,000 3+ FM $75,000 3 + (Ohio bred) $65000 2 WA $400,000 2F $500,000 2F $500,000 2 $150,000 3 $150,000 3F CAN150,000 2F CAN150,000 2 $250,000 2 $85,000 3+ F&M $85,000 3+ C&G $85,000 3 $85,000 3F $150,000 2F $150,000 2 CAN50,000 3+ F&M CAN250,000 2 CAN 75,000 2 CAN 75,000 2F CAN50,000 3+ $2,000,000 2F $2,000,000 2 C&G $150,000 3+ F&M (IN Bred) $150,000 3+(IN Bred) CAN250,000 2F $75,000 3 + FM (Ohio bred) CAN150,000+ 3+ CAN125,000 2F $100,000 3+ CAN150,000 2F CAN125,000 2 CAN125,000 2 $75,000 3 + FM

Surface T T D D D D D D T T T T T T D T AWT AWT T D T D T T D D D D D T T D T T D D D D D D D D D AWT D T D AWT D D D D AWT AWT T D D D D T D D T D D D D D D D AWT T AWT AWT D AWT AWT AWT T

Metres 1700 1700 1700 1700 1700 1700 1700 1700 1700 1700 1700 1700 1700 1700 1700 1700 1700 1700 1700 1700 1700 1700 1700 1700 1700 1700 1700 1700 1700 1700 1700 1700 1700 1700 1700 1700 1700 1700 1700 1700 1700 1700 1700 1700 1700 1700 1700 1700 1700 1700 1700 1700 1700 1700 1700 1700 1700 1700 1700 1700 1700 1700 1700 1700 1700 1700 1700 1700 1700 1700 1700 1700 1700 1700 1700 1700 1700 1700 1700

Furlongs 8.5 8.5 8.5 8.5 8.5 8.5 8.5 8.5 8.5 8.5 8.5 8.5 8.5 8.5 8.5 8.5 8.5 8.5 8.5 8.5 8.5 8.5 8.5 8.5 8.5 8.5 8.5 8.5 8.5 8.5 8.5 8.5 8.5 8.5 8.5 8.5 8.5 8.5 8.5 8.5 8.5 8.5 8.5 8.5 8.5 8.5 8.5 8.5 8.5 8.5 8.5 8.5 8.5 8.5 8.5 8.5 8.5 8.5 8.5 8.5 8.5 8.5 8.5 8.5 8.5 8.5 8.5 8.5 8.5 8.5 8.5 8.5 8.5 8.5 8.5 8.5 8.5 8.5 8.5

D T T D

1800 1800 1800 1800

9 9 9 9

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92

TRAINERMAGAZINE.COM ISSUE 36

Gr 1 Gr 3 Gr 1 Gr 2

1-May-2015 2-May-2015 2-May-2015 9-May-2015

$100,0000 $150,000 $500,000 $200,000

Closing 30-Jul-2015 30-Jul-2015

15-Aug-2015 15-Aug-2015 9-Aug-2015 12-Aug-2015 9-Aug-2015 15-Aug-2015 15-Aug-2015 15-Aug-2015 16-Aug-2015 22-Aug-2015 12-Aug-2015 12-Aug-2015 22-Aug-2015 19-Aug-2015 23-Aug-2015 19-Aug-2015 23-Aug-2015 23-Aug-2015 26-Aug-2015 26-Aug-2015 29-Aug-2015 22-Aug-2015 29-Aug-2015 26-Aug-2015 26-Aug-2015 29-Aug-2015 29-Aug-2015 4-Sep-2015 4-Sep-2015

5-Sep-2015 5-Sep-2015

2-Sep-2015

16-Sep-2015 3-Mar-2015 3-Mar-2015 3-Mar-2015 3-Mar-2015 16-Sep-2015 16-Sep-2015 16-Sep-2015 23-Sep-2015 23-Sep-2015 23-Sep-2015 23-Sep-2015

23-Sep-2015 3-Oct-2015 3-Oct-2015 19-Oct-2015 19-Oct-2015 14-Oct-2015 14-Oct-2015 14-Oct-2015 21-Oct-2015 28-Oct-2015 18-Nov-2015 11-Nov-2015 11-Nov-2015 11-Nov-2015

9f (1800m) 3F 4+ 3+ 3

21-Feb-2015 18-Apr-2015 21-Feb-2015 25-Apr-2015


STAKES SCHEDULES Check out Stakes Schedules online - trainermagazine.com/schedules Country USA USA USA USA USA USA USA USA USA USA USA JPN CAN CAN USA USA CAN JPN USA USA CAN USA USA USA CAN USA USA USA USA USA CAN CAN CAN USA USA USA USA USA JPN USA USA USA USA USA USA USA USA USA USA USA USA USA JPN USA USA CAN CAN CAN CAN JPN CAN CAN USA USA USA JPN CAN CAN JPN USA USA JPN CAN USA JPN USA JPN USA USA

Track Pimlico Pimlico Penn National Belmont Park Belmont Park Monmouth Park Monmouth Park Albuquerque Churchill Downs Churchill Downs Churchill Downs Tokyo Woodbine Woodbine Prairie Meadows Thistledown Woodbine Fukushima Arlington Park Thistledown Woodbine Saratoga Belterra Park Saratoga Woodbine Saratoga Mountaineer Saratoga Monmouth Park Monmouth Park Hastings Racecourse Hastings Racecourse Assiniboia Downs Saratoga Emerald Downs Saratoga Emerald Downs Saratoga Niigata Saratoga Arlington Park Arapahoe Park Emerald Downs Saratoga Saratoga Saratoga Saratoga Saratoga Monmouth Park Saratoga Saratoga Saratoga Sapporo Saratoga Louisiana Downs Hastings Racecourse Hastings Racecourse Hastings Racecourse Woodbine Hanshin Woodbine Woodbine Keeneland Belterra Park Thistledown Tokyo Hastings Racecourse Woodbine Tokyo Keeneland Charles Town Kyoto Woodbine Charles Town Tokyo Mahoning Valley Hanshin Remington Park Delaware Park

Race Name & (Sponsor) Black-Eyed Susan St Dixie St The Mountainview H’cap Pennine Ridge Wonder Again Monmouth St Restoration St Downs at Albuquerque H Stephen Foster H’cap Fleur de Lis H’cap Regret St Epsom Cup Plate Trial S Woodbine Oaks Presented by Budweiser Prairie Meadows Cornhusker H’cap The Daniel Stearns Cleveland Gold Cup Dance Smartly S Radio Nikkei Sho American Derby George Lewis Memorial St Nijinsky St Diana St Norm Barron Queen City Oaks Coaching Club American Oaks Toronto Cup S Curlin West Virginia Derby Jim Dandy St Haskell Invitational (INV) WinStar Matchmaker British Columbia Cup Classic H’cap British Columbia Cup Distaff H’cap Manitoba Derby National Museum Racing Hall of Fame St Washington Oaks Whitney H’cap Emerald Downs Derby Alydar Leopard St Lake Placid Pucker Up St Arapahoe Park Classic Emerald Distaff Saratoga Dew St Summer Colony Fleet Indian Albany St Personal Ensign Inv St Philip H. Iselin St Evan Shipman (NYB) Saranac St The Woodward Sapporo Nisai St Bernard Baruch H’cap Super Derby British Columbia Derby Delta Colleen H’cap SW Randall Plate H’cap Canadian S Rose St Ontario Derby Durham Cup S Juddmonte Spinster S John W. Galbreath Memorial St Best of Ohio Distaff H’cap Mainichi Okan Ballerina Breeders’ Cup St Carotene S Fuchu Himba St BC Distaff Championship My Sister Pearl Miyako St Coronation Futurity A Huevo St Tokyo Sports Hai Nisai St Ruff/Kirchberg Memotial H’cap Challenge Cup Oklahoma Derby Obeah St

FR

Longchamp

Prix d’Ispahan

Breeders’ Cup

Class Gr 2 Gr 2

Gr 2

Mile Distaff

Gr 1 Gr 2 Gr 3 Gr 3 R R Gr 3 S Gr 2 Gr 3 Gr 3 S Gr 2 Gr 1 Gr 1

Classic

Gr 2 Gr 2 Gr 1 Gr 3 S S Gr 2

Classic

Gr 1

Gr 3 Gr 2 Gr 3

S

Distaff

S Gr 1 Gr 3 Gr 3 Gr 1 Gr 3 Gr 2 Gr 2 Gr 3

F&M Turf

Distaff

Gr 2 Gr 2 Gr 3 Gr 3 Gr 1 S Gr 2 Gr 3 S Gr 2 Gr 1 S Gr 3 R S Gr 3 Gr 3 Gr 3 Gr 3

Race Date 16-May-2015 16-May-2015 30-May-2015 30-May-2015 31-May-2015 7-Jun-2015 13-Jun-2015 13-Jun-2015 13-Jun-2015 13-Jun-2015 13-Jun-2015 14-Jun-2015 14-Jun-2015 14-Jun-2015 27-Jun-2015 4-Jul-2015 5-Jul-2015 5-Jul-2015 11-Jul-2015 18-Jul-2015 19-Jul-2015 25-Jul-2015 26-Jul-2015 26-Jul-2015 26-Jul-2015 31-Jul-2015 1-Aug-2015 1-Aug-2015 2-Aug-2015 2-Aug-2015 3-Aug-2015 3-Aug-2015 3-Aug-2015 7-Aug-2015 8-Aug-2015 8-Aug-2015 9-Aug-2015 9-Aug-2015 9-Aug-2015 14-Aug-2015 15-Aug-2015 16-Aug-2015 16-Aug-2015 17-Aug-2015 24-Aug-2015 28-Aug-2015 28-Aug-2015 29-Aug-2015 30-Aug-2015 4-Sep-2015 5-Sep-2015 5-Sep-2015 5-Sep-2015 7-Sep-2015 12-Sep-2015 13-Sep-2015 13-Sep-2015 13-Sep-2015 13-Sep-2015 20-Sep-2015 20-Sep-2015 3-Oct-2015 4-Oct-2015 10-Oct-2015 10-Oct-2015 11-Oct-2015 12-Oct-2015 12-Oct-2015 17-Oct-2015 30-Oct-2015 7-Nov-2015 8-Nov-2015 8-Nov-2015 14-Nov-2015 23-Nov-2015 28-Nov-2015 12-Dec-2015 20-Sep-2103 14-Jun-2104

Value $500,000 $300,000 $200,000 $200,000 $200,000 $200,000 $60,000 $150,000 $500,000 $200,000 $100,000 $723,000 CAN150,000 CAN500,000 $300,000 $75,000 CAN200,000+ $671000 $150,000 $75,000 CAN200,000 $500,000 $75,000 $300,000 CAN125,000 $100,000 $75,0000 $600,000 $1,000,000 $150,000 CAN50,000 CAN50,000 CAN 75,000 $200,000 $65,000 $1,250,000 $65,000 $100,000 $723,000 $300,000 $100,000 $100,000 $65,000 $100,000 $100,000 $200,000 $250,000 $75,0000 $150,000 $100,000 $300,000 $600,000 $542,000 $250,000 $500,000 CAN 250,000 CAN50,000 CAN50,000 CAN300,000+ $908000 CAN150,000+ CAN150,000+ $500,000 $150,000 $150,000 $1,173000 CAN 100,000 CAN150,000 $955000 $2,000,000 $50,000 $671000 CAN250,000 $50,000 $580000 $75,000 $723,000 $400,000 $150,000

Age 3F 3+ 3+ 3 3F 3+ 3 3+ 3+ 3+ FM 3F 3+ 3 3F 3+ 3 (OH Bred) 3+ F&M 3 3 3+ (OH Bred) 3+ 3+ FM 3F 3F 3 3 3 3 3 3+ FM 3+ 3+FM 3 3 3F 3+ 3 4+F 3 3F 3F 3+ 3+ FM 3+ FM (NY bred) 3 + FM 3F 3 (NY bred) 3+ FM 3+ 3+ 3 3+ 2 3+ 3 3 FM 3+ 3+ F&M 3F 3 3+ 3+ F&M 2F 3+ FM (OH Bred) 3+ 3+FM 3F 3+ FM 3+ FM 3+ F&M 3+ 2 3+ 2 3+ 3+ 3 3+ FM

9f (1800m)

Surface D T D T T T T D D D T T AWT AWT D D T T T D T T T D T D D D D T D D D T D D D D D T T T D D D D D D D D T D T T D D D D T T AWT AWT AWT T D T D T T D D D AWT D T T T D D

Metres 1800 1800 1800 1800 1800 1800 1800 1800 1800 1800 1800 1800 1800 1800 1800 1800 1800 1800 1800 1800 1800 1800 1800 1800 1800 1800 1800 1800 1800 1800 1800 1800 1800 1800 1800 1800 1800 1800 1800 1800 1800 1800 1800 1800 1800 1800 1800 1800 1800 1800 1800 1800 1800 1800 1800 1800 1800 1800 1800 1800 1800 1800 1800 1800 1800 1800 1800 1800 1800 1800 1800 1800 1800 1800 1800 1800 1800 1800 1800

Furlongs 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9

T

1850

9.25

Stakes Schedules updated online monthly Gp 1

24-May-2015

ˆ 250000

Pimlico

The Pimlico Special

15-May-2015

$300,000

17-Jun-2015 26-May-2015 1-Jul-2015 1-Jul-2015 11-Jul-2015 16-Jul-2015 11-Jul-2015 8-Jul-2015 18-Jul-2015 20-Jul-2015 18-Jul-2015 19-Jul-2015 25-Jul-2015 25-Jul-2015 25-Jul-2015 25-Jul-2015 25-Jul-2015 23-Jun-2015 1-Aug-2015 5-Aug-2015

1-Aug-2015 8-Aug-2015 15-Aug-2015 15-Aug-2015 15-Aug-2015 16-Aug-2015 22-Aug-2015 22-Aug-2015 22-Aug-2015 21-Jul-2015 22-Aug-2015 15-Aug-2015 5-Sep-2015 5-Sep-2015 5-Sep-2015 26-Aug-2015 4-Aug-2015 2-Sep-2015 16-Sep-2015 16-Sep-2015

1-Sep-2015 3-Oct-2015 23-Sep-2015 1-Sep-2015 19-Oct-2015 28-Oct-2015 29-Sep-2015 21-Oct-2015 4-Nov-2015 13-Oct-2015 27-Oct-2015 20-Sep-2013

9.25f (1850m) 4+

Call us on 1 888 659 2935 to subscribe from $20 USA

Closing 5-May-2015 5-May-2015 20-May-2015 16-May-2015 16-May-2015 24-May-2015 5-Jun-2015 3-Jun-2015 30-May-2015 30-May-2015 30-May-2015 28-Apr-2015 27-May-2015 6-May-2015 13-Jun-2015

29-Apr-2015

9.5f (1900m) 3+

D

1900

9.5

ISSUE 36 TRAINERMAGAZINE.COM

5-May-2015

93


STAKES SCHEDULES Stakes Schedules updated online monthly Country USA JPN USA USA CAN CAN USA

Track Pimlico Kyoto Arlington Park Arlington Park Woodbine Fort Erie Arlington Park

Race Name & (Sponsor) Preakness St Heian St Modesty H’cap Arlington H’cap Prince of Wales S Prince of Wales S Beverly D. St

Breeders’ Cup

F&M Turf

Class Gr 1 Gr 3 Gr 3 Gr 3 R S Gr 1

Race Date 16-May-2015 23-May-2015 11-Jul-2015 11-Jul-2015 28-Jul-2015 28-Jul-2015 15-Aug-2015

Value $150,0000 $633,000 $150,000 $150,000 CAN500,000 CAN500,000 $75,0000

9.5f (1900m) Age 3 4+ 3+ FM 3+ 3 3 3+ FM

Surface D D T T D D T

Metres 1900 1900 1900 1900 1900 1900 1900

Check out Stakes Schedules online - trainermagazine.com/schedules GB

Goodwood

Nassau

Gp 1

1-Aug-2015

£200,000

3+ F

Furlongs 9.5 9.5 9.5 9.5 9.5 9.5 9.5

9.85f (1900m) T

1970

9.85

Call us on 1 888 659 2935 to subscribe from $20 USA ITY JPN FR USA JPN USA JPN GB USA IRE USA USA USA CAN JPN JPN GER JPN CAN USA USA USA USA FR JPN USA USA JPN IRE USA JPN FR USA GB CAN JPN ITY USA USA CAN FR ITY JPN JPN JPN JPN

Churchill Downs Rome Niigata Longchamp Belmont Park Hanshin Belmont Park Hanshin Royal Ascot Santa Anita Curragh Belmont Park Belmont Park Belmont Park Woodbine Fukushima Hakodate Munich Kokura Woodbine Arlington Park Arlington Park Del Mar Saratoga Deauville Sapporo Saratoga Thistledown Niigata Leopardstown Belmont Park Hanshin Longchamp Thistledown Ascot Woodbine Kyoto Rome Keeneland Keeneland Woodbine Saint-Cloud Rome Fukushima Kyoto Chukyo Nakayama

Kentucky Derby Premio Presidente della Repubblica Niigata Daishoten Prix Saint-Alary (Pour Moi Coolmore) New York St Naruo Kinen Manhattan S Mermaid St Prince of Wales’s St The Gold Cup at Santa Anita Pretty Polly St (Stobart Ireland) Belmont Oaks Invitational Belmont Derby Invitational Suburban H’cap The Queen’s Plate S Tanabata Sho Hakodate Kinen Grosser-Dallmayr Preis Kokura Kinen Wonder Where S Arlington Million XXXI Secretariat Stakes TGV Pacific Classic Alabama Prix Jean Romanet (Darley) Sapporo Kinen Travers Governor’s Buckeye Cup Niigata Kinen Irish Champion St Flower Bowl Invitational St Sirius St Prix de l’Opera (Longines) Best of Ohio Endurance H’cap Champion (Qipco) E P Taylor S Shuka Sho Premio Lydia Tesio BC Filly & Mare Turf BC Classic Maple Leaf S Criterium de Saint-Cloud Premio Roma Fukushima Kinen Radio Nikkei Hai Nisai St Kinko Sho Hopeful S

GB

Sandown Park

Eclipse St (Coral)

GB

York

International St (Juddmonte)

Classic F&M Turf

Turf Classic

Turf F&M Turf F&M Turf

Gr 1 Gp 1 Gr 3 Gp 1 Gr 2 Gr 3 Gr 1 Gr 3 Gp 1 Gr2 Gp 1 Gr 1 Gr 1 Gr 2 R Gr 3 Gr 3 Gp 1 Gr 3 R Gr 1 Gr 1 Gr 1 Gr 1 Gp 1 Gr 2 Gr 1 S Gr 3 Gp 1 Gr 1 Gr 3 Gp 1 S Gp 1 Gr 1 Gr 1 Gp 1 Gr 1 Gr 1 Gr 3 Gp 1 Gp 1 Gr 3 Gr 3 Gr 2 Gr 2

2-May-2015 10-May-2015 10-May-2015 24-May-2015 5-Jun-2015 6-Jun-2015 6-Jun-2015 14-Jun-2015 17-Jun-2015 27-Jun-2015 28-Jun-2015 4-Jul-2015 4-Jul-2015 4-Jul-2015 5-Jul-2015 12-Jul-2015 19-Jul-2015 26-Jul-2015 9-Aug-2015 9-Aug-2015 15-Aug-2015 15-Aug-2015 22-Aug-2015 22-Aug-2015 23-Aug-2015 23-Aug-2015 29-Aug-2015 5-Sep-2015 6-Sep-2015 12-Sep-2015 26-Sep-2015 3-Oct-2015 4-Oct-2015 10-Oct-2015 17-Oct-2015 18-Oct-2015 18-Oct-2015 25-Oct-2015 31-Oct-2015 31-Oct-2015 31-Oct-2015 1-Nov-2015 8-Nov-2015 15-Nov-2015 28-Nov-2015 5-Dec-2015 27-Dec-2015

$2,000,000 ˆ 242,000 $723,000 ˆ 250000 $300,000 $723,000 $100,0000 $633,000 £375,000 $500,000 ˆ 200,000 $100,0000 $1,250,000 $500,000 CAN1,000,000 $723,000 $723,000 ˆ 155000 $723,000 CAN250,000 $100,0000 $500,000 $100,0000 $600,000 ˆ 250000 $1226000 $1,250,000 $75,000 $723,000 ˆ 1000000 $600,000 $633,000 ˆ 400,000 $150,000 £1,300,000 CAN500,000 $1,608,000 ˆ 264000 $2,000,000 $5,000,000 CAN150,000 ˆ 250000 ˆ 242,000 $723,000 $580000 $1,085,000 $1,173,000

4-Jul-2015

£425000

3 4+ 4+ 3F 4+ FM 3+ 4+ 3+ FM 4+ 3+ 3+ F 3F 3 4+ 3 3+ 3+ 3+ 3+ 3F 3+ 3 3+ 3F 4+ F 3+ 3 3+ (OH Bred) 3+ 3+ 3+ F&M 3+ 3+ F 3+ (OH Bred) 3+ 3+ F&M 3F 3+ F 3+ F&M 3+ 3+ F&M 2 CF 3+ 3+ 2 3+ 2

D T T T T T T T T D T T T D AWT T T T T T T T AWT D T T D D T T T D T D T T T T T D AWT T T T T T T

2000 2000 2000 2000 2000 2000 2000 2000 2000 2000 2000 2000 2000 2000 2000 2000 2000 2000 2000 2000 2000 2000 2000 2000 2000 2000 2000 2000 2000 2000 2000 2000 2000 2000 2000 2000 2000 2000 2000 2000 2000 2000 2000 2000 2000 2000 2000

10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10

T

2010

10.05

Gp 1

19-Aug-2015

£750000

T

2080

10.4

3+

Longchamp Curragh Chantilly Chantilly

Prix Ganay Gold Cup (Tattersalls) Prix du Jockey Club Prix de Diane (Longines)

Gp 1 Gp 1 Gp 1 Gp 1

USA USA JPN JPN USA GER CAN CAN CAN USA USA

Belmont Park Belmont Park Kyoto Hanshin Monmouth Park Dusseldorf Hastings Racecourse Northlands Park Woodbine Del Mar Saratoga

Sheepshead Bay H’cap Man o’ War BC St Kyoto Shimbun Hai Takarazuka Kinen United Nations St Henkel Preis der Diana German Oaks British Columbia Cup Marathon (BC Bred) Canadian Derby Sky Classic S Del Mar H’cap Glens Falls H’cap

3-May-2015 24-May-2015 31-May-2015 14-Jun-2015

ˆ 300,000 ˆ 210000 ˆ 1500000 ˆ 1000000

94

TRAINERMAGAZINE.COM ISSUE 36

Turf Turf

Turf

2-May-2015 9-May-2015 9-May-2015 28-Jun-2015 5-Jul-2015 2-Aug-2015 3-Aug-2015 15-Aug-2015 16-Aug-2015 22-Aug-2015 5-Sep-2015

$200,000 $400,000 $942000 $2,721,000 $500,000 ˆ 500000 CAN 20,000 CAN 200,000 CAN200,000 $200,000 $200,000

4-Aug-2015 30-Sep-2015 1-Sep-2015 8-Oct-2015 19-Oct-2015 19-Oct-2015 14-Oct-2015 14-Oct-2015 15-Oct-2015 29-Sep-2015 13-Oct-2015 27-Oct-2015 10-Nov-2015

28-Apr-2015

23-Jun-2015

10.5f (2100m) 4+ 4+ 3 CF 3F

T T T T

2100 2100 2100 2100

10.5 10.5 10.5 10.5

4 + FM 4+ 3 3+ 3+ 3F 3+ 3 3+ 3+ 3+ FM

T T T T T T D D T T T

2200 2200 2200 2200 2200 2200 2200 2200 2200 2200 2200

11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11

Stakes Schedules updated online monthly Gr 2 Gr 1 Gr 2 Gr 1 Gr 1 Gp 1 S Gr 3 Gr 2 Gr 2 Gr 3

21-Jul-2015 27-May-2015 15-Sep-2015 3-Oct-2015 26-Aug-2015

10.4f (2080m)

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17-Jan-2015 16-Apr-2015 31-Mar-2015 CLOSED 23-May-2015 28-Apr-2015 23-May-2015 28-Apr-2015 20-Apr-2015 18-Jun-2015 22-Apr-2015 Inv Inv 20-Jun-2015 6-May-2015 26-May-2015 9-Jun-2015 5-May-2015 23-Jun-2015 22-Jul-2015 23-May-2015 23-May-2015 13-Aug-2015 8-Aug-2015 29-Jul-2015 7-Jul-2015 15-Aug-2015

10.05f (2010m) 3+

Check out Stakes Schedules online - trainermagazine.com/schedules Turf

23-Jun-2015

10f (2000m)

Stakes Schedules updated online monthly Gp 1

Closing 17-Jan-2015 14-Apr-2015 1-Jul-2015 1-Jul-2015 14-Jul-2015 1-Jul-2015 23-May-2015

15-Apr-2015 18-Mar-2015 CLOSED CLOSED

11f (2200m) 18-Apr-2015 25-Apr-2015 31-Mar-2015 12-May-2015 20-Jun-2015 CLOSED 25-Jul-2015 29-Jul-2015 13-Aug-2015 22-Aug-2015


STAKES SCHEDULES Check out Stakes Schedules online - trainermagazine.com/schedules Country CAN JPN JPN CAN JPN

Track Northlands Park Niigata Niigata Hastings Racecourse Kyoto

Race Name & (Sponsor) Speed to Spare St St Lite Kinen All Comers BC Premier’s H’cap Queen Elizabeth II Commemorative Cup

Breeders’ Cup

JPN USA JPN JPN USA USA USA ITY IRE FR GB GER CAN USA FR IRE GB USA USA GER CAN GB NOR USA GER FR CAN USA GER JPN FR JPN GB ITY CAN USA GER JPN

Tokyo Churchill Downs Tokyo Tokyo Belmont Park Belmont Park Belmont Park Milan Curragh Saint-Cloud Belmont Park Hamburg Woodbine Arlington Park Longchamp Curragh Ascot Belmont Park Saratoga Hoppegarten Woodbine York Ovrevoll Saratoga Baden-Baden Longchamp Woodbine Belmont Park Cologne Hanshin Longchamp Kyoto Ascot Milan Woodbine Keeneland Munich Tokyo

Aoba Sho Louisville H’cap Yushun Himba (Japanese Oaks) Tokyo Yushun (Japanese Derby) Belmont St Brooklyn Invitational Brooklyn H’cap Gran Premio Milano Irish Derby (Dubai Duty Free) Grand Prix de Saint-Cloud River Memories IDEE 145. Deutsches Derby Singspiel S Stars and Stripes St Grand Prix de Paris (Juddmonte) Irish Oaks (Darley) King George VI and Queen Elizabeth (Betfair) Bowling Green H’cap Waya St Grosser Preis Von Berlin Breeders’ S Yorkshire Oaks (Darley) Erik O Steens Memorial Sword Dancer Invitational St Longines Grosser Preis von Baden Prix Vermeille (Qatar) Northern Dancer BC Turf Joe Hirsch Turf Classic Invitational St Preis von ˆ pa Kobe Shimbun Hai Prix de l’Arc de Triomphe (Qatar) Kyoto Daishoten QIPCO British Champions Series Fillies & Mares Gran Premio del Jockey Club e Coppa d’Oro Pattison Canadian International BC Turf Grosser Pries Von Bayern Japan Cup

GB GB GB

Epsom Downs Epsom Downs Epsom Downs

Oaks (Investec) Coronation Cup (Investec) Derby (Investec)

JPN JPN JPN

Tokyo Tokyo Nakayama

Meguro Kinen Copa Republica Argentina Arima Kinen

Class Gr 2 Gr 2 Gr 3 Gr 1

Race Date 7-Sep-2015 21-Sep-2015 27-Sep-2015 12-Oct-2015 15-Nov-2015

Value CAN 100,000 $942000 $1,173,000 CAN 100,000 $1,636000

11f (2200m)

Age 3+ 3 3+ 3+ 3+ FM

Surface D T T D T

Metres 2200 2200 2200 2200 2200

Furlongs 11 11 11 11 11

3 3+ 3F 3 3 4+ 4+ 3+ 3 CF 4+ 4 + FM 3 CF 3+ 3+ 3 CF 3F 3+ 4+ 3+ FM 3+ 3 3+ F 3+ F&M 3+ 3+ 3+ F 3+ 3+ 3+ 3 3+ CF 3+ 3 + FM 3+ 3+ 3+ 3+ 3+

T T T T D D D T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T

2400 2400 2400 2400 2400 2400 2400 2400 2400 2400 2400 2400 2400 2400 2400 2400 2400 2400 2400 2400 2400 2400 2400 2400 2400 2400 2400 2400 2400 2400 2400 2400 2400 2400 2400 2400 2400 2400

12 12 12 12 12 12 12 12 12 12 12 12 12 12 12 12 12 12 12 12 12 12 12 12 12 12 12 12 12 12 12 12 12 12 12 12 12 12

3F 4+ 3 C&F

T T T

2410 2410 2410

12.05 12.05 12.05

T T T

2500 2500 2500

12.5 12.5 12.5

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Turf

Turf

F&M Turf Turf Turf

Turf

Gr 2 Gr 3 Gr 1 Gr 1 Gr 1 Gr 2 Gr 2 Gp 1 Gp 1 Gp 1 Gp 1 Gr 3 Gr 3 Gp 1 Gp 1 Gp 1 Gr 2 Gr 3 Gp 1 R Gp 1 Gr 1 Gp 1 Gp 1 Gr 1 Gr 1 Gp 1 Gr 2 Gp 1 Gr 2 Gp 1 Gp 1 Gr 1 Gr 1 Gp 1 Gr 1

2-May-2015 23-May-2015 24-May-2015 31-May-2015 6-Jun-2015 6-Jun-2015 6-Jun-2015 7-Jun-2015 27-Jun-2015 28-Jun-2015 5-Jul-2015 5-Jul-2015 5-Jul-2015 11-Jul-2015 14-Jul-2015 18-Jul-2015 25-Jul-2015 1-Aug-2015 8-Aug-2015 9-Aug-2015 16-Aug-2015 20-Aug-2015 23-Aug-2015 29-Aug-2015 6-Sep-2015 13-Sep-2015 13-Sep-2015 26-Sep-2015 27-Sep-2015 27-Sep-2015 4-Oct-2015 12-Oct-2015 17-Oct-2015 18-Oct-2015 18-Oct-2015 31-Oct-2015 1-Nov-2015 29-Nov-2015

$942000 $100,000 $1,757,000 $3,617,000 $150,0000 $400,000 $400,000 ˆ 242,000 ˆ 1250000 ˆ 400,000 $100,000 ˆ 650000 CAN150,000+ $100,000 ˆ 600,000 ˆ 400,000 £1000000 $250,000 $200,000 ˆ 175000 CAN500,000 £325000 NOK 400,000 $100,0000 ˆ 250000 ˆ 350,000 CAN300,000+ $600,000 ˆ 155000 $942000 ˆ 400,0000 $1,173000 £565000 ˆ 242,000 CAN1,000,000 $3,000,000 ˆ 155000 $5,426,000

5-Jun-2015 6-Jun-2015 6-Jun-2015

£400,000 £350000 £1325000

31-May-2015 8-Nov-2015 27-Dec-2015

$997000 $997000 $4,530,000

17-Mar-2015 9-May-2015 14-Apr-2015 14-Apr-2015 17-Jan-2015 CLOSED 14-May-2015 CLOSED 10-Jun-2015 20-Jun-2015 CLOSED 17-Jun-2015 1-Jul-2015 CLOSED 9-Jun-2015 18-Jul-2015 25-Jul-2015 19-May-2015 29-Jul-2015 23-Jun-2015 22-Jun-2015 15-Aug-2015 16-Jun-2015 26-Aug-2015 26-Aug-2015 15-Sep-2015 30-Jun-2015 18-Aug-2015 13-May-2015 1-Sep-2015 3-Aug-2015 24-Sep-2015 30-Sep-2015 19-Oct-2015 11-Aug-2015 13-Oct-2015

12.05f (2410m)

Check out Stakes Schedules online - trainermagazine.com/schedules Gr 2 Gr 2 Gr 1

4+ 3+ 3+

Saratoga

John’s Call St

26-Aug-2015

$100,000

Saratoga Curragh Woodbine

Birdstone St Leger (Irish) Valedictory S

Gp 1 Gr 3

12-Aug-2015 13-Sep-2015 29-Nov-2015

$100,000 ˆ 300,000 CAN150,000+

3+

T

2600

13

15-Aug-2015

14f (2800m) 3+ 3+ 3+

D T AWT

2800 2800 2800

Check out Stakes Schedules online - trainermagazine.com/schedules GB

Doncaster

St Leger (Ladbrokes)

Gp 1

12-Sep-2015

£600,000

3 C&F

14 14 14

1-Aug-2015 27-May-2015 11-Nov-2015

14.6f (2920m) T

2920

14.6

Call us on 1 888 659 2935 to subscribe from $20 JPN

Kyoto

Kikuka Sho (Japanese St Leger)

Gr 1

25-Oct-2015

$2,029,000

Saint-Cloud

Prix Royal-Oak

Gp 1

25-Oct-2015

ˆ 250000

3 No G

T

3000

15

Kyoto Belmont Park

Tenno Sho (Spring) Belmont Gold Cup Invitational St

Gr 1 Gr 1

3-May-2015 5-Jun-2015

$2,721,000 $250,0000

3+

T

3100

15.5

4+ 3+

Nakayama

Stayers St

Gr 2

5-Dec-2015

$1,085,000

T D

3200 3200

16 16

Royal Ascot Longchamp

Gold Cup Prix du Cadran (Qatar)

Gp 1 Gp 1

18-Jun-2015 4-Oct-2015

£375,000 ˆ 300,000

17-Mar-2015 CLOSED

18f (3600m) 3+

T

3600

18

Stakes Schedules updated online monthly GB FR

7-Oct-2015

16f (3200m)

Call us on 1 888 659 2935 to subscribe from $20 JPN

15-Sep-2015

15.5f (3100m)

Check out Stakes Schedules online - trainermagazine.com/schedules JPN USA

21-Jul-2015

15f (3000m)

Stakes Schedules updated online monthly FR

14-Apr-2015 29-Sep-2015 10-Nov-2015

13f (2600m)

Stakes Schedules updated online monthly USA IRE CAN

14-Apr-2015 14-Apr-2015 CLOSED

12.5f (2500m)

Call us on 1 888 659 2935 to subscribe from $20 USA

4-Aug-2015 18-Aug-2015 3-Oct-2015 29-Sep-2015

12f (2400m)

Stakes Schedules updated online monthly Gp 1 Gp 1 Gp 1

Closing

27-Oct-2015

20f (4000m) 4+ 4+

T T

4000 4000

20 20

ISSUE 36 TRAINERMAGAZINE.COM

20-Apr-2015 26-Aug-2015

95


SID FERNANDO

T

HE impetus to change had, without question, a firm behind-the-scenes push from powerful breeders and owners. They implied that the profile of the classic North American dirt horse, once celebrated for its speed up to classic distances, was being changed imperceptibly – but systematically – to a hybrid turf/all-weather type that lacked the brilliant speed that once characterized it. Developments over the years have bolstered this train of thought. The improbable leading General Sire in North America in 2013 was turf champion Kitten’s Joy. It’s notable, too, that during the height of the “synthetic era” from 2009 to 2014, the only older male champion to make a name for himself on dirt was Blame, in 2010. Most of the others were turf horses: Gio Ponti (2009), Acclamation (2011), Wise Dan (2012 and 2013), and Main Sequence (2014) altogether made only one combined start on dirt during their championship seasons, and that was Acclamation’s dead-last run in the Grade 3 Charles Town Classic. This turf “anomaly,” too, has now been institutionally rectified by the organizations that hand out the Eclipse Awards. Beginning this year, older male and female champions will be limited to dirt or main track horses only, wiping out turf horses by decree and all-weather types like Acclamation by opportunity. With this in mind, consider that Zayat Stable’s American Pharoah may be the last two-year-old champion to win a Grade 1 race on all-weather in North America, and there is a bit of irony in this. The brilliant colt debuted last summer in a maiden special on Del Mar’s artificial surface and lost, but his trainer, Bob Baffert, undeterred, wheeled him back in the Del Mar Futurity-G1, which the colt won by almost five lengths in the front-running style of a future classics contender. It says something about Baffert’s belief in American Pharoah that he raced him as a maiden in a Grade 1 – he told me it’s the first time he’d done something like that – but it also shows that all-weather didn’t hinder the 96

TRAINERMAGAZINE.COM ISSUE 36

All-weather kickback to dirt detractors This year’s Triple Crown preps were notable for producing a number of high-class contenders, and, coincidently, it was the first year of mostly all-dirt trials since major tracks in California, Kentucky, and Dubai abandoned synthetic surfaces for the real thing. colt’s brilliance one bit. Since the Futurity, the colt went on a winning streak on dirt as well and came to the Derby with wins in the Grade 1 FrontRunner Stakes at Santa Anita and the Grade 2 Rebel and Arkansas Derby at Oaklawn Park. American Pharoah is a homebred for Ahmed Zayat, who got into the business ten years ago with some notable high-priced auction purchases and who has enjoyed one of the best runs of any owner the last decade with classics contenders. His most expensive buy was the $4.6 million Maimonides, purchased at the 2006 Keeneland September yearling sale. Maimonides, too, was trained by Baffert but made his debut at two, in 2007, at Saratoga, in a race that he won by 11½ lengths with the world apparently at his feet. But he would only make one more lifetime start, a third-place finish in the Grade 1 Hopeful Stakes, after bucking his shins. He never stayed sound enough to continue his career and was subsequently retired to stud. Maimonides began his career at Saratoga because Zayat, who had a big chunk of his

It says something

about Baffert’s belief in American Pharoah that he raced him as a maiden in a Grade 1, but it also shows that all-weather didn’t hinder the colt’s brilliance one bit

stable with Baffert in California at the time, was unhappy with the synthetic surface at Del Mar and famously moved much of his stock to New York after a confrontation in the summer of 2007 with Del Mar’s Joe Harper one morning. Hank Wesch of the U-T San Diego reported on July 31st of that year: “The argument, in a chance meeting near the backstretch racing office, was over whether the new Polytrack surface, which has produced a perfect safety record through the first two weeks of the meeting, could and should be fine-tuned to better accommodate horses bred for speed and to produce faster times.” Maimonides didn’t stay sound on dirt, but Zayat’s homebred Pioneerof the Nile, a two-year-old of 2008 who also made his debut at Saratoga instead of Del Mar, relished the all-weather surface at Hollywood Park. He won the track’s Grade 1 CashCall Futurity in December by a nose for his first stakes score. In a blog post dated December 24, the late Jack Werk wrote of the colt, who was originally trained by Bill Mott at Saratoga but was switched to Baffert at Hollywood: “In the race, Pioneerof the Nile was under a sustained drive from a long ways out, and this particular ability has been the hallmark of superior synthetic runners.” Pioneerof the Nile later won Santa Anita’s three major Derby preps on all-weather and he would go on to run second in the 2009 Derby. He has since become one of the top young sires in the country, with American Pharoah his best to date. With that colt and others, Pioneerof the Nile is proving that perhaps the long-term effects of the “failed experiment” weren’t quite as bad for the breeding shed. After all, the synthetics – and turf – played to the stamina that had started to wane in North America, and now some of that is finding its way back into the speed. n


NIAGARA CAUSEWAY Giant’s Causeway-Theoretically, by Theatrical (Ire)

{

GRADED STAKES-WINNING SON OF

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ON A BLACK CHARGER ($22,417) Recent winner by 5 1/2-lengths at Delta Downs

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North American Trainer, issue 36 - May - July 2015  
North American Trainer, issue 36 - May - July 2015