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ISSUE 54 – BREEDERS’ CUP 2019 TO PEGASUS 2020 $6.95 www.trainermagazine.com

THE QUARTERLY MAGAZINE FOR THE TRAINING AND DEVELOPMENT OF THE THOROUGHBRED

THE OFFICIAL MAGAZINE OF THE

Preserving the family legacy

JIMMY JERKENS CONFORMATION AND BREEDING CHOICES

REMEMBERING RANDY ROMERO

THOROUGHBRED NUTRITION PAST AND PRESENT


|OPINION |

G I LES A ND E R S ON PUBLISHER’S OPINION

I know that the horse featured on this cover has been retired to stud but with our main trainer profile in this issue being on his trainer, Jimmy Jerkens, using this shot of Preservationist was too good an opportunity to miss! With horses like Preservationist this past summer and the exciting juvenile, Green Means Go to look forward to, it’s great to see the Jerkens name back in the limelight – truly preserving the legacy of one of the greatest family names to be associated with the sport. In this issue, Alan Balch pens an excellent and thoughtful essay, outlining ideas for the management of perception and preservation of our sport. Balch writes about this year’s Jockey Club Round Table, where we delegates were given an insight into crisis management by David Fuscus of Xenophon Strategies. Not only did he tell us about how the Chinese symbol for the word ‘crisis’ translates to the words ‘danger and opportunity’, but he also told us the key actions his business advises clients when faced with managing a crisis - which I’ve paraphrased below: Engagement - the ability to shape the story, having the ability to define rather than be defined. Transparency - gives you the public credibility to be able to shape your own story - without it, you can’t. Responsibility - means admitting you did something wrong, or acknowledging that something needs fixing - you need this for credibility. Meaningful actions - it’s what are you going to do to solve the problem, how are you going to do it and getting people to believe in your ability to take those actions. Now it was great that The Jockey Club arranged for Fuscus to present to delegates but I do get a sense of the need for a ‘game plan’ to be promoted more widely across the industry. From a PR perspective I do feel that the industry has been reactive to negative media this past year rather than proactive in the presentation of facts to promote the industry. To put it simply, too much attention has been played on the bad egg in the dozen rather than on the fact that there are eleven good eggs in the same carton. In the closing paragraph of his essay, Balch sums up excellently what should be: If racing is to survive in anything like its present reach and magnitude, our leadership, our cavalry command, must act like Xenophon, with care for, and husbandry of the horse above all else. They must urgently develop our strategy, anticipating the necessity of changing in harmony with the cultural evolution we can all see. Now. And we soldiers in the cavalry – whether breeders, owners, trainers, veterinarians, regulators, or marketers – must execute their fully developed national strategy without reservation and with massive financial, emotional, political, media, and public relations support. Wherever your racing takes you this winter, good luck! ISSUE 54 TRAINERMAGAZINE.COM

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Editorial Director/Publisher Giles Anderson (1 888 218 4430) Sub-Editor Jana Cavalier Advert Production Charlotte Fossey Circulation/Website Charlotte Fossey (1 888 659 2935) Advertising Sales Giles Anderson, Anna Alcock 1 888 218 4430 Photo Credits: Alamy, Giles Anderson, Beaufort Educational Trust, Eclipse Sportwire, Florida Equine Veterinary Associates, Keeneland, Dave Landry, Jennifer Poorman, Kim Pratt, Rossdales LLP, Shutterstock, The Jockey Club of Canada, Judy Wardrope Photographer “At Large” Frances J. Karon Cover Photograph Eclipse Sportswire Design ATG Media

Trainer Magazine is published by Anderson & Co Publishing Ltd. Contact details Tel: 1 888 659 2935 Fax: 1 888 218 4206 info@trainermagazine.com www.trainermagazine.com North America PO Box 13248, Lexington, KY 40583-3248 United Kingdom 14 Berwick Courtyard, Berwick St Leonard, Salisbury, Wiltshire SP3 5UA

Trainer Magazine is the official magazine of the California Thoroughbred Trainers. It is distributed to all ‘Trainer’ members of the Thoroughbred Horsemen’s Association and all members of the Consignors and Commercial Breeders Association, the Maryland Horse Breeders Association, the Pennsylvania Horse Breeders Association, the Alberta Thoroughbred Owners & Breeders Association and the Virginia Thoroughbred Association.

Education Ed cati tii ! Integrity I t it Service

Alan F. Balch was hired as the executive director of the California Thoroughbred Trainers in April 2010. His professional career in racing began at Santa Anita in 1971, where he advanced to the position of senior vice president of marketing and assistant general manager, and was in charge of the Olympic Games Equestrian Events in Los Angeles in 1984. He retired in the early 90s to become volunteer president of the National Equestrian Federation of the USA, as well as of the National Horse Show of Madison Square Garden. He remains president of USA Equestrian Trust, Inc.

Annie Lambert is a photojournalist based in Temecula, California. She grew up enjoying many facets of the equine industry with her veterinarian father, Dr Willard D Ommert, and mother, Pat North Ommert, who is an inductee of the National Cowgirl Hall of Fame. Anne has been involved in many aspects of the thoroughbred racing industry, rode hunters and jumpers as well as reined cow horses.

Alex Campbell is a freelance writer based in Toronto, Canada, covering Woodbine Racetrack. He earned the Jockey Club of Canada’s Sovereign Award for Outstanding Writing in 2013. His work has appeared in the Daily Racing Form, The Blood-Horse, Canadian Thoroughbred and Harness Racing Update.

Jeff Lowe is a freelance writer who previously served as media director for Team Valor International for seven years. Lowe also was the Kentucky Derby and Breeders’ Cup beat writer during a nine-year stint at Thoroughbred Times. He won the 2008 Bill Leggett Writing Award for a magazine story on the Breeders’ Cup Classic. He grew up around the harness racing business as his father was the longtime general manager of the small racetrack in Delaware, Ohio, that puts on one of the sport’s most prestigious races, the Little Brown Jug.

Linda Dougherty is a freelance writer based in Philadelphia. She earned an Eclipse honorable mention while with Daily Racing Form, and was a staff writer and handicapper for The Trentonian. Most recently she captured an Equine Media Award from American Horse Publications for work that appeared in Mid-Atlantic Thoroughbred, and she also writes for other industry publications. A New Jersey native, she is the author of a book about that state’s “golden age” of racing.

Catherine Rudenko is an independent registered nutritionist with a focus on thoroughbreds. Based in the UK Catherine has worked in the USA, Europe and Asia with trainers and studs creating feeds and feeding plans customised to their needs and climate. With a keen interest in education and research Catherine works with professional bodies and universities to promote knowledge of nutrition and its importance in the management of thoroughbreds and other breeds.

Bill Heller is an Eclipse Awardwinning author of 26 books, including biographies of Hall of Fame jockeys Ron Turcotte, Randy Romero and Jose Santos. Bill and his wife Marianne live near Gulfstream Park in Florida. Bill’s son Benjamin is an accomplished marathon runner in Troy, N.Y.

Peter J. Sacopulos is a partner in the law firm of Sacopulos, Johnson & Sacopulos in Terre Haute, Ind., where he represents clients in a wide range of equine matters. He is a member of the American College of Equine Counsel and serves on the Board of the Indiana Thoroughbred Owners and Breeders Association and Indiana Thoroughbred Breed Development Advisory Committee. Sacopulos has written extensively on equine law issues and is a frequent speaker at equine conferences.

Tom O’Keeffe is a Partner at Rossdales LLP working with the Horses in Training Team. Tom was brought up on National Hunt stud farm in Waterford, Ireland and he has been based in Newmarket since 2014, having previously worked in Kentucky, Florida, Australia, and Ireland.

Judy Wardrope Mechanically inclined by nature, Wardrope has applied her curiosity regarding how things work in several directions, including a 17-year stint as a locomotive engineer. Combined with an avid interest in horses, she started looking beyond straight legs and subjective descriptors to explain what she was seeing in individual horses.

Trainer Magazine (ISSN 17580293) is published 4 times a year, February, April, July and October by Anderson & Co Publishing and distributed in the USA by UKP Worldwide, 3390 Rand Road, South Plainfield, NJ 07080. Periodicals postage paid at Rahway, NJ and at additional mailing offices. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to Trainer Magazine, Anderson & Co Publishing C/O 3390 Rand Road, South Plainfield NJ 07080

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A DV E R T I S E M E N T

EIPH AND BLEEDING Best Solution When LASIX Are Banned By Mark Hansen

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hile bleeding from the nose in racehorses is uncommon, it is accepted that most every horse will experience some level of bleeding in their lungs. Even though this may only cause slight discomfort for the equine athlete, it is a trainer’s worst nightmare because it can lead to poor performance, lost training days, costly treatments, or worse — a very sick horse that’s banned from racing for life. For one trainer, this is exactly the nightmare that happened to him. Suddenly not just one, but two of his best horses were bleeding from EIPH (Exercise Induced Pulmonary Hemorrhage). They were in danger of being banned from racing, even though they were still in their prime. Lasix (Salix) was not an option. The trainer was at a loss. What can be done? Facing these concerns for two of his horses, the trainer (who asked us to withhold his name for competitive reasons) was willing to try anything. So, he searched for another option. He gave his horses an alternative to bleeder drugs and treatments; something he had read about called BleederShield. This natural respiratory horse supplement helps control bleeding. It is just as effective in improving the health and performance of bleeders but without any of those “drug issues” that come with most race-day bleeder medications.

“I used BleederShield paste on two horses that had been bleeding. Now, neither horse has bled. This is a great product; it saved the careers of two very good horses.”

The Science Behind BleederShield To understand how BleederShield works, we looked at a controlled study run by veterinarians at the University of Minnesota College of Veterinary Medicine. They investigated the effects of the active ingredient in BleederShield, yunnan baiyao, which has been shown to help reduce bleeding in people and animals. The veterinary team wanted to see how this active ingredient specifically affected bleeding in horses. They measured template bleeding times in horses before and after receiving a supplement with the active ingredient. The researchers reported that the supplement significantly reduced bleeding time. They concluded that the active ingredient in BleederShield was effective at minimizing blood loss in horses.1 What surprised us the most about BleederShield is its effectiveness without the use of drugs. Having a drug-free option is critical in countries that ban most raceday EIPH medications. And even though Lasix/Salix isn’t banned in the USA yet, its day may be coming. There’s a serious need NOW for a natural solution that can help

control bleeding in performance horses. Trainers and owners alike are impressed with the results they are seeing from BleederShield. One winning trainer told us: “I have horses that bleed and when I use this product I have no problems. I’m sure there are a lot of products on the market but I stand behind this one all the way.” Now you can improve the health of your horses while protecting the investment in their racing careers. With the results from the scientific studies, you can expect BleederShield to reduce bleeding events in horses during intense exercise… repair damaged blood vessels … and provide support for normal lung function and normal blood flow.2 Best of all, BleederShield is easy AND affordable. It could be the smartest investment you make to avoid pricey problems related to EIPH. It’s well worth the small price to avoid a banning risk or losing a great horse. A company spokesperson confirmed an exclusive offer for Trainer Magazine readers: if you order BleederShield this month, you’ll receive 10% off your first order by using promo code TM10 at checkout. You can order BleederShield today at www.BleederShield.com. 1. 2.

Graham L. et al. J Vet Emerg Crit Care. 12:4 (2002) 279-282. Graham L. Vet Clin North Am Equine Pract. 2006.


|CONTENTS |

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CONTENTS

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F E AT U R E S

80 #soundbites

46 Grade 1 winning owners – in association with RoadStallion

10 Remembering Randy

Bill Heller pays tribute to Randy Romero – a legendary jockey and wonderful human being.

12 Jimmy Jerkens

Has enjoyed a stellar year with the recently retired Preservationist and has plenty to look forward to with the exciting juvenile prospect Green Means Go. Bill Heller looks back at his career to date.

22 Conformation

Ahead of the breeding season, Judy Wardrope looks at conformation for breeding choices.

28 Ontario breeding

Alex Campbell talks to leading Canadian breeders about the state of the breeding industry in the Heartland Province.

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Thoroughbred nutrition past and present

Catherine Rudenko examines how what goes into performance horse feeding has changed over the years.

@ tr ain er _m ag

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Bill Heller profiles owners of horses that have made headlines winning Grade 1 races this summer at Saratoga.

52 Indiana’s biological samples testing law

Is integrity assured or is this a case of invasive overreach? Asks Peter Sacopulos.

60 My NEW Kentucky home

Jeff Lowe talks to six European ‘ex-pats’ employed in the bloodstock industry who now call Kentucky home.

66 Tyler Servis

Alan F. Balch column – this quarter, Bill Heller asks: The Horse Racing Integrity Act currently before the U.S. Congress would create a uniform standard for drug testing horses that would be overseen by the U.S. Anti-Doping Agency. Would that be good or bad?

Linda Dougherty talks to Tyler Servis who is continuing the family tradition of training racehorses.

70 Backstretch forward

Annie Lambert talks to the newly elected CHRB member Oscar Gonzales Jr.

74 Sales assessment

Thomas O’Keeffe reports from the 2019 Gerald Leigh Memorial Lectures held in Newmarket this past July.

/ t r ai ner ma g azi ne

TRAINERMAGAZINE.COM ISSUE 54

REGULARS

/ t rai ner magaz i ne

Visit trainermagazine.com to download our current digital editions and access back issues of both European and North American Trainer


| CALIFORNIA THOROUGHBRED TRAINERS |

ANTICIPATING NECESSITY L ooking back over 2019, it seems to me this has been The Year of the Bromide. Our own annus horribilus in so many ways, including having to endure so many of those truisms, many of them dubious, owing to racing’s regrettable circumstances. “Whatever doesn’t kill you makes you stronger.” “The darkest hour is just before dawn.” “There is no I in TEAM, but ME is in there somewhere.” And my own personal favorite: “Stress is the confusion created when one’s mind overrides the body’s basic desire to choke the living s**t out of some a**hole who desperately deserves it.” So, yes, if there’s one thing we’ve plenty of, it’s stress. As an enterprise, humor aside, all of us in racing are stressed as never before; not the least of that stress is trying to determine what’s been happening, why, and how we can correct our course. It seems to me that the root of our problem is cultural. Other sports, when distressed, can resort to multiple remedies including constant rule-changing when faced with fundamental problems. Tennis invented the tie-breaker to eliminate endless boredom. Basketball adopted the three-pointer for excitement and closer competition. Baseball re-organized its leagues, designated hitters for pitchers, juiced the ball, defined wild card teams, and improved drug testing. Football is finally concentrating on player safety . . . too late? But we have an animal to nurture and protect. We’re fundamentally different from all other sports. How human culture treats animals has been evolving since the beginning of time, and that won’t stop. In horse sport, we who have always preached animal welfare are now confronted by those who no longer speak in terms of humane husbandry, but instead of animal “rights.” Football players choose their game; horses do not, even though they’re bred for it. Racing’s rabid enemies vehemently argue that “no animal can be required to participate in any activity without its informed consent.” Seriously. That means your pets and even your choice of food are at risk, according to these advocates, not just horse racing. And any leisure activity involving a horse or any other animal.

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Absurd, you say? No, it’s not. I’ve been in front of several governmental authorities this year when these arguments have been made. And have been received seriously and solemnly. They underly, stimulate, and spread the entire worldwide opposition to racing we are seeing more and more every month. Our experience and the media coverage of it at Santa Anita this year, and elsewhere, has given our enemies a platform and influence with media and journalists they always had but never before could exploit as they do now. We belittle them, fail to understand them, and ignore these arguments and their consequences, at our peril. A year ago in these pages, I actually praised The Jockey Club’s annual Round Table, for a change, on its enlightening and productive conference. This year, I wish I could do the same . . . but with one exception, that’s impossible. The industry had a rare opportunity this August to listen to an expert who should also have been understood deeply: David Fuscus of Xenophon Strategies, which deals with crisis management and communications. Anyone whose company is named for the founder of horsemanship and cavalry command is someone we should take seriously. The complete transcript of his remarks is readily available. After pointing out that every crisis, however dangerous, offers opportunity, he stated very simply that “the first rule of crisis communications is to end it.” That is, end the crisis, take the actions necessary to correct the situation, and then clearly communicate that to the public. But most often, he said, industries David Fuscus

don’t “end it” because they don’t observe one or more of the four fundamentals he then described: engagement, transparency, responsibility, and meaningful actions. After detouring through non-racing case studies for illustration, he pointed out that many elements of racing are engaged on the current crisis, but not coordinated on a clear message or solution. As to transparency, there is no unified narrative, so we’re perceived by the public as “cloudy.” While we admit to being responsible for a problem, we don’t actually define or even agree on just what it is. Meaningful actions? We are a long way from ending the crisis, despite the serious steps begun in California and replicated elsewhere to improve safety. Here, then, was a golden opportunity for The Jockey Club to set out explicitly what should have been and needs to be done. As an expert, who understands racing, Fuscus could have helped us understand and begin developing the fundamental “engagement” he said we required. But what happened? Instead, he pitched the Horse Racing Integrity Act, as did the following two speakers, one from the Humane Society of the United States (HSUS). Each was at great pains to try to connect that same old, divisive Jockey Club legislative project (which deals exclusively with an authority for uniform national drug and medication rules) to what ails us now. That can’t be done, at least in anything close to the bill’s present form, which even detracts from the engagement, transparency, responsibility, and meaningful actions we need! Moreover, eliminating raceday Lasix and funding the United States Anti-Doping Agency would not improve our safety metrics, and might well even worsen them, all the while calling more attention to our sport’s supposed “cheaters and abusers.” Was it a coincidence that the 2019 version of this legislation was introduced March 14 in Congress, simultaneously with California’s United States Senator and Santa Anita’s Congresswoman in


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| CALIFORNIA THOROUGHBRED TRAINERS |

Washington calling for racing at Santa Anita to be stopped? I doubt it . . . since the HSUS political operatives were working over Congress in support of that legislation at the very same time Santa Anita had been closed for track renovations. Does anyone seriously believe that the enemies of racing wouldn’t see through the smokescreen of that federal legislation in a heartbeat, were it even possible to enact, and could turn its passage into the rightful accusation that it would do little or nothing to improve safety? Worsening our perception problems? To achieve true engagement of the entire American racing industry on this crisis, The Jockey Club, National Thoroughbred Racing Association, Breeders’ Cup, National HBPA, Thoroughbred Horsemen’s Association, California Thoroughbred Trainers, Thoroughbred Owners of California, New York Racing Association, Churchill Downs, The Stronach Group, National Turf Writers and Broadcasters Association, Association of Racing Commissioners International and each major racing state’s commission, should be invited immediately to appoint delegates of racing’s wisest and most experienced to a leadership council. Unwieldy? Maybe not so much – there is so much overlap and duplication

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among many of these organizations that preliminary conversations could well lead to a manageable number. In any event, the first task of these Supreme Overseers would be promptly to elect a much smaller, more effective steering committee to organize an exceptionally serious closed-door brainstorming and consensus-building strategy summit prior to the end of this year. Engagement is job one, remember, to coordinate on clear messaging and solution development. Everything else flows from that. And remember too, as I’ve written before, that we are in this situation because of our increasing failure over decades to observe the most basic principles of horsemanship and racing management, and adapt to cultural changes. Breeding a more substantial, sound horse is fundamental to its welfare; so is that horse’s proper management and the proper management of the conditions under which it is raised, trained, and raced. There is enormous room for improvement in these basics. As daunting as those tasks, or more, is grappling with public perception. The culture of “animals are people, too” no doubt started with human domestication of and care for animals. That began with dogs around 15,000 years ago, researchers say, and other animals around 12,000 years ago. It no doubt seeemed only “natural” to begin naming paarticular domesticatted animals and even ascribing human characteristics to th hem. What we now w call “media,” beginn ning in the early 1900s, intensely stim mulated this process:: Felix the Cat was “born” in 1919 and Mickey Mouse in 19 928. Motion picturees and the advent of “ttalkies” literally gavee th hese aniimalls hum maniistiic lives, and d th he race to anthropom morphize vviirtually i everyt ytthing was on. Think k off it: we sttartted d namiing mammals, then expanded to fowl (Donaald Du uck), and as media attention exploded,

just about everything else: insects, fish, even inanimate objects such as cars and natural phenomena like storms and winds. This all seems to be an innate tendency of human psychology, and some believe it actually helps to keep humans happy and grounded. Pets have come to be part of the typically affluent American family, of course, and are treated as such. Prior to World War II, pets were far less common. But now, expenditures in the United States alone on pets mushroomed from $17-billion in 1994 to an estimated $75-billion this year. Almost 70% of American families now own a pet, and pet marketing is based fundamentally on ascribing human characteristics to pets, as each of us sees every day in media and markets if we have our eyes open. Is it any wonder, therefore, that animal “rights” has taken over from animal welfare, in an unthinking way, by so many in our political and media leadership and influencers? I freely admit that I didn’t understand the distinction myself until a few months ago, and I have little doubt that only a relatively small portion of the American public has given these issues much more than a passing thought. Which is exactly what animal “rights” extremists are banking on. The status and emphases of organizations like the 4-H Club and Future Farmers of America have been transformed as the nation has transitioned from less rural to more urban economies, and understandings of livestock husbandry have been diminished drastically and increasingly in the last 50 years. It is in this very fertile soil that racing’s enemies are multiplying, flowering, and prospering, while we flounder to respond. To end a crisis. To save our sport’s reputation and the very sport itself. If racing is to survive in anything like its present reach and magnitude, our leadership, our cavalry command, must act like Xenophon, with care for and husbandry of the horse above all else. They must urgently develop our strategy, anticipating the necessity of changing in harmony with the cultural evolution we can all see. Now. And we soldiers in the cavalry – whether breeders, owners, trainers, veterinarians, regulators, or marketers – must execute their fully developed national strategy without reservation and with massive financial, emotional, political, media, and public relations support. There is no realistic alternative for ending this crisis.


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| RACING |

REMEMBER ING RAND Y ROMERO Bill Heller

H

all of Fame jockey Randy Romero began winning races when he was nine years old—races at the bush tracks of rural Louisiana before hundreds of witnesses with lots of money on the line. If it was too much pressure for a little kid, he never showed it. He rode the rest of his life that way, seemingly impervious to the pressure of big stakes races and in defiance of a litany of serious injuries that would lead to life-long illness that he battled until the day he passed on August 29th. He was 13 when he fell while working a horse and fractured his kneecap. Three years later, he had his first serious accident at Evangeline Downs. Another horse came over on Randy’s horse, who went down. Randy was trampled on by multiple horses. It punctured his lung, liver and kidney; and doctors would have to remove his spleen. He was unconscious for two days. When he awoke in the hospital, his mother begged him to stop riding. He told her, “Momma, I want to be a jockey.” He was born to ride. When he retired at the end of 1999, he was the 26th leading jockey ever with 4,294 victories despite missing some six years from injuries. He won 25 riding titles at 10 different tracks including Arlington Park, Belmont Park, Fair Grounds and Keeneland. What would his numbers have been if he only missed two or three years? Or if he hadn’t been nearly burned to death in 1983 in a freak accident in a sweatbox? Randy flicked off a piece of rubbing alcohol on his shoulder and it hit a light bulb and caused the sweatbox to explode. Randy suffered second and third degree burns over 60 percent of his body. Doctors gave him a 40-percent chance of surviving. He was back riding in 3 ½ months and won his first race back on a horse trained by his brother Gerald. Randy will always be linked to two great fillies he rode: the undefeated Personal Ensign and the ill-fated Go for Wand. Randy’s incredible ride on Personal Ensign in the 1988 Breeders’ Cup Distaff at Churchill Downs—when, in the final start of her career, she struggled early yet got up to edge Winning Colors by a nose—was voted by fans in 2008 as the best moment of the 25-year history of the Breeders’ Cup. She was the first undefeated major horse with more than nine starts in 80 years. Go for Wand’s career also ended, and tragically her life, just two years later when she went down in the same race—the 1990 Breeders’ Cup Distaff at Belmont Park.

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Eclipse Sportswire

Randy loved the filly. He said she would grunt like a pig just before she entered the starting gate in every race, announcing her presence. Randy said he’d never heard a horse ever do that. Randy suffered injuries from that fall—hairline fractures of his shoulder and eight ribs. The injuries were initially misdiagnosed by two doctors, and Randy lived with pain from those injuries for a year and a half. “I was never the same after that,” Randy once told me. But he was the same person. He never asked, “Why me?” Even when his health got much worse. In February 2002, he nearly died from kidney damage. Doctors were ready to do a kidney transplant, but they discovered only 25 percent of his liver was functioning. Without knowing it, Randy had been carrying Hepatitis C—a virus he might have caught from a tainted blood transfusion during the treatment for his burns from the sweatbox explosion 19 years earlier. Randy was put on dialysis, three four-hour treatments every week for the rest of his life—17 years of that routine right up to his final days. I accompanied him to a fourhour treatment in New Orleans as I worked on his 2010 biography, Randy Romero’s Remarkable Ride. In the waiting room at the dialysis center, where there were many patients in worse shape than him, he was just another person. They didn’t seem to know that he was one of the greatest jockeys ever, and he never bothered to tell them. Instead they just traded stories of what it took to cope with all the problems each one of them endured. Randy was the bravest, sweetest, most upbeat person I ever knew. I was honored to write his biography and delighted that we became close friends. He remained upbeat no matter how many times he’d been to the hospital—a number that kept growing as his health deteriorated. Stomach cancer had been added to all his problems. Yet he’d tell me, “Can’t complain.” In the book’s dedication to his “precious granddaughter Mia,” he wrote, “You have brought such joy to me as your grandfather, Mia; let it be known that you should always follow your heart, even if it does not turn out for the best. There will always be bumps and left-handed turns throughout life, but always remember that you must never give up.” Lord knows, he never did. Randy’s final weeks, especially the last one, were brutal. His brother Gerald said Randy fought death until his final breath. Speaking on the phone with him the day after, Gerald and I sobbed like babies. We consoled ourselves with the realization that finally, Randy was free of pain. Rest in peace, my brother.


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PROFILE

J I MMY J ER K EN S Bill Heller

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Eclipse Sportwire


| JIMMY JERKENS |

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PROFILE

Green Light Go winning the Gr.2 Saratoga Special

H

ow do you measure patience...in months waiting on a talented horse...in years waiting to go out on your own? How about perseverance? Overcoming the loss of key clients? Fighting through heart surgery and a hip replacement? Trainer Jimmy Jerkens, who has enjoyed the most successful run in an already successful career the past five years, sees no other way to function. Rushing horses is anathema to him. So he does the right thing with his. “You’re forced to,” he said. “You have no choice.” Giving into lost business or personal health issues would be unnatural to him. So he fought through both. “It’s all I know how to do,” he said. “I kept working and tried hard not to lose faith. It was hard not to. I figured I’d best buckle down.” He buckled down so well that he set personal highs in earnings in 2014, topping $4 million for the first time, and he did it again in 2015 and in 2017, when his horses earned more than $5.5 million. He’s already over $3 million this year thanks to his lightly-raced six-year-old Preservationist, owned by his long-time client Centennial Farm, and his precocious two-year-old Green Light Go, owned by Stronach Stables.

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It’s hard to believe that Jerkens didn’t win a single stakes in 2011 and 2012 and went through 2011, 2012 and 2013 without a graded stakes victory. Or that his stable shrunk from 40 to 12. Looking forward to Preservationist and Green Light Go’s next starts in high-profile Gr1 stakes at Belmont Park—Preservationist in the Jockey Club Gold Cup on Sept. 28 and Green Light Go in the Champagne the following Saturday— helped him get through hip replacement surgery on Sept. 23. A year earlier, he had heart surgery when stents were inserted. Of course, his wife Shirley (they were high school sweethearts who grew apart then reconnected 25 years later) helped him get back on his feet and tried to prevent him from doing too much too soon, which of course, he tried to do. “You want to do right for your owners,” Jerkens said. “You want to do things right. It’s seven days a week. There’s a lot of stress. That’s what’s hard about this business. There’s no downtime unless you make time for it.” Shirley is a physical therapist for the New York State Department of Education, with a small private practice treating 8- to 18-year-old athletes. She is an accomplished rider and gallops horses for her husband every summer. She knows and appreciates how hard he works: “He takes no vacations. He goes back to the barn three times a day. He


| JIMMY JERKENS |

YOU WANT TO DO RIGHT FOR YOUR OWNERS. IT’S SEVEN DAYS A WEEK. THERE’S A LOT OF STRESS. THAT’S WHAT’S HARD ABOUT THIS BUSINESS. sees how the horses are doing at that particular moment.” Close your eyes and you can almost see his departed father—Hall of Fame trainer Allen Jerkens—nodding in approval that his two training sons, Steve, 63, and Jimmy, 60, learned the right way to take care of their horses and the commitment and work ethic that is required before success can follow. “I’m very proud of Jimmy,” Steve said. “He puts everything into it and he deserves any success he gets. Like my father used to say, `You got to fight it hard. You got to keep at it.’” It’s a family trait. Jimmy and Steve have two other siblings: Jimmy’s twin sister Julie, a school teacher and author of children’s books; and their older 67-year-old brother Alan, a recently retired sportscaster for the NBC affiliate in Tulsa, Okla. “They’re all a bunch of hard workers,” Shirley said. Jimmy didn’t spend a lot of time figuring out where he wanted to work. He knew what he wanted to do with his life at the age of 11, when he began working weekends and summers with his father and older brother. “I was a barn rat,” he said. “It was unbelievable. We worked all day. Went to the track kitchen with the other help. We worked from dawn to dusk and never gave it a second thought.” Steve said, “We were going to the barn with my father for as long as I can remember, on weekends and

summers. Always to the barn. We’ve been doing it all our lives. At an early age, we learned to take care of the horses and we enjoyed it. We loved getting horses ready for the races. It was a great life. It kept us out of trouble.” They’d play basketball on a wooden hoop at a small farm in Huntington, Long Island, where their father kept a couple horses. “My older brother (Alan) was a pretty good player,” Steve said. My father was very competitive. We’d have touch football games after feeding behind his barn at Belmont in the parking lot. That was very competitive. Stable hands from other outfits would show up and we’d choose sides. And we all played polo at West Hills Stable. I met my wife Joan at polo.” The first time Shirley talked with Jimmy (they both went to Walt Whitman High School in Huntington—he was two years ahead of her) was at a polo farm where she had her horse stabled. “He was there with his dad and Steve,” Shirley said. “I was 13.” They dated for five years before going separate paths. “I wanted to get out and see the world,” she said. Twenty-five years later, they bumped into each other at a polo event in Miami. “We just got talking,” Shirley said. “I found he was split up from his wife. I was getting divorced from my husband. That was it. We had dinner at Joe’s Stone Crab. We walked through the rain. It was romantic. From then on we’ve been together.”

ABOVE: Jimmy and Shirley Jerkens

ISSUE 54 TRAINERMAGAZINE.COM

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| JIMMY JERKENS |

PROFILE

Allen Jerkens

They married and went on a delayed honeymoon to Napa Valley, arriving on Christmas Day in 2008. “We stayed for one week,” Jimmy said. “Believe it or not, it was a little bit of downtime. The horses had shipped to Florida. It was actually a good time to go.” He had a good time during what may be the only real vacation he’s ever taken. Shirley testified, “He did relax,” knowing how unusual that is for him. Shirley was surprised to see a side of Jimmy that he and his father shared: “Even with all their skills and their success, they’re very humble.” Jimmy, though, idolized his father. “Growing up and seeing my father—he was at the pinnacle of his career. WOR-TV had horse racing on the weekends. He was on almost every weekend. I was so proud of him, seeing his horses run on television. You get so proud of it, you wanted to be a bigger part of it. My father had such devotion to his horses. He was my hero. I guess it just kind of rubbed off. I wanted him to be proud of me. I knew I wanted to do it.” Steve saw his younger brother’s passion for horses at an early age. “He was always a student of the game,” Steve said. “He read books about breeding. He had a great memory about horses. Worked hard at it. Even galloped horses.” One Saturday afternoon at Saratoga was one of the highlights of both Jimmy and Steve’s lives. They watched from the backstretch as their horse Onion stepped into the starting gate to tackle Secretariat in the 1973 Whitney Stakes. “That was like a fantasy,” Jimmy said. “We just didn’t know what to expect. He (Onion) was super sharp. He broke the track record four days earlier. We were hoping he’d get a check.”

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But there was an obstacle for Steve and Jimmy. The toteboard blocked their view of part of the stretch. “We saw him in front, then we were blocked by the toteboard a little bit,” Steve said. “Sure enough, he was still in front. It was great—some thrill.” Jimmy said, “We just couldn’t believe that. I’ll remember that for the rest of my life. We jumped up and down like idiots. We just beat one of the best horses to ever live with a homebred gelding. That wasn’t supposed to happen.” They celebrated…(ready for this?) By playing touch football! Jimmy’s hoop days are long gone, but his passion for his horses continues unabated. And it served him well while working for his father and then finally, he went on his own in December 1997, two months before his 39th birthday. “It was my father’s idea,” Jimmy said. “I had just gotten divorced, and I was pretty down. He was trying to pull me out of a little funk. He said, `Why don’t you go out on your own?’ He had an owner, Peter Blum, who started my brother out. He said, `Take his six horses that I have. Maybe Mrs. DuPont will have a couple. Earl Mack possibly.’ I said, ‘Yeah, it sounds good.’ That’s what we did.” Jimmy’s success was immediate. In his first full year on his own in 1998, he won 35 of 186 starts and his horses earned $1.4 million. Not bad for a 39-year-old rookie. He topped $1 million for 13 straight years before his stable took a mighty hit. Actually two hits. With Jimmy as his trainer, Edward Evans’ Quality Road won the 2009 Gr2 Fountain of Youth and the Gr1 Florida Derby. That made Evans’ decision to take all his horses from Jimmy hard to fathom. Then another long-


How do you live up to the glory of your past?

you work like hell. Coming new to


PROFILE

| JIMMY JERKENS |

time client, Susan Moore, took her horses from him. “He went from 40 horses to 12,” Shirley said. Replacing those horses was difficult. “Jimmy doesn’t sell himself,” Shirley said. “People reached out to us. We got horses here and there. Afleet Express won the (2010) Travers. We got a few more. Centennial hung in there with us.” It wasn’t a difficult decision for Centennial’s President Don Little Jr., who played polo professionally in Argentina, Canada, England, France and the U.S. Little’s father, a past president of the U.S. Polo Association, founded Centennial in 1982. Don Jr. took over after his father died from an accident when his horse fell during a jumping competition. “I think Jimmy and me—we’re like-minded people,” Don Jr. said. “We kind of grew up in the shadow of our fathers. I knew Jimmy’s ability was there. You’re going to have tough years. One thing I learned is that loyalty can go a long way in life and in business. If you’re successful it will happen again. If you look at this sport as any other professional sport, I’m the general manager of a franchise of equines. My coach is Jimmy. And he learned from the best.” Jimmy, who has 28 horses in his stable now, has been successful at racing’s highest level. “He does things differently than other trainers,” Little said. “He does blowouts two days before the race. That’s old school. I don’t see a lot of trainers do that anymore. Jimmy takes a little more time. He doesn’t have 200 horses. He will find the true ability of a horse. He’s done it time and time again. He sees things sometimes that are missed. There are injuries. It might take another year. People with him have been with him a long time—had been there with his dad because they’re true horsemen. Jimmy is probably the best dirt trainer out there.” Steve concurred: “Owners that stuck with him stuck with his training style. I don’t think there is anyone better at developing horses, who has a keen sense of when to keep going and when to back off. And Centennial Farm and the Stronach Stable appreciate it. You don’t wait on a horse who doesn’t have talent.” Preservationist is a perfect example. But the horse that rejuvenated Jerkens career was Centennial Farm’s Wicked Strong. Purchased for $375,000 at the Keeneland Yearling Sale, Wicked Strong captured the 2014 Gr1 Wood Memorial before finishing fourth in both the Gr1 Kentucky Derby and the Gr1 Belmont Stakes. He then won the Gr2 Jim Dandy Stakes, setting him up perfectly for the Travers. Jerkens entered two horses in the 2014 Gr1 Travers: Wicked Strong and V.E. Day. Allen Jerkens and his daughter Julie watched the race on TV in Florida. Wicked Strong rushed up three-wide around the far turn to take the lead, opened a 2 ½ length cushion, and then began to tire. Allen recounted, “I was screaming at the TV, `Oh my God, he’s not going to hang on! They’re going to catch him!’ while my daughter’s in front of me jumping up and down. I said, `Jeez, he got caught right at the end.’ She said, `Yeah, but it’s his horse.’” It was. Jimmy had pulled off a remarkable 1-2 finish. V.E. Day won by a fraction of a nose over Wicked Strong. A Jimmy Jerkens Travers exacta. “Believe me, it’s wonderful to be 1-2 in the Travers, but it would’ve been nice to win it for Centennial.” Jimmy said. “It felt strange.

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| JIMMY JERKENS |

PROFILE

Centennial Farms Preservationist after winning the Gr.1 Woodward Stakes at Saratoga.

What I appreciated was how nice they (Centennial) were about it. It was crushing to be beaten in the final stride. They showed a lot of class the way they handled it. They were very nice to do that.” Centennial would win a Gr1 stakes at Saratoga in 2019 with Preservationist, who may represent the best job of training and management by Jimmy in his whole career. Preservationist didn’t make his debut until June 10, 2016, as a four-year-old when he finished second as the 6-5 favorite. “Obviously, there were things wrong with him,” Jimmy said. “Everyone can add two plus two. He never had any fractures. He had a little bit of foot issues. Early on, he used to get bad muscle cramps. He was always a very big horse. I don’t know if he was too talented for his own good. He just couldn’t stand the rigor of training.” Preservationist didn’t return to the races until December 21, 2017, when he finished third. He then broke his maiden by a nose before tacking on a fourlength allowance score on February 17, 2018. He wouldn’t race again until June 5, 2019, when he was third in an allowance race. That was just his fifth career start in the middle of his six-year-old season. His quick ascension to the top level of racing with victories in the Gr2 Suburban and a fourth in the Gr1 Whitney reached a new height when he captured the Gr1 Woodward Stakes—46 years after the Jerkens’ Prove Out stunned Secretariat. “It was very emotional,” Little said. “To win a Gr1 is very special. To win a Gr1 at Saratoga is even more special. Fred Martin, a partner in Preservationist, has been with us for 30 years. He’s 88.” Preservationist finished fourth in the Jockey Club, but with six victories in only 11 career starts, he retires to Airdrie Stud as one of the top older horses in the

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country—a testimony to Jerkens’ patience and incredible horsemanship. “Give Don Little more credit than me,” Jerkens said. “They had to restructure the partnership (on him). None of us ever gave up on him, but there comes a point… Obviously, things have changed. It’s wonderful that things are coming to fruition.” They have, despite Jimmy enduring a frightening health scare in the summer of 2018. “It was something that just crept up on me,” he said. “I had blood pressure problems. I was heavy. I worry about the barn. I was sitting here with my wife. I actually felt fine, just sitting in the living room. Out of nowhere I had this pain in my chest like somebody stuck a knife in me. Then it subsided. Believe it or not, we didn’t do anything immediately. Went to my cardiologist the next day. Went to St. Francis Hospital and they put stents in right away. It was scary.” Blood thinners and a better diet have helped him. But the stress of training never changed. So he deals with it. Having Preservationist and Green Light Go in his stable certainly doesn’t hurt. Green Light Go took a two-for-two record into the Champagne following his emphatic 3 ¾ length victory in the Gr2 Saratoga Special. Green Light Go’s quick start to his career isn’t typical of Jerkens’ two-year-olds. “I don’t like pressing two-year-olds at all,” he said. “That’s a disaster. All you’re doing is ruining a good horse because he isn’t coming around fast enough. I think you’re a fool if you go in that direction. There’s only so far you can push a young horse. They get nervous. Sore shins. You don’t want a young horse to go through that. They’re impressionable. If they start out with pain when they’re young, when it’s supposed to be fun, they remember.” He remembers who he is and what he believes in. Like his father before him, that’s worked just fine.


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| BREEDING |

CO NFO RM AT IO N AN D B R E E D I N G CHOICES

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| CONFORMATION |

Judy Wardrope Judy Wardrope, Shutterstock

A

lot of factors go into the making of a good racehorse, but everything starts with the right genetic combinations, and when it comes to genetics, little is black and white. The best we can do is to increase our odds of producing or selecting a potential racehorse. Examining the functional aspects of the mare and then selecting a stallion that suits her is another tool in the breeding arsenal. For this article we will use photos of four broodmares and analyze the mares’ conformational points with regard to performance as well as matings likely to result in good racehorses from each one. We will look at qualities we might want to cement and qualities we might hope to improve for their offspring. In addition, we will look at their produce records to see what has or has not worked in the past. In order to provide a balance between consistency and randomness, only mares that were grey (the least common color at the sale) with three or more offspring that were likely to have had a chance to race (at least three years old) were selected. In other words, the mares were not handpicked to prove any particular point. All race and produce information was taken from the sales catalogue at the time the photos were taken (November 2018) and have not been updated.

Mare 1

Her lumbosacral gap (LS) (just in front of the high point of croup, and the equivalent of the horse’s transmission) is not ideal, but within athletic limits; however, it is an area one would hope to improve through stallion selection. One would want a stallion with proven athleticism and a history of siring good runners. The rear triangle and stifle placement (just below sheath level if she were male) are those of a miler. A stallion with proven performance at between seven furlongs and a mile and an eighth would be preferable as it would be breeding like to like from a mechanical perspective rather than breeding a basketball star to a gymnast. Her pillar of support emerges well in front of the withers for some lightness of the forehand, but just behind the heel. One would look for a stallion with the bottom of the pillar emerging into the rear quarter of the hoof for improved soundness and longevity on the track. Her base of neck is well above her point of shoulder, adding additional lightness to the forehand, and she has ample room behind her elbow to maximize the range of motion of the forequarters. Although her humerus (elbow to point of shoulder) shows the length one would expect in order to match her rear stride, one would likely select a stallion with more rise from elbow to point of shoulder in order to add more lightness to the forehand.

MARE 1

ISSUE 54 TRAINERMAGAZINE.COM

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| BREEDING |

| CONFORMATION |

Her sire was a champion sprinter as well as a successful sire, and her female family was that of stakes producers. She was a stakes-placed winner at six furlongs—a full-sister to a stakes winner at a mile as well as a half-sister to another stakes-winning miler. Her race career lasted from three to five. She had four foals that met the criteria for selection; all by distance sires of the commercial variety. Two of her foals were unplaced and two were modest winners at the track. I strongly suspect that this mare’s produce record would have proven significantly better had she been bred to stallions that were sound milers or even sprinters.

MARE 2

Mare 2

Her LS placement, while not terrible, could use improvement; so one would seek a stallion that was stronger in this area and tended to pass on that trait. The hindquarters are those of a sprinter, with the stifle protrusion being parallel to where the bottom of the sheath would be. It is the highest of all the mares used in this comparison, and therefore would suggest a sprinter stallion for mating. Her forehand shows traits for lightness and soundness: pillar emerging well in front of the withers and into the rear quarter of the hoof, a high point of shoulder plus a high base of neck. She also exhibits freedom of the elbow. These traits one would want to duplicate when making a choice of stallions. However, her length of humerus would dictate a longer stride of the forehand than that of the hindquarters. This means that the mare would compensate by dwelling in the air on the short (rear) side, which is why she hollows her back and has developed considerable muscle on the underside of her neck. One would hope to find a stallion that was well matched fore and aft in hopes he would even out the stride of the foal. Her sire was a graded-stakes-placed winner and sire of stakes winners, but not a leading sire. Her dam produced eight winners and three stakes winners of restricted races, including this mare and her full sister. She raced from three to five and had produced three foals that met the criteria for this article. One (by a classic-distance racehorse and leading sire) was a winner in Japan, one (by a stallion of distance lineage) was unplaced and one (by a sprinter sire with only two starts) was a non-graded stakes-

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OUR SAMPLE MARES WOULD SEEM TO PROVE THAT THE BEST OFFSPRING ARE THOSE THAT REPRESENT A CROSS OF SIMILAR TYPES WHEN IT COMES TO THE MECHANICAL ASPECTS THAT DICTATE DISTANCE PREFERENCES. winner. In essence, her best foal was the one that was the product of a typeto-type mating for distance, despite the mare having been bred to commercial sires in the other two instances.

Mare 3

Physically, this mare has several areas for improvement. Her LS could be better and her rear triangle should not have the femur (point of buttock to stifle protrusion) as the shortest side as this puts additional stress on the hind legs, especially from hock down. As the photo shows, the mare’s suspensory apparatus on both hind legs (particularly on the right hind) exhibit signs of stress. Her forehand has two main areas for improvement: the bottom of the pillar and a tight elbow. The pillar emerges well behind the hoof, putting strain on the tendons and ligaments of the forelegs, and the tight elbow limits the range of motion.

Notice the muscle she has developed as a brake to avoid hitting her ribcage with the elbow and consider how much more muscle she would have had in training. One would hope to find a stallion to eliminate these issues in her foals. She is not built to have an efficient stride and not built to be sound. In fact, she likely alternated between being sore behind and being sore up front. Breeding her and expecting the stallion to improve all the areas where she could be improved, is a real longshot. Her sire won the Breeders’ Cup Classic among other Gr1 stakes, and sired champions as well as numerous stakes winners. Her dam was a stakeswinner (at eight to nine furlongs and by a champion sprinter) and a producer of four stakes-winners plus a stakes-placed winner. One of the stakes-winners was a stakes-producer and one was a sire of stakes-winners.


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and a stakes-placed winner who, in turn, produced a stakes-winner. The mare raced from three to seven, was a multiple graded-stakes winner in Argentina and was stakes-placed in a Gr1 (at a mile and an eighth) in the U.S. She had four foals that fell within the selection criteria: one stakes winner at a mile and a sixteenth (by a sprinter stallion), one stakes-placed winner at a mile and a quarter (by a classic-distance horse), one winner in Australia (by a sprinter sire) and one unraced gelding (by a miler). This is the type of mare that makes stallion selection easier, and I suspect that she might have produced even better if bred to higher-fquality milers.

Lessons Learned

MARE 3

Despite her appealing pedigree and running family, she was unraced. The three offspring (all sent to GB) that met the criteria for this article were also all unraced despite the fact that one was by a sprinter; one was by a miler and one was by a classic-distance horse. If she passed on any of her faults, it is little wonder that she was a proven failure as a broodmare for the track.

her head turned towards the camera, she appears to have more muscle on the underside of her neck than is evident when she is looking straight ahead. Her sire was a stakes-winner on the turf, preferring distances of seven or eight furlongs. As a shuttle stallion, he sired champions in addition to his numerous stakes-winners on two continents. Her dam produced two stakes-winners

Our sample mares would seem to prove that the best offspring are those that represent a cross of similar types when it comes to the mechanical aspects that dictate distance preferences. We might also deduce that if there are too many corrections for the stallion to make, the mare has little chance of producing a superior runner. Our best bet is to add an examination of the functional aspects of conformation of both mare and stallion if we are breeding or selecting with racing, not marketing, in mind. And, after all, isn’t that healthier for the entire racing and breeding industry?

Mare 4

This mare has the best construction of our sample group. Her LS gap is positioned directly in line with a line drawn from hip to hip for maximum ability to transfer her power. Her rear triangle is equal on the ilium side (point of hip to point of buttock) and the femur side (point of buttock to stifle protrusion), allowing for maximum propulsion without additional strain. Her stifle protrusion would be just below sheath level, were she male, meaning that her best distances would be just over a mile. The forequarters exhibit a pillar of support that emerges well in front of the withers for lightness on the forehand and into the rear quarter of the hoof for soundness. Her elbow is located a significant distance from her ribcage, allowing her a full range of motion without interference. Her humerus shows considerable rise from elbow to point of shoulder, adding more lightness to the forehand and her high base of neck continues that trend. Because she has

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MARE 4


GULFSTREAM PARK 2019-2020 THOROUGHBRED STAKES SCHEDULE

CHAMPIONSHIP MEET

NOVEMBER

FEBRUARY

DATE

STAKES

CONDITIONS

DIST/TURF

PURSE

DATE

STAKES

CONDITIONS

DIST/TURF

11.30.19

Buffalo Man

2yo

6F

$75K

2.1.20

Holy Bull (G2)

3yo

1 1/16 M

$350K

House Party

2yo F

6F

$75K

Forward Gal (G3)

3yo F

7F

$150K

Smooth Air

2yo

1M

$75K

Swale (G3)

3yo

7F

$150K

Hut Hut

2yo F

1M

$75K

Sweetest Chant (G3)

3yo F

1 M (T)

$100K

Pulpit

2yo

1 M (T)

$75K

Wait a While

2yo F

1 M (T)

$75K

DECEMBER DATE

STAKES

12.7.19

12.8.19

12.14.19

12.21.19 12.28.19

CONDITIONS

DIST/TURF

PURSE

Jewel (Claiming Crown)

3yo & up

1 1/8 M

$200K

Tiara (Claiming Crown)

3yo & up (F&M)

1 1/16 M (T)

$125K

Emerald (Claiming Crown)

3yo & up

1 1/16 M (T)

$125K

Iron Horse (Claiming Crown)

3yo & up

1 1/16 M

$110K

Express (Claiming Crown)

3yo & up

6F

$110K

Glass Slipper (Claiming Crown)

3yo & up (F&M)

1M

$110K

Rapid Transit (Claiming Crown)

3yo & up

7F

$110K

Canterbury (Claiming Crown)

3yo & up

5 F (T)

$110K

Distaff Dash (Claiming Crown)

3yo & up (F&M)

5 F (T)

$110K

Caribbean Classic

3yo

1 1/8 M

$300K

Confraternity Caribbean Cup

3yo & up

1 1/4 M

$100K

Invitational Cup For Imported

3yo & up

1 1/4 M

$90K

Lady Caribbean Cup

3yo F

1 1/16 M

$100K

Caribbean Cup Speed

3yo & up

6F

$100K

PURSE

Dania Beach (G3)

3yo

1 M (T)

$100K

2.8.20

Suwannee River (G3)

4yo & up (F&M)

1 1/8 M (T)

$150K

2.15.20

Royal Delta (G3)

4yo & up (F&M)

1 1/16 M

$150K

2.17.20

Old Hickory

4yo & up

1 1/16 M

$60K

Rail Splitter

4yo & up

6 1/2 F

$60K

Old Man Eloquent

4yo & up

1 1/16 M (T)

$60K

Mary Todd

4yo & up (F&M)

1 1/16 M (T)

$60K

American Fabius

3yo

7F

$60K

Queen Mother

3yo F

7F

$60K

Sage of Monticello

3yo

7 1/2 F (T)

$60K

Mrs. Presidentress

3yo F

7 1/2 F (T)

$60K

Lady Bird

4yo & up (F&M)

7F

$50K

Rough and Ready

4yo & up

1M

$50K

Trust Buster

4yo & up

6F

$50K

Little Magician

4yo & up

1 M (T)

$50K

2.22.20

2.29.20

Gulfstream Park Sprint (G3)

4yo & up

6F

$100K

Hutchenson (G3)

3yo

6F

$100K

Any Limit

3yo F

6F

$75K

Xpressbet.com Fountain of Youth (G2)

3yo

1 1/16 M

$400K

1M

$300K

Fort Lauderdale (G2)

3yo & up

1 1/8 M (T)

$200K

Harlan’s Holiday (G3)

3yo & up

1 1/16 M

$100K

Hardacre Mile Gulfstream Park Mile (G2)

4yo & up

Sugar Swirl (G3)

3yo & up (F&M)

6F

$100K

Davona Dale (G2)

3yo F

1M

$200K

My Charmer (G3)

3yo & up (F&M)

1 M (T)

$100K

Mac Diarmida (G2)

4yo & up

1 3/8 M (T)

$200K

Rampart (G3)

3yo & up (F&M)

1M

$100K

Honey Fox (G3)

4yo & up (F&M)

1 M (T)

$150K

Mr Prospector (G3)

3yo & up

7F

$100K

Very One (G3)

4yo & up (F&M)

1 3/16 M (T)

$150K

H Allen Jerkens

3yo & up

2 M (T)

$100K

Canadian Turf (G3)

4yo & up

1 M (T)

$150K

Via Borghese

3yo & up (F&M)

1 3/16 M (T)

$75K

Palm Beach (G3)

3yo

1 1/16 M (T)

$150K

Tropical Park Derby

3yo

1 1/16 M (T)

$75K

Herecomesthebride (G3)

3yo F

1 1/16 M (T)

$150K

Tropical Park Oaks

3yo F

1 1/16 M (T)

$75K

Janus

3yo & up

5 F (T)

$100K

Abundantia

3yo & up (F&M)

5 F (T)

$100K

MARCH

JANUARY

DATE

STAKES

CONDITIONS

DIST/TURF

PURSE

3.7.20

Captiva Island

4yo & up (F&M)

5 F (T)

$75K

Silks Run

4yo & up

5 F (T)

$75K

DATE

STAKES

CONDITIONS

DIST/TURF

PURSE

3.14.20

Hurricane Bertie (G3)

4yo & up (F&M)

7F

$150K

1.4.20

Mucho Macho Man

3yo

1M

$100K

3.21.20

Texas Glitter

3yo

5 F (T)

$75K

Kitten’s Joy

3yo

7 1/2 F (T)

$100K

Melody of Colors

3yo F

5 F (T)

$75K

Ginger Brew

3yo F

7 1/2 F (T)

$100K

Appleton (G3)

4yo & up (F&M)

1 M (T)

$100K

Glitter Women

3yo* F

6 1/2 F

$75K

Hal’s Hope (G3)

4yo & up

1 1/8 M

$100K

Sir Shackleton

4yo & up

7F

$75K

Xpressbet.com Florida Derby (G1)

3yo

1 1/8 M

$1M

Gulfstream Park Oaks (G2)

3yo F

1 1/16 M

$250K

1.11.20 1.18.20

1.25.20

Limehouse

3yo*

6F

$75K

Marshua's River (G3)

4yo & up (F&M)

1 1/16 M (T)

$150K

Tropical Turf (G3)

4yo & up

1 M (T)

$100K

3

M 4

3.28.20

Sunshine Millions Classic (FL)

4yo & up

1 1/8 M

$200K

Pan American (G2)

4yo & up

1 1/2 M (T)

$250K

Sunshine Millions Turf (FL)

4yo & up

1 1/16 M (T)

$150K

Orchid (G3)

4yo & up (F&M)

1 3/8 M (T)

$100K $100K

Sunshine Millions F&M Turf (FL)

4yo & up (F&M)

1 1/16 M (T)

$150K

Sand Springs

4yo & up (F&M)

1 M (T)

Sunshine Millions Sprint (FL)

4yo & up

6F

$100K

Cutler Bay

3yo

1 M (T)

$125K

Pegasus World Cup (G1)

4yo & up

1 1/8 M

$9M

Sanibel Island

3yo F

1 M (T)

$125K

Pegasus World Cup Turf (G1)

4yo & up

1 3/16 M

$7M

Inside Information (G2)

4yo & up (F&M)

7F

$200K

W.L. McKnight (G3)

4yo & up

1 1/2 M (T)

$200K

La Prevoyante (G3)

4yo & up (F&M)

1 1/2 M (T)

$200K

Fred Hooper (G3)

4yo & up

1M

$150K

Ladies’ Turf Sprint

4yo & up (F&M)

5 F (T)

$150K

Gulfstream Park Turf Sprint

4yo & up

5 F (T)

$150K

South Beach

4yo & up (F&M)

7 1/2 F (T)

$150K

NOVEMB ER S

3.27.20

T 5

W

T

6

7

DECEMB ER

↓ SIMULCASTING EVERY DAY (Except Christmas Day) Note: Live race days are subject to change. Please visit gulfstreampark.com for the most up-to-date information.

JANUARY

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LIVE RACING DAY

SIMULCAST DAY

CLOSED

SHADED AREAS DENOTE PREMIUM STAKES DAYS

901 S FEDERAL HIGHWAY // HALLANDALE BEACH 954.454.7000 // GULFSTREAMPARK .COM


| BREEDING |

Johnny Bear – a dual winner of the Gr.1 Northern Dancer Turf Stakes.

O NTA RIO BR EE DI N G Alex Campbell

28

TRAINERMAGAZINE.COM ISSUE 54

Dave Landry, Eclipse Sportswire, The Jockey Club of Canada


| ONTARIO BREEDING |

T

David Anderson blue suit with Peter Berringer

he Ontario breeding industry has experienced a number of twists and turns since the provincial government canceled the lucrative slots-at-racetracks program back in 2013. Prior to the cancelation of the program, the once robust industry had years where more than 1,600 mares were bred in the province, according to numbers published by The Jockey Club. In 2018, that number was down to 733. While the cancelation of the program has impacted the majority of the province’s breeders, well-known breeding operations in Ontario have experienced success through all of the uncertainty. Sam-Son Farm won back-to-back Sovereign Awards as Canada’s top breeder in 2013 and 2014, while Frank Stronach’s Adena Springs won three straight Sovereign Awards between 2015 and 2017 when they bred two Queen’s Plate winners in that time, including Shaman Ghost in 2015 and Holy Helena in 2017. Along with these big operations, several other commercial breeders are also experiencing success, not only in Ontario but throughout North America and internationally as well. Ivan Dalos’ Tall Oaks Farm bred two Gr1 winners in 2018, including full brothers Channel Maker, who won the Joe Hirsch Turf Classic at Belmont Park, and Johnny Bear, who won the Gr1 Northern Dancer Turf Stakes at Woodbine for the second consecutive year. In addition, Dalos also bred Avie’s Flatter, Canada’s champion two-year-old in 2018; dam In Return, who produced Channel Maker; and Johnny Bear, which was Canada’s Outstanding Broodmare. As a result, Tall Oaks Farm won its first Sovereign Award for Outstanding Breeder in 2018 as well. Horses bred by David Anderson’s Anderson Farms and Sean and Dorothy Fitzhenry also were big winners at last year’s Sovereign Awards. Anderson bred Queen’s Plate winner and 2018 Canadian Horse of the Year, Wonder Gadot, while Fitzhenry’s homebred, Mr Havercamp, was named champion older male and champion male turf horse. Both Anderson and Fitzhenry have also had success selling horses internationally, primarily at Keeneland. In 2017, Anderson sold Ontario-bred yearling, Sergei Prokofiev—a son of Scat Daddy—to Coolmore for $1.1 million. One of Fitzhenry’s success stories is that of Marketing Mix, who he sold for $150,000 to Glen Hill Farm at the 2009 Keeneland September Yearling Sale. Marketing Mix went on to win the Wonder Where Stakes at Woodbine as a three-year-old in 2011, and captured two Gr1 victories later on in her career in the 2012 Rodeo Drive Stakes at Santa Anita and the 2013 Gamely Stakes at Hollywood Park. For Anderson, commercial breeding is all he’s ever known. The son of the late Canadian Horse Racing Hall of Fame inductee, Robert Anderson, David Anderson grew up around horses at his father’s farm in St. Thomas, Ontario. In the 1970s and 1980s, Anderson Farms was one of the biggest breeders and consignors in the province, breeding several graded stakes winners. In fact, in 1985, Anderson Farms was the leading consignor at both the Saratoga and Keeneland yearling sales. “That’s what my father established years ago, and that’s what I grew up with was breeding and selling at all of the ISSUE 54 TRAINERMAGAZINE.COM

29


| BREEDING |

ABOVE: Ivan Dallos left accepts his Sovereign Award from James Bannon accompanied by his daughter Colleen Dallos.

BELOW: Marketing Mix

30

international sales,” David Anderson said. “We haven’t diverted from that philosophy in nearly 50 years. It’s what I learned growing up, and I try to buy the best quality mares that I can and breed to the best quality sires that I can.” While Anderson closely watched his father build up the Thoroughbred side of the business, he got experience of his own breeding Standardbreds. After all, the farm’s location in Southwestern Ontario is in the heart of Standardbred racing in the province. Anderson said the Standardbred business had a number of success stories spanning more than a decade: breeding champions such as Pampered Princess, Southwind Allaire, Cabrini Hanover, and The Pres. In 2010, Robert Anderson passed away from a heart attack, and the farm was taken over by David Anderson and his sister, Jessica Buckley, who is the current president of Woodbine Mohawk Park. Anderson went on to buy Buckley out of her share of the farm and took

TRAINERMAGAZINE.COM ISSUE 54

| ONTARIO BREEDING |

on full control. He also decided he wanted to focus exclusively on Thoroughbred breeding and racing. “After my Dad died I decided I wanted to jump back into the Thoroughbreds,” he said. “I sold all the Standardbreds and put everything I had back into Thoroughbreds. I came full circle back to my roots, and this is where I really love it.” It’s been a long-term project for Anderson to get the farm to where it is today. After taking control of the farm, Anderson sold off all of his father’s mares—with the exception of one—and began to build the business back up. Anderson said his broodmare band currently sits between 25 and 30, which is where he wants to keep it. Fitzhenry, on the other hand, took a much different path to his current standing in the Thoroughbred breeding industry. Fitzhenry said his start in Thoroughbred racing came through a horse owned by friends Debbie and Dennis Brown. Fitzhenry and his wife, Dorothy, would follow the Brown’s horse, No Comprende, who won seven of his 30 starts in his career, including the Gr3 Woodbine Slots Cup Handicap in 2003. The Fitzhenrys decided they wanted to get involved in ownership themselves and partnered with the Browns on a couple of horses. The more Fitzhenry got involved, the more the breeding industry appealed to him. “When we first started, we owned two horses in partnership with these friends of ours,” Fitzhenry said. “I was just really interested in the breeding aspect of it. I started reading stuff and asking people questions and more or less decided that I’d like to breed horses. So that’s what we did.” With a focus on getting into the breeding industry, the Fitzhenrys changed their approach when acquiring new horses. Fitzhenry said they exclusively started looking for fillies to purchase in order to build up their broodmare band. “What we wanted to do was buy fillies, race them and


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| BREEDING |

then retire them,” he said. “We always looked to buy a filly that would look good in our broodmare band. We consider ourselves to be commercial breeders first and foremost, but racing is fun too.” The Fitzhenrys continued to purchase horses and build up their stock, until one day, Sean Fitzhenry realized he had too many horses. “It kind of evolved the more and more interested I got in the breeding,” he said. “I woke up one day and I think I had 50 horses, and I thought this is wrong and we can’t do this. That’s when I sat down and said this is what we’re going to do and this is how we’re going to do it; and it worked out well.” Fitzhenry now has 10 mares that he maintains each year, and while he’s always on the lookout for new mares to improve his broodmare band, he won’t go higher than 10 mares at a time. “We keep 10 mares,” he said. “If we buy one, then one has to be sold. The deal is if I buy one, it has to be better than some of my mares, so you’re always improving your broodmare band that way.” Fitzhenry said that every horse he breeds will make it to a sale and will have a reserve price. If the horse doesn’t meet the reserve price, Fitzhenry will keep the horse and send it into training with Catherine Day Phillips at Woodbine. The strategy has worked out nicely on both sides, as Fitzhenry has sold horses like Tone Broke, who won the second jewel of the Canadian Triple Crown this past July in the Prince of Wales Stakes. And he has kept horses like Dixie Moon, who won the Woodbine Oaks in 2018, and Mr. Havercamp, who was a multiple-graded stakes winner last season and recently won the Gr3 Forbidden Apple Stakes at Saratoga in July. “We’ve been very lucky,” Fitzhenry said. “Dixie Moon was a gorgeous yearling. She was very well-bred and from

32

TRAINERMAGAZINE.COM ISSUE 54

| ONTARIO BREEDING |

a good family, but she had a big scar on her neck. We were calling that our million-dollar scar. [Mr. Havercamp] was kind of an awkward yearling and as a matter of fact, he was an awkward two-year old. Catherine had him and she said, ‘I like this horse but he’s just big and goofy. Let’s send him home and bring him back as a three-year old.’” When it comes to deciding on mating decisions for their mares, both Anderson and Fitzhenry consult the services of bloodstock agent Marette Farrell. Anderson and Fitzhenry tend to focus on Kentucky stallions in order to appeal to the broader market.

TOP: Sergei Prokofiev ABOVE: Wonder Gadot


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This world class training barn has produced 27 Grade 1 winners, 3 Breeders’ Cup winners and a Dubai World Cup winner. Located in Fair Hill Training Center, with a one-mile dirt track, 7/8th mile all-weather track, wooded trails, miles of grass gallops and numerous paddocks. Race & return to 12 racetracks, no other location in the US offers this kind of racing availability.

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83-acre farm featuring a 5/8th mile training track, 12 center aisle barns with a total of 292 stalls, indoor therapy pool, covered eurocizer, 2 arenas, numerous paddocks, and two homes. Rarely does an equestrian training facility of this magnitude come available in the Mid-Atlantic region.

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Gorgeous 103 acre working horse farm. 24 stalls in several different barns, indoor jogging track, 6 horse eurocizer, extensive pastures, stocked pond, and large, well designed home. Currently used as a Thoroughbred breaking, breeding and lay-up operation. Suitable for numerous other disciplines.

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| BREEDING |

ABOVE: Dixie Moon

BELOW: Sean Fitzhenry left and Dorothy Fitzhenry (right) accept their Sovereign Award from Katherine Curry of Racing Ontario.

34

“From a commercial standpoint, that’s what the market is dictating and that’s the strength in the market,” Anderson said. “I’m breeding to race and sell Grade 1 winners. When you breed and sell Grade 1 winners, or attempt to sell Grade 1 winners, you’re producing for the world-wide racing market. They happen to be Ontariobred, so there’s always a great fallback position to be able to come back and run in the restricted program.” While the Ontario breeding industry is attempting to build itself back up, Anderson said he gets positive feedback on the Ontario-bred racing program from buyers around the world. Recently, Ontario Racing, which oversees the administration of the province’s horse racing industry for all three breeds, announced a $2.375-million Ontario-bred bonus program that will split a $2,500

TRAINERMAGAZINE.COM ISSUE 54

| ONTARIO BREEDING |

bonus evenly between the owner and breeder for any registered Ontario-bred that wins an overnight race at Woodbine. A similar $1,250 bonus is available for any Ontario-bred that wins an overnight race at Fort Erie. “I sell at all of the major sales in North America. I travel overseas to Tattersalls and Arqana, and people are intrigued by our program,” Anderson said. “They’re always asking me about it. I think our purse structure is very strong. The Ontario-bred bonus structure is very strong. We have plenty of stakes races that are worth a lot of money that gives everybody a lot of opportunities to make money and buy Ontario-bred yearlings. I’ve been fortunate enough to breed Group winners outside of Canada, but so have so many other good breeders in Canada.” Anderson said Woodbine is also in a unique position when it comes to turf racing. Woodbine already has a highly-regarded turf course that attracts top horses from the United States and Europe every year, but this year, the track has also opened up its new inner turf course, replacing the old Standardbred track on the infield. “I hear so many compliments of the E. P. Taylor Turf Course,” Anderson said. “It’s a world-renowned track. Now, adding this inner turf, I think it has a lot of people excited. It offers a little bit of a different dimension with the tighter turns, and it seems to be a high-speed track. A different type of horse can win on that versus the E. P. Taylor.” Anderson added that the addition of the inner turf at Woodbine has had an impact on his breeding decisions. “I think in the last five years across North America, more and more people are influenced by turf and looking at turf,” he said. “We’re seeing a lot of European horses come over here and are doing very well. It has influenced me, as far as breeding a little more turf-oriented horse.”


Catherine Rudenko Giles Anderson, Shutterstock

THOROUGHBRED N U T R I T I O N PA S T & PRESENT

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TRAINERMAGAZINE.COM ISSUE 54


| HORSE FEED |

F

eeding practices for racehorses have changed as nutritional research advances and food is no longer just fuel but a tool for enhancing performance and provi viding i that wi winning i edge. While feeding is dominantly considered the content of the feed bu uck ket, which byy weight forms the largesst part of the horse’ss diet, changes in forage quality have also played a role in the changing face of Thoroughbred nutrition. The content of the feed bucket, which is becoming increasingly elaborate wi with a wit multitude of supplements to consider, the forages—both long and short chop and even the bedding chosen—all

play a part in what is “the feed program.” Comparing feed ingredients of the past against the present provi vides i some interesting insights as to how the industry has changed and wi will i contin nue to change.

Comparing key profiles of the past and present The base of anyy diet is forage, being the most fundamental need of th he horse alo ongside water. Forage quality ty and fo orm has changed over the years, parrticularly since haylage entered the market and growers began to focus specifi fically fic on equine. The traditional diet of hay and oats, perhaps combined wi with mash as needed, provi wit vided a signifi vid ficantly fic diff fferent dietary intake to that now seen for horses fed a ffe high-grade haylage and fortifi fied complete feed. fie

ISSUE 54 TRAINERMAGAZINE.COM

37


| NUTRITION |

TRADITIONAL DIET • 7kg Oats • 1kg Mash – comprised of bran, barley, linseed and epsom salt • 0.5kg Chaff • Hay 6% protein consumed at 1% of bodyweight

MODERN DIET – MEDIUMGRADE HAYLAGE • 8kg Generic Racing Mix • 0.5kg Alfalfa Chaff • 60ml Linseed Oil • 60g Salt • Haylage 10% protein consumed at 1% of bodyweight

MODERN DIET – HIGHGRADE HAYLAGE • 8kg Generic Racing Mix • 0.5kg Alfalfa Chaff • 60 0ml Linsee ed Oill • 60g Salt • Haylage 13% protein consumed at 1% of bodyweight

38

TRAINERMAGAZINE.COM ISSUE 54


We are proud to have fed the winners of

91 Breeders’ Cup races,

and we look forward to rooting on this year’s Breeders’ Cup entrants that were raised on or race on Hallway Feeds.

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HALLWAYFEEDS.COM

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ISSUE 54 TRAINERMAGAZINE.COM

39


| NUTRITION |

The traditional example diet of straights with bran and hay easily met and exceed the required amount of protein providing 138% of requirement. When looking at the diet as a whole, the total protein content of the diet inclusive of forage equates to 9.7%. In comparison, the modern feeding example using a high-grade haylage produces a total diet protein content equivalent to 13.5%. The additional protein—while beneficial to development, muscle recovery and immune support—can become excessive. High intakes of protein against actual need have been noted to affect acid base balance of the blood, effectively lowering blood pH.(1) Modern feeds for racing typically contain 13-14% protein, which complement forages of a basic to medium-grade protein content very well; however, when using a high-grade forage, a lower protein feed may be of benefit. Many brands now provide feeds fortified with vitamins and minerals designed for racing but with a lower protein content. While the traditional straight-based feeding could easily meet energy and protein requirements, it had many short-falls relating to calcium and phosphorus balance, overall dietary mineral intake and vitamin intake. Modern feeds correct for imbalances and ensure consistent provision of a higher level of nutrition, helping to counterbalance any variation seen within forage. While forage protein content has changed, the mineral profile and its natural variability has not. Another point of difference against modern feeds is the starch content. In the example diet, the “bucket feed” is 39% starch—a value that exceeds most modern racing feeds. Had cracked corn been added or a higher inclusion of boiled barley been present, this level would have increased further. Racing feeds today provided a wide range of starch levels ranging from 10% up to the mid-thirties, with feeds in the “middle range” of 18-25% becoming increasingly popular. There are many advantages to balancing starch with other energy sources including gut health, temperament and reducing the risk of tying-up. The horse with a digestive anatomy designed for forages has limitations as to how much starch can be effe fectively proccessed in the small intestine, where it contributes direcctly to glucose levels. Undigested starch that moves into the hindgut is a key factor in acidosis and while still digeested, the pathway is more complex and not as benefi ficial i as when digested in the small intestine. Through regulating starcch intake in feeds, the body can operate more eff ffectively, f gy provi viided through ffiibrous i sources ensures and energy adeq quate energy gy intake for the work required.

Feed ingredients for the modern racehorse

Movviing from straights to completed bagged feeds has creaated a w wiider i range of materials that are now easily fed. Th he incclusio on of pellets wi wi n a muesli an within nd cubes as a feed faccilitattes the use of various co-products. Haviin ng a wiid der

range of feed materials to work with means a greater range of nutritional profiles are now available, with multiple combinations of protein, oils, starch and fiber. The old rule of thumb that as protein increases so would “energy” namely in the form of starch no longer applies. A 10-11% protein feed is no longer exclusively a pony feed with a low value, but is found in racing feeds used in both flat and national hunt. Cereals are still the dominant inclusion in racing feeds with very few diets being cereal free. Oats as before remain the most popular grain as they offer the best protein, fiber and starch ratio of all the grains. Other materials, known as co-products, produced by other feed industries are now widely used along with grass or alfalfa meal. These alternatives to grain allow flexibility in designing both the energy and the protein profile of the feed. (See table below). Commonly Used Ingredients: Typical Characteristics When comparing cereals against the co-products, the difference in starch content is easily identified. Grass and alfalfa meal also offer a low-starch level while maintaining a good level of protein. Straw is less commonly used as the protein content and digestibility are lower than the other materials. Combining the groups in different ratios allows a wide range of starch levels to exist while still maintaining the appropriate level of protein. While co-products are not whole foods, this does not mean their nutritional value is any less worthy of consideration or that they are not as valuable to the horse. Each brings its own benefits depending on what the diet is intended for. It is the combination of these materials that matters; the creation of a feed is somewhat of an art as much as it is a science. Rice Bran A co-product of rice milling whereby rough rice is dehulled to produce brown rice (a common human food) is then milled. Rice bran is produced during the milling process and is comprised of the pericarp (outer layer), the aleurone layer (inner layer), some endosperm and germ. It is valued for its naturally high-oil content, good protein content and moderate starch content relative to whole cereals. Sugar Beet Pu Pulp up The residue thatt remains after sugar has been extracted from sugar beet.. It is not high in sugar as the name might imply, typ ypically p containing only 7% sugar. When molassed, the su ugar content increases to around 20%. In the latter form m, it is highly palatable and produces a glycemic responsse similar to that of oats, making it well suited for horsess in training. It also infl flluences hindgut fermentation, haavviing i a natural prebiotic eff fffect and making it ideal for racing where the en nvironment i and diet create challengess for the hin ndgut.(2,3)

Whole Cereals Oats

Co-Products

Barley

Maize

Wheat

Rice Bran

Sugar Beet Pulp (Molassed)

Soya Hulls

Straw Wheatfeed

Oatfeed

Grass/Alfalfa

Nutritionally Improved Straw

Alfalfa Meal

Grass Meal

Protein

%

9

11

8

11

14.5

11

12

15

5.5

4

16.5

16

Fibre

%

11.3

4.8

2

2

6.5

14

35

9.5

24

35

26

19

Oil

%

6.8

2.6

4

2.3

21

1.5

2.5

4.5

2.3

1.2

3

3.4

Starch

%

38

51.5

63

60

26

2

6

22

11.5

0.5

3

1.5

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| NUTRITION |

Wheat Grain Structu ture u (above) htttp://ww ww w. w.naabim..org g.uk//wheeat-sstru ucturee

Soya Hulls Derived from soya beans during processing. The hulls (outer shells) are removed and are highly fibrous with a crude fiber content of 35%—significantly higher than any grain but containing an equivalent amount of protein. Ideal for use when looking to increase fiber content and lower starch content of a feed. Oatfeed A co-product of oat milling made up dominantly of the oak hull (outer layer) with a high-fiber content. Beneficial when looking to provide fiber without elevating protein content. Wheatfeed Produced from wheat following extraction for flour. The profile of wheatfeed is based on the level of bran, germ and middlings. It provides a good level of protein, somew whatt high her than wh holle graiins and d hass a mod deratte starch content w wiith i only a low level of fiber, i compared to soya hulls or sugar beet pulp. Nutritionally Improved Straw (NIS) Straw is highly fi fibrous and poorly digested. To improve fib digestion, straw can be treated wit ith an alkali—sodium hydroxide—at which point it becomes NIS. Less commonly used in Thoroughbred feeds and primarily included for fib iber content.

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TRAINERMAGAZINE.COM ISSUE 54

| HORSE FEED |

Grass Meal & Alfalfa Meal Dried grass (grass meal) is produced from herbage that may contain a blend of grass, clover, alfalfa and sainfoin. The protein value depends upon plant maturity when harvested, but will be a minimum of 13% protein and typically 16% protein. Alfalfa meal, while commonly thought of as a forage in the same manner as hay, is by family a legume—the same as peas and beans. Alfalfa is often valued for its protein and mineral content, in particular its calcium level. All ingredients used in a feed are listed in the composition section of the feed label. Their order of inclusion on the label relates to the weight of each material—the largest inclusion by weight being the first and then so on. Checking the feed composition section informs you as to what materials have been blended to create your feed. The composition of mixes and cubes for the same category of horse are often different as the variety of materials that can be made into a cube is much greater than those that can be used in a mix.

Feed Additions

In addition to the raw materials, many feeds now contain additional supplements or use alternative sources of vitamins or minerals based on research into their availability to the horse. This is the area of nutrition that continually progresses as such additions can impact performance. The majority of feeds on the market now deliver more than just protein, carbohydrate, fats, vitamins and minerals. The most commonly used additions include probiotics, prebiotics, maerl, plant-based antioxidants, vitamin C and natural forms of vitamin E. Probiotics & Prebiotics Live yeast culture—a form of probiotic—is widely used to improve digestibility of the diet, increasing digestion of fibrous fractions, protein and minerals.(4) In addition, the preb biottic FOS—a sh hortt-ch haiin fructtoolligosacch hariide—iis sometimes included d to promote the growt wth t of benefficial i gut bacteria such as Bifid idobacteria. Supporting benefiiccial bacteria can increase VFA (volatile fatttyy acid) production.(5) These fatty acids are converted and used for energy. By maintaining a healthy hindgut profi file, it is possible to fil maximize digestion and nutrient uptake.


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| NUTRITION |

| HORSE FEED |

Its use in feeds is part of a cocktail of antioxidants which is reflected by the inclusion rate. Some evidence exists for the use of much higher doses of vitamin C for horses with respiratory issues or aged horses with compromised immune systems. A high dose for these specific situations, and for horses following surgery or with wounds to heal, is then advisable. As long-term high levels of intake are not well documented and such inclusions may impact on the horse’s ability to naturally synthesise vitamin C, its use should be moderated at high intakes to times of specific need only. Vitamin E Vitamin E is found in feeds in two forms within feed: synthetic and natural. Also described as all-racemic (synthetic) and RRR (natural). The natural form is the most abundant type found within plants and is considered the most active form. Studies into horses at rest and when exercised have shown the natural form to be more effective at elevating plasma vitamin E status (9). Supplementing with vitamin E has many noted benefits for performance and is particularly relevant for horses with ERS. As with all nutrients, an excessive intake can be detrimental and should be carefully considered.

Summary

Maerl Also known as acidbuff or lithothamnium, maerl is a calcareous marine algae with a honeycomb-like structure that is effective in buffering acid in various parts of the digestive tract. It is naturally rich in minerals, most notably calcium and is more available to the horse than calcium carbonate (limestone). Its increased d availability is also noted when fed in the presence of omeeprazole, a commonly used medication that reduces calciium uptake.(6) Its use in racing feeds and supplements is beecoming more common, partly for its eff ffect f on regulation of acidity and its improved availability as a calcium source,, but also for its role in bone development. Studies from m Kentucky Equine Research have evi videnced i an improveed bone density and thickness when using calcareouss marine algae in the diet of Thoroughbred (7). Plant-Bas assed An Antioxi n xiidants There is an increasing interest in the use of plantt-based antioxidants to support rt the more commonly kno ow wn n antioxidants vviiitamin E and vviiitamin C. The blend d of plants work syn yn nergi gistically, i making them eff ffective f at low w doses. Studies have evi vid idenced a positive eff ffect f of such blends on plaasma vi viittamin n E, viittamin C and to otal antioxid dant capaccity ty (8). Vit itamin C While the horse can produce vi vitamin C from glucose and vit therefore it is not strictly required to be provi vided in the vid diet, the inclusion of vi vitamin C may have benefi vit fits. Vitamin fit C is an antioxidant and has a role in collagen development.

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Modern feeds offer a wide range of nutrient profiles, allowing more flexibility of feeding through the use of a greater range feed materials, including co-products. Understanding the feed profile inclusive of starch content is important when selecting feeds best suited to the yard. Supplementation level within feed of antioxidants and additional benefits such as prebiotics has created feeds that deliver much more than traditional nutrition. When reviewing a feed, all factors including additional nutritional features should be considered. Nutrition is now a powerful tool when looking to enhance performance. References: 1. Graham-Thiers,P.M.,Kronfeld,D.S.(2005) Dietary Protein Influences Acid-Base Balance in Sedentary Horses. Journal of Equine Veterinary Science (2005) pp 434-438. 2. Gebbink, GAR., Sutton, AL., Richert, BT., Patterson JA., Nielsen, J., Kelly, DT., Verstegen, MWA., Williams, BA., Bosch, M., Cobb, M., Kendall, D.C., DeCamp, S., Bowers K (1999) Effects of Addition of Fructooligosaccharide (FOS) and Sugar Beet Pulp to Weanling Pig Diets on Performance, Microflora and Intestinal Health. Department of Animal Sciences, Purdue University, and Wageningen Institute of Animal Sciences, Wageningen Agricultural University, The Netherlands. 3. Al-Tamimi, M.A.H.M., Palframan, R.J., Cooper, J.M., Gibson, G.R., Rastall, R.A (2006). In vitro fermentation of sugar beet arabinan and arabinooligosaccharides by the human gut microflora. Journal of Applied Microbiology 100 (2006) pp 407–414. 4.Glade,M.J. (2011). Dietary yeast culture supplementation of mares during late gestation and early lactation. Effects on dietary nutrient digestibilities and feccal nitrogen partitioning. Journal of Equine Veterinary Science 11 (1991) pp 10-166. 5.Berg,E.L.,Fu.J.H.,Porter,J.H.,Kerley,M.S.(2005) Fructooligosaccharide supplementation in the yearling horse: Effects on fecal pH, microbial content, and volatile fatty acid concentrations. Journal of Animal Science 83 (2005) pp 1549–1553. 6. Pagan,JD. Petroski,LA.,, Mann,AC., Hauss,AA., Huntingdon,PJ. (2018) Effecct of Omeprazole and Calccium Sources on Calcium Digestibility in Thorougghbred Horses. Proceedings of the Austtralasian Equinee Science Sympoosium. 7. Pagan, JD., Swanhall, A., Ford, E., Mulvey, E.,, & Huntingtton, PJ. (2018) Mineral and Vitamin Supplementation Includingg Marine Derived Calcium Increases Bone Density in Thoroughbreds. Proceedings of the Australasian Equine Science Symposium. 8.Lowe, J.A., Lucas, D., Paganga, G., Observations on the antioxidant status of horses as influenced by supplementary dietary antioxidants. 9. Pagan, JD.(2006) Tocopherol form affects vitamin E. Feedstuffs 78 (2006).


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ISSUE 54 TRAINERMAGAZINE.COM

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GRADE 1 WINNING OWNER PROFILES Raymond Mamone – Imperial Hint

Quitting school at the age of 14 might not work for everyone, but it allowed 86-year-old Raymond Mamone an early entrance into the real world. He began hauling ice and plucking tomatoes, eventually earning enough to open his own body shop and get involved with Thoroughbreds by claiming 22 horses in one year. He even tried training his own horses for a few months. Now he’s enjoying life more than ever, thanks to trackrecord breaking Imperial Hint—one of the top sprinters in the world and a horse from a mare he had given up on and sold. Luckily, he reconnected with Imperial Hint at the age of two, bought him for $17,500 and has watched with glee as Imperial Hint bankrolled more than $1.9 million. “You can’t believe it’s happening,” he said. “It doesn’t happen to many people. How many years do people spend trying to find a good horse?” Born in the Great Depression, Mamone was the son of an Italian immigrant who worked in the Brooklyn

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Navy Yard and was a tailor, too. Raymond was born in Brooklyn, where he would sneak into Ebbits Field to watch the Dodgers. His family moved to New Jersey, and Mamone quit school at an early age. “I went looking for work,” he said. “I was an ice man— $2 a day. To make more money, I went to work on a tomato farm. Ten cents a bushel. Go down the line, bend down and pull tomatoes. I did mason work and mixed cement for contractors. I was a hustler. I moved around a lot. I went into the body shop business.” He did well enough to open his own body shop in 1956. A trip to Monmouth Park with a friend piqued his interest. Why? “I won that day,” he laughed. “I went to the track occasionally. I decided to buy horses and get into the claiming business.” In his first year, he claimed 22 horses with trainer Mike Vincitore. “He told me I was crazy,” Mamone said. “But I made money. I was written up in the Morning Telegraph. They wrote an article about me and Mike.”

ABOVE: Marc Holliday Blue Devil Racing Stables – Come Dancing. RIGHT: Raymond Mamone


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Then Mamone began breeding horses. “I did it on my own,” he said. “Nobody really taught me anything. I have common sense. I would figure it out myself.” He decided to try to figure out how to train his own horses and got his own trainer’s license. “I learned all this on my own,” he said. “It sounds stupid, but that’s how I did it. But I couldn’t handle the body shop and training.” So his training career lasted only six months. His involvement with Thoroughbreds has continued his whole life. And he got lucky...very lucky. He went to look at some yearlings at the farm where he’d sold Imperial Hint’s dam. “I went down to look at yearlings and I said, `Who’s this?’ He said, `That’s your baby.’ I said, `You got to be kidding.’ He was almost two years old. They were going to take him to a sale. I bought him for $17,500. He was small but well-built.” Mamone gave Imperial Hint and other horses to trainer Luis Carvajal, Jr., who had worked for Bobby Durso, a trainer Mamone had used. “He passed away, so ISSUE 54 TRAINERMAGAZINE.COM

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| OWNERS |

I gave Luis the horses,” Mamone said. “We’re really close friends. We’re really tight.” Carvajal is thrilled with the opportunity Mamone gave him. “It’s a good relationship—a business relationship and a friendship,” Carvajal said. Of course, Imperial Hint’s immense success in Carvajal’s care has strengthened their bond. Imperial Hint won the 2018 Gr1 A.G. Vanderbilt Stakes at Saratoga by 3 ¾ lengths at 4-5. When he returned to defend his title in the $350,000 stakes, July 27, he went off at 5-1 due to the presence of Mitole, who had won seven straight races and nine of his last 10 starts. “Luis didn’t want to put him in the Vanderbilt,” Mamone said. “He wanted to run in the $100,000 Tale of the Cat. I said, `No, we’re going to win this race. He said, `Are you for real?’ I said, `Yes.’ He said, `Mitole?’ I said, `Don’t worry about Mitole.’” Imperial Hint certainly didn’t, taking his second consecutive Vanderbilt by four lengths in 1:07.92, the fastest six furlongs in Saratoga’s 150-year-history. The call from Larry Collmus was perfect: “He’s back! And he broke the track record!” That track record, 1:08.04, had been set by Spanish Riddle in 1972 and equaled by Speightstown in 2004. Mamone said, “I didn’t think he’d break the track record. When he called that, that was unbelievable. That gave me chills.” It’s so much better getting chills that way than hauling ice for $2 a day.

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Terry Green (Jackpot Farm) – Basin

What’s a former professional cutting rider from Gulfport, Miss., doing in the winner’s circle at Saratoga Race Course after the Gr1 Hopeful Stakes? Well, he’s posing with his first Gr1 stakes winner, Basin, a horse he purchased for $150,000 at the 2018 Keeneland September Yearling Sale. “I can’t explain it,” Green said, taking a break from the 2019 Keeneland September Yearling Sale. “I’ve watched the race 25 times, probably 50 times. It’s hard to believe. When we bought the colt, we thought he was nice. When I’m sitting here in this arena, and you buy him from the bottom of the totem pole... what’s $150,000 when you see these prices these horses are going for?” Green, 67, had quite a unique introduction to horses. “As a kid growing up in Mississippi, my grandfather had some horses,” he said. “He had cattle and he would turn them loose. Back in the day, we would brand them and turn them loose in the woods. At certain times of the year, we’d round them up. I would go into the woods with my grandfather and herd cattle. I couldn’t wait to do it every time with my grandfather. It was a blast.” After graduating from the University of Southern Mississippi, Green became a developer, building houses, apartments and shopping centers—an occupation he continued when he moved to Houston in the late ‘80s. “I heard of cutting horses (a Western style equestrian competition which demonstrates a horse’s athleticism and the horse and rider’s ability to handle cattle), and I watched it,” Green said. “It was really cool—just a horse and a cow by themselves. I just enjoyed it so much.”

ABOVE: Imperial Hint


BELOW: Terry Green – Jackpot Farm – Basin

He enjoyed it even more when he became a cutting rider in the late ‘90s, competing in the non-pro ranks for some 15 years. In 2003, he opened 200-acre Jackpot Ranch in Weatherford, Texas, which became a leader in producing outstanding cutting horses. By then, he’d ventured into the casino business, almost by accident. He and a friend in the restaurant business, Rick Carter, went on a day cruise out of Miami. “Everybody was in the casino,” Green said. “I said, `This would be unbelievable in Mississippi.” Green and Carter contacted the Mississippi Port Authority and secured the rights to do a gambling cruise ship out of Gulfport. “We didn’t know anything about gambling,” he said. “We started sailing in and out of Mississippi. It didn’t work. We had too many people working in the engine room. We came up with the idea that if we could tie it to the dock, we could make it work. It got approved. I think it was 1989 or 1990. Now we own two casinos there, both in Gulfport, Miss. It’s really exciting. How did we do this? We were just a couple local guys from Mississippi.” Thoroughbreds were next, thanks to his friendship with Mike Rutherford Jr., a fellow cutting rider. They became hunting buddies. Mike’s father is a life-long horseman who began riding horses and working with cattle at the age of eight in Austin, Texas. He was a force in Quarter Horse racing before switching to Thoroughbreds. He purchased Manchester Farm in Lexington, Ky., in 1976, and it continues to thrive. Mike and his father invited Green to their farm seven years ago. Green was blown away. “I said this is a great alternative,” he said. “I said I’m not going to be able to ride cutting horses forever.”

Two years later, Green and Rutherford Jr. created Jackpot Ranch-Rutherford. They purchased and campaigned Mississippi Delta. “She was a Gr3 winner,” Green said. “That really gave me a buzz.” Green purchased some land near Lexington, Ky., to begin Jackpot Farm. “We built barns and paddocks,” Green said. “The last two years, I really got into it. I have about eight or nine horses now. I kind of fell in love with it pretty quick.” Basin’s performance in the Hopeful did nothing to cool his passion. “Oh my God,” Green said. “It’s unbelievable.”

Marc Holliday (Blue Devil Racing Stables) – Come Dancing

What could possibly be better than winning a Gr1 stakes at Saratoga? Winning a Gr1 at Saratoga with a homebred. That’s exactly what Marc Holliday’s Blue Devil Racing Stables did when its five-year-old mare Come Dancing rallied from last to capture the Gr1 Ballerina August 24th by 3 ½ lengths. “She was awesome,” Holliday said. “Winning at Saratoga on Travers Day, a Gr1, `Win and you’re in.’ I’ve been going to Saratoga for close to 35 years. It doesn’t get much better than that.” The 53-year-old native of Huntington, Long Island, is the CEO and Chairman of SL Green Realty—New York City’s largest owner of office properties and the dominant landlord in Midtown Manhattan. He is also a member of the New York Racing Association Board. He has deep roots in horse racing, and he and his family have become benefactors of Akindale Sanctuary, a rest, rehab, retrain and retirement program with more than 165 retired Thoroughbreds in Pawling, New York.

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| OWNERS |

Holliday’s father, Morton, raced a stable of Standardbreds at The Meadowlands and campaigned his horses in the rich New York Sire Stakes. “Way back in high school, I fell in love with racing...with the action,” Holliday said. He didn’t get involved in the action until 2006, when he began Blue Devil Racing Stable. While in high school, Holliday played lacrosse with the Huntington, Long Island, club team. “The mascot was the Huntington Blue Devil,” Holliday said. He wanted to call his stable “Blue Devil,” but The Jockey Club said he had to get approval from Duke University—home of the more famous Blue Devils. It probably didn’t hurt that legendary Duke Basketball Coach Mike Krzyzewski is a huge Thoroughbred fan who annually comes to Saratoga. The name was approved. In 2007, with the help of trainer Dale Romans, Blue Devil Racing Stable and partner James O’Reilly purchased Honest to Betsy, a two-year-old filly who had raced twice at Churchill Downs and finished second in a maiden $50,000 claimer and second again in a maiden special weight. Honest to Betsy didn’t wait long to put a smile on Holliday’s face. In her first start for him at Belmont Park on July 19, 2007, she won a maiden special weight by four lengths. She followed that up with a fourth in the Gr2 Adirondack Stakes at Saratoga. “The first race was a bit of a surreal experience,” Holliday said. “I wasn’t at the track. James was there. I watched it on TV, she showing our colors in front. She won convincingly. I was pretty shocked. It all came together quickly. Then she was fourth in the Adirondack. I immersed myself in the business.” Come Dancing, a daughter of Malibu Moon out of Tizahit by Tiznow, has become the star of his business. Trained by Carlos Martin, Come Dancing won her first two starts. As a five-year-old, she won the Gr3 Distaff Handicap by 7 ¾ lengths, the Gr2 Ruffian by 6 ¾ lengths and then finished second by 3 ½ lengths in the Gr1 Ogden Phipps, before her sparkling performance in the Ballerina.

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Holliday has achieved almost as much success with Thoroughbreds as he has in real estate, which is saying a lot. “I think there are a lot of similarities with real estate and horses,” he said. “With real estate, it’s about vision, planning, design, development, and if you do it right, there’s a payoff. Horses are a long-term investment. It takes a lot of careful planning. There are all the handson issues that come along the way. Then you forget everything...all the time and the setbacks...when you have those successful moments with these great equine athletes racing at the top level. It’s the payoff for five years of work. He has a handful of racehorses, yearlings, weanlings and 10 broodmares. “I’m very passionate about the business,” he said. He’s also passionate about the Thoroughbreds who create the business, and their aftercare when they’re done racing. His involvement with Akindale came not long after the patriarch of Akindale Farm, John Hettinger, passed on September 6, 2006. Hettinger, the former president of Fasig-Tipton and a successful owner and breeder, led the racing industry in the battle to end horse slaughter in the United States. He won as horse slaughter in America came to a halt that very year. Hettinger set aside 1,000 acres of Akindale Farm to be used as a home for rescued Thoroughbreds. Holliday’s niece, Michelle Woolf, did a research paper on Thoroughbred retirement and included Akindale. “That was right after Mr. Hettinger died,” Holliday said. Holliday’s wife, Sheree, and their daughter, Danielle, are equestrians, and they ride in charity events at Akindale. “I started sending my lay-ups and yearlings to break there,” Holliday, who has received numerous awards for his philanthropy with people, said. “I sent a couple retired horses there. It’s always been a nice relationship. We built a showing ring for them and donated some equipment to them. They always can use the help.”

ABOVE: Marc Holliday Blue Devil Racing Stables - Come Dancing


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| LEGAL |

INDIANA’S NEW “BIOLOGICAL SAMPLES” TESTING LAW: INTEGRITY ASSURED OR INVASIVE OVERREACH? 52

TRAINERMAGAZINE.COM ISSUE 54


| BIOLOGICAL SAMPLES |

Peter J. Sacopulos

Alamy

From House Bill To Horse Law

On May 1, 2019, Governor Eric Holcomb signed Indiana House Bill 1196 into law. The statute, which took effect on July 1 of this year, directs the Indiana Horse Racing Commission (IHRC) to adopt a variety of new rules and procedures governing horse racing within the state. Governor Holcomb and Indiana State Representative Bob Cherry, who introduced HB 1196 to the legislature, are Republicans. However, the bill enjoyed broad bipartisan support—a rarity in current American politics. In fact, the final version sailed through both chambers, receiving not a single “nay” vote in the House and a mere three “nays” in the Senate. HB 1196 is something of an equine regulatory smorgasbord. Examples of its provisions include officially changing references to the IHRC’s “secretary” to “executive director,” altering the way breed advisory committee members are appointed, specifying that certain funds be directed to the Indiana-sired horses program, and the creation of new privacy protections to guard the personal information required on license applications. Items like these, as well as several others included in HB 1196, are unlikely to cause ripples within the racing community. However, the new law also includes provisions designed to enhance and expand the Commission’s ability to detect, police and reduce the use of banned substances. And while this is undoubtedly a worthwhile cause, a two-word term used in the drug-testing language of HB 1196 has the potential to negatively impact horses and trainers for years to come, with consequences that may spread well beyond the borders of Indiana.

Two Words, Too Broad?

The two-word term is “biological sample.” It is legally defined in the statue as follows: “Biological sample” refers to any fluid, tissue or other substance obtained from a horse through an internal or external means to test for foreign substances, natural substances at abnormal levels, and prohibited medications. The term includes blood, urine, saliva, hair, muscle tissue collected at a necropsy, semen, and other substances appropriate for testing as determined by the commission. This definition goes well beyond the longstanding blood, saliva, urine, and more recently, hair, samples routinely collected from Thoroughbred competitors for analysis. It is also disturbingly open-ended. Indeed, the phrase: “…and other substances appropriate for testing as determined by the commission…” is a definition that is essentially wide open, providing the IHRC staff the power to define or redefine a “biological sample.” While there was discussion and temporary agreement to limit the use of biological samples to necropsy purposes, that limitation was removed from the final version of the bill that was signed into law and became effective July 1, 2019. Therefore, the Commission Staff is authorized and may elect to take muscle tissue, and other biological ISSUE 54 TRAINERMAGAZINE.COM

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| LEGAL |

| BIOLOGICAL SAMPLES |

for horses than blood, saliva, urine or hair sampling. To be clear, I am referring to biopsies. A biopsy is the removal and examination of cells or tissue from a living being for the purposes of testing and examination. Any biopsy carries risk of injury or infection. Taking a biopsy from a horse may be as simple as a skin sample from the withers or tissue from the lining of the mouth, or as difficult as removing material from the teeth or the interior of the eye; or from internal organs such as the heart, lungs, liver, intestine or colon. In the latter examples, a biopsy becomes a complex medical procedure. A procedure performed on a large, valuable animal requires sedation and may require general anesthesia to facilitate tissue collection. Sedating a horse is serious business. Sedatives and anesthetics carry significant risks, even when administered with care by skilled equine veterinary professionals. Those risks include allergic reactions, collapse, excitement, cardiac arrest, medical injury and post-anesthetic colic.

Unknown and Unanswered

THE PROTOCOLS FOR TESTING EQUINE BLOOD, SALIVA, URINE AND HAIR SAMPLES ARE WELL ESTABLISHED. samples, from live animals as it deems and determines necessary and appropriate. This rule and its definition of biological sample establishes a new frontier of testing.

Is This Risk Really Necessary?

One of the primary concerns and positions advanced in opposition to allowing biological samples to be taken from live animals is the risk of injury. Taking saliva and hair samples from a Thoroughbred is painless and easy. And anyone who has ever been around horses knows that they are more than happy to provide all the urine you could ever want! Drawing blood from a horse is only slightly more difficult and rarely involves the use of a local anesthetic. However, taking “…any fluid, tissue or other substance… through an internal or external means…” is another matter entirely. It opens the door to far more invasive collection techniques that carry far greater risks

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The collection and use of biological samples and potential need for sedation and/or anesthetics to effectuate the process creates a potential competitive conundrum. For example, a trainer that is positioning a horse toward a certain start subsequently learns that he/she must present the horse for purposes of providing a biological sample. If the horse is sedated, and undergoes a biopsy, the effect and levels of the sedative may prohibit the horse from racing as scheduled. Further, the taking of biological samples (e.g., tissue samples) creates a risk of infection. Who bears the risk for the infection—the trainer or the state? And, if taking the biological sample results in the horse’s inability to compete due to the lingering presence of sedatives/ anesthetics, who bears that cost or assumes that liability? These are questions and scenarios unanswered by the new law providing for biological samples. Further, if there are trace amounts of sedative or anesthetic, will there be any possibility of waiver, given the substance was “state administered,” to allow participation? And, if so, how is the betting public assured those levels in no way affect the performance of the horse? These questions, too, are left unanswered; it creates a catch-22 that this new law simply does not address. At what point do the potential dangers to the animal’s health and ability to compete take precedent over biological sample collection? Indiana’s new law does not specify. Nor does it specify or limit the size and scope of an acceptable sample. Nor does it identify what specific substance or substances Indiana’s regulators are trying to detect or why this new testing is necessary. As HB 1196 moved through the legislature, horsemen were told that the IHRC has no intentions of extracting biological samples in ways that would affect a horse’s ability to compete. While those words were reassuring, they are not reflected in the text of the law. And, given the initial agreement of limiting the use of biological samples to necropsy purposes was removed from the final version of the rule offers little assurance. The protocols for testing equine blood, saliva, urine and hair samples are well established. But what are the


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| LEGAL |

protocols for testing a biological sample that could come from anywhere in or on a horse? How are the samples to be stored, and what are the parameters for testing such samples? Are procedures and protocols for vitreous samples and muscle tissue the same or different; and if different, how so? What are the chances that an array of new testing procedures could result in inaccurate measurements, or outright false positives? At this point, these questions are disquieting unknowns.

A Minefield for Trainers?

In addition to the potential risks that the short-yetsweeping phrase “biological sample” presents to horses, there are potentially serious implications for trainers. The rules governing racing in nearly every jurisdiction include some variation of the trainer responsibility rule (also known as the absolute insurer rule or the absolute liability rule). While the specific provisions vary, the bottom line is the same: The trainer is held responsible whenever a horse, entrusted to his or her care, tests positive for a prohibited medication or substance, or when a permitted medication appears in excess of maximum allowable levels. The resulting fines, suspensions and other penalties fall on the trainer— although other members of the trainer’s team such as assistant trainers and grooms may be sanctioned as well. It does not matter if an employee failed to follow a trainer’s written instructions when administering medication. The trainer of record is responsible. Any trainer that has a horse disqualified due to a positive test is entitled to and should request, in most instances, a split sample. This involves the laboratory

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dividing the existing test sample and forwarding a portion of it to a confirming or “split” laboratory in order to check the accuracy of the initial results. The trainer is typically required to pay costs associated with requested split sample tests. The current costs of split-sample testing of blood, urine, saliva or hair exceed $500. This is a reasonable expense if the trainer is the subject of a laboratory error. However, what would it cost a trainer for the split-sample testing of “any fluid, tissue or other substance obtained from a horse through an internal or external means”? The only realistic answer at this point is unknown but potentially, punitive. The “biological sample” language also prompts concerns about increased out-of-competition testing. Recall the language defining the two-word phrase: “…The term includes, blood, urine, saliva, hair, muscle tissue collected at a necropsy, semen, and other substances appropriate for testing as determined by the commission.” “As determined by the commission” provides the IHRC the authority to utilize biological samples/testing in out-ofcompetition testing. Consider a trainer of a winning horse that is sent to the test barn. The blood, serum, saliva, and hair samples are all negative. However, the regulators elect to secure a biological sample, and that sample tests positive. That trainer is presented with the cost of a split sample. And, at the time of this writing, that trainer would be without guidance as to the levels of detection in a biological sample, procedure of storage and change of custody of such sample, and/or choice of confirming labs accredited to perform split sample testing. All of this is to say the biological sample tips the undefined unlevel penalizing field further in favor of the regulators.


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| LEGAL |

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More Causes for Concern

Dr. Clara Fenger, DVM, PhD, DACVIM, is a well-known equine veterinarian who serves on the Board of Directors of the American Association of Racetrack Veterinarians. The vague language and broad definition of “biological samples” in the new Indiana statute troubles her. “In racing, there is a constant fear of the great ‘what if.’ As in, ‘What if everybody is winning because of some new substance we don’t know about?’ It strikes me as paranoia,” she says. “Any time someone is winning at, say 40%, competitors insist they must be juicing. But if you examine the details of those wins on a race-by-race basis, you’ll find very good reasons for them that have nothing to do with drugs. Of course, that kind of competitive analysis is hard work. It’s much easier to fire up the rumor mill and fuel the grand conspiracy.” A noted toxicologist, pharmacologist and professor of veterinary science also has concern and sees the new

EVERYTHING WE DO NEEDS TO BE BASED ON LOGIC AND SOUND SCIENCE— SCIENCE THAT HAS BEEN THOROUGHLY EXPLAINED, TESTED AND PUBLISHED. 58

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Indiana biological sample statute as: “An extremely and unusually broad rule. They seem to be casting their net wide as possible without naming specific samples. A sample appears to be any part of a horse with no restrictions on sample size. It opens the door to invasive test methodology.” “People don’t realize that horse racing has the longest established, most effective history of testing of any sport on earth,” he continues. “It was established in 1910. Current methods are efficient and rigorous.” Like Dr. Fenger, he warns against letting our imaginations run away with us. “Everything we do needs to be based on logic and sound science—science that has been thoroughly explained, tested and published.” These concerns become ever more important as science moves testing forward, allowing the detection of substances at parts-per-trillion levels. Experts, including equine veterinarians, toxicologists and pharmacologists, have begun pointing out that man-made pollutants that are unintentionally absorbed by people and animals may wreak havoc with testing programs unless more specific standards are enacted. The fact that Indiana appears to be moving in the opposite direction and may be providing the lead for others to do so is a legitimate cause for concern. Will Indiana’s new biological sample testing language ensure the integrity of Thoroughbred racing in the Hoosier state or prove to be an invasive boondoggle? Time will tell. The politicians and regulators are doing what they think is best. However, the devil is always in the details. For now, the Indiana Horse Racing Commission needs to define and provide the specifics of implementation.


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MY NEW K ENTUCKY HOME Jeff Lowe

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Giles Anderson, Keeneland, Shutterstock


| KENTUCKY HOME |

A

s much as horse racing and breeding are steeped in parts of English and Irish culture, the avenue to America has been wide open for many years in providing numerous young horsemen with a chance to branch out in establishing themselves in the Thoroughbred industry. A fascinating aspect among the driven 20-somethings who come across the pond each year to work for farms and agencies, Kentucky is the likelihood that a certain number of them will find a new home there—both personally and professionally.

MICHAEL HERNON – Gainesway Farm

Expats dot the landscape of the Thoroughbred world in America, including a broad swath in the bluegrass. Take, for instance, Geoffrey Russell – Keeneland’s long-time director of sales – and Michael Hernon, who has the same title at Gainesway, which is one of the leading stud farms and perennial leading consignors in the U.S. Russell and Hernon both arrived in Kentucky from Ireland in the same time period in the early 1980s and were roommates for a while in a Lexington townhouse. Hernon was just getting started working for a pedigree service, and Russell was beginning a stint at Fasig-Tipton. Within a little more than a decade, both Dublin natives had ascended many heights with Hernon taking his current job at Gainesway in November 1995 and Russell joining Keeneland as Assistant Director of Sales in 1996. Hernon has been a mainstay under the Beck family’s ownership of Gainesway and played an integral part in both the sales division and the acquisition of stallions, including leading sire Tapit and the repatriation of Empire Maker from Japan. Hernon also has dabbled in breeding and pinhooking for his own account and has scored some big victories on that front recently as the co-breeder of champion Monomoy Girl and Gr1 winner Zazu. Hernon can instantly recite the hip numbers of certain highlight horses with which he has been involved, not to mention prices and pedigree nuggets. He is a fervent admirer of Tapit, dating back to when he watched a replay one Saturday morning in the fall of 2003 of the horse’s juvenile stakes win in the Laurel Futurity, which led to Gainesway pursuing Tapit’s services as a stallion.

Michael Hernon

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| BLOODSTOCK |

ABOVE: Carl McEntee

Where pride really begins to swell in Hernon’s voice is in discussing a personal milestone: becoming a U.S. citizen in August 2019. “I had been a permanent resident with a green card for many years, and I am very happy to say that I am now a U.S. citizen,” he said. “Someone asked me last year if I was going home for Christmas and I remember replying, ‘I am home.’ “America is what you make of it. If you work hard, you will get an opportunity to make your own buck. I have had so many great opportunities here from when I first came over and was learning from the ground up. I started out doing pedigree reading, writing, composition, and one key thing we did on Saturday mornings was go around and look at stallions. I got to see the stallions I was writing about and get that perspective. A lot of them did not have perfect conformation. But if you look at a horse long enough, they will more than likely tell you who they are. You can learn so much [by] looking at them in the flesh, seeing how everything fits together, and that is something that was formative for me from when I first came over.”

CARL MCENTEE – Ballysax Bloodstock

RIGHT: Alys Emson

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Carl McEntee, president of the Kentucky Farm Managers Club and head of the Ballysax Bloodstock consignment, is a sixth-generation Irish horseman and came to America for good when he was 23 years old in a bit of an unusual circumstance. A graduate of the British National Stud, McEntee worked for Darley in Europe for three years before injuring his arm and needing to take off a few weeks of work. During the downtime, he decided to come and visit his brother, Mark, who was already working in the racing industry in Kentucky. McEntee heard about a job opening at Idle Hour Farm in Lexington and figured he should apply and see if he got an interview, thinking it would be a good experience for him. “I really didn’t expect to get the job, but I did, and that kind of put me on an accelerated career path here in America—compared to what I would have been in Europe because it takes a little more time there, and I just settled right in,” said McEntee, who met his wife, Rachel, a Kentucky native, the following year. The couple met

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at a barbecue hosted by Ben Colebrook, who is now a Kentucky-based trainer. The McEntees have three children. “Things have continuously reached a crescendo,” McEntee said. “I had the chance to set up Ghost Ridge Farm in Pennsylvania, and I think we helped move the breeding industry along there bringing in stallions like Jump Start, E Dubai, Honour and Glory and Smarty Jones from Kentucky. Jump Start was the first stallion I bought, and that was kind of my entry into sales. I had never done sales before, but I figured I could sell the shares of the stallion myself, and that’s what I did. I think it turned out that I am probably better at sales than any other aspect of the industry, and so that was a big discovery.” A stint at Northview Stallion Station in the MidAtlantic followed; and while attending the Keeneland November breeding stock sale, Carl and Rachel McEntee discussed their desire to return to Kentucky. “We had just had our third child and she was dropping me off at the sale and she said, ‘If there is an opportunity for us to move back to Kentucky, I would really like that since my mom lives here and we could have some help with the children,” McEntee recalled. “I walked halfway around the pavilion and bumped into Robert Hammond and his first question was, ‘Do you think you would be interested in being director of sales and bloodstock for Darby Dan Farm?’ That’s how I ended up back in Kentucky. “I think that’s the great thing about working in America. You are presented with so many opportunities, and from all that I’ve developed a well-rounded perspective to go along with what I grew up with. I’ve done just about everything at some point: hotwalker, exercise rider, assistant trainer, farm manager, sales, yearlings, broodmares. I’ve been able to have my hand in just about everything and see horses from different points of view.” In early 2018, McEntee launched Ballysax, focusing on sales consignments.

ALYS EMSON – Lane’s End

Alys Emson has worked at Lane’s End Farm—one of the leading stud farms in Kentucky—for 20 years, not including a break she took to return home and work in England.


| KENTUCKY HOME |

“I had worked at Lane’s End for four years the first time and went home; and then there was an allure that drew me back to Kentucky,” she said. “I’ve always liked being part of a large team and it is a little bit faster pace, with the numbers and the size of the farm; and it’s first class all the way. “It’s a privilege to work there every day. If you love this business—and I don’t know why you would work in it if you didn’t—a place like Lane’s End is at the top of the pile, really. If you align yourself with the best people in the business, you give yourself the chance to be your best as well.” Emson’s focus is client management, working with a cadre of top owners and breeders as well as providing occasional public updates on the always popular champion racemare Zenyatta, who is boarded at the farm. “I feel like I have kind of grown up in the business here under the oversight of the Farishes and Mike Cline, and they have granted me some freedom to kind of make the job my own, and it’s just been fantastic. “The opportunities in America might be more available for someone with a background like mine. I wasn’t born into the racing industry. My father is ex-Army and so I spent a lot of my time in boarding schools growing up when my parents were overseas, and I think that gives you an affinity to be able to travel and leave and not be tied to where you grew up. I always rode though, and the racing bug caught me early. One of my real mentors was Julie Cecil, as I was friendly with her children in Newmarket. She would let me ride the hack on a Saturday morning from the yard. She and one of her close friends, Tote Cherry Downes, told me Lane’s End would be a great spot if I wanted to move to America, and that’s what I did. It’s home for me now. I really couldn’t ask for a better place to live and work.”

MICHAEL CALLINAN – Sierra Farm

Michael Callinan followed the footsteps of his uncle, Pat Costello of Paramount Sales, from Ireland to Kentucky while still in college in 1999 and settled in the bluegrass full time in 2002, working at ClassicStar Farm and Vinery before being tapped as the farm manager of Ed Hudon’s Sierra Farm in Lexington in 2008. Hudon died last year, just a few hours after Sierra sold its first-ever million-dollar yearling—an American

Pharoah filly who brought $1.4 million at Keeneland in September. Earlier in 2018, Hudon had also scored his first Graded stakes win as an owner when Nessy captured Santa Anita Park’s Gr3 San Juan Capistrano Stakes. The farm is continuing under the leadership of Hudon’s wife, Sharon. “It was quite an emotional rollercoaster,” Callinan said. “Ed gave me such a wonderful opportunity, and it’s great that the quality of his operation was shining through before he died. Kentucky is home for me now and my family. I can’t really see me wanting to go back, but you never say never. It helps that there is a big group of Irish people working here, and we do have a nice camaraderie, usually centered around McCarthy’s [a pub in downtown Lexington] during the spring on a Saturday or Sunday when Ireland will be playing [soccer] and every Irish person in Lexington will be in there, and many of those are people in racing.”

ABOVE: Michael Callinan

FERGUS GALVIN – Hunter Valley Farm

Fergus Galvin grew up in a racing family in Ireland—his father a steeplechase jockey and farm owner—and he got his own career started at Darley’s Kildangan Stud where he worked under Michael Osborne for three years. It was Osborne who encouraged Galvin to branch out and spend some time in Kentucky. “He was a big proponent of young people getting that experience like he did earlier in his career,” Galvin recalled of the late Osborne, who had managed North Ridge Farm in Kentucky and later established international racing in Dubai. “I came over to Kentucky in 1992 thinking I would stay for 12 or 18 months and get some work experience. I didn’t realize I would stay all this time.” “That’s kind of the story for a lot of us, it seems. We come over looking to gain experience and we like it so ISSUE 54 TRAINERMAGAZINE.COM

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| BLOODSTOCK |

ABOVE: Fergus Galvin ABOVE RIGHT: Gerry Duffy

much we never leave. It might have changed since then, but back then it was very hard for a young person to kind of make their way to the top end of things. In Kentucky, if you are willing to put in the hard work and have a good level of horsemanship, the chances to rise to the top are a lot more prevalent.” Galvin worked for five years at Pin Oak Stud in Versailles, Ky., under the leadership of Osborne’s son, Joe. Galvin was then appointed as the manager of Prince Fahd bin Salman’s Newgate Farm, but when Prince Fahd died suddenly in 2001, the farm was sold. Galvin moved over to Coolmore’s Ashford Stud as a stallion manager for about eight years until he and three partners joined together to launch Hunter Valley Farm in 2005. The very first yearling Hunter Valley sold was Scat Daddy—the eventual Gr1 winner and top sire. “We struck lightning right away; it’s pretty amazing being associated with a horse like Scat Daddy,” Galvin said. “He’s been the flagbearer ever since.”

GERRY DUFFY – Godolphin Stonerside Farm

Gerry Duffy grew up around horses in his native Ireland and rode from any early age but did not give much serious consideration to pursuing a career in horse racing until he was about ready to graduate from college in Dublin with a dual degree in mathematics and mechanical engineering. A friend had just been accepted into the Darley (now Godolphin) Flying Start Program and Duffy decided to follow suit; he too was accepted. It truly was a flying start for Duffy, who has gone on to several key roles for the Darley/Godolphin organization in Ireland and Kentucky as well as a stint with WinStar Farm in the bluegrass. He also has fit in time to obtain a Master’s Degree in Business Administration from the University of Kentucky. Duffy said he is often asked how he applies a degree in

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| KENTUCKY HOME |

mechanical engineering to the role of managing a stud farm, which he has done for Godolphin at both Kildangan Stud in Ireland and now at Stonerside Stable in Paris, Ky. “Engineers are really trained to analyze and solve problems, and we all do that continuously in our dayto-day lives,” said Duffy, who also says he loves engines, machinery and tractors. “It’s a way of thinking more so than a particular skill set. I certainly consider myself very lucky to have pursued what was my hobby as opposed to what I felt was a good career. It was whilst working in nominations sales for Darley that I developed an interest in marketing, contracts, budgeting and was fascinated by the stories of some of our clients and their businesses outside of our industry that prompted me to get my master’s in business administration.” Soon after completing his master’s in the bluegrass, Duffy got the job back home in Ireland at Kildangan. After four years, he was headed back to Kentucky to accept the post at Stonerside. “The biggest attraction to the U.S. for me is the abundance of opportunity here,” he said. “It’s mainly due to the size of the market here which ultimately leads to a requirement for more people to fill roles. There’s higher turnover in senior roles, and all of that leads to more opportunities for those who are looking to take on more responsibility. “Kentucky is certainly home for the time being. My wife Muffin is from here and our son Patrick is settled in school here, but I keep a very open mind as to what our future may hold. I’m very much of the opinion that fiveand ten-year career plans are nonsense, and I focus more on adding value today. I know that my five-year plan at age 20-25 was a lot less exciting than what I ended up doing, so my philosophy is to work hard, add value and roll with it.”


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PROFILE

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| TYLER SERVIS |

TY LE R S E RVI S – LIKE FAT HER , LIK E S O N Linda Dougherty

Jennifer Poorman, Kim Pratt

hen Afleet Tizzy defeated eight rivals in winning the $100,000 Dr. Teresa Garofalo Memorial Stakes at Parx Racing August 3—one of five stakes for Pennsylvania-Breds on the Pennsylvania’s Day at the Races card—it represented the first stakes victory for young trainer Tyler Servis, the son of prominent trainer John Servis. And not only did Tyler Servis collect his first stakes win, but he did it two races before his father won with Main Line Racing Stable and Alexandria Stable’s Someday Jones in the $100,000 Roanoke Stakes. Adding to the festivities of the day was the presence of the family patriarch Joe Servis, now in his late 80s. The former jockey and steward, who rode on the West Virginia circuit and was inducted into the Charles Town Hall of Fame, was there to celebrate a birthday but ended up having a double celebration thanks to the accomplishments of his son and grandson. “To have (my grandfather) here to see this, at his age, was awesome,” said Tyler afterwards. John Servis echoed those words, saying, “It was a very special afternoon, not only because it was Tyler’s first stakes win and we both won a stakes on the card, but because three generations of the Servis family were there.” Owned by Marvin Delfiner and George Krall, Afleet Tizzy is a five-year-old daughter of Tizway, bred by Blackstone Farm. Tyler Servis began training her earlier this year, and she was his second starter and second career winner, having won an allowance/optional claiming race at Parx May 14. Sent off at odds of 7-1 in the six furlong Garofalo, Afleet Tizzy was piloted by Angel Rodriguez, who kept her about a length behind the early leaders, I’m the Talent and Zipper’s Hero, as they ding-donged through early splits

W

John, Joe, Delores and Tyler Servis Kim Pratt

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| TYLER SERVIS |

PROFILE

ABOVE: Afleet Tizzy wins the Garofalo BELOW: Afleet Tizzy trophy presentation

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of :21.93 and 44.78. She made her move at the top of the stretch when the taxing pace took its toll on the top two and stormed to the lead, drawing clear by a length and crossing the wire in 1:10.52 over betting favorite Sweet Bye and Bye with Trace of Grace, third. The Garofalo Memorial was also the first stakes win for Afleet Tizzy, who had been second in her previous start, the Power by Far Stakes for Pennsylvania-Breds at Parx June 22. The $57,600 she earned boosted her career earnings to $374,646. “I was pretty confident that she would run well,” said Tyler. “She’d only been off the board three times in her life, and she has a ton of heart.” Tyler Servis has come a long way in a very short period of time as a trainer, but it all began with a bang April

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12 at Keeneland when his first starter, Wentz, became his first winner. Through the end of August, he saddled 27 starters, won six times and placed 12 more for purse earnings of $380,514. But the 28-year-old is anything but new to Thoroughbred racing, growing up around horses at his father’s barn, along with his brother Blane, and having gotten a taste of the highest levels of the sport, thanks to dual classic winner Smarty Jones who captivated the nation in 2004. In addition, his uncle, Jason Servis, is a successful trainer, and his Aunt Laurie is married to another top conditioner, Eddie Plesa, Jr. Tyler originally wanted to become a jockey like his grandfather and began galloping horses for his father when he was 16. But it soon became evident that he would outgrow those dreams. “Tyler was very small until his senior year in high school,” recalled John Servis. “When he began breezing horses for me, he was about 92 pounds, but he had a size nine foot. I told my wife Sherry, ‘Honey, if he grows into his feet, you won’t have to worry about him becoming a jockey.’” By the time he grew too big to ride in races, Tyler was already hooked on the sport and expressed a desire to become a trainer. In addition to galloping horses, he had years of experience helping his father and knew the day-today routine of caring for horses and getting them ready to race. “I wouldn’t say my father discouraged me, but he wanted me to follow wherever my heart was at,” said Tyler. “I wanted to become a trainer because I wanted horse racing


| TYLER SERVIS |

to be a part of my life. There’s nothing like the incredible adrenaline rush you get when they turn for home.” Once he passed his trainer’s test, Tyler was given a chance with some horses owned by John’s long-time clients, including Main Line Racing Stable, the DJ Stable of Leonard Green, and Chuck Zacney’s Cash is King LLC. It was a top-notch group of clients. For the partnership of DJ Stable and Cash is King, John Servis conditions champion Jaywalk, while for Cash is King he’s developed Kentucky Oaks (Gr1) winner Cathryn Sofia. “They gave me an opportunity,” said Tyler of his owners. “I believe I had built a good rapport with them before I got my trainer’s license, and so they have supported me now.” “Tyler wanted to be a trainer, and to his credit he watched

and waited until he was ready,” said John Servis. “And he has a great personality for the business—people flock to him.” Currently, Tyler has about 20 horses, which include stakes competitors Shemakesmehappy and the tough allowance gelding Degrom, who captured a $63,000 allowance optional claiming test at Colonial Downs August 8. And just because Tyler outgrew his dreams to become a jockey doesn’t mean he’s stopped riding. “I like to get on at least two of my horses a day, because that way I can tell how they’re feeling or if there’s a problem,” he said. “I don’t do much more than jog them.” Now that he’s off and running on his training career, Tyler Servis is poised to carry the flag for the Servis family now and in the future. And it should come as no surprise...after all, he’s had a top-notch education.

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PROFILE

BACKSTRETCH FORWARD CHRB member Oscar Gonzales, Jr. possesses the backside credentials to confidently tackle his new position. Annie Lambert

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Eclipse Sportswire


| OSCAR GONZALES |

H

e may have come from humble beginnings, but recently appointed California Horse Racing Board appointee Oscar Gonzales, Jr, drew from family values on and off the racetrack in pursuit of success. Gonzales is proud of his large racetrack family, including National Museum of Racing Hall of Famer Ishmael ‘Milo’ Valenzuela. Almost every one of his relations, in fact, has worked on the backside at California racetracks. The 51-year-old former groom worked his way through college and into corporate business and public service. Gonzales has a passion for people, which his career goals have embraced. “I grew up in East Los Angeles where poverty rates are high, but dreams and hopes are alive and well,” acknowledged Gonzales. “That, coupled with my experience on the backstretch where the work ethic and commitment to a bigger picture, is really what got me started into public service.”

On Track

Gonzales is the penultimate of four children born to Oscar, Sr, and Yolanda Gonzales as a young couple living in East Los Angeles. His extended family is a complex blend of the Gonzales and Valenzuela families. Jockey Milo Valenzuela is Gonzales Sr’s uncle, making rider Patrick Valenzuela Oscar Jr’s second cousin. Milo had 21 siblings, so, plenty of family worked on the backside. A four-generation pedigree could seem daunting. “My dad’s mom, Maria Gonzales, is the sister of the Valenzuela brothers,” Oscar pointed out. “The boys were all jockeys or trainers; the women worked a combination of jobs.” At 6’1” Oscar chuckled that he never had a shot at making a rider. Oscar, Sr, was an exercise rider in his younger (lighter) years before grooming and working as a barn foreman. Grandpa Jose (Joe) Gonzales, fondly nicknamed Chelo, was a groom for Lou Carno and others. Grandmother Gonzales, Maria, sold her homemade burritos barn-tobarn on the backside. Oscar and his brother, Alfred, followed in the shadow of their father and grandfather. Alfred spent three years grooming horses for Tom Blincoe, before sadly passing away at a young age. Oscar, Jr, truly grew up on the backstretch; in his early teens he helped his father and grandfather whenever school afforded him the time. He often ate in the track kitchen where his mom worked. Once he secured his first license he stepped out from under the family umbrella. Gonzales enjoyed his school days era. He was a Student Body President in high school, as well as in college - his first two leadership positions. His initial, official boss on the backside was his uncle, Albino Valenzuela in Santa Fe, New Mexico. “You always kind of start off with the family and then you find people outside the family pay just a little bit better and they don’t work you so hard,” Gonzales said with a laugh.

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PROFILE

Gonzales is confident he can be a bridge between individuals and groups to help resolve some of racing’s bigger chhalllenges.

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“When I first got my license in 1984 at Hollywood Park, my dad was a barn foreman for Martin Valenzuela, Sr, who had some really good horses back then,” said Gonzales. “I was able to work for some big outfi fits i and learn the ropes. My ffiirst i ttw w full-time hot walking jobs were during wo the summers of 1984 and 1985 working for Joe Manzi and Dick Mulhall respectively. Those were really good experiences, great horsemen, well rounded, quality ty horses wi with i good people around them all the time.” Once graduated from Rosemead High School, just four miles from Santa A An n nita, he att tttended East Los A An n ngeles College in nearby Monterey Park, California, before transferring to University ty of California San Diego three years later. ttending t ELA LAC, A Gonzales went to work full-time While att at the racetrack rubbing horses in Darrell Vienna’s barn for three years. When he transferred to UCSD he spent tw two w years working for D. Wayn yn ne Lucas and his assistant, Randy Bradshaw, at San Diego Chargers own wn ner Gene K Klllein’s training facility ty in Rancho Santa Fe near Del Mar. During his school years Gonzales never quibbled about the size of his paychecks. l ty because of my class schedule “I always asked for ffllexibility and extra curricular activi viities,” Gonzales off ffered. f “Everyw ywhere w I worked people were always supportive. I never asked for any other favors except to hang my tubs early so I could go take an exam or go to a meeting at school.” “It all worked out,” he added. “Without that experience on the backside I don’t think I would have gotten through school; I’d never have been involved in public servi vice. i There were so many people that I surrounded myself w wiith i that understood that I was kind of on a mission in life to help people and to not forget where I came from.” There was a crossroad for Gonzales once he ffiinished i his education. Training horses had always been a passion of his. He secured his trainers license at Sunland Park in New Mexico, but before he dove into that profession life ciircumsttances drew him intto pollitics.

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“Training was always a desire of mine because it’s such an honorable profession,” said Gonzales. “It takes a lot of hard work and attention to detail. I always looked up to the trainers and their ability to straddle many worlds; they have to be competent in so many ways. It’s one of the best professions out there. The good trainers last so long because they love what they do.”

Public Business

Gonzales put his college degrees in Political Science and Business Administration to work helping people. Perhaps his desire to improve the human situation was inspired by grandparents who took track workers in need into their home near Santa Anita until they got on their feet. Possibly it is just part of his nature, either way, he has built a career around uplifting people in need. Skills learned while working wi within i the racing industry went well beyond handling horses and mucking stalls, according to Gonzales. Communication, attention to detail and thinking outside the box all helped him ffiit i into the world of public servi vice. i Gonzales has worked for Aura, a community ty development ffiinancial i institution, for the past ttw w years. As wo Vice President for Government and Community ty Relations, he commutes betw tween w his home in Davi vis, i California, to San Francisco a few times per week vi via i A Am m mtrak. His job also demands time in Sacramento, working wi wiith policy makers, and travel to expand Aura into additional states. Gonzales is adamant that his name wi will i never be on a voting ballot, but he has been involved in politics. He served at the US Department of Agriculture in Washingt gton t DC from 2009 to 2017 as a Barack Obama appointee. His positions included Deputy ty Chief of Staff ff, f Deputy ty Assistant Secretary for Administration, Deputy ty Director of Intergovernmental A Afffffairs f and Immigration senior advi visor. i Oscar used his bilingual skills to help trainers and foremen communiicatte wi wit ith work kers att the racettrack k.


| OSCAR GONZALES |

That skill set has helped him in his current duties as well, which includes his commitment to immigrant communities on several fronts. He was the first Latino ever appointed to serve as Farm Service Agency’s State Executive Director in California, where he oversaw USDA’s crop insurance and farm loan programs. Gonzales served on the Gavin Newsom for Governor campaign as co-chair of his agricultural policy committee. His expertise in agriculture includes he and other Obama appointees forming Rural Forward, “a non-profit organization that empowers and advocates for families living in rural America.” Other involvement in California state politics includes working for former Governor Gray Davis, Speaker Antonio Villaraigosa and Majority Leader Gloria Romero as well as other political campaigns.

“I NEVER ASKED FOR ANY OTHER FAVORS EXCEPT TO HANG MY TUBS EARLY SO I COULD GO TAKE AN EXAM OR GO TO A MEETING AT SCHOOL.” Gonzales’ wife of 15 years also works in government as a USDA Public Affairs & Outreach officer. She is a granddaughter of Latino American civil rights activist Cesar Chavez. The couple has no children, but do have several nephews and nieces. They, along with their two dogs, enjoy their other home in Santa Barbara when time allows. Oscar also fits marathon running into his schedule.

Objectives

As a new CHRB member, Gonzales has given some deep thought to the future of racing in California. His skill set from backside worker to government service has him well armed to input plausible ideas. While California’s horse racing image has been somewhat skewed this year, Gonzales sees a way forward to more amiable times. He hopes educating everyone involved – from backstretch workers, front side officials, owners, trainers, veterinarians, activists and the public at large – will lead to fair policing and regulations leading to a copasetic compromise. “It’s an amazing time,” Gonzales noted. “I believe the industry is up for the challenge and I’m among those up for the challenge to reform, to become organized. This is not the first time the industry has been asked to step up. “I’m confident and optimistic that we’re going to be able to step up to the challenge. I see it happening, we now have the leadership at all levels of government and more importantly we have the strong leadership on the backside, people who have experience and understand their individual responsibility.” Gonzales looks forward to being part of the reform and modernization process now being discussed regarding regulatory changes in California horse racing. Encouraging people to become engaged and being transparent, he believes, will be imperative in returning the public’s trust back to racing.

The industry needs to identify and engage their future leaders, according to Gonzales. He’d like to see more people engaging in the process, even if it is just pointing out problems that need to be addressed. “I’m always going to be trying to identify who will be the next generation of leaders,” he said. “When I look at leadership I see not only the trainers, jockeys, exercise riders, grooms, hot walkers and people on the front side, there are also others we have to attract. The backstretch workers, in many ways, are going to be the future. I want to inspire the next generation of leaders and uplift the voices of the people that feel they are not at the table.” Women in racing belong to a group that Gonzales would like to uplift. He said the numbers of ladies working on the backside have dropped off. He’d like to reach out to those workingwomen and discover what the industry could do better to support them. “I’m going to be taking it upon myself to reach out to women leaders in the Thoroughbred business to find out what I can do as a board member to keep that ladder of opportunity up,” Gonzales said. “Diversity, especially gender balances, is critical and when decisions are being made it needs to include women and minorities.” USDA Secretary Tom Vilsack was a positive force for Gonzales, who credits his mentor with “opening his eyes to the importance of rural America.” With Gonzales’ strong background in agriculture, he believes the conversation must go beyond the few racetracks remaining in California. The state is second only to Kentucky, ahead of Florida and New York, in breeding Thoroughbred horses, he noted, “a distinction we have to embrace.” “I’m going to do my very best to engage small farms, small breeding operations, to remind them that they have a voice in this process,” said Gonzales. “We have to make sure that the public discourse isn’t just relegated to two or three racetracks or fairgrounds. Horseracing is a part of the overall state agricultural industry, and no small part. Horse racing has to embrace its agricultural roots, rural roots and rural voices.” Gonzales reiterated that whenever he takes on a leadership role, his mantra is to, “never forget where I came from.” “I will always identify as a backstretch worker,” he reminded. “I want to make sure people know that our most important asset in the industry is our personnel, our workforce. The backstretch is a wonderful place and, if tapped into properly, could provide some of our next generation of leaders.”

As a backstretch worker Gonzales learned many portable skills that accompanied him into business and politics.

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| EDUCATION |

Nick Wingfield-Digby

TH OR OU GH BRED SAL ES ASSESSMENT

Update from the Gerald Leigh Memorial Lectures, 2019 Tom O’Keeffe

Beaufort Educational Trust, Florida Equine Veterinary Associates, Rossdales LLP

T

he Beaufort Cottage Educational Trust Gerald Leigh Memorial Lectures took place this year at the National Horseracing Museum in Newmarket and a host of international and local veterinary specialists and industry leaders were present to discuss the veterinary aspects of the sales selection of the Thoroughbred. Gerald Leigh was a prominent breeder and racehorse owner until his death in 2002; and his friend and vet Nick Wingfield Digby opened the seminar and introduced the speakers. The Gerald Leigh Charitable Trust has established this annual lecture series to provide a

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platform for veterinary topics relating to the Thoroughbred to be discussed amongst vets and prominent members of the industry.

Welcome and introduction – Nick Wingfield Digby

Sir Mark Prescott described his take on the sales process and some of the changes he has noted since his early involvement in the industry. He recalled how the first Horses in Training sale he attended had only 186 horses. In those early days, his role was to sneak around the sales ground

stables late at night on the lookout for crib biters. Back then, there was no option to return horses after sale, and as a result, trainers preferred to buy horses from studs they were familiar with—a policy Sir Mark still follows to this day. Sir Mark went on to explain that he believes strongly that the manner in which an animal is reared has a strong bearing on their ability to perform at a later date. Sir Mark also mentioned that horses can cope with many conformational faults nowadays that would have been deemed unacceptable in his early years. He attributed this to improvements in ground conditions, such as watering and all-weather surfaces.


| THOROUGHBRED SALES ASSESSMENT |

Sales selection – The trainer’s view point - Sir Mark Prescott

Mike Shepherd, MRCVS, of Rossdales Equine Practice in Newmarket had been tasked with describing and discussing the sales examination from a veterinary viewpoint and in particular attempting to define what vets are trying to achieve in this process. Shepherd’s key message was that the physical exam is the cornerstone of any veterinary evaluation. A vet examining a horse on the sales ground is not a guarantee that the horse will never have an issue—there is no crystal ball. Owners and trainers should be aware there are several limitations of the vetting process, and it is helpful to think in terms of a

“pre-bid inspection” rather than a “prepurchase examination.” The horse is away from its home environment, and this puts a lot of stress on the animal. In most cases, pre-purchase exercise is not possible, so conditions that are only apparent when the horse is exercising and in training may go undetected. Time is a major challenge, with both vendors and prospective purchasers pushing for everything to be done as quickly as possible. A busy sales vet may have a long list of horses to examine, and information on each must be transferred to their client coherently and clearly—all before the horse is presented for sale. It can be challenging to acquire a detailed veterinary history. Previous surgeries, medication and vices displayed by the animal ought to be reported, but in many cases the person with the horse is not in a position to accurately answer questions on longer-term history.

Everyone involved—the vendor, the prospective purchaser, and the auction house—wants the process to go ahead. The horse to be bought/sold and the vet can be seen as a stumbling block. Prospective purchasers may want the horse to be examined clinically, its laryngeal function examined by endoscope, radiographs of the horse’s limbs either reviewed or taken, ultrasound examinations of their soft tissue structures and heart performed. The role of the vet is to help the purchaser evaluate all this information and make an evidence-based decision on whether to purchase the horse. Examining vets can face conflicts of interest when examining horses that are under the ownership or care of one of their clients. Shepherd explained how Rossdales, and some other practices involved in sales work, have a protocol that an examining vet will not perform a vetting on a horse in the care of one of

At Sales, ultrasonography of the heart (echocardiography) can be used to estimate heart size. These images from a two-year old Thoroughbred shows the left ventricle, the main pumping chamber in long (image A) and short axis (image B). By measuring the thickness of the walls and the diameter of the chamber, an estimate of size is created. A small heart is likely disadvantageous, however relating heart size in the young horse to its subsequent performance shows that for those with average or above heart size, multiple factors come into play in determining race performance.

The main strength in heart scanning in a pre-purchase setting is in identifying cardiac conditions can lead to poor performance. These heart scans from a yearling with a loud murmur first detected as it was prepared for Sales, show a ventricular septal defect, a hole in the heart. Using colour Doppler to map blood flow, the coloured area shows blood flowing through a hole between two chambers (Image A). 3D echocardiography, the most advanced form of heart scanning, allows a 3D image of the hole in the heart muscle to be visualised (Image B).

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Sales evaluations now often include ultrasonography of the tendons and ligaments. This shows a normal ultrasonographic appearance of a healthy suspensory branch (A) and the pathology typical of juvenile insertional suspensory ligament branch injury (B). The arrows indicate loss of fibre attachment and bone damage at the insertion onto the sesamoid bone.

their own clients, and will disclose to the prospective purchaser if the vendor is a client of the practice. It is crucial to avoid working for both buyer and seller as a conflict of interest becomes unavoidable. It is also essential that the vet understands exactly what the horse is expected to do following the sale. Thoroughbred horses in flat racing have short timescale targets and, as a result, certain parts of the examination carry more weight than others. For example, the knees and fetlock joints are commonly implicated in lameness in flat racehorses; thus particular attention must be paid to these joints when examining yearlings. Soft tissue injuries are impactful in all young Thoroughbreds, but there is a particular emphasis on tendon integrity in the National Hunt racehorse because career-threatening tendon injuries are particularly prevalent in these horses. When evaluating potential broodmares, good feet are very relevant, and overall conformation is particularly important if the aim is to breed to sell. Vetting horses for clients aiming to pin hook their purchases places different requirements on the examining vet. These horses need to be able to cope with the preparation required for another sale, and they must also stand up to the scrutiny

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of vets at a later sale. The horse’s walk and conformation rank high in the foal/ yearling stage but may be judged to be less significant if the horse breezes in a fast time at a breeze up sale. It is also critical that purchasers recognise that many of the common veterinary issues encountered in training are not detectable at the Sales stage. For example, subchondral fetlock pain (bone bruising), which is common in a large

subset of Thoroughbreds in training, is not accurately practicable in young Thoroughbred prior entering training. For assessing laryngeal function, there is often concern that this may be too subjective. Dr. Justin Perkins, of the Royal Veterinary College, has shown good agreement on endoscopic grading between experienced vets. However, horses’ laryngeal scores vary significantly day to day, and more worrying in the sales setting, one horse examined several times on the same day can have different scope grades. The gold standard in assessing the horse laryngeal function is an overground exercising endoscopy. This is not feasible on sales grounds, and purchasers should be aware that the limited purpose of a resting laryngeal scope is to exclude specific serious hereditary conditions and not to rule out problems which are only evident during exercise. Dorsal displacement of the soft palate cannot be accurately predicted at rest. Similarly, exercise-induced pulmonary haemorrhage or bleeding can be career limiting, yet once again in the juvenile Thoroughbred, there is no way to predict this condition before the horse enters training. Some conditions can affect some individuals yet be of little consequence in others. An example is kissing spines (impinging spinous processes), and whilst it can be a clinical issue in some individuals, it is commonly encountered in normal horses and therefore is very easy to over-interpret its significance. The Hong Kong vetting process is considered the gold standard in terms of assessing and examining a racehorse in training. Shepherd highlighted that some

A: This is what one hopes to find at Sales endoscopy: a normal larynx from a three year old Thoroughbred colt with no abnormal respiratory noise. The arrows are pointing to the arytenoid cartilages. B: In this 3 year old, dynamic endoscopy shows marked left arytenoid and vocal cord collapse. It is important that purchasers recognise that the resting examination is not a complete evaluation and some conditions are only fully revealed at exercise whereas others, like displacement of the palate only occur while the horse is exercising.


| THOROUGHBRED SALES ASSESSMENT |

new rules have recently been introduced. There are now guidelines on measuring tendons, and horses with a superficial digital flexor tendon cross-sectional area of greater than 1.6cm2 are not allowed to be imported into Hong Kong because of a potential increased risk of tendon injury. The use of medication in horses at the sales ground and early in their life is currently an area of controversy. The concern is that there may be longer-term impact. Penalties associated with the use of anabolic steroids are well documented: the horse will be placed under a lifetime ban if these drugs have been used. The British Horseracing Authority will also place a lifetime ban on young horses which have received bisphosphonates. Potentially, these drugs may have been given without the knowledge of the vendor, therefore client education and sales conditions will have to be adapted unless a sensible compromise can be reached to prevent a high-profile embarrassment for the authorities.

The Sales Exam – The veterinary viewpoint – Mike Shepherd

The topic discussion then moved back to earlier in a Thoroughbred’s life to examine whether foal injuries and disease compromise sales and racing performance. Common reasons for foals admitted to neonatal units include neonatal maladjustment syndrome (dummy foals), neonatal sepsis, prematurity/dysmaturity and congenital abnormalities. There is often multi-organ or multi-joint involvement. Prematurity/dysmaturity leads to poor bone formation, which is most typically

detected via radiography where incomplete ossification of the cuboidal bones in the knees and hocks is seen. In 339 Thoroughbred foals presented to the Peter Rossdales Foal Unit, there was a 75% survival rate with premature foals having the least chance of survival. Relating neonatal illnesses to the Thoroughbred sales process, Dr. Kevin Corley in Ireland has shown there was no difference in sales price between hospitalised foals and controls selected from the same sales. Prof Celia Marr looked at ultimate racing success in foals that had been admitted to the Peter Rossdales Foal Unit. Overall, the likelihood of these foals racing, winning and being placed stood up well in comparison to a cohort of foals born in 1999—the most recent available data for comparison which had been published from researchers based in the Equine Fertility Unit. In a larger study, Chidlow and colleagues looked at foals hospitalised in Florida. Foals that were sick as neonates were less likely to race than their siblings with premature foals and foals who had orthopaedic issues as a neonate worst affected. In the Rossdales group of foals, foals treated for prematurity and orthopaedic problems achieved less than others. In contrast, racing outcomes from foals with rib fractures sustained during birth were not different from their siblings. Looking at the impact of lung problems on future racing performance— perhaps against expectations—in a cohort of over 1,200 foals, foal pneumonia had no significant difference in likelihood to race. The overall conclusion of this section of the day was that if the foal survived initial problems, on the whole to prognosis for sales and racing, then that is favourable.

Do foal injuries and diseases compromise sales and racing performance – Celia Marr

The keynote speaker for the 2019 Gerald Leigh Memorial Lectures was Debbie SpikePierce of Rood and Riddle Equine Hospital in Lexington, Kentucky. Spike-Pierce is widely published in the field of juvenile radiography, and throughout her career she has focused on relating the conditions encountered at yearling Thoroughbred auctions with future race performance. Spike-Pierce has amassed a huge amount of information over the past 20 years. Based on this, she is able to apply an evidence-based approach to advising her clients on the relevance of radiographic lesions found in yearlings. Spike-Pierce’s research has largely been performed on horses both reared and racing in the U.S. There are differences in opinion and experiences of vets based in Europe and those in the U.S. with respect to their interpretation of the significance of various lesions. There are also major difficulties encountered with following up racehorses in training because of the huge range of variables that these horses encounter with different training techniques, surfaces and racing under different medication guidelines.

Radiography at the Sales - Are findings associated with future performance Pt1 – Debbie Spike-Pierce

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| EDUCATION |

| THOROUGHBRED SALES ASSESSMENT |

unique biomechanical stresses placed on the racehorse and the potential impact this has on future injury.

Does conformation affect gait: objective assessment – Renate Weller

Radiographs of sesamoids without sesamoiditis (A) and with severe sesamoiditis (B). The circle contains one of the sesamoids. Note the dark areas in the affected sesamoid which are vascular channels in the affected sesamoid.

Radiography at the Sales - Are findings associated with future performance Pt2 – Debbie Spike-Pierce

When looking at the impact of these juvenile radiographs, published studies are invaluable. But it is also very important not to be dogmatic about their potential impact as the myriad of other issues that can prevent a horse from racing—including illness, colic, orthopaedic injury and most importantly each horse’s inherent ability—will impact upon the outcome measures used in many of the studies looking at repository radiography findings. The first specific condition Spike-Pierce discussed was sesamoiditis. She ran through the various studies performed from Howard and colleagues in 1992 to McLellan and Plevin’s more recent research. Spike-Pierce highlighted a few points from her own earlier research, which concluded that horses with the worst sesamoiditis had decreased starts and earnings. Horses with mild generalised sesamoiditis show no difference in earnings. McLellan and Plevin have shown that horses with severe sesamoiditis were five times more likely to develop a suspensory branch injury than control horses. Horses with supracondylar lysis are three times less likely to start than their siblings; however, of those that raced, no difference in earnings was seen. Dr. Kane’s study on enthesophyte formation proximal sesamoids showed affected individuals were three times less likely to start a race than horses without this condition; and those with dorsal proximal pastern fragmentation of the hind fetlock

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joints are two times less likely to start than horses without this lesion. There is evidence to show medial forelimb apical sesamoid fragments have a poor prognosis. Basilar sesamoid fragments are uncommon and found in only 37 cases of over 7,000 radiography reports from 1999-2005; but the bigger the fragment the worse the prognosis. Looking at the carpus (knee), SpikePierce explained how the upper joint or antebrachiocarpal joint is looked upon more leniently from a veterinary point of view. Lesions there are less likely to cause lameness, and this joint is generally a more ‘forgiving’ joint; abnormalities here do not negatively impact upon horse ability to sell and race. However, pathology within the lower knee joint, or radial carpal joint, is looked upon very critically; and there is little tolerance to changes seen here due to its position as one of the most common origins of lameness in the racehorse. Stifle cysts come in all shapes and sizes, however in many cases, they can have a major detrimental impact on the affected horse’s ability to race. SpikePierce’s research has shown that 70% of cases seen by her clinic and suffering from medial femoral condyle cysts that cover a joint surface of less than 1.5mm will race, compared to 30% of the horses with lesions over 1.5mm making the racetrack. SpikePierce also expressed her frustration over the inability to predict which horse will become lame with cysts and which will not. Next in the programme, Professor Renate Weller of the Royal Veterinary College looked at whether conformation affected gait. Weller highlighted the

Dr. Des Leadon of the Irish Equine Centre provided an update on current discussions amongst industry stakeholders on the topic of Genomics. Dr. Leadon stressed that whilst much exciting work is being done, Genomics research is still in its infancy, and more knowledge and cooperation between the different industry participants is required before its use can be validated in the mainstream Thoroughbred population.

Genomics and performance profiling – Where are we heading – Des Leadon

Luca Cumani brought the day to a close describing the great success that he and Gerald Leigh had together, most notably with Barathea in the Breeders Cup. Cumani talked about his dual role as a trainer in trying to identify yearlings and as a commercial breeder challenged with placing horses in the right sale and selling them commercially.

A personal view on producing and selecting horses for racing and breeding – Luca Cumani

The seminar at Palace House Museum was attended by industry leaders from all over Europe and owes much to the incredible generosity proved by the Gerald Leigh Memorial Trust and the wonderful array of international world-renowned speakers that the Beaufort Cottage Educational Trust assembled in Newmarket. The Thoroughbred sales auction place will never be without stress and some consternation, but with continuing scientific research and a practical application of the knowledge gained over the years, vets are better placed than ever to offer advice to their clients in their efforts to source the next champion.

All talks given in this seminar, plus additional seminars arranged by Beaufort Cottage Educational Trust are available to view via www.beaufortcottage.com.


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| OPINION |

Bill Heller

# SO UN D BIT ES Norm Casse

The Horse Racing Integrity Act currently before the U.S. Congress would create a uniform standard for drug testing horses that would be overseen by the U.S. AntiDoping Agency. Would that be good or bad?

I’m all for uniform rules, but I’m not in favor of the government being involved. It doesn’t seem like it ever works. I think we’re an industry that should be able to regulate ourselves rather than have someone else do it.

Ralph Nicks

It would probably be good. It would level the playing field. We need standard medication rules.

Eoin Harty

I think it would be good. Anything that’s going to enhance the public perception of our industry would be good. I believe this is a step in the right direction. I think it’s very important to enhance confidence in our industry. I think it’s at an all-time low. Anything that would improve that is a good thing.

Ian Wilkes

Bad. I don’t think we need Congress getting involved in our sport. I think our testing is very sophisticated now anyway. I think it’s quite good. Yes, we need uniform rules, but we don’t need Congress involved.

Tom Proctor

When is the government getting involved ever a good thing?

Rick Schosberg

The jury’s out. I think uniform medication rules are a good thing. Whether it’s the government’s job to do, I’m not sold on that. A lot of people have been working very hard in the industry to get all the jurisdictions on the same page without government intervention. But absolutely it’s important that it gets done.

Chris Englehart

I guess it all depends on what the rules were. You’re talking about uniform rules. That would be fine, unless the rules included banning Lasix. I wouldn’t be in support of that. Where would we race our bleeders? I think it would be a good thing to have uniform testing. In a lot of ways, it would be great.

Jim Bond

It would be bad, though the way it is now is chaos. It’s sad. Ninety-nine percent of the people in our business are good people. You can have all the rules in the world, but they don’t punish the people that have overstepped boundaries hard enough. Not 60 days or 90 days. Make it real. Put some teeth into it. But getting the government involved would not be good. It never seems to work.

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North American Trainer - Winter 2019/20  

North American Trainer - Winter 2019/20