Fairview Park Master Plan 2016-2017

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FAIRVIEW PARK MASTER PLAN ANCHORAGE PARKS & RECREATION Spring 2017


FAIRVIEW PARK MASTER PLAN


ACKNOWLEDGMENTS COMMUNITY ADVISORY GROUP Harry Need, FCC President Darrel Hess, Fairview Resident Laura Vachula, Fairview Resident Beth Verrelli, Fairview Resident Travis Smith, MOA Su Chon, MOA/Americorps Catherine Kemp, MOA/Americorps Heather Harris, Fairview Resident

Caitlin Taylor, Anchorage Community Land Trust Radhika Krishna, Anchorage Community Land Trust Brendan Stuart, APF/Schools on Trails Michelle Fehribach, MOA Paul Wackrow , Neighborworks Alaska Chantel Welch, Neighborworks Alaska David Reamer, UAA Historian Allen Kemplen, Fairview Community Resident Maria Campbell, Anchorage School District

CONTACT Taylor Keegan, Park Planner Email: KeeganTH@muni.org Phone: 907-343-4355

Address: Anchorage City Hall Parks and Recreation 632 W 6th Ave Anchorage, Alaska 99501



TABLE OF CONTENTS

CHAPTER ONE

p. 3

CHAPTER TWO

p. 8

Introduction Context

Overview of Community Advisory Group Overview of Student Outreach

CHAPTER THREE

p. 28

CHAPTER FOUR

p. 42

APPENDIX

p. 49

Existing Conditions Proposed Conditions Master Plan

Cost Estimates Timeline for Coordination and Approval

Community Survey

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CH1: INTRODUCTION GUIDING PRINCIPLES The mission of the Anchorage Parks and Recreation Department, “Healthy Parks, Healthy People,� and to ensure that Anchorage parks are well maintained and safe for the public. To fulfill this mission, Anchorage Parks and Recreation is guided by a set of eight strategies or core value which guide the Parks and Recreation Department in the management of Municipal parkland and were established in the Anchorage Bowl Park, Natural Resource, and Recreation Facility Plan (2006).

CORE VALUES AND STRATEGIC GOALS 1. Improve Maintenance and Stewardship of What We Have 2. Private-Public Partnership 3. Parks as Community Building Blocks 4. Parks as Economic Engines 5. Balanced Services & Facilities for a Diverse Community 6. Access and Connections 7. Stewardship of Natural Resources 8. Creating a Strong Parks and Recreation Organization


ABOUT THE MASTER PLAN This master plan is intended to address issues and guide development of Fairview Park over the next 10 years. The public process for this plan took place between 2016 and 2017, including community involvement from diverse neighbors and users surrounding Fairview Park. From this plan recommendations for implementation are suggested to provide a space that better meets the needs of the community. In addition to an overview of Public Process and the results of each meeting, the following pages will include Fairview Park context and overview, existing conditions, a master plan and implementation strategies.

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L ST

BEL

GAM

A ST INGR

15

TH

AV E

LEGEND

FAIRVIEW PARK CONTEXT Fairview Park Fairview Rec Center

Sullivan Arena

CarRS Groce

WestChester LaGoon

ANChorage Cem

Post Office

Fairview-LIo


ery

metary

ons Park

6T

FAIRVIEW PARK CONTEXT

HA VE

Fairview Park is the focus of this Master Plan, with many of the contextual landmarks around Fairview. Fairview Elementary and Fairview Recreation are both quite close, as well as the FairviewLions park. A driving document in establishing the context and future goals of the Fairview community was the 2014 Fairview Neighborhood Plan completed by Agnew::Beck. This resource included much public process and provides a holistic view of the community. It is currently available on the Municipality of Anchorage Website.

Fairview ELEMENTARY SCHOOL Fairbanks Park Downtown Anchorage 5


ABOUT FAIRVIEW PARK

Fairview Park was developed in 1968 with Funds from a Capitol Improvement bond from 1966. During the development of this park, three different designs were used until 2006. In 2004, improvements were done through the Community Development Block Grant which included updated playground equipment and a second pavilion. Fairview Park is just under an acre, and is proximate (within .25 miles) to the Fairview Recreation Center as well as Fairview Elementary School. The park currently has ADA accessible play equipment for school age children as well as children aged 2-5. It has two picnic shelters, a grill, a fenced recreation court with lines indicating tennis use, and on street parking. On the far left, historic imagery of development around the park is shown. Note the development that occurred from 1950 to 1970, which is during the time the park was established as was the rest of the neighborhood.

FIREWEED, ICON ON FAIRVIEW NEIGHBORHOOD.


Fairview Park

Fairview Park

Legend

Legend

Fairview Park

Fairview Park

Park Land

Park Land Fairview Community Council Boundary

FAIRVIEW PARK IMAGERY 1939

Fairview Community Council Boundary

FAIRVIEW PARK IMAGERY 1980

Fairview Park

Fairview Park

Legend Fairview Park

Legend

Park Land

Fairview Park

Fairview Community Council Imagery 1950

Fairview Community Council Boundary

FAIRVIEW PARK IMAGERY 1990

Fairview Park

Fairview Park

Legend

Legend

Fairview Park

Fairview Park

Park Land

Park Land

Fairview Community Council Boundary

FAIRVIEW PARK IMAGERY 1960

Fairview Community Council Boundary

FAIRVIEW PARK IMAGERY 2002

Fairview Park

Fairview Park

Legend Fairview Park

Legend

Park Land Fairview Community Council Boundary

FAIRVIEW PARK IMAGERY 1970

Fairview Park

Fairview Community Council Imagery 2014

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CH2: PROCESS OVERVIEW Public Involvement is an important component of any planning process. To ensure that the Fairview Park Master Plan aligns with the desires of the community, a public involvement process was led by Anchorage Parks and Recreation and supported by numerous non-profit partners in the area. In October 2016, the planning team began outreach with a presentation at the Fairview Community Council forming the Fairview Park Community Advisory Group. Three meetings were held with this group refining ideas and potential partners to begin to implement improvements at this park. These three meetings were spread from November to February, and were also spattered with many smaller meetings with local stakeholders on how different priorities of this project could be implemented with diverse funding sources, partnerships, and volunteer events. The planning team also had a design charette with the After School Program at Fairview Recreation Center and did biweekly outreach


OCTOBER 2016.

Fairview Community Council

NOVEMBER 2016.

Fairview Community Advisory Group (CAG) Meeting One, Fairview Recreation Center, Outreach at Fairview Elementary

DECEMBER 2016.

Fairview Community Advisory Group Meeting Two

JANUARY 2017.

Working with smaller working groups within CAG for volunteer event planning

FEBRUARY 2017.

Fairview Community Advisory Group Meeting Three

at the Fairview Elementary School Third Grade recess and lunch period. The team also used the public process page on mySidewalk and did consistent outreach on Nextdoor, Facebook and Twitter to advertise about Community Advisory Group meetings and outreach overviews. The approval process included three meetings total with the Fairview Community Council resulting in a resolution of approval for the proposed updates to Fairview Park, as well as a resolution from the Parks and Recreation Commission.

MARCH 2017.

Fairview Community Council

SPRING 2017.

Fairview Community Council Resolution. Parks and Recreation Commission Resolution. Fairview Park Volunteer Event

SUMMER 2017.

Fairview Park Volunteer Event (Arts and Placemaking).

FALL 2017.

Potential working committee

WINTER 2017.

Planning for Capital Improvements

SPRING 2018.

Additional issues on Bond

SUMMER 2018.

Fairview Community Council

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FAIRVIEW RECREATION CENTER COMMUNITY ADVISORY GROUP MEETING. December 14, 2016.


PUBLIC PROCESS

In this case of this outreach process, the Community Advisory Group was formed through the typical process aforementioned as well as contacting local stakeholders and neighbors and advertising the group’s formation and meetings on Facebook, mySidewalk, and Nextdoor. Also part of this process were door to door surveys of the neighbors proximate to the park, a design workshop at Fairview Recreation Center, and spending time with the third grade classes during Lunch and Recess at Fairview Elementary in the 2016-2017 school year. In January of 2017, the Park Planner, Taylor Keegan, received additional support through a Americorps VISTA, Catherine Kemp, who then supplemented the public outreach mentioned above with more community engagement at the Fairview Recreation Center, Fairview Elementary Center, and door to door surveys of the community members in Fairview. Pictured to the left are Harry Need, Fairview Community Council President, and Radhika Krishna, of Anchorage Community Land Trust, participating in the second Community Advisory Group Meeting and making notes about precedent parks to be recorded for design development. This was the second Community Advisory Group meeting of three total CAG meetings prior to master plan approval.

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STUDENT OUTREACH FAIRVIEW RECREATION CENTER Overview and Methods

On November 3, 2016, a design workshop was done with over 45 students from the Fairview Recreation Center Afterschool Program. Students were broken up into four different groups in the Fairview Recreation Auxiliary Gym and were lead by Taylor Keegan (Parks and Recreation), Michelle Fehribach (Parks and Recreation), Tiffany Santos (Parks and Recreation) and Amanda Sassi (UAA). Additionally, the two Fairview Recreation Center Supervisors, Dorena Bingham and Jessie Haynes, were an enormous help in scheduling and organizing students for the event. The four groups were high school age, middle school age, and elementary school age boys and elementary school age girls. The intent for the middle school and high school age students was to discover what the students currently did in their free time, what hobbies they enjoyed, who they looked up to and spent their time with and how they envisioned they could impact their community. They received the survey example displayed in the top right of the following page. The elementary school students were broken into gendered groups to see if there were differences and similarities between what programmatic elements they would want to see in their local park. FAIRVIEW RECREATION CENTER AFTER SCHOOL PROGRAM. November 3, 2016.


FAIRVIEW RECREATION CENTER AFTER SCHOOL PROGRAM SURVEY SAMPLE. November 3, 2016.

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FAIRVIEW RECREATION CENTER AFTER SCHOOL PROGRAM. November 3, 2016.

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(Student Outreach cont) HS and MS Age Results

The intent of the survey was also to determine what type of programming improvements would be made to the park. As you can see, many of the students overwhelmingly play basketball in their spare time, followed by listening to music and cooking out. Which activities were not popular? Tennis, which is the current programming of the recreation court.

PUBLIC PROCESS

When asking students open-ended questions, we found that the Fairview Recreation Center is a very popular place for them to go in their free time. They enjoyed playing basketball, and many of the people they looked up to were basketball players (Kevin Durant), and family members or close friends. Favorite foods? Pizza and chicken, which could indicate a opportunity to provide options for fresher, and healthier foods. Favorite Park? Fairview Park, or the “polar bear park� which is the informal name of Russian Jack Park due to its iconic Polar Bear Slide. What would these students do to make their community better? Clean up and pick up trash. Also popular but did not show up in the wordle was the request for water fountains and drinking water on site.

FAIRVIEW RECREATION CENTER AFTER SCHOOL PROGRAM. November 3, 2016.


FRC AFTER SCHOOL PROGRAM SURVEY RESULTS . November 3, 2016.

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ELEMENTARY SCHOOL AGE BOYS

ELEMENTARY SCHOOL AGE GIRLS

PLAYGROUND SPORTS OR BBQ ART COMMUNITY GARDEN


(Student Outreach cont) Elementary School Age Results

The intent of splitting the elementary school students into gendered groups was to understand if there was preference between different types of equipment and programming between the two groups. It seems, however, that both groups had equally proportionate preferences for playground equipment, followed by sports activities, then public art with community garden as an interest being the last priority.

FAIRVIEW RECREATION CENTER AFTER SCHOOL PROGRAM. November 3, 2016.

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FAIRVIEW PARK. FALL 2016.


EXISTING CONDITIONS Overview The existing conditions were established through several site visits, site observations, Community Advisory Group (CAG) input, Community Council input, Fairview Recreation After School Program design workshop, informal discussions with Fairview Elementary School Students, a digital survey, and door to door interviews with neighbors. Also used was census data, and larger scale infrastructure studies looking and connectivity and resource availability. More specifically, during the first CAG Meeting, the group established Opportunities and Constraints, which ultimately laid the foundation in forming priorities moving forward. It was also during this meeting that priorities for improving the park were determined supplemented by the results from discussions with the After School Program at the Fairview Recreation Center. These priorities have also been bolstered by the other outreach methods aforementioned.

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OPPORTUNITIES • The area that was historically used for a tennis court is currently used by groups playing volleyball. As it exists now, people will bring their own net, and attach it to the fence surrounding the play area. According to neighbors, this park becomes heavily activated during these weekend - long volleyball and cook out events. • The fence surrounding the area historically used as tennis courts was discussed as a place that could host public art. This was proposed as a way to also engage the community in some sort of design contest. • The open green area was discussed as both an asset and a constraint. This area was discussed as a place to potentially work with the schools in Fairview (namely Fairview Elementary), to develop a learning lab similar to Russian Jack/Nunaka Valley. • There is currently an area in front of the pink pavilion near 12th Ave that once housed landscaping; edible plants proposed (specifically raspberries based on the popularity of alley raspberries among youth in Fairview). • The newer playground equipment is “fairly popular” • There is a water hookup that could be used for landscaping or to facilitate a place for public drinking water (re: Fairview Rec youth requested drinking fountains multiple times).


CONSTRAINTS • Change use of tennis court because it is no longer used for tennis, nor does it “serve the broader needs of the community” • Clean up fencing and entire boundary along the alleyway. The fence currently has old roots, and could be beautified. • Play equipment is for younger children (no activities for older children or young adults) and is in disrepair. • Lack of facilities at pavilion for larger gatherings- would benefit from more tables and BBQ facilities. • No lighting in pavilions or park itself • No infrastructure for older ages/ older than 6th grade • The park lacks identity! The community would like to have an iconic playground, piece of art, and/or rename the park. • Engage the housing on the other side of the alley- there used to be heavily used swings in that property that were removed.

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LARGER DATA TRENDS

Infrastructure and Connectivity

Shown to the left is a map which indicates the walking distance to schools, the Fairview Recreation Center (yellow block), and the Chester Creek Greenbelt. The orange boundary shown is the Fairview Community Council Limit. The map to the far right demonstrates the total receiving food stamps/SNAP in the Census Block Group containing a large number of Fairview Residents. As you can see, there is a much larger number of individuals in the census block containing Fairview who are receiving food stamps as compared to the rest of the community within its zip code. Recent studies* have found correlations between obesity and food stamp recipients. Within the context of park planning, this makes food education and security a priority within the neighborhood, ensuring families and children have access to healthy food and have opportunities for education in where healthy food sources come from in their local environment. *“Most Americans are heavier than they should be, of course, but a U.S. Department of Agriculture study delving into National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey data from 2007 through 2010 found Americans on food stamps were more likely to be obese than other groups — including people who didn’t receive benefits even though they were poor enough to qualify.” Source: Delaney, Aurthur. “Food Stamp Recipients More Likely To Be Obese, Study Finds.” Huffinton Post (2015): n. pag. Http://www.huffingtonpost. com/2015/05/05/food-stamps-obesity_n_7204824.html. 05 May 2015. Web. 6 Mar. 2017. SOURCE: MUNICIPALITY OF ANCHORAGE, ESRI 2015 PRODUCTION.


SOURCE: U.S. Census Bureau, 2011-2015 American Community Survey (ACS) 5-Year Estimates. ACS 5-year estimates become available in December of the year following the calendar year of the data. ACS (20112015) 5 -year estimates were released December 8, of 2016.)

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mySidewalk.com: DC 1990,200, 2010, ACS est mySidewalk.com: US CENSUS 2011-2015 ACS

mySidewalk.com: CDRC 2013-2014

mySidewalk.com: US CENSUS 2011-2015 ACS

mySidewalk.com: US CENSUS 2011-2015 ACS

mySidewalk.com: US CENSUS 2011-2015 ACS

mySidewalk.com: US CENSUS 2011-2015 ACS


LARGER DATA TRENDS Demographic Information

As seen in the graphics formed utilizing census data through mySidewalk, we observe a fairly even split of men and women in the neighborhood. How does Fairview compare to the municipality as a whole? What we do see is a disproportionately high number of renter occupied housing units in Fairview, and a much higher proportion of students enrolled in the Disabilities Education Act in Fairview than we do across the Municipality. We also see a higher number of American Indian and African American neighbors than we do compared to the rest of the Municipality of Anchorage. This information demonstrates that we should be investing in infrastructure that goes beyond ADA accessibility also celebrates Anchorage’s diversity in a neighborhood that shows a more diverse population than is typical of Anchorage neighborhoods.

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CH3: THE MASTER PLAN GUIDING PRINCIPLES Based on the public process, and the priorities, an illustrative Master Plan has been drafted as well as suggestions for implementing the desires of the community. The remaining pages of the document will go over the priorities as set forth by the Community Advisory Group and supplemented by the results from student outreach, larger data trends, and community surveys.


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SETTING PRIORITIES COMMUNITY ADVISORY GROUP MEETING ONE During the first Community Advisory Meeting on November 21, 2016, the group sifted through the constraints and weaknesses of the site and prioritized issues to be included in the master plan. To the right are the notes from the meeting and are slightly amended and expanded below: 1. Tennis Court into Basketball and Volleyball uses 2. Engage the neighborhood and incorporate art into the fencing 3. Landscaping with a edible vegetation that would attract children and would be something that is perennial in nature. 4. Explore learning lab opportunities with schools and other organizations (specific to the green space). 5. Provide additional amenities in pavilions 6. Upgrade play equipment and make opportunities for older children and young adults. Also adding swings for higher density housing surrounding park. 7. Work to Engage Neighbors and Existing Park users 8. Give park a sense of identity- maybe rename the park or have iconic art or playground equipment.


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Would the park benefit from having a permanent BBQ installed near one of the pavillions? 80%

Yes

Indifferent

Do you think that the park would benefit from additional picnic tables in the pavillion areas?

Indifferent

15%

67%

Yes

27%

No 6%

No 5%

Would you like to see edible landscaping enhancements in the park? Examples of edible landscaping include strawberries, apple trees, raspberries and rhubarb.

Regarding the current tennis court infrastructure: What is your ideal outcome? Don’t Change (keep tennis) (0% response)

95%

Yes

Change to volleyball (0% response) Change to basketball (7% response) Change to both volleyball and basketball (61% response)

Indifferent

0%

No 5%

Other

(31% response)


COMMUNITY SURVEYS Collecting balanced and diverse feedback To help substantiate the requests and feedback received at the Public Workshops, a door to door survey was completed and a digital survey was distributed on Nextdoor, Facebook, and by email to the CAG. While the door to door surveys were helpful in engaging the neighbors and receiving direct feedback from people proximate to the park, it was difficult to translate those accounts into charts and graphs. What was heard by the surveyors was helpful and recorded in notes at the bottom of a questionnaire. The same survey that was used as a guideline going to door to door was turned into a digital survey and after being distributed received 15 responses. Seen to the left are some of the results of the survey, which seem to echo the requests of both the CAG and the Fairview Recreation After School Program participants. For the full responses, please visit the appendix.

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What types of positive activities do you see in Fairview Park? “Strong community engagement and identity. Steady Improve streetscape. Slow but steady the reduction in public inebriation problems, active community council.some improvement in the up keep of the house instead” “Gardening, playground” “Volley ball, BBQs/picnics, families playing with children on equipment, fencing and other martial arts” “Plan on planting a my first garden this Spring. A community improvement project. Sponsored by Grant through PRC. If approved for Grant this will be aired on a local news station. Creation a very positive image direct at the Fairview community.”

What types of unsavory/negative activities do you see in Fairview Park? “Same as most of Anchorage. A lot of homeless people wandering around. At least Fairview is not seeing the problems other areas are experiencing. Very quiet in this neighborhood with respectful neighbors. Has been a minor problem with individuals roaming in the early morning hours looking for unlocked vehicles.” “Drinking/loitering” “Drug use, gang, graffiti, poor lighting, lack of trash cans or dog poop bags, lack of education piece” “I live in Fairview, but do not visit Fairview Park.”


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1

st

103rd STREET PARK

ABECKET URBAN SQUARE

PARK 1

PARK 2

BLAKE HOBBS

BOX HILL GARDENS

PARK 3

PARK 4


PRECEDENT PARKS Community preference on existing spaces During the first Community Advisory Meeting it was determined through analyzing the constraints and weaknesses of the site that the following points should lead the remainder of the master planning process for the park. During the digital survey for Fairview Park, these four parks were ranked from most ideal to least ideal. Where Park 2, Park 3, and Park 4 came in nearly the same, Park 1 had a much stronger preference. Some of the feedback for these parks included the following: “I like the ideal of the garden, a nice place for the children, the open space the adults are relaxing on the grass, and a spot the older children can enjoy a sports activity.” “Grass and vegetation is most important, with prescribed areas for activities that use an open plan/layout (minimal fencing).” “Thinking of multi-use for all seasons, park 1 seemed to be a family friendly park for summer and snow.” “Park 1 appeals to me the most because it looks like it could attract individuals with diverse interests and serve multi uses. Fairview Park is about a ten minute walk from my home and I would make it a place I walked to regularly. I like the design of Park 3, but I chose to rank it below Park 2 because it the main features, sports courts, would be buried under snow in winter. I like that Park 3 is built around trees. It looks like a great space for adults and children. Park 4 appeals to me the least.”

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RENDER FOR FIRST (OF TWO) CONCEPTS OF MULTI-USE COURTS. INCLUDES BASKETBALL AND VOLLEYBALL USES, COLORFUL COURT SURFACING, AS WELL AS ART IN FENCING


The Community Advisory Group for the park would like to incorporate art into the chain-link fencing on site. What type of art would you like to see in the park? “Art reflecting the culture/landscape/wildlife of Fairview and Alaska” “Mural by students at Fairview or plastic figures of children playing” “Quality art. Please no temporary, ad-hoc approaches. Art that contributes to the ambiance of the spaces all year round. Provide some power drops so LED illumination can be incorporated.” “It would be cool to have a place for the art could engage children and change from time to time. Some sort of community mural wall that got painted differently every year. Or some sort of cool piece of art that reflected people or science in someway.” “Something that speaks to the diversity and history of Fairview.”

What are three words or symbols that you think define your neighborhood and give your neighborhood a positive identity? “Community” ”Hard working people” ”Equality” ”caring” ”inviting” ”perseverance” ”zest ”grit ”revitalizing” ”tenacity” ”art” ”unique”

”Improving” ”urban” ”violence” ”historical” ”resilience” ”music” ”economically next” ”eclectic” ”block party” ”potential” ”nice older homes ” ”well kept” ”resiliency”

”hope” ”positive” ”clean” ”culture” ”people” ”diversity” ”saftey” ”historic” ”multicultural” ”diverse” ”school” ”eclectic”

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MASTER PLAN Fairview Park Master Plan Ultimately, the community wanted to invest and improve the existing assets at the park to make it more welcoming for people of all ages and from diverse backgrounds. Strategies included: reprogram the recreation to suit the existing activities that are popular in the neighborhood (volleyball and basketball), improve the identity of the park, add BBQ areas and more seating near the pavilions, incorporate art with the community, update the playground, and have more places for children and community members to learn about food that grows in Alaska. The programmatic elements and infrastructure improvements requested by the community and approved by Anchorage Parks and Recreation are highlighted to the right on the illustrative master plan. This plan is meant to serve as a guideline for future development, volunteer events, partnerships, and capital improvements. For example, the community requested apple trees be planted in the park, which are pictured in the illustrative master plan, but may not be planted exactly where they have been called out in the plan.

Futhermore, the larger improvements such as the playground include a separate public process to determine the desires of the community in conjunction with how they come together with the goals and mission of Anchorage Parks and Recreation.

REPROGRAM RECREATION

IMPROVE PARK IDENTITY/PLACEMAKING

OTHER AMENITIES

UPDATE PLAYGROUND

LEARNING LAB

EDIBLE LANDSCAPING


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CH4: IMPLEMENTATION MOVING FORWARD Out of the priorities defined by the community, the Master Plan makes the following recommendations in the spirit of moving forward with the desires set forth by the community in the following pages. The work that can be done with volunteer support and minimal funds will be done in the 2017 season including a volunteer Fix-It day involving cleaning up the park, removing graffiti, landscaping improvements, and place making project surrounding the recreation court area. Also incorporated into the Plan is a end of summer “harvest day� with local neighbors and stakeholders pending the success of the landscaping improvements. Additionally, the requests for more amenities like seating and BBQ infrastructure will be provided by the Parks and Recreation department as funding becomes available. The requests include overall playground improvements and the transition of the recreation court area from tennis to multi-use volleyball/basketball courts require more extensive funding and are projected to be place on future city bonds. Upon the bond passing, these improvements can be made as long-term investments into the infrastructure of the park. The requests for a


learning lab are noted in the Master Plan as desired by the community, but will require more extensive outreach with schools and educational institutions in the area to ensure a sustainable program to care for any infrastructure provided for public use in the park. Parks supports that the learning lab will be introduced in addition to the amenities aforementioned in the Master Plan.

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PARTNERSHIPS CITIES OF SERVICE This Master Plan and project was enhanced greatly by funding and assistance from the Cities of Service Resilience Program Partnership. The Cities of Service Resilience AmeriCorps VISTA program was established to strengthen climate resilience planning and implementation in vulnerable communities. Through this program, Cities of Service has provided a grant, two AmeriCorps VISTAs, and program consulting services to ten US cities, supporting the development of impact volunteering initiatives that engage community residents to improve resilience in low-income neighborhoods. In 2015, the Municipality of Anchorage was chosen as one of the ten participating cities. Food insecurity is a constant challenge to building resilience in Alaska—an estimated 95% of food bought in Alaska is imported. To contribute to local efforts to combat food insecurity in Anchorage, Cities of Service will provide funding for edible landscaping and educational components in Fairview Park in an effort to teach students and residents about local food production and its connection to food security.


LOCAL ORGANIZATIONS Other local partnerships include: Anchorage Park Foundation (APF) continues to serve as a great ally of the Parks and Recreation Department as our non-profit partner facilitating neighborhood and community scale improvements across Anchorage. Thus far, APF offered development support in public outreach through attending public meetings, facilitating outreach, and also through the support of their Schools on Trails program. Anchorage Community Land Trust (ACLT) who applied for a Challenge grant with the Fairview Community Council for enhancements in conjunction with this Master Plan. These two organizations also provided great support in getting the word out about this planning effort. ACLT and VISTA staff provided support in going door to door in the neighborhood during the winter months to gain greater input and ensure proximate stakeholder response. Neighborworks Alaska, who is doing other food security projects in the Fairview Community and have provided organizational support and community connection

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Additional issues on Bond

SUMMER 2019

Potential outreach

GOALS FOR 2018

Potential outreach event including maintenece of vegetation and celebration of community

AUGUST 2017

Site Outreach and Maintenence of Vegetation

JUNE + JULY 2017

Volunteer Event including cleanup park, landscaping improvements, and placemaking project involving court area

MAY 2017

Fairview Community Council Resolution Parks and Recreation Commission Resolution

APRIL 2017


TIMELINE Moving forward

Learning LabMeeting One, Fairview Recreation Center, Outreach at Fairview Elementary

GOALS FOR 2020 + BEYOND

Moving forward we will continue to work with the community to make this park serve the both the surrounding neighbors and the broader requests of the community. We will be doing this through pursuit of capital improvement money (bonds) as well as through volunteer events and partnerships with local non profits like Anchorage Park Foundation and Anchorage Community Land Trust. A big thank you to all who made this master planning process possible through thier participation and input!

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CH5: APPENDIX MOVING FORWARD Included is the following: CAG Meeting One Overview and Photos CAG Meeting Two Sheets and Photos Public Survey Results via Survey Monkey Time Capture of mySidewalk Fairview Master Plan Project

*NOTE: Meeting three results not included, because the master plan serves as culmination of CAG meetings


COMMUNITY ADVISORY GROUP MEETING THREE, FAIRVIEW RECREATION CENTER. February 13, 2017

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