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ACKNOWLEDGEments The Bank of America Merril Lynch Low Income Housing Challenge has provided the perfect opportunity for the Sanctuary 6 team to live the Cal Poly motto of "Learn by Doing." Through collaboration between students of various majors - Architecture, Construction Management, City & Regional Planning, Business Finance, and Business Economics - the team has developed an innovative project that will engage and enhance San Luis Obispo's veteran population for years to come.

| PROJECT SUPPORTERS Kenneth Trigueiro

Executive Vice President + CFO, Peoples’ Self-Help Housing

Robert Ellis Alan McKean Chris Berthiaume

CAPSLO Director of Housing Initiatives Workforce Services for Veterans, Supportive Services for Veteran Families Site Supervisor, America’s Job Center

Bryan Shields Pratish Patel

Faculty Advisor, Architecture Faculty Lecturer Faculty Advisor, Assistant Professor of Finance

Greg Wynn Stacey White Andrew Goodwin Kent Macdonald Margot McDonald

Architectural Review Committee Chair, Architecture Lecturer, Cal Poly San Luis Obispo LEED AP BD+C, Architecture Lecturer, Cal Poly San Luis Obispo Architecture Lecturer, Cal Poly San Luis Obispo Architecture Lecturer, Cal Poly San Luis Obispo Architecture Department Head, Cal Poly San Luis Obispo

Hemalata Dandekar William Riggs Mike Multari

City and Regional Planning Department Head, Cal Poly San Luis Obispo, City of San Luis Obispo Planning Commission City and Regional Planning Assistant Professor, Cal Poly San Luis Obispo, City of San Luis Obispo Planning Commission City and Regional Planning Lecturer, Cal Poly San Luis Obispo, City of San Luis Obispo Planning Commission

DeVonia Colbry Richard Bermudez Kyle Laird Shane Smith Richard Salazar

U.S. Navy Veteran, Goodwill Industries Central Coast U.S. Army Veteran, Goodwill Industries Central Coast U.S. Air Force Veteran, Goodwill Industries Central Coast U.S. Marine Corps Veteran, Cole Farms Trucking Logistics Tech – San Luis Obispo U.S. Navy Veteran, Carpenter and Craftsman

Mark Groen Annette Aviles Nicole Hern Tyler Corey

Vrilakas and Groen Architects San Luis Obispo Beauty College New Life K-9s, Director of Training Housing Programs Manager, Community Development Department

Jennifer Gil

Lender, Bank of America

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PROJECT OVERVIEW

| DEVELOPER

People’s Self Help Housing

| LOCATION

San Luis Obispo, CA

| PARCEL SIZE

1.36 acres

| TARGET MARKET

Homeless, at-risk veterans

| UNIT MIX

13 studio (efficiency) units 31 one-bedroom units

| AMENITIES

Community Spaces: Resident Gym, Resident Lounge, Recreation Room, Communal Work Room, Multi-Purpose Room with Kitchen Counseling Center Job Training Leasing Office w/Lobby and Mail Room Pet Friendly

| CONSTRUCTION PERIOD

14 months

| CONSTRUCTION COST

$11,943,450

| FINANCING SOURCES

Predevelopment/Construction Sources San Luis Obispo County Housing Trust Fund: $1,580,625 PDLP: $800,000 CDBG: $250,000 Affordable Housing Fund: $800,000 HOME Funds: $500,000 Construction Loan: $8,762,825 Permanent Sources Low Income Housing Tax Credits 9%: $11,003,450 Veteran Housing and Homeless Prevention Program: $500,000 SLO County Housing Trust Fund Tax Credits: $440,000 Permanent Loan: $2,000,000

| SUSTAINABLE DESIGN

Designed for LEED Platinum Certification

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TABLE OF CONTENTS

01 | PROJECT TEAM

P.04

02 | DEVELOPER CAPACITY

P.05

03 | EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

P.06

04 | CLIENT ANALYSIS

P.07

05 | MARKET ANALYSIS

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06 | THE SITE

P. 10

07 | REGULATORY ANALYSIS

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08 | DESIGN CONCEPT

P. 14

09 | RESIDENT SERVICES

P. 15

10 | COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT

P.27

11 | DEVELOPMENT TIMELINE

P.28

12 | FINANCING STRUCTURE

P.30

13 | APPENDIX

P.35

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01 | PROJECT TEAM

Our Mission Sanctuary 6 is a low-income housing project specifically designed to house veterans. Every day our military service men and women put their lives on the line to keep us safe. Sanctuary 6 provides an opportunity to give back to our veterans by fostering an integrated community that celebrates environmental friendliness, interconnected transportation solutions, supportive services, and most importantly the notion of home. By combining innovative architecture and planning practices, groundbreaking construction methodology, and novel financing techniques Sanctuary 6 and our development partners will set the standard for affordable veterans housing in San Luis Obispo County for years to come. Sanctuary 6 comes from the military adage of “got your six� or standing back to back with someone to provide defense and support. The development stands on six pillars to support our veterans: Veterans, Independence, Support, Camaraderie, Connectivity, and Sustainability.

TEAM CAL POLY Andrew Fortner Nate Roberts

4th year Business Administration Major with a Concentration in Financial Management, has a strong interest in real estate finance, securitization, and investments. 4th year Economics Major with a Concentration in Finance, has strong interest in real estate finance and urban development.

Charles Andrews

4th Year, Construction Management Major, with two Minors in Sustainable Environments and Real Property Development, LEED Green Associate, has a passion for cost estimating and sustainable design.

Emily Foley Justin Frentzel

4th year City and Regional Planning Major with a Minor in Real Property Development, passionate about affordable housing for all and transportation. 3rd year double Major in City and Regional Planning and Economics with two Minors in Statistics and Real Property Development, with strong interests in the intersection of private sector development and public sector planning.

Amy Rutty 3rd year Architecture Major with a Minor in Sustainable Enviroments, has interests in urbanism and socially conscious design. Annelise Barbieri 3rd year Architecture Major, LEED AP BC+C, has interests in construction management and sustainable design. Chloe Eitzer 3rd year Architecture Major, has interests in environmental design, increasing user comfort, and low-income housing. Chris McCoy 3rd Year Architecture Major, has interests in city planning and interdisciplinary design. Jordan Keiser 3rd year Architecture Major with two Minors in Sustainable Environments and Ethnic Studies, has a passion for socially conscious design. Mengdi Zhang 3rd year Architecture Major with a Minor in Architectural Engineering, has strong interests in collabration amongst design, construction, planning, and financial fields. Rodrigo Robles-Gonzalez 3rd year Architecture Major with a Minor in Sustainable Environments, has strong interests in community development and integration within architecture and design.

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02 | DEVELOPER CAPACITY Founded in 1970, the mission of Peoples’ Self-Help Housing (PSHH), a national award-winning non-profit organization, is to provide affordable housing and programs leading to selfsufficiency for low-income families, seniors, and other special needs groups on California’s Central Coast. Since then, the organization has built 1,200 “sweat equity” units and over 1,600 affordable rental units. PSHH currently operates 45 affordable housing complexes in San Luis Obispo, Santa Barbara, and Ventura counties. In partnership with Sanctuary 6, PSHH is working on increasing its focus in homeless and veteran’s housing as outlined in its 2013-2018 Strategic Plan. Kenneth Trigueiro, our contact at Peoples’ Self-Help Housing, is Executive Vice President and Chief Financial Officer at the organization. Trigueiro has been with PSHH since 2005 with past responsibilities over rental housing acquisitions, development, financing and construction. In addition, he has been an integral guide to the Cal Poly team in our efforts to create Sanctuary 6. Recent Projects in San Luis Obispo County

Kenneth Trigueiro

Judson Terrace Lodge Judson Terrace Lodge at 3042 Augusta St. is affordable housing that has green building technology and community aspects with decreased water consumption, low-flow toilets, and the blue-bin recycling program. Community driven amenities include an exercise spa room, outdoor patio, library, television, and large rooms for any other event. Canyon Creek Apartments The Canyon Creek apartments at 400 Oak Hill Road in Paso Robles have 9 one story buildings of affordable housing. It has central heating and air conditioning, on site laundry, large community area, walking distance to school, and close to Wal-Mart/Albertsons. With 68 available apartments, 50% of them do not exceed the Area Median Income (AMI). Lachen Tara Apartments The Lachen Tara apartments in Avila Beach at 240 Ocean Oaks Lane #1, the average unit size is 1272 square feet. In addition, there are 29 units within the complex, all of which are in 2 story buildings.

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03 | EXECUTIVE SUMMARY Sanctuary 6 is an expression of a community coming together to give back to those who put their lives on the line to protect our friends and family. Designed for veterans by veterans, and supported by dozens of San Luis Obispo organizations and leaders, this project will define what modern low-income housing looks like for years to come. In its design, Sanctuary 6 is a celebration of thoughtful architecture including PTSD friendly and fully ADA accessible unit layout. The calming sanctuary environment is also environmentally friendly, and is designed as LEED platinum. Unique partnerships with agencies like the Community Action Partnership of San Luis Obispo (CAPSLO) and Supportive Services for Veteran Families (SSVF) allow the project to provide access to services that homeless veterans would otherwise forego at any other site. Project Goals - Create a healthy atmosphere for homeless veterans. - Engage local community to support the project. - Address environmental issues with sustainable design. Market Summary San Luis Obispo is an incredibly supply constrained market making already expensive California housing even more difficult to afford. With incredibly low vacancy (residential vacancy was <3% for 5 of the last 6 years) and a large disconnect between housing cost and wages, affordable housing is desperately needed. A project like Sanctuary 6 will go a long way to make living in San Luis Obispo affordable for local veterans that would otherwise go homeless. Housing and Demographics: San Luis Obispo County has a population of approximately 274,000 and the City of San Luis Obispo has a population of approximately 46,000. Despite its relatively small size, it is home to over 20,000 veterans, including over 130 homeless veterans.

Community Collaboration & Engagement The SSVF, Goodwill, and other local outreach programs we have worked with all have a passion for serving the underserved veteran population in San Luis Obispo. Throughout the entire process, our team has partnered with more than 17 community groups, resources, and agencies to strengthen the concept of having the veterans’ “six.” With partners and supporters like these, this project serves veterans not only through housing but also through building a supportive community. Unit Development People’s Self-Help Housing serves the needs of local veterans in the San Luis Obispo County. This project has a mix of 13 studio and 31 one bedroom units. Therefore, there is a total of 44 units within the complex. They are below 30% of the Area Mean Income (AMI) with the majority of the buildings containing a community space on the ground floor. This community space provides programing planned by Self-Help Housing and any activities the residents wish to participate in. Entitlements The site is currently zoned CS-S, a designation that allows for mixed-use projects. Sanctuary 6 has 44 units, the maximum number of units allowed. The project design also incorporates suggestions from a number of local planning and design guidelines, and is CEQA exempt. Financing Structure, Uses, Sources Sanctuary 6 utilizes a variety of funding sources, including state-level grants and loans, and a construction loan, before transferring into permanent financing by selling federal Low Income Housing Tax Credits. Veterans Affairs Supportive Housing rental subsidies were employed to further Sanctuary 6’s financial feasibility. Combining all of these sources and accounting for various scenarios allow the project to be financially robust.

As a college town, San Luis Obispo suffers from a housing affordability crisis, with more than 50% of households paying more than 30% of their income towards housing. The standard benchmark for affordable housing is 30%. Median income for the city is $44,894 and median rent in 2014 was $1,225.

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04 | CLIENT ANALYSIS Our Client In a housing study conducted by the Community Action Partnership of San Luis Obispo (CAPSLO), there were an estimated 130 homeless veterans in San Luis Obispo with 13% of them sheltered and 87% unsheltered. Over 80% of the remaining homeless veterans report to have been chronically homeless for over 1 year and are waiting for the availability of veteran friendly, affordable housing projects to transition out of homelessness. Architectural Concerns for Veterans Fighting for a country you believe in and returning to no family, friends, or home to call your own will change one’s outlook on the world. Many veterans are currently homeless because they are struggling to adjust back to civilian life. The County of San Luis Obispo is home to just over 20,000 of our nation’s veterans, with 1,250 of those veterans living below the poverty line. In fact, of the County’s 3,500 estimated homeless people 12% of them are veterans. The majority of these veterans are male (~94%) and many suffer from disabilities (~35%). Many things can serve as a trigger to those who have been in war and have symptoms of Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD). This can range from the sound of fireworks to a pattern change in wallpaper. In studying the demographic of homeless veterans and creating a space veterans can finally call home, we have tailored design aesthetics to help them relax in a space that they can call their own, with people who care and understand what they have been through.

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The project materials are stucco and corrugated metal so as to not surprise the residents with any unusual pattern or feature. All surfaces will be calming, and all plants will have relaxing smells with soothing colors so they will not catch the eye of a resident who thinks it may be a potential threat. In order to not remind the veterans of anything harsh from war, all paintings hung in the community spaces will incorporate the color teal (researched as the most healing color for those with PTSD) with no eccentric design. Open-cell foam will be used as insulation and GreenGlue between any cracks within the windows in order to increase the sound barriers between apartments and the exterior environment. In addition, carpets will be placed under the sofas to decrease ceiling noise for any residents below, while leaving the rest of the floor resilient to accomodate pets. Through well though out, respectable, and responsible architectural design, veterans can live a more comfortable and relaxed life within Sanctuary 6.

Sources: http://actionslo.org/2013/Folio3.pdf http://www.perkinswill.com/sites/default/files/PosttraumaticUnderstanding_2013.pdf http://www.core77.com/posts/21224/architecture-for- recovery-ideo- and-michael-graves-design-ahome-for- disabled-military- veterans-21224 http://www.mentalhealthamerica.net/conditions/post-traumatic- stress-disorder http://www.ptsd.va.gov/public/PTSD-overview/basics/symptoms_of_ptsd.asp

FIGURE 4.1: DESIGN MEETING WITH VETERANS AT THE SSVF OFFICE

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04 | CLIENT ANALYSIS

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As part of our investigative efforts, we reached out to several veterans and SSVF associates in order to expose ourselves to the community needs, challenges, and desires when addressing homelessness within San Luis Obispo. DeVonia Colbry - U.S. Navy - Material Handler Goodwill Industries Central Coast “I’m hoping this is a pilot program. I’m hoping this is a model. You gotta place them, with veterans, we have a lot of drinkers … that’s what the community rooms are about, healthy stuff going on in there... and will draw somebody to it. With the community in mind, I think this could be a great project.” DeVonia’s Interview: https://youtu.be/7bb6bdu07CY Shane Smith - U.S. Marine Corps Cole Farms Trucking - Logistics Tech - San Luis Obispo “Coming back was fine because I was still around people that I served with.” “Camaraderie: brotherhood, its more than a family.” “I didn’t feel like I fit in anywhere, due to things I saw in the marine corp.” Shane’s Interview: https://youtu.be/KMLvuG28q_k Chris Berthiaume - Site Supervisor (SSVF) “I see this project as an opportunity to create a center point that then has a ripple effect across the community in positive ways.” Chris’s Interview: https://youtu.be/bHHD5MIExtE

Alan McKean - Workforce Services for Veterans (SSVF) “There’s a critical need for housing in San Luis Obispo anyway, but when it comes to homeless there is a great need.” “A lot of people want to help, but when you have a project like this, to us, as far as SSVF is concerned, it’s ideal, because it’s something that can come to fruition.” “[Veterans services] can provide a return of belief that things can get better.” Alan’s Interview: https://youtu.be/OcaggbTek8c

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05 | COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT Sanctuary 6 is a project for veterans by veterans. But really it is more than that; it is an expression of a community coming together to celebrate our nation’s heroes. The Sanctuary 6 project has been a community endeavor from day one, and 17 agencies/public officials/other entities have sat down with our team and reviewed the project, provided hands on feedback, and have agreed to support the project full heartedly. The level to which this project has engaged the community alone puts it on the cutting edge of community planning techniques, and Sanctuary 6 is positioned to be the first grassroots veteran housing project of its kind. Some of our outreach efforts and supporting intuitions are outlined in this section. Veterans Vitally critical to our team was incorporating the veterans our project would serve into the design process. On April 4, 2016, the team hosted an outreach event with homeless veterans at Supportive Services for Veteran Families’ headquarters to find out exactly what people who might live in the development thought about the project. The outcome was overwhelmingly in support, and the team got important feedback on everything from unit design to community amenities and accessibility issues.

Architectural Review Commission From the initial stages of design conceptualization, the Sanctuary 6 team has been working with resident architect and member of the City of San Luis Obispo’s Architectural Review Commission, Gregory Wynn. With his guidance and support the Sanctuary 6 team has formed a project consistent with the architectural vernacular of the surrounding area while retaining a contemporary aesthetic. Planning Commission As part of the team’s outreach we met with and received direct feedback from three of San Luis Obipso’s Planning Commissioners: Riggs, Multari, and Dandekar. All three gave integral feedback at various stages of the project in regards to land use, affordable housing incentives, design, and community sentiment.

FIGURE 5.1: meeting WITH CAPSLO

Veteran Service Organizations Throughout the course of the project, the Sanctuary 6 team has held meetings with dozens of SSVF and CAPSLO employees, including case workers and project managers who work with this population everyday, to get their expertise on how to best serve a homeless veteran population. Their input directly guided communal amenities, interior furnishings, and the final project massing.

FIGURE 5.2: veterans review mtg.

Goodwill Industries Knowing how important neighboring entities would be for the project, the team reached out to neighboring property and business. Goodwill was not only supportive of the project, they decided to become a full project partner. They will provide job training and employment opportunities for veterans being housed at Sanctuary 6.

FIGURE 5.3: ARchitectural review mtg.

Community Organizations Engaging with the broader San Luis Obispo community around the project, the Sanctuary 6 team has reached out to institutions like the Wood’s Humane Society who are potentially supporting the project with pet adoption days. The SLO Beauty College has agreed to help provide the veterans with haircut vouchers.

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06 | MARKET ANALYSIS Needs Analysis Low-Income Housing Need When the County of San Luis Obispo updates its General Plan, state law requires the preparation of a Regional Housing Need Assessment (RHNA) to determine how many housing units must be built in the jurisdiction during the following 5 year cycle. In the County’s most recent RHNA report, a minimum of 4,090 additional housing units are needed to accommodate population growth by 2019. The breakdown of units needed by income level are represented in Figure 6.1. Figure 6.2 displays the income limits for each income level based on household size. The income brackets set the maximum rent for each low-income class per unit size. People with very low and low income would be the primary group that satisfies the affordable housing requirement with income of $26,000 to $54,000.

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San Luis Obispo’s Demographic Information While Sanctuary 6’s goal is to serve the homeless veteran population of San Luis Obispo, it is important to understand the broader demographic trends should the project ever become available to a broader pool of applicants. In 2014 the County of San Luis Obispo had an estimated 274,000 residents that made up just over 102,000 households. The county has 5 moderately sized cities and several unincorporated areas, the largest of which is the City of San Luis Obispo with a population of 46,000 residents. Both the City and County have similar racial demographies, those being White (~83%), Hispanic (~14%), and Asian (~3%). Educational attainment within the County is relatively high with a high school graduation rate of 92.8% and 49.6% of the population holding a bachelor’s degree.

Veteran Housing Need All veterans we are providing housing to are in the extremely low income level. The county median income for veterans is $43,700. Most veterans in the county are given housing discounts to help them afford low income housing. With this in mind, the lack of affordable housing in San Luis Obispo drives the need for projects like Sanctuary 6.

The median household income for the county is just under the state median income of $59,454. The City of San Luis Obispo’s Average Mean Income is considerably less than both the County and the State at $44,894. This significant difference in income is primarily due to the high concentration (23%) of individuals making less than $20,000 annually and a disproportionate share of the County’s youth. Despite this elevated level of youth, the City holds a labor force participation rate of 60.5% which is slightly higher than the County’s rate at 58.0%.

FIGURE 6.1: NEED PER INCOME LEVEL

FIGURE 6.2: INCOME LIMIT PER HOUSEHOLD 83k

24.9% Very Low 1020

74k

Household Size Low 640

55k

15.6%

64k

49k 43k 34k 30k 27k

Moderate 720

41.8% Above-Moderate 1710

16k

18k

20k

17.7%

Extremely Low under 30%

Very Low 31%-50%

Low 51%-80%

Moderate 81% - 120%

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551  

Paying <30%  

Paying >30%  

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FIGURE 6.3: DEMOGRAPHICs BY GEOGRAPHY FIGURE 6.5A: COST OF BURDENED RENTAL City of SLO SLO County California Cost BRurdened   Rental  HGROUP ouseholds   y  rouping   Income  Grouping   HOUSEHOLDS BY INCOME Cost  Burdened   ental   Households   by  Income  bG Total Population Total Households Avg. Household Size Median Age Median Household Income %Households with Income < $20,000

45,911 17,855 2.48 25.0 $44,894 23.5%

274,184 102,350 2.52 39.5 $59,454 13.6%

38,066,920 12,617,280 100% 2.95 35.6 $61,48990%   13.8%

Housing Market Assessment

Luis Obispo   ounty  |  2014   San  Luis  OSan   bispo   County   |  2C014  

100%

645      602    

645    

602    

90%

2,063    

80%

80%

70%

70%

2,063    

4,684    

4,684    

Rental Households  

Every few years the County of San Luis Obispo formulates 60% by  Income   60%   Grouping   Cost  Burdened  Rental  Households   a plan gauging the health of the housing market. The f  San  LG uis   Obispo  |  2014    8,551     Cost  Burdened  Rental  Households  City   by  Ioncome   rouping   50%   50%   Consolidated Plan 100%   for 2015-2019 that growth in City  ofound f  San  Luis   Obispo   |  2014     8 ,336       7 ,262      8,336      7,262      136      91     demand and a lack of supply would increase rental rates 100%   40%   40%    136       9 1     90%  yearly. At the same time the County by an average of 6%  4,727      4,727     90%   30%   estimated home prices to increase by 12% yearly, deepening30%   80%    670     the need for affordable housing in the region. Given this 20%   80%   20%    670     expansion in the cost 70%   of living, the County reports that it  2,234      2,234      942     10%   will70%   need approximately 1,050 affordable units by 2019. 10%   60%     The County estimates the best case scenario  942  will leave  645     0%    1,771     60%   Paying  <30%   Households   Paying  $35,000-­‐$50,000   <30%   aHouseholds   shortage of 780 units (or 76.4% of the affordable units  1,771     0%   <$20,000   $20,000-­‐$35,000   $50,000-­‐$75,000   50%   <$20,000   $20,000-­‐$35,000   $35,000-­‐$50,000   $50,000-­‐$75,000   >$75,000    3,645      1,851     Households  Paying  >30%   Households  Paying  >30%   Households  Paying  <30%   required). 50%   Rental  Households  

Grouping

06 | MARKET ANALYSIS

3,645    

40%  1,851    

8,551    

Households Households   Paying  <30%   Pa

Households Households   Paying  >30%   Pa

645     >$75,000  

Households Paying  >30%  

FIGURE 6.5B: COST OF BURDENED RENTAL Looking at the City 30% of San Luis Obispo, the affordability crisis  840     does not look any better. The city’s General Plan (updated Cost   B urdened   R ental   H ouseholds   b y   I ncome   G rouping   Cost   Burdened   Rental  GROUP by  Income  Grouping   HOUSEHOLDS BY INCOME Cost  Burdened   Cost  Burdened   Rental   Households   bHy  ouseholds   Income  Grouping   30%   Rental  Households  by  Income  Grouping    840     San  Luis   O20%   bispo   County   City   of  San  |L  2uis   Obispo  |  2014   San  estimates Luis  Obispo   County   |  2014   2015) that over 50%|  2of014   households pay more City  of  San  Luis   Obispo   014    454     100%   20%  30% of their income for housing. The median price 100%   than  136      91      136      645      602      91      602     10%    454     for a house in the City was $569,000 in 2013, and median 45      204     90%   10%   90%   rental rates (~$1,225/month in 2014) are consistently higher 5,000    2,063     0%    204      2,063     <$20,000   $20,000-­‐$35,000   $35,000-­‐$50,000   $50,000-­‐$75,000   >$75,000   than0%  in the County. This elevated price level is supported 80%   by 80%    670      670     <$20,000   $20,000-­‐$35,000   $35,000-­‐$50,000   $50,000-­‐$75,000   >$75,000   an astonishingly low rental vacancy rate (less than 3% for 70%   70%   5 of the 6 years between 2005  4,684     and 2011), making housing  4,684      942      942     options scarce for people at every income level. As the 60%   60%   Grouping   market stands housing in San Luis Obispo Cost   Burdened   Rental  and Households  by  Income  Grouping   is limited,  8,551      1,771      8,551      1,771     Households   Paying   <O 30%   Households  Paying   <30%   City   oncome   f  San   LG uis   bispo  |  250%   014   Households  Paying  Household <30%   Cost   B urdened   R ental   H ouseholds   b y   I rouping   50%   affordability is only expected to decrease as pricing growth  3,645        3,645      7,262    8,336        7,262      1,851    1,851     Households  Paying   Households   City  of  San  Luis   Obispo   |  >230%   014   Paying  >30%   Households  Paying  Household >30%   100%    91     outpaces income growth.  136     40%  

100%

4,727     90%  

136    4,727      

91    

FIGURE 6.4: AMI CATEGORIES 90%

80% Area  Median  Income  Catagories  

o f  2S,234   an  L  uis  Obispo  |  2014    2County   ,234      670     70%  

80% $70,000.00  

Paying >30%  

45  

5,000

$50,000.00 Paying  >30%   Households  

50%

3,645    

$40,000.00

50%

645    

$47,563.20    3,645      

30%

20%

20%

1,771    

1,851    

$29,727.00    

30%

840    

840    

20%

$17,836.20    

20%

10%

454    

10%

0% $0.00  

100%

<$20,000

840    

454    

454    

10%

0% <$20,000  

1,771     $20,000-­‐$35,000   $20,000-­‐$35,000   $35,000-­‐$50,000   $50,000-­‐$75,000   $50,000-­‐$75,000   >$75,000   Households   Paying  $35,000-­‐$50,000   <30%   <$20,000  

Households Paying  <30%  

204     >$75,000  

Households Paying  >30%  

Households Paying  >30%  

$10,000.00

0%

942    

840    

204     0%  

40%  1,851    

30%

$20,000.00

30%

942    

>$75,000

40% $30,000.00  

40%

10%

70%

645      $59,454.00    60%   $60,000.00   0  551     <$20,000   $20,000-­‐$35,000   $35,000-­‐$50,000   $50,000-­‐$75,000   >$75,000   $20,000-­‐$35,000   $35,000-­‐$50,000   $50,000-­‐$75,000   60%   Households   Paying  <30%  

Paying <30%  

670    

40%

<$20,000 80%  

$20,000-­‐$35,000

$20,000-­‐$35,000

$35,000-­‐$50,000

50%

$35,000-­‐$50,000

$50,000-­‐$75,000

Sources: http://www.slocounty.ca.gov/Assets/PL/Housing/AHS/AHS.pdf 454     http://www.slocog.org/sites/default/files/Regional%20Housing%20Needs%20Plan%20RHNP%20 Final%20Jun_2013.pdf http://factfinder.census.gov/faces/nav/jsf/pages/searchresults.xhtml?ref=geo&refresh=t&tab=map&src=bkmk#none  204     http://www.slocity.org/home/showdocument?id=6639 http://www.codepublishing.com/CA/SanLuisObispo/

204     $50,000-­‐$75,000  

>$75,000

30%

>$75,000

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07 | THE SITE Project Site Location

[page 1 of 2]

FIGURE 7.1: map of project location

The development site is located in the City of San Luis Obispo, California. The city is 9 miles inland of the Pacific Ocean, at the California Highway 1 and 101 interchange. The city is nestled amongst a range of hills and mountain peaks to the north and south, and is adjacent to the California Polytechnic State University (Cal Poly) campus. A generous portion of the cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s housing accommodates college students, leading to high rental rates and a competitive housing market that has driven the city into a shortage of afforable housing options for its residents. In Figure 7.1, the project is located 3 miles south of Downtown San Luis Obispo. The project site is near the intersection of Broad Street and Industrial Way, surrounded mainly by commercial and residential uses. Adjacent Land Uses A unique opportunity to house veterans on this site exists because it is within walking distance of Supportive Services for Veteran Families (SSVF). SSVF is a nationally recognized 501c3 non profit organization tasked with providing services for low income, at risk, and homeless veterans. Their willingness to partner with Sanctuary 6 gives onsite residences access to SSVFâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s wide variety of offerings including specific individual case management, employment counseling, legal assistance, financial mediation, and housing placement/advisory services. The immediate surroundings to the project site offer various amenities to the future residents. The Goodwill and SSVF Offices are located along Industrial Way, and will be a great resource for the veterans in Sanctuary 6. Residents will have minimal issues with transportation to a supermarket for produce as the Vons Grocery Store is located within a walkable distance. The Damon-Garcia Sports Fields offer an outdoor recreation space for public use, and promote a

healthy life balance for residents. Additionally, a number of potential employment opportunities including MindBody and SESLOC Federal Credit Union and a variety of retail establishments are also nearby, as seen in Figure 7.2 and Figure 7.3 on the following page.

FIGURE 7.2: adjacent land uses

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07 | THE SITE

[page 2 of 2]

FIGURE 7.3: map of amenities within 0.5 miles of the project

Development on Broad St. Corridor Broad Street is one of the largest commercial/industrial corridors in the city, but future efforts are planning on making it more residential and pedestrian friendly. The General Plan Housing Element identifies the site as a good location for housing based on proximity to the amenities discussed earlier. Sanctuary 6 would not be the only residential development along Broad Street. Next door to the site, KTGY Architects are developing the Ironworks Apartments. Ironworks is a 46-unit, 100% affordable development, which is set to break ground soon. This project will share a driveway with Sanctuary 6, known as the Broad Street Alley, establishing a shared community between the two projects. Beyond the adjacent lots, the City has the South Broad Street Area Plan. Our site is not within the Plan’s jurisdiction,

but we fulfilled parts of the vision in the hopes of creating a cohesive Downtown to South Broad Street corridor. The plan calls for increased residential use and walkability. The plan also wants mixed-use residential and commercial use on Broad St. so Sanctuary 6 will be one of many mixed-use projects along the corridor. Architecturally, the project fits with the plan’s “railroad style” with angled roofs and choice of materials. By fitting in with the greater context of the Broad St. corridor, Sanctuary 6 will be a part of the San Luis Obispo community. Site Ownership The Sanctuary 6 parcel is owned by the team’s project development partner: People’s Self Help Housing. This eliminates any barriers for property acquisition, and the project is able to be considered as proposed.

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08 | REGULATORY ANALYSIS Entitlements

FIGURE 8.1: city of slo zoning map

Under the City of San Luis Obispo’s most recently updated zoning ordinance (March 2015), the site has a Commercial Service (C-S) base zone with an overlay designation (-S). The C-S zone is intended to support San Luis Obispo’s need for business service users and light retail, and allows a variety of land uses from live-work residences to wholesale commercial entities on the site. After talking with three of the City’s planning commissioners and reviewing the zoning code, our team found that the project does not require a change in zoning. Given the multiuse nature of the proposal and this site’s identification as an agreeable location for housing by the General Plan the project only needs a director’s use permit after review by the planning commission. Current zoning in place, Sanctuary 6 would be eligible for a maximum density of 24 dwelling units/acre. With the site’s total area of 1.36 acres, the base unit cap for the project is 32 units. Additionally, the site has a required setback of 10’ from all parcel boundaries and a maximum height of 35’. Affordable Housing Incentives Underneath AB-744 (CA Govt. Code § 65915), affordable housing projects are eligible for statewide development incentives designed to make them economically feasible. Such incentives include general parking requirement reductions, increases in maximum allowable density, and up to three discretionary concessions. Given the 100% affordable nature of the proposed project, Sanctuary 6 qualifies for for reduced parking (described below), a 35% maximum density bonus, and 3 concessions with discretionary approval by the City of San Luis Obispo. This State mandated incentive structure is reiterated and reinforced within the City of San Luis Obispo’s zoning code (Section 17.90.000-110) with additional suggested concessions including waiver of application/development fees, further density bonuses, relief of other physical restrictions imposed by the existing zoning regulations, direct subsidy, etc. With these affordability incentives, our allowable density raises from 32 to 44 dwelling units making the current proposal of 44 units (31 one bedrooms and 13 studios) allowable. The project will not exceed its maximum height of 35’ or violate the 10’ setback, making the project request no further variance. Design Guidelines The City of San Luis Obispo Residential Design Guidelines provide a number of recommendations to consider when

project site

designing multi-family housing. One is to divide the units into multiple housing pods as opposed to one large, unbroken building. The guidelines also emphasize the importance of visual interests and finishes, such as porches on any streetlevel front doors, and an articulated facade. Sanctuary 6 reflects these suggestions while considering the needs of veterans and the constraints of the site. In addition to this, the Architectural Review Commission would need to approve the project, and has prompted the design team to actively seek out feedback from members of the ARC for such approval. Parking Under the current affordable housing design standards, the City of SLO requires 1 space per studio or one-bedroom unit, and 2 spaces per 2 or 3 bedroom unit. Since Sanctuary 6 has studio and one-bedroom units, a total of 44 parking spaces are required. The project only accommodates 41 parking spaces total, and thus will request a minor parking reduction as one of its 3 concessions under state and as suggested in the City’s affordable housing code. In addition to this, there is a requirement for ample bike parking, which the design has met. Environmental Considerations We are confident Sanctuary 6 is a CEQA exempt development because it is an infill project with 100% affordable housing units. We can predict this because the Ironworks Apartments next door to Sanctuary 6 is a CEQA exempt development, using the basis that it is an infill project with affordable housing units. This will save a lot of time and money on environmental consultants and additional regulations.

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09 | DESIGN CONCEPT Project Vision Sustainability and Connectivity: From the beginning, the design team agreed that the neighboring developments and amenities should support the veteran community. The site was carefully selected based on this criteria. Half-mile proximity of necessities and other services, including groceries, job finding, and postal were what ultimately determined the location of our design. These characteristics, in tandum with the adjacent Ironworks housing development, informed our decision to design with openness and external connectivity in mind. The buildings on the adjacent Ironworks development extend and open up to the Broad Street Alley, creating a space that functions as an extended courtyard. Our intent is to work with this development in order to encourage a dialogue with the Ironworks community. The hope is to establish a visual and physical partnership between the two projects, to communicate that Sanctuary 6 is truly integrated into its neighborhood. The Ironworks development may accommodate the veteransâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; eventual transition from extremely low income, to low income housing. This means creating a series of clear openings and pathways to the street, between the projects as well as limiting the amount of building mass in the pedestrian experience on Broad Street. This also influnced our decision to locate parking away from pedestrian areas.

[page 1 of 12]

Camaraderie and Internal Community: We designed for a balance between the projectâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s openness and its sense of safety and internal community. Research demonstrated the need for a community that could provide outlets for connection as well as privacy. To maintain privacy, the residential units are pushed back from Broad Street with the commercial space serving as a buffer between the traffic of Broad Street and the residents. The entrances to each residential unit are oriented towards the courtyard and connected on each level by a continuous walkway. The walkway allows for convenient circulation between the units. The outdoor courtyard features barbecues, gardens, seating, and picnic tables in order to encourage community amongst the residents. We placed an emphasis on site services for the convenience of the residents. These accommodations range from community-based to more individually tailored spaces. Veterans can come together in the communal kitchen, lounge, gym, rec room, and outdoor gathering spaces. This project also provides for more intimate spaces to allow for counseling and job placement services. By providing communal spaces, as well as more private accommodations, veterans can rely on Sanctuary 6 to become their home.

FIGURE 9.1: OVERHEAD SITE VIEW

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09 | DESIGN CONCEPT

[page 2 of 12]

FIGURE 9.2: render a - BROAD STREET ALLEY

FIGURE 9.3: render B - internal COURTYARD

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09 | DESIGN CONCEPT

[page 3 of 12]

FIGURE 9.4: render C - third floor balcony

FIGURE 9.5: NORTH ELEVATION

FIGURE 9.6: west elevation

FIGURE 9.7: east elevation

FIGURE 9.8: south elevation

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09 | DESIGN CONCEPT

[page 4 of 12]

FIGURE 9.9: Overall site plan

Building D

Building C Building A

SITE PLAN 25’

50’

100’

BROAD

STREET

BROAD STREET ALLEY

Building B

Project Site The Sanctuary 6 residential units are organized within four buildings which enclose a courtyard. Three of the four buildings (Buildings A, C, and D) contain both community space and two floors of residents. The fourth building contains only residential units. (Building B) Along Broad Street there are plans to be a separate coldshell commercial building project owned by People’s Self Help Housing. Since Sanctuary 6 shares a street with the neighboring development, vehicular parking and access are wrapped around to the back of the site. This both mimic the neighbors layout and creates a more friendly relationship with the Iron Works project.

System, PG&E, CitiGroup Inc., American Electric Power, Intel Corporation Anthem, Sprint, Amazon, Starbucks, Dollar General, CVS Health, Veterans United Home Loans, Solarcity, and Hertz Equipment Rental. With organizations like these as tenants, the local job opportunities for the veteran residents increases. This encourages residents that may normally struggle with mobility or transportation to have the chance to work and develop a broader skill set. In addition, it provides a close workspace within their community that they can potentially work, volunteer, or shop comfortably.

Commercial Inclusion The commercial building on the southwest side of the site will serve as a streetfront to the units; protecting it from the traffic along Broad Street. People’s Self Help Housing has plans to build the commercial site as a separate legal entity from Sanctuary 6, using different sources of funding as well. The building will contain office spaces for tenants to rent out. The commercial site will interact with Sanctuary 6, therefore outlines of the building have been presented. A potential tenant is the neighboring entity, Iron Works who is currently seeking additional office space. Other potential veteran friendly clients include CSC (Computer Sciences Corporation), AT&T, Verizon, GE, Devita, State Farm, Capital One Financial Corporation, Army & Air Force Exchange

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09 | DESIGN CONCEPT

[page 5 of 12]

FIGURE 9.10A: unit layout plan - Floors 2 + 3 FLOOR 2 & 3

BROAD STREET ALLEY

Building D

25’

100’

Building B

BROAD

STREET

Building A

50’

Building C

FIGURE 9.10B: unit layout plan - Ground Floor GROUND FLOOR

BROAD STREET ALLEY

Building D

2

3

4

1

BROAD

STREET

5

16

1 2 3 4 5 17 6 7

Commercial Space 6 7 Storage Laundry 16 Restroom Gym Rec Room Workshop + Lockers

1

Commercial Space

2 3 4 5 6 7

Storage Building A Laundry8 9 11 Restroom 10 Gym Rec Room Workshop + Lockers

8 9 10 11 12 13 14

Lobby Building C Leasing Office Mailbox 15 Event Space Kitchen Lounge Storage

1 Commercial Space 15 8 Lobby 1 Commercial Space 9 Leasing Office 2 Storage 16 10 Mailbox 2 Laundry Storage 3 17 11 Event Space 3 Restroom Laundry 4 12 Kitchen 4 Gym Restroom 5 13 Lounge 5 Rec GymRoom 6 14 Storage 6 Workshop Rec Room + Lockers 7 7 Workshop + Lockers 15 Counceling Center 8 Lobby Unit 8 Layout Lobby Office 9 Leasing 16 Bicycle Racks 9 Mailbox Leasing Office 10 17 other RefuseinEnclosure 10units Mailbox 11 Event Space The are stacked atop each order to provide 11 Event Space 12 Kitchen efficiency in construction. The unit types are mixed within 1 Bedroom Apartment 12 Lounge Kitchen 13 each of 13 studio apartments Studio Apartment 13 building. Lounge 14 Storage Sanctuary 6 consists and one bedroom apartments. Stairs are located near the 1431 Storage 15 of Counceling Center There are two elevators located on ends each building. 15 Counceling Center both the north-east and south-west corners of the residential 16 Bicycle Racks part the site. This is to allow several points of entry for the 16ofRefuse Bicycle Racks 17 Enclosure residents. 17 Refuse Enclosure 1 Bedroom Apartment 1Studio Bedroom Apartment Apartment The apartment entries are on the courtyard side of each Studio Apartment

25’

50’

100’

Building B

12

13

14

16

Counceling Center Bicycle Racks Refuse Enclosure 1 Bedroom Apartment Studio Apartment

FIGURE 9.11: UNit layout aERIAL VIEW

building to encourage interaction and maintain privacy for the resident community. All of the buildings are connected on the upper floors by a continuous walkway.

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17


09 | DESIGN CONCEPT

[page 6 of 12]

FIGURE 9.12: render d - recreation space looking into courtyard

Community Spaces In designing Sanctuary 6, the main goal was to create not only a home, but a community for the residents. In support of this goal, the project contains various shared spaces for the residents to connect with one another and call their own. On the first floor of every building (except Building B, which is comprised solely of residential units) there are community spaces, which can be occupied by group meetings, activities, leisure, and large open spaces for group events. There will be storage rooms where residents can keep board games, cards, and anything they wish to be communal for everyone. Building A hosts the leasing office, main lobby, and mailroom (8,9,10) and will serve as the front door to the project. In addition to these features, there is a large event space (11) with an adjacent full-size kitchen (12) for the residents to use at any time. This space is intended to create opportunities for community events, dinners, and informal lunches. Adjacent to this spaces is the resident lounge (13) in which the residents can hang out, use computers, watch sports, but above all interact and develop relationships with each other. Connected to this space is storage space. Building B hosts only residential units, to accommodate residents who would prefer the ease of access that the ground floor provides. Additionally, these residents are made

more private through the inclusion of trellised front porches. Central to the project is the project is the shared courtyard in which the interior community spaces can spill out. Furnished with barbecues, seating, and landscaping features, this space is intended to become the axis on which the whole site centers itself. All community spaces face inward to the courtyard in order to focus on the community within. Building C also contains residential units as well as the counseling offices (15). The counseling offices are pulled away from the alley, and nested within the community in order to create a welcoming yet protected venue for our development partners to provide services and for the veterans to receive assistance in various areas. There are various scales of counseling rooms to serve for both individual and group counseling spaces. Building D serves as the primary center of recreation and activity for the residents. A workshop (7) with tool storage, a recreational game room (6), and a fitness gym (5) all provide opportunities for engagement and support for the individual residentsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; interests. The recreation room is furnished with activities such as ping pong and billiards. The gym will provide workout equipment for the residents.Also located within this building, adjacent to the elevator is the laundry facility.

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09 | DESIGN CONCEPT

[page 7 of 12]

FIGURE 9.13: render E - Community space looking into courtyard

FIGURE 9.14: Program breakdown Community Shared Space Building A Building B Building C Building D Total Community

2,659 sqft 0 sqft 1,060 sqft 2,140 sqft 5,859 sqft

Residential Space One-Bedroom Units (31) @495 sqft ea. Studio Units (13) @445 sqft ea. Total Residential

15,345 sqft 5,785 sqft 21,130 sqft

Total SQFT

26,989 sqft

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09 | DESIGN CONCEPT FIGURE 9.15A: typical studio plan

[page 8 of 12]

FIGURE 9.15B: typical 0ne bedroom plan

BEDROOM LIVING LIVING

CLOSET

BEDROOM

KITCHEN

CLOSET

CLOSET

CLOSET

KITCHEN

BATHROOM

BATHROOM CLOSET

1 BDRM PLAN

STUDIO PLAN

495 s.f.

445 s.f.

1’

Unit Plans

4’

6’0”

1’

10’

6’0”

4’

Studio Apartments The studio style apartment is designed to have a more open layout. (Figure 09.15A). The bedroom space is separated C from the kitchen space by a wall but open to the living space. This connectivity allows for ease of movement. There are a total of 13 studios mixed into each building consisting of 445 square feet each. 6’0”

6’0”

Each unit contains a living room, kitchen, bedroom, bathroom and storage spaces. (Figure 09.15). Each apartment kitchen is furnished with a stove, oven, refrigerator, sink and built in cabinetry. Each apartment has two large 6 foot by 6 foot windows for daylighting. This also provides a connection to the outdoors and awareness of surroundings for each resident. In both unit types, the exterior walls closest to the bedroom are set back to increase privacy and mitigate exposure to sound. Exterior to each residence is a patio space to encourage connection between residents and create a sense of greater ownership for the resident within the larger community. 36”

19”

10’

One Bedroom Apartments The one bedroom apartments are designed to have a separation of living and sleeping. (Figure 09.15B). This layout allows for increased privacy as well as a larger kitchen, living, and bedroom spaces. This layout also contains more closet space. There are 31 one bedroom apartments consisting of 495 square feet each. 36”

48”

Material Use TUB CLEARANCE Each apartment has wood-like marmoleum flooring. This Accessibility and Adaptability flooring type is both aesthetically pleasing and easy to All units in this project are constructed to follow the A maintain and replace. It is also pet-friendly for veterans with SINK CLEARANCEAmericans with Disabilities Act Accessibility Guidlines service animals or family pets. The counter-tops consist of (ADAAG)Dand California Building Code (CBC) accessibility bamboo butcher-block which is both durable and hard. As requirements. At least 5% of the units will be constructed to many materials as possible will be locally sourced. Residents accessibility standards with all other units constructed to be will also have the opportunity to customize their space with adaptable. This includes the installation of handrail blocking wall paint, artwork and furniture when desired. within the bathrooms, appropriate spacing of plumbing features, and the installation of adaptable cabinetry in the 1 BDRM PLAN STUDIO PLAN kitchen. 30”

36”

12”

60”

60”

48”

30”

30”

36”

48”

18”

36”

18”

18”

19”

36”

18”

495 s.f.

445 s.f.

1’

4’

10’

1’

4’

10’

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09 | DESIGN CONCEPT

1 BDRM PLAN

STUDIO PLAN

495 s.f. [page 9 of 12]

445 s.f.

1’

4’

FIGURE 9.16A: STUDIO FLOORPLAN 6’0”

1’

10’

4’

10’

FIGURE 9.16B: one-bedroom FLOORPLAN

6’0”

6’0”

6’0”

C

36”

36” 19”

48” 36”

12” 60”

60”

48”

30”

30”

A

30”

TUB CLEARANCE

36”

48”

SINK CLEARANCE

D 18”

36”

18”

18”

19”

36”

18”

1 BDRM PLAN

STUDIO PLAN

495 s.f.

445 s.f.

1’

4’

FIGURE 9.17A: STUDIO INTERIORS

10’

1’

4’

10’

FIGURE 9.17B: ONE BEDROOM INTERIORS

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09 | DESIGN CONCEPT Sustainable Practices The LEED (Leadership in Energy & Environmental Design) v4 Building Design and Construction for Homes and Multifamily Lowrise is a rating system started by the U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC) to transform the way we construct and operate buildings. USGBC is a non-profit organization committed to creating a sustainable future in the design and construction industry. The LEED rating system focuses on eight main categories made up of prerequisites and credits. These categories are Location and Transportation, Sustainable Sites, Water Efficiency, Energy and Atmosphere, Materials and Resources, Indoor Environmental Quality, Innovation, and Regional Priority. There are four levels of certification depending on the amount of points the project achieves; Certified, Silver, Gold, and Platinum. Sanctuary 6 is designed to be LEED Platinum with a total of 84.5 points out of a possible 110. We focused on designing a building that was worthy of housing veterans as well as providing a healthy and sustainable environment for the community and planet. In California, as well as the United States, energy, water, and waste disposal are topics of priority and concern. In our project, we focused on providing solar panels for clean energy generation, using native landscaping to eliminate outdoor irrigation, selecting low flow fixtures to reduce indoor water usage, and controlling waste from construction to occupation. A total of 8,870 sqft of solar panels will be attached to the roof and will provide approximately 254,075 kWh per year of energy. Greywater and rainwater collection will be used to water the landscape. Occupants can enjoy walking through a landscape of plants native to the San Luis Obispo area, while being a part of a drought resistant environment. Indoor water fixtures have a WaterSense label and specified flow rates. Toilets will have a rate of 1.28 gal/flush, faucets 1.5 gal/min, and showers 1.75 gal/ min. Washing machines will also be Energy Star qualified. Approximately 60% of construction waste will be diverted from landfills and recycled/salvaged for reuse. After occupation, recycling, composting, and general waste containers will be provided. By focusing on optimizing energy, water and waste, our project will educate the surrounding community on green building practices and create a healthy environment for the veterans. Image Sources http://www.ceiarchitecture.com/2015/08/the-misconceptions-of-integrated-project-delivery/ http://www.slideshare.net/MobilityLab/leedtransportation-symposium-chris-marshall http://www.michaelheacock.com/cate-pool-facility/ https://www3.epa.gov/watersense/ http://www.rotorooter.com/rotogreen/products/ http://www.relenergy.com/resources/water-saving-devices/low-flow-faucet-aerators/ http://www.unitedrsm.com/services/ http://www.desertvalleydisposal.com/business/commercial_recycling.htm https://www.glasdon4recyclingbins.com/ https://www.waterfiltersfast.com/16x25x4-MERV-13-Pleated-Air-Filter-3PK-155x245x3625--ActualSize_p_12453.html http://californiaballet.org/accessibility/ http://www.houzz.com/photos/1027584/Favorite-California-Native-Plants-I-Design-With-mediterranean-landscape-san-francisco

[page 10 of 12]

FIGURE 9.18: LEED CATEGORY FOCUSes Integrative Process INTEGRATIVE STRATEGIES Initial formation of the project team leads to cost-effective integrated solutions. Location and Transportation SITE SELECTION Location on previously developed land and walkable to eight diverse uses. Sustainable Sites RAINWATER MANAGEMENT Low impact management of water with the use of pavers and bioswales. Water Efficiency LOW FLOW FIXTURES Efficient indoor water fixtures to save water. Energy and Atmosphere SOLAR POWER Energy generated from photovoltaic panels on roof. Materials and Resources WASTE DIVERTED Recycling program keeps waste from landfills during and after construction. Indoor Environmental Quality CONTAMINANT CONTROL Reduces airborne contaminants through source control and removal. Innovation

DESIGN FOR ADAPTABILITY All units are capable of being ADA accessible.

Regional Priority OUTDOOR WATER USE Native landscaping will eliminate the use of potable water for irrigation purposes.

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09 | DESIGN CONCEPT

[page 11 of 12]

FIGURE 9.19: SUSTAINABLE FEATURES SITE PLAN

Building D

Building A

Building B

Building C

Privacy and Acoustics The large willow trees in the courtyard provide a natural screen from the ground floor to the units above. In order to create a comfortable space for the veterans, we have applied specific insulation types to decrease noise pollution and provide privacy. Although the units are mostly hardwood floors for pet friendliness, the floor is carpeted in order to decrease any noise made by walking around. The curtains provide privacy and a sound barrier. Additionally, GreenGlue and open cell spray-on insulation is used as an inexpensive way to isolate the units acoustically.

FIGURE 9.20: LEED POINTS BREAKDOWN LEED V4 BD+C: HOMES AND MULTIFAMILY LOWRISE Platinum Level (80-110) 02 / 02 Integrative Process 12.5 / 15 Location and Transportation 07 / 07 Sustainable Sites 07 / 12 Water Efficiency 33 / 38 Energy and Atmosphere 4.5 / 10 Materials and Resources 8.5 / 16 Indoor Environmental Quality 06 / 06 Innovation 04 / 04 Regional Priority 84.5 / 110 Total

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09 | DESIGN CONCEPT Landscape Strategy All of the plants within the landscape are native to San Luis Obispo. Along Building A and Building B, areas closer to the neighboring development, there is a community garden space for residents to participate in group activities involving growth and care within their home. The commercial building is fronted by the Juncus, a plant native to San Luis Obispo that fits in perfectly within the housing landscape context around the neighborhood. When turning the corner off Broad Street, the California Buckeye tree rests in the entrance to the outdoor community space with white flowers to be visually peaceful and pleasing to residents. There is Carizo Grass placed on the edge of the buildings to create a soft appeal to the complex and welcome residents in after turning in from Broad Street. Along the pathway between Sanctuary 6 and The Ironworks development, there are two 40â&#x20AC;&#x2122; bioswales. They are placed at the lowest part of the site in order to collect maximum run off water.

[page 12 of 12]

plants surround the building units, only with breaks to create an entryway into the communal greenspace or into the individual buildings. The White Sage creates a calm atmosphere within the project. Willow trees are placed in the center of the courtyard. Seeing the natural movement of a large tree will provide a sense of a calm and tranquil environment. Coast Live Oaks are placed on either end of the the courtyard space, both with adjacent picnic tables, BBQ areas, and a horseshoe pit, to provide a natural space for shade, relaxation, and socialization within the community. In addition, the heights of the trees provide some privacy for the units and balconies above. California Buckeye trees surround the units, making it a recognizable complex within San Luis Obispo. When leaving the site along the commercial building and out on Broad St. there are two large Willows alongside the Carizo Grass.

Using Sage provides a delicate smell when residents enter the complex, while the light exteriors of Jimson Weed and Chamise are placed in the first open green space. The three

FIGURE 9.21: LANDSCAPING PLAN

Building D

Building A

Building B

Building C

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10 | RESIDENT SERVICES FIGURE 10.1: SErvices site plan

Building D

Building A

Building B

Building C

Transportation Our project provides fourty-one parking spaces. Since many low-income veterans do not always have personal vehicular transportation, the site has access to two SLO Transit bus stops that are both within walking distance of the site. One to the north on Broad Street, and the other to the south, these stops serve Route 3 to downtown. This route has a stop a block away from The VA San Luis Obispo Community Based Outpatient Clinic, and directly in front of the San Luis Obispo County Drug and Alcohol Services, which provides outreach programs designed for veterans. The City of San Luis Obispo has alternative modes of transportation available, especially to veterans. In addition to the SLO Transit bus, the non-profit organization RideOn provides a Veterans Express Shuttle which provides a ride from one’s doorstep to the VA clinic in San Luis Obispo or Santa Maria for $3. The VA also provides an additional bus from the Santa Maria clinic to other clinics in Southern California.

become and/or remain stably housed.” These resources focus on housing, job training and counseling. Support groups can reduce the feeling of being alone during this process and create a more positive atmosphere. Unfortunately, approximately 11-20% of the veteran population who served in Operations Iraqi Freedom and Enduring Freedom suffer from Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD). Animal companions reduce some of the effects that war can have on the brain. The Woods Humane Society located in San Luis Obispo has waived all adoption fees for veteran and active military families. Additionally, veterans with documented cases of PTSD are also able to apply for a trained service dog from the non-profit organization, New Life K-9s. The apartments are designed with animal companions in mind. Employment

Sanctuary 6 is also designed to encourage bicycling. The building has two large bicycle storage areas that lead to preexisting bicycle pathways. This fulfills the City’s Bicycle Transportation Plan for San Luis Obispo residents to have access to high quality bicycle infrastructure.

As veterans return from active duty, readjusting to civilian life can make otherwise normal functions difficult. Good community design can ease the adjustment, especially regarding finding employment. Beyond the project scope, our team has been in contact with several members within Community Action Partnership of San Luis Obispo, Inc. (CAPSLO). Organizations within CAPSLO including the SSVF and Goodwill, provide job training and employment opportunities to veterans.

Support

Other

The design of Sanctuary 6 encourages a strong sense of community by providing a central green space where residents can interact with one another. A sense of safety within the project is created by surrounding the internal courtyard with the residential buildings. Sanctuary 6 also has access to veterans’ services. The Supportive Services for Veteran Families (SSVF) is located to the east of our site. The SSVF’s mission is to provide “the necessary services to eligible veterans and their families that will enable them to

After discussing the project with veterans, it was brought to our attention how beneficial a haircut can be. While serving in the military there are strict rules about the style of ones hair. Paying for a haircut is a luxury many homeless veterans cannot afford. The San Luis Obispo Beauty College has agreed to provide 25 haircut vouchers per month for our residents. Additionally, the beauty school already has a program for veterans interested in learning more about the industry.

||||||||||||| P.27


11 | DEVELOPMENT

[page 1 of 2]

Construction Typology

Construction Cost Estimate

Construction of Sanctuary 6 includes five buildings and three occupancies. All efforts will be made to source materials locally and sustainably. Cost assumptions include that structures will be type V-A construction. The general material layout of the building is a fire-rated wood frame with an exterior skin of stucco and galvanized metal panels with standard internal furnishings.

The cost estimate to construct Sanctuary 6 is $9,909,030. This averages to $196.46 per square foot of building area and $173,104 per unit. This price consists of all materials, labor, overhead, and profit attributed to the four buildings and site area. Part of the land acquisition deal stipulates that all construction laborers will be part of a labor union increasing costs. All costing analysis is preliminary and will be further refined when project goes to bid. The RSMeans Online square foot estimator provided all pricing. Pricing figures are based on a 2011 model and are subsequently inflated to Q2 2016 numbers. Sanctuary 6 also assumes a premium for sustainable materials; despite their lower life-cycle cost, these materials tend to cost more to install than their less environmentally friendly counterparts. Figure 11.1 and Figure 11.2 outline the cost estimate in further detail.

FIGURE 11.1: CONDENSED COST ESTIMATE Building Type: Location: Story Count: Story Height (L.F.): Building SF: Lot Area SF: Labor Type: Basement Included: Data Release: Unit Count Cost per Unit Cost Per Square Foot:

Apartment, 1-3 Story with Wood Siding / Wood Frame San Luis Obispo, CA 3 11 38,769 sqft 59242 sqft STD No Year 2011 (Inflated to 2016) 44 $173,104 $196.46 / sqft

Building Hard Costs:

$7,616,562

Construction Timeline The construction of Sanctuary 6 will take approximately 14 months to complete. Construction will start once all permits are complete and the Notice to Proceed is issued. The four buildings will have staggered start dates to prevent the various trades from interfering with each other. This also allows subcontractors to limit their time on site thereby reducing overhead cost. For further details, refer to the schedule on Figure 11.3.

FIGURE 11.2: EXPANDED COST ESTIMATE

||||||||||||| P.28


5 Excav

Excavation

40 30 30 35 40 35 35

MEP Rough In

Roofing

Insulation

Drywall

Openings and Fixtures

Interior Finishes

Exterior Finishes

10 10

Exterior Lighting

Landscaping

||||||||||||| P.29

Final Clean

Punch List 5

5

45

Asphalt Pavement

10

10

Finish Grade

Post Construction

40

Sidewalks, Curbs, and Gutters

Site Work

50

20

15

Floor and Wall Framing

Foundations

Building Construction

Electrical

Plumbing

Underground Utilities

Aug

Sep

Foundations

Elec

15 Plumbing

3 RG

Rough Grading 5 Ret Wall 20

2 C&G

Clear and Grub

Retaining Walls

5 Temp

5 Mobi

20

340

Jul

Duration 2016

Temporary Utilities/Structures

Mobilization

Pre-Construction

Total Project Duration

Construction Task

FIGURE 11.3: development timeline Jan

Roofing

Rough MEP

Nov Dec

Framing

Oct

2017

Insul

Feb

Drywall

Mar

Aug

FG Ext Light Land

Sep Oct

Pavement

Exterior Finishes

Interior Finishes

Jul

Sidewalks

Openings

Apr Jun

Clean

Punch

Nov

11 | DEVELOPMENT [page 2 of 2]


12 | FINANCING STRUCTURE Overview Diverse sources of funding are utilized for development of Sanctuary 6. Some of the sources include rental subsidies, grants, loans, and 9% federal tax credits. The highlights of the financial structure are as follows: 1. The loan-to-value ratio of the construction loan is 64%. This ratio satisfies the lending requirement of our construction loan lender (Bank of America). 2. The debt-coverage ratio is 1.2 for the first five years of operation, and it increases to 1.3 for the remaining ten years. This ratio also satisfies the lending requirements of the construction loan lender. We have received a term sheet from Bank of America. 3. Veterans Affairs Supportive Housing (VASH) project-based rental subsidies are used for operations. The VASH subsidies are given out by the Housing Authority of San Luis Obispo (HASLO). HASLO also has provided a verbal commitment to provide the VASH vouchers. Additionally, HASLO has also verbally committed to provide Section 8 housing vouchers as needed. 4. There have been extensive conversations with the Building Department regarding funds to be received from the City. Tyler Corey, SLO’s Housing Programs Manager, has verbally agreed to committing $800,000 from the City’s in lieu funds. 5. Sanctuary 6 has finished the California Tax Credit Allocation Committee (CTCAC) application used for Federal Tax Credits. The current score of the development is 138 the required score. Since a diverse source of funds are used, the likelihood of the development receiving the full amount of tax credits we applied for is high. More importantly, not all the allocated tax credits Sanctuary 6 qualifies for are used, increasing the probability of success. In addition, the tiebreaker score was calculated to be 31.5%, a fairly high score for projects in the area.

[page 1 of 5]

as a separate legal entity under People’s Self Help Housing. No funding for Sanctuary 6 will be used for this building, and will have no effect on the performance of the project from an investment standpoint. People’s Self Help Housing has chosen to separate the two projects, and has agreed to write a letter of intent to lease out the commercial development to the neighboring project, Ironworks. The Supportive Services for Veteran Families (SSVF) program has committed to providing the necessary services in the community centers located on the property including Legal Services, Health Services, and Job Assistance. In the case that SSVF cannot fulfill the assistance needed, People’s Self-Help Housing (PSHH) will provide the services in the community centers. PSHH’s memorandum of understanding spells out all the services that they will provide.

FIGURE 12.1: FUNDING SOURCES

To summarize, Sanctuary 6’s financial operations are robust and incorporates letters of support from various participants and a wide range of funding sources. To be conservative, a sensitivity analysis is included to illustrate the possible outcomes if not all units can be filled with at-risk veterans. As a low probability case, we assume that the VASH subsidies will be discontinued. In this case, we intend to change the unit mix (50% AMI) and apply for Section 8 rental choice subsidies. Again, with these changes, we show that our financial operations are robust. 50% AMI units are utilized because that is the threshold to qualify for Section 8 rental subsidies. In fact, increasing the unit mix to 50% AMI actually increases our annual net operating income. As outlined in the architecture stage, the commercial building is being developed separately from the core residential component of the project. This building will be developed

||||||||||||| P.30


12 | FINANCIAL STRUCTURE Predevelopment Sources People’s Self Help Housing has acquired the project site for a cost of $1,600,000, stated as the land acquisition cost. Sanctuary 6 expects the local fees and other predevelopment costs to equal $780,625; these fees are also in accordance with our developer. Pre-development Loan Program (PDLP): $800,000 The Pre-development Loan Program offers a maximum loan of $800,000 with 3% simple annual interest on the outstanding balance for a maximum of 2 years. Sanctuary 6 intends to use the loan strictly for acquisition of the site, as the program specifies that the loan must be used on land acquisition and other predevelopment expenses. The California Department of Housing and Community Development gives priority to projects in rural regions, and based on the need for affordable housing in the area, thus our project is eligible for this program. San Luis Obispo County Housing Trust Fund: $1,580,625 The SLO County Trust Fund’s mission is to increase the availability of very low, low, and moderate-income housing in San Luis Obispo County. Loans acquired via this program can be used for site acquisition, pre-development costs, construction costs, or rehabilitation of low-income sites. The Housing Trust Fund’s Loan conditions specify loan terms of up to 5 years, with 5-7% fixed interest rates, and loan fees of 0.5-2%. A maximum of $2,000,000 is available per project from this fund.

[page 2 of 5]

to satisfy this requirement through in-lieu fees. The housing impact fee is imposed on each project as a condition for new development projects within the county. Both of these fees are deposited into San Luis Obispo City’s Affordable Housing Fund (AHF). Based on the project’s goal of providing extensive affordable housing for extremely-low income Veterans, an estimated $800,000 from AHF is used to allocate towards construction costs in agreement with city ordinance. HOME Funds: $500,000 The City of San Luis Obispo receives grant funds under HOME Investment Partnership to financially help communitybased projects that provide affordable housing to benefit lowincome households and homeless populations. The project lines up with the fund’s objectives, therefore Sanctuary 6 is confident to receive $500,000 from HOME Funds. Construction Loan: $8,762,825 A construction loan will be utilized for a term of 14 months (with a 6 month extension option) to cover the remaining costs of the project. After discussing terms with Jennifer Gil, our lending agent at Bank of America, it was decided that Sanctuary 6 would need a loan of $8,762,825 with a floating index interest rate of LIBOR + 2%. A stipulation placed upon the loan is that the project must keep a Loan to Value (LTV) of less than 64%. After Sanctuary 6 receives a certificate of occupancy, the construction loan and interest will be paid off, and permanent financing sources will be enforced.

FIGURE 12.2: CONSTRUCTION LOAN

Construction Sources CDBG: $250,000 The City of San Luis Obispo offers a City Development Block Grant Program that provides communities with resources to address a wide range of community development needs. CDBG grants are awarded by the US Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) and provide funds for projects and programs that benefit low and moderateincome households, businesses and community-based organizations. CDBG funds may be used for acquisition of real property for affordable housing, construction or rehabilitation of certain public facilities, etc. Sanctuary 6 has received a verbal agreement from Housing Programs Manager, Tyler Corey for $250,000 from CDBG to allocate towards the construction of off-site improvements. Affordable Housing Fund: $800,000 In-lieu fees and housing impact fees in San Luis Obispo County were created with the intent to subsidize very low, low, moderate income, and workforce households. The In-lieu fees are generated through the inclusionary housing requirement for each development project and has the option

||||||||||||| P.3 1


12 | FINANCING STRUCTURE

[page 3 of 5]

Permanent Financing Upon the completion of construction, remaining predevelopment and construction financing sources will be transferred into various methods of permanent financing. The vast majority of these funds will be received via the sale of federal low income housing tax credits. Low Income Housing Tax Credits (LIHTC) 9%: $11,003,450 Sanctuary 6’s permanent financing relies heavily on federal Low Income Housing Tax Credits. $2,000,000 of LIHTC will be used during the construction portion of the project, while the remaining $9,003,450 will be sold for permanent financing. Sanctuary 6 is extremely competitive for LIHTC due to its many amenities, serving veterans, being the only Single-Room Occupancy (SRO) development applying, and being an 100% extremely low-income development. Due to the location of our site within a Small Area Difficult to Develop (SADD) area, Sanctuary 6 qualifies for a 30% increase in the eligible basis as well. Sanctuary 6 has voluntarily excluded a total of $1,557,027 additional tax credits for which it has qualified. As discussed with Ken Triguiero, the Executive Vice President and CFO of PSSH, credits are expected to have a market value price of $1.05 to $1.13 per credit. Using a conservative value of $1.05 per credit, the total equity value equals $11,004,619. Veteran Housing and Homeless Prevention Program: $500,000 The California Housing Financial Agency in collaboration with the California Department of Veteran Affairs received a bond to support the needs for homeless/at-risk veterans and their families. The program has a goal of distributing $75 million annually towards housing developments for veterans. More specifically, VHHP has guaranteed 50% of the funds to serve extremely low-income veterans. Due to the fact that Sanctuary Six will be providing 100% units towards extremely low income veterans, it is estimated to receive a $500,000 loan at 3% fixed interest through VHHP. San Luis Obispo County Housing Trust Fund: $440,000 San Luis Obispo’s Housing Trust Fund also provides a loan program where residual cash flows generated from the project can be used to pay back the loan. In the case of there not being enough cash flow after debt services, the amount will simply accrue. Our development qualifies for $10,000 per unit, for a total of $440,000 under this program. Permanent Loan: $2,000,000 As a stake of equity in the project and in line with our developer’s plans, a new 15-year permanent loan of $2,000,000 will be taken out to fund the project’s operating costs, with fixed interest of 5%.

||||||||||||| P.32


12 | FINANCING STRUCTURE

[page 4 of 5]

Rent Structure The Department of Housing and Urban Development has determined housing to be affordable if a household spends 30% or less of their annualized income on the provision of housing. Furthermore, the State of California set income categories that are used when determining eligibility for a wide variety of government housing assistance programs based upon a percentage of average median income (AMI). Of these designations, extremely-low income is the lowest at 30% AMI and very-low income is the median at 50% AMI. The following rent schedule is representative of the project rents that can be charged without exceeding the 30% affordability threshold for each of the income categories being served by Sanctuary 6. The rental subsidies are calculated using the 2016 Fair Market Rent for San Luis Obispo. Sanctuary 6â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s rent structure will utilize extremely-low rent needed to qualify for the various funding sources listed above. With 13 Efficiency units and 31 single bedroom units, the first year annual rent revenue is $203,868. Projected rental income is to grow at 2% annually. Rental Subsidy There is an estimated total of 130 homeless veterans in San Luis Obispo County according to an SSVF survey. The rental subsidies are calculated using the 2016 Fair Market Rent for San Luis Obispo. Due to low vacancy rates, there is little or no incentive for landlords to rent to low income tenants. These conditions have lead to a surplus of rental subsidy vouchers in the county. The difficulty for impoverished people to find housing in the county has led to the need for additional low-income housing units in the area. The surplus of housing vouchers has increased the feasibility of the project. Furthermore, the project proves to remain sustainable under the sensitivity analysis of filling only 20% (26 veterans) of San Luis Obispo Countyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s homeless veterans in the complex. Projected income from rental subsidies is $278,604 for the first year, growing at 2% thereafter.

FIGURE 12.3: RENT STRUCTURE

FIGURE 12.4: RENTAL SUBSIDY

||||||||||||| P.33


[page 5 of 5]

FIGURE 12.5: PRO FORMA

12 | FINANCING STRUCTURE

||||||||||||| P.34


13 | APPENDIX

[page 1 of 48]

| LEED PROJECT CHECKLIST

P.36

| DETAILED COST ESTIMATE

P.37

| FINANCE STRUCTURE

P.53

| LETTERS OF SUPPORT

P.63

||||||||||||| P.35


13 | APPENDIX

[page 2 of 48]

FIGURE 13.1: LEED Project checklist LEED v4 for Building Design and Construction: Homes and Multifamily Lowrise Project Checklist Y

2

?

Project Name: Date:

N Credit

2

Integrative Process

12.5 0 2.5 Location and Transportation Y

Prereq

Floodplain Avoidance

EA PRESCRIPTIVE PATH (continued)

15

Credit

Heating & Cooling Distribution Systems

3

Required

Credit

Efficient Domestic Hot Water Equipment

3

Credit

Lighting

2

Credit

High Efficiency Appliances

2

Credit

Renewable Energy

4

PERFORMANCE PATH Credit

LEED for Neighborhood Development Location

15

PRESCRIPTIVE PATH 8

7

0

Credit

Site Selection

8

Credit

Compact Development

3

4.5

0.5

Credit

Community Resources

2

Y

2

Credit

Access to Transit

2

Y

3 1.5

0 Sustainable Sites Prereq

Construction Activity Pollution Prevention

Required

2.5

Y

Prereq

No Invasive Plants

Required

2

2

Credit

Heat Island Reduction

2

3

Credit

Rainwater Management

3

8.5

2

Credit

Non-Toxic Pest Control

2

Y

0

5 Water Efficiency

Y

Prereq

Water Metering

Credit

Total Water Use

12 Required PERFORMANCE PATH 12 PRESCRIPTIVE PATH

3

3

4

33

0

0

7

Y

7

Sanctuary 6 4/13/2016

Certified Tropical Wood

Required Required

Prereq

Durability Management

1

Credit

Durability Management Verification

1

4

Credit

Environmentally Preferable Products

4

0.5

Credit

Construction Waste Management

3

Credit

Material Efficient Framing

2

16

Prereq

Ventilation

Required

Y

Prereq

Combustion Venting

Required

Y

Prereq

Garage Pollutant Protection

Required

Y

Prereq

Radon-Resistant Construction

Required

Y

Prereq

Air FIltering

Required

Y

Prereq

Environmental Tobacco Smoke

Required

Y

Prereq

Compartmentalization

Required

Credit

Enhanced Ventilation

3

Credit

Contaminant Control

2

Credit

Balancing of Heating and Cooling Distribution Systems

3

Indoor Water Use

6

1

Credit

Outdoor Water Use

4

2

5 Energy and Atmosphere

10

Prereq

7.5 Indoor Environmental Quality

Credit

0

5.5 Materials and Resources

2 3

38

1

Credit

Enhanced Compartmentalization

1

Y

Prereq

Minimum Energy Performance

Required

2

Credit

Enhanced Combustion Venting

2

Y

Prereq

Energy Metering

Required

2

Credit

Enhanced Garage Pollutant Protection

2

Y

Prereq

Education of the Homeowner, Tenant or Building Manager

Required

0.5

Credit

Low Emitting Products

3

29

6

PERFORMANCE PATH 24

5

Credit

Annual Energy Use BOTH PATHS

2.5

0

0

Innovation

Y

Prereq

Preliminary Rating

6 Required

5

Credit

Efficient Hot Water Distribution System

5

5

Credit

Innovation

5

2

Credit

Advanced Utility Tracking

2

1

Credit

LEED AP Homes

1

1

Credit

Active Solar Ready Design

1

1

Credit

HVAC Start-Up Credentialing

1

PRESCRIPTIVE PATH Y

4

0

0

Regional Priority

4

1

Credit

Regional Priority: Annual Energy Use

1

Required

1

Credit

Regional Priority: Active solar-ready design

1

Prereq

Home Size

Credit

Building Orientation for Passive Solar

3

1

Credit

Regional Priority: Rainwater Management

1

Credit

Air Infiltration

2

1

Credit

Regional Priority: Outdoor water use

1

Credit

Envelope Insulation

2

Credit

Windows

3

Credit

Space Heating & Cooling Equipment

4

84.5 0 25.5 TOTALS

Possible Points:

110

Certified: 40 to 49 points, Silver: 50 to 59 points, Gold: 60 to 79 points, Platinum: 80 to 110

||||||||||||| P.36


13 | APPENDIX

[page 3 of 48]

FIGURE 13.2A: DETAILED COST ESTIMATE FOR BUILDING A

||||||||||||| P.37


13 | APPENDIX

[page 4 of 48]

FIGURE 13.2B: DETAILED COST ESTIMATE FOR BUILDING A (CONTINUED)

||||||||||||| P.38


13 | APPENDIX

[page 5 of 48]

FIGURE 13.2C: DETAILED COST ESTIMATE FOR BUILDING A (CONTINUED)

||||||||||||| P.39


13 | APPENDIX

[page 6 of 48]

FIGURE 13.2D: DETAILED COST ESTIMATE FOR BUILDING A (CONTINUED)

||||||||||||| P.40


13 | APPENDIX

[page 7 of 48]

FIGURE 13.3A: DETAILED COST ESTIMATE FOR BUILDING B

||||||||||||| P.4 1


13 | APPENDIX

[page 8 of 48]

FIGURE 13.3B: DETAILED COST ESTIMATE FOR BUILDING B (CONTINUED)

||||||||||||| P.42


13 | APPENDIX

[page 9 of 48]

FIGURE 13.3C: DETAILED COST ESTIMATE FOR BUILDING B (continued)

||||||||||||| P.43


13 | APPENDIX

[page 10 of 48]

FIGURE 13.3D: DETAILED COST ESTIMATE FOR BUILDING B (CONTINUED)

||||||||||||| P.44


13 | APPENDIX

[page 11 of 48]

FIGURE 13.4A: DETAILED COST ESTIMATE FOR BUILDING C

||||||||||||| P.45


13 | APPENDIX

[page 12 of 48]

FIGURE 13.4B: DETAILED COST ESTIMATE FOR BUILDING C (CONTINUED)

||||||||||||| P.46


13 | APPENDIX

[page 13 of 48]

FIGURE 13.4C: DETAILED COST ESTIMATE FOR BUILDING C (CONTINUED)

||||||||||||| P.47


13 | APPENDIX

[page 14 of 48]

FIGURE 13.4D: DETAILED COST ESTIMATE FOR BUILDING C (CONTINUED)

||||||||||||| P.48


13 | APPENDIX

[page 15 of 48]

FIGURE 13.5a: DETAILED COST ESTIMATE FOR BUILDING d

||||||||||||| P.49


13 | APPENDIX

[page 16 of 48]

FIGURE 13.5B: DETAILED COST ESTIMATE FOR BUILDING d (CONTINUED)

||||||||||||| P.50


13 | APPENDIX

[page 17 of 48]

FIGURE 13.5C: DETAILED COST ESTIMATE FOR BUILDING d (CONTINUED)

||||||||||||| P.5 1


13 | APPENDIX

[page 18 of 48]

FIGURE 13.5D: DETAILED COST ESTIMATE FOR BUILDING d (CONTINUED)

||||||||||||| P.52


13 | APPENDIX

[page 19 of 48]

FIGURE 13.6: PROJECT SUMMARY

FIGURE 13.7: LIHTC EQUITY

||||||||||||| P.53


13 | APPENDIX

[page 20 of 48]

FIGURE 13.8: ACHIEVABLE RENTS BREAKDOWN

FIGURE 13.9: GROSS INCOME PROJECTION

FIGURE 13.10: RENTAL SUBSIDY

FIGURE 13.1 1: VASH RENTAL SUBSIDY

FIGURE 13.12: COMMERCIAL UNIT MIX AND GROSS INCOME PROJECTION

FIGURE 13.13: city fees

||||||||||||| P.54


[page 21 of 48]

FIGURE 13.14: ALLOCATION OF FUNDING SOURCES

13 | APPENDIX

||||||||||||| P.55


13 | APPENDIX

[page 22 of 48]

FIGURE 13.15: DEVELOPMENT BUDGET

||||||||||||| P.56


13 | APPENDIX

[page 23 of 48]

FIGURE 13.16: OPERATING BUDGET

||||||||||||| P.57


[page 24 of 48]

FIGURE 13.17: COMMERCIAL PRO FORMA

13 | APPENDIX

||||||||||||| P.58


[page 25 of 48]

FIGURE 13.18: SENSITIVITY ANALYSIS

13 | APPENDIX

||||||||||||| P.59


[page 26 of 48]

FIGURE 13.19: PRO FORMA SENSITIVITY ANALYSIS

13 | APPENDIX

||||||||||||| P.60


13 | APPENDIX

[page 27 of 48]

FIGURE 13.20: POINTS SYSTEMS SUMMARY

||||||||||||| P.6 1


PROPOSED FINAL TIE BREAKER

13 | APPENDIX

PROPOSED FINAL TIE BREAKER CALCULATOR

[page 28 of 48]

Final Tie Breaker Formula:

PROPOSED FINAL TIE BREAKER FIGURE 13.21: tie breaker calculator

Requested unadjusted eligible basis + amount of (Committed, permanent, leveraged soft financing defraying residential costs X size factor) X subsidy basis reduction equal to leveraged soft financing percentage factor exclusive of donated land and fee waivers PROPOSED FINAL TIE BREAKER CALCULATOR + 1 Total residential project development costs Total residential project development costs

((

) /3)

Final Tie Breaker Formula: SOFT FINANCING (Committed, permanent, leveraged soft financing defraying residential costs X size factor) X subsidy Tranche B, if applicable (calculate below) $0 percentage factor Total donated land value and fee waivers Total residential project development costs Total leveraged soft financing excluding donated land and fee waivers CDBG $250,000 PDLP $800,000 SOFTHousing FINANCING SLO Trust Fund Tax Credit $440,000 VHHP $500,000 Tranche B, if applicable (calculate below) $0 HOME Funds land value and fee waivers $500,000 Total donated Affordable Housing Fund $800,000 Total leveraged soft financing excluding donated land and fee waivers

+

((

BASIS REDUCTION Requested unadjusted eligible basis + amount of basis reduction equal to leveraged soft financing Voluntary basis reduction exclusive of donated land and fee waivers 1 Total residential project development costs

$1,555,790

) /3)

BASIS REDUCTION Voluntary basis reduction

$1,555,790

CDBG $250,000 PDLP $800,000 TOTAL $3,290,000 SLO Housing Trust Fund Tax Credit $440,000 VHHP $500,000 MIXED USE PROJECTS HOME Funds $500,000 Affordable Housing Fundthe permanent public fund numerator must be discounted/reduced by the $800,000 For mixed-use projects, mixed-use ratio below. Mixed-use projects: Total commercial cost / Total project cost: 0.0% THE PRORATED COMMERCIAL COST DEDUCTION TO SOFT FUNDS MUST BE CALCULATED FIRST, BEFORE APPLYING ANY SIZE OR SUBSIDY ADJUSTMENT/INCREASE (REGULATION SECTION 10325(c)(10)(A)) TO THE NUMERATOR. TCAC staff may adjust this ratio as deemed appropriate. TOTAL $3,290,000 Sample formula (commercial costs) for numerator Committed permanent soft funds defraying residential costs =(G16)*(1-J21)

MIXED USE PROJECTS RENTAL/OPERATING SUBSIDY BOOST For mixed-use projects, the permanent public fund numerator must be discounted/reduced by the mixed-use ratio below. For projectsprojects: with publicTotal operating or rental subsidies listed in Reg. Section 10325(c)(10)(A), calculate the percentage increase below and increase the Mixed-use commercial cost / Total project cost: 0.0% soft numerator by the adjustment THEfunds PRORATED COMMERCIAL COSTpercentage. DEDUCTION TO SOFT FUNDS MUST BE CALCULATED FIRST, BEFORE APPLYING ANY SIZE OR SUBSIDY Operating and rental subsidies: % of subsidized units: 100.000% Subsidy adjustment/increase to permanent public funds numerator ADJUSTMENT/INCREASE (REGULATION SECTION 10325(c)(10)(A)) TO THE NUMERATOR. TCAC staff 25.000% may adjust this ratio as deemed appropriate. The number of rental subsidy units and the number of (This adjustment is calculated in the numerator after any commercial Sample formula (commercial costs) for numerator Committed permanent soft funds defraying residential costs =(G16)*(1-J21) operating subsidy units are cumulative, up to 100%. cost adjustment). RENTAL/OPERATING SUBSIDY BOOST FINAL TIE BREAKER CALCULATION For projects with public operating or rental subsidies listed in Reg. Section 10325(c)(10)(A), calculate the percentage increase below and increase the soft funds numerator by the adjustment $13,202,054 Soft financing less commercial prorationpercentage. $3,290,000 Requested unadjusted eligible basis Operating and rental subsidies: % of subsidized units: 100.000% 25.000% Subsidy adjustment/increase to permanent public funds numerator Withnumber rental/operating $4,112,500 The of rental subsidy subsidy boost units and the number of (This adjustment is calculated in the numerator after any commercial operating subsidy units are cumulative, up to 100%. cost adjustment). $4,112,500 $13,202,054 + 1 = 31.521% $15,900,000 $15,900,000 FINAL TIE BREAKER CALCULATION

((

Soft financing less commercial proration $3,290,000 Requested unadjusted eligible basis Tranche B calculation With rental/operating subsidy boost $4,112,500 For purposes of the public funds points section and the final tie breaker, a Tranche B loan is the lesser of the actual commitment amount or the following. Please note, an application must include a private Tranche B loan supported by a public subsidy to utilize this calculation. Rental Income Differential: Rent Limit: $4,112,500 $13,202,054 + 1 40% AMI $15,900,000 $15,900,000 (SRO/SpN) OR 50% AMI (ALL OTHER) and the final

((

) /3)

$13,202,054

) /3)

=

31.521%

Public Calculated Subsidy Annual Tranche B calculation Contract Rent Rent Unit Type # of Units For purposes of the public funds points section tie breaker, a Tranche B loan is the lesser of the actual commitment amount SRO 13 $405 $472 or the following. Please note, an application must include a private Tranche B loan supported by$10,452 a public subsidy to utilize this calculation. SRO 31 $463 $551 $32,736 Rental Income Differential: Rent Limit: SRO $0 40% AMI SRO $0 (SRO/SpN) SRO OR Public Calculated $0 SRO 50% AMI Subsidy Annual $0 $43,188 (ALL OTHER) Contract TOTAL Rent Rent Unit Type # of Units SRO 13 $405 $472 $10,452 Rental Income Differential $43,188 SRO 31 $463 $551 $32,736 Less Vacancy SRO 5.0% $0 Net Rental Income $41,029 SRO $0 Available for debt service SRO $0 @ 1.15 DSC ratio: $35,677 SRO $0 TOTAL $43,188 Loan term (years) 15 Interest rate (annual) 6.0% Rental Income Differential $43,188 DSC 1.15 Less ratio Vacancy 5.0% Net Rental Income $41,029 Loan amount per TCAC Available for debt service underwriting $352,321 @ 1.15 DSCstandards: ratio: $35,677 Actual Tranche B Loan term (years) loan amount: Interest rate (annual) DSC ratio Loan amount per TCAC underwriting standards:

15 6.0% 1.15 $352,321

Actual Tranche B loan amount:

CALIFORNIA TAX CREDIT ALLOCATION COMMITTEE

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April 13, 2016

Justin Frenzel The Sanctuary 6 Support Team California State Polytechnic University San Luis Obispo, CA Subject: Letter of Support and Cooperation for The Sanctuary 6, Affordable Housing for Low-Income Veteran Families, Program Dear Justin, On behalf of Goodwill Central Coast, a California Non Profit Corporation (hereinafter called Goodwill), I am pleased to write this letter of support and cooperation with The Sanctuary 6 Program. The mission of Goodwill is to build lives, families, and communities by helping people with employment needs become successful, supported by innovative enterprises that preserve the earth’s resources. Goodwill Central Coast is the manager of the federal workforce system, America’s Job Center of California, in San Luis Obispo County and operates the employment services component of Supportive Services for Veterans Families (SSVF) program. Both programs focus on service priority to veterans, their spouses and dependents. As such, we are in a unique position to provide tremendous resources to help veterans and their families housed through your program with connections to job openings, work retention and career advancement, case management and supportive services, along with skill development activities to increase their earning potential. Homelessness is a significant barrier to employment success. Limited access to public transportation coupled with the stigma of homelessness prevents access to many entry-level and middle-skill employment opportunities in our community. By providing housing stability through this project, you will satisfy both personal and logistical needs to allow veterans and their families to focus on self-sufficiency, obtaining and retaining employment, and improving their position in the labor market. In closing, I strongly support your efforts to house veterans and their families in San Luis Obispo County and look forward to providing services that meet the long-term employment and economic needs of Sanctuary 6 residents. Respectfully,

Allison Schiavo Director of Workforce Services Goodwill Central Coast 805-903-1424 aschiavo@ccgoodwill.org Goodwill Central Coast 880 Industrial Way, San Luis Obispo, CA 93401

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San Luis Obispo Beauty College ... where the art of hair styling begins

Annette Aviles San Luis Beauty College 285 South Street San Luis Obispo, CA 93401

Jordan Keiser The Sanctuary 6 Team California Polytechnic State University San Luis Obispo May 4, 2016 To whom it may concern, I am so impressed by the proposal of Sanctuary 6, that I would love to propose a partnership in where we offer monthly visits to our beauty college. With this proposed partnership the residents would be given access to monthly grooming services to include shaves, haircuts and even pedicures. You may be wondering how this is an important component for the community of Sanctuary 6. Not only does a shave or haircut make a client look better and boost their self confidence something that may seem as simple as a pedicure, can actually help give health benefits as well. Thank you for your time and consideration of our partnership with Sanctuary 6, Sincerly, Annette Aviles Manager San Luis Beauty College

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College of Architecture & Environmental Design City and Regional Planning

April 10, 2016 Bank of America Affordable Housing Challenge Jury Competition Year 2016 Dear Members of the Jury: As an active member of the City of San Luis Obispo’s Planning Commission, I write to support the Sanctuary 6 project’s goal of addressing the homeless veteran’s population in SLO. There is a chronic a housing affordability challenge in San Luis Obispo, making living here out of reach for low and moderate income households let alone those who have extremely low incomes. Affordable projects like the one proposed are critical for helping make San Luis Obispo livable for all income levels, and are consistent with the General Plan’s goal of creating long term affordable housing stock. In addition this project serves our veteran population, a group that is very much in need of housing and support services in our city. After having reviewed the project proposal with representatives from the Sanctuary 6 team, I believe the 44-unit project on Broad Street is consistent with the City’s long term goals for developing the Broad Street Corridor. The project will serve an underrepresented portion of our resident population while building San Luis Obispo’s affordable housing stock. The team’s willingness to engage with veterans and other community groups makes the project one worthy of consideration by the Commission, and I am happy to support the project moving forward. Sincerely, Hemalata Dandekar Planning Commissioner City of San Luis Obispo

Phone 805-756-1315 | www.planning.calpoly.edu 1 Grand Avenue | San Luis Obispo | CA | 93407-0280

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2016 Sanctuary 6 Bank of America Low-Income Housing Competition Proposal  

This housing project won 1st place on a national level. The team consisted of 7 architecture students, 2 city and regional planning students...

2016 Sanctuary 6 Bank of America Low-Income Housing Competition Proposal  

This housing project won 1st place on a national level. The team consisted of 7 architecture students, 2 city and regional planning students...

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