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© 2017 Harry Winston SA

Project Z11

NEW YORK BEVERLY HILLS SAN FRANCISCO LAS VEGAS CHICAGO DALLAS HONOLULU SOUTH COAST PLAZA HOUSTON RIVER OAKS DISTRICT BAL HARBOUR SHOPS MIAMI DESIGN DISTRICT 800 988 4110 HARRYWINSTON.COM


NE WPORT BE ACH | ASPEN | PALM BE ACH | 866. 584.2666 | LUGANODIAMONDS.COM


G R A V I T Y V45T CS SQT


SEVEN DAYS V45 S6 SQT

212.463.8898 WWW.FRANCKMULLER.COM


let nohing come between us T H E S E A R E HAWAI I ’S M O S T S P E C TAC U L A R B E AC H FR O N T R E S I D E N C E S , AT TH E B E LOV E D M A U NA K E A R E S O R T. N O W T H E Y C A N B E Y O U R S .

Let nothing come between you and the sea, sand and sky. Let nothing come between you and the legendary HIWXMREXMSRXLEXGVIEXIHERHLEWHIǻRIHMWPERHPY\YV]JSVKIRIVEXMSRW8LI2EYRE0IE7IWSVX If your idea of Hawaii is the beach, then why not live directly on the best in all the islands — Hapuna. We invite ]SYXSI\TVIWW]SYVMRXIVIWXMRSYVHIFYXVIPIEWISJVIWMHIRGIWMRXLMWVIQEVOEFPIERHI\GIIHMRKP]VEVISǺIVMRK 808.557.8689

Info@MaunaKeaLiving.com

For Hapuna Beach Residences, obtain the Developer’s Public Report for a Condominium required by Hawaii law and read it before signing a binding sales contract. No federal or state agency has judged the merits or value, if any, of these properties. This does not constitute an offer to sell or a solicitation of any offer to buy where prohibited by law.


april 2018, volume 42, number 4

F E AT U R E S

FINE DESIGN 360 We explore the world of exquisite design on land, in the air, and at sea. From an Airbus A340 that functions as a residence in the sky and a superyacht with interiors crafted by one of Italy’s aesthetic geniuses to a fairy-tale oasis in the desert, we peer into the spaces that are redefining the art of living.

SAM FROST

SPECIAL SECTION BEGINS ON PAGE 88

88

104

112

MAGNIFICENT MIRAGE

ESCAPE ARTIST

THE SHAPE OF WATER

A 37-acre sanctuary in the Coachella Valley includes an 11-bedroom home, working date and horse farms, a petting zoo, and a 6-acre Clive Clark–designed golf course.

British designer Katharine Pooley’s elegantly executed private jet lounges in London add grace to even a pause in the journey.

Dutchman Cor D. Rover takes yacht design to its outer limits

BY JORGE S. ARANGO

PHOTOGRAPHY BY ANDREW BEASLEY

PHOTOGRAPHY BY SAM FROST

BY ARIANNE NARDO

108

100

FLYING SOLO

REDEFINING THE ARTS DISTRICT

British designer Celia Sawyer fashions a private-plane interior with singular good looks.

Live within and among homes that are structural works of art. BY REBEKAH BELL

BY ARIANNE NARDO

BY JULIA ZALTZMAN

116

INNER BEAUTY Designer Achille Salvagni gives the muscular superyacht Aurora a refined interior that takes pleasure in some custom curves. BY MICHAEL VERDON PHOTOGRAPHY BY PAOLO PETRIGNANI


CALIBER RM 63-02 WORLD TIMER

RICHARD MILLE BOUTIQUES ASPEN • BAL HARBOUR • BEVERLY HILLS • BUENOS AIRES • LAS VEGAS • MIAMI • ST. BARTH • TORONTO


F E AT U R E S 126

130

138

151

158

HEAD OF THE CLASS

INTO THE WILD

PASSION PROJECT

FORT NIGHTS

Our writer’s love letter to Japanese audio pioneers Stax, the subject of his most enduring relationship.

Promontory, a second-generation premium wine venture, reveals a wild and singular expression of Napa Valley terroir.

Formula 1 racing driver Lewis Hamilton leads a behind-thescenes tour of Mercedes-AMG’s new Project One hypercar.

For the ultimate introduction to the Emerald Isle, stay in a historic castle with all the comforts of modern convenience.

DRIVE: PORSCHE PANAMERA TURBO S E-HYBRID AND TURBO SPORT TURISMO

BY ROBERT ROSS

BY SARA SCHNEIDER

BY LAURA BURSTEIN

BY BRUCE WALLIN, DEVORAH LEV-TOV, AND CAROLYN MEERS

PHOTOGRAPHY BY

PHOTOGRAPHY BY

PHOTOGRAPHY BY

MATTHEW ROHARIK

OLAF BECKMANN AND

JONATHAN GLYNN-SMITH

STYLING BY JESSICA STEWART

MATT MORRIS

P H O T O B Y J O N AT H A N G LY N N - S M I T H

Porsche’s new Panamera variants—a powerful hybrid and a shooting brake—prove versatile and fun. BY LAURA BURSTEIN

R O B B R E P O R T. C O M

15


UP IS COMFORT, BEYOND CLASS.

With Wheels Up, you will access the height of luxury and economic utility. With as little as 24 hours’ notice, up to 365 days a year, an aircraft from an exclusive members only fleet of over 80 private planes is waiting for you.

WHEELSUP.COM 855-FLY-8760 Wheels Up does not operate aircraft; FAA licensed and DOT registered air carriers participating in the program exercise full operational control of all flights offered by or arranged through Wheels Up. All aircraft owned or leased by Wheels Up are leased to the operating air carrier and are operated exclusively by that air carrier.


DEPARTMENT

N Margaret Jewels; see page 68.

N Time Piece; see page 176.

S Genius at Work; see page 50.

24 26 28 30

ON THE WEB EDITOR’S NOTEBOOK QUANTUM VIEW PERFECT 10 From the Singapore Yacht Show to the 2019 Corvette ZR1, see the events, items, and experiences that caught our editors’ attention this month.

38

42

163 50

S Jaguar D-Type; see page 56.

G E N I U S AT W O R K The meticulous assembly of the M10 camera proves Leica’s exacting standards.

N SureFly; see page 44.

BY JOHN LYON

SOURCE FILE John Edelman, CEO of Design Within Reach, shares where he looks for watches and the origins of his love afair with cars.

54

BY STEPHEN TREFFINGER

77

B E TA A radically thin timepiece, a safety-focused helicopter, an all-electric muscle car, and a personal-watercraft-sized boat could all star in the world of tomorrow.

COVER ILLUSTRATION: RAY ORANGES

GALLERY The latest developments in dining, jewelry, spirits, and more.

BY NATASHA WOLFF

169

BY ANGELA M.H. SCHUSTER

A R T I C L E S O F TA S T E The golf and cycling gear that will shape your outdoor pursuits this spring.

CURIOS From Edward Steichen’s 1924 Portrait of Gloria Swanson to a rare bamboo armchair made by Ubunji Kidokoro in 1937, here are the items art connoisseurs will want to acquire this month.

TIME WELL SPENT Monaco may be small in size, but it is big on entertainment. From the Monaco Yacht Show to the Monte Carlo Casino, here’s how to make the most of a jaunt to the tiny European enclave.

176

TIME PIECE Champagne Pol Roger recently unearthed bottles that survived a cellar collapse in 1900. BY ANGELA M. H. SCHUSTER

R O B B R E P O R T. C O M

17


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HondaJet is thankful to be the most delivered jet in its category in 2017. With the accolades and accomplishments collected over the years, we are proud to announce yet another milestone: the HondaJet is the most-delivered jet in its category in 2017. This deserves extending our thanks to all who had the vision to make this possible, including our customers who we are proud to have welcomed into the HondaJet family over the past year. And now we look forward to 2018. Š Honda Aircraft Company

1.336.387.0707 HondaJet.com


ON THE WEB R O B B R E P O R T. C O M

STORY OF THE MONTH

Get Onboard Charter yacht Chasseur from the American builder Christensen ofers up a fresh interior, loads of deck space, and a crew and toys, making for an unforgettable charter vacation. robbreport.com/ chasseurcharter

Golf-equipme n Pi beyon ldi g tte on nde Karst Solhei rag com respecte cl th ust An

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brand past offerings ckl hi

READER SURVEY RESULTS

What’s your favorite way to listen to music? Our readers sounded of and chose over-ear headphones in our biggest and most surprising landslide yet.

the

breport.c gg4

23% Home stereo system

6% In-ear headphones/ earbuds

67% Over-ear headphones

4%

Portable wireless speakers

APRIL

8


Instagram @robbreport

Facebook Facebook.com/robbreport This superyacht has turned a lot of heads, especially among Robb Report’s Instagrammers.

SOCIAL STANDING Popular posts @RobbReport

Twitter @robbreport

Our Facebook fans loved the intersection of watches and cars in this limited-edition Porsche timepiece.

WEB EXCLUSIVES

SPRING FEVER NEW, SEASONAL STYLE FINDS ADD JUST THE RIGHT FINISH TO YOUR WARDROBE.

Twitter followers were captivated by a story about a beer so potent, it’s illegal in a dozen states.

The High Five WILD WHEELS

Ferrari Reveals the New 488 Pista robbreport.com/ferrari488pista

A Sneak Peek at the Off-Road Rolls-Royce Cullinan robbreport.com/rollsroycecullinan

Panerai Introduces Its Most Complicated Watch to Date robbreport.com/paneraimoonphase

Q&A: Motorcycle Collector Stuart Parr Previews His Latest Exhibition robbreport.com/ stuartparrmotorcycles A Vincent Black Lightning Strikes Record Price at Bonhams Sale robbreport.com/blacklightningrecord

PING: DAVID BUTLER

Weather Spring Showers in These Stylish Slickers robbreport.com/stylishslickers

Weekender Bags to Take on Your Next Getaway robbreport.com/weekenderbags

5 Fresh Alternatives to the White Sneaker robbreport.com/whitesneakeralts

5 Women’s Watches with More Than Just a Pretty Face robbreport.com/morethanaprettyface

Green Envy: Porsche’s New GT3 RS Will Truly Intimidate on the Track robbreport.com/porschegt3rs

R O B B R E P O R T. C O M

25


EDITOR’S NOTEBOOK

“Perfetion is achieved not when there is nothing more to add, but when there is nothing left to take away.”

Brett Anderson Executive Vice President, Editor in Chief

—A N TO I N E D E SA I N T- E X U P É RY

Studies in Contrast later, Saint-Exupéry demonstrated the subtractive nature of his art by transforming this misadventure—and its accompanying delirium—into his most famous book, The Little Prince, the hauntingly spare story of a boy from an asteroid-sized planet who encounters a stranded aviator. Just as Saint-Exupéry’s simple narrative provides a framework for exploring the complexities of human relationships, the creative talents behind the visual and spatial

Harmony has been the design hallmark of Stax Industries, the Japanese electronics firm whose classic components have assuaged audiophiles like Robert Ross for well more than half a century, as he relates in “Head of the Class” (page 126). “Stax is a rare, special brand that seems to embody the soul of its creator,” Robert says. “In 1988, when the company was celebrating its 50th anniversary, I met Takeshi Hayashi, son of the founder. We were in his Southern California oice, a small space filled with products, prototypes, and drawings, including numerous electrical schematics rendered by Hayashi with a hand as delicate as that of a Japanese calligrapher. That afternoon, Hayashi taught me how to write my name in Japanese katakana using sumi ink and a brush. I have a photo of us together, with him patiently watching with brush in hand—much as he might wield a soldering iron, pondering an experimental circuit.”

masterpieces in this issue’s special Fine Design 360 section (starting

on page 88) remind us that—in the worlds of architecture and interior design as in literature—familiar forms can acquire new resonance once all traces of the predictable are stripped away. “Design is really coming to the fore in less traditional categories,” says home and design editor Arianne Nardo of these spaces, which include a yacht, an art-inspired neighborhood, and a business jet. “Robbie

Antonio’s art park is stellar in its vision and reach, and Celia Sawyer’s airplane interior brings us into total experiential territory.” The pièce de resistance, however, likely surpasses even the wildest hallucinations of Saint-Exupéry: a 40,000-square-foot home and compound in California’s Coachella Valley. “This lush oasis is breathtaking not just for its scale,” observes Arianne, “but for how all of its elements harmonize.”

Great design often plays on opposites—light and dark, order and asymmetry—and Ireland’s Kilkea Castle, as Carolyn Meers notes in “Fort Nights” (page 151), is a “study in contrasts.” This reflection was underscored when an outing on horseback took a wild turn. “Christy Cashman, who owns Kilkea with her husband, Jay, is really into cross-country jumping,” Carolyn says. “But I was feeling pretty good about our relaxed ride. Our leader, after all, was an upbeat tween on a one-eyed pony, so how bad could things get?” Shortly into this tranquil trot, the lead horse disappeared onto a heavily wooded path, prompting a general panic among the rest of the animals. “Before I could even gather up the reins, my horse took of at full speed to chase the lead,” she recalls, “and like a domino efect, every pony in the group set of on a heart-stopping gallop through thick forest.” Fortunately, once the one-eyed lead came into view, discipline again prevailed. “We were all gasping for breath,” says Carolyn, who, despite the scare, would not have this imperfect adventure removed from her otherwise perfect stay. But she and the other guests did ask their guide to remain within sight thereafter and walk slowly back to the stables.

CORRECTIONS: The rums that are blended to create the Facundo Paraíso XA (“Bottle Rockets,” February 2018) range in age from 23 to 25 years. The Sonus Faber Aida speakers (“Driven to Succeed,” February 2018) retail for $130,000 per pair.

26

APRIL 2018

FROM TOP: FRANK FELIPE; JACK HARDY

In December 1935, a small aircraft crashed in the Libyan desert. Somehow, the pilot—French author and aeronaut Antoine de Saint-Exupéry— and his navigator, André Prévot, managed to survive the impact only to find themselves marooned. The pair, who had been attempting to set a speed record, endured 4 unbearable days—at the end of which, hallucinating and on the verge of death, they were rescued by a Bedouin nomad. Less than 10 years


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$58.8M CHICAGO

$9M SAN FRANCISCO

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FOUR SEASONS RESIDENCES

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11,906

4,640

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4 BR/4.5 BA

3 BR/3 BA

Yet to be determined 35–38

BEDS/BATHS FLOOR

92–93

39

54

YEAR BUILT

2016

2001

2007

2018

BROKERAGE

DOUGLAS ELLIMAN

SOTHEBY’S INTERNATIONAL REALTY

SYDNEY SOTHEBY’S INTERNATIONAL REALTY

JAMESON SOTHEBY’S INTERNATIONAL REALTY

Marbled breakfast bar, library, wood- and gas-burning fireplaces, master baths with marble walls/floors and Bianco Sivec marble vanities

Large walls of glass that face east, west, and south; sunrise-to-sunset views of Alcatraz; master bedroom with 2 exposures, spa-like bath clad in stone, and 3 walk-in closets; staf suite, butler’s pantry, and service entrance

Private elevator, curving staircase, fireplace

Building amenities include: Lap pool, dry-cleaning service, house car and driver, hot tub, fitness room, steam and sauna rooms, private wine storage, covered dog run

AMENITIES

28

APRIL 2018


Quantum View

View from the Top From London to Los Angeles, penthouse prices reached towering levels in 2017. While amenities such as plunge pools, private elevators, summer kitchens, and movie theaters—not to mention on-site concierge services—attract choosy buyers, many of those features can be reproduced in a less lofty address. What cannot be replicated, however, are the views. According to a January 2018 real estate report by Trulia, the greatest indicator of whether a listing was defined as among the upper echelon of opulence within the top 100 metro areas was the presence of noteworthy vistas.

Not surprisingly, the penthouses that commanded top dollar last year had notable panoramas. In New York, a unit at 432 Park Avenue (comprising three half-floor residences) above Central Park sold for more than $91 million—the year’s most expensive sale in that city. A four-bedroom penthouse in San Francisco with views of Alcatraz went for $9 million. In Miami, a seven-bedroom unit with floor-to-ceiling glass walls overlooking the brilliant waters of Biscayne Bay sold for $32 million. And new heights were reached in London with the sale of a penthouse above Hyde Park for $124.9 million—more than $16,000 per square foot. —REBEKAH BELL

$20M

$124.9M

LOS ANGELES

LONDON

PALAZZO DEL SOL

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2010

2005

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Private elevator, 18 floor-to-ceiling windows that overlook Biscayne Bay & skyline, theater, exercise room, bar and lounge, four outdoor terraces totaling 8,595 square feet on 2 levels, zero-edge swimming pool, summer kitchen

Elevator, exercise room, gated parking, outdoor cooking area, private cabana, spa, valet parking

Views of Hyde Park, valet parking, on-site spa, state-of-the-art gymnasium and pool, private landscaped garden, cinema room, playroom, 2,900 ft terrace


Perfet 10 W H AT TH E E D I T O R S A RE O B S E S SING ABOUT THIS MONTH.

1

A CORVETTE TO COVET 2019 CHEVROLET CORVETTE ZR1 “Tennyson said that in spring a young man’s fancy turns to love, and even though I’m well past the flush of youth, I’m still stirred by the 2019 Corvette ZR1, which becomes available this month. The fastest and most powerful production version of the ’Vette ever made, the car carries a 755 hp, supercharged 6.2-liter V-8 that allows it to rocket from zero to 60 mph in less than 3 seconds and top out at 212 mph—oh, baby.” —VIJU MATHEW

:


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W H AT T H E E D I T O R S A R E O B S E S S I N G A B O U T T H I S M O N T H

2 JUST ANOTHER DAY IN PARADISE THE SIX SENSES RESIDENCES FIJI

“Opening this month on the volcanic island of Malolo, the 120-acre Six Senses Fiji resort will eventually include 60 privately owned residences. Set on the west side of the island to maximize sunset views, the two- to five-bedroom homes will feature outdoor barbecues, sundecks, and private pools. Owners will have access to the greater Six Senses property, which ofers a full-service marina and a spa. Prices for the finished, furnished residences start at $3.5 million and go up to $5 million.” —REBEKAH BELL

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4 EPICUREAN

EXCURSION T H E P R E T T Y F O R K ’ S D E S T I N AT I O N D I N I N G A M E R I C A “Expanding beyond its roots of flying Seattleites to Puget Sound’s dining destinations via seaplane, the Pretty Fork is taking its culinary adventures national. This April, the tour company will depart on a 13-night, four-city exploration of some of America’s finest restaurants, flying first class from stop to stop. Not only will diners get Michelin-starred meals, they’ll also explore each city’s unique culinary culture. And while the Pretty Fork is keeping the specific restaurants secret so as to not ruin the surprise, company cofounder Joey Manley divulged that one stop would be the current No. 1 on the World’s 50 Best list: New York’s Eleven Madison Park.” —JEREMY REPANICH

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IT’S PERSONAL B O T T E G A V E N E TA ’ S C U S T O M I Z AT I O N AT E L I E R “Bottega Veneta has just made it easier to infuse your own aesthetic and personality into your wardrobe with its accessories customization program. The possibilities are limitless—from a sporty canvas dufel bag emblazoned with bold stripes and colorful initials to a tailored ostrich tote with hand-cut crocodile monogram letters. Unveiled at the brand’s new five-story flagship in New York, the service is available exclusively at seven Bottega Veneta locations internationally, where specialists—equipped with a range of leather and exotic-skin swatches in varying custom finishes and colors—help clients design a personal expression.” —JILL NEWMAN

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3: JAY GULLION; 4: EVAN SUNG

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Celebrating 30 Years of Bespoke Jewels and Unparalleled Artistry

B E V E R L Y

H I L L S

N E W

Y O R K

B E R G D O R F

G O O D M A N


W H AT T H E E D I T O R S A R E O B S E S S I N G A B O U T T H I S M O N T H

R 5 POU IT ON GLENMORANGIE GRAND V I N TA G E M A LT 1 9 8 9 “Glenmorangie has become a personal favorite—even some of its more modest single malts impress me with their rich notes of brioche, baked apples, and spice. So this month, I’m savoring a taste of the second limited edition in its exclusive Bond House No. 1 Vintage Collection: Glenmorangie Grand Vintage Malt 1989. It’s the brand’s first whisky to have been aged in casks that once held Côte-Rôtie wine.”

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—JANICE O’LEARY

6 ITALIAN AFFAIR : MILAN DESIGN WEEK

“Milan Design Week is a zany, exhilarating, Bellini-soaked free fall into furniture, lighting, and decor, highlighted by the heavy-hitting show Salone del Mobile. This year’s Salone, from April 17 through 22, features EuroCucina, a showcase of haute and tech kitchen design. Elsewhere around town, Design Week’s installations and pop-ups are always a blast, and I’m especially looking forward to Los Angeles designer Natasha Baradaran’s chic display at Tearose, an ultrahip boutique/ floral-design studio, where her third furniture collection will debut and no doubt sizzle.” —ARIANNE NARDO

7 STYLE

WATCH TOM FORD 001 TIMEPIECES “In his collections—and even his Hollywood feature films—Tom Ford’s eye for sartorial elegance is as sharp as one of his immaculate suits. Now the designer is adding another element to his idea of a life well lived with his first line of watches. Every bit as sleek as his ready-to-wear, Ford’s new 18-karatgold and stainless-steel timepieces are being ofered with a choice of 60 variations of interchangeable straps, which come in pebble-grain, ecru-stitched, or braided calf leather and alligator.” —PAIGE REDDINGER

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6: MARCO PIT TALUG A

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CALIBER RM 037

RICHARD MILLE BOUTIQUES ASPEN • BAL HARBOUR • BEVERLY HILLS • BUENOS AIRES • LAS VEGAS • MIAMI • ST. BARTH • TORONTO


W H AT T H E E D I T O R S A R E O B S E S S I N G A B O U T T H I S M O N T H

8 SEE YOU IN SINGAPORE S I N G A P O R E YA C H T S H O W “Proving that it’s more than just a passing fancy, the Singapore Yacht Show splashes down on tony Sentosa Island for its eighth edition this month. Scheduled for April 12 through 15 at the One°15 Marina in Sentosa Cove, the event goes beyond just boats, featuring art, fashion, supercars, watches, and everything else luxury. Last year’s show saw 14,000 visitors and 94 yachts, 31 of which were longer than 65 feet. This year, look for exhibitors including Azimut, Benetti, Ferretti, Gulf Craft, Heesen, Lürssen, Monte Carlo Yachts, Westport, and Sunseeker.” —DANIELLE CUTLER

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SEE

CHANGE P R A B A L G U R U N G × TA S A K I “I love Prabal Gurung’s take on pearls. The fashion designer—who took over as creative director of the Tokyo-based jewelry house Tasaki last fall—has unveiled his first-ever fine-jewelry collection. Each of the pieces is refreshing, full of movement and captivating curves. I especially like these gorgeous, swooping sculptural earrings from the Nacreous line. They’re made with white gold, diamonds, and Akoya pearls, and they’ll go with everything.” —CAROLYN MEERS

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10 THINK PINK GUNTÛ “Spring hasn’t oicially sprung until Japan’s cherry blossoms have bloomed. This year, I plan to catch the annual spectacle as I sail the Seto Inland Sea aboard the new Guntû floating hotel. One part ryokan, one part cruise ship, the sleek vessel has everything I need for a sakura celebration: a traditional tearoom, a soothing spa, and, on my private terrace, an open-air bath with views of the passing pink landscapes.” —JACKIE CARADONIO

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8: BLUEIPROD; 9: ARAHAMA K A ZUHIRO

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RARE FORM

THE FIRST- EVER LS 500. LIVE IN THE NEW. We didn’t merely try something new. We crafted an entirely new experience. With accents like Kiriko glass, designed by hand then delicately etched with thousands of cuts to catch the eye and transform in the light. A 416-horsepower1 twin-turbo engine paired with the first-ever 10-speed Direct-Shift automatic transmission in its class2 takes you from 0 to 60 in just 4.6 seconds.1,3 All this is complemented by cuttingedge technology with one of the largest Heads-Up Displays in the industry.2 The LS 500 isn’t simply new. It’s the most evocative LS ever.

lexus.com/LS | #LexusLS

Options shown. 1. Ratings achieved using the required premium unleaded gasoline with an octane rating of 91 or higher. If premium fuel is not used, performance will decrease. 2. 2018 LS vs. 2017/2018 competitors. Information from manufacturers’ websites as of 8/4/2017. 3. Performance figures are for comparison only and were obtained with prototype vehicles by professional drivers using special safety equipment and procedures. Do not attempt. ©2018 Lexus


The Source File

Modern Man When not acting in his role as CEO of Design Within Reach, JOHN EDELMAN can be found strolling through flea markets (he fell in love with his wife at one), driving fun cars, and hunting down modern design. Edelman was also recently named president of Be Original Americas, a nonprofit dedicated to educating designers, makers, and the public on the value of authentic design—so he practices and preaches. With a refined eye and access to Design Within Reach’s superb trove, he is passionate about making it real. —STEPHEN TREFFINGER


Classic Hits If you look at my business, I’m not involved in trends at all. I’m involved in the modern and the beautiful. Modern is forever. People say, “When did modern come back in style?” Come back? It’s been selling since 1950! When Steve Jobs launched the iPhone, there was a Corbusier chair and a Saarinen tulip table on a blank stage with nothing else except for him and the phone. That was a statement that modern is forever.

Tech Obsessed I have a small addiction for 1950s portable televisions and own 30 or 40 of them. These TVs were a piece of furniture. Today, we do everything in our power to hide the television. It’s gotten flatter. It disappears against the wall. But in those days, people were proud to have a TV. I also still have all my radios and love the Weltron model 2001—a martian head with an 8-track player as the mouth. I have 15 of those from flea markets. N Hamilton shirt

You Never Forget Your First . . . Car Sale Near where I grew up in Connecticut, there was a BMW down the street at a horse farm, sitting idle in a field. I said to my neighbors, “I’ll give you $25, and I’ll tow the car away.” They agreed. My older brother came with a tractor, and we towed the car a mile to our house. I’m not mechanical at all, so I polished the car and sold it to a mechanic for 600 bucks a month later. That was the start of my car obsession. By the time I was 16, I had bought and sold seven cars. Foxy Four-Door I’m currently fixing up two 1950s Studebakers designed by Raymond Loewy. They have a classic bullet nose, which was only available for ’50 and ’51. The rear doors on the four-door model are called “suicide doors.” I’m updating the cars with modern engines, transmissions, and brakes. Without the modifications, they’re not that much fun to drive, but they’re aesthetically pleasing. The Perfect Find I learned about modern furniture from flea markets, especially the one on 26th Street and in Manhattan [now defunct]. In my late 20s, I began getting fascinated with modern furniture, studying it. I became an expert. My wife and I fell in love by going to the flea market, understanding we had a shared aesthetic. How could you not fall in love with

PORTRAIT BY MARK MANN

W Weltron radio S Studebaker bullet-nose

Wristful Thinking When I graduated from college, my father gave me his Rolex Daytona. I wore that watch for 10 years, never took t k it of. f One O day d y I found f d this really cool 1970s Omega chronograph, which I still

that person when you have those kinds of interests? Dress Code I have a uniform: Jean Shop jeans, the best jeans in the world in my opinion. [Founder] Eric Goldstein lives and breathes quality m jeans. My shirts are all from the Hamilton shirtmaker in Houston, Texas. I’ve been buying there for 15 years. I wear a blazer from John Varrvatos. That’s as fancy as I get. S 1970s Seiko “turtle” watch

“I’m not involved in trends at all. I’m involved in the modern and the beautiful. Modern is forever” forever. Jean Shop jeans E

have. It opened up this world. I started findingg forgotten watches off the ’70s—Seikos, Omegas, and Breitlings. Theyy were jjust exactlyy myy aesthetic. I’d find the watch in one place, the band somewhere else, the time-correct box in yet another place. That whole hunting thing, I find it almost therapeutic. Hunting Grounds For watches, I go online to Hodinkee and Bob’s Watches. I do a lot of eBay, as well. It’s a godsend for anyone who collects, especially if you’re buying separate pieces and creating one fully constructed set. For cars, I rarely go to auto shows. I love Hemmings Motor News, and I get the daily newsletter from Bring a Trailer—everything from project cars that are rickety old junks to $200,000 classics. It’s for car junkies.

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P R O M O T I O N

in focus SUNSEEKER INTERNATIONAL sunseeker.com The new Predator 74 has all the hallmarks of greatness: striking style, remarkable power, and an innovative use of light and space. Guests will fall in love with the comfort and entertaining opportunities, while those at the helm will be in awe of speeds of up to 40 knots.

MY FATHER CIGARS myfathercigars.com My Father Cigars is releasing a very special line named Garcia & Garcia after father and son Jose Pepin Garcia and Jaime Garcia. Garcia & Garcia is the brand’s most exclusive and most expensive cigar ever released. The special box of 10 Toro Deluxe (6 ¾ x 54) will have distribution at only a very select number of certified retailers.

COLLECTION SUITES collection-suites.com Located in Miami, Fla., Collection Suites delivers a unique offering to elite collectors: a private, lavish, and safe vault, enhanced with high-tech security and top-of-the-line finishes. Join this exclusive and one-of-a-kind community, a true safe haven for your collection.

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B E T A

AN INSIDE TRACK ON THE POSSIBLE AND PROBA

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CATCH A WAVE MINI JET SPIDER DESIGNER: LAZZARINI DESIGN AND JET CAPSULE O D D S O F P R O D U C T I O N : TA K I N G O R D E R S N O W CONCEPT:

Italian designer Pierpaolo Lazzarini has evolved the Jet Capsule concept on two larger prototypes called the Reptile and the Taxi—but the Mini Jet Spider takes it a step further. The 16-foot craft has a removable carbon-fiber enclosure that transforms it from a buttoneddown boat to an open Jet Ski– style personal watercraft. The lengthwise “pilot seat” has a suspension system that absorbs pounding from waves or turns, which, along with seat belts, ensures that the driver will always be in control. Jet Capsule plans to start production once it has 10 orders for the roughly $85,000 craft. Owners will have a choice of gas, diesel, or electric engines connected to a HamiltonJet waterjet. With the 315 hp gas engine, the Mini Jet Spider has a projected top speed of 45 knots and a 25-knot cruise speed. The two rear seats fold down into a sun pad or can flip back to face the rear. Watch for the Mini Jet Spider to be unveiled in 2019. —MICHAEL VERDON

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BETA

AN INSIDE TRACK ON THE POSSIBLE AND PROBABLE FUTURE

AIR CONTROL CONCEPT:

S U R E F LY

DESIGNER:

WORKHORSE

Small owner-operator aircraft have long been plagued by safety concerns, and a few recent high-profile incidents have further cast a pall over the segment. Recognizing this consumer anxiety, Ohio company Workhorse has created a two-seat helicopter concept with a focus on safety. The comfortingly named SureFly (expected to cost $200,000) is more akin to a drone than a helicopter, with eight propellers, operating as contrarotating pairs, aixed to four struts. Each propeller is powered by its own motor, providing plenty of redundancy in case of a problem. If the main engine generating electricity for the motors fails, a backup battery system provides enough time to land safely. When all options are exhausted, the aircraft has an

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ODDS OF PRODUCTION:

IT MIGHT BE SEEN IN 2019

emergency ballistic parachute. The copter is Intended for quick hops; a full tank will keep it in the air for about an hour and allow it to travel as far as 70 miles. It also boasts a 4,000foot flight ceiling and a maximum speed of 70 mph. Workhorse built the fuselage and props from lightweight carbon fiber, helping the copter carry up to 400 pounds—the pilot and either a passenger or cargo. The SureFly can also be flown autonomously, so it could instead transport 400 pounds’ worth of cargo. While the company had intended to make its first public flight in January at the Consumer Electronics Show, the plan was scrubbed due to weather. At the time of publication, a follow-up attempt had not yet been scheduled, but the company plans to begin production in 2019. —JOHN LYON


armanicasa.com

New York, Decoration & Design Building, 979 Third Avenue, Suite 1424. Tel. 212 334 1271 Los Angeles, Pacific Design Center, 8687 Melrose Avenue, Suite G170, West Hollywood. Tel. 310 358 0901 Miami, 10 NE 39th Street, Miami Design District. Tel. 305 573 4331


BETA

AN INSIDE TRACK ON THE POSSIBLE AND PROBABLE FUTURE

STRIPPED TEASE CONCEPT:

A LT I P L A N O U LT I M AT E

When Piaget released the Altiplano 900P in 2014, it was the thinnest mechanical watch of its time. Since then, the company’s engineers have aimed for a radically thinner timepiece employing a number of never-before-tried techniques. At an overall thickness of just 2 mm, Piaget’s

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DESIGNER:

PIAGET

ODDS OF PRODUCTION:

Altiplano Ultimate Concept is barely thicker than the strap to which it is attached. Like the 900P, the Altiplano Ultimate Concept integrates the movement into the case, with the added benefit of a monobloc construction in an exotic cobalt alloy to provide rigidity at such

SLIM dramatically reduced dimensions. The movement architecture was also completely rethought, with ceramic bearings rather than traditional bridges supporting the wheels, a strippedaway barrel assembly, a “flying” escapement, and a novel worm-gearbased winding system with a telescopic

stem used to subtract thickness. “This project has allowed us to validate a number of ideas we can use in the future,” muses Marc Menant, project marketing leader for Piaget watches. “At its thinnest, the case measures 0.12 mm—practically nothing!” —JAMES D. MALCOLMSON


The frameless insulated sliding doors by Swiss manufacturer Sky-Frame blend naturally into their surroundings, creating a seamless continuity between indoors and outdoors and blurring the line between where the living space ends and the view begins. SKY-FRAME.COM


BETA

AN INSIDE TRACK ON THE POSSIBLE AND PROBABLE FUTURE

POSTMODERN MUSCLE

CONCEPT: ODDS OF

C U N N I N G H A M S Y N TA X D E S I G N E R : M AT T H E W C U N N I N G H A M P R O D U C T I O N : T I M E A N D M O N E Y A R E T H E O N LY R O A D B LO C K S T O R E A L I T Y

A muscle car for tomorrow, the Cunningham Syntax exquisitely communicates industrial designer Matthew Cunningham’s ethos on aesthetics. “A good design is all about balancing constraint systems—a triadic constellation of beauty, virtue, and utility,” says the creative, who has contributed to films—including the upcoming Aquaman—and consulted for BMW, the Volkswagen Group, and other major automakers. “This particular concept is an ecological, all-electric

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American muscle car built of of a cubic aluminum extrusion space frame with bioplastic parts and modular drivetrain components,” says Cunningham. He explains that frame and body-panel production processes were conceived to “dramatically reduce cost and improve the environmental impact of manufacturing,” respectively. But there’s more to the conceptual coupe than cutting-edge construction, according to Cunningham.

“It’s an homage to racer Briggs Cunningham [no direct relation] and two of his Le Mans cars—the 1950 Le Monstre and 1954 C4-R. Hence the white body and blue ‘Cunningham stripes,’ an innovation of Briggs which was later used by Carroll Shelby and Ford.” A mere investment of up to $3 million and a year and a half would make a prototype of the inventive vehicle possible, legendary livery included. —VIJU MATHEW


QP À ÉQUATION White gold case - Millésimé

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Obsessive care and attention to detail ensure that LEICA’s most famous model is picture-perfect every time. By John Lyon

Genius at Work

Built to M-Press of combined range-finder/viewfinder cameras has been the heart and soul of Leica Cameras. Due to their compact size and full-frame format, they have long been a favorite of street photographers and journalists. “It’s ingrained in the history of photography,” says Andreas Kaufmann, chairman of Leica’s supervisory board. “For instance, the most printed picture in the world is probably the [Alberto Korda] picture of Che Guevara. It was shot on a Leica M2.” ¶ The M10, the latest addition to this lauded lineage, is the slimmest digital M to date and the first to support Wi-Fi. Robb Report recently traveled to Leica’s headquarters in Wetzlar, Germany, to see the assembly of the camera and capture the entire process with—of course—an M10.

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ince its debut in 1954, the M-Series

Extrasensory Inception The process begins with sensor assembly, where the brain of the camera—the CMOS chip—is set, baked, and calibrated.

P H O T O G R A P H Y BY R O B B R I C E


E

Eagle Eye Each M10 arrives loosely assembled from Leica’s plant in Portugal. Upon receipt it is disassembled, and each piece goes through a rigorous inspection.

3

Pinch Hitters Workers then put together the sensor and image module. Each highly trained employee can fill in at almost any stage of assembly.

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Come Together The image sensor is carefully aligned and inspected and then sent to the next stage, where the body and back plate of the camera are installed.

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Under a Lens All of the camera’s optics are once again cleaned and scrutinized before the installation of the top plate— including the Messsucher (or range finder), from which the M-Series derives its name.

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Feels So Good A worker methodically applies the leather wrap encircling the body of the camera. “German design means staying true to the haptics, how a camera should feel,” says Kaufmann.

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6 Everything in Its Place

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The camera’s firmware is updated, and various components are aligned. The M10 then receives another round of inspections—this time focusing on the shutter, Wi-Fi, and viewfinder.

N

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Focused The range finder undergoes its own calibration to ensure that the subject is in focus when the range finder says it should be. Following a final check of the sensor, the camera’s body is finally sealed.

9 On the Dot

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7

The sensor is cleaned one last time before Leica’s red-dot logo is applied to the front of the camera as the final touch. In total, the company assembles approximately 80 cameras a day.

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A T U S C A N R A C E T R A C K S E R V E S A S T H E B A C K D R O P F O R A S I N G U L A R FA S H I O N S H O W

CARLOS FOLGOSO/MASSIMO SESTINI

ricci rally

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Gallery On a crisp day last autumn, Stefano Ricci (stefanoricci .com) gathered an intimate group of friends and Italian press at Tuscany’s Mugello Circuit to unveil his fall 2018 collection. This was no ordinary fashion show. The Florentine native known for his well-appointed cashmere suits, handprinted silk neckties, and fur-trimmed jackets presented his latest looks alongside 20 of his prized vintage automobiles on the closed racetrack. “This collection represents a new chapter for our brand,” says Ricci, who established the family-owned company in 1972 and currently has 60 stores in 25 countries. “The cars and raceway connect to today’s dynamic, fast-paced men, and we created clothing for their lifestyle.” At the daylong event— where guests rode at top speeds with professional drivers in contemporary Lamborghinis and Ferraris— models in Ricci’s new sportswear mingled with guests. “This sportswear collection is fun, younger, and comfortable for today’s dynamic man, but it remains elegant,” says Ricci’s son Filippo, the company’s creative director (pictured here with his brother—and the brand’s CEO—Niccolo). Inspired by the stylish lines and attention to detail in Ricci’s vintage cars, the new pieces include ultrasoft lambskin motorcycle jackets in slightly slimmer silhouettes; lightweight jackets in a waterproof technical silk fabric; and unlined cashmere blazers that are ideal for traveling. The numerous sportswear collection is the latest addition to Ricci’s ever-expanding empire, which includes tailored clothes, children’s clothes, home accessories, and a custom division that outfits yachts, private planes, and residences. —JILL NEWMAN

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GALLERY

J A G U A R I S B R I N G I N G B A C K T H E L E M A N S – D O M I N AT I N G D -T Y P E F R O M T H E 1 9 5 0 S

racer redux During the mid-1950s, Jaguar ( jaguarusa.com) was the dominant force on the tracks and on the streets, especially after it unleashed the D-Type— a car that captured the 24 Hours of Le Mans in 1955, 1956, and 1957. The marque originally planned to build 100 of the now-treasured vehicles, but completed only 75 examples. Today, more than 60 years later, Jaguar Land Rover Classic Works in Warwickshire, England, has announced it will construct the remaining D-Types—with a serious and respectful adherence to historical accuracy. The original D-Type was powered by a 3.4liter (and later 3.8-liter) inline-6 engine from the

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Jaguar XK120 and wrapped in a tube chassis and gorgeous, wind-cheating aluminum bodywork designed by Malcolm Sayer. The notable vertical fin aft of the driver remains the model’s aerodynamic trademark. Resurrecting such a classic design is a daunting task, but it’s one that makes sense for Jaguar, given how highly valued the original cars are today. (A 1955 example sold at Sotheby’s in 2016 for more than $21 million.) The periodcorrect continuations will also allow owners to compete in historic racing without exposing priceless originals to the terrors of the track.

The first new D-Type assembled by Jaguar Classic is an engineering prototype that debuted at the 2018 Salon Rétromobile in Paris. Based on the 1956 Longnose specifications, it features an extended hood, a tail fin, a wide-angle cylinder head, and quick-change brake calipers. Jaguar will also ofer the D-Type with the original Shortnose bodywork from 1955. The two versions are currently available to order, with first deliveries scheduled for later this year. And while Jaguar Classic will not disclose pricing, its past continuations have often cost close to $1.4 million. —ROBERT ROSS


3 times patented Timepiece fully developed and manufactured in-house

Unequalled Amadeo convertible case system Triple time zone with 24-city indicators, Indexable time zone hands Flying tourbillon, 10 days power reserve, 5 years international warranty Limited edition of 60 movements

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B R E I T L I N G ’ S L AT E S T P I LO T ’ S WAT C H I S T H E F I R S T S T E P I N A L A R G E - S C A L E F L E E T O V E R H A U L

of change According to Georges Kern, CEO of the Swiss watch manufacturer Breitling (breitling.com), there is a blind spot in the brand’s past. “Except for collectors, the beautiful years of the ’30s through the ’70s is unknown territory for most of the buying public,” he says. “Not only did [Breitling] invent many things around the chronograph, they also had some of the most phenomenal designs.” Judging by the new Navitimer 8—the first collection Kern has unveiled as part of his rolling revamp of the brand—Breitling’s past will play a much larger role in its future oferings. A major addition to the brand’s Navitimer family of aviation-oriented watches, the collection incorporates a number of dial and bezel details from historical pieces, including early cockpit-panel clocks and modernist pilot’s watches from the 1940s. Designer Guy Bove, who played a major role in Kern’s previous refocus of IWC, carefully refined Breitling’s logo and the numeric indices to approximate what appeared on the printed dials of that period. While the Navitimer 8 is a sporty complement to the brand’s well-known and highly technical Navitimer 01, it is part of a move that will de-emphasize the large and often loud pilot’s watches for which the brand has become known in recent years. Kern has planned a full family of land- and ocean-oriented chronograph and automatic watches that he hopes will allow the brand to move beyond its current niche. “We want to be a generalist brand in our price point,” he says. “Breitling was never aviation alone. It was sailing, skiing, and many other things.” —JAMES D. MALCOLMSON

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CASA NOBLE’S NEWEST TEQUILA MARRIES MEXICAN TRADITION AND FRENCH PEDIGREE

complementary

cask some 20 years ago, when Pepe Hermosillo first walked the land that would become Casa Noble’s agave fields, he did something few other tequileros in the region were doing at the time—he tested the soil. The plot, nestled against a volcano and surrounded by citrus groves, was as rich in minerals as he had hoped, with an ideal pH for growing agave. The high altitude would stress the plants as they matured, making the piña—the plant’s heart— that much sweeter. This year, in celebration of planting those first agaves, Casa Noble Tequila (casa noble.com) released the oldest tequila made from them: Selección del Fundador Volume II ($1,500). Allowed to grow for 12 years— nearly twice as long as most agaves—the plants yielded a juice that was distilled three times before aging for 8 years. Hermosillo gave the choice of barrels for the extra añejo as much attention as the land, calling in examples from Eastern Europe, Scotland, France, and

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the Southern United States. “I wanted a barrel that would complement rather than compete with the tequila,” he says. He chose a new French-oak cask that was made by Taransaud coopers and hewn from 200- to 250-year-old trees in a forest north of Bordeaux. “It’s a very straight tree, 100 feet tall,” Hermosillo says. “The ground shakes when it falls. Later, it is toasted using leftover bits of that same wood so as to not introduce any other flavors to that barrel.” That purity helps the tequila’s aroma and taste to develop with less influence from the wood. The resulting spirit—of which Casa Noble produced only 300 bottles—reveals white-flower and white-pepper notes, some minerality, and even hints of black cherry in the glass. —JANICE O’LEARY


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GALLERY

A C A L I F O R N I A L E G E N D R E C O N N E C T S W I T H N AT U R E

yes, After mudslides made it largely inaccessible for nearly a year, California’s Big Sur region is back and even more beautiful than before—its towering redwoods seemingly grander, its mountains more majestic. Much the same could be said of Ventana Big Sur (ventanabigsur.com), a favorite Central Coast hideaway that reopened last fall in its finest form yet. Originally opened in 1975 on 160 acres of redwood forest and rolling meadows, Ventana resurfaced in November as the first U.S. property from the Singapore-based hospitality brand Alila. A multimilliondollar renovation has the 59-room resort more in tune with its surroundings than ever, with a fresh palette of wood, stone, and warm grays and beiges. The renovation

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also saw the introduction of new experiences, including a creative culinary program highlighting the local land-and-sea bounty, revamped treatments at the updated spa, and back-tonature excursions such as flora-and-fauna hiking tours and falconry. A new bar overlooking the Pacific Ocean is yet another welcome addition, partly for its tastings hosted by sommelier Thomas McKay and supplied by the Sur House restaurant’s 10,000-bottle cellar. For those in search of a deeper dive into Big Sur’s wonders, Ventana has also debuted a new redwoodforest glamping site, where 15 safari-style tents each come with a plush queensize bed, a cozy deck, and total seclusion amid the soaring pines. —JANICE O’LEARY


THE FUT URE OF TIME OPTIMIZATION

THE BECKER CADILLAC ESCALADE ESV

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GALLERY

W I N C H D E S I G N M E R G E S S T Y L E A N D T E C H W I T H I T S V E R S AT I L E N E W E L E M E N T S A I R C R A F T kitchen, and ample storage. He wasn’t keen on yellow gold but requested other pure elements for the details. Most of all, he wanted a dynamic design for his new jet—an Airbus ACJ320neo, set for delivery in 2020—which he plans to use regularly for both business and family travel. Winch delivered a concept that incorporates

RICHARD GREEN

command

the brief that Winch Design (winchdesign .com) received for the Elements aircraft was straightforward enough: The client, with whom the London-based firm had collaborated once before, wanted an interior with space for family members, adequate privacy to allow guests to interact without disturbing sleepers, a large

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copper throughout the interior, including a custom copper-mesh screen that distinguishes one area from the next in the main cabin—a move that provided style and separation without interrupting the view down the length of the aircraft. Natural wood finishes and muted tones on upholstery also contribute to the interior’s

modern, streamlined aesthetic. The contemporary touches extend to bespoke lamps and accent lights that feature innovations such as ultrathin LEDs, something that wouldn’t have been possible in years past. “We’ve learned that these touches enhance an aircraft interior by breaking the commercial feel of aerospace standard fittings,” says

Sam Curson, senior aviation project manager at Winch. Further enhancing the clean, highdesign atmosphere aboard Elements is a 64-inch 4K television, installed almost like an artwork, that rests on a base composed of straw marquetry and carved solid wood brushed with real copper. —STEPHEN TREFFINGER

R O B B R E P O R T. C O M

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GALLERY

C O O K I N G F O R E M M A N U E L M A C R O N I N S P I R E D D O M I N I Q U E C R E N N ’ S N E W E S T R E S TA U R A N T

the french A year ago, Dominique Crenn returned to her homeland to cook for French president Emmanuel Macron. At the Élysée Palace— France’s White House—she joined with legendary chefs from Guy Savoy to Anne-Sophie Pic for a lunch that honored French gastronomy’s rich history. When Crenn returned home to San Francisco, she didn’t want the celebration of her native cuisine to end—so she figured out how to continue it. This excursion to Paris prompted Crenn to push forward with plans for her newest

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restaurant, Bar Crenn (barcrenn.com). The wine bar, which is located next door to her modern-French—and Michelin two-star— Atelier Crenn, is rooted in French culinary tradition. It is also an ode to the tradition’s modern masters. “I came back here, and I’m like, ‘Why am I going to cook some classic from a book?’ ” Crenn says. “‘Why don’t I go to the source and ask those chefs to allow me to use one of their recipes and to put them at the forefront?’” So she e-mailed some of the world’s most

renowned French chefs, from Alain Ducasse to the Élysée’s Guillaume Gomez, to ask if she could re-create their classics. “Not to my surprise, they all sent me their recipes and said, ‘We love you celebrating the French,’ ” she says. At Bar Crenn, which opened in March, she pairs the masters’ dishes with a selection of biodynamic and natural wines. She also serves some of her own interpretations of traditional French fare. “It’s important to celebrate our heritage,” she says, “and teach our history to a new generation.” —JEREMY REPANICH

JORDAN ALEXIS

connection


GALLERY

M A R G A R E T J E W E L S B R I N G S I T S S T O R I E D C R E AT I O N S T O T H E S TAT E S

Margaret’s red-spinel ear clips, pink-spinel bow necklace, and morganite and aquamarine earrings.

expressions of

gilt photos. They also craft vintage-inspired pieces that appear as family heirlooms. “There is a duality to our jewelry,” says Sabrier, who formerly worked in Cartier’s high-jewelry department. “It appears contemporary, but it echoes the past because we use old-world jewelrymaking techniques.” Margaret’s timeless style is exemplified in a series of diamond tiara rings— modeled after historical royal tiaras—and finely detailed designs like the bow necklace (shown). The brand made its U.S. debut in November, when Christie’s New York staged a selling exhibit of its jewelry. At the time, Christie’s Francois Curiel, chairman of Europe and Asia, described Margaret as “a well-kept secret.” Now the secret—and the story—is out. —JILL NEWMAN

IMAGIE.COM

Jewelry is historically rooted in symbolism, as an emblem of power, love, or protection—and that tradition guides the creative collections from Margaret Jewels (margaret-jewels .com). “Our jewelry tells stories,” says cofounder Oriana Melamed Sabrier, who wears gold bangles on her wrists inscribed in diamonds—one with her mother’s name and another with lyrics from a favorite French song. Sabrier started the Geneva-based jewelry salon 10 years ago with her childhood friend Candice Ophir. Collaborating with clients in their salon or at their annual February exhibition at the Gstaad Palace Hotel, the partners create stylish lockets and pendants (starting at $18,000) that bear sentimental poems, names, and children’s

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GALLERY

INSPIRED BY MERCEDES-BENZ, GARIA BRINGS SPORTS-COUPE STYLING TO THE LINKS

car for the course

At the Geneva International Motor Show in March, Garia (garia.com) debuted its Golf Car Inspired by Mercedes-Benz Style, a sleek vehicle born of a collaboration between the Danish golfcart manufacturer and the German automaker. The sports-coupe-like cart is the production model of a prototype that Garia unveiled at the Open Championship (British Open) in summer 2016. According to Garia’s creative director, Anders Lynge, the project’s greatest achievement is the number of striking similarities between that show model and the vehicle now in production. “Often

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you see revolutionary concepts being slimmed down for production use,” he explains. “Here we really have all of the essence and all of the details of the vision in the serial product.” In fact, the production version (about $72,000) introduces a handful of enhancements. The carbon-fiber roof, for example, is wider and now sports a rain groove to better handle inclement weather. The dashboard was redesigned to maximize storage, and the cart now accommodates a built-in refrigerator. Classified as a street-legal, low-speed vehicle,

the battery-powered cart has a 50-mile range. Switching the driving mode from Golf to Street allows it to reach a restricted top speed of 25 mph. On or of the course, riders can use the 10-inch infotainment touchscreen, integrated Bluetooth speakers, and Garia’s trademark 45-degree, rear-facing golf-bag compartment. The cuttingedge features extend to the carbon-fiber body panels, which are handmade by luxury aftermarket manufacturer Mansory. “It really is in another league to anything that can be used on a golf course,” says Lynge. —SHAUN TOLSON


GALLERY

T H I S W I S H B O N E - S H A P E D S A I L A N D M A S T M I G H T B E T H E S U P E R YA C H T S A I L I N G W O R L D ’ S N E X T B I G R I G

setting a

new sail Mides Design’s Aero Sail (mides-design.si) could be a revolutionary new rig for sailing superyachts, replacing traditional masts and sails. The Aero Sail has already proved itself on computer tests and an 18-foot prototype. Its next test vessel will be a 63-foot sailing yacht, though designer Erik Šifrer says the technology could work all the way up to a 400-foot sailing superyacht. The Aero Sail is built inside an A-frame on the exterior edges of the yacht and connected to a carbon roll boom that rotates around a central pivot

point. Šifrer’s goal was to create a beautifullooking sail plan for a large yacht that is also easy to handle. “It doesn’t require any deck equipment, and provides a shorthanded sailing solution,” he says. “It could even be completely automated.” The Aero Sail is 40 percent lighter than a traditional rig, and benefits like in-boom furling remove any need for winches, tracks, blocks, or deck hardware. Its compact size could also allow for helicopters to land on larger superyachts, something precluded by current mast designs. The lack of a central mast also frees up the interior design of any sailing superyacht, since most generalaccommodations plans are created around the main mast. If the Aero Sail performs well on the 63-foot sailing yacht, perhaps a superyacht will be next. —MICHAEL VERDON

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BR-X2 TOURBILLON MICRO-ROTOR EXTRA-THIN BR-CAL.380 MANUFACTURE CALIBRE - LIMITED EDITION OF 99 PIECES

The movement and case of the BR-X2 form a single mechanical unit encased between two sapphire crystal plates. This innovative design gives the appearance that the case is invisible and that the wearer has the unadorned movement on the wrist. The BR-X2 calibre is equipped with a mechanism regulated by an automatic tourbillon, wound by a micro-rotor. Bell & Ross Inc. +1.888.307.7887 · e-boutique: www.bellross.com


GALLERY IN BRIEF

house and home The wholesome founders of Southern California’s favorite wellness retreat have landed among the rolling hills of Maryland. Alex and Sue Glasscock—the couple behind the Ranch Malibu—debuted the 127-acre Estate at Foxfire (foxfiremonkton .com) in January just outside Washington, D.C. The circa-1932 mansion has been freshly renovated and now features six bedrooms adorned with contemporary and vintage furnishings. Guests at the exclusive-use estate have use of private stables for horseback rides through the countryside as well as a pool for summertime dips and a cottage for additional space. One thing they won’t experience, however, is the prohibitive dietary restrictions for which the Ranch is known: The gourmet kitchen is meat, alcohol, and cafeine friendly.

blaze of glory The French house of Lalique (lalique.com) and British automaker McLaren have unveiled their Essence of Speed collaboration, a pulse-quickening ode to design that captures both icons in crystalline brilliance. The McLaren Cheetah sculpture is the first of three limited-edition creations Lalique will release over the next 3 years. Crafted in clear crystal via the lostwax method, the collector’s piece commemorates McLaren’s Formula 1 world championships. Twenty examples of the full-size sculpture— measuring over 19 inches tall—are priced at $69,000 apiece; smaller versions are also available, starting at $2,800. —ARIANNE NARDO

—JACKIE CARADONIO

the drivers’ seat

six-figure six-wheeler Able to tame prehistoric terrain, the VelociRaptor 6×6 from Hennessey Performance Engineering (hennesseyperformance.com) may not be as agile as the Cretaceous Period predator it’s named for, but the six-wheel, 600 hp pickup is frighteningly fast and powerful. Originally a Ford F-150 Raptor SuperCrew, the modified monster (with a turbocharged engine upgrade) tears from zero to 60 mph in just 4.9 seconds. The starting cost for the VelociRaptor 6×6 is $349,000—but then, survival of the fittest always comes at a price. —VIJU MATHEW

move over, moana Dutch shipyard Oceanco (oceancoyacht.com) recently revealed a striking 377-foot concept yacht named Tuhura. Lobanov Design penned the yacht’s exterior lines, while Achille Salvagni dreamed up the interior and BMT Nigel Gee handled the naval architecture. The design borrows from the lines of ancient canoes, such as those used by the Polynesians to explore the Pacific Ocean (think Moana). Salvagni envisioned Tuhura’s interior as a “brushed-teak habitat” and included gunmetal reveals and natural bronze with tatami floors. Though the yacht harks back to ancient design, its technical specs are anything but dated. BMT made great use of the eicient, canoe-like hull design and its stellar seakeeping prowess, incorporating a hybrid Azipod contrarotation propulsion system for an estimated speed of 18 knots. It will be interesting to see which great adventurer reels this one in. —DANIELLE CUTLER

Q& A: JIM NANTZ

Every April, the world’s best golfers converge on Augusta, Ga., for the Masters. We caught up with broadcaster Jim Nantz, who has covered the prestigious tournament for more than 30 years. —SHAUN TOLSON

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What is your favorite Masters moment? For me, nothing can top 1992. To see my college teammate and suite mate, Fred Couples, accomplish his dream and to be there to present the green jacket in Butler Cabin . . . it goes beyond words.

How difficult was that ceremony for you as a broadcaster? When we roomed at the University of Houston, we both had very clear goals—Fred wanted to win the Masters; I wanted to broadcast it. We used to sit around and talk

about it. Then all those years later, it actually played out for real. Man, it was emotional. So it was diicult and wonderful at the same time. What has you most excited about the

Most speakers have multiple drivers to produce sound in distinct frequency ranges, and it’s not uncommon to have several drivers for each range. But the new McIntosh XRT2.1K (mcintoshlabs.com) floorstanding speakers ($130,000) take this concept to an extreme, with an astonishing 81 drivers each—six woofers, two low-frequency midranges, 28 upper-frequency midranges, and 45 tweeters. The woofers and low-frequency midrange drivers are housed within the speaker’s glossy black aluminum cabinet, while the high-end drivers are lined up on a panel suspended in front of the cabinet. A specially designed crossover network ensures that the four classes of driver play nicely together across the speaker’s full frequency range from 12 Hz to 45 kHz. —JOHN LYON

Masters this year? You have a talented young brigade that’s ready to make the tournament their own. Plus, Tiger [Woods] has made an amazing return to competition in the weeks leading up to it.


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Curios /Autions & Fairs

BY ANGELA M. H. SCHUSTER

“Edward Steichen’s Portrait of Gloria Swanson, shot in 1924, is the most definitive example of work from a very important time in the artist’s career,” says Vanessa Hallett, deputy chairman and worldwide head of photographs at Phillips. Having moved beyond the pictorial style of his predecessors, she explains, Steichen revolutionized portrait and fashion photography in the 1920s when he worked for Vogue and Vanity Fair, respectively. The rare-to-market, museum-quality gelatin silver print leads the photography sale at the house in New York on April 9. phillips.com

An Artful Eye $400,000– $600,000 R O B B R E P O R T. C O M

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Curios /Autions & Fairs

Balancing Act $147,000 Couple d’equilibristes

(Tightrope Walkers), a circa1983 bronze by current art-market darling Diego Giacometti, is among the covetable contemporary pieces available from Parisian gallerist Helene Bailly, a first-time exhibitor at Paris Art + Design. The 22nd edition of the fair, which runs April 4 to 8 on the grounds of the Jardin des Tuileries in the City of Light, will host 58 galleries from around the world that specialize in the best of the best in the realm of decorative arts. helenebailly.com; pad-fairs.com

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ANGELUS BY FL OC’H O Floc’h’s interpretation of L’Angélus by Jean-Françoiss Millet (Musée d’Orsay, Paris)

WWW.ANGELUS-TRAVEL.COM


Curios /Autions & Fairs W Odalisque couchée

aux magnolias Estimate Upon Request “Odalisque couchée aux magnolias is one of the best, most satisfying, and sensuous canvases [Henri] Matisse ever painted,” efuses Max Carter, head of impressionist and modern art at Christie’s in New York. The 1923 work depicts the artist’s favorite model, dancer Henriette Darricarrère, clad in harem pants and little else. Hailing from the collection of Peggy and David Rockefeller, it is one of the standout impressionist and modern masterworks going under the gavel during a 5-day auction marathon at Christie’s in New York, May 7 through 11. The Matisse carries an unpublished estimate rumored to be in the range of $70 million to $90 million. Another notable lot is Pablo Picasso’s Fillette à la corbeille fleurie (1905), which was previously owned by Gertrude Stein. It too carries an unpublished estimate, in the region of $90 million to $120 million. christies.com

“What I dream of is an art of balance, of purity and serenity devoid of troubling or depressing subject matter—a soothing, calming influence on the mind.” — H E N R I M AT I S S E W Falling Water

“Boomoon’s images appear to extend beyond the limits of an individual subjective standpoint or personal expression toward a more universal experience, containing the energy of the encounter with the waterfall,” says Brent Beamon of New York– and London-based Flowers Gallery. The gallerist will be ofering works from the South Korean photographer’s Falling Water series, which includes Waterfall #7605 (2017), at the Photography Show in New York, which runs April 4 through 8 at Pier 94 in Manhattan. flowersgallery.com

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$20,000–$32,000

Kidokoro Chair $22,000 Christophe Magnan of Paris-based WA Design Gallery will have a rare bamboo armchair made by Ubunji Kidokoro in 1937 at his stand at Paris Art + Design this month. “The chair,” he explains, “was the inspiration behind Charlotte Perriand’s Tokyo chaise longue, which was conceived in 1940, not long after the French architect and designer’s sojourn to Japan.” gallery-wa.com


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Banquette crocodile $735,000– $1.1 million

W

Claude Lalanne’s giltbronze bench, cast in 2007, headlines a single-owner sale at Tajan in Paris on April 4. Number two of an edition of eight (with four artist’s proofs), the bench is one of the designer’s most sought-after pieces, with two others from the same series having commanded $482,500 and $509,000 at Christie’s and Sotheby’s, respectively. In December, Lalanne’s similarly designed Crocodile Armchair (1997) achieved $1.2 million at Sotheby’s in New York. tajan.com

Arcano Coffee Table $10,250 Milanese designer and architect Mauro Fabbro is a fan of mirrored surfaces, which reflect and amplify the space around the objects he creates, allowing them to “mysteriously disappear.” His 2017 mirrored block-form cofee table will be presented by Parisian gallerist an Ba month Pari Desi n alexandrebia i.co

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Curios /The Collector

TEXT

PHOTOGRAPHY

BRETT ANDERSON

JASON TINACCI

“The only way to learn about wine is to taste. Let wines age, but taste them when they are young, when they are in their middle years, and when they’re over the hill.” —M I C H A E L M O N DAV I 84

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As the eldest son of Napa Valley winemaking legend Robert Mondavi, Michael Mondavi became a collector of bottlings both magnificent and mundane almost by default. “I had the luxury of growing up 100 yards from the Charles Krug winery,” says the vintner, referring to the historic property his grandparents Rosa and Cesare Mondavi purchased in 1943. “Then in 1965, my senior year in college, the infamous battle between my father and my uncle came to a head, and we were out. All that my father had of the Charles Krug cellar would fit in the trunk of his car. After we started Robert Mondavi Winery, I wanted to have some older vintages, but they were only available at the Napa Valley Wine Auction [now Auction Napa Valley], and so I put my hand up and froze my elbow and bought a number of cases there.”

N Michael Mondavi’s cellar in Napa Valley is a place for him and his guests to experiment and explore. E The collection includes many of the best vintages from the Mondavi family’s own wineries.

Mondavi’s determination to reacquire a portion of his family’s history persisted, and today, the vast cellar beneath his residence contains examples of most—if not all—of the vintages produced during his father’s tenure at the winery, including 1944 (the Mondavis’ first vintage), 1946, and salient years from the 1950s and 1960s. This endeavor naturally led to his acquiring some older vintages from many of the wineries owned by family friends, such as Beaulieu Vineyard, Louis M. Martini, Inglenook, and Concannon. Today he owns one of the most comprehensive collections of Napa Valley wines from those decades. But his taste for nostalgia proved educational, as well. “My father was always focused on how to make wines that could compete with and belong on the table with the great wines of the world,” he says. “This meant Burgundy and Bordeaux. And so I started collecting those, as well, to see how ours stood up.” This hoard of historic bottles also enabled him to dispel prejudices relating to the age-worthiness of California wines, which many notable critics had long dismissed. “On one occasion in the late 1970s, the English critic Hugh Johnson was visiting my father and me and tasting a few wines with luncheon,” Mondavi recalls. “His comment was, ‘Gee, it’s too bad that California wines don’t age well like Bordeaux.’

Being a young kid at the time, I said, ‘What are you talking about?’ So I brought up a few of first-growth Bordeaux along with a Georges de Latour Private Reserve Cabernet and a Charles Krug Vintage Select—a 1958, I think—and we pulled the corks and tasted them before dinner. Johnson shook his head and said, ‘The reason I had that opinion is because everybody drank all the good wine before it could get old.’ ” Mondavi’s passion for preserving the valley’s liquid legacy, however, is not the only motive informing his collection. His access to these venerable vintages enables him, as a vintner, to better understand how ripeness and extraction afect a wine’s longevity. “I’ve found that it’s not how big a wine is that determines how long it can age,” he explains. “The balance of a wine—the tannin, the body, the acidity, the layers of flavor—are more important. The year 1974, for example, was great for Napa. If you look at the Reserve

Cabernets of BV or Inglenook or Robert Mondavi Winery, those were bigger than the Napa Valley designates. During the first 15 years, I thought the Reserves from ’74 were the ones. But the Napas are the more enjoyable today because they were leaner and more balanced. And that, to me, is the advantage of having a cellar with multiple decades: You can go back to the same parcel of land over the past 20, 30, or 40 years to understand how the wines have changed.”


Curios /Books & Manuscripts

S

It’s Elemental $275,000–$412,000 A 13th-century Arabic translation of Euclid’s Elements—a 13-volume 3rd-century BC treatise that is considered one of the pillars of mathematics— hits the block at Sotheby’s in London on April 25. “The North African manuscript, which was likely penned in Egypt, is densely illustrated with diagrams and marginal notes,” says London-based head of sale Benedict Carter, adding that the scribes rendered the main text in naskh and the titles in thuluth script. “Owing to the medieval Arabic scientific tradition, Greek texts such as this have come down to us, bearing witness to the importance of preserving classical knowledge.” sothebys.com

“The laws of nature are but the mathematical thoughts of God.” — E U C L I D

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Rare Botanicals $300,000 Fleurs, fruits, racines et plantes d’amérique dessinées d’après nature (1820), a portfolio of 92 watercolors depicting plants native to the Americas, is available from Parisian dealer Rodolphe Chamonal, who is exhibiting at the Salon International du Livre Rare & de l’Objet d’art this month. “The unsigned watercolors illustrate each plant with its leafy stem, flower, and fruit—the latter sometimes seen in section,” says Chamonal, adding that all of the drawings appear to be by the same hand. chamonal.com; salondulivrerare.paris

E

A book of hours (use of Rome) with a text rendered by Johannes de Bruolio in Autun, France, between 1450 and 1460 leads a sale of rare books and manuscripts at Artcurial in Paris on April 26. The richly illustrated vellum volume in Latin contains 23 grisaille miniatures and bears an affinity to one produced by illuminator Jean Fillon for Jean Rolin, a Burgundian bishop and cardinal of Autun at the time. The current ofering, which first appeared on the block at Sotheby’s in 1895, has a modern Moroccan-leather binding. artcurial.com

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Timely Offering $50,000–$73,600

Prized Possession $4,700 Cédric Maussion of Librairie Au Cri de la Chouette will present a leather-bound, four-volume edition of Alfred Martineau’s Dupleix et l’Inde Française, 1722–1754 at the Salon International du Livre Rare & de l’Objet d’art, which runs April 13 to 15 at the Grand Palais in Paris. The work chronicles the exploits of Joseph Marquis Dupleix, the 18th-century governor-general of Pondicherry—a French colonial outpost in India—during a turbulent time in its history, as British, French, and Dutch colonials vied for control of the subcontinent and its resources. The volumes were published between 1920 and 1928 by Éditions Ernest Leroux and the Société de l’Histoire des Colonies Françaises. aucridelachouette.com


FINE DESIGN 360

THE LIVING IS LARGE AT A COACHELLA OASIS CREATED FOR RECREATION AND OUTDOOR ADVENTURE. 88 • APRIL 2018


BY JORGE S. ARANGO

PHOTOGRAPHY BY SAM FROST

AERIAL SHOT BY FRANK FELIPE


MAGNIFICENT MIRAGE

A

L L A N Q UAT E R M A I N — protagonist of the 1885 fabulist novel King Solomon’s Mines (and the Indiana Jones of his day)—recounts, “By noon of the third day’s journey we could see the trees of the oasis . . . and within an hour of sundown we were walking once more upon grass and listening to the sound of

running water.” Imagining Quatermain’s oasis expanded into a sprawling, resort-size paradise hints at what greets journeyers to this modernday, 37-acre oasis in the Coachella Valley, which boasts an 11-bedroom, 40,000-square-foot residence; working horse and date farms; a 6-acre Clive Clark–designed golf course; an enormous lake; canals; a petting zoo; horse and bike

trails; pickle-ball and tennis courts; a pool and spa; and a helicopter pad. As architect Gregory J. Smith says of the design team—which comprises interior designer Dorothy

An A. Rudin sectional and swivel chairs upholstered in Great Plains fabric anchor the lake-facing great room.

Willetts, Bradshaw Construction’s Mark Bradshaw, and landscape architect Anne Attinger—“they took a flat piece of land and made something unimaginable: a place that pushed the limits of reality.” Push limits it did, from concept to fruition. The raw, undeveloped land was a working pasture, says Bradshaw. “Since it was just outside the city limits, we had


APRIL 2018 • 91


to bring in utilities from over one mile away,” including domestic water, gas, and electricity. And because of the scale of the project, infrastructure capacities had to be multiplied tenfold. “A typical house is powered by a 200amp main panel,” Bradshaw notes. “This one is 2,000 amps.” The owner, a real estate developer and active sportsman, wanted an uninterrupted indoor-outdoor

MAGNIFICENT MIRAGE

92 • APRIL 2018

connection, which necessitated “as much glass as building codes allowed,” says Smith (of Uberion Architecture + Design). Consequently, because very few solid walls go from floor to ceiling,

The master suite features framed Indonesian shadow puppets, an Armani/Casa lamp, and an A. Rudin sectional.

Bradshaw points out, “We used more steel than there is in nearby Indian Wells Stadium,” which hosts the BNP Paribas Open tennis tournament. Essentially, the team created “an island in the desert,” says Willetts, a place that now holds its own fascinating mythology. The fundamental vernacular was Indonesian. “It’s meant to evoke the fabled sea serpent at Tanah


Lot Temple in Bali,” explains Smith, but the home was meant for modern recreation. Achieving the desired aesthetic in the middle of an arid valley required great subtlety to prevent the complex from

Left: Designer Dorothy Willetts created custom ping-pong and billiard tables. Below: One of the larger guest suites.

appearing completely out of place. Willetts knew there could be no lush palm-frond patterns or bright, beachy colors. Rather, she explains, “everything had to be very textural and earthy, very elemental and contemplative, to convey an island-inspired luxury destination home with South Pacific and Caribbean influences.” Palette and furnishings hewed to the architecture’s

Asian demeanor. “To me, sage greens, terra-cottas, and grays all have a Zen feel,” says Willetts. “And the red nods to the Asian influence.” She was particularly resourceful with art and accessories, since antiques and paintings might tip the house too much toward formality. She sought a more organic feel and skillfully framed textiles and Indonesian shadow puppets and arranged indigenous

“EVERYTHING HAD TO BE VERY TEXTURAL AND EARTHY, VERY ELEMENTAL AND CONTEMPLATIVE, TO CONVEY AN ISLAND-INSPIRED LUXURY DESTINATION HOME WITH SOUTH PACIFIC AND CARIBBEAN INFLUENCES.”


MAGNIFICENT MIRAGE 94 • APRIL 2018

artifacts on tables and shelves, imbuing the space with soul. For all the elements to find harmony—with the water, sky, and captivating views—Willetts’s design had to thoughtfully merge style and serenity. The heavy reliance on steel for construction not only allowed wide overhangs to shade against the harsh desert sun and shield against the winds but also permitted

the wood-covered ceilings inside to peak at 37 feet. The furniture needed to be impressively proportioned and balanced as well as comfortable. “[The client] wanted seating to be extra deep, because he’s very tall, and lots of his friends are athletes,” says Willetts. “We had muslin mock-ups made so he could see how the furniture felt.” The only viable solution was to custom build the

pieces. “So much had to be designed and made for the project, down to the billiard and ping-pong tables in the game room,” notes Willetts. And given the project’s abbreviated schedule, “I had

PK Design contributed custom cabinetry on the quartzite islands in the house’s “entertaining” kitchen.

to go to people I knew I could rely on.” Creating original pieces gave her more control over production. Living-room porcelain lamps and bar pendants were commissioned from Mirena Kim Ceramics. Willetts worked very closely with French artist Etienne Moyat to create sculptural carved-wood panels for several rooms. And she relied on A. Rudin for upholstery. “They make everything in


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“THEY TOOK A FLAT PIECE OF LAND AND MADE SOMETHING UNIMAGINABLE: A PLACE THAT PUSHED THE LIMITS OF REALITY.”


O N T H E R O C KS design f. binfarĂŠ | quickship


the U.S., and their factory is in Los Angeles. The client lives in Beverly Hills, so it was easier to have him sittest.” (Bradshaw adopted a similar philosophy with trees planted in “islands” set into the main lake. He flew the landscape-design team to Northern California to walk old olive groves and handpick the trees, which are over 110 years old, because he says “if you wait 30 days for them to arrive and they’re not right, you’re S.O.L.”) Outside, Attinger broke the project into quadrants: a date farm resplendent with

over 1,000 palms, a horse ranch, a pasture doubling as unconventional golf course, and the residential compound. “Immediately adjacent to the main house and canal, the plantings suggest a subtropical feel,” explains Attinger. “The guest quarters have a simple, stylized desert landscape.” Japanese-style garden vignettes also

It’s all about the views: The master bedroom soaks in the sun with indoor and outdoor showers.

punctuate the property. Had Quatermain’s party happened upon this oasis, discovering the treasures of King Solomon’s storied mines might have suddenly seemed ridiculously beside the point. What riches, after all, could rival these splendors?

MAGNIFICENT MIRAGE

Dorothy Willetts, Willetts Design & Associates, willetts design.com; Gregory J. Smith, Uberion Architecture + Design, uberion.com; Mark Bradshaw, Bradshaw Construction, markbradshawconstruction .com; Anne Attinger, anne attinger.com

FOR ALL THE ELEMENTS TO FIND HARMONY—WITH THE WATER, SKY, AND CAPTIVATING VIEWS—WILLETTS’S DESIGN HAD TO THOUGHTFULLY MERGE STYLE AND SERENITY.

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05_DESIGNED BY MARCEL WANDERS

REVOLUTION PRECRAFTED

04_DESIGNED BY DAPHNE GUINNESS

REDEFINING

01_DESIGNED BY EDUARDO CALMA


07_DESIGNED BY BUDJI + ROYAL ARCHITECTURE + DESIGN

06_DESIGNED BY EDUARDO CALMA

FINE DESIGN 360

REAL ESTATE DEVELOPER ROBBIE ANTONIO’S NEW PROJECT, BATULAO ARTSCAPES, WILL BE THE WORLD’S FIRST LIVABLE ART PARK.

BY REBEKAH BELL

07_DESIGNED BY BUDJI + ROYAL ARCHITECTURE + DESIGN

02_DESIGNED BY KENNETH COBONPUE


collector in the Philippines.” In 2015, Antonio merged his loves for art and architecture by founding Revolution Precrafted (revolutionpre crafted.com), a Philippine company that manufactures prefabricated houses dreamed up by leading architects and designers such as Jean Nouvel, Sou Fujimoto, and the late Zaha Hadid. Antonio’s newest venture, Batulao Artscapes (batulao artscapes.com), takes the

concept one step further. “It’s meant to be the world’s first livable art park, where you can live in and amongst wonderful works of art,” he says of the 350-acre development, which will be located about 2 hours outside of Manila. Situated between Taal Volcano in Tagaytay and the sandy white beaches of Nasugbu, Batangas, the verdant destination will be far removed from the stresses of city living but will include

11_DESIGNED BY MARMOL RADZINER

REDEFINING THE ARTS DISTRICT

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a forum for art that even urbanites will envy. The project was envisioned as a community of artistic residences and museums, and art will be the common denominator throughout. Prospective homeowners can choose one of 20 designs for one- to three-bedroom prefab properties designed by Marmol Radnizer and Kravitz Design, Philip Johnson Alan Ritchie Architects, Marcel Wanders, and Pelli Clarke

REVOLUTION PRECRAFTED

08_DESIGNED BY DANIEL LIBESKIND

F

I L I P I N O R E A L E STAT E developer Robbie Antonio has always had an eye for art. His Manila residence is filled with modern and contemporary pieces from Jef Koons, Damien Hirst, Francis Bacon, and others— a revelation that led the art-collector database Larry’s List to refer to him as “arguably the biggest


10_DESIGNED BY AFGH FOR WALLPAPER* Pelli Architects, among others. Approximately 4,000 homes will grace the grounds. Many of the freestanding residences are whimsical, ultramodern creations, with dramatic lines, slanted roofs, and walls of glass that look out to the artificial lake and surrounding forest. “People see the homes as art pieces,” Antonio says. “Neighbors will have very diferent homes, so that really adds value” to the experience of living in a

gallery of structural art. In addition to abodes that function as works of art, four museums will pepper the quarter, each designed by Pritzker Prize–winning architects, including a visualarts museum conceived by Jean Nouvel (the talent behind Madrid’s Reina Sofía museum expansion) and an architecture-and-design museum envisioned by French architect Christian de Portzamparc. In addition,

there will be a lakeside beach, a beach club, and a chapel. The one-of-a-kind undertaking will open in December 2018, with prices for the lots and homes ranging from $60,000 to $600,000. Antonio is already thinking of other projects intended for those who value the intersection of art and architecture. He says, “We’ll be announcing many other master plans throughout the region and world.”

13_DESIGNED BY DAVID SALLE

09_DESIGNED BY PHILIP JOHNSON ALAN RITCHIE ARCHITECTS 12_DESIGNED BY ELIZABETH DE PORTZAMPARC

MANY OF THE FREESTANDING RESIDENCES ARE WHIMSICAL, ULTRAMODERN CREATIONS, WITH DRAMATIC LINES, SLANTED ROOFS, AND WALLS OF GLASS THAT LOOK OUT TO THE ARTIFICIAL LAKE AND SURROUNDING FOREST.


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FINE DESIGN 360

CAN INTERIOR DESIGN BLUNT THE BLAND LIMBO OF A LAYOVER? KATHARINE POOLEY CHECKS IN.

A

CCLAIMED BRITISH designer Katharine Pooley, who currently has 30 projects going, is the talent behind memorable private residences and hotels across four continents. But her greatest feat may be helping people to forget where they are: the airport. Pooley’s refined sensibilities have reshaped the interiors of the Royal Suite Terminal 5 at London Heathrow and the VVIP Private Jet Lounge for XJet at London Stansted— spaces that serve not only as polished environments but also as refuges from the vicissitudes of 21st-century travel. With any number of discerning guests passing through, these facilities place a premium on privacy, as their separate entrances and screening areas attest. Employing a moody palette punctuated by metallic finishes and crisp accents, Pooley put her cool, understated imprint on each space, deftly mingling notes of residential splendor with elegant restraint. Here, the designer shares her thoughts on bringing touches of civility and comfort to passengers’ erstwhile purgatory. Given that most people are harried or weary in airports, how did you approach the design of these spaces? There had to be a strong design aesthetic to every area, but the furniture was

The designer’s moody blues in the VVIP Private Jet Lounge for XJet at London Stansted Airport.

BY ARIANNE NARDO

PHOTOGRAPHY BY ANDREW BEASLEY

predominantly handpicked with comfort in mind. I spent a great deal of time ensuring all fabrics were durable, soft, and inviting for the tired international traveler. A mixture of linens, velvets, cashmere, and leathers in cool tones were layered to create a peaceful and serene sanctuary from the rest of the bustling airport. Were there any limitations or restrictions to these projects? Absolutely. When working “air side” at an airport, there are many rules and regulations regarding fire retardancy, security, and durability that we had to take into account from the beginning. Also, the VVIP clients tend to have big retinues and groups of security personnel; we had to ensure, for example, that there were very strong chairs by every door for the bodyguards. The spaces also had to be fairly flexible in arrangement but completely private from each other. A typical hour might see the Pope, Justin Bieber, and the Emir of Qatar all passing through. Best kept entirely separate. How was this different from designing a hospitality project? Because of the nature of the clientele, it had to have a


very luxury feel rather than a commercial one. It was designed more in keeping with an exclusive private members club or private home—with beautiful accessories, flowers, cushions, throws, and scented candles. What amenities did you wish you could have included? It would have been fun to incorporate some beauty amenities within the spaces. For many of our clients, having a massage or manicure while they wait would be expected—and designing private spa lounges is something I have enjoyed in the past.

“A TYPICAL HOUR MIGHT SEE THE POPE, JUSTIN BIEBER, AND THE EMIR OF QATAR ALL PASSING THROUGH.” ESCAPE ARTIST

What informed the color palette and furnishings? I felt it was important to keep to a classic British color palette of royal blue, soft dove grays, and some ivory and crystal accents. I also wanted to ensure British manufacturers and artisans were predominantly used to showcase their high level of quality and unique design flair. What mood did you want to evoke? From my own experiences traveling around the world, I really wanted to create a tranquil and calm atmosphere where, for a moment, the clients might relax. What have your travel experiences taught you about good design? I find that the simplest things make a great diference when I am traveling. Can I charge my phone easily? Is the chair comfortable? The lighting flattering? Will my drink be reachable on the table? These small details, which are too easily forgotten or sacrificed for the overall design impact, make all the diference in achieving a truly successful design—one that is both beautiful and fit for purpose. Favorite travel rituals? There is nothing quite like turning my mobile to airplane mode and looking at photos of my two little boys, husband, and dogs to completely chill out and remember the most important things in life! Katharine Pooley, katharinepooley.com

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FINE DESIGN 360 BY ARIANNE NARDO

CELIA SAWYER FASHIONS A PRIVATE-PLANE INTERIOR WITH SINGULAR GOOD LOOKS.


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FLYING SOLO

“I WANT TO STAND OUTSIDE OF THE BOX AND CREATE INTERIORS THAT MOVE CONCEPTS FORWARD.”


T

H E Y K N OW that I do not do beige,” says British interior designer Celia Sawyer when asked if clients enlist her for a particular style. “It is not my ethos. I want to stand outside of the box and create interiors that move concepts forward.” Glamour is her beat—her layered, sumptuous spaces treat decoration like a high virtue and are defined by her good instincts for either welcoming indulgence or politely switching it to low-power mode. An innate instinct for reading clients guided her work for the owner of this Airbus A340, who wanted “a stylish ‘residence in the sky’ for himself and his family, with spacious, private areas and all the options to entertain business guests while traveling around the world,” according to Sawyer. Having previously collaborated with the client, a royal from the Middle East, she found a natural groove. Still, this was her largest private aircraft to date. “The last thing I wanted was a garish interior or something too bland. His brief was that it had to have the wow factor.” She answered with unflinching originality, employing a fearless jolt of blue, golden verve, and a corps of specialty artisans ready to ride shotgun on this high-flying decorative escapade. In the salon and lounge areas, a series of individual gold-plated sections trace the curvature of the aircraft, giving confident depth to the interior. Sawyer balanced these elements with linear furniture dressed in handstitched Tuscan leather,

superlative silks, and a touch of velvet. The bar is lit from beneath, while two crystal chandeliers with 24-karatgold accents emit an aureate glow. The center tables are veneered, which was a pragmatic solution, as weight— like safety, shockproofing, and fire prevention—is a constant consideration aboard an aircraft. The salon and lounge’s cooler alter ego emerges in the master suite, where the designer’s signature palette envelops the space. The hand-stitched leather headboard is flanked by bespoke bedside crystal fixtures, which were specially constructed to prevent any swing during flight. The main bathroom has a Swarovski-crystal-and-glass washbasin, while the master bath features midnight-blue marble and an integrated mirror-faced television, fulfilling the client’s wish for electronic amenities. The project is a glossy, glamorous trip into the experiential. The interior gives the impression of a hotel or restaurant that has outlived Soho House’s relaxed leather earnestness and opted for a little sizzle. Perhaps the highest compliment to be paid this space is that it does not resemble a private plane at all—a point that establishes Sawyer, whose design career has spanned more than two decades, as an accomplished luxury rebel. “I am working with the Royal Navy now, designing the oicers’ mess on their warship HMS Queen Elizabeth. [The dining hall] has the old-fashioned ‘always been done’ look, and I am keen to change history on this.” Celia Sawyer, celiasawyer.com

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FINE DESIGN 360

THE SHAPE

DUTCHMAN COR D. ROVER TAKES YACHT DESIGN TO ITS OUTER LIMITS.

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BY JULIA ZALTZMAN


Collecting. Those who do it, must do it. We understand, because at heart, we’re collectors, too. Benchmark Wine Group helps collectors build great collections—the easiest way possible— obsessively, one bottle at a time. Start or grow your wine collection online today.

©2017 B E N C H M A R K W I N E G RO U P


THE SHAPE OF WATER

Sought for his beach-type approach to yachting, Rover delivered on that promise with Seasense.

SEASENSE FULLY INDULGES IN THE LIFE AQUATIC WITH A 33-FOOT POOL AT ITS CENTER. 114 • APRIL 2018

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U T C H D E S I G N E R Cor D. Rover is a master of functional luxury. His background in naval architecture and mechanical engineering, fine-tuned under the early stewardship of Frank Mulder, forms the basis of his innovative designs today. Once tasked with the strength calculations for Heesen’s 144-foot Octopussy—the fastest megayacht at the time of its 1988 launch—he has spent the past 20 years fully immersed in the aesthetic side of his craft, creating custom yachts that “trigger outside-the-box thinking.” His concept for the 220foot motor yacht Seasense proves the point. Launched by Benetti last year, Seasense fully indulges in the life aquatic with an impressive and unexpected 33-foot pool at its center. “It started with a pool that you can walk around and spend the day around rather than putting people in a lowerdeck beach club,” says Rover. “We wanted to create a beach club on the main deck, and that is what triggered the client’s interest.” The breadth of the pool area is emphasized by teak decking that runs athwartships and is complemented

by teak louvers providing shade along the sides of the aft deck. Large sliding doors divide the pool, dining, and lounge areas into two or three spaces. If the doors are left open, the area unfolds as one sprawling 98-foot expanse. The Los Angeles– based firm Area designed the interiors, which feature light woods for the bases, trims, walls, and doors, contrasted by shades of blue like lapis lazuli velvets, leather furniture, and silky, mottled-blue carpets. Rover’s design with Seasense reflects his clients’ growing desire for more outdoor space, especially younger owners and those keen on Mediterranean sailing. To create that connection to the sea, Rover has been using more onboard glass and favoring a lighter approach with his projects. “Heavy and dark nautical interior designs have not completely fallen out of favor, but the majority of clients are looking for lighter and fresher styles, albeit rich in detailing with the use of materials.” A recent launch, the Yachting 3.0 Cor D. Rover tender, is intended for those who prefer to be on the water “traveling from one five-star hotel to the next and arriving in style.” The chic tender boat has a 170 hp Volvo engine, a minimal noise level, low fuel consumption, and its own set of bespoke luggage—all of which make it a splashy original. Cor D. Rover Design, cor-d-rover.com


SERVICE THAT DEFINES LUXURY


FINE DESIGN 360

THE 161-FOOT AURORA HAS ONE OF THE MOST ASSERTIVE EXTERIORS OF ANY RECENT SUPERYACHT LAUNCH, BUT DESIGNER ACHILLE SALVAGNI’S INTERIOR IS ALL ABOUT CURVES, CONTOURS, AND THE PLEASURES OF A 500-BOTTLE WINE CELLAR.

BY MICHAEL VERDON

PHOTOGRAPHY BY PAOLO PETRIGNANI


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E S I D E N T I A L architects have become the new darlings of the superyacht world. In some cases, they are replacing traditional yacht designers. In most, they are making the familiar, well-established marine design conventions seem like the fashion equivalent of a turtleneck—nice, but not exactly pushing it. Owners are now asking for the style and ambience of home aboard their custom vessels, and they want it delivered with requisite individuality. As a result, they’re enlisting interiordesign studios and specialists who know how to achieve a look, not just source a few plush furnishings. Achille Salvagni—whose impressive portfolio includes Central Park pieds-à-terre, London townhouses, and

a sought-after collection of furniture and lighting— has ascended to a prestigious position within the superyacht scene. Known for high-level craftsmanship and bespoke, know-themwhen-you-see-them details, Salvagni has become the go-to designer for clients who want a diferent kind of yacht experience. Aurora, the recent 161-foot launch from Italian shipyard Rossinavi, could be one of his masterpieces. Aurora is Salvagni’s third collaboration with Rossinavi, after the 230-foot Numptia and the 164-foot Endeavour II. Each vessel exemplifies his uncanny ability to combine refined decor with subtle colors and fluid

Salvagni’s design is distinct for its artistic approach; contemporary artworks create unexpected moments.

INNER BEAUTY

“I SPEND A LOT OF QUALITY TIME WITH MY CLIENTS SO I CAN LEARN WHAT THEIR DREAMS ARE. THEN I TURN THOSE DREAMS INTO DESIGNS THEY MIGHT NEVER ENVISION THEMSELVES.”


spaces while still remaining distinctive. “I see myself as much as a psychologist as a designer,” Salvagni told me during a tour of Aurora at the Monaco Yacht Show. “I spend a lot of quality time with my clients so I can learn what their dreams are. Then I turn those dreams into designs they might never envision themselves.” Designing a yacht requires an entirely diferent mind-set from a beach house in Malibu or palazzo in Venice. Not only is there the obsession over materials, since a boat needs to be as lightweight as possible, but there are also no permanent ties with surrounding terrain. “If you’re creating a design for Palm Beach or

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Curve is the word with Salvagni’s Gae chair (above) and sinuous skylight (right). Even the hi-tech wine cellar ĊĔĔĈģğë̏ďëéDz

London, the heritage of the place will give roots to the project’s identity,” says Salvagni. With yachts, the view constantly changes. “So the design becomes more about the owner than a specific location,” he adds. For Salvagni, Aurora conjures up the image of a rhino—particularly looking head-on. “You can almost see the muscles beneath her skin,” he adds. The 28-year-old Swiss owner

“WE WERE ABLE TO TAKE A SPACE THAT WAS CLOSER TO THE DESIGN OF A RACECAR AND GIVE IT A RESIDENTIAL ENVIRONMENT.”


INNER BEAUTY


INNER BEAUTY

of Aurora wanted a yacht with exceptional visual appeal, both inside and out, so veteran yacht designer Fulvio De Simoni created an exterior defined by sharp edges, huge deck spaces, and a low-slung superstructure. Special features include two saloons, a private terrace for the upper-deck master suite, and a spa with a steam room in the beach club. The unconventional exterior meant extra headaches for Salvagni, especially the enormous forward windows that slope down in the master suite. “The yacht from the outside was amazing, but I also realized that we would never be able to hide the structural elements,” says Salvagni. “Somehow, we needed to absorb them into the design.” He did this by creating “white wings,” or broad leather-covered pillars that integrate well with the pitch of the windows. The wings and windows, sitting in front of the king-size bed, ofer an exceptional view of the water without compromising the suite’s sense of harmony. “We were able to take a space that was closer to the design of a racecar and give it a residential environment,” says Salvagni. After seeing dozens of custom superyachts at Monaco, I was struck by Salvagni’s creation. The entire space is a fluid, confident expression defined by the most audacious of all design moves—the curve. From the skylight to the sculptural staircase and voluptuous seating in the saloon, Aurora bends easily into this curvilinear language. “Noble materials,” as the designer calls them, were essential to the project. A champion of artisanmade pieces, Salvagni was thoughful with his material choices and created custom

Handsome and polished, the bathroom furthers the urbane, bespoke nature of the project.

APRIL 2018 • 123


INNER BEAUTY

furnishings throughout. To give the interiors layers and dimension, he selected a variety of woods—brushed teak on the floors, limed sycamore on the walls—along with several types of Carrara marble that he handpicked from Italian quarries. The dining table has a gold-leaf top in an almost-forgotten technique developed by 1920s Parisian cabinetmakers that gives it a tactile, crocodile-skin feel. Salvagni paired this table with a futuristic globe chandelier he designed for the dining area. Aurora’s owner wanted the yacht to be a “fast speedboat” that reaches 28 knots, so De Simoni and Salvagni were cognizant of weight. The wavy marble wall in the master suite, for instance, is actually a Carrara veneer over carbon fiber. The wine “cellar” is the vessel’s heart, positioned in the center at the junction of two corridors. “[The owner] wanted the wine collection to be part of the yacht, so we designed an area where it can be seen without being too ostentatious,” says Salvagni. The efect of so many colored bottles is beautiful, like looking into a Fifth Avenue jewelry store. The climate-controlled cabinets display diferent light efects for specific wines, and a computer controls how much exposure the more light-sensitive vintages receive. The owner can access the cellar by scanning his fingerprints. Imbuing Aurora’s design with such refinement, Salvagni succeeded in elevating the vessel beyond “a static space that is simply decorated with furniture and wallpaper”—exactly what the cool kids are after. Achille Salvagni Architetti achillesalvagni.com; Rossinavi, rossinavi.it

Salvagni’s “white wings” concept for the master suite found harmony with Fulvio De Simoni’s masterful yacht design.

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Head of the Though little known outside of enthusiast circles, Stax has been taking music lovers on unmatched aural adventures since decades before the headphone revolution.

126

APRIL 2018

A M O N G T H E M A N Y S P E C I E S O F C O N N O I S S E U R — P H I L AT E L I S T S , O E N O P H I L E S ,

birders—few can compete with audiophiles for the title of Most Insuferable Person to Be Cornered by at a Cocktail Party. I have been that person for whom first dates have gone terribly wrong, even relationships doomed, by mountains of gear and monstrous loudspeakers. Indeed, my most successful and longstanding relationship might be the 42-year-long afair I’ve had with Stax audio equipment. ¶ The Japanese recording engineer Naotake Hayashi established Showa Ko-On Manufacturing in 1938, renaming it Stax Industries in 1952 and introducing its first pair of “earspeakers” in 1960. At the time, Hayashi could scarcely have imagined that his company would be on the first ripple of a massive consumer wave in the 21st century. Within the last decade, headphones have become the speakers of choice for many listeners (a trend illustrated by our most recent reader poll, on page 24), and last year, name brands took in more than $15 billion in worldwide sales. Stax still sits at the top of this genre in terms of quality—but remains known only to an infinitesimal fraction of audiophiles. The 80-year-old manufacturer may well be the best-kept secret in high-end consumer electronics.


BY

Robert Ross

Class

PH OTOG R APH Y BY

That Stax has always called its products earspeakers, not headphones, is a clue to the seriousness with which the company takes music reproduction. Such ultrahigh-fidelity transducers can only be compared to costis-no-object loudspeakers, and to hear a pair of the company’s current flagship, the SR-009, is to enter a heavenly musical realm.

Matthew Roharik

ST YLI NG BY

My stairway to heaven, as it were, started in college in 1974, when I first made the life-changing discovery of audio. I soon sold my car and bought a hi-fi system anchored by Quad electrostatic loudspeakers, perhaps the most significant audio product ever invented. The speakers’ sonic excellence lay in the use of electrostatic panels instead of cone

Jessica Stewart

drivers. Electrostatics feature a plastic membrane that is coated with electroconductive material and suspended between two parallel fixed electrodes. A polarizing voltage is applied to the diaphragm, and when the fluctuating voltage of the audio signal reaches the electrodes, the diaphragm moves back and forth by the repulsion and attraction of electrostatic

The SRA-12S preamplifier, DA-300 amplifier, and SRD-7/MK2 transformer with SR-X/MK3 earspeakers delivered state-of-the-art sound in 1976—and still sound great today.


Head of the Class

forces, producing sound waves. The diaphragm moves in absolute compliance with the amplifier output—with no time lag or distorted waveforms. My Quad electrostatics rendered music with transparency, detail, and speed unmatched by any dynamic speaker of the time (and few today). Listening to my albums on the Quads was a transformative experience. And then I discovered Stax. Stax reemerged after World War II selling condenser phono cartridges based on the electrostatic principle. It soon released a tonearm, and by 1954 it had developed an electrostatic tweeter. The Stax miracle occurred when Hayashi introduced his SR-1 earspeakers—the world’s first electrostatic headphones—in 1960. In 1964, Stax extrapolated its earspeaker technology with a trio of electrostatic loudspeaker models. My first Stax encounter was in 1976, at an audio salon demonstrating the brand’s SR-X/MK3 earspeakers and game-changing DA-300 amplifier. Perhaps the finest amp of its era, it

was a 90-pound, 150-wattper-channel behemoth the size of a microwave oven. At $3,600—a small fortune for an amplifier at the time— it saw very limited production. Today, a good example is one of the most coveted pieces of classic audio gear on the planet. The following year, Stax released the SR-Sigmas, top-of-the-line earspeakers that produced a panoramic sound stage never before possible with the genre— thanks largely to a physical design resembling a pair of miniature bookshelf speakers. The Sigmas were best used in private, so ridiculous was the appearance of the listener wearing them. The semi-panoramic Lambda Series followed in 1979, developed in part to meet the exacting requirements of Daimler-Benz for instruments needed to analyze the acoustic properties of automotive interiors. By the late 1980s, I was living with Stax’s ELS-F81 and larger ELS-8X loudspeakers. The latter were the size of doors and allowed one to achieve a sort of sonic nirvana—imagine Stax

headphones writ large. This was a time when LPs were still being spun, but the promise of digital—still in its formative years—prompted Stax to design the Quattro CD player, followed by a monumental digital-toanalog converter and some colossal monaural amplifiers. Each piece pushed the state of the art to the very edge. I met Takeshi Hayashi in 1988, when Stax was celebrating its 50th anniversary and his father, who lived into the early 1990s, was still putting in a full day’s work at the factory. Himself a brilliant designer,

the younger Hayashi carried on the Stax tradition of innovation and artisanal excellence. His SR-Omega of 1993 ushered in a new generation of Stax electrostatic headphones, with sound that was stunning for its realism and total freedom from distortion. Announcing the breakthrough Omega, a Stax brochure of the day stated: “We concluded that only headphones, which are totally immune to the sonic variations of listening rooms, can serve as a truly universal audio reference standard monitor.” Created to complement the Omegas, the Hayashidesigned SRM-T2 headphone amplifier from 1994 was a


sonic triumph—and a colossal failure. Priced at more than $4,500 and limited to fewer than 50 units, it had complicated innards that were prone to overheating and sometimes-fiery failure. The strain this placed on the small company of fewer than 15 employees—exacerbated by internecine disagreements over product development— forced Stax into insolvency, and it closed its doors in 1995. Remarkably, the small band of employees rallied to revive Stax the following year. The company moved to a new factory in the same prefecture of Saitama, an hour north of Tokyo. Continued development of the original Omega bore fruit as the SR-007 in 1998—an improved version of which, the SR-007/MK2, is still in production to this day— along with other electrostatic

That Stax has always called its products earspeakers, not headphones, is a clue to the seriousness with which the company takes music reproduction.

The SRM-T8000 vacuum-tube amplifier and SR-009 earspeakers celebrate 80 years of sonic accomplishment.

headphones and amplifiers. By 2011, the SR-009 had emerged to claim top rung on the Stax ladder. Powered by Stax’s vacuum-tube SRM007tII amplifier, the SR-009 produced sound that was unparalleled among headphones. But again, insolvency struck that same year. Stax was acquired in 2011 by Chinese electronics giant Edifier Technology. While the cost of the acquisition

amounted to a rounding error for Edifier, the intellectual property that came with the deal would allow the parent company to explore electrostatic technology. And remarkably, the heavy corporate hand that the Stax faithful predicted would sufocate their beloved brand was never raised. True to its word, Edifier retained the small team of employees and provided them with a new factory in Saitama and the needed resources for greater research and development. Today, fewer than 20 people continue to create products like the SR-L700, the latest high-end Lambda earspeaker, and the SRM-T8000, the longawaited amplifier designed to fully exploit the SR-009. Stax’s president, Yoshimoto Nakata, is quite conscious that his team is

carrying on a legacy and leadership role in the audio industry. “Stax has come a long way, and we are very proud of our electrostatic audio heritage,” he says. “After Stax was purchased by Edifier, our manufacturing facilities and soundtesting equipment have been improved greatly, and the value of our brand has grown worldwide. We will continue to strive for the best sound, driving our electrostatic audio products to a higher level.” Considering that Stax products from the past four decades are still regularly used and enjoyed by music lovers, it’s hard to imagine things getting much better. But progress and tenacity are the brand’s way, and with just a little luck, a Stax centenary is looking pretty certain. Stax, staxheadphones.com

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Bolstered by careful planning, science, and well-honed instincts, Promontory— a second-generation wine venture—reveals a wild and singular expression of Napa Valley terroir. By S A R A S C H N E I D E R Photography by O L A F B E C K M A N N and M A T T M O R R I S

W I L D


Into the Wild

Until about 10 years ago,

the vineyard now called Promontory was growing fruit that went unmarked into other Napa Valley Cabernet Sauvignons. After serious scrutiny, extensive soil studies, and minimal but high-tech viticulture, that parcel’s steward, Will Harlan, now has confidence that the land can produce—in fact, is producing—the valley’s next bar-setting Cabernet blend. What’s more, he has built a winery complex on a grand scale not only to vinify and age his wines but also to welcome collectors and enthusiasts to come taste them—a surprising move for a member of a family whose vineyard properties have rarely opened their gates to visitors. Through the early 1980s, in pursuit of a plot of land capable of producing a markedly distinctive, exceptional wine akin to the first growths of Bordeaux, Harlan’s father, Bill, hiked the western hills of the valley, kicking the dirt and letting instinct reign. On these rambles, a large expanse to the south of where he eventually established Harlan Estates caught his eye, visible from a promontory he frequented—but it was not for sale. Twenty-odd years later, the 840 acres became available. Intuition prompted him to buy. Both vineyard and winery are now in the hands of the second generation. Having launched his own label, the Mascot, within the family portfolio, Will Harlan was well prepared to manage and champion this newest venture, building on the aggregate experience and quality of his father’s work while at the same time establishing an entirely distinct style. SP ECIAL S OIL

In describing the Promontory vineyard, which consists of about 80 acres carved out of the larger

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parcel—90 percent of which remains unfarmed—the younger Harlan lets more than a little passion show. Surrounded by forests and traversed by diverse wildlife, “it’s rugged, hidden, raw,” he says. “It’s untamed, like the Old West.” His words conjure a stark contrast to the manicured vine rows most visitors to the valley see. Call it the power of suggestion, but the 2009 Promontory—the first vintage released—hints at wildness, with a vein of minerality beneath bright red fruit and compact layers yet to open. It wasn’t a given, Harlan says, that this rather untamed vineyard would yield its own label and, eventually, a winery. His family’s philosophy has always been guided by dual tenets: First, “do no harm” (the easy part); second, “only take on something that has the potential to surpass what we’ve done before” (a tall order). As Harlan puts it, because he was brought up with and plans to continue the family’s 200-year plan—in which time and resources are never spared to ensure each project’s viability for generations—he moved slowly with Promontory.

GRAND CREW: Will and Bill Harlan; views of Napa Valley and serene spaces are framed by the walls of the winery.


Innumerable soil pits were dug in the cause of extensive geologic testing. “We had a geologist who lived out there for years,” Harlan says. One pocket of soil they found, located between two fault lines running through the jagged property, is unique within Napa Valley. While most examples fall under the general categories of volcanic or sedimentary, Promontory’s rarer soil is the wine world’s third type— metamorphic rock, which also marks such old-world appellations as Alsace, Beaujolais, and the Loire Valley. Years of tasting the wines of the existing vineyard made it clear that the soil yielded a character distinct not only from most Napa wines but also from Harlan Estate vintages. Striking a slightly mystical note, Harlan calls it “an undefinable otherness.” With exceptional potential in hand, Harlan could justify redeveloping the vineyard—farming it in such a way as to reduce potential erosion, rehabilitating the soil from prior harsh chemical treatments, and replanting where necessary. And he could begin designing a winery that

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“We want people to relate their experience with our wine to an actual memory.” 134

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Into the Wild

both connected to the history of the land and spoke to the new wine’s distinctive qualities. DESIGN OF THE TIMES

Opened just last June, the Promontory facility—comprising a tank room, a cellar, a lab, and tasting areas—is massive in scale. Thick concrete walls start deep underground and soar overhead, where they’re laced with steel girders. The structure, designed by renowned Napa architect Howard Backen, has an industrial aesthetic that simultaneously evokes the majesty of the surrounding forested canyons and peaks. The style nods to the pioneering era of the late 1800s, when the main stagecoach line between Napa and Sonoma ran directly through the Promontory property. The tank room is all business: Steel beams crisscross the space, yet the design is as thoughtfully stylish as it is practical. The walls in the vast tasting spaces rise tall as trees. Minimal furnishings direct focus to stones taken from the soil that have been sliced open and polished to show the unique qualities of metamorphic rock. Simple, clean lines like canyon walls frame distant views, while a tree-shaded patio ofers valley vistas. On another terrace, a woven awning of willow twigs conveys the dappled light of an arboreal canopy. Perspectives change at every turn, showcasing the wildness of the landscape. That the spaces are meant to host tasters, who are welcome (by appointment), is a dramatic departure from the practices of previous Harlan properties. Connoisseurs who haven’t secured a spot on the Harlan Estate and Bond allocation lists have had scarce access to the wineries. Will Harlan wants Promontory to be diferent. He wants to communicate directly with people, to build relationships. “At the end of the day, wine is one of the most visceral experiences someone can have with the land,” he says. “We want people to relate their experience with our wine to an actual memory.” He and his team are making this wine because they love drinking it, and he wants other people to drink it, too—here, where it’s made. TASTE AND S E E

A tour takes guests 20 feet underground to the elegantly appointed cask room, which is surrounded, bunker-like, in earthquake-defying concrete. In the damp coolness, artful lighting highlights a ring of oversize Austrian-oak casks lining the walls. Beauty meets utility here, as director of winegowing Cory Empting describes it. The goal is always to translate the vineyard site through

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OPEN DOOR: The winery’s industrial design is a nod to the vineyard’s history.

the wine, and Empting found that smaller new French-oak barrels tended to obscure the purity of the fruit. The more neutral Austrian vessels “encourage a transparency of place,” he says. A cask sample of the 2015 vintage gives up complex, elusive aromas of violets and minerals as well as flavors of dark plums, berries, and rich spice. The wine won’t be released until 2020, though. Echoing the take-it-slow spirit of the family’s approach, Promontory’s wines will age for 5 years, giving them time to settle down, integrate, and get a start on the long life they already promise. There will be no jostling for space here; Harlan secured enough casks to age five vintages for 5 years each. Back above ground, tastings of several more of those vintages continue in the library. The shelves here

don’t hold library wines; instead, they house a large collection of the world’s most significant wine tomes, some dating back centuries. Across the hall is an ultramodern lab for data collection and analysis—a juxtaposition that bears out Harlan and Empting’s old-new approach to winemaking. “We don’t talk in terms of style” from year to year, says Harlan. “The land provides character, and the vintage gives the wine its individual personality. We just try to get out of the way.” Empting resists that simplicity. “Getting out of the way is the hardest work of all,” he’s quick to add. They watch—and test—endlessly to understand the terroir and make adjustments to achieve the best expression of Promontory each year. The winery was intentionally located a short distance from the

vineyard, which remains cloaked from view. Isolated in its canyon from the rest of Napa Valley, the territory remains as free from human impact as possible, as Harlan firmly believes this protection preserves the character of the wines. Guests at the winery will have the opportunity to experience this ethereal quality as expressed in several vintages. The 2012 ($650), the current release, is fresh, vibrant, and mineral driven compared to the riper, fruit-driven norm of today’s Napa Valley Cabernet Sauvignons. And these second-generation wines will likely influence the style of Harlan’s own viticultural peers, just as his father’s first bottlings did decades ago. To make an appointment ($200 per person), email concierge@promontory .wine or call 707.944.0125.


Lewis Hamilton gives Robb Report a behind-the-scenes look at Mercedes-AMG’s new Project One, a road-going hypercar

PASSION


the Formula 1 phenom has been championing for years.

PROJECT By L A U R A B U R S T E I N

P h o t o g ra p hy by J O N A T H A N G LY N N - S M I T H R O B B R E P O R T. C O M

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Lewis Hamilton greets me in his air-conditioned trailer holding a box of raw cremini mushrooms. “Want one?” he asks, extending his arm. I decline. “Suit yourself,” he says, and pops one in his mouth. “I quite fancy mushrooms. Well . . . not those kind of mushrooms,” he adds with a laugh. ¶ He is still wearing the last look from his earlier photo shoot for Robb Report, an outfit he chose himself after eschewing a more traditional suit. The black trousers and houndstooth-and-velvet coat by Colombian-born designer Haider Ackermann are far too glamorous for our digs—a Star Waggon parked on a dusty runway in Inyokern, roughly 3 hours by car from Los Angeles in Southern California’s high desert. What the locale lacks in panache, however, it makes up for in scenery—an arid pastel landscape set against the Sierra Nevada foothills. ¶ For racing fans, Hamilton needs no introduction. Last year he earned his fourth Formula 1 world championship, putting 140

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Passion Project

him on par with Sebastian Vettel and Alain Prost and surpassed only by Juan Manuel Fangio and Michael Schumacher. Back in 2007, I watched from turn 10 at the Circuit Gilles-Villeneuve in Montreal as the 22-year-old rookie won his first F/1 race, a victory he claimed without ever having previously raced at that circuit. (He attributed his knowledge of the track to racing simulators.) When he earned his first world championship a year later, he became the youngest driver ever to claim the title. In 2013 he signed with the Mercedes-AMG Petronas Motorsport F/1 team and went on to win three more world championships, the most recent being last year. Of course, Hamilton didn’t do it alone. His accomplishments are shared with the hundreds of men and women who work long, hard hours in design studios,

RACER’S REQUEST: Formula 1 legend Lewis Hamilton’s persistent pleas for higher performance have paid off with Mercedes-AMG’s $2.7 million road rocket.

laboratories, and garages, creating and perfecting some of the fastest, most technologically advanced cars in the world. Although Mercedes dominated F/1 racing in the 1930s with its famous Silver Arrows, the German automaker was absent from Formula 1 (aside from a brief return to the sport in the 1950s) until 2010, when it bought a minority stake in the Brawn GP team and kept F/1 heavyweight Ross Brawn on as team principal. In a move that shocked the Ferrari tifosi, Mercedes even enticed Michael Schumacher—who had spent the majority of his career driving for the Italian marque— out of retirement for its first three seasons. Since then, the Mercedes-AMG Petronas Motorsport F/1 team has gone on to rule the sport, claiming the constructor’s championship every season for the past 4 years. But we haven’t trekked to the middle of

nowhere to rehash past wins. (Hamilton doesn’t watch them anyway, he tells me.) Mercedes-AMG has brought its first hypercar, Project One, to the desert and ofered Robb Report an exclusive look at the vehicle with one of its biggest proponents. FIRST SH OWN last year as part of AMG’s

50th anniversary, Project One is the company’s answer to the Porsche 918 Spyder and the forthcoming McLaren BP23. The limited-edition halo car takes most of its workings straight from Formula 1, packed into a breathtaking example of style and performance for the road. With a price tag of about $2.7 million, Project One will be limited to 275 examples—and the waiting list is already three or four times that number. It will use a high-performance plug-in hybrid drive

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“I’ve been nagging Mercedes for years, because We’re winning world championships, yet we don’t

system—that comes directly from Formula 1—combined with a 1.6-liter turbocharged V-6. Although exact specifications of the mid-engine production car were not available at press time, AMG chief Tobias Moers has said Project One will produce more than 1,000 hp and reach a top speed of nearly 220 mph. Hamilton says it’s about time. “I’ve been nagging Mercedes for years, because we’re in Formula 1 and we have all this technology,” says Hamilton, who has pulled up a stool next to the sofa where I’m sitting. His box of mushrooms lies abandoned on the counter behind him. “We’re winning world championships, yet we don’t have a car that can match a Ferrari road-going car. So I guess they eventually decided this is actually a good idea. I’m not saying it was my idea, but I did nag them for ages to do it.”

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HAMILTON-WORTHY HYPERCAR: Setting a new paradigm for Mercedes-AMG, Project One packs more than 1,000 hp and plenty of Formula 1 functionality.

As with F/1 cars, Project One’s monocoque structure is made of carbon fiber. Designers, led by Daimler design chief Gorden Wagener, followed the credo of “no styling,” so every detail is functional; there are no scoops, outlets, or power bulges merely for vanity’s sake. Flat LED headlamps frame the car’s face, which is dominated by a large front spoiler. A wasp waist, vertical shark fin, and long tail are all nods to racecar design. Inside the minimalist cockpit, fixed sculptural seats seem to flow out of the surrounding cabin. Part of Project One’s achievement lies in the fact that so much F/1 technology will be applied straight to the production car. Certain features, like sequential (paddleshifter) gearboxes, have trickled down from racing to road cars in the past, but the direct lineage has never been as clear as it is now.

Project One, however, wasn’t always a clear fit for Mercedes-AMG. “I always thought AMG was not at the level to have a kind of super-, hyper—whatever—car. But I was approached by customers over the last few years, and that brought everything together,” Moers told us in a previous interview. Once the decision was made to pursue the project, the company was unwavering in the direction it should take. “We see major transitions in the automotive industry for the future, in all segments. It was very clear for us it would not be a V-8 or V-12 because that’s, well, I call it old school,” Moers added. “We are going to move on to electrified power trains and add more eiciency. With today’s spec of Formula 1, the door was opened to make this car happen.” Bringing a car from the track to the street is not without its hurdles. In


Passion Project

we’re in Formula 1 and we have all this technology. ... have a car that can match a Ferrari road-going car.”

particular, the longevity of the engine is a major concern. In racing, an engine may be swapped out several times each season. And although the road car, according to Moers, will be assisted by two additional electric motors and rev at 11,000 rpm (compared with an F/1 car’s 13,000 rpm), the wear and tear will necessitate a complete rebuild after about 31,000 miles. “It’s the most challenging project we’ve ever done,” Moers said. NE V E R ONE to shy away from a challenge, Hamilton has his own opinions about the future of automobiles. When asked what he’d like to see in the next generation of F/1 cars, he does not mince words. “I’d love them to bring back the stick shift, three pedals, less shit on my steering wheel, and a more raw racecar, but that’s

not gonna happen,” he says. And what about autonomous cars? Will robots usurp drivers? “I’ll be long gone by then,” he says. When asked about life after racing, Hamilton hesitates. “I don’t know, I’m in this discovery mode right now. I think fashion is an area which I am exploring, and I’ll always do music,” he says. “I was playing ‘Easy’ on the piano the other day, and I was thinking, how cool would it be if Lionel Ritchie was sitting here right now, singing this with me? Could you imagine?” Yes, I could imagine. But while Lionel Ritchie might be easy like Sunday morning, Hamilton, for now, will be quite busy on those days. Between promoting Project One and preparing for the current Formula 1 season, he’s going to need a lot of mushrooms.

THE LOWDOWN FROM LEWIS RR: What do you do when you’re not racing? LH: I’m involved in the fashion world, so I go to a lot of fashion shows. And the music side, as well. Every spare day that I have, I fill it with work. I just like being busy. Tell us more about your love of music.

When I was 14, my dad was in a band, and that inspired me. I played guitar and then started to deejay. I couldn’t be in a band because I was always racing. Then I wanted to study music at school, but my dad made me study history. You spend a lot of time in the States, especially Los Angeles. What attracts you to this place? The world is fascinated by America because everything

is generally bigger and better here. And it’s the central hub of entertainment. Growing up in England watching movies, you just dream of one day going to visit those locations. You already have a 1966 427 Shelby Cobra. What is another classic you’d like to own? The Ferrari California 250 GT Spyder Short Wheelbase [built from 1960 to 1962]. —L.B.

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MEMBERSHIPS • JET CARD • SKY ACCESS


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The entrepreneurial Jet Edge culture pairs this high level of experience with optimization. “We’ve invested in technology and information management systems to allow owners the kind of oversight they expect when doing business. Our proprietary systems allow owners to understand the granular P&L of their aircraft, just like they do in their own businesses,” says Papariella, who goes on to explain that the large-cabin private jet is misunderstood. “Given the current market conditions, owning a large-cabin private jet isn’t as expensive as people think. Because of our position in the industry, we are able to generate significant value on aircraft purchases for our owners. That combined with our industry-leading owner-charter program, allows us to be incredibly competitive when it comes to optimizing the cost of aircraft ownership.”


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FA I R M O N T G R A N D D E L M A R , S A N D I E G O , C A SEPTEMBER 22-24, 2018

DANIEL BOULUD

WILLIAM BRADLEY

PAUL BARTOLOTTA

THOMAS KELLER

JOSIAH CITRIN

JÉRÔME BOCUSE

GAVIN KAYSEN

MING TSAI

A N E X T R A O R D I N A R Y D I N I N G E X P E R I E N C E P R E PA R E D BY E X T R AO R D I N A RY C U L I N A RY M A S T E R S . Join Robb Report and some of the most celebrated chefs in the world for a culinary experience like no other. Headlined by Daniel Boulud, Thomas Keller, and Jérôme Bocuse—world-renowned culinary masterminds will gather at Addison, Southern California’s only Five-Star and Five Diamond restaurant, to create an unforgettable dining experience paired with the most exquisite wines. The following day, guests and chefs will take to The Grand Golf Club for a friendly tournament. For guests who prefer the kitchen instead of the links, engage in a hands-on cooking experience with Chef Paul Bartolotta and Urbani Truffles. Don’t miss this deliciously inspiring and masterfully crafted experience that benefits the ment’or BKB Foundation.

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F O R T

S

More than 900 years after the Anglo-Normans built their first fortified estates, Ireland remains one of the most castellated countries on earth. But only a few of the Emerald Isle’s historic citadels can claim to be as gloriously grand today as they were during the days of high kings and queens. On the following pages, we raise the portcullises and open the ironclad doors to three extraordinary castles that have not only retained their royal pedigrees but evolved into modern-day manses worthy of a 21st-century stay. R O B B R E P O R T. C O M

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THE IRISH IDEAL ADARE MANOR

trout-filled river runs almost within reach of Adare Manor’s east-facing guest rooms. The ruins of a 13th-century castle lie just beyond the river, while an emerald-green golf course straddles it to the south, bordered along the way by formal gardens, a woodland walking trail, and a country-pursuits academy for aspiring archers and falconers. Just outside the estate’s 842 acres—a single acre shy of Manhattan’s Central Park—sits what prideful locals refer to as the prettiest village in Ireland. ¶ This idyllic Irish estate, located about a half hour’s drive from Shannon in county Limerick, is anchored by the manor house itself—a 19th-century neo-Gothic palace that has been polished to perfection. Originally built at the behest of the second Earl of Dunraven, Adare Manor first opened as a hotel in the 1980s. Last November, the property’s new owners completed 152

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a nearly 2-year renovation that revived the architectural gem as an archetypal countryhouse escape. The stately manor’s calendar-house details (days, weeks, and seasons are represented by precisely 365 leaded windows, 52 chimneys, seven pillars, and four towers) and other quirks (carvings of oddball characters and creatures adorn nooks and walls throughout) were preserved in the renovation, which also saw the subtle integration of technologies both cutting-edge and commonplace. (An elevator, something Adare Manor previously lacked, is now hidden inside a replica of the manse’s original pipe organ.) A new wing brought the number of guest rooms and suites to 104, with each individually designed in 19thcentury-style splendor. The Dunraven Staterooms are particularly ravishing, with their old-master paintings and Georgian-style furnishings fit for the second earl himself. Adare Manor’s most beautiful room is reserved for afternoon tea, an elegant afair in a 132-foot-long barrel-ceilinged, stained-glass sanctuary that was modeled after the Hall of Mirrors in the Palace of Versailles. The hotel is also home to a speakeasy-style bar—which serves up more than 100 rare whiskies—as well as a private cinema and the only La Mer spa in the British Isles. Southwestern Ireland’s many must-sees— from the Ring of Kerry to the Clifs of Moher— are within easy driving distance of Adare Manor. On-estate activities include handling snowy owls, peregrine falcons, and other birds of prey at the country-pursuits facility as well as fishing for trout (and salmon in season) in one of the high-yield holes just out the back door. Rounding out the Irish country action is the riverside golf course, a parkland-style Tom Fazio design that opens for play this spring. —Bruce Wallin Adare Manor, adaremanor.com

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Fort Nights

A FAMILY AFFAIR DROMOLAND CASTLE

D

romoland Castle has loomed over the shores of Lough Dromoland in Newmarket-on-Fergus for nearly 500 years as the ancestral residence of the O’Brien family. Direct descendants of Brian Boru, the High King of Ireland 1,000 years ago, the O’Briens became the barons of Inchiquin in 1543. Over the years, their county Clare estate has served as the home to 18th-century racehorse owner Edward O’Brien and the 1840s M.P. William Smith O’Brien—as well as the modern-day Lord Inchiquin, who lives adjacent to the property at Thomond House. ¶ Maintaining a 16th-century castle—and current residence—as a contemporary resort is a delicate dance, one that Dromoland has been perfecting during an ongoing 4-year restoration. With the second phase of the $20 million project complete, the hotel presents, in the words of general manager Mark Nolan, “a nod to the old world but in a contemporary way.” Set on 450 breathtaking acres—with a championship golf course, a walled garden, and a trout-stocked lake—Dromoland first opened as a hotel in 1963. Today it features 98 lavish rooms and suites, many of which have been updated with modern Irish fabrics, custom lime-washed furnishings, original artworks, and pillows embossed with the Inchiquin coat of arms. There’s also a fresh, new feeling in the castle’s gallery and dining areas,

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although the historic charm is still there—a knight’s armor display greets you in the reception area and portraits of the O’Briens dot the walls. The 17th-century style continues in the ruby-toned drawing room, newly adorned with brocade wall fabric, cushy velvet chairs with piped cushions, and an elaborate chandelier. Much of the work at Dromoland, however, has been behind the scenes, including installing new heating, cooling, and

water systems (which cut water consumption to less than half of what it was 2 years ago). Additionally, all the windows, including 130 historic ones, were replaced with doubleglazed glass that retains heat and blocks out noise—like those howling Irish winds. Dromoland’s final renovation phases, scheduled for completion next year, will include a revamp of the indoor pool, the Club Wing, and the Queen Anne

Court guest rooms. Like the changes before them, the updates will bring a contemporary sense of comfort—both physical and familial—to the historic estate. “My test is, would you jump on the sofa? Can you sit and read a book in the chair for a couple of hours?” Nolan says. “That’s my key. I want you to feel at home.” Even if you aren’t Lord Inchiquin. —Devorah Lev-Tov Dromoland Castle, dromoland.ie


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Fort Nights

K

ilkea Castle is a study in contrasts—at once ancient and contemporary, imposingly grand and disarmingly homey. Indeed, there are no signs of dreary draftiness at the 838-year-old estate, but rather a timeless sense of comfort and calm, whether you’re lounging with an Irish cofee in the sun-soaked drawing room or sinking into a crushed-velvet armchair in the cozy Keep bar. ¶ Built in 1180, Kilkea originally served as a fortress for the Anglo-Norman lords of the de Riddlesford family. It passed to the Fitzgerald clan in

1273, and the earls of Kildare kept it in the family for seven centuries. Converted into a hotel in the 1960s, the castle—located an hour’s drive southwest of Dublin in county Kildare—eventually closed and sat abandoned for years. But in 2012, the Bostonbased construction mogul Jay Cashman purchased the 180acre estate and, after investing $30 million in its restoration,

reopened it as a hotel this March. Today, guests can settle in to one of the castle’s 11 refurbished bedrooms, which, depending on the country’s notoriously fickle weather, boast views of either ash and oak groves and a charming rose garden or a soft blanket of fog. An adjoining carriage house has been freshly converted with 31 cheery rooms, many of

which feature original wood beams and wrought-iron details. Days at Kilkea can be filled with rounds of golf on a newly built 18-hole course, walks among the holly bushes and beech trees, falconry lessons, skeet-shooting sessions, tennis matches, horseback rides, and dips in the crystal-clear River Greese, which weaves through the estate. Starting this summer, guests will also have the option of massages and other treatments at a new 8,000-square-foot spa. For dinner, take a short walk downhill ( just past the medieval cemetery and the ruins of a 16th-century church) to the clubhouse, where two restaurants serve up local fare with modern flair—think feather-blade cuts of Irish beef braised for 24 hours and delivered with maple-roasted carrots, whipped potatoes, and a basket of freshbaked brown soda bread. Follow the footpaths around the estate after dinner, when a warm light emanates from the narrow stone windows—and Kilkea’s grandeur truly glows. —Carolyn Meers Kilkea Castle, kilkeacastle.ie

CASTLE COMFORTS

THOMAS SUNDERLAND, BRUNO STERNBERGER

KILKEA CASTLE


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N The flagship of the Panamera line, the Turbo S E-Hybrid takes performance cues from the Porsche 918 Spyder.

W Aside from alternative power-train displays, interior touches in the Turbo S E-Hybrid track with the rest of the Panamera pack.

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DRIVE PORSCHE PANAMERA TURBO S E-HYBRID AND TURBO SPORT TURISMO

A new high-speed hybrid and stylish shooting brake confirm the Panamera as a pinnacle of practicality and performance. B Y L A U R A B U R S T E I N

MANUEL HOLLENBACH

When the Panamera arrived on the scene 8 years ago, purists scofed at the idea of a four-door, front-engine Porsche (mostly the same naysayers who bemoaned the Cayenne SUV’s introduction a few years earlier). Soon, though, the car was outselling large luxury sedans made by Maserati, Bentley, and Aston Martin combined. Porsche knew that, as with its SUVs, there was a market for a sporty, performance-oriented car with room for a family. Now the marque has unveiled its fastest Panamera ever—a plug-in hybrid, no less—along with a new-body-style version that gains even more practicality without sacrificing looks. ¶ The Panamera Turbo S E-Hybrid (from $184,400) takes inspiration—and a boost function—from the 918 Spyder. Porsche calls it the new flagship of the Panamera lineup, with its 4.4-liter, biturbo V-8 engine and 100 kW electric motor that combine to produce 680 hp and 626 ft lbs of torque. All of the components work in symphony to propel the car from zero to 60 mph in 3.2 seconds—a rate of acceleration on par with the newest Aston Martin Vanquish S, the Bentley Continental GT Supersports, and the Mercedes-AMG E63 S Wagon. PORSCHE PANAMERA TURBO S E-HYBRID R O B B R E P O R T. C O M

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The car is just as much a handful to drive as its name is a mouthful to say. We tested the Turbo S E-Hybrid’s chops at Vancouver Island Motorsport Circuit, a private racetrack nestled in the forest about an hour northwest of Victoria, British Columbia. Compact and highly technical, the track boasts 19 turns and dramatic elevation changes in just 1.4 miles—a layout better suited to a 911 than a 5,100-pound four-door. The Panamera, however, managed the corners with the help of systems such as PTM (Porsche Traction Management) and PSM (Porsche Stability Management—or, as our driving instructor called it, “Please Save Me”). Over blind crests and around late-apex turns, the car stayed settled. Gear changes were imperceptible, courtesy of a new version of Porsche’s 8-speed, dual-clutch PDK transmission paired with an electric clutch actuator. And the brakes bit hard, with standard carbon-ceramic rotors and lime-green calipers— another tip of the hat to the 918 Spyder. The Turbo S E-Hybrid’s zero-to-60-mph time is no doubt impressive, but the real pin-you-to-yourseat moments come at higher speeds. The car’s boost technology helps propel it from 62 to 125 mph almost a full second faster than the conventional Panamera Turbo (although we ran out of straightaway to really put it to the test). Diferent drive modes take the plug-in hybrid from electric daily commuter to all-out track car. By default, it starts up in pure electric mode, but

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Known to Europeans as shooting brakes, the cars could, theoretically, be called wagons.

Porsche Panamera Turbo Sport Tourismo

Porsche Panamera Turbo S E-Hybrid

the gas engine will kick in when you push down hard on the accelerator or when the car is running low on battery reserves. (On electricity alone, the Turbo S E-Hybrid can go about 30 miles.) With a turn of the mode switch on the steering wheel, the driver can also select Hybrid Auto mode, which automatically transitions between gas and electric for optimum eiciency. The E-Charge mode favors the gas engine to help charge the battery, while the Sport and Sport Plus selections use the gas engine continually, with an electric boost when needed. Porsche is famous for its long list of options that can add tens of thousands of dollars to a sticker price, but the Turbo S E-Hybrid comes standard with the Sport Chrono package, dynamic chassis control, ceramic brakes, Torque Vectoring Plus, Active Suspension Management, and 21-inch turbo design wheels. Also included is auxiliary cabin climate control, which can precool and heat the


COURSE OF STUDY Porsche experimented with the idea of a shooting-brake body style more than 30 years ago. The 928 H50 Study was a secret concept car that was developed in 1987 but never saw production. It was based on the 928, the front-engine luxury touring car that sent shock waves among purists who insisted that

“real” Porsches should retain their rear-engine configuration. The H50 Study featured half-size rear doors and was powered by a 330 hp, 5-liter V-8 engine. One of the car’s major features also proved to be one of its major flaws—a lengthened chassis that provided more interior room but compromised structural

integrity. Porsche hid the concept car in its archives until 2012, when it made its first public appearance at the Pebble Beach Concours d’Elegance. Now, the car is on display at the Petersen Automotive Museum in Los Angeles, on loan from the Porsche Museum in Stuttgart, Germany. —L.B.

928 H50 STUDY: TED SEVEN/PETERSEN AUTOMOTIVE MUSEUM

The 928 H50 Study was a secret concept car ...but never saw production.

car via a timer or remotely with its smartphone app (also compatible with the Apple watch). For the most part, the cockpit is identical to those of its Panamera siblings, with the exception of some displays specific to the plug-in variant. Among the Turbo S E-Hybrid’s siblings are four new Panamera Sport Turismo models (from $96,200). Known to Europeans as shooting brakes, the cars could, theoretically, be called wagons— although the description seems vulgar for such an elegant design. The Sport Turismo looks, in many ways, as a Panamera should have always looked. Its voluminous rear brings its proportions into harmony, complementing the long wheelbase. Ferdinand Porsche, the marque’s founder, once said, “Design must be functional, and functionality must be translated into visual aesthetics without any reliance on gimmicks that have to be explained.” The Sport Turismo’s functionality is obvious, with increased space and a lower trunk floor for easier loading and unloading. Yet despite Ferdinand’s dictum, the vehicle employs some design cues that are worth explaining. It has a slightly diferent rear-end design compared to the latest sedan, new extended wheelhouses, and a new integrated roof spoiler— featuring active aerodynamics—with three positions to adjust downforce as necessary. Adhering to the basic design criteria for all Porsches, the Sport Turismo’s centerline is lowered

BY THE NUMBERS: PORSCHE PANAMERA

4 198.7 20 1,455 49 37.4 110 192 12:06

Number of Panamera Sport Turismo variants available in the States Length of the Panamera Sport Turismo, in inches Seconds of additional boost with the Sport Response button on Panameras equipped with the Sport Chrono package Watts in the Panamera’s optional Burmester 3D surround-sound system Cubic feet of maximum cargo space in the Sport Turismo The Sport Turismo’s turning radius, in feet Additional pounds of downforce created by the Sport Turismo’s roof, which transforms into an adaptive spoiler Top speed of the Panamera Turbo S E-Hybrid, in mph Record-breaking lap time, in minutes, set by the Panamera Turbo Sport Turismo in December 2017 for towing a trailer around Germany’s Nürburgring racetrack

compared to the fenders, and its narrow waist highlights the hips. The bigger dash-to-axle ratio evokes memories of the 928, a milestone car in Porsche’s history, and the longer roof is supported by a dynamic D-pillar that lightens the mass of the rear overhang. Several elements pay homage to the 911, including rear wheels that hug the ground thanks to elongated, muscular lines in an “anti-wedge” shape. And the rear light hearkens back to the 911 G model, produced from 1974 to 1988. Under the hood are many of the same engines ofered with the sedan, save for the Panamera Turbo S E-Hybrid’s. We savored the Turbo Sport Turismo model on the winding back roads of Vancouver Island, kicking up dust and listening to that amazing exhaust sound. More open space in the rear of the car usually equates to more noise in the cabin, but in this case, the engineers did a superb job quelling any additional ambient sound. The Sport Turismo models also ofer ample rear headroom and legroom. And unlike the Panamera sedan—which exclusively uses a 2+2 layout—the shooting brake can be equipped with a bench seat to accommodate three rear passengers. In all, the new Panamera Turbo S E-Hybrid and Sport Turismo models are the perfect complements to Porsche’s existing array of cars, ofering not only increased utility but also the cool factor of driving something unusual in a world full of staid SUVs. Curmudgeonly purists, you’ve been warned.

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MAT THIEU FORICHON

Time Well Spent

MONACO A P R I L

2 0 1 8


MONACO The French Riviera’s mini monarchy once again proves that big things come in small packages. By Natasha Wolf

7

3

1

4

It’s safe to say there’s never a dull moment in Monaco. 5

The petite principality may be among the world’s smallest nations, at just under 500 acres, but it’s big on action, hosting more than 700 events each year. This month marks the commencement of another spectacular season of see-and-be-seen fetes and fairs, starting with the Rolex MonteCarlo Masters tennis tournament (running from April 14 through 22) and culminating in the 28th edition of the Monaco Yacht Show (taking place

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September 26 through 29). Drawing the biggest crowd will be May’s Monaco Grand Prix 1 (formula1 .com), an annual adrenaline-inducing event that invites the fastest drivers in the world to race past the Place du Casino and yacht-filled Port Hercules on one of Formula 1’s most harrowing circuits. Still, there’s more to this glitzy destination than revving engines and soaring superyachts. Prince Albert II, Monaco’s most eminent

man-about-town, has turned his family’s 700-year-old domain into a modern hub of culture and style, drawing in Michelin-starred chefs, spearheading new construction, and luring innovative events like the Nomad art fair to his corner of the Mediterranean. Ready to drink it all in, of course, is the steady stream of jet-setters who descend on this tiny nation year after year. Join them and you’ll find plenty new to explore in the biggest little country in Europe.

“There’s nothing better than a Campari soda on one of Monaco’s many outdoor terraces.” NORMAN FOSTER

6

LOCAL FAVORITES STAY

ALAIN DUCASSE CHEF

INDIA MAHDAVI INTERIOR DESIGNER

GIORGIO PACE

Built in 1864, the Hôtel de Paris allows guests to stay in the heart of glamorous Monaco while enjoying excellence in the art of hospitality. The eighth floor has unforgettable sunsets over the Mediterranean. hoteldeparismontecarlo.com

EAT

A pinch of the Far East in Monaco, Maya Bay is a Japanese sushi bar and Thai restaurant accessed through a secret door. Let yourself be tempted by the Thai-basil cotton candy. mayabay.mc

DRINK

SHOP

DO

The Bar Salle Blanche, nestled in the Monte Carlo Casino, has a beautiful mosaic design. It’s the perfect venue for a cocktail before or after dinner.

I like Pierre 2 for its eclectic selection and originality. You’ll find a sharp assortment of design objects as well as one-of-akind antique pieces.

With its majestic clif-top facade, the Oceanographic Museum of Monaco 3 has been watching over the oceans for more than a century. A visit before or after a stroll in the Jardin Albert I is a must.

casinomontecarlo.com

pierre.mc

oceano.mc

The Monte-Carlo Beach’s Olympic seawater pool features a private beach dotted with adorable striped canvas umbrellas, lounge chairs, and cabanas. It’s my happy place to relax in the shade of the Aleppo pines.

La Vigie Lounge & Restaurant 4 is a small piece of heaven between sea and sky. They serve exquisite fresh grilled fish and seafood with infinite views of the sea and all of Monaco.

monte-carlo-beach.com

lavigiemontecarlo.com

I love the Monte-Carlo Beach. The view, the elegant rooms, the swimming pool, and the diferent restaurants make this the best place to stay.

Hôtel Le Roquebrune, located between Monaco and Italy, has delicious local fish. I also like Song Qi, which is the first Chinese restaurant in Monte Carlo.

Hôtel de Paris 6 is a must for its lobby bar. It’s the best place in town for barbagiuan fried dumplings, a true Monegasque specialty.

monte-carlo-beach.com

le-roquebrune.com; song-qi.mc

hoteldeparismontecarlo.com

Buddha Bar is a destination in and of itself. The decoration is spectacular, the lounge music creates a great ambiance, and everything on the menu is delicious. buddhabarmontecarlo.com

Lull Monaco has a large selection of clothing and accessories from an impressive mix of emerging labels, as well as its own in-house brand, Maison Noir. lull-monaco.com

I love to shop at Czarina. They have a great collection of chic curated objects. czarina.mc

ILLUSTRATIONS: G ARY WILLIAM MUSGRAVE

casinomontecarlo.com

Take a day trip to Villa Santo Sospir 7 in SaintJean-Cap-Ferrat. The artist Jean Cocteau lived there for 13 years, and the whole house is a giant mosaic of his artworks, from the floors and walls to the ceilings. villasantosospir.fr

COFOUNDER, NOMAD MONACO

My wife and I always stay at Four Seasons GrandHotel du Cap-Ferrat. It’s a bucolic contrast to the urbanity of Monaco. fourseasons.com

NORMAN FOSTER

The Monte Carlo Casino 5 is the icon of Monaco. Dating to 1863, the atmosphere remains as it ever was. If you go to Monaco, you have to spend a few dollars there.

Dinner at Cipriani Monte Carlo is a favorite, as well as lunch at the Monaco Yacht Club. ciprianimontecarlo.com; yacht-club-monaco.mc

There’s nothing better than a Campari soda on one of Monaco’s many outdoor terraces— unless it’s an aperitif at the Bar Américain before dinner. hoteldeparismontecarlo.com

I often spend my Saturday mornings at the farmer’s market in Beaulieu-sur-Mer.

Take a day trip to Fondation Maeght in Saint-Paul de Vence, and then enjoy the courtyard restaurant at the nearby La Colombe d’Or. fondation-maeght.com; la-colombe-dor.com

ARCHITECT

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Time Well Spent MONACO

Elsa

Beyond Bouillabaisse I T ’ S N O S E C R E T T H AT

Monaco’s culinary prowess relies largely on the flash and flair of cuisine à la française. Indeed, some of France’s (and Michelin’s) biggest names—Alain Ducasse, Joël Robuchon, and Marcel Ravin among them—helm highly regarded kitchens within steps of each other along the yacht-filled ports of Monte Carlo. But it’s not all sauces and soufflés in this seaside sovereignty. Lately, a more health-conscious approach to dining has emerged. Leading the pack is the Michelin-starred Elsa (monte-carlo-beach.com), Monaco’s first all-organic restaurant, where chef Paolo Sari sources high-end ingredients from the hills of Provence and the bays of the Mediterranean to create clean and simple variations on traditional dishes. Tennis champ and Monaco resident Novak Djokovic added to the wholesome trend with the opening of his clean-eating Eqvita (eqvitarestaurant.com), an organic and gluten-free restaurant ofering plant-based dishes like zucchini lasagna and safron arancini. And even the old guard has joined the movement—Joël Robuchon recently opened Le Chocolat (metropole .com), a swanky seasonal bar at the Hôtel Metropole with a focus on the healthful benefits of a decadent French favorite: chocolate.

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A Legend Reborn THERE’S A REASON

everyone in Monaco is talking about the Hôtel de Paris (hoteldeparismontecarlo .com): The 150-year-old grande dame has been carefully undergoing a prolonged face-lift for nearly 4 years, and this fall, it’s finally unveiling its new look. Set to

An Arts Scene in Bloom MONACO IS GIVING

Milan a run for its money. This month, the Nomad fair (nomadmonaco.com) will make its second appearance in the French Riviera, bringing a 4-day showcase of the world’s top designers and artists to Roquebrune-CapMartin Bay and, once again, turning the traditional art show on its head. The fair—which will be held not in a stufy convention center but at the former seaside home of Karl Lagerfeld, known as Villa La Vigie—will

reopen in full this December, the iconic address on the edge of Port Hercules is the most anticipated debut in Monte Carlo since, well, its first debut in 1863. Though the property has remained open throughout its renovation, plenty of new surprises have yet to

be revealed—among them a new look for the legendary Bar Américain, a new home for Alain Ducasse’s Le Louis XV, and fresh interiors in all 198 guest rooms and suites. Ready in time for spring, however, is the hotel’s newest crown jewel: the opulent two-bedroom Princess

Grace Suite. An homage to Monaco’s most revered royal, the accommodation features a collection of the princess’s treasured literature and personal efects as well as a private terrace with a manicured garden, an infinity-edge pool, and bird’s-eye views over the Mediterranean. Nomad founders Giorgio Pace and Nicolas Bellavance-Lecompte

feature a sensational program of tastemakers and thought leaders, including gallerist David Gill, architect Norman Foster, and fashion designer Rick Owens. But it won’t be a show for the masses— the intimate nature of Villa La Vigie ensures there will be no labyrinth of booths to navigate (as at Salone del Mobile and Design Miami). Rather, collectors will wander the historic mansion room by room, floor by floor, experiencing the latest art and design in an inspired and quintessentially Monegasque setting—with the sparkling Mediterranean Sea in view.


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Inspired by Britain's inest English manors this is an architectural masterpiece. Terraces overlooking an oval heated pool, surrounded by incredible English gardens. The property includes a Har-Tru tennis court. Price upon request. Maria Stilo. maria.stilo@juliabfee.com

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4 BEN HOGAN The modern incarnations of the late Ben Hogan’s own wedges—which he had personally modified for perfect weight distribution—are forged from soft carbon steel for feel and aesthetics and have computer-milled faces and grooves. The Equalizer wedges are available in a range of lofts. benhogan golf.com ($100)

3 2 2 1 COBRA The circular design that adorns the sleek carbon-fiber head of the King F8 driver isn’t just for looks. It’s the result of precision computer milling, which means tighter tech tolerances and more power and accuracy on your drives. cobragolf .com ($400) 2,TOUR EDGE 3 Club sets aren’t just woods and irons anymore, as the versatile HL3 Triple Combo collection proves. Especially suited for less accomplished players, the combination of hybrids, iron woods, and wedges puts the right club in your hands for every shot. ($600) The CBX fairway wood—part of the brand’s high-end Exotics line—has a titanium face that varies in thickness to produce powerful shots no matter where you make contact—and tests prove it hits far. The specially designed “speed ramp” sole glides through any turf. touredge .com ($350)

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5 PING One of the newest putters to come out of Ping, the Dale Anser is as much a piece of art as a piece of equipment. It’s machined from stainless steel, has a milled face, and is available in a choice of finishes—copper, aluminum, or “stealth.” ping.com ($325)

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RIDE AND DRIVE

6 BROOKS BROTHERS A sharp (and surprisingly light) alternative to golf’s standard nylon carriers, the vintage appeal of this canvas oxford bag will stand out on the green. Leather details accent the straps and pockets, and the bag features five full-length dividers for clubs. brooksbroth ers.com ($1,200)

Does the spring thaw have you itching to return to your favorite outdoor sports? This collection of golfing and cycling gear will put you back in peak performance in no time. BY JOHN LYON AND PAIGE REDDINGER

P H O T O BY J O S H U A S C O T T

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Articles of Taste

1 TONINO LAMBORGHINI × HONMA These Lamborghinibranded golf balls are limited-edition versions of 59-year-old Japanese golf brand Honma’s TW-G1 and TW-G1X balls, built to emphasize control and distance, respectively. lamborghini.it ($130 for 12 balls)

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2 ROYAL ALBARTROSS Handmade in Italy, the Captain Nero brogue golf shoes combine boardroom style with sport-specific function. Water-resistant leather uppers and soles, breathable linings, and generous room in the toe allow for greater comfort while playing the links. albartross .com ($495) 3 ARCCOS The Arccos 360 is an elegant shot-tracking system that allows golfers to collect data using lightweight club-top sensors and a smartphone without interrupting their game. That data can be used in real time to help set up shots and choose clubs, or be analyzed later to determine areas of improvement. arccos golf.com ($250) 4 BARTON PERREIRA These tortoise-framed Griin sunglasses with emerald lenses ofer sophisticated style on and of the course. The Los Angeles–based brand’s eyewear is handcrafted in small batches by artisans in Japan to ensure topnotch quality. barton perreira.com ($590)

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Articles of Taste PINARELLO The Italian bicycle manufacturer’s flagship model, the Dogma F10 comes with some serious racing cred. Last year, cycling superstar Chris Froome of Britain’s Team Sky rode it to victory at the Tour de France, and the team—which has picked up five wins at the event since partnering with Pinarello in 2010—has announced that it will use the bike again this year. The Dogma F10’s asymmetric frame is 1.8 ounces lighter and 7 percent stiffer than its predecessor, the F8. Its aerodynamics have been reworked to reduce drag by as much as 12 percent in some spots. The MyWay program lets owners customize their bike’s color scheme, down to the hue of the tape on the handlebars. pinarello.com (from $7,000 for the Dogma F10 MyWay frameset only)

“Only when moving can one comfortably maintain one’s balance.” —Albert Einstein

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Articles of Taste

1 SUUNTO A digital fitness watch with refinement, the Spartan Ultra Gold Special Edition has built-in cycling features—like a real-time lap table that shows power, heart rate, and speed—as well as functions for more than 80 other sports. It also provides GPS route navigation. suunto.com ($820–$870)

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2 MAVIC The Mavic Comete Ultimate cycling shoe took 3 years to develop and features a carbon shell and a low stack height (4.5 mm) that gives a 360-degree power transfer from the cyclist to the bike, boosting power by as much as 20 watts. mavic.com ($1,000) 3 AFTERSHOKZ Using earbuds while riding risks loss of auditory situational awareness. The Trekz Air headphones address this issue by using openear bone-conduction technology to send mild vibrations through the cheekbone to the inner ear, where it is registered as sound. aftershokz.com ($180)

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4 HERNO Since its inception in 1948, the Italian outerwear company has provided stylish attire resistant to rain and wind. Its new cycling capsule collection incorporates reflective details, reachable pockets, an ergonomic design for easy movement, and a drawstring hood designed to fit over a bike helmet. herno.it ($1,075) 5 COROS Cycling mishaps are inevitable, but the Coros Omni smart helmet works to keep them from ever occurring. Wearers can make calls and listen to music without blocking out ambient sound. The helmet has built-in light-sensing LEDs and links to GPS. coros.com ($200)

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TIME PIECE

118 — L A U R E N T D’ H A R C O U R

C H A M PA G

POL ROGER THE TIMELINE BURIED IN HISTORY 1 1849 In January, a 17-year-old Pol Roger sells his first wines in Aÿ, France.

2 1851 Roger moves his business to Épernay, where he begins to produce Pinot Noir and Chardonnay.

3 1855 Roger begins production of brut Champagne, which is favored by his British clientele.

4 1877 Roger receives a royal warrant from Queen Victoria of the United Kingdom.

5 1899 Roger dies of pneumonia, leaving the business to his sons, Maurice and Georges. As a sign of respect, the brothers adopt their father’s full name as their surname.

6 1900

chef de cave Dominique Petit and his successor, Damien Cambres, happened to notice a large void at the site filled with broken glass and a single bottle of Champagne. Over the next 2 days, 25 more surviving bottles of bubbly—corked between 1887 and 1898—came to light. For the moment, says d’Harcourt, the search for more has been halted to enable sitework specialists to confirm that the ground is stable enough for further tunneling. As for the fate of the bottles found thus far? “We plan to enjoy them with friends, family, and fellow oenophiles later this spring. These bottles have been waiting for 118 years, so they can wait a few months more,” d’Harcourt says, noting that before the Champagne can be enjoyed, it must be riddled to remove any sediment. Once it is poured, a select few will have the privilege of discovering just how it compares to Champagnes of similar age, which have been carefully curated in the Pol Roger cellars. —Angela M.H. Schuster

7 1908 Pol Roger is acknowledged as the favored Champagne of Winston Churchill.

8 2018 On January 15, during a major excavation of the property, outgoing chef de cave Dominique Petit and his successor, Damien Cambres, happen upon an intact bottle of Champagne that survived the collapse of 1900. Soon, 25 more bottles are recovered.

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MICHAËL BOUDOT

“We are very excited, as the wines appear to be quite clear, despite being buried for more than a century, and we are convinced they may still be drinkable,” says Laurent d’Harcourt, CEO of Champagne Pol Roger, about the recent discovery of a cache of Champagne that survived a catastrophic cellar collapse in the early hours of the morning of February 23, 1900. Apparently the disaster was precipitated by a spell of cold, damp weather, which caused a massive sinkhole to develop in the chalk substrate into which the wine caves had been carved. In all, 500 casks of wine and 1.5 million bottles of Champagne were lost in the event, nearly wiping out the Pol Roger enterprise. The family concern, explains d’Harcourt, survived largely through the generosity of fellow vintners. Nothing was salvaged from the catastrophe until this past January, when the collapsed cellars were being industrially excavated ahead of the planned construction of a new packing facility. Outgoing

On February 23, the Pol Roger cellars are destroyed by a massive sinkhole, which also causes nearby buildings to collapse. Some 500 casks of wine and 1.5 million bottles of Champagne are lost. On March 20, tunneling eforts to recover lost stock are halted after a subsequent cave-in on an adjacent property.


DUSTIN JOHNSON GOLF'S WORLD NUMBER 1

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Robb Report USA - April 2018  

This Is 360

Robb Report USA - April 2018  

This Is 360

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