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OCTOBER 2012

DIRT, STREET, TRACK History Comes Alive At AMA Vintage Motorcycle Days

THE JOURNAL OF THE


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IT’S THE FUTURE OF MOTOCROSS. BUILT FOR GENERATION SCRUB. Motocross has evolved. Today’s racers stay low off jumps to get around the track faster. And need a bike that delivers more power and maneuverability. The all-new 2013 CRF®450R is that bike. It features a next-generation aluminum frame. New front air fork. Short twin exhaust pipes. New swingarm. And new engine upgrades. The result: greater mass centralization for more control in the air. Through the berms. Over whoops. And all the way to the podium. Check it out at your Honda Dealer. And take a virtual ride at mx.honda.com.


Don’t miss this rare opportunity to see off-road legend Malcolm Smith and dirt-track champion Mert Lawwill—stars of the iconic motorcycling film “On Any Sunday”—together on one stage.

CLASSOF2012 2012 AMA Motorcycle Hall Of Fame

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NAVIGATION

Cover

These trials riders were just some of the participants at AMA Vintage Motorcycle Days. Photo: www.wilkinsonbrothers.com.

Navigation Photo

“[We] went on a weeklong tour of Colorado this month to beat the furnace that is Phoenix, Ariz. Went to Rocky Mountain National Park. Here are our Triumph Rocket IIIs (his and her’s!)”—Liz Jones. Photo submitted by Liz Jones.

10. LETTERS You write, we read.

12. ROB DINGMAN Government intrusion.

14. RIGHTS Consumers must buy a minimum four gallons of gasoline at certain pumps, and the 2012 AMA Voter Guide is now available.

22. RIDING American Motorcyclist magazine (ISSN 0277-9358) is published monthly by the American Motorcyclist Association, 13515 Yarmouth Dr., Pickerington, OH 43147. Copyright by the American Motorcyclist Association/American Motorcyclist 2012. Printed in USA. Subscription rate: Magazine subscription fee of $10 covered in membership dues; $15 a year for non-members. Postmaster: Mail form 3579 to 13515 Yarmouth Dr., Pickerington, OH 43147. Periodical postage paid at Pickerington, Ohio, and at additional mailing offices.

October 2012 Volume 66, Number 10 Published by the American Motorcyclist Association 13515 Yarmouth Dr. Pickerington, OH 43147 (800) AMA-JOIN (262-5646) www.americanmotorcyclist.com

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8 days, 8 states, 4,000 miles.

31. RACING U.S. sets team for MXoN, and amateur roadracers are Daytona bound.

36. HALL OF FAME Evel Knievel H-D XR750 replica, and Hall of Famer Giacomo Agostini.

40. THE PAST COMES ALIVE AMA Vintage Motorcycle Days delivers.

47. UNDER ATTACK 10 threats to motorcycling.

51. GO RIDE What to do, where to go.

58. TED PASCHE Welcome to the family.


EDITORIAL OFFICES

AMA BOARD OF DIRECTORS

American Motorcyclist 13515 Yarmouth Drive Pickerington, OH 43147 (614) 856-1900 submissions@ama-cycle.org

Husqvarna is proud to sponsor the 2012 AMA National Dual-Sport Series

Contact any member of the AMA Board of Directors at AmericanMotorcyclist.com/ about/board

James Holter, Managing Editor Bill Kresnak, Government Affairs Editor Mark Lapid, Creative Director Jen Muecke, Designer Jeff Guciardo, Production Manager/Designer

Stan Simpson, Chairman Cibolo, Texas

ADVERTISING Steve Gotoski, Advertising Director (Western States) (951) 566-5068, sgotoski@ama-cycle.org

Ken Ford, Assistant Treasurer Bartow, Fla.

Maggie McNally, Vice Chairwoman Albany, N.Y.

Perry King, Assistant Secretary Northern California

Zach Stevens, National Sales Manager (626) 298-3854, zstevens@ama-cycle.org

John Ulrich, Executive Committee Member Lake Elsinore, Calif. Russ Brenan, Irvine, Calif. All trademarks used herein (unless otherwise noted) are owned by the AMA and may only be used with the express, written permission of the AMA. American Motorcyclist is the monthly publication of the American Motorcyclist Association, which represents motorcyclists nationwide. For information on AMA membership benefits, call (800) AMA-JOIN or visit AmericanMotorcyclist.com. Manuscripts, photos, drawings and other editorial contributions must be accompanied by return postage. No responsibility is assumed for loss or damage to unsolicited material. Copyright© American Motorcyclist Association, 2012.

Sean Hilbert, Hillsdale, Mich. Scott Miller, Milwaukee, Wis. Art More, Surprise, Ariz. Jim Viverito, Chicago, Ill.

(800) AMA-JOIN (262-5646) AmericanMotorcyclist.com

AMA STAFF EXECUTIVE

DEVELOPMENT/OPERATIONS

Rob Dingman, President/CEO Rhonda Hixon, Administrative Asst./Litigation Manager Bruce Moffat, Chief Financial Officer Sen. Wayne Allard, Vice President, Government Relations Bob Chaddock, Vice President, Administration Jeff Massey, Vice President, Operations Jim Williams, Vice President, Industry Relations & Corporate Member Programs Grant Parsons, Director of Communications & Marketing Rob Rasor, Director of International Affairs

Jack Penton, Director Paula Schremser, Program Specialist

ACCOUNTING

ADMINISTRATIVE SERVICES

Shannon Carlin, Legislative Assistant Marie Esselstein, Government Affairs Assistant Nick Haris, Western States Representative Jessica Irving, Grassroots Coordinator Sharon Long, Legislative Coordinator Rick Podliska, Deputy Director Imre Szauter, Government Affairs Manager - On-Road

Sandi Dunphy, Coordinator/Switchboard Operator Sean Maher, Director

INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY

Dawn Becker, Accounting Manager Tyra Hines, Lead Accounting Clerk Melanie Hise, HR Assistant/Payroll Coordinator

AMHF/MOTORCYCLE HALL OF FAME Renee Bock, Management Assistant Beth Myers, Donor Relations Specialist Katy Wood, Operations Manager AMA RACING/ORGANIZER SERVICES

www.husqvarna-motorcyclesna.com

Kip Bigelow, Amateur MX Manager Joe Bromley, Director of Racing Jacki Burris, Organizer Services Coordinator Jane Caston, Racing Coordinator Lana Cox, Administrative Assistant/Switchboard Operator Kevin Crowther, Director SX & Pro Racing Relations Bill Cumbow, Director of Special Projects Dave Hembroff, Road Riding Manager Tamra Jones, Racing Coordinator Ken Saillant, Track Racing Manager Cherie Schlatter, Organizer Services Manager D’Andra Schwabel, Organizer Services Coordinator Serena Van Dyke, Organizer Services Coordinator Chuck Weir, Off Road Racing Manager Conrad Young, Timing & Scoring Manager

DISTRIBUTION/FACILITIES MANAGEMENT John Bricker, Mailroom Manager Heida Drake, Copy Center Operator/Switchboard Operator Bill Frasch, Mailroom Clerk GOVERNMENT RELATIONS

Rob Baughman, Network Administrator John Boker, Developer Dave Coleman, Network Architect Amy Hyman, Senior Programmer/Analyst Ed Madden, Managed Services Manager Bill Miller, Web Architect Peg Tuvell, Operations Manager MARKETING Connie Fleming, Events Manager Tigra Tsujikawa, Marketing Manager MEMBER SERVICES/DATA ENTRY Lori Cavucci, Member Services Representative Deb D’Andrea, Member Services Representative Linda Hembroff, Member Services Representative Darcel Higgins, Member Services Manager Angie Miller, Member Services Representative Tiffany Pound, Member Services Representative Jessica Robinson, Member Services Representative Misty Walker, Member Services Representative


MEMBER LETTERS

Send your letters (and a high-resolution photo) to submissions@ama-cycle.org; or mail to 13515 Yarmouth Drive, Pickerington, OH 43147.

LETTER OF THE MONTH FROM FAN TO RACER For years my wife, my friends and I have faithfully attended AMA Vintage Each month, a lucky AMA member wins a Bike Motorcycle Days at Mid-Ohio. It is truly Bandit gift card worth $100. Didn’t win? No worries. You can still take advantage of your the highlight of my year. This year was 10% AMA member discount at BikeBandit.com. no exception, but with one significant difference. Rather than being content to watch the racing, I decided to participate. My choice of racing was motocross. I have to admit I was apprehensive at first. At age 44, would I be too old to race? Wouldn’t the faster, more-experienced riders be upset with me for impeding their progress? The answer to these questions are a resounding “No!” Rather than the stone-faced competitors I expected to encounter, all I met were friendly and eager to lend advice to a first-timer. Everyone was there with the same intentions I had: Ride the best race you can and above all else, have fun. Family and friends were there to watch and share in the experience. At age 88, my hero in life, my father, braved the near 90-degree temperature to be there. While a minor mechanical gremlin prevented me from racing in the second moto, I didn’t feel as I had missed anything. The excitement of being on the track is like nothing else I have experienced. What is my advice to those who have always wanted to race, but didn’t think it was for them? Give it a try. If it doesn’t agree with you, at least you have one more thing to add to your list of accomplishments in life. But don’t be surprised if you end up like me: hooked. I can’t wait to do it again next year. Racing made 2012 AMA Vintage Motorcycle Days the most memorable ever. I can’t wait to see what next year brings. Kirk Chapman Doylestown, Ohio Kirk Chapman

GOOD FOR THE HALL I could recommend no one better for the AMA Motorcycle Hall of Fame than Al Wilcox. I raced ERA then WERA in the 1970s. He always made the finish of every race a memorable experience. I remember when I came across the finish line at Summit Point first in the 400 Café class. He always made me feel like a champion. No matter if it was 200cc novice or 750GP, he was just as exuberant each time. I will miss Mr. Wilcox. He was a great one who shall be missed by all who knew him. Guy Beaucage Painesville, Ohio WHO GOT SECOND? The September issue of your magazine gets the AMA No. 1 plate! In the race of

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all the publications in print, head to head, on a track, no buts/straight-up racing, you win first place. I checked my mail and stood at the mailbox outside—fortunately it’s summertime—and read the entire magazine, including the ads. The high desert article, Jeff Ward and Team Kawasaki, the piece on the Suzuki RM, and that was just your heat race. You get the checkered flag, the energy drink, the trophy. You win! Congratulations on such a great issue. Mikey Ofiesh South San Francisco, Calif. VINTAGE FUN I attended my first AMA Vintage Motorcycle Days this year and must say that I really enjoyed it. Craig Vetter was an excellent grand marshal and his

seminars were very informative on fuel economy and streamliners. Motorcycle manufacturers should be putting more effort on both this and diesel-powered motorcycles. I believe Fred Hayes already has it figured out. It was also great to see a very nice display of vintage machines, most of which were ridden. I was very happy to have found out that there were sidecar races—a great bunch of people. But both the sidecar races and dirt-track race seemed to be left out of the program. These two events should be promoted more as it would bring in more fans. Mike Mosca Glenwood, N.J. Thanks, Mike. We also had a great time at AMA Vintage Motorcycle Days. The sidecar races were part of the racing program, and we did our best to promote the dirt-track event, which was a sell-out this year. But that won’t keep us from trying harder next time! Thanks, again! WHO’S TO CARRY THE TORCH? A lot of us are older, single-track, exenduro riders who have enjoyed riding in areas that are now closed, either by Wilderness or some other restriction. If not for organizations such as the AMA, the BlueRibbon Coalition, COHVCO and TPA, to name a few, there would be a lot fewer areas available to ride in. We, most of us anyway, can’t ride the “AA” trails any more, but we want them available for those who can. We need younger people to get involved and carry the torch, keep organizations like AMA, BlueRibbon Coalition, COHVCO, TPA going so young riders and their families can keep enjoying the sport we have enjoyed. I know, and have known, some of these people who spent so much of their time working to keep OHV trails and areas open for all recreationists to enjoy, but we are all aging. We need younger people to keep up the fight and get and keep organized so we can continue to enjoy the sport we all love. Eldon “Cap” Kuney Fruita, Colo. UNDERSTANDING ABS Thanks for the good article on antilock braking systems. As a 20-year AMA member and a rider for some 36 of my almost 55 years, I must confess that I am among those who are still not a fan of ABS on motorcycles. Of four motorcycles currently in the family stable, my BMW is the first and only


with ABS. Clearly new technology gets better with time and experience, but it was noted in the article that BMW introduced ABS to the motorcycle world in 1988, so it should be reasonable to expect that 15 years later my 2003 model R1150RT-P (police model) would have a flawless braking system. What I have found is that when braking over washboard chatters, or those nasty tar snakes, the ABS detects momentary wheel lock and turns off my brakes momentarily. Worse, this can also happen when trail-braking into corners with less than ideal pavement. The first few times this happened I about soiled myself, but have since taught myself how to live with this system. For my money, ABS is a great concept but needs a few options like sensitivity adjustment and the ability to just plain shut it off. ABS is becoming standard equipment on street bikes and is getting better and better, but we still shouldn’t be forced to have it activated if we really don’t want it. Mark Folsom Longmont, Colo. Thanks for the note, Mark. Regarding ABS technology, the leaps it is making are quantum, and today’s systems are exceptional. That said, the AMA always has, and always will, support choice for motorcyclists. RANGE OF APPRECIATION I’ve enjoyed various articles in your monthly magazine for years now. It gives a wide and broad spectrum of the joys of motorcycling across the range of motorcycling styles. I really enjoyed Steven Holt’s last two articles: “Motorcycling passion” (June) and “The competitive crunch” (September). Being a trackday rider turned racer in my later years (30s), I was truly amazed at the difference between going fast on the track and going fast on the track with other racers! It gave me a whole new outlook as to what the professionals go through during an entire season. It’s pretty cutthroat out there on the track during races but yet, through it all, the camaraderie and respect from all around is really enlightening. We are all out there together sharing the same risks and aiming at the same objective. It’s an inborn understanding among all who compete that even the slowest of racers is still a racer! The “Passion” article was also nice, as I’ve found that almost all motorcyclists appreciate a bike for its

inherent mechanical qualities as well as the representative values of freedom, individualism, uniqueness, etc. It seems to transcend the basic material conglomeration of parts that make up a simple machine. I also enjoy reading many of your travel articles and since I work a lot and my weekends are spent usually at the track, I can’t get away like I used to as a youth and travel about. I live vicariously through your stories of different areas, roads, trials and tribulations that everyday riders navigate across this country (and other countries, too). It gives me a sense of awe to see some of these riders take on monumental tasks to plan and organize their trips and then actually go through with them and succeed. It makes me passionate about the life I’ve chosen and the bikes I love. Keep up the good work! Rob Guest San Jose, Calif. CROSS TRAINING I am not surprised that BMX Olympian Arielle Martin has taken up motorcycles.

The Road

Drew Biordi

It’s just a natural progression. Even though I’ve only been a licensed rider for six years now, BMX and mountain biking have been part of my entire life and, for sure, all the skills (and spills) I’ve learned from pedaling a bike have transferred to make me a good motorcyclist. I ride off-road, sportbikes and adventure bikes and still do downhill mountain bike riding as well as road cycling. Even when I ride dual-sport events I still wear my old S&M BMX jersey. Good for Arielle to get the Ducati, and maybe we’ll see her in an AMA Superbike race someday. Drew Biordi Media, Pa.

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FROM THE PRESIDENT

GOVERNMENT INTRUSION Quiet Efforts To Restrict Your Freedoms I’ve been involved in government and politics in one way or another for more than two decades, but I still shake my head over the ability of the federal government to reach—or overreach—into our lives, and the power wielded by bureaucrats to make that happen. As a motorcyclist, you’re probably aware of many examples, and three immediately come to mind for me, affecting street and off-highway riders. They involve ethanol in gasoline, which By Rob Dingman could damage motorcycle and all-terrain vehicle engines; the strict federal Wilderness land-use designation that bars off-highway vehicle riding; and health insurance discrimination against riders. Concerning ethanol, let me make our position clear. The AMA doesn’t oppose ethanol in gasoline, but the AMA believes extensive testing needs to be done before E15—a new blend of gas coming on the market that is 15 percent ethanol—is approved for use in motorcycle and ATV engines. The key for the AMA is that E15 must be proven safe for motorcycle and ATV engines. To the best of our knowledge, E15 isn’t approved for use in any original-equipment motorcycles or ATVs. In fact, its use can void many manufacturers’ warranties. As of today, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has only approved the use of E15 in model year 2001 and newer cars, lightduty trucks and medium-duty passenger vehicles. In that case, how is the federal government going to prevent motorcyclists from inadvertently putting E15 in their gas tanks or gas cans when getting gas at a ‘blender pump” with a single hose? (A blender pump dispenses different fuel blends through the same hose, so residual E15 could be left in a hose—some say as much as two-thirds of a gallon—when a motorcyclist fills up with another grade.) Here’s where the EPA is overreaching. Under EPA rules, you must buy at least four gallons of gas from that pump. Not one gallon. Not two gallons. Not even three gallons. Yes, the government is mandating you buy at least four gallons to dilute the residual E15 in the hose. The simple solution, of course, is to use a different gas pump rather than a single-hose blender pump to get gas. What if that isn’t an option? Then, I guess, you’re hosed. Regarding threats to off-highway riding, we’re finding that the federal government apparently is once again trying to usurp congressional authority to create Wilderness through administrative fiat.

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Wilderness is one of the strictest forms of public land management. Nearly all forms of non-pedestrian recreation are illegal in Wilderness areas, including OHV riding. The AMA wholeheartedly supports appropriate Wilderness, which is defined in the federal Wilderness Act of 1964. The key for the AMA is that the land must meet the strict criteria contained in the law, have public support and congressional approval. Few Wilderness areas proposed today meet the essential criteria. How is the federal government trying to keep you off your own public land without involving federal lawmakers? Simple. U.S. Interior Secretary Ken Salazar is trying to give bureaucrats in the federal Bureau of Land Management the power to manage public land as if Congress went through the public process to designate the land as Wilderness. This is another example of the government reaching down into our lives without involving the people’s representatives in Congress. Concerning health insurance discrimination against motorcyclists and ATV riders, the AMA position is very clear: We oppose it, period. We thought we had that battle won after working hard to pass a federal law to end that kind of discrimination. In 1996, Congress passed the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) that included language prohibiting employers from denying health-care coverage based on a worker participating in legal activities such as motorcycle and ATV riding. But when federal bureaucrats wrote rules to implement the law, they reversed the intent of Congress. The AMA has recently received a flood of emails from employees of a Pittsburgh company that is adopting a new health plan next year that won’t cover injuries sustained while riding a motorcycle. This is an example of where federal bureaucrats have overreached, and the actions could be financially devastating to a motorcyclist who could get saddled with tens of thousands of dollars in medical bills. We’re fighting to protect your right to ride and race, serving as a watchdog on Congress, and government agencies and bureaucrats. And that goes for racing as well as transportation and recreation. Of course, the more members we have, the more political clout we have. That’s why I am asking you to bring a friend or family member into the AMA tent. Ask that rider to join the AMA to protect the future of riding. Or give an AMA membership as a gift. Just go to www.americanmotorcyclist.com or call (800) AMAJOIN (262-5646). Rob Dingman is president and CEO of the AMA.


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AMA Calls The Requirement ‘Unacceptable’

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency is requiring consumers to buy at least four gallons of gasoline when they use certain E15 ethanol-gasoline “blender pumps.” The mandate is designed to reduce the risk of damage to engines not designed for E15 use— which includes most motorcycles today—when pumping gas through a hose that is used to dispense multiple fuel blends. A gas station in Lawrence, Kan., in July became the first in the nation to offer E15 fuel using a blender pump. The EPA revealed the minimumpurchase requirement to the AMA in a letter dated Aug. 1, responding to AMA concerns that E15—a gasoline formulation that contains up to 15 percent ethanol by volume—could be put in motorcycle and all-terrain vehicle gas tanks inadvertently when consumers use blender pumps. A blender pump dispenses different fuel blends through the same hose. The vast majority of motorcycles and ATVs in use today aren’t designed to operate on E15 fuel. “With E15 gasoline, our members who make a concerted effort to fuel their motorcycles or ATVs with E10-or-less gasoline may be unknowingly refueling with residual fuel left in the hose,” Wayne Allard, AMA vice president for government relations, wrote in a June 20 letter to EPA Administrator Lisa Jackson. “Unlike an automobile or SUV with a large fuel tank, the residual fuel left in a fueling hose could be detrimental to the performance of motorcycle or ATV engines due to the small size of their fuel tanks and the higher concentration of ethanol that would, therefore, be present in the fuel,” Allard wrote. “In addition, the use of E15 will lower fuel efficiency and possibly cause premature engine failure,” he wrote. “Use of E15 fuel voids many manufacturer warranties. In off-road engines, the effects can even be dangerous for users.” Byron Bunker of the EPA National Vehicle and Fuel Emissions Laboratory

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responded to the AMA on behalf of Jackson. “EPA requires that retail stations that own or operate blender pumps either dispense E15 from a dedicated hose and nozzle if able or, in the case of E15 and E10 being dispensed from the same hose, require that at least four gallons of fuel be purchased to prevent vehicles and engines with smaller fuel tanks from being exposed to gasoline-ethanol blended fuels containing greater than 10 volume percent ethanol,” Bunker wrote. Reacting to the new EPA policy, Allard notes that not all motorcycle and ATV gas tanks hold four or more gallons. “Not only do we find it unacceptable for the EPA to mandate that everyone— including our members—buy minimum amounts of gas, but the EPA answer simply won’t work because of the sizes of many motorcycle and ATV gas tanks and the fact that off-highway riders take containers of gas with them on their trips, and most times those containers are much smaller than four gallons,” Allard says. The AMA has repeatedly expressed concerns to government officials and federal lawmakers about possible

damage to motorcycle and ATV engines caused by the inadvertent use of E15 when the new fuel becomes widely available, and has asked that motorcycles and ATVs be part of any scientific study into the effects of E15. In October 2010, the EPA approved the use of E15 in model year 2007 and newer light-duty vehicles (cars, lightduty trucks and medium-duty passenger vehicles). Then, in January 2011, the EPA added model year 2001-2006 lightduty vehicles to the approved list. No motorcycles or ATVs are currently on the list.

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OFFICIALS SAY CONSUMERS MUST BUY AT LEAST FOUR GALLONS OF GAS FROM CERTAIN PUMPS


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CALIFORNIA BANS, ILLINOIS RESTRICTS MOTORCYCLE-ONLY CHECKPOINTS Five States Now Have Checkpoint Laws

AMA VOTER GUIDE NOW AVAILABLE See Where Candidates Stand On The Issues

The AMA’s valuable voting resource for motorcyclists—the 2012 AMA Voter Guide—is now online. Motorcycle-only checkpoints, public land grabs and health insurance discrimination against motorcyclists are just some of the issues used to rate federal congressional and state gubernatorial candidates in the 2012 AMA Voter Guide that is part of the AMA’s “Vote Like A Motorcyclist” campaign. “The AMA is a non-partisan organization and doesn’t make political endorsements. But it does provide tools to help its members make informed choices on Election Day and offers tips for getting involved in campaigns,” says Wayne Allard, a former U.S. senator and U.S. representative from Colorado who now serves as the AMA’s vice president for government relations. “We encourage AMA members and all riders to cast their ballots and work on political campaigns based, in part, on candidates’ positions on motorcycling-

related issues as well as other issues of importance to them,” Allard says. The 2012 AMA Voter Guide gives motorcyclists important information about political candidates. It includes a rating for every federal and gubernatorial candidate of the major political parties who returned an AMA questionnaire. “The ratings show how closely the candidates’ answers align with AMA positions,” Allard says. “The 2012 AMA Voter Guide also features a scorecard for federal incumbents seeking re-election that shows how closely their voting records match the positions held by the AMA.” To learn how you can get involved to help protect the rights of motorcyclists this campaign season, go to www. americanmotorcyclist.com/rights/ getinvolved. Also, be sure to Vote Like A Motorcyclist and register to vote. Go to http://amacycle.capwiz.com/election/ register_vote/.

California and Illinois are the latest states to take stands against motorcycleonly checkpoints. California’s governor signed a bill into law on July 13 to ban motorcycle-only checkpoints, while Illinois’ governor recently signed a bill into law that prohibits the use of federal funding for law enforcement to set up motorcycle-only traffic checkpoints. Virginia and North Carolina also recently put laws on the books banning motorcycle-only checkpoints, and New Hampshire prohibits the use of federal dollars for them. “Officials say they set up these motorcycle-only checkpoints to pull over motorcyclists to check for safety violations,” says Wayne Allard, AMA vice president for government relations. “But if officials are really concerned about motorcyclists’ safety, then they need to stop discriminating against motorcyclists with these checkpoints and start supporting programs that prevent motorcycle crashes, such as rider safety training and driver awareness programs.” The AMA opposes motorcycle-only checkpoints and has been tracking the discriminatory practice since it first appeared in New York in 2007. For more information on the issue, go to www.americanmotorcyclist.com/rights/ motorcycleonlycheckpoints.aspx.

AMA ATTENDS NATIONAL LEGISLATIVE SUMMIT Effort Educates Lawmakers About Issues

Jim Viverito

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AMA Government Affairs Manager Imre Szauter spent several days in Chicago recently educating state lawmakers and staff about motorcycling issues. AMA Board member Jim Viverito of Chicago joined Szauter in an AMA informational booth to explain motorcyclists’ concerns. The event was the bipartisan National Conference of State Legislatures Legislative Summit Aug. 6-9 at the McCormick Place West convention center. It attracted thousands of lawmakers and their staff members from all 50 states, and even decision-makers from abroad. “I’m very pleased with the attention we got,” Szauter says. “Not only did a lot of people come over to our booth to learn about motorcycling issues, but I was surprised by the number who said they ride motorcycles.”

Photo Kid: David Smith/racedaypix.com

RIGHTS


LEAD LAW: ONE YEAR LATER

Kids Celebrate Motocross Victories After Lead-Law Defeat As many as 10 national motocross champions were able to take home the prestigious AMA national No. 1 plate in August thanks to the defeat of the “lead law” that banned the sale of kid’s dirtbikes. The 10 young riders under the age of 12 earned their hardware at the 2012 Red Bull AMA Amateur National Motocross Championship presented by Amsoil, which was held July 30 to Aug. 4 at Loretta Lynn’s Ranch in Hurricane Mills, Tenn. Cobra Motorcycles, which makes kids’ competition motocross machines, saw a lot of that success. Cobra President Sean Hilbert says that his riders’ titles wouldn’t have happened without the defeat of the lead law. “It is very clear that we would not have been at Loretta Lynn’s without the lead law victory,” Hilbert says. “The success was made that much sweeter due to the categorical exemption of motorcycles and all-terrain vehicles that made it possible, and obviously the AMA played a big role in that.”

Pierce Brown

For Cobra, 2012 was a bright spot for another reason: the company’s first AMA Amateur National Motocross Championship in the 65cc class. Utah’s Pierce Brown won the 65cc AMA national title for Cobra, which has been a longtime 50cc-class powerhouse. Brown won all three motos to sweep the 65 (7-9) Stock class. One year ago—on Aug. 12, 2011— President Obama signed into law H.R. 2715 to exempt kids’ off-highway vehicles from the Consumer Product Safety Improvement Act (CPSIA) of 2008, known as the lead law. The exemption was a victory that was the result of nearly three years of intensive efforts by the AMA, its members and millions of advocates of responsible OHV recreation. The CPSIA, which went into effect on Feb. 10, 2009, banned the making, importing, distributing or selling of any product intended for children 12 and under, including kids’ dirtbikes and all-terrain vehicles, that contained more than a specified amount of lead in any accessible part.


Legislative Assistant Hired

ELECTRIC MOTORCYCLE TAX CREDIT MAY BE EXTENDED Up To $2,500 Credit For Buyers

Buyers of on-road electric motorcycles would continue to be eligible for up to a $2,500 tax credit under a bill approved by the U.S. Senate Finance Committee. On Aug. 2, the panel approved bipartisan legislation extending dozens of tax breaks, including language offered by U.S. Sen. Ron Wyden (D-Ore.) to

preserve the tax credit for buying electric motorcycles designed for the street. “Right now, companies like [electric motorcycle maker] Brammo in Oregon are keeping the American electric vehicle industry on the cutting edge,” Wyden says. “But without an extension of this tax credit for the purchase of electric motorcycles, we could be stifling this innovative new industry in its infancy.” Rick Podliska, AMA deputy director of government relations, says: “This credit will benefit family-owned dealers, manufacturers and riders of motorcycles. Also, motorcycles reduce traffic and parking congestion and reduce impacts to our roads and bridges compared with automobiles and light-duty trucks.”

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Shannon Carlin has joined the AMA Government Relations Department as legislative assistant in the Washington, D.C., office. A resident of New York, Carlin has worked in communications and public relations. She has also served as a senior legislative assistant in the U.S. House. Besides monitoring federal legislation and helping push the AMA agenda on Capitol Hill, Carlin will be heavily involved in federal agency rules and regulations. She holds master’s degrees from The Catholic University of America in Washington, D.C., in congressional studies and international affairs, and has a bachelor’s in American studies from SUNY College at Old Westbury in New York. She joined the AMA Government Relations Department on Aug. 13.

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Photo Electric: Courtesy Zero Motorcycles ; Carlin: Jessica Irving

NEW AMA FREEDOM FIGHTER


STATEWAT C H CALIFORNIA The latest ruling in the ongoing legal challenges surrounding the Eldorado National Forest has largely upheld the forest’s existing travel management decision. The ruling, which ends the case, determined that the forest has fully complied with Endangered Species Act concerns and adopts the agency’s proposed remedy for continued travel along meadow routes. These meadow routes involve 135 miles, of which 46 miles will be reopened immediately. The other 89 miles will remain closed pending additional analysis. ILLINOIS A new law allows for the vertical mounting of motorcycle license plates, raises the height limit for motorcycle handlebars to no higher than the operator’s head, allows a motorcycle modulating brake light, and creates the offense of aggravated operating of a motorcycle on one wheel if the operator is also speeding. The new law is the result of Senate Bill 3452, sponsored by Sen. Donne Trotter (D-Chicago). Another new law requires motorcyclists to wait not less than 120 seconds before proceeding with due caution through an intersection controlled by a traffic-actuated

RIGHTS signal that doesn’t recognize their bikes. Motorcyclists in Chicago aren’t permitted to proceed through a malfunctioning trafficactuated signal. This new law is the result of Senate Bill 2528, sponsored by Sen. Gary Forby (D-59th). LOUISIANA A new law raises the motorcycle handlebar height limit from not more than 15 inches above the seat occupied by the operator to not higher than the operator’s shoulders when the operator is sitting astride the seat and the operator’s hands are on the handlebar grips. The new law is the result of Senate Bill 582, sponsored by Sen. Richard Gallot (D-Ruston). MISSOURI A new law exempts an active member of the U.S. armed forces who applies for a motorcycle or motortricycle license or endorsement from the state motorcycle skills test if the member has successfully completed a military motorcycle ridertraining course that meets or exceeds the Motorcycle Safety Foundation curriculum. The law is the result of Senate Bill 719, sponsored by Sen. Mike Kehoe (R-Jefferson City).

NEW JERSEY A new law makes it easier for prosecutors to get convictions for vehicular homicide or assault by auto against a person who illegally uses a cell phone while driving and, as a result, kills or injures someone. The law specifically provides that the illegal use of a cell phone while driving infers the defendant was driving recklessly. The law is the result of Assembly Bill 1074, sponsored by Assembly Member Annette Quijano (D-Union). RHODE ISLAND Championed by the Rhode Island Motorcycle Association (RIMA), House Bill 7187, sponsored by Rep. Peter John Petrarca (D-Lincoln) and Senate Bill 2130, sponsored by Sen. John Tassoni (D-Smithfield), require that a motorcycle parking plan be established for parking areas and that designated areas be made available beginning on April 1, 2013, within sight of or adjacent to state, city, and town buildings. The bills don’t apply to state airports. Both bills were signed into law by Gov. Lincoln Chafee.

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Photo Jeff Kardas

CONTROVERSIAL ‘WILD LANDS’ POLICY BEING REVIVED Federal Lawmakers Question Federal Officials

Some powerful federal lawmakers say the U.S. Interior Department has unilaterally resurrected the controversial Wild Lands policy that Congress terminated last year. On Aug. 2, U.S. Rep. Rob Bishop (R-Utah) and U.S. Sen. Orrin Hatch (R-Utah) announced that Wild Lands has been revived. Interior Secretary Ken Salazar initially unveiled the Wild Lands policy on Dec. 22, 2010. Under the policy, land designated as Wild Lands by the federal Bureau of Land Management would be managed as if they had received the restrictive Wilderness land-use designation from Congress. The policy circumvents any congressional input. When Congress designates an area as Wilderness—one of the strictest forms of public land management—nearly all forms of non-pedestrian recreation become illegal. The Wild Lands policy announcement shocked the off-highway vehicle riding community because it was expected to have a far-reaching impact. The BLM manages about 245 million acres of public land nationwide, primarily in 12 western states. Federal lawmakers considered the policy a “land grab” and a blatant attempt to usurp congressional authority. Because of opposition from federal lawmakers, governors, the AMA and other OHV enthusiasts, the Wild Lands policy hit a major snag on April 15, 2011. That’s when President Obama signed into law the Fiscal Year 2011 Continuing Resolution—the funding measure that kept the federal government operating through Sept. 30, 2011—which included language barring the Interior Department from using any funds to implement the Wild Lands land-use policy to manage land as if it had been designated as Wilderness. Now it appears that the Wild Lands policy may not be dead after all. A news release from Bishop’s office

states that BLM guidance manuals recently discovered by Bishop and Hatch show that the Interior Department “has resurrected the controversial Wild Lands policy killed by Congress in April 2011. Included in the manuals is language directly lifted from Secretarial Order 3310 and its supporting documents, known as the DOI’s Wild Lands memo, illustrating how BLM employees are to identify and manage lands with wilderness characteristics. “Congressman Rob Bishop and Senator Orrin Hatch, along with other senators and representatives from the West, today issued a letter to Secretary Ken Salazar outlining concerns and questions about the DOI’s efforts to re-establish Wild Lands through the new guidance manuals,” the news release said. “Even though these proposals have already been overwhelmingly rejected, the administration is attempting to administratively put these policies in place,” Hatch said. “This proposal will give Washington bureaucrats more control over the lands in Utah and across the West. It’s wrong, and the Interior Department needs to stop trying to keep the public off public lands.” Said Bishop: “I am troubled and angered by similarities found between the contents of the handbooks and the defunct Wild Lands proposal. This is clearly an effort to establish ‘Wild Lands 2.0’ and abandons all previous commitments Secretary Salazar made to me and many other western members to work openly and collaboratively on new land management practices. “Excerpts within these handbooks clearly depict a thinly veiled effort on behalf of this administration to further limit access to our nation’s public lands,” he said. “I expect a prompt response from Secretary Salazar and will continue to pursue this issue to ensure that the livelihoods of westerners are protected.”


RIGHTS TRIAL UNDER WAY FOR DRIVER WHO KILLED FOUR MOTORCYCLISTS First Trial Ended In A Mistrial

An Arizona driver who killed four motorcyclists and injured five others when he drove his 23,000-pound dump truck into the back of their group in 2010 is being retried. The retrial of Michael Jakscht began June 11 and was still under way at presstime. Jakscht is on trial on charges

AMA RACERS EARNING GUBERNATORIAL ATTENTION Racers Praised For Their Efforts

Some elite AMA racers are receiving high-level recognition in their states. Ryan Ambrose of Dallas won the 2012 AMA Track Racing Vintage Grand Championship, which prompted Texas Gov. Rick Perry to send him a congratulatory certificate. “With talented athletes competing yearround in sports from high school football to motorcycle racing, competition is an enduring passion for Texans,” Perry wrote. “I have no doubt you will continue to make our state proud by displaying courage, leadership and good sportsmanship.” In New Jersey, Gov. Chris Christie wrote to Fred Hoess, congratulating him on qualifying for the 2012 International Six Days Enduro in Saxony, Germany. And in Vermont, Billy Burns received a similar letter from Gov. Pete Shumlin when he qualified for this year’s ISDE.

relating to a March 25, 2010 crash in Phoenix in which he allegedly was under the influence of methamphetamine when he plowed into motorcyclists stopped at a traffic signal. An earlier trial ended in a mistrial when jurors deadlocked 9-3 for acquittal. Jakscht was charged with four counts of manslaughter, five counts of aggravated assault and two counts of endangerment. Motorcyclists who died as a result of the crash were Daniel Butler, 35; Clyde Nachand, 67; Stephen Punch, 52; and Dale Downs-Totonchi, 47.

In another case, an Indianapolis police officer who was allegedly drunk on the job in 2010 when he ran into a group of motorcyclists with his patrol car—killing one and critically injuring two others—was to appear for a hearing on Aug. 17. The officer, David Bisard, was initially charged with seven felony counts of drunk driving and reckless homicide. But prosecutors chose to drop the drunk driving charges after it was revealed that investigators at the scene didn’t follow proper procedures for conducting a blood draw for a sobriety test.

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RIDING WHAT I DID ON MY SUMMER VACATION 8 Days. 8 States. 4,000 Miles. By Brian Thorn

Last summer, I had a plan to take full advantage of an eight-day riding window. Starting in my home in Chandler, Ariz., I would add more colors to my “states ridden in” map, visit Sturgis and return to explore the southwest quadrant of Colorado with my wife, Brenda, before heading home in the Valley of the Sun. The first step is getting me, and the bike, to Hardin, Mont.—1,538 miles away. I wake at 2 a.m., load the bike, kiss Brenda goodbye and head for the local gas station. My fuel receipt shows 3:51 a.m. I saddle up and hit the road, and 23 hours, 55 minutes later I get my final receipt in Hardin, a distance of 1,634 miles. Success! Too wired to sleep, I head into Billings to have breakfast, fire up the netbook, and give Brenda a call. I board the Gold Wing and head East to Miles City, where I grab a hotel room. Morning brings a light rain and warm temps. My only goal is to get to Sturgis. I strike out toward North Dakota on Highway 12, a nice two-lane taking me through some pleasant rolling hills. At Bowman, N.D., I head south on 85 and experience my first views of antelope and bison. I reach Spearfish, S.D., in the early afternoon but severe weather and tornado warnings keep me from riding the Black Hills. Instead, I make my way to Sturgis for the obligatory pilgrimage

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AmericanMotorcyclist.com

It is a week prior to the rally. The town is already filling with riders and vendors. I get my photo in the drizzling rain and head to Rapid City to bed down for the night. After a stop at Mount Rushmore, I ride down 2/71 through the Oglala National Grassland. If you like desolate riding, this is it. There is nothing but rolling prairie for miles and miles and miles, and the occasional car every 30 minutes or so. To make up some time I slab down I-76. Once again, the weather is not my friend. I encounter high winds and heavy rain. The lightning keeps its distance, and I am able to maintain my pace toward Denver. Brenda arrives the next morning. We have a few ideas, but nothing definite. Mount Evans is a thought, but due to a late start, we decide to skip it. We instead load up and head West on I-70. Our first stop is a quick pull-off west of Denver where a bison herd is grazing next to the highway. Brenda wants some photos. Since we came to ride the twisties and see the mountain passes, we leave I-70 and head south to Loveland Pass. At the 11,990-foot summit we stop for a few photos. After a few minutes of huffing and puffing in the thin air, we mount up to leave. Just as I am pulling out, I notice two bicyclists cresting the top from the other side. We are at 12,000 feet, and these guys are pedaling bikes? Later that week, I discover that Colorado is hosting a world-class bike race that will include the Tour de France winner and many other top riders. I assume these guys were practicing for one of the stages. Next up is Independence Pass. We ride back to I-70 for a short sprint and jump on 91 from Copper Mountain. This takes us through the small quaint town of Leadville. With little time to explore, we keep moving toward Aspen via 24 and then 82. As the elevation changes, rain

begins to fall. We add rain jackets and the precipitation stays light, not a bad ride at all, even going through the tight hairpins on the way to the top. We stop once again for the “we were here” photographs and then head down into Aspen. The main road seems to bypass the majority of the town. This is fine because we aren’t here to see the sights. We are here to ride. By late afternoon, the clouds start to build up and the voice on the Weather Band is starting to talk in terms of cells, fronts, high winds and all those other things motorcyclists don’t like to

hear while riding. We had planned on heading down 133 but decide to call it a day, grabbing a room at the Days Inn right next to the Roaring Fork River in Carbondale. In the morning we encounter a Suzuki and another Gold Wing, both with Texas plates. Like us, they are headed for gas to start the day and we follow them into a station. As the Wing rider approaches me I point to my Two Wheeled Texans windshield sticker. Texas was our home for the previous 18 years and it turns out that he is a member of the same group. After introductions we follow JB and his son, Jason, down 133 and enjoy a couple hours of great riding, scenery and good ol’ Texas kinship. At Hotchkiss we take 92 and head for Gunnison. JB and his son turn off at

The view from Highway 92.


Photo Corey Mays

50 and start making their way toward Montrose. As we approach Gunnison, the rain begins to fall once again. By the time we reach McDonald’s it is coming down hard. I review the weather map on the netbook as we eat. It doesn’t look good, but the only other option is to sit and wait it out. There is no telling how long that might take. We gear up and head back on 50, then South on 149, hoping to make Durango by nightfall. It doesn’t happen. The rain slows us down and we only make Pagosa Springs. Up early the next morning, we set our sights on Durango, Silverton and the much-vaunted Million Dollar Highway (550). We stop for an early lunch in Silverton at the Brown Bear Café and have some great food.

AMA Board of Directors Chairman Stan Simpson (left) and Bob Althoff, owner of A.D. Farrow, the oldest Harley-Davidson dealership in America.

RECOGNIZING THE BEST

AMA Awards Program Now Accepting Submissions

The Million Dollar Highway.

Now it is time for the Million Dollar Highway. You’ve heard about this road, but until you’ve ridden it you don’t know it. The road is excellent. The scenery is outstanding. The temperature is in the low 80s. The wind is negligible. The sky has a few fluffy clouds. It’s as if all the bad weather endured so far was just a test to see if we would persevere and not give up. Today is our reward for not throwing in the towel. Wow. What a ride! We continue to Ouray and Ridgeway, then run 62 to 145, which takes us to Telluride. If 550 is one of the best roads to ride, Telluride is one of the best places for scenery. It’s easy to see why so many of the rich and famous have homes here. We make our way down from Telluride to Cortez for our final night in Colorado. We stop for dinner at Tequila’s. When we notice local ranch hands coming in still wearing their spurs we figure we called this one right and were not disappointed. The food was great. It is 52 degrees when we leave Cortez to begin our slog home. As we leave, we enjoy the dozen or so hot air balloons rising in the coolness of the morning air. Then we sit back and prepare ourselves for the journey ahead. We make a short stop at the Four Corners Monument to stand in four states at once, and then it is back on the bike. Next we stop for lunch at the Cameron Trading Post to fill our bellies and my Butler Cup with ice water. Now it was time to face the heat.

In 2012, the AMA has recognized several motorcyclists who have gone above and beyond to make motorcycling better. One of those was Bob Althoff, owner of A.D. Farrow, the oldest HarleyDavison dealership in America. AMA Board of Directors Chairman Stan Simpson presented Althoff the 2011 Friend of the AMA Award on behalf of the AMA. Now, the AMA Awards Program is looking for deserving individuals and organizations to be recognized in 2012. Overseen by the AMA Board of Directors, the program encourages AMA members to suggest those to be considered for the following awards: • AMA Dud Perkins Lifetime Achievement Award: Acknowledges the highest level of service to the AMA. It was first presented in 1970. •

AMA Hazel Kolb Brighter Image Award: Recognizes activities that generate good publicity for motorcycling. It was first presented in 1987.

AMA Outstanding Road Rider Award. Recognizes someone who has contributed to protecting on-highway motorcycling rights.

AMA Outstanding Off-Road Rider Award: Recognizes someone who has contributed to protecting off-highway motorcycling rights.

AMA Bessie Stringfield Award: Honors someone who has been instrumental in introducing motorcycling to new markets.

Friend of the AMA Award: Presented to those in the motorcycling community who have strongly supported the AMA mission to promote the motorcycle lifestyle and protect the future of motorcycling.

Submissions should include the individual’s or organization’s name, contact information, and accomplishments in 500 words or less. Send to submissions@ ama-cycle.org. Mail: AMA Awards Program, American Motorcyclist Association, 13515 Yarmouth Dr., Pickerington, Ohio 43147. Deadline: Nov. 9, 2012.

With a stop south of Flagstaff to soak the LD Comfort gear and another just north of Phoenix to soak everything again, two hours later we roll into the driveway with 109 degrees showing on the temperature gauge. All in all, I rode eight days and 4,070 miles on the Honda. Great riding to be sure, but the best part was sharing the final four days with Brenda—my riding partner and wife of 30 years. There’s no

substitute for having someone like that behind you on the bike. Brian Thorn is an AMA member from Chandler, Ariz.

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Mike Scott from Bakersfield, Calif., winner of the See & Be Scene AMA Kawasaki Vulcan Vaquero Flash Tour.

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AMA Kawasaki Vulcan Vaquero Flash Tours are a new way to enjoy the open road, show some creativity and win some awesome stuff from Flash Tour sponsor Kawasaki. Part of the AMA Kawasaki Vulcan Vaquero Premier Touring Series, these are Facebook-based riding challenges that encourage motorcyclists to ride to towns or roadside attractions near them, where they take pictures and submit them to be published on the AMA Facebook page. A winner is chosen at random to receive prizes. With Kawasaki’s new sponsorship, prizes will include gift certificates to

the voluminous Kawasaki product and accessories catalog. To participate, just email your photos that correspond to the active Flash Tour publicized on the AMA website and Facebook page. We’ll add your photo to our AMA Flash Tours photo gallery on Facebook, and at the end of each Flash Tour, we’ll select a winner at random from among the valid entries. (Prizes vary. See the website for details.) For more info and the current theme, see www.americanmotorcyclist.com > Events > AMA Flash Tours or www. facebook.com/americanmotorcyclist.

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AMA Member Kevin Morris of Montville, N.J., doesn’t really need a reason to ride but an excuse is always good to have. He thinks something up, hops on his bike and goes, and goes, and goes. And he’s discovered that the AMA Flash Tours are the perfect way to go. In fact, Morris has taken part in all of the AMA Flash Tours so far this year, and probably will finish them all. Here’s his list of 10 reasons why he believes AMA Flash Tours are so cool. 1. Flash Tours get you out riding, and any reason to get out and ride more is a good thing. 2. It’s free to participate in the Flash Tour series. 3. Flash Tours are short so you have many chances to get in on the action. 4. You might discover a great riding destination right in your back yard. 5. Flash Tours let you show off your motorcycle and photography skills. 6. Flash Tours add some competitive spirit to your street riding. 7. You don’t need big touring bike to participate—any motorcycle is perfect for Flash Tours. 8. It’s easy to fit Flash Tours into your daily riding regimen. 9. If you’ve already completed the AMA Grand Tours then Flash Tours can keep you riding the rest of the season. 10. By riding Flash Tours you could win a $100 Kawasaki gift certificate.


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Powersports.Honda.com ALWAYS WEAR A HELMET, EYE PROTECTION, AND PROTECTIVE CLOTHING. NEVER RIDE UNDER THE INFLUENCE OF DRUGS OR ALCOHOL AND NEVER USE THE STREET AS A RACETRACK. OBEY THE LAW AND READ THE OWNER’S MANUAL THOROUGHLY. For rider training information or to locate a rider training course near you, call the Motorcycle Safety Foundation at 800-446-9227. *MSRP excluding tax, license, registration, $310.00 destination charge and dealer-installed options. Dealer prices may vary. CRF® and Pro-Link® are registered trademarks of Honda Motor Co., Ltd. ©2012 American Honda Motor Co., Inc.


RIDING ROBIN BOETTCHER LEADS PEDIATRIC BRAIN TUMOR FOUNDATION

Ask the MSF

LOADING THE BIKE

Succeeds The Late Diane Traynor

And use common sense. Even though these might not exceed the weight limit, items like surfboards and bicycles (don’t laugh, we’ve seen both!) have no business being transported on the back of a motorcycle. Always follow the recommendations in your motorcycle’s owner’s manual, and in the owner’s manual supplied with the luggage if using aftermarket items.

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Robin Boettcher has been named the new chief executive officer of the Pediatric Brain Tumor Foundation. She succeeds PBTF and Ride for Kids co-founder Dianne Traynor, who died July 20. Traynor, who co-founded the PBTF with her late husband Mike Traynor, started the Ride for Kids in 1984. Every one of the 536-and-counting Ride for Kids events has been AMA-sanctioned, and tens of millions of dollars have been raised to fund research to find the cause of, and cure for, childhood brain tumors. Traynor worked closely with the PBTF board on the four-month national search that resulted in Boettcher’s selection. Boettcher begins her new role on Sept. 10. She brings extensive nonprofit experience, including leadership positions with two of the nation’s largest voluntary health nonprofit organizations. Since 2010, Boettcher has served as the first vice president of Chapter and Community Partnerships for the Miamibased National Parkinson Foundation. Her accomplishments included implementing consistent service standards and rebranding for chapters. She also led a team that developed NPF’s first national signature fundraising program, raising more than half a million dollars with three pilot walk events in 2011. “It is an honor and privilege to be chosen to lead the PBTF, continuing the important legacy left by the Traynors,” Boettcher said in a statement. “I look forward to working with a strong staff team and dedicated board of directors to grow vital funding for children’s brain tumor research and expand support for survivors and their families.” Before beginning her nonprofit management career, Boettcher worked in media and communications, including a decade as an Associated Press reporter. A native of Hamilton, Ohio, she holds a journalism degree from Eastern Kentucky University. Boettcher and her husband, Grant, will reside in Asheville. Their two adult daughters also Robin live in North Boettcher Carolina.

Photos MSF: Courtesy MSF; Boettcher: Courtesy PBTF; 2013 Raffle: Jeffrey Guciardo

Q: My bike has a top box and saddlebags. Assuming the luggage is empty, what should I load first? A: When locating a load on your motorcycle, keep the weight as low as possible, and evenly distributed from front to back and side to side. Carrying heavy items high and far back—such as in a top box—can lighten the front end and cause handling instability. Think of your motorcycle’s load triangle—a space formed by imaginary lines connecting your head to the motorcycle’s two axles (see photo). To maintain as much stability as possible, contain the heaviest items within the load triangle.


The 2012-13 raffle bike will be given away at AMA Vintage Motorcycle Days next summer.

High Adventure. No Hassle. The  best  routes,  roads  and  twotrack,  mapped  by  local  experts.  A  great  challenge  with  like-minded  riders. A full weekend’s activities, with  camping,  campfires,  food  and  prizes.  For more information visit  AmericanMotorcyclist.com/Riding. 

THE ADVENTURE is out there

AMA MOTORCYCLE HALL OF FAME RAFFLE BIKE WINNER ANNOUNCED

comteit Ge

Classic Bike Revealed For 2012-13 Raffle

AMA member and AMA Motorcycle Hall of Fame supporter Stephen Dwyer from Clermont, Fla., won the Hall of Fame’s 2011-12 raffle bike, with the winning ticket drawn at AMA Vintage Motorcycle Days, July 21, at Mid-Ohio Sports Car Course in Lexington, Ohio. The 1948 Indian Chief—an iconic masterpiece of Americana—not only represents America’s love for big V-twin motorcycles, but speaks to what stirs in the heart of all motorcyclists—a passion for the open road. “It’s pretty amazing,” Dwyer said. “I didn’t think I had a chance in a million. But I have to support all the organizations that support me. The money goes to a good use anyhow, but I’m certainly looking forward to riding it.” Dwyer and his wife of 22 years, Kathii, own other streetbikes, but the Indian is their first vintage motorcycle. Kathii says they are looking forward to the experience of riding and sharing a classic motorcycle.

“It’s just so exciting to win,” said Kathii, a member of the Motor Maids. “He’s going to learn to kickstart it and shift it, and we’re really going to enjoy it.” Also announced at AMA Vintage Motorcycle Days was the 2012-13 raffle bike, a 1943 Indian 741 custom bobber donated by AMA Charter Life Member Don Cornwell of Dixie, W.Va. The bobber takes a page right out of American history. Following World War II, veterans returning from active service heavily modified many of these motorcycles as they returned to the open road. “The Indian embodies the look and feel of the era, and with 2013 representing the 70th anniversary of the model year of this heritage-rich machine, it is a special opportunity for supporters of the AMA Motorcycle Hall of Fame to donate and have an opportunity to ride away on this beautiful motorcycle,” said Jeffrey Heininger, chairman of the American Motorcycle Heritage Foundation, which oversees the Hall of Fame.

See the event schedule in the  Calendar section of this magazine. 


RIDING

Want to be an AMA tester? E-mail submissions@ama-cycle.org for an application.

Gerbing’s Heated Jacket Liner Sizes: XXS-XXXXL MSRP: Jacket liner: $199.95; portable controller: $69.95; controller holder: $10.95 Specs: Current: 6.4 amps; power: 77 watts Info: www.gerbing.com Gerbing’s makes heated jackets, pants, jacket liners, vest liners, pant liners, gloves, socks and insoles. I recently tested Gerbing’s heated jacket liner. It included a battery harness, a Paul Lindoerfer controller and a leather clip case. My first impression of the liner didn’t have anything to do with its thermal properties. It’s a good-looking jacket all by itself. Also, it doesn’t feel like it is loaded with wires. My wife is the family expert on clothing and she gives this liner a thumbs-up for quality. It has outside and inside pockets, a large, soft collar and soft stretchy waste band and cuffs. A zipper pocket at the end of each sleeve has a wire for connecting to heated gloves.

M E M B E R T E S T ED

(Speaking of quality, Gerbing’s is in the process of moving all its manufacturing from China to a new factory in North Carolina. According to Gerbing’s, jacket, pants and vest liners are already made in the States, and over the next three to five years, the company’s other products will be made here, as well.) Testing of the jacket liner was done on some local rides around where I live in Connecticut and on a ride to Newfoundland where I wore the jacket liner continuously for 10 days. Temperatures ranged from the low 40s to 60s, and riding was done at both highway and off-highway speeds. I dressed as Gerbing’s recommends with a micro-fiber undershirt, then the Gerbing’s jacket liner and finally a motorcycle jacket, without a thermal layer, over the liner. The liner felt comfortable under my jacket. It didn’t bunch up or feel bulky. The electrical hookup was easy. The controller connections are color-coded, red going to the battery harness and white into the jacket liner. As the outside temperature changed with time of day and riding conditions, I found that it was easy to control the temperature as the liner heat output

quickly adjusted to a new setting. The control knob is large and easy-to-use, even with winter gloves. So, as the temperature changed, I could readiy crank the liner temperature up or down a notch or two and stay comfortable. The heat provided was consistent between torso, arms and neck. With air temperature in the low 40s and at highway speed, I was only using half of the heat range available. A significant benefit of Gerbing’s liner is that it cuts down on layers. This makes stopping at a restaurant for a sit-down meal much less hassle. Overall, I was impressed with the Gerbing’s jacket liner. It is wellmade, comfortable to wear, keeps you warm in cold weather, isn’t overbearing in warmer weather, has an enormous adjustment range and simplifies the gearing-up and gearing-down process. This heated jacket liner is an excellent product for motorcyclists.—Paul Lindoerfer

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RIDING

Photo Bike Show: Camilla Sjodin

BIKE SHOW PART OF AMA LEGENDS WEEKEND

Beautiful Motorcycles And Motorcycling Heroes The AMA Motorcycle Hall of Fame Induction Ceremony is, first and foremost, about welcoming a new class into the Hall of Fame and celebrating the careers of existing inductees who continue to inspire motorcyclists everywhere. But AMA Legends Weekend, Nov. 16-17 at the Red Rock Casino, Resort & Spa in Las Vegas, Nev., also features amazing examples of expertly restored and wonderfully preserved classic motorcycles. The AMA Motorcycle Hall of Fame Dave Mungenast Memorial Concours d’Elegance bike show—named in honor of the Motorcycle Hall of Famer who passed away in 2006—has grown every year since the Hall of Fame induction ceremony has moved to Las Vegas. It features awards and recognition across a number of categories defined by year, country of origin and class of motorcycle. “The AMA Motorcycle Hall of Fame Dave Mungenast Memorial Concours d’Elegance has quickly grown into one of this country’s mustattend bike shows for both restorers and fans of motorcycle art,” says Jeffrey V. Heininger, chairman of the American Motorcycle Heritage Foundation, which oversees the Hall of Fame. “It’s an honor to associate our event with Hall of Famer Dave Mungenast Sr., a treasured friend, a great motorcyclist and a wonderful ambassador for the sport and business of motorcycling.” Applications to show at the Concours and tickets to the AMA Legends Weekend are available at www.motorcyclemuseum.org.

This 1947 Indian Chief, owned by Bob Mitchell, won Best in Show in 2011.


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RACING

Justin Barcia

Photo Jeff Kardas

U.S. SETS TEAM FOR MXoN

Ryan Dungey, Blake Baggett, Justin Barcia To Race The World The U.S. team that will compete at the FIM Motocross of Nations Sept. 30 in Lommel, Belgium, will include Red Bull/ KTM’s Ryan Dungey, Monster Energy Pro Circuit Kawasaki’s Blake Baggett and GEICO Honda’s Justin Barcia. Perennial U.S. Team Manager and AMA Motorcycle Hall of Famer Roger DeCoster will manage the team in its hunt for a record 23rd Motocross of Nations Championship. Riders in the Motocross of Nations compete in either the MX1, which features 450cc bikes; the MX2 class, for 250cc motorcycles; or the open class. “We will have Ryan in MX1. Blake, who has excellent support for the 250cc bike from [AMA Motorcycle Hall of Famer] Mitch [Payton], will be our MX2 rider, and Barcia will be our open class rider,” DeCoster says. “This is a great team. They have proven that they are solid riders, especially in the sand, and the Lommel track is a very deep sand track.” Dungey, who returns for his fourth time to the Motocross of Nations, says he is thrilled for the opportunity. “It’s a pleasure, and it’s an honor to

represent my country at the Motocross of Nations,” says Dungey, who is leading the points for the 450cc Lucas Oil AMA Pro Racing Motocross Championship. “We’re not racing against each other. We are racing with each other for one goal, and that’s to win the Motocross of Nations. With Roger and the rest of the organizational team behind us, we have excellent support and all the support we need to win.” Baggett says he’s confident in the U.S. team’s chances to win the title. “I’m excited to go to Belgium and race,” says Baggett, who is leading the points in the 250cc class in the Lucas Oil AMA Pro Racing Motocross Championship. “It will be cool and a life experience for sure. The atmosphere of this race is really big and crazy, but the best advice is what I got last year, just ride to your potential, race the track and don’t worry about the thousands of European fans and the competition you’ve never raced before.” Barcia, who is stepping up to the 450cc bike to compete in the open class, says he is ready for the challenge and thrilled to be on the 2012 team.

“It’s awesome,” says Barcia, who is currently second behind Baggett in the 250cc class championship standings. “I’ve always dreamed of racing for the U.S. at the Motocross of Nations, and it’s incredible. I’m speechless. To be picked for that team is just mind-blowing. I’ll be riding a 450, and that will be exciting. I practice on the 450 a lot, and I ride the sand really well. I’ve matured a lot in the past year, and I’m ready.” For Belgium native DeCoster, the 2012 Motocross of Nations will be a homecoming in more ways than one. Lommel is the same track where the U.S. team, also managed by DeCoster, won its first Motocross of Nations title in 1981. “That’s where we won the first time, 31 years ago,” DeCoster says. “That first team [of Hall of Famers Donnie Hansen, Danny LaPorte, Johnny O’Mara and Chuck Sun] was one of the youngest in history, and we are returning with another young team. Being on the same track where we won the first time makes it special.” The United States is the reigning champion of the Motocross of Nations, winning in 2011 when the event was held in Saint D’Angely, France. The United States is also the all-time leader in Motocross of Nations overall victories with 22. Great Britain is second with 16.

October 2012

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RACING

AMATEUR ROADRACERS DAYTONA BOUND

2012 AMA NATIONAL MOTOCROSS CHAMPIONS Crowned At Loretta Lynn’s

Here are the class champions crowned at the AMA Amateur National Motocross Championships at the Loretta Lynn Ranch July 29-Aug. 4 in Hurricane Mills, Tenn. For more coverage from the event, see this month’s AMA Racer insert. What’s AMA Racer? It’s a quarterly supplement to this magazine that focuses on amateur competition sanctioned by the AMA. To add it to your magazine, simply call (800) 262-5646 and ask for it. It’s free! 250 C Mod........................................................... Garrett Schnepp (American Canyon, Calif.) Vet 35+.......................................................................Robbie Reynard (Oklahoma City, Okla.) Mini Sr (12-14) Mod....................................................................Justin Hoeft (Castaic, Calif.) 250 B Stock............................................................................. Cooper Webb (Newport, N.C.) 85 (9-11) Modified......................................................................Jordan Bailey (Orlando, Fla.) 250 A...................................................................................................... Zach Bell (Cairo, Ga.) 51 (7-8) AMA 2 Stock...............................................................Jaiden Taylor (Lansing, Mich.) 51 (4-6) AMA 1 Stock................................................... Ryder Difranceso (Bakersfield, Calif.) 51 (4-6) Stock Limited......................................................Codee Samples (Maypearl, Texas) 51 (4-6) Shaft Drive Stock....................................................... Braxton Brown (Lowell, Ohio) 450 C..................................................................................... Cody Herzog (Scappoose, Ore.) 65 (10-11) Stock....................................................................Conner Mullenix (Santee, Calif.) 450 B Stock.....................................................................Matt Bisceglia (Weatherford, Texas) 65 (7-9) Stock.............................................................................. Pierce Brown (Sandy, Utah) Super Mini 1 (12-15)..................................................... Adam Cianciarulo (Port Orange, Fla.) Open Pro Sport.................................................................. Jesse Wentland (Elk River, Minn.) Schoolboy 1 (12-16) B/C......................................................... Jordan Smith (Belmont, N.C.) College B/C (16-24)............................................................... Gregory Gehrer (Wichita, Kan.) Senior 45+...................................................................................Doug Dubach (Tustin, Calif.) Masters 50+.................................................................................. Gary Semics (Salem, Ore.) 85 (9-11) Stock...........................................................................Jordan Bailey (Orlando, Fla.) Girls (12-15)...........................................................Brandy Richards (Lake Havasu City, Ariz.) Girls (9-11)............................................................................Jazzmyn Canfield (Deltona, Fla.) Junior 25+............................................................................. Ricky Carmichael (Havana, Fla.) 250 C Stock............................................................................ Axell Hodges (Encinitas, Calif.) 250 B Mod.......................................................................Matt Bisceglia (Weatherford, Texas) Mini Sr. (12-14) Stock.................................................................Justin Hoeft (Castaic, Calif.) Vet B/C 30+............................................................................. Dustin Walker (Lexington, Ky.) Women (14+)........................................................................Taylor Higgins (Mesquite, Texas) 450 B Mod............................................................................. Anthony Rodriguez (Cairo, Ga.) 450 A............................................................................................. Zach Williams (Elko, Minn.) Super Mini 2 (13-16)..................................................... Adam Cianciarulo (Port Orange, Fla.) 65 (7-11) Mod................................................................. Carson Mumford (Simi Valley, Calif.) Senior 40+...................................................................................Doug Dubach (Tustin, Calif.) Two-Stroke (16+).......................................................................Mike Sleeter (Murrieta, Calif.) Schoolboy 2 (13-16) B/C................................................. Troy Graffunder (Wheatland, Calif.)

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Amateur roadracers will attack the high banks this fall when the AMA Roadrace Grand Championships head to Daytona International Speedway on Oct. 18-21 to battle for AMA national No. 1 plates. “We’re excited to bring AMA amateur national championship competition to Daytona International Speedway,” says AMA Track Racing Manager Ken Saillant. “This will be a unique opportunity for the country’s fastest amateur roadracers to compete for AMA titles in several skill-, age- and displacement-based classes.” The AMA has partnered with the American Sportbike Racing Association and Championship Cup Series to help run the AMA Roadrace Grand Championships. CCS President Kevin Elliott said the 2012 event, which welcomes racers from all clubs and organization and is open to all licensed roadracing AMA members, will contribute to the AMA Roadrace Grand Championships’ longstanding reputation for top-notch competition. “The AMA Roadrace Grand Championships have been a place for the sportsman roadracer to show their talent and abilities to the rest of the United States since 1997, and the American Sportbike Racing Association and Championship Cup Series are happy to have a part in the operation and organization of this prestigious championship once again,” Elliott said. Elliott said that Daytona International Speedway is a perfect location. “After being run at other great facilities in the past like Mid-Ohio, New Hampshire Motor Speedway and Putnam Park, the AMA Roadrace Grand Championships— joining ASRA/CCS at Daytona International Speedway—just feels right,” he said. “It is the world’s center of racing and we are excited to be a part of this new chapter in the AMA Roadrace Grand Championships at this storied facility.” Not only do riders get ample track time and an opportunity to race against the country’s fastest amateur racers, but the best compete for the AMA Roadracing Horizon Award, which is awarded to the rider showing the most promise for success in the professional ranks.

Photos Loretta Lynn’s: David Smith/racedaypix.com; Roadrace: Dan Focht Motorsports Photography; Hillclimb: Jeff Whitehead

AMA Roadrace Grand Championships: Daytona Beach, Fla., Oct. 18-21


American motorcyclist Oct_Layout 1 7/19/12 7:50 A

VINNY NUZZOLILLI TAKES HILLCLIMB POINTS LEAD Wins All-Star Challenge To Supplant Jay Sallstrom

Vinny Nuzzolilli took the points lead from rival Jay Sallstrom with a win in the Wiseco Unlimited Class at round six of the AMA Pro Hillclimb Series in Muskegon, Mich., on Aug. 5. The Wiseco Unlimited Class has been a pitched battle between 2011 champ Sallstrom and second-year pro rider Nuzzolilli. Sallstrom fired the first volley of round six with a 5.230-second run before former champ Tiger Strank posted a 5.502-second time. Nuzzolilli then edged Strank back one spot by 0.002 seconds. After intermission, Sallstrom bested his own time with a 5.225-second ride, but Nuzzolilli fired back late in the order,at 5.184 seconds for the win and a one-point lead over Sallstrom in the series. Nate Redmann was back in winning form with a first place in the Tilt-A-Rack Xtreme Class, and Alex Erickson took his second win in a row in the Pro Sport Class.

In the Tilt-A-Rack Xtreme Class, John Koester set the pace with an opening ride at 5.887 seconds up the Muskegon Motorcycle Club’s historic Mt. Garfield. Sallstrom quickly eclipsed him with a 5.876-second run before Redmann posted a 5.178, setting the bar even higher. In the second-half Xtreme action, Sallstrom laid down a 5.474-second ride, which was not enough to snatch the win from Redmann, but enough for second place. Robby DeBusk squeaked into third at 5.601 seconds to round out the podium. Redmann’s five wins in six races puts him 17 points ahead of his nearest competitor, DeBusk. In the Pro Sport class, Alex Erickson topped the hill in 7.082 seconds, with Ian Lau in second at 7.121 seconds and Chris Chartier in third with a 7.124-second run. After six rounds, Chartier holds the series lead.

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Nathan Ferderer came out on top at the Range Riders’ AMA East Hare Scrambles Championship round Aug. 4-5 when the series headed to its most Northwestern destination at Quadna Mountain in Hill City, Minn. The 11-mile course flowed well with some rock, mud, roots, a grass track and technical sections. The club did a good job of dealing with the few bad areas from all the rain. Ferderer, on Nathan his Heinen’s Ferderer Husqvarna TC250, led from lap two until the checkers were thrown. The No. 2 spot on the box went to Matthew Stavish on his Honda CRF250R with Ethan Judas on a KTM 250 XC coming in third. Josh Hayes established a new singleseason record for consecutive AMA Pro National Guard SuperBike victories with a crushing performance to secure

his eighth in a row on Sunday at Mazda Raceway Laguna Seca. The Monster Energy Graves Yamaha superstar pulled his rookie teammate, Josh Herrin, clear of the chasing pack in the race’s early stages before breaking Herrin’s pursuit as well by lap five of the 23-lap affair. Once free, Hayes put it in cruise control early and still managed to take the checkered flag with a 9.084-second margin of victory. “Good things are happening right now,” Hayes says. “I’ll ride the train as long as I can.”

Bryan Yarrow

It was a hot summer night on Friday, Aug. 10, as speedway fans filled the stands at the Gold Country Fairgrounds in Auburn, Calif. for Fast Friday’s Motorcycle Speedway. With five riders vying for the final spot in the Aug. 31 championship, the competition was fierce in the one-lap scratch races to determine the field. Bryan Yarrow, Alex Marcucci, Bryce Starks, Daniel Faria, and Devon DeFreece battled for the final spot. With the lastplace finisher in each heat retired, Faria was the first to go, DeFreece next, then Marcucci. Yarrow held on in the two-lap finale for the right to face Tommy Hedden, Bob Hicks, Greg Hooten, and Billy Janniro in the championship.

Photos Superbike: Brian J. Nelson; Hare Scrambles: Tim Anderson; Speedway: Michael Kirby; Baylor: Shan Moore

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RACING STEWARD BAYLOR NIPS MIKE LAFFERTY IN RATTLESNAKE ENDURO

Steward Baylor

Rookie Holds Down Points Lead

Steward Baylor used a strong performance in the final test to take a narrow victory over eight-time national enduro champ Michael Lafferty at round seven of the AMA Rekluse National Enduro Championship Series presented by Moose Racing in Cross Fork, Pa. After jumping out to a quick lead early in the race, Baylor found himself 10 seconds behind Lafferty heading into the sixth and final test of the day. However, the Fly Racing/RidePG.com/Genuine Dirt Racer/ WP Racing USA-backed KTM rider turned in his best run of the day to pass Lafferty by just two points at the finish. Lafferty was third fastest in the final test after high-siding over a slippery log, but the factory Husaberg rider still finished out the day in the runner-up position. With the win, Baylor extended his lead in the series standings to 23 points over Lafferty with only three rounds remaining. Husaberg’s Nick Fahringer, who handily won this race last year, rounded out the podium after turning in one of his best rides of the year. The Ohio rider turned in

the fastest time in the fourth and fifth tests after getting off to a slow start earlier in the day, but was pushing both Baylor and Lafferty heading in the final test. A couple of crashes, however, thwarted any chance of Fahringer moving into the top two. New Jersey KTM rider Jesse Groemm continues to move up the ranks and parlayed a steady and nearly error-free performance into a fourth-place finish. Meanwhile, Pennsylvania native Andrew DeLong was hoping for a strong ride in his home state and the FAR Husqvarna rider was pleased with a solid fifth. Baylor now has five wins in the series to Lafferty’s one. The only other rider to take a win this year was FMF/KTM rider Cory Buttrick, who turned the feat at the Sand Lapper enduro in South Carolina. For more on Baylor, see this month’s AMA Racer supplement. Don’t get AMA Racer? If you’re an amateur racer and would like to receive this free quarterly insert in American Motorcyclist, call (800) 262-5646 and ask for it.

As a card-carrying AMA member you’re elite among motorcyclists. Now, proclaim your pride even more with a themed AMA card showing that you are a hard-core KTM rider, Kawasaki enthusiast or are among the growing ranks of women riders.

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EVEL KNIEVEL HARLEY-DAVIDSON XR750 REPLICA Stunt Bike Harkens To Heyday Although AMA Motorcycle Hall of Famer Robert Craig “Evel” Knievel rode several different brands of motorcycles over the course of his daredevil career, he is best remembered riding HarleyDavidsons. This Harley-Davidson XR750—owned by Ed Vanaman—is a replica of the 300-pound bike that Knievel used during the height of his career in the 1970s. Knievel began his daredevil career in 1965 when he formed a troupe called Evel Knievel’s Motorcycle Daredevils, a touring show in which he performed stunts such as riding through walls of fire and jumping over live rattlesnakes and mountain lions. The name Evel came from one of Knievel’s early sponsors, who wanted to call him Evil, but settled on Evel after Knievel complained that he didn’t want to convey an image of a bad person. In 1966, he began touring alone, and performing his ever-longer and more dangerous motorcycle jumps. Knievel’s big break (literally and figuratively) came on New Year’s

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Day 1968 when he jumped 151 feet across the fountains in front of Caesar’s Palace in Las Vegas, Nev. Knievel had convinced the owner of Caesar’s Palace to let him do the stunt as publicity for the casino. He’d also talked to ABC about filming the jump. While the network turned it down, they at least told him if he had it taped they would consider showing it. After successfully clearing the fountains, his landing was a disaster and his injuries put him in the hospital, but the footage of the jump and crash landing did make ABC’s Wide World of Sports and thrust Knievel into the national spotlight. After the Caesar’s Palace jump, Knievel was suddenly in demand and began performing in front of packed stadiums. In January 1971, he jumped in front of 60,000 spectators in the Houston Astrodome.

With America in the midst of the Vietnam War quagmire, the country was looking for a hero, and Knievel’s death-defying feats and his popular messages to the world’s youth, promoting abstention from drugs and a healthy lifestyle with a positive mental attitude, quickly transformed him into a national icon. By the late-1970s, Knievel’s heyday was over. Evel Knievel was inducted into the AMA Motorcycle Hall of Fame in 1999. He died on Nov. 30, 2007, at the age of 69, but his memory lives on with this XR750, which is currently on display at the AMA Motorcycle Hall of Fame on the AMA campus in Pickerington, Ohio. For more information, go to www. motorcyclemuseum.org.

Hall of Fame features the machines and people of the Motorcycle Hall of Fame in Pickerington, Ohio. The Hall of Fame is a 501(c)3 non-profit corporation that receives support from the AMA and from motorcycling enthusiasts. For info and directions, visit www.motorcyclemuseum.org, or call (614) 856-2222.

Photos T. Paul Miller Photography/www.tpaulmiller.com

HALL OF FAME


Hall of Famer

GIACOMO AGOSTINI International Roadracing Superstar Giacomo Agostini is one of the greatest Grand Prix roadracers of all time. Over the course of a remarkable 17-year career, Agostini won 15 world Grand Prix titles (eight in 500cc and seven in 350cc), 12 Isle of Man TT crowns and an astonishing 122 Grands Prix. Whether riding a 350cc or 500cc, Agostini was nearly always the man to beat whenever he took up his position on the starting grid. In America, Agostini won the Daytona 200 in 1974, bringing unprecedented recognition to the race. Agostini was born on June 16, 1942, in Brescia, Italy, and was raised in Levere near Bergamo. He cut his racing teeth in European hillclimb events—racing up hillside roads, not the American style of hillclimbing—before being offered a place on Morini’s works team in 1964.

“Ago,” as he became known, made his first telling impact in 1965 when he rode a 350cc three-cylinder MV Agusta to victory on its very first outing at the Nurburgring in Germany. He narrowly missed out on his first world championship that year. Ago claimed the 500cc world title in both 1966 and 1967 in battles that came down to the final event. Honda’s departure from the scene in 1967 heralded eight years of dominance by Agostini and MV Augusta in the world championships. He completed the world title double with MV—on both the 350cc and 500cc—in 1968, 1969, 1970, 1971 and 1972. In 1973, he won the 350cc title and, with Yamaha, won the 350cc world crown in 1974 and the 500cc title in 1975. Agostini was with Yamaha when he made his U.S. racing debut in the Daytona 200 in March of 1974. The race that year was loaded with talent, including future Hall of Famer Kenny Roberts and Englishman Barry Sheene, as well as all the top U.S. riders, and he won. Winning the 200 not only added immensely to Agostini’s popularity in America, but it also helped solidify the Daytona 200’s standing as a world-class motorcycle race. More: www.motorcyclemuseum.org.

Put yourself in the  AMA Motorcycle Hall of Fame Museum The AMA Motorcycle Hall of Fame is YOUR  hall of fame—we couldn’t exist without  the generous support of our donors. Now  there’s a new way for you to show that  support in a very visible way: My Hall of  Fame. The idea is simple: A $20 donation  gets you a 3-inch-square space on the  wall in the Hall of Fame entrance foyer that  hangs during the campaign year. Want a  bigger space? A 6-inch square is an $80  donation, and a 9-inch square is a $180  donation. You also get an official certificate noting that your picture is on display in the  AMA Motorcycle Hall of Fame.  Hang your picture, your kid’s picture, your  company logo, almost anything. It’s up to  you! Get in the AMA Motorcycle Hall of  Fame today!

9” 6” 3” 3”

6”

$20

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donation

donation

www.motorcyclemuseum.org/myhalloffame or call 1-800-342-5464 for assistance

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Photo Bert Shepard

HALL OF FAME


AMHF BOARD MEMBER INTERVIEW Andy Ording

Andy Ording, from Indianapolis, has been an independent investor and business mentor since 2007. For nearly two decades, he was CEO of Zipp Speed Weaponry, one of the most innovative cycling component companies in the world specializing in advanced composites construction and technology development. This year, Ording joined the Board of Directors of the American Motorcycle Heritage Foundation, which oversees the AMA Motorcycle Hall of Fame. American Motorcyclist: When and where were you born? Andy Ording: Ndola, Zambia, Jan. 4, 1959. AM: Tell us a little bit about your first motorcycle ride. Ording: I was about 12 and began on a Honda Mini Trail. At 16, I got my first road bike, a Honda CB50—what a wicked bike, and I spent all kinds of hours and money trying to make that thing go quick. I then started racing off-road with a YZ125. AM: Tell us a little bit about your motorcycling experience. Ording: I was fortunate to race and ride in Africa where I grew up and have been in some of the world’s most beautiful and remote areas. I raced motocross races, and rode in off-road events through areas where you did not want a mechanical [failure] because as dark falls you could be on the menu. I have ridden and raced in Baja and done enduros in the miserable cold and wet of the Northwest, but regardless of the conditions, a motorcycle always brings a smile to my face. AM: Tell us about your work experience. Ording: I was schooled in South Africa and started working there. I moved to the United States at age 25 and worked in marketing at Malcolm Smith Products for a short time, and then went off on my own. I ended up in Bellingham [Wash.] working for Allsop who had numerous divisions, but I took over a disparate collection of miscellaneous products

in the sports division. This included a couple of bicycle products, which led me circuitously to a rather small bicycle carbon fiber wheel company in Indianapolis called Zipp. We had a very unique manufacturing system and aggressive development program that resulted in lots of new products. With hundreds of hours in the wind tunnel, we drove our brand to be the market leader in triathlon and eventually bicycle roadracing, as well. Fortunately, we were one of the earliest in the space and we spent more time convincing dealers of the validity of carbon wheels as a category than we did actually selling them. They were crazy days, massively long as we would try and get more stuff manufactured, then try and sell it, then design new stuff, then make it all again. We made a commitment to manufacture everything in the United States and spent a considerable amount of time and talent searching for, and implementing, the leanest manufacturing systems we could to service the market as quickly as possible. Now, 20 years later, all of the wheels are still made in the United States and shipped worldwide. We were all about racing, and have been very successful in competition winning Ironman, the Olympics, the World Championship and the Tour de France numerous times. AM: What is your current favorite bike? Ording: The BMW F 800 GS. Currently, this is my favorite as it is amazingly roadworthy and great on gravel roads, an excellent adventure bike. AM: What year did you join the AMA? Ording: I think it was ’86 originally, as I was racing in AMA District 37 (Southern California). I’m an AMA Life member. AM: Why are you on the AMHF Board? Ording: It is extremely important for those of us who love motorcycling to do what we can to preserve the heritage of this great sport and pastime. If we don’t, who will? I think it would be foolish to assume that someone else will do it for us and, more importantly, the next generations will know nothing of the accomplishments of the true pioneers. The AMA Motorcycle Hall of Fame has a unique opportunity to play a huge role in the perpetuation of everything every enthusiast loves about being on two wheels. We have something special, us motorcyclists.

Holiday Cards Proceeds benefit the Motorcycle Hall of Fame

www.motorcyclemuseum.org www.amahofcards.com


THE PAST COMES ALIVE AT AMA VINTAGE MOTORCYCLE DAYS

Every summer at Mid-Ohio Sports Car Course in V Lexington, Ohio, motorcycling’s past comes alive at M IN OT OR T the country’s grandest celebration of classic bikes CY A CL G E and the people who love them: AMA Vintage DA E YS Motorcycle Days. AMA Vintage Motorcycle Days delivers a full program of two-wheeled thrills that includes racing on asphalt and dirt, classic bike shows, indepth seminars, demo rides, a vendor row and caps it off with North America’s largest motorcycle swap meet. The rolling fields surrounding Mid-Ohio are packed with riders, racers, restorers and fans of all ages, riding motorcycles from all eras. This year, on July 20-22, two of motorcycling’s most iconic genres were showcased: the British café-racer motorcycles and Italian metal-bodied scooters made popular by the self-described Rockers and Mods of the 1960s. It was one of the best AMA Vintage Motorcycle Days in memory, with excellent weather and expansive crowds packing the Mid-Ohio grounds. Here, you’ll find a snapshot of the weekend. For a larger sample, see the gallery at www.americanmotorcyclist.com. For it all, see it in person next year. Trust us, you’ll be glad you did!

Photos by WilkinsonBrothers.com, Jeff Guciardo and Corey Mays

Left Annika, Ty and Ryland Jividen, from Marion, Ohio, came to AMA Vintage Motorcycle Days as three generations to camp and enjoy the vintage motorcycle scene. (Grandpa was out riding when this photo was taken.) Right George Fleiner, from Bellview, Ohio, used to shoot motocross as far back as the 1970s. Today, he’s more interested in the camaraderie he enjoys with old friends at AMA Vintage Motorcycle Days and finding cool stuff in the swap meet. Far right The best way to shop for old bike stuff is from the seat of an old bike.

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Left The AMA Motorcycle Hall of Fame tent was ground zero for multiple bike shows during the weekend. Far bottom AMA Motorcycle Hall of Famer and noted designer Craig Vetter—whose contributions to motorcycling include the iconic Windjammer fairings and the Triumph X-75 Hurricane—was the grand marshal for this year. Vetter wowed the crowds with engaging talks and even brought his high-profile motorcycle fuel-economy contest to the event. Below Ken and Lori Quesenberry from Delaware won second place for British Motorcycles (1970-79) in the Hall of Fame bike show with this 1974 Norton Commando.

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Above, left to right In keeping with the event’s Rockers and Mods theme, Mike Seate— founder of Café Racer magazine (www.caferacermag.com) and star of the “Café Racer” television show (www.caferacertv.com) on Velocity—headed up the café contingent, and put together a great bike display. Sales were brisk. The band Highway 13 rocked. Clockwise from below left Colleen McColgand and Geoff Myles brought their 1974 Honda CB125S and 1976 Honda CB550F from Stowe, Vt., to AMA Vintage Motorcycle Days. Emcee Griff Allen interviews Alan Smith, who rode this streamliner from California’s Bay Area to compete in the Vetter Fuel Economy Challenge. Bill Crookston (right) has been attending AMA Vintage Motorcycle Days since 1999, and this year this 1966 BMW R69 restored by his dad Ronald (left) got second in the Ride ’Em, Don’t Hide ’Em bike show.

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Above James Berry and wife, Debra, from North Carolina have been coming to the event for 12 years. James has been roadracing since the 1970s and loves to scratch his competitive itch with vintage racing today.

Above You don’t need a modern motorcycle to go fast. Team Pentovarna rider Derick Kemper demonstrates on this vintage Penton in the Vintage 201-250cc A class. Kemper’s teammate, Adam Giddings, was the AMA Off-Road Vintage Grand Champion. Left Doc Batsleer, from Smyrna Beach, Fla., was an iron man roadracer at AMA Vintage Motorcycle Days, competing in Pre-War, Class C Hand Shift and Vintage 50s. Here he is with his 1934 Indian Bonneville Sport Scout. He has been an AMA member since 1962.

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Clockwise from far top left Jason (left) and Matt Holbrook, and AMA members and brothers, come to AMA Vintage Motorcycle Days each year to catch up. Eight-year AMA member Cope Beckert, 13, from Zanesville, Ohio, won his hare scrambles race then borrowed a friend’s bike to compete in the motocross. Bryant Gripp and his wife, Paulette, from Nashville, Tenn., each raced a 1988 Honda Hawk in the Gen X Superbike LW class. Below, left to right Andy Nardone, who raced a 1972 Yamaha 360 in the vintage motocross, came with his family from Toronto, Canada. A new addition this year, the AMA Classic Field Meet drew in several riders, young and old.

Left AMA Motorcycle Hall of Famer and last year’s event grand marshal Jeff Fredette returned to take care of unfinished business this year, and he did. By scoring the most points in expert-level vintage hare scrambles, motocross and trials competition, Fredette was named the 2012 AMA Senior Off-Road Vintage Grand Champion.

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Clockwise from above The Vintage Japanese Motorcycle Club, the featured Classic Club at 2012 AMA Vintage Motorcycle Days, is represented in this photo by (left to right) club member Ray Bayless, club Director Peter Slatcoff and club President Tom Kolenko. Dallas, Texas’ Ryan Ambrose, who competed on vintage Triumphs, was the 2012 AMA Track Racing Vintage Grand Champion. Katherine Becker from Ypsilanti, Mich., has been coming to AMA Vintage Motorcycle Days for five years. She rides a 2008 Ural Tourist.

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AMA Video: See It All Over Again At www.youtube.com/ americanmotorcyclist, you’ll find videos and interviews highlighting some of the best from this year’s AMA Vintage Motorcycle Days. Also keep an eye on www. amavintagemotorcycledays.com to be the first to know news about next year’s event, including the date, the theme, the grand marshal and program highlights.


UNDER ATTACK

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10 THREATS TO MOTORCYCLING

Whether you like to cruise the open road on your streetbike, trail ride

with your friends in the woods or off-road race in the desert, your riding

freedoms are under attack. Intentional or not, the result is the same: our motorcycling lifestyle is in jeopardy. Here are some threats we face today, in no particular order, and what we’re doing to defeat them.

Going, Going, Gone: 1 Valley California’s Johnson Off-Highway Vehicle Riding Area

If there’s one way that an immensely popular riding area can virtually disappear, it’s for the government to decide it needs the land. Case in point: The Johnson Valley Off-Highway Vehicle Riding Area in California, roughly 55 miles

southeast of Barstow. On July 27, the Department of the Navy released a final environmental impact statement for the expansion of a nearby Marine base that would allow public use of only 40,000 acres of the 190,000-acre Johnson Valley OHV area, and for only 10 months a year. Johnson Valley is currently under the jurisdiction of the U.S. Bureau of Land Management. The Marine Corps is part of the U.S. Navy.

Federal ‘Wild Lands’ 2The Policy. Here we go again. On Dec. 22, 2010, U.S. Interior Secretary Ken Salazar signed Secretarial Order 3310 creating a new land-use designation called “Wild Lands” that essentially allowed officials to manage public land as if it had received a “Wilderness” land-use designation from Congress, but without requiring congressional approval. Wilderness is one of the strictest forms of public land management. Nearly all forms of non-pedestrian recreation are illegal in Wilderness areas. The Wild Lands policy announcement shocked the off-highway vehicle riding community because it was expected to have a far-reaching impact. With that new power, federal Bureau of Land Management officials would manage about 245 million acres of public land nationwide—primarily

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Johnson Valley has a varied landscape that has made for excellent off-highway vehicle riding and racing for decades. It has steep, rocky mountains, rolling hills, open valleys, dry lake beds and sandy washes. Elevations range from 2,300 feet to 4,600 feet. The final environmental impact statement is part of an effort by the Marine Corps Air Ground Combat Center at Twentynine Palms in San Bernardino County to expand its land holdings to allow for more live-fire training. The Navy set a comment deadline of Aug. 27 for its final environmental impact statement and plans to issue a record of decision to finalize its proposal on Sept. 28. But the proposal would still need congressional approval. The military hopes to begin training on

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in 12 western states—with the Wild Lands guidelines in mind. Federal lawmakers considered the policy a “land grab,” a blatant attempt to usurp congressional authority, and stopped it in its tracks on April 15, 2011. Now, in late 2012, some federal lawmakers claim Salazar is trying to resurrect the Wild Lands policy, and the AMA wants some answers. The AMA sent Salazar a letter on Aug. 13 seeking answers. “The AMA is asking for clarification on the BLM’s guidance manuals recently discovered by U.S. Rep. Rob Bishop and U.S. Sen. Orrin Hatch that show the Interior Department has resurrected the controversial Wild Lands policy,” says Shannon Carlin, AMA legislative assistant. “We oppose the Wild Lands policy because it can restrict responsible offhighway vehicle riding with little or no public input,” she says.

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Stop In The Name Of 3 Only The Law: MotorcycleCheckpoints How does it feel to be singled out because of the vehicle you ride? Just ask any motorcyclist forced to pull over to the roadside for a police checkpoint while automobile and SUV drivers continue down the road unabated. The AMA began tracking motorcycleonly checkpoints when they first appeared in New York in 2007. In 2011, using funds provided by the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, the state of Georgia conducted roadside motorcycle-only checkpoints as thousands of motorcyclists rode through the state March 4-13 on their way to Daytona Beach, Fla., for Bike Week. Another motorcycle-only checkpoint the public land in 2014. “While we certainly believe that the Marines Corps, like all of America’s military branches, should be the besttrained in the world, we don’t believe that it is necessary to ban off-highway vehicle riders from the area to accomplish that mission,” says Nick Haris, the AMA’s western states representative. “We, and other concerned off-highway recreation groups, will continue working with the military and Congress to ensure the needs of both the military and the OHV community are met.” U.S. Rep. Roscoe Bartlett (R-Md.) offered an amendment—which was incorporated into H.R. 4310, The National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2013—that would require a report on the base expansion impact on OHV use, as well as the potential for the military to use the same land under a permit issued by the BLM rather than closing the land to the public. The amendment also states that the secretary of the Navy can’t use funds for the expansion until Congress receives the report. “We need riders to contact their federal lawmakers to support this legislation,” Haris says. The easiest way to do that is by

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was conducted in northern Virginia during one of the nation’s most visible motorcycle rallies—Rolling Thunder— over the 2011 Memorial Day Weekend. And motorcycle-only checkpoints were also conducted in Utah when thousands of riders attended a world-class roadracing event. But motorcyclists are fighting back against what they feel is discrimination, and state legislators are paying attention. California and Illinois are the latest states to take stands against motorcycle-only checkpoints. Besides attacking the problem at the state level, the AMA is working to try to get federal officials to end the grant program to the states that provides funding for motorcycle-only checkpoints. For more information on the issue, go to www.americanmotorcyclist.com/ rights/motorcycleonlycheckpoints.aspx. going to www.americanmotorcyclist.com/ Rights/IssuesLegislation.aspx.

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It Only Hurts When I Crash: Health Insurance Discrimination

Imagine getting seriously hurt in a motorcycle accident and then having your health insurance company refuse to pay the medical bills because you were riding a motorcycle. Yes, health insurance provided by employers can legally discriminate against motorcyclists—and the AMA is determined to change that. “The AMA has been fighting this type of health-insurance discrimination for years and is on Capitol Hill lobbying to change the law so that this form of discrimination no longer exists,” says Imre Szauter, AMA government affairs manager. In a recent email to the AMA Government Relations Department from Pittsburgh, an AMA member wrote: “The company I work for has decided that as

GOVERNMENT FUNDS

of Jan. 1, 2013, they will no longer cover any employee under their health insurance plan if they ride a motorcycle, ATV or dirtbike. This disturbs me, as I am a rider of all and feel it is not fair to single us out.” In 1996, Congress passed the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) that included language prohibiting employers from denying health-care coverage based on a worker participating in legal activities such as motorcycle or all-terrain vehicle riding. But when federal bureaucrats wrote rules to implement the law, they reversed the intent of Congress, which allowed health-insurance benefit discrimination against motorcyclists, ATV riders and others. So be sure to check your medical insurance policy for “Exclusions.” That’s where your insurance company spells out what it won’t cover. If the wording is ambiguous, ask your human resources or personnel department whether injuries suffered in motorcycle crashes are covered. We haven’t given up the fight. If your insurance policy discriminates against riders, or if your insurance has refused to pay for your motorcycle- or ATV-related injuries, let us know at grassroots@amacycle.org.

The Money And 5 Take Run: Government Raids On Motorcycle Funds

Cash-strapped states needing money to balance their budgets always take a hard look at programs funded by motorcyclists to get quick cash, whether they are motorcycle safety training or off-highway vehicle programs. California is the latest state to raid that pot of money. But it turns out that California wasn’t so cash-strapped after all. While state lawmakers wanted to take $21 million from OHV programs funded by the state’s OHV trust fund, which contains taxes paid on gasoline used by OHV recreationists, Gov. Jerry Brown, in signing the proposed state budget into law, only took $7 million. The budget took effect July 1. Later, California officials found $423 million in extra money in various state funds that lawmakers and the governor never knew about. “Motorcyclists nationwide need to keep a close watch on their state lawmakers and do everything they can to stop them from raiding special funds earmarked

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10 THREATS TO MOTORCYCLING for motorcycle safety training and OHV programs,” says Nick Haris, AMA Western states representative. If you learn of such an effort in your state, contact us at grassroots@ama-cycle.org.

Loud Pipes Risk 6 Sound Rights: The Motorcycle Issue From California to New Hampshire and in various places in between, jurisdictions are cracking down on loud motorcycle sound. Simply put, people are fed up. And they’re not going to take it any more. The fix? In California, it’s a relatively new law that requires all California-registered motorcycles and exhaust systems built in 2013 and later to display a federal Environmental Protection Agency label somewhere on the exhaust certifying that the exhaust meets federal sound standards. The problem with this approach is that the law virtually mandates a stock exhaust system, because only a few aftermarket manufacturers offer pipes with the required EPA label—and even those are designed for only a few specific motorcycles.

On The Road: 8 Killers Distracted Drivers In Iowa, a woman texting on her cellphone while driving hit a motorcyclist, seriously injuring the rider. In South Dakota, a man killed a motorcyclist while allegedly texting while driving. Are you in danger from distracted drivers? You bet. The AMA is an active participant in the war on distracted driving, including taking part in national summits on the issue. In the Iowa case, Jennifer Lynn Moeller, 22, was sentenced to seven years in prison on Aug. 13 for texting while driving and hitting motorcyclist Joan Nicholson, 47. Moeller got five years for “causing serious injury by vehicle” and two years for leaving the scene of the crash. Nicholson broke her collarbone, several ribs and lost part of her left leg because of the crash. In South Dakota on July 25, Brent O’Neal, 21, allegedly was texting while driving 60 mph in a 30 mph zone and hit several vehicles, including a motorcycle ridden by Philip Sorensen, 33. Sorensen died as a result. SOUND ISSUES

Jan. 1, 2013 isn’t very far away. Other jurisdictions have also adopted EPA-label laws to try to control loud motorcycles. A better solution, endorsed by the AMA, is a sound standard offered by the Society of Automotive Engineers. In New Hampshire, opponents of loud motorcycles wanted an EPA-label law but, fortunately, cooler heads prevailed. This year the governor signed into law a bill that adopts the SAE J2825 standard to test for sound-level compliance: “Measurement of Exhaust Sound Pressure Levels of Stationary On-Highway Motorcycles.” The SAE J2825 procedure, which is conducted at a 45-degree angle 20 inches from the exhaust pipe of a running engine, recommends a limit of 92 decibels (dBA) at idle for all machines; a limit of 100 dBA for three- or four-cylinder machines at 5,000 rpm or 75 percent of maximum engine speed, whichever is less, using the Set RPM or Swept RPM procedure; or a limit of 96 dBA for bikes with fewer than three or more than four cylinders at 2,000 rpm or 75 percent of maximum engine speed, whichever is less. AMA Government Affairs Manager Imre Szauter says the roadside test procedure

is much better for controlling motorcycle sound than an EPA labeling requirement. “Simply put, a label, even if it can be located on an exhaust system, doesn’t ensure sound-law compliance,” he says. The AMA has long maintained a position of strong opposition to excessive motorcycle sound. The SAE J2825 standard is at the heart of model legislation developed by the AMA for use by jurisdictions seeking a simple, consistent and economical way to deal with sound complaints related to onhighway motorcycles within the larger context of excessive sound from all sources.

We Paid For It, 7 Recreational We Should Get It: Trails Earlier this year, the Recreational Trails Program—which provides funds to the states to develop and maintain recreational trails and trail-related facilities for both non-motorized and motorized recreational trail uses—was theatened with extinction. Continued on page 50

O’Neal faces various charges, including manslaughter. If convicted he could face life in prison. Some motorcyclists are guilty as well. In Edmonton, Alberta, Canada, police arrested 43-year-old Wayne Aucoin on Aug. 12 for allegedly texting on his cellphone while riding his motorcycle. He faces various charges, including distracted driving. The AMA Board of Directors has adopted a position statement related to distracted driving that states, among other things, that “…all road users are responsible for the safe operation of their vehicles on public roads and highways. Advances in mobile technology have made it easier than ever to become momentarily distracted by operating the controls of a stereo system, a global positioning unit, or some other device. “The American Motorcyclist Association (AMA) acknowledges that motorcyclists—in addition to car drivers, truck drivers, and even bicyclists—share this responsibility.,” the statement says. “Distracted motorcycle operation can be every bit as dangerous to the operator, other road users, and pedestrians as the distracted operation of a larger motor vehicle.”

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Going, Going, Gone 9 Bills Part II: Wilderness In Congress Imagine that with the stroke of a pen, off-highway riders can be shut out of millions of acres of federal public land. It’s a threat that riders face every day when Congress is in session. There are many bills in Congress that would lock up millions of acres of public land by declaring them federal Wilderness, which is one of the strictest forms of public land management. Once Congress designates an area as Wilderness, nearly all forms of non-pedestrian recreation become illegal, including off-highway vehicle riding. The AMA recognizes that no single recreation type is appropriate for every setting. But there are certainly many places where responsible OHV use can exist in harmony with other uses while preserving important natural and cultural resources. And the AMA supports appropriate

Wilderness—as defined by the federal Wilderness Act of 1964—and backs the designation of lands that meets its strict criteria, including congressional oversight and broad public support. The Wilderness Act states that to earn a Wilderness designation the land must be “an area where the earth and its community of life are untrammeled by man,” and that “generally appears to have been affected primarily by the forces of nature, with the imprint of man’s work substantially unnoticeable.” To see a list of Wilderness legislation now alive in Congress, go to www.americanmotorcyclist.com/ rights/issueslegislation.

The AMA helped create the Recreational Trails Program decades ago, and this year successfully fought to continue the $85 million-a-year program. But Jessica Irving, AMA grassroots coordinator, notes that the fight is far from over. That’s because not only can federal lawmakers try to gut the program in future years, but governors can now opt out of the program. “The federal Moving Ahead For Progress in the 21st Century Act (MAP-21), the surface transportation legislation signed into law on July 6, included language that continued dedicated funding for the Recreational Trails Program,” Irving says. “However, to ensure full funding of the RTP, a compromise between lawmakers occurred. Though the recreation community retained dedicated funding, a provision allows a governor to opt his or her state out of the RTP.” Funds for the RTP come from the federal Highway Trust Fund and represent a portion of the federal motor fuel excise tax collected from the sale of non-highway recreational fuel. In other words, revenues generated by the sale of fuel used for off-highway vehicle recreation—for HEALTH INSURANCE

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snowmobiles, all-terrain vehicles, offhighway motorcycles and off-highway light trucks—fund the RTP. The RTP is a state assistance program of the U.S. Transportation Department’s Federal Highway Administration. The RTP program benefits hiking, bicycling, in-line skating, equestrian use, crosscountry skiing, snowmobiling, off-road motorcycling, ATV riding, four-wheel driving, or using other off-road motorized vehicles. Irving says that riders should contact their governors immediately to ask that their state continue to participate in the program. The easiest way to do that is by going to www.americanmotorcyclist.com/ Rights/IssuesLegislation.aspx.

Safe For 10 The Motorcycles? E15 Ethanol-

because it’s a mix of 15 percent ethanol and 85 percent gas—is starting to appear at gas stations. Increased ethanol could possibly damage motorcycle and ATV engines, so the AMA doesn’t support any federal approval for the use of ethanol in these engines until it has been proven to be safe. In October 2010, the EPA approved the use of E15 in model year 2007 and newer light-duty vehicles (cars, lightduty trucks and medium-duty passenger vehicles). Then, in January 2011, the EPA added model year 2001-06 lightduty vehicles to the approved list. No motorcycles or ATVs are on the list, and the use of E15 can void many manufacturers’ warranties.

Gasoline Debate

There’s a big push by the ethanol industry to increase the amount of ethanol in gasoline, but the big question among motorcyclists: Is it safe? The new blend—known as E15

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A few of the hundreds of AMA-sanctioned events this month, detailed on the following pages.

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1 2 November 16-17, 2012 Las Vegas, Nev.

January 19, 2013 Columbus, Ohio

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If you’re looking for a good time on your adventure-tourer or dual-sport machine, then head over to the Howlin’ at the Moon event hosted by the Arizona Trail Riders. Oct. 27-28 in Payson, Ariz. It’s part of the AMA Husqvarna National Dual-Sport Series, presented by FMF, and the AMA Yamaha Super Ténéré National Adventure Riding Series. Info: www.arizonatrailriders.org.

2

The warriors of the dirt oval close out their season this month in AMA Pro Flat Track action. First up is the Tucson Half-mile in Tucson, Ariz., on Oct. 6, and then the Pomona Half-mile in Pomona, Calif., on Oct. 13. For more info, see page 54.

3

The Big Bike Weekend, Oct. 12-14, in the Northern California town of Redding is a great destination for street riders looking for a fun time with numerous traditional rally activities. The gypsy tour is part of the AMA Kawasaki

Vulcan Vaquero Premier Touring Series, and will include demonstrations by the Oakland Police Drill Team, Brad Wilson, a Dynojet horsepower contest, a motor officers competition, vendors and seminars. Info: www.bigbikeweekend.com.

4

The finale of the AMA Pro Hillclimb National Championship Series is set for Oct. 14 in Oregonia, Ohio, hosted by the Dayton Motorcycle Club. If you haven’t seen the pros in action lately, this is an event you won’t want to miss. Info: www.daytonmc. com.

5

Support a good cause and have some fun at the same time by taking part in the Tour of Honor Grand Tour that ends Oct. 1. The Tour of Honor benefits the Wounded Warrior Project and involves self-directed rides to memorials and monuments. Visit as many sites as you want, with any route you choose. Info: www. tourofhonor.com.

6

If you’ll be in the Hicksville, N.Y., area on Oct. 21, then plan to take part in a recreational road ride poker run hosted by the American Spirit Motorcycle Club. Info: www.americanspiritmcinc.com.

COMING UP AMA Motorcycle Hall of Fame Legends Malcolm Smith and Mert Lawwill will be among those honored at the AMA Legends Weekend Nov. 16-17 at the Red Rock Casino, Resort and Spa in Las Vegas, Nev. The gala features the AMA Motorcycle Hall of Fame Class of 2012 Induction Ceremony. Info: www.motorcyclemuseum.org.

October 2012

51


OCTOBER EVENTS ARIZONA RECREATIONAL ADVENTURE RIDE OCT 27-28: PAYSON: 2-DAY EVENT, ARIZONA TRAIL RIDERS, (623) 8261092, ARIZONATRAILRIDERS.ORG DUAL-SPORT RIDE OCT 27-28: PAYSON: 2-DAY EVENT, ARIZONA TRAIL RIDERS, (623) 8261092, ARIZONATRAILRIDERS.COM ROAD RUN OCT 21: MESA: PEDIATRIC BRAIN TUMOR FOUNDATION OF THE U.S., (800) 253-6530, RIDEFORKIDS.ORG ROAD RALLY OCT 26-27: MCNEIL: 2-DAY EVENT, SOUTHERN ARIZONA HARLEY RIDERS MC, (520) 432-2434, SAHR. US CALIFORNIA

OCT 14: OKEECHOBEE: UNLIMITED SPORTS MX INC, UNLIMITEDSPORTSMX.COM

OCT 28: (Includes ATVs) LUCERNE VALLEY: 100’S MC, (949) 584-9395, 100SMC.ORG

OCT 21: REDDICK: UNLIMITED SPORTS MX INC, UNLIMITEDSPORTSMX.COM

HARE SCRAMBLES

OCT 28: GAINESVILLE: UNLIMITED SPORTS MX INC, UNLIMITEDSPORTSMX.COM

OCT 7: (Includes ATVs) EL CENTRO: OVER THE BELT RACING, INC, (619) 654-0818, OTBRACING-D38.NET OCT 13-14: SAN JOSE: 2-DAY EVENT, TIMEKEEPERS MOTORCYCLE CLUB, (408) 7395762, TIMEKEEPERSMC.COM OCT 21: (Includes ATVs) EL CENTRO: INTERSTATE 8 DEZERT RACERS, , I8DEZERTRACERS.COM

TT OCT 6: (Includes ATVs) LODI: LODI MOTORCYCLE CLUB, (209) 3687182, LODICYCLEBOWL.COM COLORADO

POKER RUN

COMPETITION

OCT 6: WEST SACRAMENTO : BLACK WIDOWS INC, (916) 6492240, BLACKWIDOWSPOKERRUN. ORG

ENDUROCROSS

OCT 6: SACRAMENTO: CAPITAL CITY MOTORCYCLE CLUB, (916) 442-8242, CAPITALCITYMC.COM OCT 7: FAIRFIELD: PEDIATRIC BRAIN TUMOR FOUNDATION OF THE U.S., (800) 253-6530, RIDEFORKIDS.ORG OCT 21: CARDIFF: PEDIATRIC BRAIN TUMOR FOUNDATION OF THE U.S., (800) 253-6530, RIDEFORKIDS.ORG TOY RUN OCT 20: JAMESTOWN: SONORA COMPETITION ENDURO OCT 21: OAKLAND: OAKLAND MOTORCYCLE CLUB, (925) 9999081, OAKLANDMC.ORG OCT 21: (Includes ATVs) WESTMINSTER: TRAINING WHEELS MC, (661) 822-0331, TRAININGWHEELSMC.COM OCT 28: GRIZZLY FLAT: POLKA DOTS MOTORCYCLE CLUB, (916) 221-0834, POLKADOTSMC.COM GRAND PRIX OCT 6-7: RIDGECREST: 2-DAY EVENT, VIEWFINDERS MC INC., (818) 326-8626, VIEWFINDERSMC. COM HARE & HOUND OCT 14: (Includes ATVs) JOHNSON

AmericanMotorcyclist.com

OCT 6: ALPHARETTA: FUN AND RELIABLE TIDDLERS, (770) 9231685, DREAMHOUSE500.COM IDAHO ENDUROCROSS

OCT 7: (Includes ATVs) LODI: LODI MOTORCYCLE CLUB, (209) 3687182, LODICYCLEBOWL.COM

ROAD RUN

ROAD RUN

OCT 12: AUBURN: FAST FRIDAYS SPEEDWAY, (530) 878-RACE, FASTFRIDAYS.COM

DUAL-SPORT RIDE

OCT 12: REDDING: BIG BIKE WEEKEND, (530) 222-8025, BIGBIKEWEEKEND.COM

RECREATIONAL

COMPETITION

SHORT TRACK

GYPSY TOUR

GEORGIA

SPEEDWAY

RECREATIONAL OCT 6: BERRY CREEK: IRONMAN DUAL SPORT, (530) 680-6019, IRONMANDUALSPORT.COM

52

VALLEY: SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA MOTORCYCLE CLUB, (949) 9816776

OCT 6: DENVER: SOURCE INTERLINK MEDIA, (303) 299-5554, WESTERNCOMPLEX.COM MOTOCROSS OCT 7: STERLING: MILE HIGH MX, (303) 748-9417, PAWNEECYCLECLUB.COM CONNECTICUT COMPETITION OBSERVED TRIALS OCT 28: MERIDEN: MERIDEN MOTORCYCLE CLUB INC, (203) 235-9669, NEWENGLANDTRIALS. NET DELAWARE

OCT 27: NAMPA: SOURCE INTERLINK MEDIA, (208) 468-1000, IDAHOCENTER.COM ILLINOIS RECREATIONAL POKER RUN OCT 14: BARTONVILLE: PEORIA MOTORCYCLE CLUB INC, (309) 697-4981, PEORIATT.NET COMPETITION ENDURO OCT 21: WHITE CITY: CAHOKIA CREEK DIRT RIDERS, (618) 9464316, DIRT.COM OCT 28: LEAF RIVER: FOREST CITY RIDERS MC, (815) 624-6535, FORESTCITYRIDERS.COM GRAND PRIX OCT 21: (Includes ATVs) WEDRON: MOTO PRO INC, (815) 431-9913, FOXVALLEYOFFROAD.COM HARE SCRAMBLES

OCT 28: FORT WALTON BEACH: SAND DOLLAR MC INC, (850) 244-0376, SANDOLLARMOTORCYCLECLUB. COM

OCT 7: (Includes ATVs) ROCHESTER: READS RACING, (574) 893-1649, READSRACING.COM OCT 13: (Includes ATVs) ROCHESTER: READS RACING, (574) 893-1649, READSRACING.COM OCT 14: (Includes ATVs) ROCHESTER: READS RACING, (574) 893-1649, READSRACING.COM OCT 20: (Includes ATVs) PIERCETON: READS RACING, (574) 893-1649, READSRACING.COM OCT 20-21: (Includes ATVs) CAYUGA: 2-DAY EVENT, PLEASURE RIDERS MC, (309) 838-5062, PLEASURERIDERS.NET OCT 21: (Includes ATVs) PIERCETON: READS RACING, (574) 893-1649, READSRACING.COM OCT 27: (Includes ATVs) AKRON: READS RACING, (574) 893-1649, READSRACING.COM OCT 27-28: (Includes ATVs) WABASH: 2-DAY EVENT, WABASH CANNONBALL MOTORCYCLE CLUB, (765) 985-3657, WABASHCANNONBALLMC.COM OCT 27: (Includes ATVs) CROTHERSVILLE: LET’S GO RACING LLC, (812) 374-8228, HIGHFLYMX.COM OCT 28: (Includes ATVs) CROTHERSVILLE: LET’S GO RACING LLC, (812) 374-8228, HIGHFLYMX.COM

COMPETITION

OCT 28: (Includes ATVs) BYRON : MOTOSPORTS ENTERPRISES LTD, (815) 234-2271, MOTOBYRON.COM

POKER RUN

OCT 6: (Includes ATVs) ROCHESTER: READS RACING, (574) 893-1649, READSRACING.COM

OCT 28: WHITE CITY: CAHOKIA CREEK DIRT RIDERS, (618) 9464316, CCDIRT.COM MOTOCROSS

RECREATIONAL

MOTOCROSS

OCT 28: (Includes ATVs) AKRON: READS RACING, (574) 893-1649, READSRACING.COM

MOTOCROSS

FLORIDA

OCT 28: (Includes ATVs) CULVER: PLYMOUTH BLACKHAWKS MC INC, (574) 259-0103

OCT 27-28: (Includes ATVs) CASEY: 2-DAY EVENT, MID AMERICA XC RACING, (317) 418-6084, MIDAMERICAXC.COM

COMPETITION OCT 20-21: NEW CASTLE: 2-DAY EVENT, MIDDLE ATLANTIC MOTOCROSS ASSOCIATION, (410) 375-1059, MAMAMX.COM

MIDAMERICAXC.COM

TT OCT 14: (Includes ATVs) ALTON: SPLINTER CREEK DIRT RIDERS INC, (618) 372-4355, SPINTERCREEK. COM INDIANA COMPETITION ENDURO

COMPETITION

OCT 14: MATTHEWS: MUDDOBBERS MC INC, (765) 9982236, MUDDOBBERSMC.ORG

MOTOCROSS

HARE SCRAMBLES

OCT 7: DADE CITY: UNLIMITED SPORTS MX INC, UNLIMITEDSPORTSMX.COM

OCT 13: (Includes ATVs) CULVER: 2 DAY EVENT, MID AMERICA XC RACING, (317) 418-6084,

IOWA ENDURO OCT 7: BARTLETT: C C RIDERS MOTORCYCLE CLUB INC, (712) 313-0256, IERA22.COM HARE SCRAMBLES OCT 14: ATALISSA: IOWA CITY COMPETITION RIDERS, (319) 5301554 MOTOCROSS OCT 13: (Includes ATVs) CEDAR RAPIDS: CEDAR VALLEY TRAIL RIDERS INC, (319) 363-7800, CVTR. ORG OCT 20: (Includes ATVs) MONTEZUMA: FV MOTO X, (641) 623-3456, FVMOTOX.COM OCT 21: (Includes ATVs) MONTEZUMA: FV MOTO X, (641) 623-3456, FVMOTOX.COM MARYLAND RECREATIONAL


OCTOBER EVENTS ROAD RUN OCT 7: MECHANICSVILLE: MARCH OF DIMES-MD NATIONAL CAPITAL AREA, (571) 257-2310, BIKERSFORBABIES.COM MICHIGAN RECREATIONAL POKER RUN OCT 7: GRAND RAPIDS: PARA-DICE MC, (616) 205-6342 ROAD RUN OCT 7: PORT HURON: PORT HURON MOTORCYCLE CLUB INC, (810) 985-7800, PHMC-USA.COM COMPETITION HARE SCRAMBLES OCT 7: (Includes ATVs) JEROME: BUNDY HILL RECREATION LLC, (517) 917-0493, BUNDYHILLOFFROAD.COM

OCT 7: THEILMAN: UPPER MIDWEST TRIALS ASSOCIATION, (507) 351-8879, UMTA.ORG OCT 20: NORTH MANKATO: UPPER MIDWEST TRIALS ASSOCIATION, (507) 351-8879, UMTA.ORG OCT 21: NORTH MANKATO: UPPER MIDWEST TRIALS ASSOCIATION, (507) 351-8879, UMTA.ORG MISSISSIPPI

OCT 6: SOUTHAVEN: MID SOUTH CHARITY RIDERS ASSOCIATION, (901) 861-0130 COMPETITION MOTOCROSS OCT 28: PRENTISS: GOLDEN PINE RACEWAY, (601) 506-8669, GOLDENPINERACEWAY.COM MISSOURI

OCT 7: (Includes ATVs) VIBURNUM: MIDWEST TRAIL RIDERS ASSOCIATION, (314) 434-5095, RIDEMTRA.COM

MINNESOTA RECREATIONAL TRAIL RIDE - RECREATIONAL OCT 20-21: (Includes ATVs) AKELEY: 2-DAY EVENT, PAUL BUNYAN FOREST RIDER MC, (218) 739-5525, PAULBUNYANFORESTRIDERS.COM COMPETITION HARE SCRAMBLES

OCT 27-28: MILLVILLE: 2-DAY EVENT, COMPETITION DIRT RIDERS, (856) 696-4783, COMPETITIONDIRTRIDERS.NET OCT 5: ENGLISHTOWN: RACEWAY PARK, (732) 446-7800

OCT 27: MILLINGTON: BAJA MX INC, (989) 871-3356, BAJAACRES. COM

OCT 14: VERMONTVILLE: MICHIGAN ONTARIO TRIALS ASSOCIATION, (616) 821-6920, MOTATRIALS.COM

HARE SCRAMBLES

MOTOCROSS

RECREATIONAL

OCT 13: VERMONTVILLE: MICHIGAN ONTARIO TRIALS ASSOCIATION, (616) 821-6920, MOTATRIALS.COM

COMPETITION

ROAD RUN

OCT 7: GAYLORD: BAJA MX INC, (989) 871-3356, BAJAACRES.COM

OBSERVED TRIALS

OCT 7: KINNELON: POMPTON PLAINS H.O.G., (973) 838-8800, PPHOG.NET

RECREATIONAL

MOTOCROSS

OCT 28: MILLINGTON: BAJA MX INC, (989) 871-3356, BAJAACRES. COM

POKER RUN

POKER RUN - OFF-ROAD

ROAD RUN OCT 5: CAPE GIRARDEAU: MOTORCYCLE SPORT TOURING ASSOCIATION OCT 14: MARYLAND HEIGHTS: MARCH OF DIMES-MO GREATER MISSOURI CHAPTER, (314) 5139968, BIKERSFORBABIES.ORG COMPETITION MOTOCROSS OCT 27: COLUMBIA: 2 DAY EVENT, MOTOCROSS PARENTS, (573) 4891500, MXPRACING.COM NEW JERSEY RECREATIONAL DUAL-SPORT RIDE OCT 27-28: CHATSWORTH: 2-DAY EVENT, METEOR MOTORCYCLE CLUB INC, (609) 654-5015, METEORMC.COM

NEW YORK

DUAL-SPORT RIDE OCT 6-7: MCARTHUR: 2 DAY EVENT, ENDURO RIDERS ASSOCIATION, (614) 582-7821, ENDURORIDERS.COM ROAD RUN OCT 13: LEBANON: TRAIN MRO INC., TRAINMRO.ORG OCT 21: PORTSMOUTH: PORTSMOUTH MOTORCYCLE CLUB, (740) 352-7200 COMPETITION

RECREATIONAL

GRAND PRIX

POKER RUN

OCT 28: (Includes ATVs) SUGAR GROVE: CENTRAL OHIO COMPETITION RIDERS INC., (740) 983-3937, COCRMX.COM

OCT 21: HICKSVILLE: AMERICAN SPIRIT MC NY HEMPSTEAD, (516) 872-2521, AMERICANSPIRITMCINC. COM ROAD RUN OCT 14: RAMAPO MOTORCYCLE CLUB INC, (201) 767-3594, RAMAPOMC.ORG OCT 20: NATIONAL COUNCIL ON DOMESTIC VIOLENCE, (678) 8016238, HTTP://MAKINGNOISEFOR SILENTSUFFERERS2011. EVENTBRITE.COM/ OCT 28: BRONX: CELTIC MOTORCYCLE CLUB, (914) 9242170, CELTICMCC.COM TURKEY RUN OCT 28: OAKDALE: IDONTKNOW MC, (641) 715-3900, IDONTKNOWMC.COM COMPETITION MOTOCROSS OCT 14: (Includes ATVs) YAPHANK: LONG ISLAND MOTOCROSS INC, (631) 286-9411, ISLANDMOTOCROSS.COM OCT 21: (Includes ATVs) RICHFORD: BROOME TIOGA SPORTS CENTER INC, (607) 849-4438, BROOMETIOGA.COM OCT 28: (Includes ATVs) WALLKILL: WALDEN MX, WALDENMX.COM

OCT 7: MILLVILLE: HI WINDERS, (507) 753-2779, SPRINGCREEKMX. COM OCT 14: MAZEPPA: GOLDEN EAGLES CYCLE CLUB, GOLDENEAGLESMC.ORG

OHIO RECREATIONAL

MOTOCROSS OCT 14: (Includes ATVs) SUGAR GROVE: CENTRAL OHIO COMPETITION RIDERS INC., (740) 983-3937, COCRMX.COM OCT 20: CHILLICOTHE: CHILLI TOWN MX, (740) 703-5791, CHILLITOWNMX.COM OCT 21: CHILLICOTHE: CHILLI TOWN MX, (740) 703-5791, CHILLITOWNMX.COM OBSERVED TRIALS OCT 13-14: LITTLE HOCKING: 2-DAY EVENT, TRIALS INC, (740) 732-4056, TRIALSINC.ORG PENNSYLVANIA RECREATIONAL DUAL SPORT RIDE OCT 7: PINE GROVE: READING OFF ROAD RIDERS, (610) 921-3592, RORR.ORG POKER RUN OCT 7: LANCASTER: TWIN ROSE LADY RIDERS, (717) 898-0100, LANCASTERHONDA.COM OCT 7: SCHUYLKILL HAVEN: SCHUYLKILL COUNTY MOTORCYCLE CLUB, (570) 3851460, SCHUYLKILLCOUNTY

Check Out the All-New AMA CLASSIFIEDS! YOUR ONLINE MARKETPLACE FOR MOTORCYCLES, POWERSPORTS & MORE.

MOTOCROSS OCT 7: BROOK PARK: BERM BENDERS RACEWAY, (320) 6792582, BERMBENDERS.COM OCT 7: KELLOGG: MOTOKAZIE INC, (952) 244-9996, MOTOKAZIE. COM OCT 14: MILLVILLE: HI WINDERS, (507) 753-2779, SPRINGCREEKMX. COM OBSERVED TRIALS OCT 6: THEILMAN: UPPER MIDWEST TRIALS ASSOCIATION, (507) 351-8879, UMTA.ORG

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October 2012

53


OCTOBER EVENTS MOTORCYCLECLUB.COM OCT 7: KRESGEVILLE: ZINC CITY MC, (570) 992-4214 OCT 14: COLUMBIA: THUNDERBIRD MOTORCYCLE CLUB INC, (717) 898-0871 ROAD RUN OCT 7: BOYERTOWN: MOTORCYCLISTS FOR JESUS MINISTRIES, (215) 234-8611, THEBIKERCHURCHPA.COM OCT 14: PARRYVILLE: KEYSTONE HARLEY DAVIDSON, (610) 3794055, KEYSTONEHD.COM ROAD RALLY

336-9160

VIRGINIA RECREATIONAL

ENDUROCROSS

OBSERVED TRIALS

DUAL-SPORT RIDE

OCT 14: EXETER: RHODE ISLAND TRIALS CLUB, (508) 285-6074, RITRIALSCLUB.COM

OCT 6-7: MOUNT SOLON: 2-DAY EVENT, WASHINGTON AREA TRAIL RIDERS, INC., (540) 379-5631, WATR.US

OCT 20: EVERETT: SOURCE INTERLINK MEDIA, (425) 322-2600, COMCASTARENAEVERETT.COM

TEXAS RECREATIONAL ROAD RUN OCT 7: GRAPEVINE: PEDIATRIC BRAIN TUMOR FOUNDATION OF THE U.S., (800) 253-6530, RIDEFORKIDS.ORG OCT 13: HOUSTON: RIDERS FOR THE CURE, (713) 563-9230, RIDERSFORTHECURE.ORG

TURKEY RUN

ROAD RALLY

OCT 28: LEBANON: LEBANON VALLEY MOTORCYCLE CLUB INC, (717) 270-9797, LEBANONVALLEYMC.COM

OCT 19-20: LUCKENBACH: 2-DAY EVENT, CENTRAL TEXAS MOTORCYCLE CHARITIES, (512) 922-5494, HARVESTCLASSIC.ORG

COMPETITION

OCT 19-20: CEDAR HILL: 2-DAY EVENT, WHEELIO, LLC, (972) 2910008, BIGTEXRALLY.COM

OCT 7: HANOVER: HAPPY RAMBLERS, (717) 634-2353, HAPPYRAMBLERS.COM OCT 14: BIRDSBORO: PAGODA MOTORCYCLE CLUB, (610) 5823717, PAGODAMC.ORG OCT 28: BIRDSBORO: PAGODA MOTORCYCLE CLUB, (610) 5823717, PAGODAMC.ORG OBSERVED TRIALS OCT 14: TROUT RUN: PENNSYLVANIA TRIALS RIDERS, (570) 244-8608 SHORT TRACK OCT 7: PARKESBURG: E PA PISTON POPPERS MC INC, (484)

COMPETITION

COMPETITION

OCT 26-27: MATAMORAS: 2-DAY EVENT, CONCOURS OWNERS GROUP INC, (203) 720-7575, HTTP://TINY.CC/COG_NE_FALL_ FOLIAGE

MOTOCROSS

WASHINGTON

MILLERMOTORSPORTSPARK.COM RHODE ISLAND

OCT 26: KERRVILLE: MOTORCYCLE SPORT TOURING ASSOCIATION,

OCT 19-20: ALVARADO: 2-DAY EVENT, BIKERS ADULT RALLY, (972) 551-0024, BIKERSADUTLRALLY. COM COMPETITION MOTOCROSS OCT 7: AMARILLO: KINGDOM MOTORSPORTS LLC, (806) 6717010, BOWERSMX.COM UTAH COMPETITION ROAD RACE OCT 6-7: TOOELE: 2-DAY EVENT, UTAH SPORT BIKE ASSOCIATION, (435) 277-RACE,

WEST VIRGINIA

ROAD RALLY

RECREATIONAL

OCT 5-6: LYNCHBURG: 2-DAY EVENT, MASON DIXON 20-20 RIDERS CLUB, , RALLYTHEVOID. ORG

ROAD RUN

OCT 7: MANASSAS: VIRGINIA BRITISH MOTORCYCLE CLUB, (703) 368-0173, PWCFAIR.COM COMPETITION CROSS COUNTRY OCT 21: (Includes ATVs) PETERSBURG: LONE RIDER PRODUCTIONS LLC, (866) 9678927, VXCS.ORG GRAND PRIX OCT 7: RURAL RETREAT: VIRGINIA COMPETITION HARE SCRAMBLE SERVICES, (276) 620-0400, VCHSS. ORG OCT 14: ROSEDALE: VIRGINIA COMPETITION HARE SCRAMBLE SERVICES, (276) 701-5142, VCHSS. ORG OCT 28: CARTERSVILLE: VIRGINIA COMPETITION HARE SCRAMBLE SERVICES, (804) 502-2776, VCHSS. ORG MOTOCROSS OCT 13-14: DILLWYN: 2-DAY EVENT, MIDDLE ATLANTIC MOTOCROSS ASSOCIATION, (410) 375-1059, MAMAMX.COM OCT 21: PETERSBURG: VIRGINIA MOTORSPORTS PARK LC, (804) 862-3174, VIRGINIAMOTORSPORTS.COM

OCT 5: SNOWSHOE: MOTORCYCLE SPORT TOURING ASSOCIATION, WISCONSIN RECREATIONAL DUAL-SPORT RIDE OCT 21: TBA: KETTLE MORAINE SPORT RIDERS INC, (262) 334-1743, KETTLEMORAINESPORTRIDERS. COM OCT 27: CROSS PLAINS: MADISON MOTORCYCLE CLUB, (608) 2205564 COMPETITION HARE SCRAMBLES OCT 27: LAKE MILLS: AZTALAN CYCLE CLUB INC, (414) 265-1582, AZTALANMX.COM MOTOCROSS OCT 7: (Includes ATVs) HILLPOINT: SUGAR MAPLE MX LLC, (608) 3938812, SUGARMAPLEMX.COM OCT 14: LAKE MILLS: AZTALAN CYCLE CLUB INC, (414) 265-1582, AZTALANMX.COM TT OCT 13: (Includes ATVs) CHILTON: GRAVITY PARK USA, (920) 8497223, GRAVITYPARKUSA.COM

2012 EVENTS HALL OF FAME EXHIBITS AND EVENTS AMA MOTORCYCLE HALL OF FAME MOTORCYCLEMUSEUM. ORG The AMA Motorcycle Hall of Fame is on the AMA campus in Pickerington, Ohio, and is open 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. seven days a week. Closed: Easter, Thanksgiving, Christmas and New Year’s Day. Main Hall: AMA Motorcycle Hall of Fame: Recognizing those who have made significant contributions to all aspects of motorcycling. Dirt-Track! All-American Motorcycle Racing: Celebrating the storied history of the men and machines who battle on the dirt

54

AmericanMotorcyclist.com

oval. 30-Year Ride: Honda’s Ohiomade Motorcycles: Gold Wings aren’t the only bikes that Honda produced at its plant in Marysville, Ohio. This exhibit showcases the 30 years of production, from the CR250 to the Rune. Founder’s Hall: Honoring the AMA Motorcycle Hall of Fame’s generous contributors. AMA Legends Weekend: Nov. 16-17, Red Rock Casino, Resort and Spa, Las Vegas, Nev.; MotorcycleMuseum.org AMA PRO RACING AMA PRO ROAD RACING CHAMPIONSHIP AMAPRORACING.COM

Sept. 21-23: Homestead, Fla.: Homestead-Miami Speedway Oct. 5-7: New Orleans: NOLA Motorsports Park

Oct. 14: Oregonia, Ohio: Dayton MC; DaytonMC.com AMA NATIONAL CHAMPIONSHIP SERIES

AMA PRO FLAT TRACK AMAPRORACING.COM

AMA KENDA HARE & HOUND NATIONALHAREANDHOUND.COM

Sept. 30: Santa Rosa, Calif.: Santa Rosa Mile, Sonoma County Fairgrounds

Oct 14: Johnson Valley, Calif.: Justin Shultz, SoCal MC; (949) 981-6776, SoCalMC.com

Oct. 6: Tucson, Ariz: Tucson HalfMile, Tucson Int’l Raceway

Oct. 28: Lucerne Valley, Calif.: Ryan Sanders, 100’s MC; (949) 584-9395, 100sMC.org

Oct. 13: Pomona, Calif.: AMA Pro Flat Track Finals, Pomona HalfMile, LA County Fairplex AMA PRO HILLCLIMB NATIONAL CHAMPIONSHIP AMAPRORACING. COM

Sept. 30: Jefferson, Pa.: White Rose MC; WhiteRoseMC.org

AMA REKLUSE NATIONAL ENDURO, PRESENTED BY MOOSE RACING NATIONALENDURO.COM Oct. 14: Matthews, Ind.: Doug Spence, Muddobbers MC; (765) 998-2236, MuddobbersMC.org


2012 EVENTS Nov. 4: Stanton, Ala.: Glenn Hollingshead, Perry Mountain MC; (334) 872-4286, PerryMountain. com GEICO AMA ENDUROCROSS ENDUROCROSS.COM Sept. 15: Ontario, Calif.: Citizens Business Bank Arena Oct. 6: Denver: National Western Complex Oct. 20: Everett, Wash.: Comcast Arena Oct. 27: Boise, Idaho: Idaho Center Nov 17: Las Vegas, Nev.: Orleans Arena AMA ATV HARE SCRAMBLES AMARACING.COM Oct. 13: TBD: Mike Gibbs, Mid America XC; (317) 418-6084, TheMAXC.com Oct. 27: Gosport, Ind.: Mike Gibbs, Mid America XC; (317) 4186084, TheMAXC.com

Gatorback Cycle Park; (813) 4707498, UnlimitedSportsMX.com AMA FEATURED SERIES AMA MID AMERICA CROSS COUNTRY CHAMPIONSHIP HARE SCRAMBLES SERIES THEMAXC.COM Sept. 22: Spencer, Ind. Oct. 13-14: Culver, Ind. Oct. 27-28: Casey, Ind. AMA WESTERN CHECKPOINT ENDURO CHAMPIONSHIP SERIES RIDECHEC.COM Sept. 29-30: Reno, Nev.: Wildhorse Enduro, Western States Racing Association Oct. 20-21: Fouts Springs, Calif.: Jackhammer Enduro, Jackhammer MC Oct. 20-21: Red Mountain, Calif.: Ghost Rider Enduro, Training Wheels MC

AMA PRO-AM MOTOCROSS AMARACING.COM

Nov. 11: Stoneyford, Calif.: Climbers Enduro, Valley Climbers MC

Sept. 23: New Castle, Del.: Blue Diamond MX Park; (302) 834-5867, BCTRA.com

AMA ALL-STAR NATIONAL FLAT TRACK SERIES STEVENACERACING.COM

Sept. 30: Canton, Texas: Buffalo Creek Motocross Park; (214) 9394321, BuffaloCreekMX.com

Sept. 28: Hanover, Pa.: ST, Trailway Speedway

Sept. 30: Walnut, Ill.: Sunset Ridge MX; (815) 379-9534, SunsetRidgeMX.com Oct. 7: Gaylord, Mich.: Ostego Club; (989) 871-3356, BajaMX.com Oct. 7: Englishtown, N.J.: Raceway Park; (734) 446-7800, RacewayPark.com

Sept. 29: York, Pa.: Half-Mile, York Fairgrounds AMA CAN-AM IATVHSS IATVHSS.COM Oct. 6-7: Carlisle, Iowa: Blue Ridge Run

Oct. 14: Birdsboro, Pa.: Pagoda Motorcycle Club; (610) 582-3717, PagodaMotorcycleClub.com

Sept. 29-30: Trials des Nations: Moutier, Switzerland Sept. 30: Motocross of Nations: Lommel, Belgium AMA DUAL-SPORT/ADVENTURE SERIES

Nov. 3-4: Pell City, Ala.: Mill Creek; (205) 699-8857, RPMSportsonline.com

Nov. 10-11: Lizella, Ga.: Echeconnee MX Park; (205) 6998857, FreestoneMX.com Nov. 19-21: Gainesville, Fla.: Gatorback Cycle Park; (813) 4707498, UnlimitedSportsMX.com Nov. 22-24: Gainesville, Fla.:

Oct. 6-7: Mt. Solon, Va.: Shenandoah 500 Dual Sport, Washington Area Trail Riders, Andy Giordano; (540) 379-5631, NVTR.webs.com Oct. 6-7: McArthur, Ohio: Baby Burr National Dual Sport, Enduro Riders Assn., Steve Barber; (614) 582-7821, EnduroRiders.com Oct. 27-28: Chatsworth, N.J.: Meteor Ride in the Pines, Meteor MC, Jeff Fitzpatrick; (609) 6545015, MeteorMC.com Oct. 27-28: Payson, Ariz.: Howlin’ at the Moon Dual Sport, Arizona Trail Riders, Don Hood; (602) 692-9382, dohood@us.ibm. com Nov. 3-4: Port Elizabeth, N.J.: Hammer Run, Tri-County Sportsmen, Eldin Polhaumas; (888) 274-4469, TeamHammer.org Nov. 23-24: Palmdale, Calif.: LABarstow to Vegas, AMA D37 Dual Sport, Paul Flanders; (626) 4467386, District37AMA.org

AMA HUSQVARNA NATIONAL DUAL-SPORT SERIES, PRESENTED BY FMF AMERICANMOTORCYCLIST.COM Sept. 13-16: Helena, Mont.: Rocky Mountain Road Trip 2012, Racing for Life, James Filang; (951) 966-3150, RacingForLife.org

AMA PREMIER TOURING SERIES

AMERICANMOTORCYCLIST.COM AMA NATIONAL CONVENTION Sept. 12-16: Ruidoso, N.M.: Golden Aspen Rally, MotorcycleRally.com AMA NATIONAL GYPSY TOUR Oct. 12-14: Redding, Calif.: Big Bike Weekend, BigBikeWeekend.com AMA NATIONAL GRAND TOURS AMERICANMOTORCYCLIST.COM Jan. 1-Dec. 31: Polar Bear Grand Tour, AMA District 2 of New Jersey, (609) 894-2941, PolarBearGrandTour.com March 1-Nov. 30: Smoke Chasing Grand Tour, Team Strange Airheads, SmokeChasing.com April 1-Oct. 31: Tour of Honor Grand Tour, Tour of Honor, TourofHonor.com April 1-Nov. 30: Hodgepodge Grand Tour, Midnight Riders Motorcycle Club, (765) 566-3807, Midnight-Riders-MC.com AMA NATIONAL EXTREME GRAND TOURS AMERICANMOTORCYCLIST.COM Jan. 1-Dec. 31: USA Four Corners Grand Tour, Southern California Motorcycle Association (SCMA), (949) 246-4941, USA4Corners.org Jan. 1-Dec. 31: Best US 15 Roads Challenge Grand Tour, Southern California Motorcycle Association (SCMA), SC-MA.com AMA SIGNATURE EVENTS AMERICANMOTORCYCLIST.COM

AMA YAMAHA SUPER TÉNÉRÉ NATIONAL ADVENTURE RIDING SERIES AMERICANMOTORCYCLIST.COM Sept. 14-16: Taos Ski Valley, N.M.: Land of Enchantment, Aerostich Tours, Roger Pattison; (575) 7768785, AerostichTours.com Sept. 22-23: Logan, Ohio: Nutcracker 200, Buckeye Dual Sporters, Bill Kaeppner; (740) 380-3050, KaeppnersWoods.com

Nov. 4: Wortham, Texas: Freestone County Raceway; (713) 962-3386, FreestoneMX.com Nov. 10-11: Wortham, Texas: Freestone County Raceway; (713) 962-3386, FreestoneMX.com

Sept. 29-30: Wabeno, Wis.: Big Woods 200, Wisconsin Dual Sport Riders, John Newton; (920) 3502030, WIDualSportRiders.org

AMARACING.COM Sept. 24-29: International Six Days Enduro: Sachsenring Circuit and Saxony, Germany

Oct. 28: Prentiss, Wis.: Golden Pine Raceway; (601) 506-8669, GoldenPineRaceway.com

Sept. 22: Logan, Ohio: Nutcracker 200, Buckeye Dual Sporters, Bill Kaeppner; (740) 380-3050, KaeppnersWoods.com

AMA U.S. TEAM COMPETITION

Oct. 13-14: Roberta, Ga.: Hillbilly Hills MX, RPM Sports; (205) 6998857, RPMSportsOnline.com.com

Oct. 27-28: Leonardtown, Md.: Budds Creek Motocross Park; (301) 481-6148, BuddsCreek.com

Sept. 22-23: Buck Meadows, Calif.: Yosemite Dual Sport Adventure, Family Off Road Adventures, Lawrence Borgens; (209) 649-3633, FamilyOffRoadAdventures.com

Oct. 27-28: Payson, Ariz.: Howlin’ at the Moon Dual Sport, Arizona Trail Riders, Don Hood; (602) 6929382, ArizonaTrailRiders.org

Nov. 12-13: Titusville, Fla.: March of Dimes Bikers for Babies, BikersforBabies.org AMA SIGNATURE EVENTS - RIDE FOR KIDS PBTFUS.ORG/RIDEFORKIDS/ EVENTS/2012/ Sept. 16: Tulsa, Okla.: Tulsa Health Dept., road ride Sept. 16: Phoenixville, Pa.: Valley Forge Christian College, road ride Sept. 23: Ellicott City, Md.: Turf Valley Resort, road ride Sept. 30: Las Vegas, Nev.: Las Vegas Motor Speedway, road ride Oct. 7: Fairfield, Calif.: Solano Community College, road ride

Nov. 3-4: Port Elizabeth, N.J.: Hammer Run, Tri-County Sportsmen, Eldin Polhaumas; (856) 785-2754, TeamHammer.org

Oct. 7: Grapevine, Texas: Grapevine Mills Mall, road ride

Nov. 23-24: Palmdale, Calif.: LABarstow to Vegas, AMA D37 Dual Sport, Paul Flanders; (626) 4467386, District37AMA.org

Oct. 21: Mesa, Ariz.: Desert Ridge High School, road ride

Oct. 21: Cardiff, Calif.: MiraCosta College, road ride

Nov. 4: Lithia, Fla.: Heinrich Training Center, road ride

October 2012

55


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October 2012

57


GUEST COLUMN WELCOME TO THE FAMILY One Generation Supporting Another By Ted Pasche

58

AmericanMotorcyclist.com

From left: Ted Pasche, Trevor Baker, Hannah Baker

that brings me to my point. There are three generations involved here: myself, Trevor and the generation represented by Trevor’s daughter and the seventh graders he teaches. I represent the current, albeit aging, AMA population. Trevor is next in line to replace guys like me, and his daughter and the seventh graders must be primed to carry on the tradition of Trevor’s enthusiasm. That’s why I got the ball rolling by calling AMA Membership Services and paying for the first year of Trevor’s AMA membership. (The only reason I didn’t opt for the Champion Membership that includes the towing package is because if Trevor’s Peugeot breaks down, he can tuck the little bike under his arm and carry it home.) Trevor is the second young person who I’ve had the pleasure of welcoming into the AMA. A couple of years ago Conan Overton joined on his own dime after making an informed decision. I’ve been on a few motorcycle trips with Conan and his father, Steve. I look forward to going on a ride with Trevor some day soon. Both Trevor and Conan are prime examples of the best America has to offer, and I commend those who helped raise them and shape these young folks into the leaders of today and tomorrow. Knowing these two young men almost makes me wish I had children (almost). I challenge other AMA members of my generation to encourage younger persons to join the AMA. Maybe you can even do what I did for Trevor and pay for the first year of their membership. The future of the AMA is with our younger people and their children. Without the next generation getting involved in the AMA, it will cease to exist. Surprise your children or younger friends with a membership on their birthday, holiday, Ride To Work Day, any day. Just do it, and keep the engines running. Without the AMA fighting for our rights, we may lose them and our ability to enjoy our two wheels. Ted Pasche is an AMA member from Argyle, Texas.

Photo Sandra Lynch

I’ve been riding motorcycles since 1967. My best guess is that I have 300,000 miles on two wheels, coast-to-coast and border-toborder. I’m a 21-year AMA member. I mention that just for some background. I don’t want to write about me but about a friend of mine, Trevor, who I’d like to welcome to the AMA family. Trevor Baker, 33, is originally from Centerpoint, Miss., and now lives in Argyle, Texas. He teaches seventh grade science and robotics. His love for mechanics started at his grandfather’s auto repair shop, where he would take apart old lawnmowers and reassemble them. A bicycle was his main mode of transportation up and down the country roads, and he spent hours in his granddad’s shop fixing and tweaking his bikes. As he got older, Trevor became more drawn to anything with an engine. His introduction to motorcycles came several years later in Argyle, as he was in the middle of a homemade moped project that affixed an old chainsaw engine to a mountain bike. Trevor was teaching by then and involved his science class by having them work up the gear ratios, power-to-weight info, etc. I learned about the project when Trevor asked me for help welding an extra sprocket onto the bicycle for the project. Instead of doing what I was asked, however, I sold Trevor his first real motorized two-wheeler, a Peugeot 102sp that needed a gas tank. The old one had rusted through and couldn’t be repaired. Its condition also suggested it would be wise to replace the old wornout tires and inner tubes. Trevor replaced the tires. He mounted a lawnmower gas tank to solve the tank problem (although this required a fill up each time he rode the 6-mile round trip to school). Now, every chance Trevor gets he rides the Peugeot to school. The students enjoy seeing it. Sighting Trevor on the moped commonly prompts comments from all ages, but especially the seventh graders, who seem universally amazed by it. He’s already had some students make offers on it. “Mr. Baker, when I turn 15 I’m going to buy your moped,” one told him. Trevor certainly got his class interested in the aspect of how to apply science to real-world problems and especially motorcycling. As Trevor worked on the project, students regularly asked for updates in the middle of class, and Trevor would gladly fill them in. One class in particular fell in love with the moped after Trevor took them outside to see it. (The reason for the mini field trip: Trevor couldn’t describe the color accurately enough for a very insistent student.) Trevor and his wife, Erin, have a 4-year-old daughter, Hannah, who often asks when she’ll be big enough to ride it, and the Peugeot has made Erin warm to the idea of Trevor having a “real” bike. This is a good thing considering I threatened to report him to the Society for Prevention of Cruelty to Machinery when he began riding the Peugeot to school and up the hills on the route, taxing the poor moped because he outweighs it by a few pounds. Trevor rides by my shop even on the coldest days and honks the little horn, which sounds like a cry of distress (“Help me! Help me!”). As a matter of fact, Trevor did succeed in burning up the clutch and is trying to find a replacement, so maybe the chainsaw modification is back on the front burner. In all seriousness, though, Trevor’s whole family is quite an asset to the town of Argyle and I am honored to know them. When I see families like this, I am more hopeful for the future of America. And


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American Motorcyclist 10 2012