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AUGUST 2012

CRAIG VETTER Design Through The Eyes Of Motorcycling’s Most Free-Thinking Inventor

THE JOURNAL OF THE


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Accessorized model shown Powersports.Honda.com ALWAYS WEAR A HELMET, EYE PROTECTION, AND PROTECTIVE CLOTHING. NEVER RIDE UNDER THE INFLUENCE OF DRUGS OR ALCOHOL AND NEVER USE THE STREET AS A RACETRACK. OBEY THE LAW AND READ THE OWNER’S MANUAL THOROUGHLY. For rider training information or to locate a rider training course near you, call the Motorcycle Safety Foundation at 800-446-9227. *MSRP excluding tax, license, registration, $310.00 destination charge and dealer-installed options. Dealer prices may vary. **Honda’s fuel economy estimates are based on EPA exhaust emission measurement test procedures and are intended for comparison purpose only. Your actual mileage will vary depending on how you ride, how you maintain your vehicle, weather, road conditions, tire pressure, installation of accessories, cargo, rider and passenger weight, and other factors. ©2012 American Honda Motor Co., Inc.


Enjoy great roads, great friends and great experiences, not to mention the camaraderie that you can only find in the presence of so many like-minded women motorcyclists. Join us in Carson City, Nev., for the country’s premier gathering expressly for female riders. Expect demo rides, seminars, parties and more at the AMA International Women & Motorcycling Conference. REGISTRATION IS NOW OPEN. PLEASE VISIT OUR WEBSITE FOR MORE INFORMATION AND SIGN UP TODAY!

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NAVIGATION

Cover

AMA Motorcycle Hall of Famer Craig Vetter’s designs have fundamentally changed touring motorcycling in America. Find out a little about what makes this free thinker tick, starting on page 40. Photo: Brad Wenner.

10. LETTERS

You write, we read.

12. ROB DINGMAN An AMA for all riders.

Navigation Photo

The AMA Husqvarna National Dual-Sport Series shows riders great trail and gorgeous backroads all around the country. To find a ride in your area, see the Calendar section, starting on page 49. Photo: Jeff Guciardo.

14. RIGHTS

New Hampshire adopts objective sound test and the U.S. Forest Service backs away from derogatory language in trail guide.

22. RIDING American Motorcyclist magazine (ISSN 0277-9358) is published monthly by the American Motorcyclist Association, 13515 Yarmouth Dr., Pickerington, OH 43147. Copyright by the American Motorcyclist Association/American Motorcyclist 2012. Printed in USA. Subscription rate: Magazine subscription fee of $10 covered in membership dues; $15 a year for non-members. Postmaster: Mail form 3579 to 13515 Yarmouth Dr., Pickerington, OH 43147. Periodical postage paid at Pickerington, Ohio, and at additional mailing offices.

Five questions with Olympian Arielle Martin, and AMA Member Tested: Tourmaster Transition 3 jacket, Latitude gloves and Seat Concepts’ custom seats.

32. RACING

Ryan Dungey gathers mo‘ in outdoor MX nationals, and JR Addison wins Horizon.

36. HALL OF FAME

Craig Vetter’s 1980 Mystery Ship, and Hall of Famer Ronnie Rall.

40. CRAIG VETTER: MOTORCYCLING’S FREE THINKER

Craig Vetter wants to change motorcycles, and maybe the world.

August 2012 Volume 66, Number 8 Published by the American Motorcyclist Association 13515 Yarmouth Dr. Pickerington, OH 43147 (800) AMA-JOIN (262-5646) AmericanMotorcyclist.com

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46. 50 THINGS NEW RIDERS SHOULD KNOW

Here are tips and suggestions from experienced riders to help you get started right.

49. GO RIDE

What to do, where to go.

58. MILLIE GANNOTTI

Journeys and expectations.


TOURING DE FORCE.

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EDITORIAL OFFICES

High Adventure. No Hassle. The  best  routes,  roads  and  twotrack,  mapped  by  local  experts.  A  great  challenge  with  like-minded  riders. A full weekend’s activities, with  camping,  campfires,  food  and  prizes.  For more information visit  AmericanMotorcyclist.com/Riding. 

THE ADVENTURE is out there

comteit Ge

Contact any member of the AMA Board of Directors at AmericanMotorcyclist.com/ about/board

James Holter, Managing Editor Bill Kresnak, Government Affairs Editor Mark Lapid, Creative Director Jen Muecke, Designer Jeff Guciardo, Production Manager/Designer

Stan Simpson, Chairman Cibolo, Texas

ADVERTISING Steve Gotoski, Advertising Director (Western States) (951) 566-5068, sgotoski@ama-cycle.org

Ken Ford, Assistant Treasurer Bartow, Fla.

Maggie McNally, Vice Chairwoman Albany, N.Y.

Perry King, Assistant Secretary Northern California

Zach Stevens, National Sales Manager (626) 298-3854, zstevens@ama-cycle.org

John Ulrich, Executive Committee Member Lake Elsinore, Calif.

Aaron Cumbow, Marketing Specialist (614) 856-1900, ext. 1266, acumbow@ama-cycle.org

Russ Brenan, Irvine, Calif. All trademarks used herein (unless otherwise noted) are owned by the AMA and may only be used with the express, written permission of the AMA. American Motorcyclist is the monthly publication of the American Motorcyclist Association, which represents motorcyclists nationwide. For information on AMA membership benefits, call (800) AMA-JOIN or visit AmericanMotorcyclist.com. Manuscripts, photos, drawings and other editorial contributions must be accompanied by return postage. No responsibility is assumed for loss or damage to unsolicited material. Copyright© American Motorcyclist Association, 2012.

Sean Hilbert, Hillsdale, Mich. Scott Miller, Milwaukee, Wis. Art More, Surprise, Ariz. Jim Viverito, Chicago, Ill.

(800) AMA-JOIN (262-5646) AmericanMotorcyclist.com

AMA STAFF EXECUTIVE

DEVELOPMENT/OPERATIONS

Rob Dingman, President/CEO Rhonda Hixon, Administrative Asst./Litigation Manager Bruce Moffat, Chief Financial Officer Sen. Wayne Allard, Vice President, Government Relations Bob Chaddock, Vice President, Administration Jeff Massey, Vice President, Operations Jim Williams, Vice President, Industry Relations & Corporate Member Programs Grant Parsons, Director of Communications & Marketing Rob Rasor, Director of International Affairs

Jack Penton, Director Paula Schremser, Program Specialist

ACCOUNTING

Sheila Andrews, Senior Legislative Assistant Marie Esselstein, Government Affairs Assistant Nick Haris, Western States Representative Jessica Irving, Grassroots Coordinator Sharon Long, Legislative Coordinator Rick Podliska, Deputy Director Imre Szauter, Government Affairs Manager - On-Road Royce Wood, Government Affairs Manager - Off-Road

Dawn Becker, Accounting Manager Tyra Hines, Lead Accounting Clerk Melanie Hise, HR Assistant/Payroll Coordinator ADMINISTRATIVE SERVICES Sandi Dunphy, Coordinator/Switchboard Operator Sean Maher, Director AMHF/MOTORCYCLE HALL OF FAME Renee Bock, Management Assistant Beth Myers, Donor Relations Specialist Katy Wood, Operations Manager AMA RACING/ORGANIZER SERVICES

See the event schedule in the  Calendar section of this magazine. 

AMA BOARD OF DIRECTORS

American Motorcyclist 13515 Yarmouth Drive Pickerington, OH 43147 (614) 856-1900 submissions@ama-cycle.org

Kip Bigelow, Amateur MX Manager Joe Bromley, Director of Racing Jacki Burris, Organizer Services Coordinator Jane Caston, Racing Coordinator Lana Cox, Administrative Assistant/Switchboard Operator Kevin Crowther, Director SX & Pro Racing Relations Bill Cumbow, Director of Special Projects Dave Hembroff, Road Riding Manager Tamra Jones, Racing Coordinator Ken Saillant, Track Racing Manager Cherie Schlatter, Organizer Services Manager D’Andra Schwabel, Organizer Services Coordinator Serena Van Dyke, Organizer Services Coordinator Chuck Weir, Off Road Racing Manager Conrad Young, Timing & Scoring Manager

DISTRIBUTION/FACILITIES MANAGEMENT John Bricker, Mailroom Manager Heida Drake, Copy Center Operator/Switchboard Operator Bill Frasch, Mailroom Clerk Ron Williams, Facilities Manager GOVERNMENT RELATIONS

INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY Rob Baughman, Network Administrator John Boker, Developer Dave Coleman, Network Architect Amy Hyman, Senior Programmer/Analyst Ed Madden, Managed Services Manager Bill Miller, Web Architect Peg Tuvell, Operations Manager MARKETING Connie Fleming, Events Manager Drew Parrott, Marketing Manager Tigra Tsujikawa, Marketing Manager MEMBER SERVICES/DATA ENTRY Lori Cavucci, Member Services Representative Deb D’Andrea, Member Services Representative Linda Hembroff, Member Services Representative Darcel Higgins, Member Services Manager Angie Miller, Member Services Representative Tiffany Pound, Member Services Representative Jessica Robinson, Member Services Representative Misty Walker, Member Services Representative


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MEMBER LETTERS

Send your letters (and a high-resolution photo) to submissions@ama-cycle.org; or mail to 13515 Yarmouth Drive, Pickerington, OH 43147.

LETTER OF THE MONTH AMA VINTAGE MOTORCYCLE DAYS: A MUST DO! My dad has told me for the last two Each month, a lucky AMA member wins a Bike years that I need to check out the AMA Bandit gift card worth $100. Didn’t win? No worries. You can still take advantage of your Vintage Motorcycle Days at Mid-Ohio 10% AMA member discount at BikeBandit.com. Sports Car Course in Lexington, Ohio. He always said I would be amazed to not only see all of the racing and the vintage bikes, but to interact with all the enthusiasts. People from literally all over the world come to this thing! So I decided to attend my first one last year in 2011. We have a friend who helps organize the hare scrambles race, and I was asked if I could volunteer and help out. Of course, I agreed. I was impressed with the woods racing. I currently race a modern bike for enduros and hare scrambles, but after watching a couple of those hare scrambles races, I’m confident some of those racers would put me to shame on their 35-plus-year-old woods weapons! I was honored to help a few of them out when the mechanical gremlins got to their bikes. I was especially impressed that everywhere you look there is seemingly always something different going on. Swap meets, auctions, motocross, road course racing, woods racing. You name it, and it happens and it is cool. There’s people watching, bench racing, and of course the stories. Ah, the stories! History lessons, if you will, which I think are the best part of AMA Vintage Motorcycle Days. Some stories are factual—you think so, anyway—and some are like the old “had to walk uphill 5 miles in the snow to school everyday” kind of story. Prior to attending AMA Vintage Motorcycle Days, I never thought about racing a vintage bike. However, after leaving the event last year, I started talking to my dad about how cool it would be to race the vintage motocross. I kept having visions of the time when Pomeroy, Lackey and DeCoster ruled! Long-story short, and a couple of eBay accounts later, this year we’ll be showing up with a couple of 38-year old 250cc Pentons, ready to race. If you do not come to AMA Vintage Motorcycle Days July 20-22, you might be missing out on a bucket-list-type event. Yes, we got hooked. It was easy. Matt Bucher Toledo, Ohio Thanks, Matt. It goes without saying that we agree. Make sure you send us a post-event report—win or lose! RIDING TO WORK I’ve been lucky in that I’ve been riding to work on and off most of my 30 years at my job. I started commuting on a 1979 Honda XL125S, then a 1983 XR350. It was always fun to park my dirt bikes between the sheriff’s bikes behind the county courthouse. The vast majority of my commuting, however, has been on my trusty old ’89 Honda Transalp. The past four or five years, I’ve gotten into such a groove of riding that I never stop unless there is snow on the pavement when I leave. My commute isn’t as far as it used to be, but when it’s only 20 degrees, it’s still

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another motorcyclist riding to work, I wish I hadn’t driven. Sadly, by the time you read this, I will have missed this year’s National Ride to Work Day on June 18. I hope no one minds, as I’ll be on an 8,000-mile motorcycle journey with my friend to the great Northwest to visit his son. I’ll make it up when I get back. I promise. Michael Gorman Massillon, Ohio THE RIGHT RIVER Thank you for all you do and for a great magazine. However, I think I discovered a mistake in the June issue of American Motorcyclist. On page 39, AMA member Bryan Knysh, in an article about a trip through Northwest California and Southwest Oregon, says he followed Highway 199 “along the Rogue River.” That is incorrect. Bryan was on the Smith River, which flows through the Illinois Valley, the Smith River Canyon and joins the Pacific Ocean north of Crescent City. The Rogue River begins her headwaters near Crater Lake, flows through the Cascade Gorge, Lost Creek Lake, Shady Cove, Gold Hill, the cities of Rogue River and Grant’s Pass before entering the Wild and Scenic section and flowing out to the coast at Gold Beach, Ore. Bryan is 100 percent correct about the beauty and scenic wonder in the area and the twisty roads. My riding buds have ridden that route many times, and I recommend the ride to anyone with an appreciation of the outdoors. Highway 199 is, however, narrow and windy, with many pullouts for slow traffic. My advice is to stay sharp and focused on your ride, and use the pullouts as an opportunity to view and photograph the many natural scenes. Thank you, Bryan, for the great article, and thanks to the AMA for protecting our rights and freedoms. Patrick Davies Winston, Ore.

Michael Gorman

cold. I also keep a couple changes of clothes and a pair of shoes in the office just in case Mother Nature catches me off-guard. There are times when I have to take the truck to pick up a heavy or large object after work. When I do, I feel like I’m cheating myself out of a ride, and if I see

UNIFIED TURN THEORY I am fed up, and I won’t take it anymore. The world is full of misinformation about how to turn a motorcycle. The worst offender is the advice: “under 20 miles per hour, turn left to go left; above 20 mph, counter-steering takes over.” I wonder if in Germany it is 20 kilometers per hour or 32.19 kph? What law of physics makes it a multiple of 10? Here is the “unified” theory. At slow speeds, we are generally turning sharply (that is, in a small radius), like in a parking lot. To turn this sharply (let’s say, to the


Alan Stephenson

left), we will definitely need to turn the handlebars left while (read that again, “while”) we are turning. At higher speeds, the turn radius is generally higher and we lean more. The more we lean, the more tire profiles and camber thrust come into play, which can cause the tires to do some of the turning on their own. The handlebars need not be turned as much, much less than a car, and sometimes not at all. All of that applies while we are turning. But, to turn left, make no mistake, you had better be leaning left first. It doesn’t matter if you want to let the wind blow you over, wait until you are falling left (more effective than you think), ask pedestrians to push on you, or bounce off parked cars. Most of us are happier counter-steering, no matter what the speed. If you are not leaning left before you turn left, you’ll fall over like a 3-year old on a tricycle. All of us who understand counter-steering know this. It is not open for debate. Alan Stephenson Sedona, Ariz. Turning a motorcycle is a source of endless conversation. Our friends at the Motorcycle Safety Foundation say to initiate a lean at speeds beyond walking speed requires countersteering. Sometimes it’s so subtle we don’t even realize we are doing it. GAME-CHANGING About 20 years ago. the signing of a new state law would affect the way I would ride motorcycles forever. I did not want that bill signed into law. However, the up-and-coming elections had both the Republican and Democratic gubernatorial candidates on record to sign this bill into law if elected. So, as a voter, I had no candidate for which to vote. That’s when I had an epiphany! Realizing that neither party would give me what I wanted, I changed my voter registration to “Independent” and have been registered that way ever since. I also look at politics and life completely differently. Government is for making laws and regulations and enforcing those laws and regulations. Simply put, government

usually restricts one’s freedom. From that time forward, I have looked at government and politics very suspiciously—always at how it might affect my freedom of choice. I was reminded of this by two letters in the June issue. To Al from Lexington, Ky., who says in his letter that motorcycling is “just a hobby” and that it shouldn’t significantly influence your way of voting, I say that not only did it significantly change my way of voting, it changed my way of thinking! And to Randall of Bellville, Ohio, I applaud him for getting his priorities right. He writes, “It’s about choices.” And I say because “it’s about choices,” it’s also about liberty and freedom—principles on which this country was founded. Ron Glaum Livermore, Calif. IN IT TOGETHER In the April 2011 issue, you ran a letter I wrote about motorcyclists not always supporting each other. Some Harley riders took exception to my letter, as they thought I was banging on them, which was not my intent. I had a recent incident that requires me to write an update.

The Road

Over Memorial Day weekend, I blew out my third rear tire in less than a year. My luck has not been good. I was in the middle of nowhere in Missouri, repairing the flat, when two Harley riders stopped to check on me. Neither had anything more than half helmets for protective gear. One was smoking a thick cigar and the other had a long pony tail and ape hangers. At least one had loud pipes. They stopped, and the one with the ponytail asked if my wife and I were OK and if we needed any help. I said we had a tow on the way and were repairing the flat, but thanks. I also said this was the third flat in less than a year and it was getting a bit frustrating. The Harley rider then put his hand on me and laid a blessing on me asking the Lord to look over me and do me a little better in the future. The guy in the front just nodded along during the blessing. They then rumbled off. I truly appreciated that. It was the highlight of my Memorial Day weekend. I don’t know your names, but if you’re reading this letter, thank you. Jeff Snook West Paducah, Ky.

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Is Callin

Answer Well.

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FROM THE PRESIDENT

AN AMA FOR ALL RIDERS The Challenge Is Clear Recently I have been reflecting about the history of the AMA and how we arrived at where we are today with regard to our AMA memberships. Historically, a significant percentage of AMA members have joined the association to compete in AMA-sanctioned races. Many AMA members continue to ride long after their racing careers end, and many typically retain their AMA memberships because they recognize By Rob Dingman the importance of the AMA’s advocacy and government relations activities as we work to protect the future of motorcycling. Racing has therefore provided a very significant source of memberships for the association over the years, whether or not a member continues to compete after his or her first exposure to the AMA. Considering that there are approximately 10 million motorcyclists in the United States, and that about 125,000 are involved in racing at any given time, it becomes clear to me that AMA competition members have played an overwhelming role in shouldering the burden of protecting the future of motorcycling for all motorcyclists through their membership in the AMA. That is not to say that the association hasn’t enjoyed the support of thousands and thousands of non-racers as well, but given the stark reality of this ratio, the AMA must evolve into an organization whose infrastructure can more vigorously acquire and support noncompetition members as well. To be clear, by no means should this occur at the expense or exclusion of the interests of our competition members. Racing remains a very robust membership channel for the association, but it’s clear to me that our organization must diversify. When it comes to how we acquire AMA members, we have put virtually all of our eggs in the racing basket. Motorcycle competition, and the AMA’s involvement in it, has evolved. District-level racing and club-promoted race events have traditionally provided the foundation for the AMA’s racing activities. AMA clubs have been putting on race events to attract members into the AMA for 88 years However, this has not been a one-way relationship. At the same time that racers have helped the AMA grow, the AMA’s involvement in competition has been a tremendous boon to amateur racing, and motorcycling in general, in the United States. The AMA’s commitment to be a strong and progressive sanctioning body helped create, guide and grow what is now the largest amateur motorsports program in the world. Our hard-working race promoters benefit from the AMA, our reputation, our rulebook, our staff, our storied heritage, the AMA brand and the awarding of the AMA No. 1 plate—the top rung of motorcycle competition in the U.S. In short, the AMA has helped our racing promoters get where they are today

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For the best example of how we’ve all worked together to protect motorcycling, look no further than the very significant victory that you, AMA members, have achieved for the racing community with last year’s fix for the disastrous lead law. How long would amateur racing have continued if kids under 12 couldn’t buy racebikes, as the lead law decreed? The victory will enable race promoters to stay in business and offer wholesome, character-building experiences for future generations of amateur competitors and their families. If the AMA didn’t exist, it would have to be invented, because there must be a strong national organization whose mission is to promote the motorcycle lifestyle and protect the future of motorcycling. It is important that racers continue to support AMAsanctioned competition events, and for AMA members to let their local promoters know how important the AMA is to them. While racing has been a fundamental ingredient to growing the AMA membership over many decades, it also points to a very clear challenge for us: We must become as indispensible to recreational riders as we have to those who race. To that end, we are working diligently to become more representative of all motorcyclists and to develop programs aimed at attracting more recreational motorcyclists to the AMA—without diminishing the benefits to our loyal competition members The foundations are already in place. The strong calendar of AMA road-riding events, and AMA Congress, which oversees the framework of recreational tours, rides and rallies, are an excellent resource. This is best represented by the strong participation and industry support of the AMA Kawasaki Vulcan Vaquero Premier Touring Series, the AMA Husqvarna National Dual-Sport Series presented by FMF, and the AMA Yamaha Super Ténéré Adventure Riding Series. Still, we must do more. That’s why we have recently launched a pilot program to organize an AMA State Chapter Network The intent of this new network is for the AMA to be organized at the state level, closer to where our members are, and to establish a coalition of motorcyclists interested primarily in transportation, recreation and advocating for the motorcycle lifestyle. Although we hope that the state chapter network will become a significant membership channel for recreation-oriented members, we are not creating a new state-level organization. We are merely trying to organize networks of AMA members at the state level. These networks are intended to compliment the work currently being done by existing state organizations—not compete with them. Under the leadership of AMA Board Vice Chair Maggie McNally, we are piloting the state chapter concept in New York State. Going forward, AMA Board member Jim Viverito will be working to start a similar pilot in Illinois, and AMA Board Chairman Stan Simpson will be focusing on another pilot in Texas. For more information about the AMA New York State Chapter, see www.americanmotorcyclist. com/amastatechapters/newyork.aspx. As always, thanks for your continued support.


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NEW HAMPSHIRE ADOPTS OBJECTIVE SOUND TEST Simple, Effective Procedure To Be Used

New Hampshire Gov. John Lynch has signed into law a bill allowing roadside motorcycle sound testing using a fair and objective procedure. On May 21, Lynch signed into law amended House Bill 1442, which authorizes roadside and motorcycle inspection station sound testing using the Society of Automotive Engineers (SAE) J2825 recommended practice: “Measurement of Exhaust Sound Pressure Levels of Stationary OnHighway Motorcycles.” New Hampshire is the first state to adopt the SAE J2825 procedure for roadside use. Although Maine adopted the use of the same procedure last year, that state requires motorcyclists ticketed for excessive sound to go to a certified inspection station for testing. In New Hampshire, the roadside testing is done before any ticket is issued. The new law takes effect Jan. 1. Under the SAE J2825 procedure, decibel limits range from 92 decibels at idle to 100 decibels at certain RPMs for various motorcycles, depending on the

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type of engine. The measurement is taken 20 inches from the exhaust. “This new law is good news for responsible motorcyclists who ride in New Hampshire because it provides an objective way to prove that a motorcycle doesn’t violate the state’s sound law, rather than relying on subjective judgments,” says Imre Szauter, AMA government affairs manager. “We applaud the efforts of the New Hampshire Motorcyclists Rights Organization (NHMRO), House Transportation Chairman Sherm Packard, law enforcement officials, the New Hampshire Automobile Dealers Association (NHADA) and many others who supported this bill for getting this law passed instead of the unworkable U.S. Environmental Protection Agency soundcompliance labeling requirement that was initially introduced,” Szauter says. The AMA objects to subjective methods for determining whether a motorcycle violates sound laws. Instead, the AMA recommends objective testing procedures, such as the SAE J2825.

Official Admits The Agency Has Concerns About The Document

The U.S. Forest Service appears to have concerns expressed by the AMA and other off-highway vehicle groups about anti-OHV comments in a recent USFS OHV trail maintenance guidebook. In a letter dated May 8 to AMA Board Chairman Stan Simpson, Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack, whose department oversees the Forest Service, said distribution of the report was stopped. Vilsack wrote that the Forest Service decided to remove the report, titled “A Comprehensive Framework for OffHighway Vehicle Trail Management,” and cease distribution of hard copies “to clarify the context for the reference to Wildlands CPR’s BMPs [best management practices] and how the Forest Service develops and uses its own national BMPs.” Vilsack’s letter was in response to a letter dated March 9 in which the AMA and six other organizations demanded answers concerning the anti-OHV statements and innuendo in the document, as well as the inclusion of information from the Wildlands CPR, which is an anti-OHV group. Besides the AMA, organizations signing the letter were the All-Terrain Vehicle Association, the BlueRibbon Coalition, the Colorado Off-Highway Vehicle Coalition, the Colorado Snowmobile Association, Trails Preservation Alliance, and the Utah Shared Access Alliance. The intent of the guidebook is laudable: to help OHV trail managers develop sustainable trails and protect the environment surrounding the trails. However, among other things, the 318page guide stated: “This framework was developed to help trail managers corral the OHV management dragon. The author hopes it has provided some insight into the nature of OHV trails, and some tools to help keep the beast at bay. Happy herding and happy trails!” The guide also claimed that OHV use causes an “increase in frequency and intensity of weather events.”

Photos Sound: Conrad Lim; Trail Guide: Jeff Guciardo

RIGHTS

U.S. FOREST SERVICE MAY CHANGE DEROGATORY LANGUAGE IN GUIDE


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RIGHTS LAWMAKERS WANT OREGON FOREST CONCERNS ADDRESSED Public Felt Ignored In Creation Of Travel Plan

Two U.S. senators are asking the U.S. Forest Service to ensure that the public is heard when reconsidering a travel plan for the Wallowa-Whitman National Forest in Oregon that bans vehicles from 3,600 miles of routes. At the same time, an Oregon congressman is suggesting that language be written into the USFS budget requiring the agency to revise travel management plans when the public opposes them. Riders around the country have felt that their comments have been ignored by Forest Service officials in the creation of local travel management plans. The Oregon controversy is significant because officials are taking another look at a travel management plan after a public outcry, and both Democratic and Republican federal lawmakers are trying to ensure that the public is heard. The recently released Final Environmental Impact Statement for the Wallowa-Whitman National Forest sparked outrage from Oregonians who feel their

input was ignored. As proposed, the plan would have banned motorized travel on 3,600 miles of routes, leaving only 3,065 miles open, only 49 of which was single-track. In mid-April, U.S. Rep. U.S. Rep. Greg Walden Greg Walden (R-Ore.) urged regional forester Ken Connaugton to “scrap the proposed Travel Management Plan on the WallowWhitman National Forest and start over.” Wallow-Whitman Forest Supervisor Monica Schwalbach then announced she would withdraw her approval and gather more public input. In a letter to USFS Chief Tom Tidwell, U.S. Sens. Jeff Merkley (D-Ore.) and Ron Wyden (D-Ore.) wrote: “We applaud the Forest Service in their recent announcement to ‘stop the clock’ and withdraw the travel management decision. This is an important first step, but it will be essential that the concerns raised by the public are heard and addressed by the Forest Service as you move forward.” The lawmakers noted that, among other things, constituents complained that the road closures could hurt tourism, the

U.S. Sen. Jeff Merkley

U.S. Sen. Ron Wyden

travel maps are confusing, closed roads won’t be marked so people won’t know which ones are closed, and although many volunteers helped inventory existing routes, their input was ignored. “Given the many concerns that have yet to be adequately addressed, we are encouraged that the decision for the Wallowa-Whitman National Forest Travel Management Plan has been withdrawn,” the senators wrote. “We would now urge that you both fully re-engage with the public to ensure all stakeholders have an opportunity to raise their concerns, and respond to these concerns as you prepare a finalized travel management plan.” Rep. Walden wants assurance the USFS will address public concerns by suggesting that language should be written into the USFS budget for the next fiscal year that begins Oct. 1.

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In a letter to Chairman Mike Simpson (R-Idaho) and Ranking Member James Moran (D-Va.) of the U.S. House Appropriations Committee Subcommittee on Interior, Environment and Related Agencies, Walden noted: “The implementation of the travel management rule on the Wallowa-Whitman and Malheur National Forests in eastern Oregon has had a troubling history. “Despite many attempts to communicate the local social and economic needs, the local communities, counties and multiple-use user groups in these communities have felt that their voices have not been heard in the planning process,” he wrote. On May 2, Walden wrote a letter to Schwalbach, asking the forest supervisor to seriously consider public input before reissuing a new travel management plan. In his letter, Walden noted that “the citizens who recreate in, and live near, these forests remain eager to help the U.S. Forest Service craft a plan that preserves traditional uses of their public lands. I ask you to fully engage the public and take advantage of their knowledge and ability to help the agency with valuable information.”

ALLSTATE POSTING ‘WATCH FOR MOTORCYCLES’ SIGNS Signs Planned for 30 Cities

To help standardize warning signs for motorcycle safety and help reduce the number of motorcycle crashes at intersections, Allstate Insurance Company has announced plans to permanently install motorcycle warning signs in more than 30 U.S. cities this year. The yellow, diamond-shaped warning sign was created following two years of development, which included 140 temporary installations in various U.S. cities between 2010 and 2011. The sign was developed by Allstate

as part of its “Once is Never Enough” (ONE) program—an awareness campaign that encourages people to look twice for motorcycles at intersections. “As more and more of the ‘Watch for Motorcycles’ signs are installed across the country, we hope that riders and motorists will familiarize themselves with the message and remember to always look twice at intersections, because once is never enough,” says Keith Rutman, vice president of Allstate’s Consumer Household unit.


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STUDENTS RESEARCH MOTORCYCLING SAFETY Project Under Way To Measure Rider Habits

A dozen people at the Illinois Institute of Technology in Chicago are on a mission to make motorcycling safer for riders. A year ago, they launched a project called infoMOTO, which collects acceleration, braking and other data on a motorcycle that the rider can analyze later. The infoMOTO project is a collaboration among students majoring in various fields, from physics to engineering to computer science and even architecture. We asked Daniel Milewski, one of the 11 students involved in the project under the guidance of faculty adviser Alon Friedman, to tell us more about infoMOTO.

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American Motorcyclist: What is the purpose of the project? Daniel Milewski: Ultimately, the goal is to make riding safer. Every member of our team either rides a motorcycle or took the Motorcycle Safety Foundation course during the semester and is now a licensed rider as well. Research we have conducted during our project shows that although many riders acknowledge the need for lifetime learning, very few of them continuously pursue formal riding education. By informing the rider of his or her habits in an organized and meaningful way, we will enhance a rider’s level of safety. AM: How does the system work? DW: infoMOTO is currently using an Arduino microcontroller-based prototype with multiple sensors. We are currently monitoring acceleration, braking and lean angle using a 3-axis accelerometer, as well as the GPS coordinates of the rider. We are working on adding brake sensors and throttle position sensors to directly monitor the rider’s inputs. The prototype is currently pretty large due to its nature, but as the design becomes finalized, the size will become almost negligible.

After a ride, the user will be able to upload the information from infoMOTO to a secure website, where he or she can access the raw and analyzed data, compare riding habits to a “baseline,” as well as share routes with friends AM: What would you say to riders who are concerned that law enforcement or insurance companies would use the data collected by your device to claim that a rider was at fault in a crash due to speeding, failure to brake, etc.? DW: infoMOTO puts the power in the hands of the user. He or she can choose which data to upload or delete from the device, and all data stored on the device is encrypted. This is a safety-oriented product designed to increase awareness. infoMOTO won’t share any personal information with anyone without express consent from the user. As such, proposed information sharing with the manufacturer would be on an opt-in basis, and would preserve rider anonymity. Learn more about InfoMOTO at Facebook.com/IITinfoMoto or http:// ipro308.id.iit.edu/.


Mail in, or complete online at www.americanmotorcyclist.com/onhighwaysurvey.aspx

On-Highway Issue Survey 2012

Every two years, the AMA’s Government Relations Department surveys the association’s members to assist in establishing government relations policies and priorities. Last month, we surveyed members on off-highway issues. This month, members are asked to share their views about highway issues. Knowing how our members ride and what you consider important in motorcycling enables us to do a better job of setting AMA government relations priorities. Please take a few minutes to complete and return this survey by Sept. 30. (If you don’t want to deface your copy of American Motorcyclist, please feel free to make a photocopy of the survey, complete the survey online, or download a PDF copy, from www.americanmotorcyclist.com/onhighwaysurvey.aspx).

1. Are you a current AMA member? 1.1 q Yes 1.2 q No

11. If your state doesn’t require you to wear a helmet, please check the answer

that accurately describes how often you wear a helmet. (If your state requires you to wear a helmet, go on to question 12.) (Check one box only.) 11.1 q 100% of the time 11.2 q More than 90% of the time 11.3 q 75%-90% of the time 11.4 q 50%-74% of the time 11.5 q 25%-49% of the time 11.6 q 0%-24% of the time

2. What is your ZIP code?: ______________________ 2.1 2.2 2.3 2.4 2.5

3. What is your age? ______________ 3.1

4. What is the last grade or class you completed in school? (Check one box.) 4.1 q Grade 8 or less 4.2 q Some high school 4.3 q High school graduate 4.4 q Some college 4.5 q College graduate 4.6 q Post-graduate 5. What was your total household income last year? (Check one box.) 5.1 q Under $20,000 5.2 q $20,000-$24,999 5.3 q $25,000-$34,999 5.4 q $35,000-$49,999 5.5 q $50,000-$74,999 5.6 q $75,000-$99,999 5.7 q $100,000-$124,999 5.8 q $125,000-$149,999 5.9 q More than $150,000

operator license/permit fees and operator license renewals) to fund rider education in your state? (Check one box.) 13.1 q $0 13.2 q $1-$3 13.3 q $4-$6 13.4 q $7-$10 13.5 q $11-$20

14. Check the box for each response that applies to you. 14.1 q I have completed a novice rider education program 14.2 q I have completed an experienced rider education program 14.3 q I have other formal rider training 14.4 q I have no formal rider training 15. Check all of the advocacy activities in which you participated during the past year.

15.1

7. How many of the following motorized vehicles do you currently own? 7.2 7.3 7.4 7.5 7.6

15.2

____ Two-wheeled street motorcycles ____ Three-wheeled street motorcycles (trike, Cam-Am Spyder, sidecarequipped) ____ Off-highway motorcycles ____ ATVs ____ Dual-sport motorcycles ____ Side-by-sides

15.3 15.4 15.5 15.6 15.7 15.8

8. How many street miles did you ride in the last 12 months? (Check one box.) 8.1 q 0-1,999 8.2 q 2,000-4,999 8.3 q 5,000-9,999 8.4 q 10,000-14,999 8.5 q 15,000 or more 9. In the column on the left below, check the displacement of the street

motorcycle you ride the most. (Check one box.) q 0-349cc ....................................................................... 10.1 9.2 q 350-599cc .................................................................... 10.2 9.3 q 600-749cc .................................................................... 10.3 9.4 q 750-999cc .................................................................... 10.4 9.5 q 1,000-1,299cc ............................................................... 10.5 9.6 q More than 1,300cc ......................................................... 10.6 9.1

(Your answers should total 100%.) ____% Commuting less than 50 miles per round trip 12.2 ____% Commuting more than 50 miles per round trip 12.3 ____% Pleasure riding, less than 50 miles per trip 12.4 ____% Pleasure riding, more than 50 miles per trip 12.5 ____% Organized events such as tours, poker runs, etc. 12.6 ____% Longer rides/pleasure touring (2 or more days) 12.1

13. What is an acceptable annual fee (distributed across motorcycle registration,

6. What is your political party affiliation? (Check one box.) 6.1 q Democratic 6.2 q Republican 6.3 q Libertarian 6.4 q Other (minor party, independent, etc.) 6.5 q Not registered to vote 7.1

12. What percentage of your total riding does each of the following represent?

q q q q q q

q q q q q q q q

Testified at a public hearing Attended a public hearing but didn’t testify Sent a letter to a politician or a government agency Made a phone call to a politician or government agency Wrote a letter to the editor or otherwise commented through the press Used e-mail to communicate with riders or to send messages to a politician or a government agency Involvement in party politics or a campaign Didn’t participate in any of these activities

16. Other than your AMA membership, which of the following motorcycle groups do you support or belong to? (Check all that apply.) q “Marque Club” (BMWMOA, H.O.G., GWRRA, etc.) 16.2 q State Motorcyclists’ Rights Organization (ABATE, etc.). (Which state?)____________ 16.3 q AMA-chartered club or district 16.4 q Attorney-sponsored rider group (NCOM, AIM, etc.) 16.5 q Motorcycle Riders Foundation (MRF) 16.1

17. How do you feel about mandatory helmet laws for all riders? (Check one box.)

17.1 17.2 17.3 17.4 17.5

q q q q q

Strongly favor Favor No opinion Oppose Strongly oppose

10. In question 9 above, in the column at the right, indicate the displacement of the next bike you plan to buy as your main street or road bike. (Check one box.)

Continued on page 20


26. Which method of addressing motorcycle exhaust sound is appropriate?

Continued from page 19

(Check one box.) q Enforcement of current state sound laws 26.2 q Adoption of AMA-endorsed SAE J2825 recommended practice at state level 26.3 q Adoption of U.S. EPA labeling requirement at state level 26.4 q I don’t support any sound law change or enforcement effort

18. How do you feel about the allocation of AMA resources to preserve

26.1

voluntary helmet use for adult motorcyclists? (Check one box.) q 17.1 Strongly favor 18.2 q 17.2 Favor 18.3 q 17.3 No opinion 18.4 q 17.4 Oppose 18.5 q 17.5 Strongly oppose 18.1

27. Which of the following terms best describes your opinion of the AMA’s Government Relations Department? (Check one box.) q Highly effective 27.2 q Moderately effective 27.3 q Not very effective 27.4 q Ineffective

19. How do you feel about incorporating economic conditions, such as

27.1

requirements for additional insurance for riders, into laws that would permit voluntary helmet use for adult riders? (Check one box.) 19.1 q Strongly favor 19.2 q Favor 19.3 q No opinion 19.4 q Oppose 19.5 q Strongly oppose

28. Did you contribute financially to the AMA’s government relations efforts

20. Of the following issues, check the box on the left of the one you feel was the most important issue that motorcyclists faced over the last two years. (Check one box.) 20.1 q Inadequate sentences in serious traffic crashes ................ 21.1 20.2 q State mandatory helmet laws ........................................ 21.2 20.3 q Local threats to privately owned OHV riding areas ............. 21.3 20.4 q Consumer Product Safety Improvement Act (CPSIA)/lead law 20.5 20.6 20.7 20.8 20.9 20.10 20.11

q q q q q q q

q q q

................................................................................ 21.4 q

Excessive motorcycle sound ......................................... 21.5 q Motorcycle insurance cancellations/premium increases ...... 21.6 q Health-insurance benefits discrimination.......................... 21.7 q Supporting rider education ............................................ 21.8 q EPA emissions regulations ............................................ 21.9 q Ethanol-blended gasoline (i.e., E15) use........................... 21.10 q Motorcycle-only checkpoints ......................................... 21.11 q

21. In question 20 above, please check the box to the right for each issue with which you aren’t familiar. (Check all that apply.)

22. Of the following issues, check the box on the left of the one on which you think the AMA spent the most time. (Check one box.) q Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC)ATV safety .. hearings........................................................................... 23.1 22.2 q Consumer Product Safety Improvement Act (CPSIA)/lead law 22.1

22.3 22.4 22.5 22.6 22.7 22.8 22.9 22.10 22.11 22.12 22.13 22.14 22.15

q q q q q q q q q q q q q

q

................................................................................ 23.2 q

EPA emissions regulations ............................................ 23.3 Ethanol-blended gasoline (i.e., E15) ................................ 23.4 Excessive motorcycle sound ......................................... 23.5 Global harmonization of manufacturing and safety standards

q q q

................................................................................ 23.6 q Health-insurance benefits discrimination.......................... 23.7 q Inadequate sentences in serious traffic crashes ................ 23.8 q Local threats to privately owned OHV riding areas ............. 23.9 q Motorcycle insurance cancellations/premium increases ...... 23.10 q Motorcycle-only checkpoints ......................................... 23.11 q State mandatory helmet laws ........................................ 23.12 q State-mandated restrictions on OHV use by children.......... 23.13 q Supporting rider education ............................................ 23.14 q U.S. Forest Service route designation process .................. 23.15 q

23. In Question 22 above, please check the box to the right for the one issue on which you feel the AMA should have spent the most time. (Check one box.)

24. Would you support mandatory rider education for: YES

NO

24.1

q

24.2

24.3

q q q q

24.4

24.5 24.7 24.9

q

q q 24.8 q 24.10 q 24.6

All first-time motorcycle license applicants regardless of age Riders under age 18 Riders under age 21 All riders I don’t support mandatory rider education

25. Do you believe that excessive motorcycle sound creates a problem for motorcycling? (Check one box.) 25.1 q Yes 25.2 q No 25.3 q Don’t know/no opinion

(Defender membership, AMPAC, etc.) in 2010 or 2011? (Check all that apply.) q 2010 28.2 q 2011 28.3 q Didn’t contribute 28.1

29. What configuration of on-highway motorcycle do you ride most often?

(Check one box.) q Two-wheeled motorcycle 29.2 q Two-wheeled motorcycle with sidecar attached 29.3 q Three-wheeled motorcycle (trike configuration, one wheel in front, two in rear) 29.4 q Three-wheeled motorcycle (other than conventional trike, such as Can-Am Spyder) 29.5 q Two-wheeled motorcycle with removable two-wheel kit added 29.6 q Three-wheeled motorcycle with removable two-wheel kit added 29.1

30. If you pull a trailer, which configuration do you pull most often? (Check one box only.)

30.1 30.2 30.3 30.4

q q q q

Camper Cargo Utility Other (please specify) ___________________________________________

________________________________________________________________

31. Is your on-highway motorcycle (or the one your ride most) equipped with ABS (antilock brake system)? (Check one box.) q Yes 31.2 q No 31.3 q Don’t know 31.1

32. When considering your next motorcycle, would the availability of ABS

influence your purchase decision? (Check one box.) q Yes, I would consider a motorcycle with ABS as standard equipment 32.2 q Yes, I would consider a motorcycle with ABS as optional equipment 32.3 q No, ABS availability would not influence my purchase decision 32.4 q I don’t want a motorcycle equipped with ABS 32.5 q I don’t have an opinion on motorcycles equipped with ABS 32.1

Completed surveys should be mailed to: American Motorcyclist Association Attn: Off-Highway Survey 13515 Yarmouth Dr. Pickerington, OH 43147 Optional AMA Number __________________________________________________ Name _________________________________________________________ Address _______________________________________________________ Address _______________________________________________________ City_________________ State_______ Zip Code _____________________ Daytime Telephone _____________________________________________ Please send AMA Government Relations alerts to the following email address _______________________________________________________


Put yourself in the  AMA Motorcycle  Hall of Fame Museum

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The AMA Motorcycle Hall of Fame is YOUR hall of fame—we  couldn’t exist without the generous support of our donors.  Now there’s a new way for you to show that support in a  very visible way: My Hall of Fame. The idea is simple: A $20  donation gets you a 3-inch-square space on the wall in the  Hall of Fame entrance foyer that hangs during the campaign  year. Want a bigger space? A 6-inch square is an $80  donation, and a 9-inch square is a $180 donation. You also  get an official certificate noting that your picture is on display in the AMA Motorcycle Hall of Fame. 

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OLYMPIAN ARIELLE MARTIN Five Questions

Even world-class athletes find time for their motorcycling passions. Consider Arielle Martin, a member of the U.S. BMX team headed to the Olympic games this summer in London. When she’s not training with the U.S. team in Southern California, she’s riding Ducatis with her husband, Michael Verhaaren, at their home in Washington State. We caught up with Martin during some of her down time to find out how motorcycles factor into her hectic schedule. American Motorcyclist: What role do motorcycles play in your life? Arielle Martin: I grew up on two wheels. I started racing BMX when I was five years old, but I came from a long line of motorcyclists on both sides of my family. My mom grew up riding dirt bikes. My dad always had a bike, mostly dirtbikes, but now he has a Harley XR1200. Two years ago, I got my first motorcycle. My husband, who rode, had a crash and stopped riding after we got married. Well, he wanted another bike, so he played the move that he would get me a motorcycle for my birthday. I told him the only motorcycle I would want was a Ducati Monster. He found one, and that’s

how I got my Ducati. Two months later, he got one. I have the 696, and he has the big one, the 1100S. AM: What’s a typical ride for you? Martin: We really enjoy riding together. We have Bluetooth in the helmets, so we can communicate. It’s kind of our thing when we’re both home, but when I’m training and since he’s active-duty Army based in Washington, that’s not very often right now. But when we’re both home, we get out two to three times a week. My favorite ride is Highway 7. It’s right outside our back door. Within 20 minutes, we’re out of civilization and in the woods. It’s a great road. We got the bikes we did to move fast through turns, and there are a lot of turns. The road is well-maintained. We can loop all around Mt. Rainer, and the scenery is gorgeous. AM: Obviously, BMX racing and motorcycles both involve two wheels, but how specifically do they relate in your experience? Martin: The biggest distinction is handling. My little bike is very quick and very responsive, so you have to be able to react well. On the motorcycle, everything

slows down. Everything is slower from a handling perspective. It gives me more time to read lines. Moving from BMX to the motorcycle, it was very easy for me to read lines through turns. I wanted to take a safety course, so I signed up for a Motorcycle Safety Foundation class, but I signed up for the expert course. The first question the instructor asked was whether everyone took the novice and intermediate course, so I lied, and of course I’m the first person out on the course. But I nailed it. I nailed all the figure-eight turns and the drills and after the class, the instructor asked if I ever was interested in becoming an instructor because they always were interested in recruiting more women. That’s when I fessed up. AM: Can you identify how skills on the BMX bike apply to motorcycle riding? Martin: I think a lot of it is intuitive—that is, being able to move the bike and work the bike. Vision is a big thing. Keeping your head up and spotting the exit is very important when you’re on a BMX bike. On the motorcycle, at higher speeds and because it reacts slower, it’s just about learning to start initiating even earlier and moving your body into position earlier so you have time for the bike to come around. AM: Have you ever raced motocross? continued next page

22

AmericanMotorcyclist.com

Photo Cory Parris Photography

RIDING


RIDING Martin: I haven’t, but I want to. I think post-Olympics I will get out on a track and try it out. AM: What’s a typical day for you? Martin: I get up by 6:30 and hop on my trainer. I spin for 30 minutes. I’m not 16 anymore. It helps keep me lean and wakes me up. I then have a bite to eat, then answer a few emails. Then it’s off to the trainer. Our first session is at 9 a.m., generally out on the BMX course. We’ll spend 2-3 hours working on starts or on the 3½-story start ramp. We then break for lunch and maybe a quick nap. Then it’s a few more hours of either gym work or skill work on the bike, maybe sprints on asphalt. Then it’s time for recovery—massages, acupuncture, ice baths, compression pants—dinner, maybe a little TV then crash out. AM: What are your expectations for London? Martin: A medal. I’m not going [just] to be a participant. It’s very awe-inspiring and humbling to qualify for the games. I came one point short in 2008, so it’s really cool now. We’re training for a medal. I want to represent my country, and I want to do it well.

AMA PREMIER TOURING SERIES, FLASH TOURS GO GREEN AMA Kawasaki Vulcan Vaquero Premier Touring Series and AMA Kawasaki Vulcan Vaquero Flash Tours on Facebook

Kawasaki Motors Corp. U.S.A. has signed on to sponsor the AMA’s touring rallies, along with the all-new AMA Flash Tours for riders who follow the AMA on Facebook. The AMA Kawasaki Vulcan Vaquero Premier Touring Series encompasses a great variety of AMA-sanctioned rides and rallies that are open to all riders, from mega-events like AMA Vintage Motorcycle Days, Americade and the Golden Aspen Rally, to national-level events like the Rally In The Gorge, to Gypsy Tours and Signature Events. The full slate of AMA-sanctioned road rallies is at www.americanmotorcyclist. com/riding/street/eventsandseries. New for 2012, the AMA Kawasaki Vulcan Vaquero Flash Tours are Facebookbased riding challenges that encourage motorcyclists to ride to towns or roadside attractions near them. A winner is chosen at random. Prizes include gift certificates to the voluminous Kawasaki product and accessories catalog.

“Kawasaki’s involvement really ties the long-standing AMA Premier Touring Series and the all-new AMA Flash Tours together, and showcases the road-going potential of the Vulcan Vaquero,” said Grant Parsons, the AMA’s director of communications and marketing. For the currently active AMA Kawasaki Vulcan Vaquero Flash Tour, see www. facebook.com/americanmotorcyclist. “This is the perfect opportunity to demonstrate exactly how well suited the Vaquero is to this ideal audience,” said Chris Brull, Kawasaki’s marketing director. “The spirit of the Vaquero demands pointing its front wheel at the horizon, so it’s a natural fit with so many riding opportunities.”

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Individuals and companies have a new way to advertise their support of the AMA Motorcycle Hall of Fame. “The idea is simple,” says AMA Director of Operations and Hall of Famer Jack Penton. “For a small donation, your photo can hang on the wall of the AMA Motorcycle Hall of Fame museum entrance foyer, under the same roof as the Hall of Fame legends, during the campaign year. The image you put in that space can be a photo of you, your family, your friends, your bike or your company logo.” “The Penton family has jumped on board with our support, and I’m looking forward to seeing others support the Hall of Fame’s mission in this very visible way,” Penton adds. A 3-inch-square photo will be placed on the wall for a $20 donation, while an $80 donation includes a 6-inch-square photo and a $180 donation secures a 9-inch-square photo. All donors receive an official certificate noting that their picture is on display. All proceeds support the AMA Motorcycle Hall of Fame, a 501(c)(3) non-profit organization. To hang with the legends and support the AMA Motorcycle Hall of Fame, just visit www. motorcyclemuseum.org/myhalloffame.

Ask the MSF

RIDING MINIBIKES IN LOW TRACTION

SPY204_RT 1-3_2.25x9.5_AMaug.indd 1

Q: Do you have any advice for my 13-year-old son? He’s intimidated by low traction (such as gravel or muddy) uphills. A: For a successful run up a loose or slick steep hill, there are some points and techniques to remember. First, know the motorcycle and rider limitations. With that in mind, let’s work on the techniques of climbing a hill. When approaching a hill, keep both feet firmly on the footpegs. Stand up and grip your motorcycle with your knees. Keep your upper body loose, with your weight forward toward the hill. Depending on the length of the climb, choose an appropriate gear and maintain momentum and engine revs. Typically, for a shorter and looser

climb, shift to a higher gear (remember to keep up the momentum) so that your rear tire will not bury itself. For longer and steeper hills, shift to a lower gear (keeping up your momentum) and speed up before you get to the base. You need enough momentum to propel you over the hill and enough engine revs to prevent you from stalling. When descending a hill keep both feet on the footpegs. Transfer your weight to the rear. Shift the transmission into low gear and descend with the throttle closed. Apply brakes as needed. The motorcycle may waver in its path slightly. On wet or slippery surfaces, braking will have to be much more gradual to avoid sliding tires. A helpful reminder when riding in sand or mud is to accelerate sooner and brake later than you would on surfaces having greater traction. Also, know what is on the other side of the hill and tell your son. Be aware of other trail users, including ATV riders, 4x4 drivers, hikers and horseback riders. Talk about the possible paths up or down the hill; help him choose the best line. Finally, get some practice on a level surface with the loose conditions. Once your son is comfortable riding on the varying surfaces, tackle the hill.

Photo Illustration Jeff Guciardo

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RIDING

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For many motorcyclists, adaptability is a key element in their gear selection. Adaptation is undoubtedly the jewel of Ron Liebeck the Tourmaster Transition 3 jacket. While touring, the jacket quickly adapted to various conditions, which ranged from temperatures in the 30s and rainy to the 80s and sunny. And no rain suit was needed; the three-quarter length jacket’s 600 Denier Carbolex outer shell is designed with a waterproof Rainguard barrier that, at least in my experience, didn’t allow a drop of water to penetrate, even around the smartly designed vents. When the temps are cold, the jacket features a zip-out quilted liner that features 100g poly-fill insulation. Even with a t-shirt on, the liner provides warmth in temps around the 50s. Take the liner out, and the jacket is comfortable in temps in the 80s. And when you need optimal cooling, simply unzip the waterproof “scoop” vents, which are everywhere— three-position shoulder vents, chest vents, sleeve vents, and a rear-exit vent that features a two-way zipper for desired opening. The intake vents are enhanced due to the Pipeline Ventilation System, which improves airflow. The textile jacket provides adjustable sleeve take-up straps at the bicep and forearm, and one on each shoulder. These provide a personalized fit, and I found myself tightening the take-up straps when the full-sleeve liner was out. Waist and wrist Velcro straps also allow further personalization. Other highlights of the jacket are reflective materials throughout to enhance nighttime visibility, a huge, built-in fannypack-style rear pocket with a zipper entry on the left and right, a sleeve key pocket, jacket/pants zipper attachment, and of course CE-approved armor at the elbow and shoulder with a triple-density back protector that’s not bulky when riding.

The only issue I had with the jacket was the double-Velcro scoop system on all intake vents and collar anchor. When temps ascended into the mid80s, it was a struggle while riding to anchor the collar open via a Velcro patch on the right shoulder, or to poistion the Velcro of the intake vents to allow air in. The answer, of course, is simple: perform these operations while stopped. The full-gauntlet Tourmaster Latitude gloves are a nice complement to the jacket. They aren’t waterproof, but offer much protection due to a goatskin design. What really makes these gloves stand out, though, is the extreme comfort due to the light-EVA foam padding in the palms, which reduces vibrations. The gloves are not designed with much ventilation, but were comfortable in temps from 50s to around 75 degrees. Although a bit stuffy on warmer days, the comfort factor quickly makes them a favorite.— Ron Lieback

AFTERMARKET SEAT Seat Concepts

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Tom Berry

Seat Concepts makes foam and cover kits designed to transform stock dirt, dual-sport and adventure motorcycle seats into platforms comfortable enough to significantly enhance and extend your

riding endurance. The company has been making affordable, do-ityourself custom seats for all-terrain vehicles and vintage cycles, and recently expanded into motorcycles. They cover a number of models from many manufacturers, some with options for seat height, foam density and vinyl choices. I tested the standard height foam with the embossed black cover for a Kawasaki KLR650. The kit includes in-house


RIDING

molded foam that is wider and sculpted noticed that with more support came less won’t cut it for your particular situation, to Seat Concepts’ design, a new cover foam compression and that we both felt a Seat Concepts offers an excellent formed to the foam, and an instruction little taller in the saddle. aftermarket alternative that can keep you sheet. The first impression is one of quality For times when the stock seat just riding longer, comfortably.—Tom Berry of the individual pieces. The instructions are step-by-step and easy to follow, with online videos that are also useful. The company does offer (for a fee) installation, if you lack the tools or don’t feel comfortable enough or qualified to install the kit yourself. The most tedious 5 Fantastic Days of Fun! task is removing all the staples securing • Demo Rides the original factory cover. A 5-inch flathead • Poker Runs screwdriver worked well. With the original • Scavenger Hunt cover and foam removed, the next step is Now managed by: • Vendors fitting the kit foam, which is easy since it’s • Music, Food & Fun molded using stock seat pans. August 30-September 3, 2012 • and so much more! The vinyl also fits great. No real Visit www.killingtonclassic.com for www.killingtonclassic.com stretching is required. I spent a couple Event Details and Lodging Information facebook.com/killingtonclassic minutes smoothing the cover to line up the 518.798.0858 seams and flipping the seat over to plan Register by August 15 & $ave! info@killingtonclassic.com where my initial staples would be placed. Most seat pans are made of soft plastic. Although I had a pneumatic staple gun available, I tested the installation with a standard hand-squeeze unit. I was able to AMA One Sixth KC AugSept Issues.pdf 1 5/12/2012 shoot 3⁄16-inch and ¼-inch staples into the plastic with little effort. ® Personally, I’ve always found my stock KLR650 seat too dirt-oriented—fine for sporty dirt riding situations but too narrow for the 95 percent of the time I’m in a static riding position. The Seat Concepts improvement was immediately noticeable during casual riding and didn’t negatively impact offroad comfort. The extra width holds and Wherever the road takes you, Choice Sports Travel makes getting there easy. With more than distributes my seated weight evenly. I now 6,100 hotels in 35 countries, and great amenities* like FREE breakfast or FREE Internet, staying sit on flat foam instead of half on flat, half with Choice Hotels is the right move. on edges and I’m no longer shifting from side to side to relieve pressure points. My occasional passenger also Save 15% when you use Special Rate ID: 00947556 commented how much more supportive the back portion feels. We both also

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Virginia City is waiting, ladies!

Maggie McGee will inspire attendees with stories of her racing exploits.

Jessica Prokup

WOMEN’S CONFERENCE PROGRAM EXPANDS Street Party, Special Guest, Seminars Added

Attendees at the AMA International Women & Motorcycling Conference have a full—and growing—list of activities to keep them busy in Carson City, Nev., July 26-29. “There will be so much to do, see and learn at the conference this year. There’s no way anyone will be able to do it all,” says AMA Marketing Manager Tigra Tsujikawa. “The program is really coming together nicely, and we’re excited about everything we have to offer.” Tsujikawa says that a personal favorite is the addition of special guest Mary McGee, a pioneer in female motorcycle competition, to the program. McGee will address the conference participants during the Saturday Night Celebration at Mills Park. “Meeting Mary was an unforgettable experience,” Tsujikawa says. “Among other things, she is a pioneering woman who started roadracing a Honda CB92 in the United States in 1960. And in 1975, she rode her 250 Husqvarna solo in the Baja 500, zipping by 17 two-man teams. Mary McGee is an inspiration for any woman who rides.” McGee has yet to hang up her riding boots. She still races—and wins—in vintage competition. Tsujikawa says another highlight will be a street party in nearby Virginia City. “Our Friday evening party will take us back in time as we gather in the iconic and picturesque mining town of Virginia

City,” she says. “We’re shutting down the main street so we can enjoy an authentic western cookout, not to mention an unforgettable ride to and from the event against the stunning backdrop of the Sierra Nevada Mountains.” In the mid-19th century, Virginia City was the most important industrial city between Denver and San Francisco, and its silver and gold mines made millionaires. Today, the charm of the town remains intact, with shops, museums and restaurants lining its main street. In addition, the conference has also added Jessica Prokup as emcee. A former editor of RoadBike Magazine and director of communications for Discover Today’s Motorcycling, Prokup now owns Yellow Devil Gear Exchange in Southern California and serves as the host of the eBay video series “modJOBS 2.” She will take the reins at evening activities and serve as a “roving reporter” for the event. The conference also includes seminars, demo rides of modern production bikes, the marketplace and Moto Action Center, the Saturday Night Celebration party, and a Women’s Health Fair where women can get a variety of health screenings such as mammograms and cholesterol and blood pressure checks. Registrants will also receive a conference t-shirt and gift bag. For registration details, see the ad on pages 4-5 of this issue, or visit www.womenandmotorcycling.com.


VINTAGE BIKE SHOWS FEATURE ALL MAKES, MODELS

From Classic Twins To Historic Fours

Photo Open Image Studio

There’s still time to shine up your restored or original classic motorcycle to show it off at AMA Vintage Motorcycle Days July 20-22 at Mid-Ohio Sports Car Course in Lexington, Ohio. Four bike shows will highlight the best and most historic machines: the Hall of Fame Ride ’Em, Don’t Hide ’Em Bike

Show and Scooter Bike Show on Friday, July 20, and the Hall of Fame Static Bike Show and Café Racer Bike Show on Saturday, July 21. For times and registration details, see www.amavintagemotorcycledays.com. Proceeds from AMA Vintage Motorcycle Days, which also features national championship vintage racing, a massive swap meet, seminars and a field meet, support the Hall of Fame. For tickets, see www.midohio.com.

NINA’s AN orIgINAl. Up to Utah’s Hill Air Force Base for organizing the base’s third annual “See Me, Save Me” motorcycle ride on June 13, which was designed to promote motorcycle awareness and safety in Davis and Weber Counties. Down to a California State Assembly committee for voting to raid $31 million from the rider-funded Off-Highway Vehicle Trust Fund to pay for non-OHV related programs. Up to police in Austin, Texas, for using surveillance and tracking devices to bust a motorcycle theft ring that stole 17 bikes and was conspiring to steal at least a dozen more.

Down to Fairwarning,org, a self-proclaimed, “investigative journalism” website, for cherry picking stats in a story promoting helmet mandates and motorcycle-only checkpoints. Down to the thief who stole a motorcycle from the Honda Rider Education Center in Colton, Calif.—and promptly crashed it, according to police.

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Powersports.Honda.com ALWAYS WEAR A HELMET, EYE PROTECTION, AND PROTECTIVE CLOTHING. NEVER RIDE UNDER THE INFLUENCE OF DRUGS OR ALCOHOL AND NEVER USE THE STREET AS A RACETRACK. OBEY THE LAW AND READ THE OWNER'S MANUAL THOROUGHLY. For rider training information or to locate a rider training course near you, call the Motorcycle Safety Foundation at 800-446-9227. *MSRP excluding tax, license, registration, $310.00 destination charge and dealer-installed options. Dealer prices may vary. CRF® and Pro-Link® are registered trademarks of Honda Motor Co., Ltd. ©2012 American Honda Motor Co., Inc.


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RYAN DUNGEY GATHERS MO‘ IN OUTDOOR MX NATIONALS Splits Wins With Injured James Stewart Red Bull KTM’s Ryan Dungey added to his points lead in the AMA Pro Motocross Championship at southeastern Pennsylvania’s High Point Raceway on Saturday, June 9, with a 1-1 moto sweep. It was Dungey’s second straight overall win in the premier 450 class. In the first moto, MotoConcepts Suzuki’s Mike Alessi, of Victorville, Calif., grabbed the early lead and opened a big gap on the field. Following a third-place start, Dungey began his charge forward. At the halfway point, he passed Alessi and won by nearly 20 seconds. In the second moto, Dungey grabbed the holeshot before being passed by Alessi. Dungey again passed Alessi back near the mid-moto point before pulling away for the win. “Mike put up a fight in both motos,” said Dungey afterwards. “These were the toughest conditions I’ve experienced here, [but] the bike worked really well

throughout the day. Every race [and] every championship series goes differently, so I’ll keep my head down and go one race at a time. To celebrate the win is awesome. You’ve got to enjoy it, but it’s time to go to work again. You’re only as good as your last race and you’ve got to be there every single weekend.” Alessi’s pair of runner-up efforts gave him a season-best finish of second overall, while Monster Energy Kawasaki’s Jake Weimer rounded out the podium in third for the second consecutive round. High Point was another tough race for Yoshimura Suzuki’s James Stewart. Stewart injured his hand at the previous round in Colorado, where he did not finish. At High Point, Stewart finished fifth in the first moto and did not start moto two. Dungey extended his lead in the 450 class standings to 42 points over Alessi, who moved into second.

Photos Motocross: Jeff Kardas; EnduroCross: Drew Ruiz

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RACING

JERSEY, CLUB TEAM SPONSOR ON BOARD FOR ISDE Wellard Group Holdings To Back U.S. Effort

Ryan Dungey

TADDY BLAZUSIAK BACK ON TOP IN ENDUROCROSS Taylor Robert, Kevin Rookstool Podium At Sacramento Round two of the GEICO AMA EnduroCross Championship marked the series’ first stop in Northern California with KTM’s Taddy Blazusiak finding his way back to the top of the podium. He was joined by Monster Kawasaki’s Taylor Robert and GEICO Honda’s Kevin Rookstool. But it wasn’t an easy win for the typically dominant Blazusiak, who was beat to the first turn by Rookstool and then ran in third and second until the Honda rider crashed while leading. The ride of the night was put on by Robert, however, who started the race in last after a first-turn crash but then fought his way to a five-way battle for second between himself, Rookstool, Kawasaki’s Destry Abbott, Beta’s Cody

Wellard Group Holdings, a global agricultural distributor, has signed on as the jersey sponsor for the U.S. national team at the International Six Days Enduro in Saxony, Germany, Sept. 24-29. In addition to supplying team jerseys for each U.S. national team rider at the ISDE, Wellard will also be the title sponsor of a U.S. club team at the event. The riders on the Wellard Club Team will receive direct financial support to help cover expenses. Wellard Managing Director Mauro Balzarini has been involved with offroad racing for many years and was a multi-National Enduro Champion in his earlier riding career. Having completed six ISDEs himself—the last being at the extremely difficult 2006 event in Taupo, New Zealand—he knows what is required to compete at such a high level. “Motorcycle racing is one of our passions. It is based on courage and determination which also is part of our business ethos so we are pleased to put our support behind the U.S. team at this year’s ISDE,” Balzarini says. “We’re looking forward to not only a strong

Webb and KTM’s Mike Brown. With the win, Blazusiak took over the points lead ahead of Colton Haaker, Robert, Rookstool and Graffunder.

showing from the Wellard Club Team, but all riders racing for the United States this year in Saxony.” Germany will be the sixth appearance of a Wellard Team at the ISDE since 2007. In that time, they have taken three Australian teams, the first Australian Women’s ISDE team that earned a podium finish in Portugal, and two New Zealand teams.

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RACING

JR ADDISON WINS 2012 AMA DIRT TRACK HORIZON AWARD

Patrick Smage

SMAGE, WEBB SPLIT WINS AT AMA/NATC MOTOTRIAL OPENER Rivals Tied In Points

Patrick Smage and Cody Webb each claimed a win at rounds one and two of the SWM AMA/NATC National MotoTrials Series in hot and sunny southern California, leaving the two deadlocked atop the points standings as the 2012 series kicked into full swing. Saturday’s event also doubled as the 42nd edition of El Trial de Espana, and Smage took the early lead when Webb dropped an unfortunate five by touching a boundary marker in section two. The factory Beta rider seemed to lose his composure after that, finishing the 12-section first lap with five fives and a total of 22 marks. Meanwhile, Smage, riding for Sherco USA, managed to stay out of trouble and finished the lap with seven marks to take the early lead. Lap two was a big improvement for Webb, who turned in a card with seven marks, compared to Smage’s card, which totaled five. Smage still held a big advantage heading into the final lap, which would be held on four exhibition sections, giving the large crowd on hand a chance to see the top trials riders in the nation up close. Heading into the exhibition, Smage led with 12 points, followed by Webb with 29,

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Sherco’s Karl Davis Jr. with 54, Gas Gas USA’s Keith Wineland with 55, and another Sherco USA rider, rookie Pro Bryan Roper, with 57 marks. The exhibition did little to change the order, with Smage dropping just two points for his eight rides. Webb was one point back with three, giving Smage the overall win with a grand total of 14 points, while Webb took second with 32. Meanwhile, Wineland was able to gain enough ground on Davis to steal away the final spot on the podium, squeaking by Davis by just two points to claim third, while Roper ended the day in fifth. On Sunday, Webb roared back with a clean opening lap, serving notice that this year’s title chase was still very much up for grabs. The 2010 champ finished the second lap with a single mark, and finished the trial with a total of just two points after dropping one more point on the final lap. Smage, on the other hand, finished the day with a total of five points, going 1-4-0 over the three laps. Young Roper claimed his first podium finish with an impressive final score of 46 points, topping Colorado’s Wineland by 10 points for third place.—Shan Moore

To excel in the highest levels of motorsports competition, you need both speed and consistency on the track, as well as maturity and respect off it. At the 2012 AMA Dirt Track Grand Championships in Springfield, Ill., in late May, JR Addison from Bucyrus, Ohio, proved he had it all, winning the 2012 AMA Dirt Track Horizon Award. The 16-year-old Addison won AMA Grand Championships in the 450 Modified class and in the 251cc-Open Singles class. His individual discipline titles were in the two 450 Modified halfmile rounds, and on the mile and half mile in the 251-Open Singles class. “I’m speechless really,” Addison said following the anouncement. “I don’t know what to say. The mile was a good race, and the TT was good—I got a second and third. I was disappointed about the rain. I wanted to run the short track, but I was excited, too, because I like half miles, and it all worked out.” Additional honors at the AMA Dirt Track Grand Championships recognize other standout performances. Cody Chisham won the AMA Racing Fast Brain Award, which recognizes a rider whose speed on the track is matched by academic performance. The award was sponsored for the third straight year by AMA Motorcycle Hall of Famer Bill Werner and AMA Board Chairman Stan Simpson. The 2012 AMA Youth Dirt Track Rider of the Year was Tyler Scott from Emmaus, Pa. Thomas Englehart won the 2012 AMA Vet Dirt Track Rider of the Year award. For a list of all dirt track champions, see www.americanmotorcyclist.com/ racing. JR Addison

Photos Trials: Shan Moore; SuperBike: Brian J. Nelson

Dirt-Track Champions Crowned In Springfield


RACING

JOSH HAYES DOMINATES ELKHART LAKE SUPERBIKE WEEKEND Yamaha Rider Brings Home Maximum Points

Josh Hayes proved simply unstoppable at the Subway SuperBike Doubleheader in Elkhart Lake, Wis., on June 1-3. The performance was punctuated by his day two race that saw him power away from the field to claim the checkered flag in what can only be viewed as demoralizing fashion by his would-be challengers. The Monster Energy Graves Yamaha superstar owned Road America over the weekend, rounding off his maximum points haul with a conquering 13.906-second victory on Sunday afternoon. Hayes had nearly a full second advantage after the opening lap and then really closed out the hopes of his opponents with a string of laps in the 2:11s, including a 2:11.216, which stood more than a 10th of a second inside the track’s lap record that he established on Saturday morning. The flawless ride confirmed that

the Mississippian has taken a big step forward in his search for a third consecutive AMA Pro National Guard SuperBike title. The win on the second day of Elkhart Lake’s doubleheader was Hayes’ sixth this year, doubling his 2011 tally, and upping his career total to 23. “I don’t really know too much of what to say except the same things you always hear: A big thank you to an amazing crew,” he said after the race. “I have a great crew and a great motorcycle, and it allows me to just come here and focus on one thing and that’s riding my best.” Josh Hayes


HALL OF FAME

1980 MYSTERY SHIP Craig Vetter’s Limited Edition Streetbike The late 1970s were heady times for motorcycle innovator and now AMA Motorcycle Hall of Famer Craig Vetter. The man who had changed the motorcycling world with his line of Windjammer fairings in the ’70s sold that successful company in 1978, and moved on to other pursuits. That year, he sponsored two-time AMA Superbike Champion and current Hall of Famer Reg Pridmore on the roadrace circuit, and the combination resulted in a third straight title for Pridmore. But Vetter wasn’t just looking for a championship. He also used the team to develop

concepts for a project he called the Mystery Ship. The Mystery Ship would be a limitedproduction streetbike, or what Vetter referred to as “a streetable roadracer, with all the right parts.” To create the bike, Vetter took a stock Kawasaki KZ1000 and disassembled it. He removed all the unneeded tabs and brackets from the frame and welded on struts and gusseting to strengthen the structure. He also bolted on a box-section swingarm for strength and installed “laid-down” shocks for more travel and progressive action.

The wheels were magnesium Dymags, the hot ticket of the era. The gas tank held 6 gallons, the maximum allowed in AMA Superbike racing. Rearset pegs and a Yoshimura four-into-one pipe also showed the bike’s racing heritage. But what makes the Mystery Ship unique is the full bodywork, which is essentially just two pieces: the nose fairing and the body. Of course, all that hand-work didn’t come cheap. While a stock KZ1000 of the time cost $3,500, Vetter’s Mystery Ship was offered at $9,995. From the beginning, the bike was

Hall of Fame features the machines and people of the Motorcycle Hall of Fame in Pickerington, Ohio. The Hall of Fame is a 501(c)3 non-profit corporation that receives support from the AMA and from motorcycling enthusiasts. For info and directions, visit MotorcycleMuseum.org, or call (614) 856-2222.

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Photos T. Paul Miller Photography/www.tpaulmiller.com

planned for a limited production run. In the end, only 10 of these exclusive machines actually were built, each bearing its production number on the side number plates. This 1980 Mystery Ship is just one of the many remarkable machines that help tell the stories of the fascinating men and women of American motorcycling at the AMA Motorcycle Hall of Fame on the AMA campus in Pickerington, Ohio. Info: www.motorcyclemuseum.org.


HALL OF FAME Hall of Famer

RONNIE RALL Midwestern Dirt-Track Star

Ronnie Rall was one of the leading dirt-track racers from the Midwest during the 1960s. In that decade, the Ohio native won five AMA Nationals, including the famous Peoria TT. Rall’s best ranking in the AMA Grand National Championship was third in 1964. He won nationals on half-mile, short-track and TT circuits. He also won dozens of local and regional races during that time, and was regarded as one of the best “cushion” racers of his era. Born in Upper Sandusky, Ohio, on Dec. 29, 1938, Rall grew up on a farm. When he was about 10, the family bought a Cushman scooter that Rall learned to ride. Later he picked up a road model Jawa 250, and by the time he was 17 he’d stripped the Jawa and began to compete in local scrambles races at the Mansfield Motorcycle Clubgrounds. In 1957, Rall bought a new Triumph Tiger Cub and raced it in off-road scrambles and enduros. At about the same time, Rall also started getting his

first taste of flattrack racing and did well from the start. In 1960, Rall was sponsored by a local dealer who had just taken on the BSA line and agreed to get Rall a BSA Gold Star at cost. Rall did well in his first pro race in Lawrenceburg, Ind., finishing in the top five and winning $29, which more than paid for his trip. His pro career was off and running. Rall turned expert two years later. In his first season in the nationals, he showed great promise by taking three podium finishes as a rookie expert. He finished the season ranked fourth in the nation. In 1963, Rall got his first national win on the half-mile in Heidelberg, Pa. In 1964, Rall chased the series in earnest and finished the year ranked third. That same year Rall won the Peoria TT national in the lightweight division. Despite a limited schedule of nationals, Rall still managed to put together strong

showings. In 1968, he won the national on the half-mile in Livonia, Mich., and in 1969 he earned his biggest paycheck by winning the season opener—the Houston Short Track. That was Rall’s final AMA national win. By the early 1970s, Rall was getting deeper into his newfound hobby of flying. His final AMA National came in 1973, but he continued to race locally throughout most of the 1970s. Ronnie Rall was inducted into the AMA Motorcycle Hall of Fame in 2001. To read more about Motorcycle Hall of Famers, see www.motorcyclemuseum.org.

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Now Available Free To AMA Members Get your full-color copy of the all-new AMA Member Benefits Guide online at AmericanMotorcyclist.com > Members and make sure to check out some of these featured benefits.

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Motorcycle Shipping Ride Where You Want In the United States, call Federal Companies, an agent for Allied Van Lines, at (877) 518-7376 for at least $60 off standard rates. For international shipments, call Motorcycle Express at (800) 2458726. To get your discount, be sure to have your AMA number handy. Motorcycle Express also offers temporary international insurance. Car Rentals Save Money When You Drive Get up to 25 percent off prevailing rates at any Avis or Budget car rental agency. For Avis, enter discount code: D388100. For Budget, enter code: Z942000. AMA Gear Buy AMA Stuff Online Find unique patches, pins, posters, T-shirts and books at AmericanMotorcyclist.com and at the AMA Motorcycle Hall of Fame in Pickerington, Ohio. Details at MotorcycleMuseum.org.

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MEMBERS ONLY DISCOUNT CODES


CRAIG VETTER

Motorcycling’s Most Free-Thinking Inventor By James Holter

What Makes Craig Vetter Tick?

Find out first-hand at AMA Vintage Motorcycle Days this July 20-22 at Mid-Ohio Sports Car Course in Lexington, Ohio, where AMA Motorcycle Hall of Famer Craig Vetter will be honored as grand marshal.


C

raig Vetter’s first motorcycle was a practical, basic machine: a 1944 Cushman Airborne scooter. Given to him by his father in 1956 when his family lived near Rantoul, Ill., the future AMA Motorcycle Hall of Famer did what any Midwestern teenager would do when given a motorcycle: He rode it. “This was rural America in the 1950s,” Vetter explains. “There were no licenses, no rules. We lived out in the country, and I just roamed the Illinois countryside on my Cushman.” And he also modified it.

August 2012

Photos Portrait: Brad Wenner; Archive photo: Courtesy of Craig Vetter

“An Airborne is a bare-framed Cushman,” he says. “There’s no structure around it. There’s no bodywork. I was thinking I should put some type of neat bodywork on it. That’s when I got some chicken wire out and papier-mâché and put it on my Cushman, and of course it didn’t work.” The family moved—Vetter’s father was in the Air Force—and the Cushman stayed, sold with most of the family’s possessions, but Vetter’s passion for design took root. Vetter graduated from high school in 1960 in Anchorage, Alaska. His first stop was an appointment to the Air Force Academy later that year, and he was initially thrilled. But he quickly found out that the Air Force was not where “they made all these little vertical take-off machines. It was where they made pilots.” After that false start, Vetter enrolled at the University of Illinois to pursue engineering and then faced his second disappointment: “I found out that I couldn’t do differential equations.” Disillusioned and adrift, Vetter was walking through the student union one day when he passed an exhibit that re-focused his innovative energies. “There was a display of little machines—cars, scooters, products,” he remembers. “It was industrial design. It wasn’t engineering. It wasn’t homemaking. It wasn’t football. It was its own field of study with its own curriculum. So, I skipped one of my classes and went to listen to the professor, Ed Zagorski. He was showing students how to draw designs and it was wonderful. It was a combination of art, engineering, mechanics and dreams. My life changed instantly.” Vetter had found his creative outlet. His philosophy was shaped by the influence of a well-known contemporary inventor of the day. “Buckminster Fuller was the designer’s designer, the inventor’s inventor, the dreamer’s dreamer,” Vetter says

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of his role model. “Buckminster Fuller—I would follow him around in the 1960s when he spoke and call him up at night asking questions. He said that you don’t have to fear the future if you do more with less.” Most designers are obsessed with style, with horsepower, with bling. Not Vetter. His obsession is practicality: doing more with less. For his entire career, from his first homemade fiberglass fairing in 1966, to the sale of his company in 1978, to his freelance design projects since, Vetter has chased the functionality embodied by his first motorcycle, that simple Cushman scooter. That drive has shaped the designs of a man who created one of motorcycling’s most iconic products and re-set the path of touring motorcycle design.

Riding Better

Vetter could have tried to improve other machines—and has— but his primary focus has always been on motorcycles. “Motorcycles were easy because motorcycles already do more with less,” Vetter says. “My Yamaha 305 got 40 miles per gallon in an era when cars got 12 mpg. The common thread of all my work was to make motorcycling better.” And it started with that Yamaha. In October-November 1966, Vetter built his first fairing using fiberglass construction. It worked and looked cool. His brother wanted one, then a friend. “By Christmas 1966, I sold my first fairing to some guy in Peoria, and we had a business,” Vetter says. That fairing became the basis for what Vetter called the Series 1000. It was a small-scale hit, and he branched out. In addition to the Series 1000, designed for mid-sized Japanese standards, there was the Series 800, designed for smaller machines such as Bridgestone 175s; the Series 500 (later, the Phantom), which introduced curvature around the headlight and eliminated lowers; and the much larger Series 1700, for Honda CB750s. He also developed the Series 2500 for slash-5 BMWs. “The first fairings were works of art,” Vetter says. “They were

Windjammer: Craig Vetter invents the Windjammer fairing, a product that would change touring motorcycling in America.

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marvels of simplicity. They were extraordinarily good. But they were bad product. They were good fairings. They were a delight to your eye, but they were bad product.” Vetter says the fairings lacked commercial viability. They all suffered from the same logistical flaws. Indeed, these products that were designed with practicality in mind were impractical in terms of production, storage and shipping. “You couldn’t ship them,” Vetter says. “They were specific. Each one only fit one bike. I had to make to order. One day in the fall of 1970, the season when nobody bought a fairing, I looked up and hanging from my workshop was one of everything I sold—five different designs in black and white, 10 different fairings. At first, I thought, ‘Boy, this is great. I can see all of everything I make.’ Then I thought, ‘This is terrible. A dealer will never be able to stock all of these things.’” So, Vetter went back to his drafting table, and he returned with the Windjammer. “I set out to design a better fairing and a good product,” Vetter says. “What’s a good product? A good product is one that you can ship. A good product is one that you can install quickly. A good product is a fairing that will fit every motorcycle. A good product has a catchy name. “The Windjammer was all of those things,” he says. “It was a good fairing and a good product. I knew it on my first ride in early 1971. Before my first ride, I knew it.”

What’s In A Name?

No question, the Windjammer is what etched Vetter’s name in motorcycling history. Vetter, who sold a few thousand units of his first-generation fairings from 1966 to 1971, had sold about 10,000 Windjammer fairings by 1973. Retailing for about $150, they provided the capital for Vetter to expand, and he did, introducing the Windjammer II. Different in one major way—it was constructed from ABS plastic

Photos Portrait: Brad Wenner; Archive photos: Courtesy of Craig Vetter

Series 1000: Craig Vetter’s first fairing, on the sketch pad, in the studio and on the road.


rather than fiberglass—the Windjammer II was easier to build, less brittle, and had a number of rider-friendly features, such as reflectors, compartments and accessory power. Vetter sold roughly 30,000 Windjammer IIs in two years. His business had grown to employ 50 people. The 1970s were a stupendous decade for motorcycling. Innovation and advancement were everpresent, led by the big four Japanese manufacturers. In 1975, Honda introduced the Gold Wing, a motorcycle that would become the standard by which all other touring motorcycles were judged, but it was lacking one convenience sought by long-distance riders: a fairing. Vetter recognized the opportunity and rolled out the Windjammer III. By 1977, when production stopped, about 150,000 Windjammer IIIs had been made. That year, Vetter again upped the ante with the Windjammer SS. It included leadingedge turn signals, an onboard headlight adjuster and options that included Fiamm dual horns. Over the next three years, 200,000 Windjammer SS fairings saw production.

Hurricane: A production 1973 Triumph X75 Hurricane. It was based on a BSA Rocket III. It looked nothing like it.

Breaking Barriers

While Vetter’s fairings arguably reshaped the touring motorcycle profile for perpetuity, they were a small part of his output. “At the end of 1968, I wanted to put my design skills to work on a complete motorcycle,” he says. “I had always been a sucker for the biggest two-strokes you could buy, and Suzuki just came out with this big 500cc twin, and I decided it would be what I used to show my full design talents to the world.” Vetter says he “took off everything” and put on this “zoomy fiberglass bodywork.” It was a seat/tank/fender assembly that integrated three major components of motorcycle functionality. In 1970, he rode the bike to Daytona, parked in the infield and invited representatives from the major motorcycle manufacturers in attendance to notice his design. It worked, and a few weeks later he got a call from the head of the U.S. importer for Triumphs and BSAs, Don Brown. “Brown said they had a problem—nobody wanted the Rocket III,” Vetter remembers. “Brown wanted to talk.” So, they talked, and Vetter visited the company’s offices in New Jersey. Brown was convinced and, without getting the approval of Triumph headquarters in Britain, hired Vetter to redesign the BSA 750 Rocket III as a product intended solely for the American motorcycle market. Vetter’s Rocket III was nothing like BSA’s three-cylinder answer to the Honda 750. It was streamlined and trim, and boasted a flowing motif from the flared-out redesigned exhaust to the re-imagined lines that suggested motion even while the machine sat still and, notably, accentuated rather than obstructed the motorcycle’s defining vertical three-cylinder powerplant. The design did see production, but not as a BSA. Triumph took over the BSA name, and Vetter’s machine was sold as the limited-edition

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Triumph X75 Hurricane. About 1,000 Hurricanes were built. The Hurricane wasn’t the pinnacle of Vetter’s motorcycle design, however. Many believe that distinction belongs to Vetter’s Mystery Ship. Built from lessons learned during Vetter’s sponsorship of Superbike racer Reg Pridmore in 1978, the Mystery Ship was a modern café bike. It was a limited-run, street-legal sportbike that encapsulated much of Vetter’s streamlined design philosophies with top-shelf performance (for more on the Mystery Ship, see page 36).

Fuel Economy: In 1980, Craig Vetter introduced competitive fuel-economy runs to motorcycling. Now, the events are back, but with slight twists that emphasize function as much as saving gasoline.

Moving On

By the time Vetter had developed the Mystery Ship, his company had grown to 500 employees. Business was strong, but Vetter was ready to move on. He sold it in 1978. “Selling the company was the greatest thing that I could have ever done,” he says. “I was 36, and it was time to do something else. I had done everything that I could think of for motorcycles. I even married the prettiest girl in the company, and it was time to do other things—have kids and play at design.” Plus, Vetter admits, the motorcycle industry wasn’t moving in the direction that he thought it should go. Bigger bikes were taking over. Horsepower was king. Motorcycle design was pushing the limits of performance but in the process, it was losing efficiency. In Vetter’s opinion, motorcycles were doing less with more. “Bigger bikes grew my company, but I didn’t like it,” Vetter says. “I didn’t like big bikes. Well, then, what’s the point? I was no longer doing more with less. I lost interest.” Freed from the constraints of operating a business, Vetter would focus on whatever he wanted to do. And he focused on a lot— designs and ideas that impacted numerous areas of lifestyle and industry—but his orbit remained firmly fixed around motorcycles. His goal became the discovery of the minimum amount of energy it takes to propel a person down the road at 55 miles per hour. “I made a streamlined 250cc single,” he says. “I incorporated everything I knew about streamlining. It was lightweight, it was sleek, and it would get a constant 100 miles per gallon in a world of 55 miles per hour. I invited other people to challenge me.” The challenges became the AMA-sanctioned Craig Vetter Fuel Economy Contests. They ran from 1980 to 1985, and it didn’t take long for other people to beat Vetter. In five years, competitors were getting more than 470 mpg on real roads under real-world conditions. Now, a quarter-century later, the fuel-economy runs are back. Reborn as the Vetter Fuel Economy Challenges, Vetter will hold his fifth challenge at AMA Vintage Motorcycle Days in Lexington, Ohio, where he will also serve as the event’s grand marshal. The goals of the current challenges are the same: do more with

Craig Vetter rides at Woody Creek Raceway outside of Aspen, Colo., in 1975 on his Rickman-framed Kawasaki.

less. But they are even more focused on function. “I do not want to end up with museum queens,” Vetter says. “I want to end up with something that could change motorcycles, and our rules are written for that. You have to be able to go 70 miles per hour in a 30-mile-per-hour headwind. You also must sit up and be comfortable. The machine has to be your first choice in the garage. You have to be able to carry four bags of groceries.” Vetter has designed a personal machine that embodies these qualities. The original rendition featured distinctive bright-yellow panels riveted into an oval-shaped fairing. Now, the fairing is hand-formed from aluminum, but the goals are the same, as is Vetter’s challenge: He wants others to beat him at his own game. “Last year, I was fifth place in my own contest, and I’ll probably do the same or worse this year, but that’s OK,” he says. “We’re bringing attention to the upper-end of what is possible with a motorcycle that you really want to use.” Vetter insists his inventing “was never about the money.” It was about feeding the same passion that he imagined also drove his

Craig Vetter: Motorcycle Racer Craig Vetter believed in learning through experience. And, he says, riding was not enough. He wanted to develop the perspective that would come from competition. “I did a lot of riding,” Vetter says. “I rode to Colorado from Illinois, to California two or three times I year. I knew the problems that touring motorcyclists faced. I would test things and know when I got wet and when I didn’t get wet, what broke, and I would fix it. “However,” Vetter adds, “I always suspected that if I would roadrace, that I would know things that other designers didn’t


Photos Portrait: Brad Wenner; Archive photo: Courtesy of Craig Vetter; Aspen: Shelly Stallings

heroes: car, motorcycle and airplane inventors. “They were the people who made America what it is,” Vetter says. “They were the people who thought of what they wanted to make, and they made it.” And as they made things, they learned and evolved, which Vetter himself has done. It’s an evolution represented by the slightbut-distinct differences in his economy runs of the 1980s and today. Then, it was about burning the least fuel, not necessarily with function in mind. Today, the emphasis is not just on operating the motorcycle efficiently, but using the motorcycle well.

know, and I would be better for it.” So, Vetter raced. In 1974, he purchased an Aermacchi frame and a Yamaha YZ250 engine. He put the engine in the frame and took it to the amateur roadrace in Daytona in 1975. Riding the motorcycle for the first time that day, he raced it to fifth place in the 250cc amateur class. “I thought it was fun,” Vetter says. “But I still needed to learn more about racing. Bob Braverman, the editor of Modern Cycle magazine, told me he could teach me to roadrace.” Braverman, who was inducted in the AMA Motorcycle Hall of Fame in 2000, did just that, and Vetter was making plans to continue his assault on amateur roadracing when two other Hall of Famers, Derek and Don Rickman,

“Buckminster Fuller missed something,” Vetter says. “The reason the bikes of the first contests didn’t change the world is that it is not enough to ‘do more with less.’ You have to live better on less energy. That can change things.” Vetter and his wife Carol have generously donated large portions of Vetter’s collection to the AMA Motorcycle Hall of Fame. To see many of the unique items from Vetter’s history, visit the museum, which sits on the AMA campus in Pickerington, Ohio. More info is available at www.motorcyclemuseum.org.

contacted Vetter about distributing their racing frames in the United States. “When Rickman came over, I told him what I was doing, racing the Aermacchi, and he said, you shouldn’t be racing that. You would be much better off racing one of my Rickman frames, and if you do it, I’ll send you some special, one-off parts for it,” Vetter remembers. So, Vetter started racing a Kawasakipowered Rickman. The sleek machine was not only stunning, but it was fast, with an engine built by yet another Hall of Famer, Russ Collins, the champion dragracer and engine developer. “I sent it to Russ Collins and told him to make it as big and as fast as he could,” Vetter says. “It was big, and it was fast. It scared me. I got third in

Daytona on that motorcycle.” Vetter ultimately decided the Rickmanframed racer was too fast and he downsized to a Yamaha RD350 and started racing the stock class. It was that bike, however, that ended Vetter’s racing career. “I was riding at Road Atlanta and coming up on these guys, and they didn’t know I was behind them and how fast I was coming, and when I caught them, I had nowhere to go,” Vetter says. “I went off the inside and destroyed my motorcycle and myself and that was the end of my racing.” But the lessons learned from competition were not lost on Vetter, and formed the foundation of what would become a new chapter in his life. August 2012

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THINGS NEW RIDERS SHOULD KNOW

(And Experienced Riders Shouldn’t Forget)

R

iding a motorcycle is a big decision, and one that motorcyclists arrive at in a number of ways.

Some of us started on dirtbikes. Others may have spent years as a passenger and decided it’s time to get behind the controls. Many are simply drawn to the freedom, fun and practicality offered by transporting themselves on two wheels. Regardless of the path you take to riding, a number of decisions can make or break your experience. Motorcycling can be a relatively inexpensive (even moneysaving) hobby, or it can lead you into unforgettably expensive mistakes. These tips come from the collective wisdom of numerous longtime riders, who between them have millions of miles on the road. Intended for new street riders, they are also good as a refresher for experienced riders and as an outline for advice when new riders inevitably ask for help.

3Get Trained. Be legal: get licensed. Studies show that unlicensed riders are more likely to be involved in a crash. Does a motorcycle endorsement on the piece of plastic in your wallet make your riding skills sharper? Of course not. Although there’s certainly something to be said for being able to prove you have the skills to pass the licensing exam, a bigger reason licensed riders are less likely to crash is because of their attitude. Riders who take motorcycling seriously, ride legally and sober, and try to continuously improve their riding skills are more likely to have long and happy riding careers. It’s about attitude.

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Your passenger can wait.

Tom Bear Photography

Learn to ride solo well before even thinking of taking someone else along for the ride.

Grogan Studios

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Whether you could leap your dirtbike over 60-foot doubles as a kid or can barely wobble a bicycle across the parking lot today, you need training before you head out on the street. The risks and considerations of riding in traffic are distinctly different from riding offroad—and have serious implications. And, get this: Your best friend or spouse probably isn’t your best teacher. Familiarity removes borders, and emotions fuel reactions that don’t necessarily create an ideal learning experience. Don’t end up like the woman whose rider training lasted the length of the parking lot. That’s how far she got before her boyfriend got nervous and yelled at her, which sparked an argument that drove her from riding forever. Often, it’s easier to learn from a professional instructor than from even the bestintentioned friend or relative. Fortunately, the Motorcycle Safety Foundation offers a course specifically designed to take you from zero riding experience to a license-ready motorcyclist in one weekend: the Basic Rider Course. In fact, in many states, passing the course qualifies you for a motorcycle endorsement on your driver’s license. Also, many insurance companies offer discounts if you’ve passed the course.

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Don’t be afraid of the front brake. Learning the proper use of

this important control will make slowing and stopping much more manageable.

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Spin your own wrenches.

You’ll be shocked at how well you’ll come to know your bike.

Ask questions. There’s no such thing as a stupid question.

If you can’t fix it yourself,

find a trustworthy mechanic and local

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AmericanMotorcyclist.com

shop for your motorcycle maintenance.

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Check tire pressures. It matters. Really.

Want to ride off-road? The MSF has a course designed to help you with that, too. Even if you never stray from the pavement, having experience in a low-traction environment will improve your skills and make you a better rider. Some of the world’s best asphalt riders got started in the dirt. Learn more at www. dirtbikeschool.com.


17Your Dream Bike Shouldn’t Be Your First Bike.

When you’re just getting started, it’s easy to get caught up in the allure of the machine itself. Your friend has a Harley so you have to have a Harley. You saw the Ducati gleaming in the sun and now you can’t get the color red out of your mind. You saw AMA Superbike Champ Josh Hayes dragging a knee at Road Atlanta and you’re convinced a Yamaha R-1 is the only bike for you. Don’t get us wrong. Dreaming is a great exercise. Experienced riders can waste hours talking about how great this bike is, or how much we’d love to own that one, or why this other one is more beautiful, more desirable, etc. And yet, the best bike for you to start on is probably one that would never inspire lust. While you may be tempted to buy the bike of your dreams, you’re probably best off buying a smaller, less-expensive used motorcycle that’s mechanically sound. Lame advice? Hear us out. There are at least three good reasons to start with an inexpensive used bike: You’re going to drop it. And if you drop your dream bike, you’re going to cry. And incur bills. Hey, it’s nothing personal. Take it from experience: It’s easier to stomach the results when you’re less emotionally (and financially) attached to a bike that’s smacking the pavement.

Jeff Kardas

You can still get your dream bike. Once you have some experience and have refined your idea of what you want in a motorcycle, you’ll be better able to choose the one that’s right for a long-term relationship. Plus, you can sell the inexpensive learner bike, probably for about what you paid for it, to another aspiring rider.

When you ride with others, know them, or at least

their experience level. It’s better to ride with those whose skills you respect.

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Go for a ride without a destination. Seek the advice of other area riders. There’s something

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When changing lanes or pulling into a cross street

when the light turns green always— always!—perform a head check.

with both brakes and practice, practice, practice…

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Ride like you’re invisible

because, to a distracted driver, you already are.

to be said for local knowledge. Talk to area riders at bike shops and events. What you learn may surprise you.

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Riding is important, but stopping is more important. Learn to brake properly

Scan the road and terrain aggressively. Know what’s

the limits of the riding environment.

Ride at your own pace. If

you need to explore limits, attend a track day.

Ride your own ride, don’t just follow (or mimic) the leader.

Find a local dealer you trust and make him or her your friend. Reliable dealers can be a

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Don’t ignore the virtual world. The wealth of information

available on motorcycle forums is astounding. Take advantage of it.

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Look where you want to go.

going on around you at all times.

On every ride, know your limits, the limits of your bike and

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new rider’s most valuable resource.

Jeff Kardas

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Harley-Davidson

What you think you want now may not be what you really want later. Only after you’ve ridden for a while will you know whether what you really love is riding across three states on a weeklong tour or riding three miles to your local bike-night hangout. Buying an expensive new bike today and selling it a year from now (when you realize it’s not for you) is a great way to take a big financial hit.

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Never ride complacently,

and don’t implicitly trust any other road users. If a car is waiting at the intersection of a side street, assume the driver will pull out in front of you, even if he or she is looking directly at you.

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Compromising on your first bike doesn’t mean getting something you don’t want. Even if it’s not the coolest bike on

the road, it should still be cool.

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Drink plenty of water when you ride.

Think about your best lane position. Try to maximize

your visibility to other road users while giving yourself an escape route.

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Comfort matters. If your gear is comfortable, you’ll wear it. Plus, when you are comfortable, you are relaxed, and when you are relaxed, you are in control.

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unpleasantness of dropping your bike. What if your body hits the ground? Will you be prepared? The AMA strongly encourages voluntary helmet use as well as a full complement of protective apparel. As far as the law goes, some states don’t require helmets for adults but may require them for riders with less than a year of experience. You can find your state’s requirements on the States Laws page at www. americanmotorcyclist.com/rights. In addition to a helmet, you’ll also want gloves, over-the-ankle boots, a jacket and pants specifically made for riding. Gearing up right doesn’t have to be expensive. Your local dealer almost certainly will have a closeout rack of non-current styles.

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lot.

Read about motorcycles and riding techniques. A Make training a lifelong goal. Never stop learning.

When you group ride, consider the safety of others in your group to be your responsibility. This applies whether or not you are the group leader. No one should be along just for the ride.

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Listen to your body. If it wants to stop, stop. If it wants to ride, ride.

Ride loose and relaxed.

Riding a slow bike well is way more fun than riding a fast bike poorly.

to safe riding.

Ride smooth.

Good suspension doesn’t always require an expensive revalve job. Make sure

the fluids are fresh, the seals are good, the springs are the right rate for your weight and the sag is set. For customization, you can usually achieve your goals with your bike’s stock compression and rebound adjustments. Read the manual.

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Bigger isn’t always better. Small bikes are fun, and

often they’re a better tool for the job.

Take time to adjust your controls. Position the levers

where you want them, and make sure you can get the toe of your boot comfortably under the shifter lever. Don’t forget the brake pedal—make sure it’s low enough that you’re not unintentionally dragging it with your toe when you’re riding.

Drinking alcohol? Never a good idea if you’re riding.

We don’t care what they charge for truly waterproof riding gear—it’s worth twice that. While as a new

rider you may not intend to ride in unfavorable weather, you should always be prepared. Rain gear made specifically for motorcycling is a great value and will keep you comfortable and safer when the weather turns foul.

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Be prepared (but not too prepared). You’ll want to

carry the tools and emergency supplies that you’re most likely to need, but you don’t need to overdo it. Leave the spare transmission at home.

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Know the signs of hypothermia.

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Don’t ride on an empty stomach.

Always dress for the crash, even when riding to the corner store. Murphy’s Law

doesn’t care if you’re riding for 2 miles or 200.

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Wear earplugs.

Buy the best riding gear you can afford.

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Spend (or set aside) money for standard maintenance before you buy a lot of expensive aftermarket add-ons.

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Buy a bike on which, when seated, you can comfortably touch the ground with both feet.

50Don’t Ride Alone.

Of course you can, if you want, but for most people, motorcycling is a social activity. Riding with responsible, experienced riders can make you a safer motorcyclist and can help you improve your skills and technique. And, above all that, it’s fun. How do you find like-minded riders? At www.americanmotorcyclist.com, you can find an AMA-chartered club in your area or search our database of thousands of AMAsanctioned events across the country. For many riders, AMA events, whether dual-sport rides, adventure rides, poker runs, rallies, or one of the dozens of other types of rides we sanction, are the highlights of their seasons. Hopefully, you’ll become hooked on motorcycling like the rest of us, and not only stay active on two wheels but remain a member of the AMA—not just to support the rides you’ll love but to help protect your right to ride (and race) for decades to come. Mosca Photo

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Proper suspension setup and fresh tires are essential

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Jeff Kardas

Photos: Earplugs: ©iStockphoto.com/Joe Belanger; Hydration Pack: ©iStockphoto.com/Eliza Snow; Tire Gauge: ©iStockphoto.com/James McQuillan

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Get The Gear. We’ve mentioned the


A few of the hundreds of AMA-sanctioned events this month, detailed on the following pages.

GO RIDE

7 3 2

5 1 6

4 4 3

3 July 20-22, 2012 Lexington, Ohio

7 July 26-29, 2012 Carson City, Nev.

November 16-17, 2012 Las Vegas, Nev.

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Who better to host an AMA National Gypsy Tour in Sturgis, S.D., than the famed Jackpine Gypsies Motorcycle Club? The Sturgis Gypsy Tour is set for Aug. 9 and promises to be a rockin’ good time. Info: www. jackpinegypsies.com.

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The high-flying racers in the AMA Motocross National Championship Series will be in Southwick, Mass., on Aug. 11 and at Unadilla in New Berlin, N.Y., on Aug. 18. For the full schedule, see page 53.

5

The AMA West Hare Scrambles National Championship Series wraps up its season with youth competition on Aug. 25 and amateur action on Aug. 26 in Big Sky, Mont. Info: www.bigskyxc.com.

You won’t want to miss the Sound RIDER! Rally in the Gorge that will be held Aug. 1-5 in Stephenson, Wash. This AMA National Touring Rally incorporates four mini-rallies: Sportbike Northwest, Sport Touring Northwest, Dualsport Northwest and Maxi Scoot Northwest. Info: www.soundrider.com/rally.

3

The all-American sport of dirt-track racing takes center stage around the country this month when the AMA Pro Grand National Championship Series visits Castle Rock, Wash., for a TT on Aug. 4, Peoria, Ill., or the famed Peoria TT on Aug. 12 and the equally famous Indy Mile in Indianapolis on Aug. 18. For the full schedule, see page 53.

6

The fastest racers on the planet will be at it once again at the AMA Racing Land Speed Grand Championships— BUB Motorcycle Speed Trials Aug. 25-30 at the Bonneville Salt Flats near Wendover, Utah. Info: www.bubspeedtrials.com.

7

The Three Flags Classic Grand Tour will be held in El Paso, Texas, Aug. 30-Sept. 4, hosted by the Southern California Motorcycle Association. Info: www.sc-ma.com.

COMING UP Want to ride with AMA Motorcycle Hall of Fame off-road and desert racers Malcolm Smith, J.N. Roberts and Larry Roeseler? Just sign up for the Rocky Mountain Road Trip 2012 that is set for Sept. 13-16 at Roberts’ 1,400-acre ranch in Helena, Mont. But you better hurry—this AMA-sanctioned charity ride is limited to 30 riders. Info: www. racingforlife.org. It’s not too early to start planning for one of the greatest motorcycling events of the year: the AMA Legends Weekend Nov. 16-17 at the Red Rock Casino, Resort and Spa in Las Vegas, Nev. The gala features the AMA Motorcycle Hall of Fame Induction Ceremony and showcases Hall of Fame Legends Malcolm Smith and Mert Lawwill. Info: www.motorcyclemuseum.org.

August 2012

49


AUGUST EVENTS ARIZONA COMPETITION OBSERVED TRIALS AUG 12: KINGMAN: CENTRAL ARIZONA TRIALS INC, (602) 840-3640, CAT.ORG CALIFORNIA RECREATIONAL DUAL SPORT - OFF ROAD AUG 4: BIG BEAR CITY: BIG BEAR TRAIL RIDERS CLUB, (818) 391-3031, BIGBEARTRAILRIDERS.COM DUAL SPORT RIDE AUG 4: BIG BEAR CITY: BIG BEAR TRAIL RIDERS CLUB, (818) 391-3031, BIGBEARTRAILRIDERS.COM DUAL SPORT - OFF ROAD AUG 25: BERRY CREEK: 2 DAY EVENT, IRONMAN DUAL SPORT, (530) 6806019, IRONMANDUALSPORT.COM DUAL SPORT RIDE AUG 25: BERRY CREEK: 2 DAY EVENT, IRONMAN DUAL SPORT, (530) 6806019, IRONMANDUALSPORT.COM GRAND TOUR AUG 30: NORWALK: SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA MOTORCYCLING ASSN, (760) 954-9054, SC-MA.COM POKER RUN AUG 5: SAN JOSE: SAN JOSE DONS MOTORCYCLE CLUB, (408) 509-6396, SANJOSEDONSMC.COM ROAD RALLY AUG 6: EUREKA: SPYDER RYDER OF AMERICA, AUG 31: ECHO LAKES: DISTRICT 36, ROAD RIDING DIVISION, (530) 659-7539 COMPETITION MOTOCROSS AUG 11: (Includes ATVs) ADELANTO: ROVERS MC, (661) 252-6392, AMASOCALMOTORCROSS.COM AUG 12: (Includes ATVs) ADELANTO: AMA-DIST 37 SPORTS COMM, (760) 220-6575, AMASOCALMOTOCROSS. COM SPEEDWAY AUG 3: AUBURN: FAST FRIDAYS SPEEDWAY, (530) 878-RACE, FASTFRIDAYS.COM AUG 10: AUBURN: FAST FRIDAYS SPEEDWAY, (530) 878-RACE, FASTFRIDAYS.COM AUG 17: AUBURN: FAST FRIDAYS SPEEDWAY, (530) 878-RACE, FASTFRIDAYS.COM AUG 24: AUBURN: FAST FRIDAYS SPEEDWAY, (530) 878-RACE, FASTFRIDAYS.COM AUG 31: AUBURN: FAST FRIDAYS SPEEDWAY, (530) 878-RACE, FASTFRIDAYS.COM SHORT TRACK AUG 11: (Includes ATVs) LODI: LODI MOTORCYCLE CLUB, (209) 368-7182, LODICYCLEBOWL.COM TTS AUG 25: (Includes ATVs) LODI: LODI MOTORCYCLE CLUB, (209) 368-7182, LODICYCLEBOWL.COM COLORADO

AUG 2: SILVERTON: ROCKY MOUNTAIN ADVENTURE RIDERS, (719) 510-7160, RMARIDERS.ORG DUAL SPORT - OFF ROAD AUG 4: WALDEN: 2 DAY EVENT, FRONT RANGE RIDERS, FRONTRANGERIDERS.COM DUAL SPORT RIDE AUG 4: WALDEN: 2 DAY EVENT, FRONT RANGE RIDERS, , FRONTRANGERIDERS.COM DUAL SPORT - OFF ROAD AUG 10: SALIDA: EXIT TOURS LTD, (281) 686-8625, COLORADODUALSPORT.COM DUAL SPORT RIDE AUG 10: SALIDA: EXIT TOURS LTD, (281) 686-8625, COLORADODUALSPORT.COM DUAL SPORT - OFF ROAD AUG 26: SOUTH FORK: SIDEWINDERS MC, (210) 861-4993, COLORADOTPA. ORG DUAL SPORT RIDE AUG 26: SOUTH FORK: SIDEWINDERS MC, (210) 861-4993, COLORADOTPA. ORG COMPETITION MOTOCROSS AUG 12: DACONO: IMI MOTORSPORTS INC, (303) 833-4949, IMIMOTORSPORTS.COM AUG 19: MILLIKEN: TWO RIVERS RACING LLC, (970) 587-5770

AUG 17: (Includes ATVs) PECATONICA: PRO SHOW INC, (815) 275-6686, STATELINEMX.COM AUG 19: (Includes ATVs) BYRON : MOTOSPORTS ENTERPRISES LTD, (815) 234-2271, MOTOBYRON.COM AUG 26: (Includes ATVs) BYRON : MOTOSPORTS ENTERPRISES LTD, (815) 234-2271, MOTOBYRON.COM OBSERVED TRIALS AUG 26: OTTAWA: VARIETY RIDERS MOTORCYCLE CLUB INC, (815) 4343669, VARIETYRIDERS.COM SHORT TRACK AUG 31: SPRINGFIELD: ILLINOIS MOTORCYCLE DEALERS ASSOCIATION, (217) 753-8866, ILLINOISMDA.COM TTS AUG 26: BARTONVILLE: PEORIA MOTORCYCLE CLUB INC, (309) 6974981, PEORIATT.NET

DUAL SPORT RIDE

AUG 26: KOKOMO: MIDNIGHT RIDERS MC, (765) 452-7654, MIDNIGHTRIDERS-MC.COM ENDURO

AUG 9: BLAIRSVILLE: TEAMSTRANGE AIRHEADS, (678) 293-5275, TEAMSTRANGE.COM

AUG 11: ROSE LAWN: HILL AND GULLY RIDERS ENDURO TEAM, (708) 424-1969

AUG 4: (Includes ATVs) PETERSBURG: PEKIN MOTORCYCLE, , PEKINMOTORCYCLECLUB.COM HILLCLIMB AUG 11: WHITE CITY: CAHOKIA CREEK DIRT RIDERS, (618) 946-4316, CCDIRT. COM HARE SCRAMBLES AUG 11: (ATV only) ALTON: SPLINTER CREEK DIRT RIDERS INC, (618) 3724355, SPLINTERCREEK.COM AUG 12: ALTON: SPLINTER CREEK DIRT RIDERS INC, (618) 372-4355, SPLINTERCREEK.COM

DUAL SPORT - OFF ROAD

AUG 4: (Includes ATVs) PECATONICA: PRO SHOW INC, (815) 275-6686, STATELINEMX.COM AUG 5: (Includes ATVs) BYRON:

HARE SCRAMBLES AUG 4: FREMONT: 2 DAY EVENT, TURKEY SCRATCH ENDURO RIDERS, (641) 660-1326

AUG 11: (Includes ATVs) MONTEZUMA: FV MOTO X, (641) 623-3456, FVMOTOX.COM

AUG 11: COLUMBUS: 2 DAY EVENT, STONEY LONESOME M/C, (812) 3439772, STONEYLONESOMEMC.COM

ROAD RALLY

1/2 MILE DIRT TRACK

IOWA COMPETITION

DUAL SPORT - OFF ROAD

COMPETITION

COMPETITION

AUG 26: (Includes ATVs) LAOTTO: G & S RACING, (260) 637-5416, GANDSRACING.COM

AUG 4: (Includes ATVs) CEDAR RAPIDS: CEDAR VALLEY TRAIL RIDERS INC, (319) 363-7800, CVTR.ORG

RECREATIONAL

AUG 12: (Includes ATVs) OTTAWA: VARIETY RIDERS MOTORCYCLE CLUB INC, (815) 434-3669, VARIETYRIDERS. COM

AUG 25: (Includes ATVs) LAOTTO: G & S RACING, (260) 637-5416, GANDSRACING.COM

MOTOCROSS

AUG 3: CORYDON: MOTORCYCLE SPORT TOURING ASSOCIATION,

TRAIL RIDE - RECREATIONAL

AUG 19: (Includes ATVs) PARIS CROSSING: HOOSIER HILLTOPPERS, (812) 873-1178, HOOSIERHILLTOPPERSMX.COM

AUG 11: COLUMBUS: 2 DAY EVENT, STONEY LONESOME M/C, (812) 3439772, STONEYLONESOMEMC.COM

ROAD RUN

RECREATIONAL

AUG 19: (Includes ATVs) ROCHESTER: READS RACING, (574) 893-1649, READSRACING.COM

ADVENTURE RIDE

AUG 19: EAST HAMPTON: BRITISH IRON ASSOCIATION OF CONNECTICUT, (860) 585-5102, CTBRITIRON.ORG

ILLINOIS

AUG 18: (Includes ATVs) ROCHESTER: READS RACING, (574) 893-1649, READSRACING.COM

RECREATIONAL

BIKE SHOW

GEORGIA

READSRACING.COM

AUG 18: (ATV only) CARLISLE: IOWA ATV HARE SCRAMBLE SERIES, (515) 971-3136, IATVHSS.COM

INDIANA

AUG 11: COLUMBUS: 2 DAY EVENT, STONEY LONESOME M/C, (812) 3439772, STONEYLONESOMEMC.COM

CONNECTICUT

MOTOCROSS

AmericanMotorcyclist.com

MOTOSPORTS ENTERPRISES LTD, (815) 234-2271, MOTOBYRON.COM

RECREATIONAL

RECREATIONAL AUG 2: SILVERTON: ROCKY MOUNTAIN ADVENTURE RIDERS, (719) 510-7160, RMARIDERS.ORG

50

DUAL SPORT RIDE

AUG 12: ROSE LAWN: HILL AND GULLY RIDERS ENDURO TEAM, (708) 424-1969

AUG 12: (Includes ATVs) MONTEZUMA: FV MOTO X, (641) 623-3456, FVMOTOX.COM AUG 18: (Includes ATVs) CEDAR RAPIDS: CEDAR VALLEY TRAIL RIDERS INC, (319) 363-7800, CVTR. ORG MARYLAND COMPETITION MOTOCROSS AUG 25: MECHANICSVILLE: 2 DAY EVENT, MIDDLE ATLANTIC MOTOCROSS ASSOCIATION, (410) 375-1059, MAMAMX.COM SHORT TRACK AUG 3: TIMONIUM: BALTIMORE COUNTY TRAIL RIDERS ASSOC., BCTRA.COM MASSACHUSETTS

HARE SCRAMBLES

RECREATIONAL

AUG 11: (Includes ATVs) MARENGO: MID AMERICA XC RACING, (317) 4186084, MIDAMERICAXC.COM

ROAD RUN

AUG 26: (Includes ATVs) CULVER: PLYMOUTH BLACKHAWKS MC INC, (574) 259-0103 MOTOCROSS AUG 3: (Includes ATVs) AKRON: READS RACING, (574) 893-1649, READSRACING.COM AUG 4: (Includes ATVs) AKRON: READS RACING, (574) 893-1649, READSRACING.COM AUG 5: (Includes ATVs) AKRON: READS RACING, (574) 893-1649, READSRACING.COM AUG 10: (Includes ATVs) CAYUGA: PLEASURE RIDERS MC, (309) 8385062, PLEASURERIDERS.NET AUG 11: (Includes ATVs) PIERCETON: READS RACING, (574) 893-1649, READSRACING.COM AUG 11: PIERCETON: READS RACING, AUG 12: (Includes ATVs) PIERCETON: READS RACING, (574) 893-1649,

AUG 19: FISKDALE: PEDIATRIC BRAIN TUMOR FOUNDATION OF THE U.S., (800) 253-6530, RIDEFORKIDS.ORG COMPETITION HILLCLIMB AUG 26: (Includes ATVs) MONSON: QUABOAG RIDERS INC, (413) 2674414, QUABOAGRIDERSMC.COM HARE SCRAMBLES AUG 11: E. FREETOWN: 2 DAY EVENT, PILGRIM SANDS TRAIL RIDERS INC, (781) 294-8355, P.S.T.R.ORG OBSERVED TRIALS AUG 5: WRENTHAM: KING PHILIP TRAIL RIDERS, (401) 934-2633 MICHIGAN RECREATIONAL DUAL SPORT - OFF ROAD AUG 18: WOLVERINE: 2 DAY EVENT, GREAT LAKES DUAL SPORTERS, (989) 751-6863, GLDSMC.ORG DUAL SPORT RIDE


AUGUST EVENTS AUG 18: WOLVERINE: 2 DAY EVENT, GREAT LAKES DUAL SPORTERS, (989) 751-6863, GLDSMC.ORG DUAL SPORT - OFF ROAD AUG 26: ANN ARBOR: PEDIATRIC BRAIN TUMOR FOUNDATION OF THE U.S., (800) 253-6530, RIDEFORKIDS. ORG DUAL SPORT RIDE AUG 26: ANN ARBOR: PEDIATRIC BRAIN TUMOR FOUNDATION OF THE U.S., (800) 253-6530, RIDEFORKIDS. ORG ROAD RUN AUG 4: DEFORD: LUCKY THUMB MC, (810) 404-2895 AUG 26: ANN ARBOR: PEDIATRIC BRAIN TUMOR FOUNDATION OF THE U.S., (800) 253-6530, RIDEFORKIDS. ORG COMPETITION 1/2 MILE DIRT TRACK AUG 17: (Includes ATVs) LAKE ODESSA: 2 DAY EVENT, I-96 SPEEDWAY LLC, (616) 642-0555, I-96SPEEDWAY.COM AUG 25: (Includes ATVs) CROSWELL: 2 DAY EVENT, PORT HURON MOTORCYCLE CLUB INC, (810) 9857800, PHMC-USA.COM ENDURO AUG 5: (Includes ATVs) BENTLEY: VALLEY TRAIL RIDERS, THEVALLEYTRAILRIDERS.COM

AUG 4: (Includes ATVs) CADILLAC: 2 DAY EVENT, CADILLAC MOTORCYCLE CLUB INC, (231) 884-3729, CADILLACMC.COM AUG 4: (Includes ATVs) ATLANTIC MINE: RANGE MOTO X, (906) 482-9333 AUG 5: (Includes ATVs) ATLANTIC MINE: RANGE MOTO X, (906) 482-9333

ENDURO

AUG 19: (Includes ATVs) BATTLE CREEK: BATTLE CREEK MOTORCYCLE CLUB, (269) 729-9691, BATTLECREEK MOTORCYCLECLUB.COM OBSERVED TRIALS AUG 4: ROSE CITY: MICHIGAN ONTARIO TRIALS ASSOCIATION, (810) 417-2892, MOTATRIALS.COM AUG 5: ROSE CITY: MICHIGAN ONTARIO TRIALS ASSOCIATION, (810) 417-2892, MOTATRIALS.COM SHORT TRACK

AUG 19: (Includes ATVs) MIDLAND: POLKA DOTS M/C, (989) 832-8284 MOTOCROSS

TTS

AUG 12: MAZEPPA: HURRICANE HILLS MX PARK INC, AUG 19: KELLOGG: MOTOKAZIE INC, (952) 244-9996, MOTOKAZIE.COM

ROAD RUN

AUG 11: (Includes ATVs) LAKE ODESSA: I-96 SPEEDWAY LLC, (616) 642-0555, I96SPEEDWAY.COM

AUG 12: (Includes ATVs) MIDLAND: POLKA DOTS M/C, (989) 832-8284, POLKADOTSMC.NET

AUG 12: BROWERVILLE: MOTO CITY RACEWAY & RECREATION INC, (612) 919-3457, MOTOCITYRACEWAY.COM

MINNESOTA

AUG 11: (Includes ATVs) CHRISTMAS: X-MAS FAMILY MOTORSPORTS PARK LLC, (906) 202-2681, X-MASFAMILYMOTORSPORTS.COM

AUG 12: (Includes ATVs) CHRISTMAS: X-MAS FAMILY MOTORSPORTS PARK LLC, (906) 202-2681, XMASFAMILYMOTORSPORTS.COM

ECHOVALLEYMOTOCROSS.COM

RECREATIONAL AUG 10: HILL CITY : 2 DAY EVENT, MINNESOTA WINGS INC, (800) 4226649

AUG 11: (Includes ATVs) DEFORD: LUCKY THUMB MC, (810) 404-2895, LUCKYTHUMB MOTORCYCLECLUB.COM

HARE SCRAMBLES

AUG 12: (Includes ATVs) DEFORD: LUCKY THUMB MC, (810) 404-2895, LUCKYTHUMB MOTORCYCLECLUB.COM

AUG 26: (ATV only) MAZEPPA: HURRICANE HILLS MX PARK INC, AUG 26: MILLVILLE: HI WINDERS, (507) 753-2779, SPRINGCREEKMX.COM

COMPETITION

AUG 26: LITTLE FALLS: MOTO CITY RACEWAY & RECREATION INC, (612) 919-3457, MOTOCITYRACEWAY.COM

AUG 11: AKELEY: 2 DAY EVENT, PAUL BUNYAN FOREST RIDER MC, (218) 739-5525, PAULBUNYANFORESTRIDERS.COM

OBSERVED TRIALS AUG 4: GILBERT: UPPER MIDWEST TRIALS ASSOCIATION, (507) 351-8879, UMTA.ORG

AUG 25: DUQUETTE: 2 DAY EVENT, STRAIGHT ARROW ENDURO RIDERS, (651) 456-0224, STRAIGHTARROWS. ORG

AUG 5: GILBERT: UPPER MIDWEST TRIALS ASSOCIATION, (507) 351-8879, UMTA.ORG

HILLCLIMB AUG 25: (Includes ATVs) MANKATO : KATO CYCLE CLUB, KATOCYCLECLUB.COM

MISSOURI RECREATIONAL

AUG 26: (Includes ATVs) NEW ULM: FLYING DUTCHMEN CYCLE CLUB INC, (507) 354-2306, FLYINGDUTCHMEN MOTORCYCLECLUB.COM HARE SCRAMBLES

ROAD RUN AUG 19: COTTLEVILLE: PEDIATRIC BRAIN TUMOR FOUNDATION OF THE U.S., (800) 253-6530, RIDEFORKIDS. ORG COMPETITION

AUG 4: (Includes ATVs) HILL CITY: 2 DAY EVENT, RANGE RIDERS MC, (763) 229-1177, RANGERIDERSMC.ORG

MOTOCROSS

AUG 5: MILLVILLE: HI WINDERS, (507) 753-2779, SPRINGCREEKMX.COM

AUG 18: (Includes ATVs) KIRKSVILLE: 2 DAY EVENT, THUNDER RIDGE MX PARK LLC, (660) 626-5138, THUNDERRIDGE-MXPARK.COM

AUG 5: BROOKSTON: ECHO VALLEY MOTOCROSS PARK, (218) 348-4754,

COMPETITION

MOTOCROSS

MONTANA

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AUGUST EVENTS HARE SCRAMBLES AUG 25: BIG SKY: 2 DAY EVENT, LONE PEAK RACING LLC, (406) 223-0478, BIGSKYXC.COM NEBRASKA RECREATIONAL ROAD RALLY AUG 10: BEATRICE: 2 DAY EVENT, NEBRASKA BMW NIGHTRIDERS, (402) 499-4876 NEVADA RECREATIONAL DUAL SPORT - OFF ROAD AUG 23: STATELINE: ADVENTURE MOTORCYCLE RENDEZVOUS, LLC., (775) 586-7700, TAHOEADVENTUREMOTO.COM DUAL SPORT RIDE AUG 23: STATELINE: ADVENTURE MOTORCYCLE RENDEZVOUS, LLC., (775) 586-7700, TAHOEADVENTUREMOTO.COM NEW HAMPSHIRE

AUG 5: NEW STRAITSVILLE: NEW STRAITSVILLE ENDURO RIDERS, (740) 394-2220, NSENDURO.COM

AUG 12: EAST MEADOW: ALLIANCE MC, (516) 509-8143, ALLIANCEMC. COM

DUAL SPORT RIDE

AUG 26: CLARENCE : REGENT RIDERS

POKER RUN

ROAD RALLY

AUG 18: FAIRBORN: ABATE-OH INC, (937) 845-1992, ABATE.COM

AUG 25: LONG EDDY: 2 DAY EVENT, CELTIC MOTORCYCLE CLUB, (914) 924-2170, CELTICMCC.COM TRAIL RIDE - RECREATIONAL AUG 12: (Includes ATVs) E. QUOGUE: LONG ISLAND RECREATIONAL TRAILS CONSERVANCY, (631) 928-1153, LIRTC.ORG COMPETITION AUG 19: BERKSHIRE: ITHACA DIRT RIDERS INC, (607) 657-8248, ITHACADIRTRIDERS.COM HARE SCRAMBLES AUG 5: (Includes ATVs) GENOA: CAYUGA COUNTY RIDERS INC, AUG 12: (Includes ATVs) ODESSA: TOMPKINS TRAIL RIDERS, (607) 5925138, WNYOA.NET

RECREATIONAL

AUG 26: (Includes ATVs) VIRGIL: SHC RIDERS, (585) 297-2742

BIKE SHOW

MOTOCROSS

AUG 18: MT HOLLY: MOTORCYCLISTS FOR JESUS MINISTRIES, (215) 2348611, GO2MJM.COM

AUG 5: (Includes ATVs) AUBURN: FROZEN OCEAN MOTOCROSS INC, (315) 784-5466, FROZEN-OCEAN.COM

LIME RUN

AUG 12: (Includes ATVs) CAROGA LAKE: ROYAL MOUNTAIN SKI AREA, (518) 835-6445, ROYALMOUNTAIN. COM

AUG 12: LEBANON: AMA-DIST 02 OF NEW JERSEY, (732) 603-8434, WILLIAMSHD.COM ROAD RUN AUG 5: BRIDGEWATER: FRATERNAL ORDER OF EAGLES SOMERSET AERIE #2137 EAGLE RIDERS, (908) 526-9898, NJFOE.ORG/RIDERS COMPETITION ENDURO AUG 26: MAURICETOWN: COMPETITION DIRT RIDERS, (856) 696-4783 NEW YORK RECREATIONAL BINGO RUN

AUG 12: ONEONTA: RETREADS - NEW YORK REGION

AUG 26: LANSING: DISTRICT 4 TRIALS COMMITTEE, (607) 844-3289 AUG 4: (Includes ATVs) PORT CRANE: SQUARE DEAL RIDERS M/C, (607) 6092634, SQUAREDEALRIDERS.COM

NORTH CAROLINA

POKER RUN AUG 5: LEBANON: LEBANON VALLEY MOTORCYCLE CLUB INC, (717) 9270979, LEBANONVALLYMC.COM AUG 12: SCHUYLKILL HAVEN: SCHUYLKILL COUNTY MOTORCYCLE CLUB, (570) 385-1460, SCHUYLKILLCOUNTY MOTORCYCLECLUB.COM AUG 12: MARIETTA: AMERICAN LEGION RIDERS PA POST CHAPTER #466, (717) 898-0871

MOTOCROSS

AUG 17: SPRING GROVE: WHITE ROSE MC, (717) 229-2621, WHITEROSEMC. ORG

AUG 1: (Includes ATVs) GALLIPOLIS: AMERICAN MOTORSPORTS LLC, (937) 358-2427, AMERICANMX.COM

AUG 19: (Includes ATVs) MARYSVILLE: AMERICAN MOTORSPORTS LLC, (937) 358-2427, AMERICANMX.COM AUG 26: DAYTON: DAYTON MOTORCYCLE CLUB INC., (937) 2639321, DAYTONMC.ORG AUG 29: (Includes ATVs) MT. GILEAD: AMERICAN MOTORSPORTS LLC, (937) 358-2427, AMERICANMX.COM AUG 30: (Includes ATVs) RICHWOOD: AMERICAN MOTORSPORTS LLC, (937) 358-2427, AMERICANMX.COM OREGON

AUG 26: FLETCHER: PEDIATRIC BRAIN TUMOR FOUNDATION OF THE U.S., (800) 253-6530, RIDEFORKIDS.ORG

AUG 4: TILLAMOOK: NORTHWEST TOUR & TRAIL, (503) 681-8881, BLACKDOGDUALSPORT.COM

COMPETITION

DUAL SPORT - OFF ROAD

TTS

AUG 4: TILLAMOOK: NORTHWEST TOUR & TRAIL, (503) 681-8881, BLACKDOGDUALSPORT.COM

DUAL SPORT - OFF ROAD

AUG 19: COLUMBIA: THUNDERBIRD MOTORCYCLE CLUB INC, (717) 8980871

AUG 25: LEESPORT: CLASSIC HARLEY-DAVIDSON, (610) 916-7777, CLASSICHARLEY.COM

ADVENTURE RIDE

AUG 5: CENTRAL VALLEY: PEDIATRIC

CARNIVAL RUN

AUG 19: (Includes ATVs) AMESVILLE: ATHENS MOTORCYCLE CLUB, (740) 592-6480, ATHENSMOTORCYCLECLUB.COM

ROAD RUN

OHIO

AUG 4: GLENSIDE: MOTORCYCLISTS FOR JESUS MINISTRIES, (215) 8853633, GO2MJM.COM

AUG 5: CRANBERRY TWP: PEDIATRIC BRAIN TUMOR FOUNDATION OF THE U.S., (800) 253-6530, RIDEFORKIDS. ORG

RECREATIONAL

RECREATIONAL

PENNSYLVANIA BIKE SHOW

AUG 12: (Includes ATVs) SUGAR GROVE: CENTRAL OHIO COMPETITION RIDERS INC., (740) 9833937, COCRMX.COM

RECREATIONAL

AUG 31: GOLDSBORO: MOTOPROMO, (919) 222-9614, BUSCOBONEH.COM

AUG 2: BAKER CITY: 2 DAY EVENT, NORTHWEST MOTORCYCLE INSTRUCTIONAL SCHOOL

AUG 26: BUCK: GENTLEMEN MC SPORTSMEN, (717) 285-3710

AUG 12: DAYTON: DAYTON MOTORCYCLE CLUB INC., (937) 2639321, DAYTONMC.ORG

AUG 12: DUNDEE: DISTRICT 4 TRIALS COMMITTEE, (607) 243-7221

ROAD RUN

AUG 5: (Includes ATVs) LOGAN: HOCKING VALLEY MOTORCYCLE CLUB, (614) 989-3326, HOCKINGVALLEYMC.COM

OBSERVED TRIALS

ROAD RUN

AmericanMotorcyclist.com

HARE SCRAMBLES

AUG 10: (Includes ATVs) CHILLICOTHE: AMERICAN MOTORSPORTS LLC, (937) 358-2427, AMERICANMX.COM

AUG 11: (ATV only) BATAVIA: WESTERN NEW YORK EXTREME DIRT TRACK RACING (WNYEDT), (585) 737-5698, BATAVIAMOTORSPEEDWAY.COM

AUG 4: BOLDWIN: 2 DAY EVENT, QUEENSBORO MC, (718) 350-9856, QUEENSBOROMC.COM

AUG 26: MCARTHUR: ENDURO RIDERS ASSOCIATION, (614) 582-7821, EUNDRORIDERS.COM

AUG 28: (Includes ATVs) MAPLEVIEW: SMX ASSOCIATES LLC, (315) 480-7733, MOTOMASTERS.COM

AUG 4: HANCOCK: 2 DAY EVENT, BEAR CREEK SPORTSMEN, (201) 3147868, BEARCREEKSPORTSMEN.COM

POKER RUN

COMPETITION

AUG 9: (Includes ATVs) CROTON: AMERICAN MOTORSPORTS LLC, (937) 358-2427, AMERICANMX.COM

TTS

AUG 26: MINEOLA: NASSAU WINGS, (516) 680-0178, POPSRUN.ORG

AUG 24: MARIETTA: MOTORCYCLE SPORT TOURING ASSOCIATION

AUG 26: (Includes ATVs) YAPHANK: LONG ISLAND MOTOCROSS INC, (631) 286-9411, ISLANDMOTOCROSS.COM

DUAL SPORT - OFF ROAD

FUN RUN

AUG 19: ORIENT: CAPITAL CITY MOTORCYCLE CLUB INC, (614) 8771777

AUG 5: (Includes ATVs) MARYSVILLE: AMERICAN MOTORSPORTS LLC, (937) 358-2427, AMERICANMX.COM

SHORT TRACK

AUG 4: HANCOCK: 2 DAY EVENT, BEAR CREEK SPORTSMEN, (201) 3147868, BEARCREEKSPORTSMEN.COM

ROAD RUN

AUG 25: (Includes ATVs) YAPHANK: LONG ISLAND MOTOCROSS INC, (631) 286-9411, ISLANDMOTOCROSS.COM

AUG 5: QUEENSBURY: ADIRONDACK RIDERS OF GLENS FALLS NY INC, (518) 792-1713, ADIRONDACKRIDERS. COM

DUAL SPORT RIDE

AUG 12: AKRON: GREATER AKRON M/C, (330) 760-3715

ENDURO

ENDURO

ROAD RACE

NEW JERSEY

AUG 5: NEW STRAITSVILLE: NEW STRAITSVILLE ENDURO RIDERS, (740) 394-2220, NSENDURO.COM

AUG 26: GENESEO: CONESUS LAKE RIDERS M/C, (585) 721-0667, CLR-MC. COM

COMPETITION AUG 18: LOUDON: 2 DAY EVENT, UNITED STATES CLASSIC RACING ASSOCIATION, (413) 498-4433, RACEUSCRA.COM

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BRAIN TUMOR FOUNDATION OF THE U.S., (800) 253-6530, RIDEFORKIDS. ORG

ROAD RUN

ROAD RALLY

COMPETITION 1/2 MILE DIRT TRACK AUG 11: (Includes ATVs) MINERSVILLE: SHIPPENSBURG MC, (717) 796-0294 ENDURO AUG 12: THREE SPRINGS: GREEN MARBLE ENDURO RIDERS, (301) 8650779, GMER.US HARE SCRAMBLES AUG 19: (Includes ATVs) NEELYTON: FT OF MOUNTAIN, (814) 259-3873 AUG 26: (Includes ATVs) PLYMOUTH: BACK MOUNTAIN ENDURO RIDERS, (570) 675-1814, BMER.ORG MOTOCROSS AUG 5: NEW ALEXANDRIA: PITTSBURGH RACEWAY PARK, (724) 668-7600, PITTSBURGHRACEWAYPARK.COM AUG 5: BIRDSBORO: PAGODA MOTORCYCLE CLUB, (610) 582-3717, PAGODAMC.ORG AUG 12: HANOVER: HAPPY RAMBLERS, (717) 634-2353, HAPPYRAMBLERS.COM AUG 18: ELKLAND: MILES MOUNTAIN MX, (607) 368-3429 AUG 19: ELKLAND: MILES MOUNTAIN MX, (607) 368-3429 AUG 19: SHIPPENSBURG: DOUBLIN GAP MX PARK INC, (717) 249-6036, DOUBLINGAP.COM OBSERVED TRIALS

DUAL SPORT RIDE

AUG 5: MARYSVILLE: TRICKY TRYALERS MC, (717) 580-1272

AUG 4: TILLAMOOK: NORTHWEST TOUR & TRAIL, (503) 681-8881, BLACKDOGDUALSPORT.COM

AUG 5: (Includes ATVs) SHIPPENSBURG: SHIPPENSBURG

SHORT TRACK


AUGUST EVENTS MC, (717) 796-0294 SOUTH DAKOTA RECREATIONAL GYPSY TOUR

OBSERVED TRIALS AUG 25: SWANTON: 2 DAY EVENT, GREEN MOUNTAIN PLONKERS TRIALS CLUB INC, (802) 578-3022, GREENMOUNTAINPLONKERS.ORG

CLASSIC MOTORCYCLE CLUB, (509) 294-1249, NWCLASSICMOTORCYCLECLUB.COM POKER RUN AUG 5: SUMNER: TACOMA M/C, (253) 531-4408

AUG 9: STURGIS: JACKPINE GYPSIES MOTORCYCLE CLUB INC, (605) 3476022, JACKPINE-GYPSIES.COM

COMPETITION

ROAD RUN

CROSS COUNTRY

RECREATIONAL

AUG 6: STURGIS: CITY OF STURGIS RALLY DEPARTMENT, (605) 720-0800, STURGISMOTORCYCLERALLY.COM

AUG 19: (Includes ATVs) RUCKERSVILLE: LONE RIDER PRODUCTIONS LLC, (866) 967-8927, VXCS.ORG

ROAD RALLY

TENNESSEE COMPETITION MOTOCROSS AUG 11: (ATV only) HURRICANE MILLS: 2 DAY EVENT, RACER PRODUCTIONS INC, (304) 284-0084, ATVMOTOCROSS. COM UTAH RECREATIONAL ROAD RUN AUG 11: SALT LAKE CITY: PEDIATRIC BRAIN TUMOR FOUNDATION OF THE U.S., (800) 253-6530, RIDEFORKIDS. ORG COMPETITION

VIRGINIA

WEST VIRGINIA

GRAND PRIX AUG 12: MARTINSVILLE: VIRGINIA COMPETITION HARE SCRAMBLE SERVICES, (276) 252-6801, VCHSS. ORG AUG 26: PENHOOK: VIRGINIA COMPETITION HARE SCRAMBLE SERVICES, (540) 576-2038, VCHSS. ORG MOTOCROSS AUG 11: PETERSBURG: 2 DAY EVENT, MIDDLE ATLANTIC MOTOCROSS ASSOCIATION, (410) 375-1059, MAMAMX.COM WASHINGTON RECREATIONAL

AUG 18: TOOELE: 2 DAY EVENT, UTAH SPORT BIKE ASSOCIATION, (435) 277RACE, MILLERMOTORSPORTSPARK. COM

AUG 1: STEVENSON: SR! NW FULL FACE RIDERS, (206) 329-7808, SOUNDRIDER.COM

COMPETITION

WISCONSIN RECREATIONAL

CONVENTIONS

AUG 18: (Includes ATVs) CHILTON: GRAVITY PARK USA, (920) 849-7223, GRAVITYPARKUSA.COM AUG 24: (Includes ATVs) HUSTLER: CMJ RACEWAY LLC, (608) 220-6853, CMJRACEWAY.COM AUG 25: (Includes ATVs) HUSTLER: CMJ RACEWAY LLC, (608) 220-6853, CMJRACEWAY.COM AUG 26: TIGERTON: FANTASY MOTO LLC, (920) 419-2863, FANTASYMOTO. COM

ROAD RUN

OBSERVED TRIALS

AUG 5: MIDDLETON: PEDIATRIC BRAIN TUMOR FOUNDATION OF THE U.S., (800) 253-6530, RIDEFORKIDS.ORG

AUG 4: DICKEYVILLE: 2 DAY EVENT, WISCONSIN OBSERVED TRAILS ASSOCIATION, (608) 434-5530, WISCONSINTRIALS.ORG

COMPETITION 1/2 MILE DIRT TRACK AUG 4: (Includes ATVs) STURGEON BAY: DOOR COUNTY FAIR ASSOCIATION, (920) 309-0623 AUG 11: (Includes ATVs) ANTIGO: RIB MOUNTAIN RIDERS, (715) 573-4934 HARE SCRAMBLES AUG 19: HAYWARD: MIDWEST OFFROAD TRAIL RIDERS, (715) 9342793

ROAD RACE

VERMONT

AUG 4: SOD: ROAD RIDERS FOR JESUS, (304) 756-2276

CYCLE CLUB INC, (414) 265-1582, AZTALANMX.COM

MOTOCROSS

FIELD MEET

AUG 5: (Includes ATVs) HILLPOINT: SUGAR MAPLE MX LLC, (608) 3938812, SUGARMAPLEMX.COM

AUG 17: CLAYTON: NORTHWEST

AUG 12: LAKE MILLS: AZTALAN

AUG 25: TRIMBELLE: UPPER MIDWEST TRIALS ASSOCIATION, (507) 351-8879, UMTA.ORG AUG 26: TRIMBELLE: UPPER MIDWEST TRIALS ASSOCIATION, (507) 351-8879, UMTA.ORG SHORT TRACK AUG 18: LAKE MILLS: AZTALAN CYCLE CLUB INC, (414) 265-1582, AZTALANMX.COM AUG 19: LAKE MILLS: AZTALAN CYCLE CLUB INC, (414) 265-1582, AZTALANMX.COM AUG 25: (Includes ATVs) CHILTON: SOUTHEASTERN SHORT TRACKERS LTD, (262) 754-0686

2012 EVENTS HALL OF FAME EXHIBITS AND EVENTS AMA MOTORCYCLE HALL OF FAME MOTORCYCLEMUSEUM.ORG The AMA Motorcycle Hall of Fame is on the AMA campus in Pickerington, Ohio, and is open 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. seven days a week. Closed: Easter, Thanksgiving, Christmas and New Year’s Day. Main Hall: AMA Motorcycle Hall of Fame: Recognizing those who have made significant contributions to all aspects of motorcycling. Dirt-Track! All-American Motorcycle Racing: Celebrating the storied history of the men and machines who battle on the dirt oval. 30-Year Ride: Honda’s Ohio-made Motorcycles: Gold Wings aren’t the only bikes that Honda produced at its plant in Marysville, Ohio. This exhibit showcases the 30 years of production, from the CR250 to the Rune.

Washougal MX Park Aug. 11: Southwick, Mass.: Moto-X 338 Aug. 18: New Berlin, N.Y.: Unadilla Sept. 1: Delmont, Pa.: Steel City Raceway

AMA PRO ROAD RACING CHAMPIONSHIP AMAPRORACING.COM

Oct. 6: Tucson, Ariz: Tucson HalfMile, Tucson Int’l Raceway

July 13-15: Lexington, Ohio: MidOhio Sports Car Course July 27-29: Monterey, Calif.: Mazda Raceway Laguna Seca Aug. 18-19: Indianapolis: Indianapolis Motor Speedway Sept. 7-9: Millville, N.J.: New Jersey Motorsports Park Sept. 21-23: Homestead, Fla.: Homestead-Miami Speedway

AMA Vintage Motorcycle Days: July 20-22, Mid-Ohio Sports Car Course, Lexington, Ohio; AMA VintageMotorcycleDays.com

AMA PRO FLAT TRACK AMAPRORACING.COM

AMA MOTOCROSS SERIES MXSPORTSPRORACING.COM July 7: Buchanan, Mich.: RedBud July 14: Millville, Minn.: Spring Creek Motocross July 21: Washougal, Wash.:

Sept. 8: Knoxville, Iowa: Knoxville Half-Mile, Knoxville Raceway Sept. 30: Santa Rosa, Calif.: Santa Rosa Mile, Sonoma County Fairgrounds

Oct. 5-7: New Orleans: NOLA Motorsports Park

AMA PRO RACING

Sept. 2: Springfield, Ill.: Springfield Mile II, Illinois State Fairgrounds

Sept. 8: Lake Elsinore, Calif.: Lake Elsinore Motocross Park

Founder’s Hall: Honoring the AMA Motorcycle Hall of Fame’s generous contributors.

AMA Legends Weekend: Nov. 16-17, Red Rock Casino, Resort and Spa, Las Vegas, Nev.; MotorcycleMuseum.org

Sept. 1: Springfield, Ill.: Springfield ST, Illinois State Fairgrounds

July 7: Hagerstown, Md.: Hagerstown Half-Mile, Hagerstown Speedway July 14: Lake Odessa, Mich.: I-96 Half-Mile, I-96 Speedway July 28: Sacramento, Calif.: Sacramento Mile, Cal Expo Aug. 4: Castle Rock, Wash.: Castle Rock TT, Castle Rock Race Park Aug. 12: Peoria, Ill.: Peoria TT, PMC Race Park Aug. 18: Indianapolis: Indy Mile, Indiana State Fairground

Oct. 13: Pomona, Calif.: AMA Pro Flat Track Finals, Pomona Half-Mile, LA County Fairplex

AMA PRO HILLCLIMB NATIONAL CHAMPIONSHIP AMAPRORACING. COM July 15: West Branch, Mich.: Ogemaw Hills Bike Week; OgemawHillsBikeWeek.com Aug. 5: Muskegon, Mich.: Muskegon MC; MuskegonMotorcycleClub.com Sept. 9: Freemansburg, Pa.: Bushkill Valley MC; BikeHillclimb.com

SERIES AMA KENDA HARE & HOUND NATIONALHAREANDHOUND.COM Sept. 8: Panaca, Nev.: Zach Livreri, Silver State Trailblazers; (702) 9946823, https://sites.google.com/site/ silverstatetrailblazers/ Oct 14: Johnson Valley, Calif.: Justin Shultz, SoCal MC; (949) 981-6776, SoCalMC.com Oct. 28: Lucerne Valley, Calif.: Ryan Sanders, 100’s MC; (949) 584-9395, 100sMC.org AMA REKLUSE NATIONAL ENDURO, PRESENTED BY MOOSE RACING NATIONALENDURO.COM July 29: Cross Fork, Pa.: Peter Burnett, Brandywine Enduro Riders; (610) 368-7332, BER.us Sept. 9: Park Hills, Mo.: Michael Silger, Missouri Mudders; michael. silger@avnet.com, MoMudders.com Oct. 14: Matthews, Ind.: Doug Spence, Muddobbers MC; (765) 9982236, MuddobbersMC.org

Sept. 30: Jefferson, Pa.: White Rose MC; WhiteRoseMC.org

Nov. 4: Stanton, Ala.: Glenn Hollingshead, Perry Mountain MC; (334) 872-4286, PerryMountain.com

Oct. 14: Oregonia, Ohio: Dayton MC; DaytonMC.com

GEICO AMA ENDUROCROSS ENDUROCROSS.COM

AMA PRO ATV MOTOCROSS NATIONAL CHAMPIONSHIP ATVMOTOCROSS.COM

July 1: Los Angeles: Staples Center (X Games)

July 14-15: New Berlin, N.Y.: Unadilla

Oct. 6: Denver: National Western Complex

July 28-29: Buchanan, Mich.: Red Bud Aug. 11-12: Hurricane Mills, Tenn.: Loretta Lynn’s AMA NATIONAL CHAMPIONSHIP

Sept. 15: Ontario, Calif.: Citizens Bank Arena

Oct. 20: Everett, Wash.: Comcast Arena Oct. 27: Boise, Idaho: Idaho Center Nov 17: Las Vegas, Nev.: Orleans

August 2012

53


2012 EVENTS Arena AMA WEST HARE SCRAMBLES AMARACING.COM Aug. 25 (Youth) Aug. 26 (Amateur): Big Sky, Mont.: Jamey Kabisch, Lone Peak Racing; (406) 223-0478, BigSkyXC.com AMA EAST HARE SCRAMBLES AMARACING.COM July 21 (Youth & Amateur): Valley View, Pa.: Tiffany Tobias, Rausch Creek Powersports; (570) 682-4600, RauschCreekRacing.com Aug. 4 (Youth) Aug. 5 (Amateur): Hill City, Minn.: Paul Otto, Range Riders MC; (763) 229-1177, RangeRidersMC. org Aug. 11 (Youth) Aug. 12 (Amateur): E. Freetown, Mass.: Gordie Coyle, Pilgrim Sands Trail Riders; (781) 2948355, PSTR.org Sept. 1 (Youth) Sept. 2 (Amateur) Arrington, Va.: Chuck Honeycutt, April Fools Promotions; (757) 375-5665; AprilFools62@verizon.net AMA/NATC YOUTH TRIALS AMARACING.COM July 20-22 (West): Howard, Colo.: Bill Markham, International Trials School; (719) 942-3372, ITSoffroad.com AMA ATV HARE SCRAMBLES AMARACING.COM July 22: Valley View, Pa.: Tiffany Tobias, Rausch Creek Powersports; (570) 682-4600, RauschCreekRacing. com Aug. 4: Hill City, Minn.: Paul Otto, Range Riders MC; (763) 229-1177, RangeRidersMC.org Oct. 13: TBD: Mike Gibbs, Mid America XC; (317) 418-6084, TheMAXC.com Oct. 27: Gosport, Ind.: Mike Gibbs, Mid America XC; (317) 418-6084, TheMAXC.com ITP/MOOSE RACING AMA ATV MOTOCROSS, PRESENTED BY PARTS UNLIMITED ATVMOTOCROSS.COM July 14-15: New Berlin, N.Y.: Unadilla July 28-29: Buchanan, Mich.: Red Bud Aug. 11-12: Hurricane Mills, Tenn.: Loretta Lynn Ranch AMA ATV EXTREME DIRT TRACK EDTRACING.COM July 21-22: Ashtabula, Ohio: Pine Lake Off-Road Facility, Bud Fischer, (440) 997-4166, EDTRacing.com Aug. 11: Batavia, N.Y.: Batavia Motor Speedway, BataviaMotorSpeedway. com Aug. 31-Sept. 1: Goldsboro, N.C.: Busco Beach, (919) 222-9614, BuscoBeach.com

Aug. 17: Pecatonica, Ill.: Stateline MX; (815) 275-MOTO, StatelineMX.com Aug. 26: Armagh, Pa.: Pleasure Valley Raceway; (814) 695-2453, PVRMX.com Aug. 26: Millville, Minn.: Spring Creek MX Park; (507) 753-2779, SpringCreekMX.com Sept. 1-3: Millington, Mich.: Baja MX; (989) 871-3356, BajaMX.com Sept. 2: Athelstane, Wis.: Pine Ridge Raceway; (715) 856-6612, Gmellissa337@aol.com Sept. 9: Clifford, Pa.: Hurricane Hills Motorsports; (570) 222-9290, HHMotocross.com Sept. 23: New Castle, Del.: Blue Diamond MX Park; (302) 834-5867, BCTRA.com Sept. 30: Canton, Texas: Buffalo Creek Motocross Park; (214) 939-4321, BuffaloCreekMX.com Sept. 30: Walnut, Ill.: Sunset Ridge MX; (815) 379-9534, SunsetRidgeMX. com Oct. 7: Gaylord, Mich.: Ostego Club; (989) 871-3356, BajaMX.com Oct. 7: Englishtown, N.J.: Raceway Park; (734) 446-7800, RacewayPark. com Oct. 14: Birdsboro, Pa.: Pagoda Motorcycle Club; (610) 582-3717, PagodaMotorcycleClub.com Oct. 27-28: Leonardtown, Md.: Budds Creek Motocross Park; (301) 481-6148, BuddsCreek.com Oct. 28: Prentiss, Wis.: Golden Pine Raceway; (601) 506-8669, GoldenPineRaceway.com Nov. 4: Wortham, Texas: Freestone County Raceway; (713) 962-3386, FreestoneMX.com Nov. 4: Pell City, Ala.: Mill Creek; (205) 699-8857, RPMSportsonline.com Nov. 10-11: Wortham, Texas: Freestone County Raceway; (713) 9623386, FreestoneMX.com Nov. 10-11: Lizella, Ga.: Echeconnee MX Park; (205) 699-8857, FreestoneMX.com Nov. 19-21: Gainesville, Fla.: Gatorback Cycle Park; (813) 470-7498, UnlimitedSportsMX.com Nov. 22-24: Gainesville, Fla.: Gatorback Cycle Park; (813) 470-7498, UnlimitedSportsMX.com AMA FEATURED SERIES AMA MID AMERICA CROSS COUNTRY CHAMPIONSHIP HARE SCRAMBLES SERIES THEMAXC.COM July 21: Martinsville, Ind. Aug. 11: Merango, Ind.

AMA VINTAGE DIRT TRACK AMARACING.COM

Sept. 8: Canaan, Ind.

July 21: Ashland, Ohio: HalfMile, Ashland County Fairgrounds, Ken Saillant; (800) 262-5646, AmericanMotorcyclist.com

Oct. 13-14: Culver, Ind.

Aug. 17-18: Dundee, N.Y.: 4/10-Mile, Black Rock Speedway, Dean Hoag; (607) 243-8686, BlackRockSpeedway. com AMA RACING PRO-AM MOTOCROSS AMARACING.COM

54

July 15: Crothersville, Ind.: High Fly MX; (812) 374-8228, HighFlyMX.com

Sept. 22: Spencer, Ind. Oct. 27-28: Casey, Ind. AMA WESTERN CHECKPOINT ENDURO CHAMPIONSHIP SERIES RIDECHEC.COM Sept. 29-30: Reno, Nev.: Wildhorse Enduro, Western States Racing Association

AMA ALL-STAR NATIONAL FLAT TRACK SERIES STEVENACERACING.COM July 4: Frederick, Md.: Half-Mile, Al Wilcox Memorial at the 90th Annual Barbara Fritchie Classic

AMA DUAL-SPORT/ADVENTURE SERIES

July 6: Winchester, Va.: Half-Mile, Winchester Speedway July 21: Billings, Mont.: ST, Billings Motorcycle Club Aug. 10: Peoria, Ill.: ST, Peoria Speedway Sept. 28: Hanover, Pa.: ST, Trail-way Speedway Sept. 29: York, Pa.: Half-Mile, York Fairgrounds AMA CAN-AM IATVHSS IATVHSS.COM July 20: Centerville, Iowa: Appanoose County Fair July 25: Indianola, Iowa: Warren County Fair July 28-29: Mount Pleasant, Iowa: Greenhurst Farms Aug. 4: Chariton, Iowa: Lucas County Fairgrounds Aug. 17-18: Carlisle, Iowa: Heartland Challenge Sept. 8-9: Beaconsfield, Iowa: Coyote Crossing Oct. 6-7: Carlisle, Iowa: Blue Ridge Run AMA GBC MOTORSPORTS HEARTLAND CHALLENGE HEARTLANDCHALLENGE.COM Aug. 17-18: Carlisle, Iowa AMA ENDURO TRIALS TRIALSTRAININGCENTER.COM July 5: Sequatchie, Tenn. AMA AMATEUR GRAND CHAMPIONSHIPS AMA AMATEUR NATIONAL MOTOCROSS MXSPORTS.COM July 29-Aug.4: Hurricane Mills, Tenn.: Grand Championships (final), Loretta Lynn’s Ranch AMA VINTAGE GRAND CHAMPIONSHIPS AMAVINTAGEMOTORCYCLE DAYS.COM July 20-22: Lexington, Ohio: AMA Vintage Grand Championships, MidOhio Sports Car Course AMA HILLCLIMB GRAND CHAMPIONSHIPS AMARACING.COM Aug. 17-19: Bay City, Wis.: AMA Hillclimb Grand Championships AMA LAND SPEED GRAND CHAMPIONSHIPS/BUB MOTORCYCLE SPEED TRIALS BUBSPEEDTRIALS.COM Aug. 26-30: Wendover, Utah: Bonneville Salt Flats, Delvene Manning, (530) 272-4310 AMA KENDA TENNESSEE KNOCKOUT TENNESSEEKNOCKOUT ENDURO.COM Sept. 1-2: Sequatchie, Tenn. AMA U.S. TEAM COMPETITION AMARACING.COM

Oct. 20-21: Fouts Springs, Calif.: Jackhammer Enduro, Jackhammer MC

Aug. 12: FIM Junior Motocross World Championship: Sevlievo, Bulgaria

July 1: Shippensburg, Pa.: Doublin Gap MX; (717) 249-6063, DoublinGap. com

Oct. 20-21: Red Mountain, Calif.: Ghost Rider Enduro, Training Wheels MC

Sept. 24-29: International Six Days Enduro: Sachsenring Circuit and Saxony, Germany

July 14: Batavia, N.Y.: Area 51 MX; (585) 345-7433, HighFlyMX.com

Nov. 11: Stoneyford, Calif.: Climbers Enduro, Valley Climbers MC

Sept. 29-30: Trials des Nations: Moutier, Switzerland

AmericanMotorcyclist.com

Sept. 30: Motocross of Nations: Lommel, Belgium

AMA HUSQVARNA NATIONAL DUAL-SPORT SERIES, PRESENTED BY FMF AMERICANMOTORCYCLIST.COM July 14-15: Chandlersville, Ohio: Zanesville National Dual Sport, Zanesville Trail Riders, Jerry Sode; (740) 221-1050, ZanesvilleTrailRiders.com July 21-28: Grayling/Indian River, Mich.: 28th Annual Six Days of Michigan, Cycle Conservation Club of Michigan, Lewis Schuler; (517) 416-0126, CycleConservationClub.com Aug. 1-5: Stevenson, Wash.: Dualsport Northwest, SoundRider!, Tom Mehren; (206) 329-7808, SoundRider.com Aug. 4-5: Walden, Colo.: Moose Run Dual Sport Rally, Front Range Riders, Deborah Nielsen; (307) 778-8685, FrontRangeRiders.com Aug. 4-5: Hancock, N.Y.: Hancock Quarry Run, Bear Creek Sportsmen, Mike Goetz; BearCreekSportsmen.com Aug. 11-12: Columbus, Ind.: Buffalo 500 D/S Adventure Ride, Stoney Lonesome MC; Nathan Gaskill; (812) 343-9772, StoneyLonesomeMC.com/ DualSport/index.html Aug. 18-19: Wolverine, Mich.: Ted’s Chandler Hill Challenge, Great Lakes Dual Sporters, Jeremay Valley; (989) 751-6863, GLDSMC.org Aug. 23-26: Lake Tahoe, Nev.: Lake Tahoe Adventure Ride & Rendezvous, Mike Bradford; (775) 586-7700, TahoeAventureMoto.com Sept. 8-9: Golden Pond, Ky.: Land Between the Lakes 200, K.T. Riders, Jesse Thomas; (270) 522-3703, LBL200. com Sept. 13-16: Helena, Mont.: Rocky Mountain Road Trip 2012, Racing for Life, James Filang; (951) 966-3150, RacingForLife.org Sept. 22-23: Buck Meadows, Calif.: Yosemite Dual Sport Adventure, Family Off Road Adventures, Lawrence Borgens; (209) 649-3633, FamilyOffRoadAdventures.com Sept. 22-23: Logan, Ohio: Nutcracker 200, Buckeye Dual Sporters, Bill Kaeppner; (740) 380-3050, KaeppnersWoods.com Sept. 29-30: Wabeno, Wis.: Big Woods 200, Wisconsin Dual Sport Riders, John Newton; (920) 350-2030, WIDualSportRiders.org Oct. 6-7: Mt. Solon, Va.: Shenandoah 500 Dual Sport, Washington Area Trail Riders, Andy Giordano; (540) 379-5631, NVTR.webs.com Oct. 6-7: McArthur, Ohio: Baby Burr National Dual Sport, Enduro Riders Assn., Steve Barber; (614) 582-7821, EnduroRiders.com Oct. 27-28: Chatsworth, N.J.: Meteor Ride in the Pines, Meteor MC, Jeff Fitzpatrick; (609) 654-5015, MeteorMC. com Oct. 27-28: Payson, Ariz.: Howlin’ at the Moon Dual Sport, Arizona Trail Riders, Don Hood; (602) 692-9382, dohood@ us.ibm.com


2012 EVENTS Nov. 3-4: Port Elizabeth, N.J.: Hammer Run, TriCounty Sportsmen, Eldin Polhaumas; (888) 274-4469, TeamHammer.org Nov. 23-24: Palmdale, Calif.: LA-Barstow to Vegas, AMA D37 Dual Sport, Paul Flanders; (626) 792-7384, District37AMA.org

Strange Airheads, SmokeChasing.com March 17-Sept. 9: Prostate Cancer Pony Express Grand Tour, Prostate Cancer Awareness Project, http://prostatecancerponyexpress.wordpress.com April 1-Oct. 31: Tour of Honor Grand Tour, Tour of Honor, TourofHonor.com April 1-Nov. 30: Hodgepodge Grand Tour, Midnight Riders Motorcycle Club, (765) 566-3807, MidnightRiders-MC.com AMA NATIONAL EXTREME GRAND TOURS AMERICANMOTORCYCLIST.COM/ROADRIDE/ TOURING

AMA YAMAHA SUPER TÉNÉRÉ NATIONAL ADVENTURE RIDING SERIES AMERICANMOTORCYCLIST.COM Aug. 11-12: Columbus, Ind.: Buffalo 500 D/S Adventure Ride, Stoney Lonesome MC, Nathan Gaskill; (812) 343-9772, StoneyLonesomeMC.com Aug. 20-24: Various locations, Idaho: Sasquatch Adventure Tour, SoundRider!, Tom Mehren; (206) 3297808, SoundRider.com Aug. 23-26: Lake Tahoe, Nev.: Lake Tahoe Adventure Ride & Rendezvous, Mike Bradford; (775) 586-7700, TahoeAventureMoto.com Sept. 8-9: Morganton, N.C.: Blue Ridge Adventure Ride, JB Saki Promotions, Ron Miller; (704) 309-3271, VolunteerRiders.com Sept. 14-16: Taos Ski Valley, N.M.: Land of Enchantment, Aerostich Tours, Roger Pattison; (575) 776-8785, AerostichTours.com Sept. 22-23: Logan, Ohio: Nutcracker 200, Buckeye Dual Sporters, Bill Kaeppner; (740) 380-3050, KaeppnersWoods.com Oct. 27-28: Payson, Ariz.: Howlin’ at the Moon Dual Sport, Arizona Trail Riders, Don Hood; (602) 692-9382, ArizonaTrailRiders.org Nov. 3-4: Port Elizabeth, N.J.: Hammer Run, TriCounty Sportsmen, Eldin Polhaumas; (856) 785-2754, TeamHammer.org Nov. 23-24: Palmdale, Calif.: LA-Barstow to Vegas, AMA D37 Dual Sport, Paul Flanders; (626) 792-7384, District37AMA.org AMA PREMIER TOURING SERIES

Jan. 1-Dec. 31: USA Four Corners Grand Tour, Southern California Motorcycle Association (SCMA), (949) 246-4941, USA4Corners.org Jan. 1-Dec. 31: Best US 15 Roads Challenge Grand Tour, Southern California Motorcycle Association (SCMA), SC-MA.com Aug. 30-Sept. 4: Three Flags Classic Grand Tour, Southern California Motorcycle Association (SCMA), SC-MA.com

Husqvarna is proud to sponsor the 2012 AMA National Dual-Sport Series

AMA SIGNATURE EVENTS AMERICANMOTORCYCLIST.COM/ROADRIDE/ TOURING Aug. 6: Sturgis, S.D.: Sturgis Mayor’s Ride , (605) 7200800, SturgisMotorcycleRally.com/events Nov. 12-13: Titusville, Fla.: March of Dimes Bikers for Babies, BikersforBabies.org AMA SIGNATURE EVENTS - RIDE FOR KIDS PBTFUS.ORG/RIDEFORKIDS/EVENTS/2012/ July 8: South Bend, Ind.: Pinhook Park, road ride July 15: White Bear Lake, Minn.: East Century College, road ride July 15: Elgin, Il.: Elgin Community College, road ride July 15: Deerfield, N.Y.: Deerfield Volunteer Fire Dept., road ride July 22: Marysville, Ohio: Scotts Miracle-Gro Headquarters, road ride July 29: Knoxville, Tenn.: Pellissippi StateCommunity College, road ride July 29: Overland Park, Kan.: Johnson County Community College, road ride Aug. 5: Cranberry Township, Pa: Home Dept, road ride Aug. 5: Central Valley, N.Y.: Central Valley Elementary School, road ride Aug. 5: Middleton, Wis: Firemen’s Park, road ride

AMERICANMOTORCYCLIST.COMROADRIDE/ TOURING AMA GRAND NATIONAL RALLY July 26-29: Carson City, Nev.: International Women & Motorcycling Conference, AMA, (614) 856-1900, WomenandMotorcycling.com AMA NATIONAL RALLY July 20-22: Lexington, Ohio: AMA Vintage Motorcycle Days, Mid-Ohio Sports Car Course, AMA, Connie Fleming; (614) 856-1900 ext. 1258, AMAVintageMotorcycleDays.com AMA NATIONAL CONVENTION Sept. 12-16: Ruidoso, N.M.: Golden Aspen Rally, MotorcycleRally.com AMA NATIONAL TOURING RALLY June 24-28: Avon, Colo.: STAR 2012, SportTouring. us/STAR2012 July 11-15: Maggie Valley, N.C.: Roadrunner Motorcycle Touring & Travel Annual Touring Weekend, Roadrunner.travel/events/touring-weekend/ Aug. 1-5: Stephenson, Wash.: Rally in the Gorge, SoundRider.com/rally AMA NATIONAL GYPSY TOUR Aug. 6-12: Sturgis, S.D.: Sturgis Motorcycle Rally, SturgisMotorcycleRally.com AMA NATIONAL GRAND TOURS AMERICANMOTORCYCLIST.COM/ROADRIDE/ TOURING Jan. 1-Dec. 31: Polar Bear Grand Tour, AMA District 2 of New Jersey, (609) 894-2941, PolarBearGrandTour. com March 1-Nov. 30: Smoke Chasing Grand Tour, Team

Aug. 11: Salt Lake City: This is the Place Heritage Park, road ride Aug. 19: Cottleville, Mo.: St. Charles Community College, road ride Aug. 19: Fiskdale, Mass.: Tantasqua Regional High School, road ride Aug. 26: Ann Arbor, Mich.: Washtenaw Community College, road ride/dual-sport Aug. 26: Fletcher, N.C.: WNC Ag Center and Fairgrounds, road ride Sept. 9: Carnation, Wash.: Remlinger Farms, road ride Sept. 9: Leeds, Ala.: Barber Motorsports Park, road ride Sept. 9: Indianapolis: Indianapolis Motor Speedway, road ride Sept. 16: Tulsa, Okla.: Tulsa Health Dept., road ride Sept. 16: Phoenixville, Pa.: Valley Forge Christian College, road ride Sept. 23: Ellicott City, Md.: Turf Valley Resort, road ride Sept. 30: Las Vegas, Nev.: Las Vegas Motor Speedway, road ride Oct. 7: Fairfield, Calif.: Solano Community College, road ride Oct. 7: Grapevine, Texas: Grapevine Mills Mall, road ride Oct. 21: Cardiff, Calif.: MiraCosta College, road ride Oct. 21: Mesa, Ariz.: Desert Ridge High School, road ride Nov. 4: Lithia, Fla.: Heinrich Training Center, road ride

www.husqvarna-motorcyclesna.com


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SUNDAY, AUGUST 5, 2012

STADIUM MOTOCROSS

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$10,000 Pro MX Purse $ 1,900 Pro ATV Purse $ 3,000 in gift certificates

awarded in amateur division

For Information Phone: (636) 488-3174

E-mail: tgulley83@yahoo.com

GATE FEE (INCLUDES FAIRGROUNDS ENTRY) ADULTS................................................. $20 CHILDREN ............................................. $15 NO GATE FEE REQUIRED FOR RIDER

ENTRY FEE MONEY CLASS ...................................... $50 AMATEUR CLASSES............................... $30

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ADVERTISER INDEX Allstate .................................................................60 AMA Classifieds powered by SprocketList.com .27 AMA Hall of Fame................................................21 AMA Husqvarna National DS Series ...................55 AMA Kawasaki Premier Touring Series ...............11 AMA Vintage Motorcycle Days ............................59 AMA Women’s Conference ............................... 4-5 AMA Yamaha Super Ténére NARS........................8 Americade ...........................................................27 American Motorcycle Specialties ........................57 Benchmark Helmets ............................................28 Best Rest Products .............................................56 Bike Bandit ..........................................................16 Black Book ..........................................................56 BMW....................................................................15 Bohn ....................................................................56 Bridgestone ...........................................................7 Brookside S/100 ..................................................17 Can-Am .........................................................24, 25 Capital One......................................................9, 51

Choice Hotels ......................................................27 Cycle Analysis .....................................................56 Discount Ramps ..................................................35 Draggin Jeans .....................................................56 Federal Co. ..........................................................23 Gerbings ..............................................................56 GRIPSWELL Gloves ............................................57 Honda .....................................................2-3, 30-31 JC Motors ............................................................16 K&N Filters...........................................................32 Pit Posse .............................................................33 Progressive ..........................................................13 Port-A-Chopper...................................................57 RidersGuides.com ...............................................56 Rivco ...................................................................26 Seat Concepts.....................................................18 Sound RIDER!......................................................57 Sudco ..................................................................18 Washington Town and Country Fair ....................56 Yuasa ...................................................................29

AMA Trademarks The following represent active, registered trademarks, trademarks and service marks of the AMA. Usage of any AMA trademark or registered trademark without our permission is prohibited. Please contact smaher@ama-cycle.org for more information or assistance. (800) AMA-JOIN® • AMA Dragbike™ • AMA Endurocross® • AMA Pro Grand National Championship™ • AMA Pro Racing® • AMA Racer® • AMA Racing® • AMA Supermoto® • AMA Supercross® • AMA SX Lites™ • AMA U.S. Drag Racing Championship® • AMA U.S. Flat Track Championship® • AMA U.S. Hillclimb Championship® • AMA U.S. Motocross Championship® • AMA U.S. Supercross Championship® • AMA U.S. Supersport Championship® • ATV Hare Scrambles National Championship Series™ • ATV Motocross National Championship Series™ • Amateur National Motocross Championships™ • American Motorcyclist Association® • Arenacross® • Dirt Track Grand Championships™ • Grand National Enduro Championship™ • Gypsy Tour® • Hare & Hound National Championship Series™ • Hare Scrambles Championship Series™ • Hare Scrambles National Championship Series™ • Kids Just Want To Ride® • Motorcycle Hall of Fame® • Motorcycle Hall of Fame Museum® • Motorcyclist of the Year™ • National Adventure Riding Series™ • National Dual-Sport Series™ • National Enduro Championship Series™ • Protect Your Right to Ride® • Protecting Your Right to Ride® • Ride Straight® • Rights. Riding. Racing.® • Road Race Grand Championships™ • Vintage Grand Championships™ • Vintage Motorcycle Days® • Vote Like A Motorcyclist®


GUEST COLUMN JOURNEYS AND EXPECTATIONS Gary and I had been searching for a yellow trike online at different Honda dealerships. We finally found one that we both liked at Russellville Honda in Arkansas. It had nearly everything we needed, and what it didn’t have, the dealer could add: a CB system, a spoiler with brake lights and a luggage rack. They also offered us a fair trade-in value for our Goldwing. However, we live in southeastern Connecticut. It was going to be a long ride down and back home. It was already November and getting cold. It seemed crazy to ride down that time of the year with the weather so unpredictable, but we checked the five-day forecast. It was supposed to be in the high 50s and low 60s, so off we went. We left Connecticut on our Goldwing on a Saturday morning at 5 a.m. It was dark and cold, but we were prepared. We were only 50 miles or so into our journey when we realized how cold it actually was, but we kept going. We stopped every 100 miles or so to warm up in a store or gas station. As we walked around warming up and flapping our arms, people stared, but we just challenged each other to keep riding. When the sun came up, it was a welcoming sight. It got warmer as we made our way south, but the wind was bitterly cold on the turnpike and sometimes so gusty that we felt like we were getting pulled off the road. Many times we had biked from Connecticut to the southern states. For several years, we rode to the Honda Hoot in Tennessee, one of our favorite bike rallies, and Americade in New York. We always rode with our group from Connecticut, and we gathered at the rallies. We rode and ate and rode some more each day. It has always been a lot of fun. But this ride was different. We were alone, just us on one bike. We were on a mission. The weather held out for us. The sun came out and warmed us up each morning. We were lucky, finding good motels for our rest and recuperation each evening. We did have time to enjoy the sights—some we had seen before and some we hadn’t, such as the Mississippi River and Arkansas’ cotton fields, ravaged this particular year by a drought and left in the fields unpicked. Everywhere we stopped, we met friendly people. There was always someone interesting to chat with. That’s the thing about riding. When you’re out on the bike, you notice a lot more people, and more people notice you. You stand out. People always admire the motorcycle and the fact that we opt to ride instead of sitting in a comfy car. Although we have travelled a lot, there are things we have not seen or done. Several times, we biked from Connecticut to Knoxville. We have been to the Wing Dings in Greenville, S.C., but we never went farther west than Knoxville. So we got to go through some new places for us, such as Nashville, and visit Graceland, the famous home of Elvis Presley and see his bigger-than-life bronze statue. We had never been to Memphis. Now we have. Traveling farther west on Route 40, we arrived in Little Rock, Ark., for the night. By now, the weather was almost perfect, a little chilly, but

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the sun was out every day. After a short few-hour ride the next day, we arrived in Russellville. We talked to the dealer, and the extras were installed. With our directional lights and, of course, the bright yellow color of our trike, we’ll definitely stand out on the road. No one will miss us now. We thought we would feel self-conscious about the color, but we just love it. It’s beautiful, and we’re getting used to the attention. A few hours later, we were headed home. The ride was good. With the heated seats, it was warmer than the trip going south. The built-in GPS navigator, “Jill,” was right on top of things for us. We joked that it was like having another person ride with us. After five days on the road—and one instance where Gary temporarily “lost” a set of keys to the trike—we made it home to Connecticut. It was late and dark, but not cold—a good sign. It was a long but well-paced trip. We were glad to have done it, but we also were glad it was over. The next day, one of the first things we did was get two American flags for the antenna. We are both patriotic, and we love this country. We are so grateful that we have been able to travel and see as much as we have. Now, with the trike, we are able to see more—and do it in style. AMA Member Millie Gannotti lives in Waterford, Conn.

Photos Portrait: Cara Lee Photography; Inset: Provided by Millie Gannotti

Finding Our New Ride States Away By Millie Gannotti


cycle days r o t o m e g a t in V Come to aumsacelebrate and help

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Motorcycle Da July 20-22, 2012 e g ta in V A M A o t Ride gton, Ohio, in x Le in e s r u o C Sports Car 3-Day Admission: STANDARD - $55 Single-Day Admission: STANDARD - $35 Tent Camping: STANDARD - $45 RV Camping: STANDARD - $70 Cart Rental: Advance - $100

Grand Marshal

craig vetter ama motorcycle hall of famer economy run pioneer iconic designer racer Meet craig at: autograph sessions, laps of the track, seminars...and a special-edition fuel economy challenge!

BRING T H Kids

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Swap Meet | Road Racing | Seminars | Motocross Vintage Displays | Scrambles | Bike Shows | Trials | And More! And‌ A classic field meet on the infield! Enjoy all those great field meet games that test your skills and get the laughs! Ride the plank, bite the weenie, slow race! Have fun, win prizes!

Learn more on the World Wide Web: AMAVintageMotorcycleDays.com


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M O T O R C Y C L E

American Motorcyclist 08 2012 Web Preview  

The Journal of the AMA web preview version.

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