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AUGUST 2010

Stand Up Guy [ ‘Last Comic Standing’ Alonzo Bodden Lives to Ride ]

THE JOURNAL OF THE


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Gawk.Honda.com BE A RESPONSIBLE RIDER. ALWAYS WEAR A HELMET, EYE PROTECTION AND PROTECTIVE CLOTHING. NEVER RIDE UNDER THE INFLUENCE OF DRUGS OR ALCOHOL. AND NEVER USE THE STREET AS A RACETRACK. OBEY THE LAW AND READ YOUR OWNER’S MANUAL THOROUGHLY. INTERSTATE,TM SABRE TM and FURY® are trademarks of Honda Motor Co., Ltd. ©2010 American Honda Motor Co., Inc. (4/10)


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NAVIGATION

Cover Alonzo Bodden loves to ride, photographed by Conrad Lim. Navigation Photo The latest rendition of the AMA Motorcycle Hall of Fame is getting ready for prime time. As this issue went to bed, we were putting the finishing touches on the new Hall of Fame exhibit. The official opening took place on July 8. Photo by Grogan Studios.

8. LETTERS

You write, we read.

10. ROB DINGMAN

Elevating the Hall of Fame

12. RIGHTS

Rick Dorfmeyer and D.I.R.T. do good for trail riders in Indiana.

17. RIDING

Designing the Harley-Davidson XR1200R to change opinions. American Motorcyclist magazine (ISSN 0277-9358) is published monthly by the American Motorcyclist Association, 13515 Yarmouth Dr., Pickerington, OH 43147. Copyright by the American Motorcyclist Association/American Motorcyclist 2010. Printed in USA. Subscription rate: Magazine subscription fee of $10 covered in membership dues; $15 a year for non-members. Postmaster: Mail form 3579 to 13515 Yarmouth Dr., Pickerington, OH 43147. Periodical postage paid at Pickerington, Ohio, and at additional mailing offices.

August 2010 Volume 64, Number 8 Published by the American Motorcyclist Association 13515 Yarmouth Dr. Pickerington, OH 43147 (800) AMA-JOIN AmericanMotorcyclist.com

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26. RACING

Grand Prix hero Tony Cairoli hopes to race in the United States full time.

32. HALL OF FAME

Dick Burleson’s 1979 Husqvarna, the Class of 2010 and Evel Knievel.

36. ALONZO BODDEN: STAND UP GUY

He may be the “Last Comic Standing,” but he’s often the first guy out riding.

42. TWO-WHEELED RUSH!

AMA Racing is the gold-standard of amateur motorcycle racing in America. Here’s why.

48. GO RIDE

What to do, where to go.

58. RICK JACOBS Riding like a warrior.


Open or Close Your Garage Door with EDITORIAL OFFICES

AMA BOARD OF DIRECTORS

American Motorcyclist 13515 Yarmouth Drive Pickerington, OH 43147 (614) 856-1900 submissions@ama-cycle.org

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To order, visit us at www.F2Ptechnologies.com. Use AMA member promo code: AMA2009 to save 10%. (online orders only) Proud supporter of the AMA.

Contact any member of the AMA Board of Directors at www.AmericanMotorcyclist. com/whatis/trustees.asp Stan Simpson, Chairman Cibolo, Texas

Grant Parsons, Managing Editor James Holter, Associate Editor Bill Kresnak, Government Affairs Editor Mark Lapid, Creative Director Nora Berardi, Production Coordinator Jen Muecke, Designer

Jim Williams, Vice-Chairman Irvine, Calif. Jon-Erik Burleson, Assistant Treasurer Murrietta, Calif. Perry King, Assistant Secretary Northern California

ADVERTISING Bob Buchanan, Advertising Manager (310) 505-3241, bbuchanan@ama-cycle.org

John Ulrich, Executive Committee Member Lake Elsinore, Calif.

Ray Monroe, Advertising Manager (815) 633-8011, rmonroe@ama-cycle.org

Andy Goldfine, Duluth, Minn.

Misty Walker, Advertising Assistant (614) 856-1900, ext. 1267, mwalker@ama-cycle.org

Charles Goman, Winder, Ga.

All trademarks used herein (unless otherwise noted) are owned by the AMA and may only be used with the express, written permission of the AMA. American Motorcyclist is the monthly publication of the American Motorcyclist Association, which represents motorcyclists nationwide. For information on AMA membership benefits, call (800) AMA-JOIN or visit AmericanMotorcyclist.com. Manuscripts, photos, drawings and other editorial contributions must be accompanied by return postage. No responsibility is assumed for loss or damage to unsolicited material. Copyright© American Motorcyclist Association, 2010.

Michael Lock, Cupertino, Calif. Maggie McNally, Albany, N.Y. Scott Miller, Milwaukee, Wis. Art More, Surprise, Ariz. Jim Viverito, Chicago, Ill.

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CONTRIBUTORS AND STAFF

CL

RJ

KF

JH

CONRAD LIM, Photographer You’ve seen Conrad’s work in this magazine before, with a few of the women in our “Fast Forward” feature last year. One of the most polite people we know, Conrad hooked up with Alonzo Bodden to shoot this month’s cover.

MARK LAPID, Creative Director Amazingly, Mark’s twofor-one-motorcycle-swap deal hasn’t soured with the passage of nearly a month. He is, however, becoming somewhat adept in the intricacies of carburetors, jets and that wonderful stuff called varnish.

RICK JACOBS, Guest Columnist As it turns out, the biggest issue with crossing the country by motorcycle isn’t the traffic, the heat, the sun, the gloom of night or even the endless parade of road food. It’s the spiders.

JEN MUECKE, Designer Oddly enough, Jen’s one-fortwo-motorcycle-swap deal has gone even better, involving absolutely zero carb work and a fair amount of riding.

KEN FRICK, Photographer A long-time AMA member and master image-man, Ken donated his Honda CB750, with 300,000 miles on the odometer, to the AMA Motorcycle Hall of Fame. JAMES HOLTER, Associate Editor James has, we believe, set a new world record for “days pulling a trailer behind a vehicle in hopes of closing a deal on a CRF100.” After an initial abortive attempt ended in three days, the next stretch lasted more than eight. And the “seller” is still MIA. BILL KRESNAK, Government Affairs Editor Having recently discovered the joys of mail-order diplomas, Krez has re-named his motorcycle “Dr. Z350.” To no one’s surprise, it hasn’t made him even an eensy bit faster.

NORA BERARDI, Production Coordinator So there she is, working inside the house, when she hears a motorcycle fire up in the garage. What!?! She makes it to the window just in time to see her (new) husband, Mike, heading out for a ride on her bike! What’s wrong with this picture? Everything! GRANT PARSONS, Managing Editor With Father’s Day fast approaching as this issue went to press, Grant was thinking back wistfully to his best present ever: The time Charlotte and Jake surprised him by cleaning up the garage. If you’ve never seen Grant’s garage, you can’t imagine how huge that is. Other contributors include: Dan Campbell Photography, Grogan Studios, The Roxy Studio, Brian Williams Photography


Ethanol 101 What you nEEd to KnoW about E10/Ethanol FuEl

4 Main problEMs With E10/ Ethanol FuEl Problem 1: Debris in Fuel Gums rapidly form in the fuel tank and fuel delivery systems as ethanol fuels age. However, ethanol is also a powerful solvent that will strip away and disperse this build up back into the fuel as large, performance-robbing particles. This leads to clogged filters, injectors and carburetors.

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Problem 2: excessive Water in the Fuel anD Phase seParation Ethanol attracts moisture from the atmosphere, forming an ethanol/water solution mixed in the gasoline. E-10 fuel will naturally hold .5% water in suspension, but when water levels exceed this threshold, or when the fuel cools significantly, the water/ethanol mix drops out of suspension. This is phase separation. Excessive water in the fuel tank causes engines to run rough, stall, and can lead to internal damage to engine components. Ethanol provides a significant amount of the fuel’s octane, so when the ethanol/water solution separates and drops to the bottom of the tank, the remaining fuel is left without enough octane to properly operate the engine. Additionally, the ethanol/water solution can become partially combustible, which can lead to engine damage. Star tron® Solution: star tron®’s enzyme formula reduces interfacial surface tension between fuel and water. the molecular cluster size is greatly reduced, allowing more water to be dispersed throughout the fuel. these sub-micron sized droplets are safely eliminated as the engine operates. star tron® treated fuel helps prevent phase separation by allowing more water to be burned off than with untreated fuel, drying out the tank and preventing water buildup. Problem 3: ethanol Fuels break DoWn Quickly Over a short period of time ethanol fuel begins to break down. As ethanol and other components evaporate, the fuel loses octane and becomes “stale.” This causes hard starts, pinging and engine knock, which robs your engine of power and can cause damage. ®

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STOP AND SEE There were two disturbing items in the July issue. The Insurance Institute for Highway Safety wants to mandate antilock brakes on all motorcycles. Although I would object to making ABS mandatory, it should be available on all motorcycles because it is an important safety feature; some importers have chosen not to make ABS available on U.S. models. As one example, on the Ninja 650R, ABS is available on European models but not on U.S. models. Surely our lives are as important as European lives. The other item concerns car rear-view mirror adjustment and recommends following the dangerous fad of adjusting mirrors wide. However, that creates small additional blind spots close to the car, which could easily hide a motorcycle or bicycle. Seeing into those blind spots Frank Eggers

LETTER OF THE MONTH A WORTHY CAUSE Gasoline for a great ride: $14. Eight cups of pink lemonade: $2. Tip for great service: $1. Stopping and enjoying a delicious cup of lemonade and providing a group of kids with enough money to buy a can of worms to go fishing with: Priceless. Eric Lemoine AMA No. 598125 Montgomery, Mass.

Send your letters (and a high-resolution photo) to submissions@ama-cycle.org; or mail to 13515 Yarmouth Drive, Pickerington, OH 43147. would require greater neck flexibility than most drivers have. Frank R. Eggers AMA No. 818736 Albuquerque, N.M. We agree that ABS should not be mandatory, and we’d like to see it offered on more motorcycles. But when it comes to rear-view mirror adjustments on cars, the truth is that no system is 100-percent effective at covering every space around a vehicle. The wide-view system requires care to use effectively, but it allows more awareness than simply pointing all three mirrors to offer the same view. A headcheck is prudent (car or bike) whenever you’re changing lanes. And when you’re on a bike, it’s always best to assume that the driver never sees you at all, regardless of where the mirrors are oriented. WHY THE BREAK? I cannot begin to express my disappointment with the editors of your magazine to allow the July edition guest spot to be offered to someone who took a personal hiatus of 50 years to not ride a motorcycle. It seems a typical cliché of anybody who excludes motorcycle riding while they fulfill other aspects of their lives, only to re-ignite their desire at a more convenient time. I thought the AMA reflected the lifestyle and experiences of the avid day-to-day rider and not someone who always wanted to. Dennis Tremaglio AMA No. 816302 Garden Grove, Calif. As a matter of fact, Dave Tucker, the guest columnist you mention, is an avid day-to-day rider. He is also someone who always wanted to ride, and decided to make that dream a reality. In both respects, he’s just like every one of us. We all at some point wanted to ride, and now we all do. There’s no age limit—young or old—on having a passion for motorcycling. In fact, that passion is the one universal among everyone who rides. And as the country’s premier advocate for the motorcycling lifestyle, the AMA welcomes all riders. BRITS RULE! I’ve been a life member for years. I like stories about old European motorcycles: the Brough Superior, Hesketh, Ariel Square Four, Vincent, Nortons, Triumphs and BSA triples, etc. The Excelsior SuperX, old and recently discontinued models, are cool too!

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I visited your old museum years ago and will visit your present location soon, I hope. Keep up the great work! Al Greenberg AMA No. 175195 Port Saint Lucie, Fla.

Al Greenberg

MAKE THEM AWARE For years, when I have seen a car pointed toward me waiting to turn, I’ve always flashed my high-beam a couple of times. I feel that the light flashing is a little more noticeable than a steady beam. Andy Herman II AMA No. 308616 Midland, Mich. Unfortunately, Andy, we can’t recommend that approach. In many parts of the country, a flash of the high-beam in that situation can be interpreted as a signal for the other vehicle to “go ahead.” That would have them turning right in front of you at the last possible moment! Better to keep your headlight on steady, scan for possible swerve areas in case the car pulls out in front of you anyway, and, if you can, watch the car wheel to see if it starts turning— something that’s often noticeable before you can perceive the car itself moving.

Photo Eggers: Killboy.com

MEMBER LETTERS

A NEW TAKE ON WHAT DEFINES A MOTORCYCLE When it comes to the question of how we should define a motorcycle, here’s another way to look at it. What if a motorcycle was defined as any motor vehicle with no permanent hardtop over the operator and Don Peter passenger area? This should greatly help eliminate helmet laws and motorcycle bans. Can you imagine Jay Leno cruising southern California in his convertible Shelby Cobra wearing a helmet? Or, being told he has to park it outside a Beverly Hills gated community? Don Peter AMA Life Member No. 544276 Pioneer, Calif.


AN INTERESTING TAKE ON VISIBILITY I aways take care to look out for others on motorcycles when I’m driving, so I was amazed at the invisibility of a large cruiser that was crossing my path one sunny afternoon. I had been looking right at him, but didn’t see the machine until I noticed a flicker of his many headlights when he hit a bump! I was at a loss, until I remembered a bit of history. In World War II in the Atlantic when German U-Boats had to keep a sharp watch for Allied aircraft, the boats could dive to safety as long as they saw that dark speck miles away. But when they put incredibly bright lights on both wings and flew around during the day, it seems the light cancelled out the image of the aircraft against the sunlit sky and they disappeared. I figure that the bike was doing the same thing to me. Check it out yourself some time, and draw your own conclusions. Mark Hayzlett AMA No. 422769 Flemington, N.J.

WATCH OUT FOR MISLEADING CHRISTMAS CARD OFFERS Wait For The Real Thing From the AMA For years, the AMA Motorcycle Hall of Fame has offered a popular series of Christmas cards to AMA members featuring motorcycle-themed images. In recent years, AMA members have called to our attention the fact that you may, unfortunately, receive an incredibly similar-looking solicitation by mail and e-mail that has nothing to do with the Hall of Fame or the AMA. That’s why we’re asking that if you plan to order Christmas cards, please be sure the ones you’re ordering are the real deal—so that proceeds from the sale benefit the AMA Motorcycle Hall of Fame. You’ll hear more about our Christmas Card program in the near future, both in this magazine and on MotorcycleMuseum.org. Thanks for your support.

May 2010

WHY I RIDE The “Navigation” photo in your May issue condensed into one picture all the reasons I ride a motorcycle. Clement Salvadori AMA No. 77415 Atascadero, Calif.

On Facebook? Us, too! Become a fan of the American Motorcyclist Association and you could be leaving comments like these: www.facebook.com/AmericanMotorcyclist As long as the kids have responsible parents that will make sure they have had adequate training and are wearing helmets I see no reason to keep them off. — Jacque Vanderbloom, on a Massachusetts plan to make it illegal for children under the age of 14 to operate an ATV or recreational utility vehicle.

motorcyclists when they are annoyed/frightened by loud motorcycles. Noisy motorcycles are a problem everywhere but the dragstrip or racetrack. — Charley Pierson, on a California proposal to require stock exhausts on all registered motorcycles.

That’s crazy, riding is great for kids! — Thomas Cooke, on the same subject.

Congratulations. One of my favorite motorcycle movies is the Don Castro story titled “Learning Curve.” — Ken James, on dirt-track racer Castro being nominated to the AMA Motorcycle Hall of Fame (see story, page 34)

This was, obviously, a way to get BikeWeek out of that town. We need to improve our image, therefore, preventing this type of harassment in the future. — Roger Rojas, on a discriminatory Myrtle Beach, S.C., city law struck down by the state Supreme Court requiring motorcyclists to wear helmets, despite a state law that allows riders to choose whether to wear helmets. I still like my old favorites but it’s good to see some new blood winning in the GNCC series. — Jimmy Charuhas, on XC1 rookie Cory Buttrick taking a win the the Can-Am Grand National Cross Country Series. We’ve been saying for 40 years that loud pipes risk rights. Normal people don’t like noisy motorcycles and hold it against all

I want one! — Tina Mericle, on an announcement of Can-Am roadster demo rides available at AMA Vintage Motorcycle Days. I need a bigger garage! — Matt Benefield, on a sale for Bikebandit.com merchandise. You mean there are people that DRIVE to work?!?! LOL — Jason Kaplan, on Ride To Work Day in June. Follow all AMA news—and chat with fellow AMA members— on Facebook. You can also always get the latest info at AmericanMotorcyclist.com.

August 2010

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VIEWPOINT

ELEVATING THE HALL OF FAME In addition to protecting the future of motorcycling, the AMA also has the responsibility to preserve the history of motorcycling for tens of millions of motorcyclists. What began as a vision to create a world-class national museum of motorcycling resulted in the creation of the American Motorcycle Heritage Foundation (AMHF) in 1982, and the opening in August 1990 of what was then called the Motorcycle Heritage Museum, located at the AMA headquarters building, then in Westerville, Ohio. In order to grow the museum beyond the roughly 7,000 square feet available to it in the Westerville offices, former AMA President Ed Youngblood moved the Association headquarters to its location in Pickerington, Ohio, where the AMA Motorcycle Hall of Fame occupies a dedicated 26,000-square-foot building. This would not have been possible were it not for the tens of thousands of dollars donated by AMA members and others to support the foundation. As president of the AMA, I feel a sense of responsibility to continue the work of those before me to preserve the heritage of motorcycling and the AMA and, wherever possible, improve upon what has been done. Just as we have refocused the AMA mission and the pages of this magazine on the people of motorcycling, so too have we refocused the AMA Motorcycle Hall of Fame on the incredible individuals inducted into its hallowed halls. The original philosophy of the foundation was to regularly change its major exhibits, which resulted in a succession of a number of great displays. The Hall of Fame, however, was in need of an upgrade. Until now, the Hall of Fame occupied a portion of the lower level of the facility. To visitors, the Hall of Fame could have more appropriately been called the “Wall of Fame.” That’s because the plaques dedicated to each Hall of Fame inductee were velcroed to a carpeted wall adjacent to a crowded display of motorcycles associated with Hall of Fame members. There simply was not adequate space for the inductees and their bikes to be truly appreciated by visitors. Fast forward to July 2010. After a great deal of work undertaken by our dedicated staff, the Hall of Fame now occupies the entire main exhibit hall, and visitors are led through a series of displays that culminate in a new 360-degree Hall of Fame Gallery. Hall of Famers’ plaques are affixed to the walls of this gallery in-the-round, and the

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centerpiece is a remarkable statue called “Glory Days.” This Steve Posson-cast sculpture was commissioned and donated in 1990 by Mike and Margaret Wilson, AMA Life Members, AMHF Board Members and Hall of Famers themselves. It is a three-quarter life-size bronze statue depicting former motorcycle racer, AMA race official and Hall of Famer Jim Davis on a 1919 Indian. Glory Days has played a special role in the development of the Hall of Fame. It served as the inspiration for the AMHF logo, and is a recognized icon that represents the AMA Motorcycle Hall of Fame today. It is only fitting that this sculpture occupy the prominent spot it does in the Hall of Fame Gallery. This recent elevation of the Hall of Fame inductees is only the beginning. We trust that the improvements we’ve made will generate more interest and financial support for the Hall of Fame so that further enhancements can be made. For 20 years, the AMA has shouldered the responsibility for building, growing and funding the Hall of Fame. To make the Hall of Fame a truly world-class destination, the AMA can’t do it alone. We need the support of the entire motorcycling community. Each of you can help. To learn how, please visit MotorcycleMuseum.org > Support. Better yet, come visit the AMA Motorcycle Hall of Fame in Pickerington, Ohio, and see for yourself the tremendous improvements being made to honor the legacy of motorcycling. You’ll be glad you did. And you might just ride away with an inspiration of your own. Rob Dingman is the AMA’s president and CEO.

Photo Ken Frick Photography

New Exhibit Expansion Is Only The Beginning By Rob Dingman


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RIGHTS

Rick Dorfmeyer (center) and fellow D.I.R.T. members Roy Garrett (left) and Gary DeLong help build trails.

D.I.R.T. GETS IT DONE

Tenacious Indiana Riding Group Creates New Trails When it comes to creating new riding areas, sometimes you have to take the long view. And that’s exactly what a hardworking group of off-highway riders in Indiana has done in recent years, working to create not one, but two places for the state’s off-road riders to enjoy. The group is Discover Indiana Riding Trails (D.I.R.T.), and the off-highway vehicle (OHV) riding areas are the Redbird State Recreational Area near Dugger, and Interlake State Recreation Area near Lynnville, both in southwest Indiana. The efforts are the result of hard work that started back in the 1980s in response to a problem with illegal riding on former Redbird Coal Company land near Dugger. D.I.R.T. was formed in 1988, and members including Rick Dorfmeyer, Gary DeLong, Roy Garrett and Tim Garrett wanted to legally open Redbird. It was an uphill battle that took a lot of effort from the group, Dorfmeyer says. “Take Gary DeLong’s work, for instance,” Dorfmeyer says. “The man spent so many days and evenings going

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to town council meetings, and he and Roy were going to the statehouse, politicking, making friends, learning how state departments work and appropriations work, and getting a legislative education. You could almost forget how to ride a dirtbike!” They succeeded, but it took nearly 15 years. The Redbird State Recreational Area opened in 2003, with state help in the form of more than $1 million in investment in the property. Today, Redbird has 1,400 acres of marked, managed and maintained OHV riding trails. Now, D.I.R.T. is working to create another state-owned riding area at a place called Interlake—parts of which are already open. Interlake was the brainchild of Tom Hartman, the owner of Big 4 Cycle in Evansville, Ind., along with Keith Obermeyer, who owns Obermeyer Yamaha in Jasper, Ind., Roy Garrett and Dorfmeyer. Dorfmeyer expects the Interlake project to progress relatively quickly. “The process has been accelerated a little bit because Indiana has a spectacular governor [Mitch Daniels],” Dorfmeyer says. “He’s a common-sense guy. If it makes

sense, then there’s no reason for all of the bureaucratic baby steps.” What has D.I.R.T. learned over the years? Perseverance and patience can win. “There’s no end to the number of people who complain about not having a place to ride,” Dorfmeyer says. “There is only one way to create and protect riding areas, and that’s become involved with the AMA, the BlueRibbon Coalition, local groups, state lawmakers and local folks,” he says. “If you’re serious about it, if it’s a passion, then you need to devote a lot of time to it,” he says. “There has to be room somewhere in your life for the preservation of the opportunities to ride a motorcycle or ATV [all-terrain vehicle] off-road.” It’s impressive work, says AMA Government Affairs Manager Royce Wood. “D.I.R.T. really has done a great job,” says Wood. “What’s impressive is that they worked so long and hard to create the state’s first OHV park at Redbird, and then they rolled up their sleeves and got back to work to create another one at Interlake. They are tenacious,” Wood says. For more information on D.I.R.T., go to DiscoverIndianaRidingTrails.com.


RIGHTS

Photos D.I.R.T.: The Roxy Studio; Parade: Paul McNaughten

Dirtbikes unite!

OFF-HIGHWAY RIDERS PRIVILEGED TO PAY TRIBUTE TO SERVICE MEMBERS

Northern Virginia Trail Riders Take Part In National Memorial Day Parade About 65 dirtbike, dual-sport machine and all-terrain vehicle (ATV) riders took part in the National Memorial Day Parade in Washington, D.C., as part of a Northern Virginia Trail Riders (NVTR) effort to

honor those who serve in the U.S. armed services and remember those who gave their lives. Joining the NVTR as guests were members of the Family Off-Road Riders

of Prince William County, the Green Marble Enduro Riders, the Potomac Vintage Riders and the R & T Club. Rick Podliska, AMA Washington representative, joined former AMA National Enduro and International Six Days Enduro competitor Mark Spence, Angel Earles and Shifter the dog in a Kawasaki Mule leading the contingent. Brig. Gen. Ernest Audino, a U.S. Army combat veteran of Iraq, and his wife, Marie, rode in the contingent on their own dirtbikes. The parade included nearly 150 military units, marching bands, youth groups and floats. An estimated 350,000 spectators lined the parade route along Constitution Ave. “With over 26 years of active and reserve Army service, I’m no stranger to parades,” says Jim Cowgill, NVTR legislative officer. “However, none matches the thrill of turning my motorcycle onto Constitution Ave. on Washington’s National Mall before thousands of cheering spectators at the National Memorial Day Parade. “When the veterans and active duty service members in our parade unit ride up and render our salutes to the reviewing officer, we share a proud moment, indeed,” he says.


RightS ForeSt ServiCe ProPoSeS Fee inCreaSeS in north Carolina New System-Wide Riding Permit Also Proposed

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Responsible riders keep the sound down, especially at night.

Sound CraCkdown

Cities Watching For Loud Motorcycles With the riding season in full swing, jurisdictions around the nation are once again telling motorcyclists to quiet down or pay up. In North Hampton, N.H., voters on May 11 approved a law that prohibits the operation of any motorcycle that doesn’t have a federal Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) label stating the exhaust system meets quiet federal sound emissions requirements. Fines for a first offense range from $200 to $500, while subsequent violations result in fines of $500 to $1,000. In Alton, Ill., where Mayor Tom Hoechst made election promises last year to do something about loud motorcycles, a new law cracks down on car stereos, cars, trucks and motorcycles that produce unreasonably loud sounds, banning noise amplification that disturbs “the peace, quiet and comfort of passersby or is plainly audible at a distance of 75 feet” unless it is coming from an emergency vehicle. Fines include $75 for the first infraction and, for subsequent violations, a minimum $750 fine and the possible impoundment of the vehicle. In Maine, efforts failed to pass a state law that would require all motorcycles built after 1982 to have an EPA-sound compliance label. But lawmakers did pass a law that allows the operator of a motor vehicle with excessive exhaust sound to be ticketed, which would result in a $137 fine.

The key in all these cases, notes AMA Government Affairs Manager Imre Szauter, is how the laws are applied. “The AMA has long stated its opposition to excessive motorcycle sound, but jurisdictions need to be sure they don’t unfairly discriminate against motorcyclists when trying to control sound,” Szauter says. “If jurisdictions are going to create new sound laws, then they must be sure those laws fairly address all sources of excessive sound.” At the same time, with cities and other jurisdictions now paying a lot more attention to motorcycle sound, it’s critical that motorcyclists be respectful of others, Szauter says. “That means that motorcyclists need to control their throttle hands in populated areas, and we need to have pipes that don’t produce excessively loud sound,” Szauter says. In addition to its decades-long history of opposition to excessive motorcycle sound, the AMA has hosted national summits on the subject that have brought together riders, manufacturers, aftermarket companies, law-enforcement officers and government officials. And just last year, the AMA unveiled model legislation to encourage adoption of the new, industry-backed SAE J2825 sound measurement standard. To read the AMA’s formal position on excessive sound, go to AmericanMotorcyclist.com > Rights > Resources > AMA Position Statements.

Photo Helmet : Jim Bowie

The U.S. Forest Service is considering raising user fees in various national forests in North Carolina, continuing an ongoing trend across the nation in recent years. Forests have instituted user fees to help raise money for operating and maintaining facilities under the Federal Lands Recreation Enhancement Act of 2005. At the Nantahala National Forest, officials are proposing raising the vehicle fee at the Wayehutta OHV Trail Complex from the current $5 per vehicle to $7 per operator in 2011 and $10 in 2013. The Brown Mountain OHV Trail Complex in the Pisgah National Forest would see the same increase. In addition, the Forest Service is proposing a systemwide seasonal pass program for OHV trail users. Under the new proposal, a forest-wide seasonal pass would cost $45 per operator in 2011 and $60 in 2013. In the Uwharrie National Forest, the operator fee at the Badin Lake OHV Trail would increase from the current $5 to $7 in 2011 and $10 in 2013. And at the Croatan National Forest, the $5 vehicle fee at the Black Swamp OHV Trail Complex would increase to a $7 operator fee in 2011 and to a $10 fee in 2013. Comments on any of these proposals must be mailed by July 30 to USDA Forest Service, National Forests in North Carolina, Attn: Recreational Fee Proposals, 160A Zillicoa St., Asheville, NC 28801 or by e-mail to comments-southern-northcarolina@fs.fed.us and should include “Recreation Fees” in the subject line.


ProPosed Michigan Laws affect off-highway riders

Trail Permit Fee Would Almost Double A flurry of off-highway vehicle (OHV) bills has been introduced in the Michigan Legislature that could simplify some existing requirements and pump more money into the state fund that is used to maintain OHV trails. Of particular interest for younger riders is House Bill 6159 that requires youths aged 10 to 16 to be certified to be able

to legally ride OHVs and caps the cost of certification at $20. H.B. 6160 would increase the fee of a trail permit from the current $16.25 to $30.50. The proposal also specifies that no event fee would be needed for an event involving 75 or fewer vehicles. H.B. 6161 focuses on basic rider safety education and responsible use, making “hands-on” training an option. This is seen as a way to make training available to more people. Under the proposal, the state Department of Natural Resources and Environment would be required to develop a hands-on training program. Finally, H.B. 6162 would give more counties the option of opening their roads to OHV use. You can get more information on these bills by going to the Rights section of AmericanMotorcyclist.com.

riders win in south caroLina

Supreme Court Rules That Discriminatory Myrtle Beach Helmet Law Can’t Stand In a victory against motorcycle discrimination, the South Carolina Supreme Court has struck down a Myrtle Beach, S.C., law that required riders to wear helmets within the city limits. The measure was one of more than a dozen designed to keep motorcyclists out of Myrtle Beach. The city passed the law in 2008 despite a state law that allows motorcyclists 21 or older to choose to ride with or without a helmet. The City Council passed 15 laws and amendments at that time, all targeting motorcyclists who attended week-long bike rallies in the Myrtle Beach area, ranging from the helmet requirement to a ban on loitering in parking lots. The state Supreme Court, in a decision on June 8, said the Myrtle Beach helmet ordinance was pre-empted by state law that gives adult riders the right to choose. “We find that the City Helmet Ordinance

fails under implied field preemption due to the need for statewide uniformity and therefore issue a declaratory judgment invalidating the ordinance,” the high court ruled. “It is regrettable that the city of Myrtle Beach felt the need to alienate motorcyclists with the law, especially since motorcyclists had supported businesses in Myrtle Beach for years during rallies,” says Ed Moreland, AMA senior vice president for government relations. “But we’re pleased that the South Carolina Supreme Court struck down the Myrtle Beach law, sending a clear message to all jurisdictions that discriminatory laws against motorcyclists are unacceptable.” The high court issued the ruling in response to a lawsuit filed on behalf of about 50 riders who were ticketed for riding without helmets shortly after the new law went into effect.


s tat e watc h

RIGHTS

ArizonA House Bill 2475, sponsored by state Rep. Jerry Weiers (R-Glendale), would permit motorcyclists in Maricopa County to split lanes during 2011. Unanimously passed by the House and with a large majority in the Senate, the bill was sent to Gov. Jan Brewer for consideration. Brewer vetoed the bill on May 11. Read her veto letter at AZleg.gov/ govlettr/49leg/2R/HB2475.pdf. CAliforniA Senate Bill 435 would require stock exhaust systems on all motorcycles constructed on or after Jan. 1, 2000. The bill would require thousands of currently legal motorcycles to be removed from the road, or their owners forced to spend hundreds (or thousands) of dollars to install stock exhaust systems. Sound off against the issue at AmericanMotorcyclist.com > Rights > Issues and Legislation. MAine Last month’s StateWatch incorrectly reported details of House Paper 1170. It ultimately was amended as LD-1642 and signed into law April 12. The legislation requires all vehicles operated in Maine to have a muffler, and modifications to amplify the exhaust sound are prohibited. A study group is mandated to research the noise issue and make further recommendations to the legislature. The governor also signed LD-1675 into law, which requires inspection stickers to be placed on the rear of a motorcycle registered in the state as of Jan. 1, 2012. A study group is also mandated and must report to the Legislature no later than Jan. 1, 2011.

U.S. HoUSe Committee DemanDS FUll DiSCloSUre on lanD CloSUre

Interior Department Discussed Possibly Closing Millions Of Acres Of Public Land As this issue went to press, the battle over a proposal with the potential to close up to 13 million acres to off-highway riding was heating up. At issue are hundreds of pages of internal documents related to the move that federal officials have kept secret. On June 16, the House Natural Resources Committee approved H. Res. 1406—a Resolution of Inquiry—that directs the Interior Department to turn over to Congress the missing pages and related documents of an internal memo that discusses proposed national monument designations and other land

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MArylAnd House Bill 676, sponsored by Delegates James Malone, Jr., (D-Arbutus) and Benjamin Kramer (D-Montgomery County), authorizes the use of certain auxiliary lighting on motorcycles. Senate Bill 189, sponsored by Sen. Bryan Simonaire (R-Anne Arundel County), authorizes the Motor Vehicle Administration to suspend for up 180 days the license of a person who is convicted of a moving violation that contributed to an accident that resulted in death. Both bills were signed into law May 20 by Gov. Martin O’Malley. new Jersey Several off-highway vehicle groups have joined forces to send a letter to New Jersey’s new commissioner of environmental protection asking for the creation of new riding areas. The AMA, New Jersey offHighway Vehicle Association, Motorcycle Industry Council and Specialty Vehicle Institute of America sent the letter dated March 24 to Bob Martin, who was recently appointed to serve as commissioner of the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection (DEP). The letter asks Martin to act quickly to carry out a law—P.L. 2009, c. 275—which calls for the creation of three off-highway vehicle (OHV) parks. The parks are to be created within three years, with one each in the north, central and southern parts of the state. Riders are encouraged to contact Martin to stress the need for creation of the parks. The fastest way to reach him is at AmericanMotorcyclist.com > Rights > Issues and Legislation.

ohio Following devastating tornados in northwest Ohio on June 5, members of the Toledo Trail Riders (www.ToledoTrailRiders. com) are calling for volunteers to help with the cleanup of the Maumee State Forest APV area. For more information, contact Matt Bucher at mbucher@toledotrailriders. com. oklAhoMA Five bills requested and supported by ABATE of Oklahoma have been signed into law by Gov. Brad Henry. Sponsored by Rep. Mike Christian (R-Oklahoma City), House Bill 2264 adds a $3 fee for each registered motorcycle for deposit in the Motorcycle Safety and Education Program Revolving Fund. House Bill 2322, sponsored by Rep. Paul Roan (D-Tishomingo), clarifies state law with regard to yielding the right-of-way for left-turning vehicles. Two bills were sponsored by Sen. Randy Bass (D-Lawton): Senate Bill 1329 permits a motorcycle operator to proceed with caution through a “stuck on red” traffic-actuated signal after coming to a complete stop and determining the signal did not detect the motorcycle, and Senate Bill 1670 changes the makeup of the Advisory Committee for Motorcycle Safety and Education. Lastly, Senate Bill 1917, sponsored by Sen. Cliff Aldridge (R-Choctaw), provides for special license plates in support of the Downed Bikers Association and for Armed Forces Veterans motorcycle license plates.

uses of some 13 million acres in the West. National monument designations could lead to bans on offhighway riding on that land. The measure—introduced by Natural Resources Ranking Member Doc Hastings (R-Wash.) and National Parks, Forests and Public Lands Subcommittee Ranking Member Rob Bishop (R-Utah)—was approved by a voice vote. It now Utah is just one state facing goes to the full House for closures. Photo submitted by Mike consideration. lewis of Pataskala, ohio. “We now have a strong today’s actions by the committee bipartisan agreement that the seriously and discloses the documents Interior Department needs to reveal to the that we have requested promptly and public exactly what plans are under way without further delay.” to unilaterally lock up millions of acres of Ed Moreland, AMA senior vice land across the country by designating president for government relations, them as national monuments,” Hastings praised Hastings and Bishop. said. “I hope the department takes


RiDiNG p Jeff Hower of Altamont, Mo., submitted this photo of adventure touring in Argentina. t Left to right: “My 2005 BMW GS1200 that I made a bike rack for. I mount my mountain bike on my GS so I can go mountain bike riding during peak traffic times in the L.A. area. ‘Ride to ride.’ And when I’m done, the rack comes off quickly since I’ve mounted it with quick release pins. This rig gets lots of looks as I lane split in the Los Angeles traffic. It rides very stable (the bike only weights 24 pounds) and does not extend any wider than the motorcycle.” Submitted by Allen Robinson of Agoura Hills, Calif.; “This is a pic of my ‘international’ bike trip of Missouri. Here’s my bike in front of the murals of Cuba, Mo. I also went to Mexico, Paris, Japan...all Missouri.” Submitted by Darian Puga of Saint Peters, Mo. t Left to right: Submitted by Thomas Stanwood; taken by Roy Saba, submitted by Will Rutledge of Aspen, Colo.

Got a picture you’d like to see in American Motorcyclist? Send it to submissions@ama-cycle.org with the subject line “Snapshots.” August 2010

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Photos XR1200R: Harley-Davidson; Housing: Brian Williams Photography

RiDing

Designing A streetbike thAt ChAnges OpiniOns Talking With The Stylists Behind The Harley-Davidson XR1200R

When Harley-Davidson set out to bring styling cues from the company’s impressive XR750 racebike to a streetoriented motorcycle, the goal was far reaching: Build a muscular, performancebased Harley-Davidson that really turned heads. The crew tasked with getting the look right included Frank Savage, the styling manager for the XL and XR lines, and Mark Daniels of the Motor Company’s design department. We caught up with them for an insider’s look at how a project like that comes together, as well as find out how they got two of the biggest dream jobs in motorcycling: designing new Harley-Davidsons. American Motorcyclist: Before we get to the XR, can you tell us how someone gets one of the most coveted jobs in the

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motorcycle world? Frank Savage: Well, we all have art backgrounds, and even before we went to college, we’ve had a penchant for drawing, and we have gasoline in our veins. I’ve always been a motorhead. When I was young, my father built hot rods. There was always a project going on. And when I would go to school, I’d draw pictures of cars that would just blow kids away. After school, I was doing some work in downtown Milwaukee for a consulting agency that was doing some work for others and Harley-Davidson. I got to meet Louie [Netz, vice president, director of styling] and Willie [G. Davidson, senior vice president, chief styling officer, and AMA Motorcycle Hall of Famer], and I was very enamored with their design philosophies

and the bikes they were working on. I hit it off with those guys and hit them up repeatedly for about six months for a job. Mark Daniels: Mine was very much the same path. I was from Milwaukee, and my dad was into sports cars and race cars. Out of art school, I knew I didn’t want to be involved in other jobs offered in the area—dishwashing and manufacturing— and when you grow up in Milwaukee, there’s only one place you want to work. I was working for a small shop that was doing some work with the VR racebikes, and that’s where I met Willie and Louie. I knew I wanted to work there, so I made a lot of phone calls and sent my resume and basically harassed my way into the job. It’s been great, especially to work for someone like Willie, who is an icon in the design world. AM: How’d the XR project get started? Savage: The XR started back in 2000, when Louie and Willie came to me and asked me to go over to the race department and see what we could do for them. At the time, I noticed there was


RIDING a tank on the bike that was an evolution of the earlier 750, but not like Louie and Willie would have liked it. So we re-did the tank, and that got us thinking. If we evolve the Sportster XL—it was a bike that was trying to be a sporty bike—what if we took it to the next level, and took some design cues from the XR and transfer those to the XL chassis? How do you maintain the look and work with the marketing requirements to get a gas tank that has enough fuel, and a seat that looks good, but still allows for two-up seating? We knew we wanted to use the imagery of that, but getting the proportions from pure race to street was the challenge. Daniels: The XR750 is such a huge motorcycle to the company from a historical standpoint, a crowning achievement, if you will. But it’s so minimalistic. Its proportions are so much different. You just can’t put lights on it and call it a streetbike. The challenge is not doing a straight copy of what’s sitting in the race trailer. That muscular stance really boils down to proportion, and that’s why we worked so much in 3-D, in clay, to make sure that the motor, the gas tank and tail section worked well together. As with most Harleys, the engine is the centerpiece, and you try to work in balance with that. Savage: We did a lot of work with the tank, placing it low on the bike and challenging the engineering department, because they typically want a lot of space for components. We actually wanted the tank low enough to bisect the rocker box. Daniels: Toward the end, I think we were arguing over, like one-eighth of an inch. It’s a fine process. AM: This has been a three- to four-year project. How do you keep the focus for such a long period of time? Savage: It’s interesting. We’ll finish our work, the styling, in the first year. Its done up in clay, and we’ll critique it and have Willie bless it. And then we kind of sit and look at the bike for a couple years as engineering and manufacturing work with it. They’re a big part of it. It goes through a development process with engineering to surprise people with its handling, and also with manufacturing to build it well. Styling is a part of it, but it’s the whole package. Without everyone’s input, it wouldn’t work so well. Then when it hits the street, we kind of have to look back because we’ve moved on to other projects. Daniels: Its great. It’s kind of a different segment that we’re stepping into. To bring a Harley to the racetrack for the press introduction, to a lot of people, that’s a foreign concept. To deliver a bike that is a little different than what a lot of people in general think of Harley-Davidson is gratifying.

A MOTORCYCLIST’S NEIGHBORHOOD Building Our Kind Of Community

These days, plenty of neighborhood zoning boards and city councils are cracking down on motorcycles, trying to ban them from their streets, or restrict riders’ rights within the limits of their cities or housing developments. Then there’s Neil Shuster. Instead of looking for ways to rid his 2,500-home development in central Florida of motorcyclists, Shuster is actively courting them—catering directly to them while urging them to “live where they ride.” It’s a move that only makes sense, Shuster says. And it started with a simple realization. “The area around here is incredibly popular with riders, and it’s a big draw for riders from throughout the state for its great roads,” he says. “We have curvy backroads and beautiful farm country with Spanish moss that drapes down from the trees and forms canopies over the road.” With plenty of housing developments in and around the Lake Weir area, Shuster figured it made sound business sense to appeal to those riders, some of whom may be looking for retirement homes or

second homes. “It’s been a successful approach on many levels,” he says. “The response has been unbelievable. It shows that riders themselves want to be in a community where they are respected, where they can enjoy their passion, and where they can do something as simple as have their bikes with them, which some communities don’t allow.” Shuster also notes that he will build homes specifically for motorcyclists. “There are differences between houses for motorcyclists and houses for nonmotorcyclists, and one of them is in the garage. We’re seeing people who want bigger space to store all their toys.” As a bonus, Shuster notes, his latest endeavor has allowed him to tap into something he didn’t realize he had: a passion for riding motorcycles. “I started riding recently myself,” he says. “I am the consummate workaholic, and riding is a great stress-reliever; it allows me to turn off my brain from work and focus on the ride. From the first moment I get on a bike, everything goes away and I get into the moment.”

Neil Shuster (right) with Joe Thompson, builder and owner of Sterjo Construction.

August 2010

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MEMBERS REVIEW

RIDING

Chip Lamb: I have 2001 and 2009 Bonneville T100s in the extended stable. A Corbin saddle on the ’01 and the factory gel saddle on the ’09 solved moderatelength rideability, but neither make the

bike particularly livable over the long haul. Factory EFI is nice on the ’09. Keihins on the ’01 have been reasonably troublefree. Amazingly, with almost 30,000 miles on this bike, the valve lash was still as

built. The unserviceable forks on both are a black eye for Hinckley bikes; no tuning is possible without major disassembly and modification. Typical production-grade Japanese shocks in rear are improved upon easily with Hagons (’01) or Konis (’09). Heather Johnson: I have 2,500 miles on my 2010 Triumph Thruxton now, and it’s smoothing out so nicely. At first, its throttle was twitchy, and it took me a while to get used to the short turning radius. I’ve upgraded the shocks to Ikons for improved handling and a lower center of gravity to accommodate my small body, and now it moves like a dream. Sam Foster: I’ve got a 2010 Triumph Bonneville T100. It’s great fun to ride, handles well, has character and looks like the motorcycles I grew up dreaming about. I like that it didn’t spring forth from a cookie cutter mold to fit nicely into a specific category—it’s just a traditional motorcycle. The only thing that I had to change was the stock seat. Timothy Dodd: My 2003 Triumph Bonneville T100 is great fun to ride, and great to look at. It just needs to be geared a little taller and sound more like the original versions.

1988-1991 HONDA HAWK GT

Mark Janes: Mine’s a 1988. It’s ideally suited to its environment, minimalist and modern at the same time, and rides like a dream. It took me a bit of adapting (coming from a 1980 CX500 Custom), but it’s been very rewarding. In a vein, it’s similar to the CX. The Hawk blends the cutting edge with the tried-and-true, with a single-sided swingarm and an engine based on a design that was at the time at least five years old. Even in stock trim it’s very ridable and more power can be made from the engine. Performance aside, it’s a

beautiful, minimalist motorcycle that was about a decade ahead of its day. Pete terHorst: I bought a gray ’88 with only 1,500 miles on it and put on red bodywork, color-matched Sargent seat, CB1 handlebars, CBR footpegs, a K&N jet kit and SuperTrapp pipe—what a great citybike and corner carver it was! At a Road Atlanta Pridmore school, Reg gave me a thumbs up as he passed me on the outside, carrying a passenger no less. I think he thought more of the bike than my riding style, but I was still proud.

2001-2010 TRIUMPH BONNEVILLE Timeless Standard With Modern Tech

Edward Lalonde: My 1988 Hawk GT has been a dream come true for me. I replaced my beloved but much-too-fast FJ1100 with it five years ago. Bought it for $600 bucks, rescued it from the track, really, scrounged the web, found hawkgtforum.com, put new old bodywork on it, and now it is nearly perfect, once again. It’s a keeper for life. Love the V-twin, the ease of maintenance, the single-sided swing arm. And you can ride it fast through the corners. Brendan McLaughlin: I raced one for a season up at Loudon and had a blast. I dubbed it the poor man’s Ducati. At the time, it just so happened that there were about five of us up there campaigning these, and we had a ball spanking the more modern SV650s and the Ducatis on our 18-year-old-plus motorcycles.

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The Honda Hawk has a cult following. Photo Hawk: SloDeth via Flickr

Affordable Performance, Cult-Bike Character


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p r o d u c ts

RIDInG Sticker, PinS, PatcheS and More

You’ll Find It All At the AMA Online Gift Shop Looking to show your AMA pride on your motorcycle, car window or toolbox? A sticker is just the thing, and they’re available online at the AMA’s online gift shop in small, medium and large sizes, from $2 to $4. Need to replace an AMA-member year pin in your collection? The gift shop stocks pins from year 1 to year 70, with prices ranging from $2 to $5. You’ll also find an assortment of T-shirts, patches and more, all at AmericanMotorcyclist.com > Gear.

calM the turbulence

Special Mounts Deaden The Vibes Motorcycle vibration is not your friend, at least when it comes to electronics. Hard-mount your GPS, cellphone, MP3 player or camera, and you’re asking for equipment failure. Adaptiv knows this, which is why it has created the new AdaptivMount. With a dual-layer vibration-absorbing design, the mount has been developed for the company’s popular radar detectors, but with other electronics in mind. A double-ball-joint neck allows freedom of position, and installation is simple. Mounts are available to fit a wide range of bikes. Info: RadarForBikes.com.

Ask the MSF

look Where You Want to Go

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AmericanMotorcyclist.com

throughout the intended path: scan side to side and near to far, keeping eyes up and looking through the entire curve. Those who fixate on a given point in the distance might miss certain factors that are important for safety. As you approach a curve, evaluate radius, lane width, camber, surface Target fixation can lead to trouble.

Photo MSF: Tom Bear

You Ask: “I’ve always heard that you need to turn your head in the direction of the turn when you want to go around a corner, because the motorcycle will go where you look. What exactly should I be doing with my head and eyes when riding through a curve?” The MSF Responds: Does a motorcycle go where its rider looks? No. This is a common misconception. If this were true, a rider could simply avoid a crash by looking elsewhere. Reality requires switching the words around a bit: “A rider should look where he wants the motorcycle to go.” Not because looking will aim the motorcycle, but because you need to gather visual information and evaluate the path to assist in your navigation. Turning your head in the direction of the turn helps you form a good visual picture, but to cause a motorcycle to move from a straight path of travel, there must be some physical input—the handlebars normally must be moved. A rider should look in the general direction of the turn but move his eyes

condition, other traffic, etc. Select a good lane position for the smoothest line through the corner, and choose an appropriate entry speed so you won’t need to brake while leaned over. Keep throttle, steering and braking inputs smooth. Be ready for any changes in the curve. And increase speed only as you straighten up when the curve begins to straighten out. Curves are where most single-vehicle motorcycle crashes occur. Don’t be a “sightseer” in curves. Be an active participant in the task at hand.


&

UPS

DOWNS

To Diane Pearson, for distributing more than 200,000 bumper stickers saying: “Look Twice, Save A Life: Motorcycles Are Everywhere.” Utah Highway Patrol for running a motorcycle-only checkpoint on Interstate 80 near the Utah U.S. World Superbike round. The patrol has since said it would reevaluate its policies.

Bike photo: www.brunoratensperger.com

To the South Carolina Supreme Court for striking down a discriminatory Myrtle Beach helmet ordinance that conflicted with state law.

No new bike this year? So get to your dealer and improve what you’ve got. Our S100® “stimulus package” is just the thing. To the Toledo Trail Riders for cleaning up the Maumee State Forest APV Area after tornados in northwest Ohio. To Cycle News editor Paul Carruthers for publishing a June 23 column entitled “Hall of Shame” suggesting that the AMA Motorcycle Hall of Fame—which includes his father, Kel Carruthers, and Cycle News founders Chuck and Sharon Clayton—evokes “derisive laughter.” To Texas’ Sidewinders Motorcycle Club, which was recognized by the National Forest Service for its 15 years of volunteer work clearing the Rainbow Trail in Salida, Colo.

Market-leading bike care products that have been around for over 25 years … even supplied to bike manufacturers themselves. (Some of our customers tell us they fooled their friends into thinking their bike was new!) So invest for the future by adding value to your ride with S100 Cycle Care products. See the full lineup at www.s100.com or call 203-488-6569 for a free catalog. Available at better bike shops.


Photo submitted by Rashmi Tambe.

Crash Course

SECURE YOUR LOAD Learning A Lesson The Hard Way

I was on a road trip, with a bag held to the rear luggage rack with bungee straps. Fortunately, since it was so cold, I was wearing full protective gear. Apparently, a bungee came loose, and the other cords pulled the bag off the rack. I felt the center of gravity change and correctly assumed that I had just lost my bag. What I didn’t know was that the bag was still hanging off the back of the bike. As I thumbed my signal and pulled toward the shoulder to slow down and look for the bag, it became wedged between the tire and the fender. Instantly, the wheel locked up, causing the bike to fishtail. I instinctively put my foot down at about 60 mph, which threw me instantly face down onto the pavement. Had it not been for my full-face helmet,

I wouldn’t have much of a face left. Had I not been wearing full gear, I would have lost a lot of my skin. In the end, I was lucky that my only significant injury was a fractured leg. Lesson Learned: All the gear, all the time [ATGATT – ed.]. No matter how careful you are, you can never tell when Murphy’s Law is going to throw a wrench into the works. The secondary lesson? Use straps, and not bungees. Rodger Williamson AMA No. 1091872 Equality, Ala. Got a Crash Course? Send your experience and the lesson learned to: submissions@ama-cycle.org.

American Motorcyclist Archives

JANUARY 1971

The AMA has long been involved in helping raise safety awareness, as the January 1971 issue shows. In its pages, the AMA announced that it would be producing a series of public service announcements aimed at helping drivers think about—and watch for— motorcycles on the road. “The three-fold purpose is to improve the traffic manners of motorists, to elevate the motorcyclist’s self-respect, and to improve the public image

of the sport,” the article noted. “The campaign is timed to begin when large numbers of motorcyclists return to the nation’s highways with warm weather.” The AMA is still involved in creating public service announcements today, with its latest campaigns available at AmericanMotorcyclist. com > Rights > Resources. To view archived issues of American Motorcyclist magazine go to Books. Google.com.

Photo Curves: Tom Bear

Educating Drivers To Watch For Motorcyclists


Watch the Indy GP, Save Some money

AMA Members Get Special Pricing On Tickets For Indianapolis GP AMA membership has its benefits— dozens, in fact—but add to the list a new one for fans of motorcycle roadracing: a $37 discount on the price of a three-day ticket package to the Red Bull Indianapolis Grand Prix event. You’ll also get to ride the same track as MotoGP regulars in a special parade lap. Set for Aug. 27-29 at the Indianapolis

Motor Speedway, the race will showcase the best racers on the world MotoGP level—including Americans Nicky Hayden, Ben Spies, and Colin Edwards. In the Moto2 class, American Kenny Noyes and the AMA’s wildcard selection, Roger Lee Hayden, will race for American honor. With competition played out against the backdrop of the historic speedway and its infield road course, the Indy GP has become a Midwest moto-must-do. And AMA members get an exclusive discount that allows them to take in the action for less cash. Members can enjoy a three-day southwest vista ticket, backstretch motorcycle parking, an official event program, an event cinch bag and 10 percent off any Indy Motor Speedway merchandise. It’s a $135 value for $95. And it’s only available to AMA members. To buy tickets, call (866) 221-8775 or visit imstix.brickyard.com/promotions and use promo code AMA10GP.

throW your rIdInG Some curveS

Find Rides, Rallies And Roads On AmericanMotorcyclist.com Looking to throw your riding some curves? Are your normal rides getting stale? Looking for new adventure? The answer is as close as the “Riding” pages of AmericanMotorcyclist.com. There, you’ll not only find comprehensive listings of all the events of the AMA Premier Touring Series— including national-level rallies, statewide gatherings and regional events—but you’ll also find detailed listings of every AMAsanctioned riding event in your area. Just

click on Riding and look for the events box. A handy chart of state motorcycle laws will keep you informed as you travel. Looking for even more? Check out the Members Area, which is linked from the main page on AmericanMotorcyclist.com. There, once you sign up for access (free for AMA members), you’ll find memberrecommended motorcycle routes in the Good Roads Database. All that’s left? Load up and roll out!


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RACING  Downtown Laconia, N.H., vintage roadracing a few years back. Submitted by Edward Lalonde of Grand Isle, Vt.  Clockwise from the left: Submitted by Maria A. Olmos-Chambers of Sacramento, Calif.; Nick Burson at the 100’s Motorcycle Club National Hare and Hound at the Johnson Valley Off-Highway Vehicle Area in California. Submitted by Greg Thomas of Burbank, Calif.; “My first hare scrambles race, which I did not finish due to falling in a pricker bush. It was a great time and everyone at the track was very friendly. I’m 15 and my dad took this photo of me in the woods. The race was at Battle Creek, Mich.” Submitted by Pat Neiman of Alto, Mich.

Got a picture you’d like to see in American Motorcyclist? Send it to submissions@amacycle.org with “Snapshots” in the subject line.

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Photo Cairoli: Jeff Kardas; Lodi Cycle Bowl: David Bickle

RACING At 24 years, I am not too old to come here to race Supercross and motocross. I’ve talked to KTM about coming over next year for three or four Supercross races to see how it goes. Right now I have a twoyear contract with them to race in Europe, so in 2012 I may have the opportunity to come here and race full time. When you come here to race you must want to win. I don’t just want to come here to qualify.—Jim Kimball

KTM’s Tony Cairoli is the most popular rider on the FIM World Motocross circuit.

KIds RIdE FREE AT LOdI CyCLE BOwL Building The Sport, One Rider At A Time

LOOKING TO RACE IN AMERICA

U.S. MX Grand Prix Winner Tony Cairoli Wants To Take The Next Step Tony Cairoli is the European answer to U.S. superstars such as Jeremy McGrath and Ricky Carmichael. Overseas, Cairoli is domination personified and, as such, is the most popular rider on the FIM World Motocross circuit. Although he’s only 24, the Italian won three World Championships for Yamaha before switching to KTM for the 2010 season. He has kept winning and, in late May, he did so at California’s Glen Helen Raceway for the U.S. Motocross Grand Prix—impressively riding a KTM 350 SX-F in the MX1 class, where nearly every other rider was on a 450cc bike. American Motorcyclist: Tony, congratulations on the Glen Helen win. Tony Cairoli: Thank you. The USGP for sure is a special event for us. I like to win all the time for sure, but I am really looking forward to a championship. I don’t want to make any mistakes. Last year I had a few races where I scored no points, so that is not good. I just want to keep going, and when it is possible to win, I want to give 100 percent. When a win is not possible, I just try to ride to enjoy it and get as many points as possible. I have had many new things this year, a new team, and a new bike. The 350 was a big question mark in many minds at the start of the season. When I first chose the bike, everyone told me that the bike would not be as competitive as the 450 bikes. But I believed in the bike after testing it. I also trained with Mike Alessi with the bikes

when he was in Italy with us. The bike worked perfectly. For sure, the bike was competitive, and I was looking forward to the start of the GPs. Now I am leading the points, and I think that we’ve shown everyone that the bike can be on top. AM: What do you think is the key to your success? TC: I just like to ride. I enjoy it a lot, and it’s not like work for me. It’s more me going out and having fun on the track— that is what makes my motivation stronger. Also, I love to win, and show all the fans a good race. Every time is different, and there is always this new motivation for me. AM: What about your popularity? Where does that come from? TC: Yeah, I like the fans at the races. They are like an extra power that motivates you during the race to do the best that you can. AM: What are your thoughts about bringing the GP circuit to the U.S.? TC: When I first heard that the GP was coming to America, I was very surprised. I really liked it because it was a big opportunity for the World Championships. We can also see how the American riders are, because with the Motocross of Nations we only see three riders from the U.S. This is a good opportunity to mix things up with the American riders. Motocross is big in the U.S., so this will also give fans here the chance to see how a GP is run.

Today’s motorcyclists were yesterday’s kid riders. The folks at the Lodi Motorcycle Club understand that, and they’re taking a step toward improving the future of dirttrack racing in their region. For 2010, the club has created a program to provide 12 free race entries for riders in the PeeWee Jr., PeeWee Sr., Mini Am, 60/65 and 80/85 classes. The free entries—tracked with a card that the kids get punched at each event—could potentially save a racing family hundreds of dollars a year. Jeff Taylor, long-time club member and track builder at the Lodi Cycle Bowl, says the idea is simple: grow the sport. “We’re excited to do this and get some new young riders interested in racing,” Taylor says. The club also has worked with local bike shops to promote the free entries on the dealer floor. One dealership, Stockton Honda Yamaha, will even pay for the AMA Competition membership or AMA District 36 (Northern California, Northwestern Nevada) membership that a first-time racer needs to compete. District 36 is also behind the effort with an additional break on district membership fees, and the San Francisco Motorcycle Club has donated $1,000 to further offset the fee costs incurred by first-time racers. Taylor says the program is working. “We are noticing a benefit,” he says. “Hopefully, this can keep going and get more youngsters involved in the sport. It helps us all in the long run.” Learn more at LodiCycleBowl.com.

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The VinTage PersPecTiVe It’s Academic by Cody Hanson

As I approached my high school graduation, I was given the opportunity to complete a senior project. Luckily, there were no limits on what we could do. About six months before my project started, my dad and I took possession of one complete, nearly operational 1974 CZ 250 and most of the components of a ’73, along with a bunch of miscellaneous parts. After seeing my dad race the ’74 at a few of the AMA District 36 (Northern California,

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Northwestern Nevada) cross country races in the vintage class (we ride modern bikes in that series as well), I knew what my senior project had to be. With my dad as my mentor, I began the project with a paper on the history of motocross and its most influential riders. Then the real fun began. Starting with a dead motor, carb, stock frame, airbox, forks, wheels, bars, seat and stock aluminum CZ tank, I got to work.

I started by sourcing the rest of the parts from a guy in Los Angeles. We were able to get the ignition parts we needed, exhaust, new rear shocks, plastics, rubber parts, odds and ends, and everything to rebuild the motor. (You mean we have to split the cases, Dad?!) Just as my dad had said, the project followed a trend of one step forward, two steps back. Between rust removal, bearing greasing and replacing, engine rebuilding, and painting, my after-


RACING school leisure time all but disappeared. Finally, as senior presentations and graduation loomed, I got it done. I had a lot of much-needed help from my dad, and I can’t thank him enough. He was also generous enough to finance the project for me. I got full marks on my project and the presentation I gave to community members. Seeing people who knew nothing about motorcycles being genuinely interested and excited about my project was well worth the effort. It’s a beautiful bike now and almost completely stock. Unfortunately, being in college I barely have room in my tiny garage for my regular bike, and I haven’t had much time to get home and ride the CZ. The project taught me a lot as a high school kid about mechanics, history, responsibility, dedication and showmanship. I strongly encourage other young people to get involved in projects and cultures they wouldn’t normally be associated with. There is a whole world of cool stuff out there, and getting

Can you think of a better high school project than restoring a vintage dirtbike? We didn’t think so.

a different perspective on things (like the vintage perspective) can really open your eyes to the world’s possibilities and give you much-needed respect for the history

and heritage of our sport. Cody Hanson is an AMA member currently attending California Polytechnic State University in San Luis Obispo, Calif.


vinTage DirT TracKers chasing PoinTs Top Riders Emerge In Inaugural Year Of National Series

Having battled through four rounds as of mid-June, a few standouts have climbed to the top of the point chases in the 2010 AMA Racing Vintage Dirt Track National Championship Series in their bids for AMA Racing National No. 1 plates. Steve Bromley, from Trevose, Pa., is one star of the new series. Bromley leads the points for three championships: 1977-1988 250cc (two-stroke) to 504cc (four-stroke), with two seconds and a win; 1969-1976 335-750cc Multi-cylinder, with a sixth and two wins; and 1969-1976 175250cc (two- or four-stroke), with a second and two wins. “The 175-250cc class has been the most fun for me,” Bromley says. “I’m riding a 1972 Suzuki TM 250. That bike

was fairly easy to set up. I call it my ‘eBay special.’ I had a restored TM, so I took the good stuff off it and bought some old parts at AMA Vintage Motorcycle Days last year. It has drum brakes in the back. I put a downpipe on it.” Bromley says the affordability of vintage racing is a big attraction. “For $1,000, you could be in there racing,” he says. “There are a lot of bikes out there, especially for that 175-250cc class. Yamahas are probably the easiest bike to buy, MXs and YZs. You can pick one up for 250 bucks and then just lace up some 19-inch wheels. Yamaha TT500s are another good bike to start with.” Don Miller, from Brackney, Pa., is leading the points chase in the class for 1952-1968 0-250cc (two- or four-stroke),

with a third, a second and a win. Miller is also a technical adviser for the series. He says the class structure reflects all eras of dirt track history while avoiding nontraditional modifications that violate the spirit of a vintage meet. “I was thrilled when I was asked to help with the development of the series rules,” says Miller, who also owns MetroRacing. com. “I poured over old AMA rulebooks, competition bulletins and old photographs to make sure that this series stays true to the heritage of AMA Dirt Track Racing. This series is a great step in preserving motorcycle’s past by promoting historically correct racing in the spirit of this first American motorcycle sport.” Full results, class rules and equipment regulations are available in an AMA Racing Competition Bulletin at AMARacing.com > Archived Results & Rules > AMA Racing Rules > Competition Bulletin: AMA Racing 2010 Vintage Dirt Track Classes.

The King Lives

Put An Image Of Him On Your Wall Dunlop has released another edition of its popular Legends posters, this one featuring the winningest AMA Supercross rider of all time, AMA Motorcycle Hall of Famer Jeremy McGrath. McGrath’s overall win record stands big enough to fill a stadium: 72 race wins, two 125-class titles, seven Supercross championships and an outdoor Motocross title. For 2010, Dunlop has commissioned the creation of a Jeremy McGrath Legends poster to benefit the Clayton Memorial Fund and the Road 2 Recovery Foundation. These efforts, which to date have raised more than $50,000, lend financial assistance to injured motorcycle racers—a most worthy means of supporting our sport. This 19x26-inch poster is available for purchase by calling (800) 831-2220 or (480) 276-1131.

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Photo Dirt Track: Jim Grant

RACINg


AMA Motorcycle hall of Fame induction Ceremony Friday, Nov. 19 AMA Concours d’elegance Saturday, Nov. 20 AMA Racing Champions Banquet Sunday, Nov. 21

AMA Legends & ChAMpions Weekend LAS VEGAS RED ROCK RESORT REDROCKLASVEGAS.COM TICKETS AVAILABLE SOON


HALL OF FAME

1979 HUSQVARNA 390WR ENDURO

Photos Grogan Studios

King Richard’s Throne

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Many off-road enthusiasts like to say that there were only two names to remember in American enduro riding from 1974 to 1981: Dick Burleson and Husqvarna. That’s because every season throughout that eight-year period, AMA Motorcycle Hall of Famer Burleson—“King Richard” to his fans—came out on top in

AmericanMotorcyclist.com

the AMA National Enduro Championship. This 1979 Husqvarna 390WR is the bike that Burleson rode to win his sixth woodsriding title in 1979. By that time, the Japanese manufacturers were moving in the direction of liquid cooling and monoshock rear suspension, but the Swedish

Husqvarna factory stuck to its simple, lightweight air-cooled two-stroke design with twin rear shocks canted forward in a “laydown” position. Burleson recalls that this machine had a lighter front end than many of the machines being ridden by his competitors, making it trickier to turn in tight woods but


easier to loft over logs and rocks. Undoubtedly, the most pressurepacked season for Burleson was the 1981 campaign. He had tied fellow Hall of Famer Bill Baird’s seemingly insurmountable record of seven AMA National Enduro championships the year before, and was going for a record eighth title. Burleson’s competition was coming on strong, especially young Burleson protege and teammate Terry Cunningham. The championship came down to the final

checkpoint of the final round, and it was Burleson who emerged victorious over Cunningham by a mere two points. With his eighth national championship, Burleson forever etched his name into the record books as one of the truly elite American motorcycle racers of his day. He went on to earn gold for the eighth time in the International Six Day Trials, or ISDT, which is now known as the International Six Days Enduro, held on the Mediterranean Isle of Elba. After winning eight AMA National

Enduro Championships and eight ISDT gold medals, Bureleson retired from national competition at the end of 1981. In all, Burleson won 60 AMA National Enduro events, in addition to his eight ISDT gold medals. He was inducted into the AMA Motorcycle Hall of Fame in 1998. This 1979 Husqvarna 390WR is just one of the many exciting machines on display at the Hall of Fame at AMA headquarters in Pickerington, Ohio, that honors outstanding human achievement in the world of motorcycling.

Heritage features the machines and people of the AMA Motorcycle Hall of Fame in Pickerington, Ohio. The Hall of Fame is a 501(c)3 non-profit corporation that receives support from the AMA and from motorcycling enthusiasts. For info and directions, visit MotorcycleMuseum.org, or call (614) 856-2222. August 2010

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AMA Motorcycle HAll of fAMe clAss of 2010 Induction Celebration At Las Vegas Red Rock Resort Set For Nov. 19

The AMA Motorcycle Hall of Fame is pleased to announce the list of the dreamers, racers and luminaries who will be recognized this year with motorcycling’s highest honor. The nine honorees will be inducted into the AMA Motorcycle Hall of Fame on Nov. 19 as part of the AMA Legends & Champions Weekend at the Red Rock Resort in Las Vegas, Nev. You’ll hear more about them in the coming months. Eyvind Boyesen, who founded Boyesen Engineering in 1972 in Lenhartsville, Pa., and has built a worldwide reputation as a two-stroke engine expert. His innovations include reed valves, porting techniques and water-pump designs. He holds more than 40 patents for the aftermarket motorcycle industry. Don Castro, who joined the professional ranks as an Expert in 1970, riding dirt-trackers and roadracers for Triumph, and was one of the sport’s most popular riders. Castro won the San Jose, Calif., half-mile against the likes of Hall of Famers Mert Lawwill, Chuck Palmgren and Kenny Roberts. Clark Collins, who formed the national advocacy group the BlueRibbon Coalition after he was told by then-Idaho Gov. John Evans that recreationists were not politically significant. He grew the BRC

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into a nationally recognized authority on responsible motorized recreation. Larry Coleman, who won AMA sidecar national championships in 1976-77 and in 1979. He also is known for his 1980 campaign when he built a Yamaha TZ750based bike that was one of the most advanced machines of its type and helped promote sidecar racing in the United States. David Emde, who followed in the footsteps of his father, Floyd, and brother, Don, both Daytona 200 winners and AMA Motorcycle Hall of Famers. After starting in dirt track, he switched to roadracing in 1975, competing alongside some of the fastest roadracers ever: Hall of Famers Kenny Roberts, Steve Baker, Gary Nixon and others. John and Rita Gregory, whose JT Racing sponsored just about every big-name motocrosser of the 1970s and ’80s. They created a variety of innovative products including jerseys, pants and chest protectors, and were masters of marketing in the creation their global business. Bruce Ogilvie, who excelled at winning races in the challenging terrain of Baja, Mexico. Ogilvie was a master, collecting victories in the San Felipe 250, the Baja 500 and the Baja 1000. He was the only racer in history to win the Baja 1000

overall in four different decades, getting his last win in 2003 at the age of 51. Mitch Payton, AMA District 37’s (Southern California) top 125cc desert racer in 1977 before an injury ended his career, he refocused his efforts on the business side of the sport, ultimately building an AMA Supercross and Motocross team dynasty. After his injury, he bought and ran a local Husqvarna shop at the age of 18, and his skill and reputation as a tuner grew. He ultimately built a team dynasty that produced more AMA Supercross and Motocross championships than any other. The AMA Legends & Champions Weekend also will include the AMA Concours d’Elegance on Saturday, Nov. 20, featuring some of the country’s most impressive classic motorcycles, and the AMA Racing Championship Banquet, where AMA Racing amateur champions of all ages will be recognized for their 2010 accomplishments. Lodging reservations can be made at AmericanMotorcyclist.com/ Accommodations. Tickets are available at AmericanMotorcyclist.com/ LegendsandChampions. The AMA Motorcycle Hall of Fame honors individuals who have made lasting contributions to protecting and promoting the motorcycle lifestyle. Its members include those who have excelled in racing, road- and off-road riding, pushed the envelope in motorcycle design, engineering and safety, and championed the rights of riders in the halls of government and among the public. The independent AMA Motorcycle Hall of Fame Induction Committee includes nine members in addition to the chairman. There are eight committees, each representing a different aspect of motorcycling.

Photos Hall of Fame Gallery: Grogan Studios; Knievel: Harley-Davidson Archives. Copyright Harley-Davidson

HALL OF FAME


HALL OF FAME Hall of Famer

EVEL KNIEVEL World-Class Stuntman, Showman And Hero The quintessential American daredevil motorcyclist, Evel Knievel defied gravity as he rode his bike in increasingly challenging, thrilling stunts to the heights of international fame. Knievel’s popularity transcended the world of motorcycling. During the early 1970s, Knievel was one of the best-known celebrities in the world. His jumps attracted thousands of spectators and millions more watched on television. Knievel reached the zenith of his popularity in 1974. At least two feature films and numerous books were made on Knievel’s life. Born in Butte, Mont., on Oct. 17, 1938, Robert Craig Knievel was raised by his grandparents from the age of 6. At age 8, he saw Joey Chitwood’s Auto Daredevil Show, which he later credited for his career choice. As a kid, he loved showing off to the other neighborhood kids by jumping his bicycle. At 13, Knievel got his first motorcycle, but crashed it into a neighbor’s garage

while showing off, nearly catching the garage on fire when his gas tank ruptured. In 1962, Knievel broke his collarbone and shoulder in a motorcycle race. While on the mend, he took a job as an insurance salesman. He later worked at a motorcycle dealership in Washington state, drumming up business by offering $100 off of the price of a bike to anyone who could beat him at arm wrestling. In 1965, he began his daredevil career when he formed a troupe called Evel Knievel’s Motorcycle Daredevils, a touring show in which he performed stunts such as riding through walls of fire and jumping over live rattlesnakes and mountain lions. The name Evel came from one of Knievel’s early sponsors, who wanted to call him Evil, but settled on Evel after Knievel complained that he didn’t want to convey an image of a bad person. In 1966, he began touring alone, saying that it was too much trouble having employees. Knievel’s big break—literally and

figuratively—came on New Year’s Day, 1968, when he jumped 151 feet across the fountains in front of Caesar’s Palace in Las Vegas, Nev. Knievel had talked the owner of Caesar’s Palace into letting him do the stunt as publicity for the casino. After successfully clearing the fountains, his landing was a disaster and his injuries put him in the hospital, but the footage of the jump and crash landing made news on ABC’s Wide World of Sports and thrust Knievel into the national spotlight. After the Caesar’s Palace jump, Knievel was suddenly in demand and he began performing in front of packed stadiums. In January of 1971, he jumped in front of 60,000 spectators in the Houston Astrodome. In 1974, he attempted to jump over the Snake River Canyon in Idaho in a jet-powered “Skycycle.” Knievel failed to clear the canyon but suffered only minor injuries. In May of 1975, Knievel jumped in front of his largest crowd ever when 90,000 people packed Wembley Stadium in London to watch him unsuccessfully try to clear a row of double-decker buses. The great showman died on Nov. 30, 2007. He was 69. Knievel is just one of the many colorful personalities whose achievements are recognized today in the AMA Motorcycle Hall of Fame at AMA headquarters in Pickerington, Ohio. He was inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1999.

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ALONZO BODDEN MAY BE

‘THE LAST COMIC BUT HE’S OFTEN THE FIRST GUY OUT

RIDING

Words: Grant Parsons Photos: Conrad Lim


STANDING,’ Alonzo Bodden doesn’t play favorites.

When it comes to motorcycles, he likes ’em all. The hard-working comic and actor—and host of “America’s Worst Driver” on the Travel Channel— can appreciate the mechanical elegance of a Honda 400 Four, the raw power of a Hayabusa, the craziness of a hopped-up Honda Ruckus and the beauty of a Yamaha SR500-based café bike. In fact, a look in the garage of his Studio City, Calif., home is testament to an obsession that most of us can easily understand. He’s got a BMW HP2, a Ducati 1098, a Triumph Rocket III and, in the shop for some design work, a Ducati Multistrada he’s having built into a full-on café racer. He’s the kind of guy whose first vehicle was a motorcycle, not a car. And he bought that first vehicle to ride in Los Angeles, which is not exactly known as the most hospitable place in the world for motorcyclists. Yes, he’s afflicted. “I grew up in New York, but my grandmother had a farm in South Carolina, and her son had a bike,” Bodden remembers. “I’m not sure if it was a Bonneville or a Norton, but I remember that it was an old British twin. I was probably 8 or 9 years old, and he would take us for rides on the back, up and down this dirt road. I fell in love with that feeling, and to this day, it’s never changed. It’s never waned.” An eight-year AMA member, Bodden is the kind of guy who can ride to a motorcyclists’ gathering spot like L.A.’s Rock Store on either his power cruiser or his sportbike, and fit in just fine with either tribe. He’s the type of rider who, no matter where he goes, notices bikes and riders first. He’d rather ride a slow bike fast than a fast bike slow. He’s the type of guy who you just know would be great to hang out with and talk bikes. So that’s exactly what we did. Bodden may make his living by staying up late and doing comedy in clubs across the country, but 9 a.m. isn’t too early for him at all. In fact, he’s often up and heading out on rides at this time of the morning. So, despite returning from a series of comedy gigs in Australia just a day or so before, he’s perfectly at home showing off his bikes on a sunny L.A. weekday morning at his place, a townhome just off a walkable section of

Studio City, near Burbank. It’s an impressive collection, with his cruiser complementing his sportbike, which offers a different experience than his HP2 enduro. What they mostly have in common— aside from their differences—is that they’re comfortable for a 6-foot, 3-inch guy. And every one is pointed toward the roll-up garage door, ready to ride. At breakfast nearby, the talk turns,

naturally, to motorcycles. “When I was younger, I had friends with minibikes, the kind with those little Briggs & Stratton engines, but my parents wouldn’t let me get one,” he says. “So when I turned 18 and moved to Los Angeles, I bought a Honda 400 Four, and that was my first vehicle. I had a bike before I had a car.” It was a great experience, he says. “I was living in North Hollywood, and I’d go up Mulholland Drive,” he remembers. “Being from New York, these were all things I’d read about, but never seen. It was cool to go up Mulholland, ride the canyons and go out looking for all of it. I never got in with the racers of Mulholland, but I remember the first time I scraped my footpeg, and I felt like a hero.” Most people may have thought twice about learning to ride a bike in a place as traffic-crazy as Los Angeles. But Alonzo’s secret was simple: “I didn’t know I was supposed to be scared of it, so I wasn’t.” What’d he learn on the streets? “I learned, ‘Don’t pass on the right,’” he says, laughing. “This was 1980. There weren’t many safety courses. They showed you how to ride a bike at the dealership, and you rode it home, and if you made it home without killing yourself, you were a motorcyclist. “Well, I passed a woman on the right, and she turned and clipped me. I went down and I broke my wrist. That also made me an advocate of helmets. Not helmet laws, but helmets. My helmet had a V in it where I hit the curb. I wouldn’t be here now if I wasn’t wearing a helmet. That’s how I learned. You don’t do that. Got it.” To this day, though, he loves riding in L.A. The energy of the traffic, the attitude of full awareness on the bike—it all fires him up. “It’s almost like going into battle,” he says. “The funny thing is that I’ve had people change lanes into me in their cars. You feel

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them pushing into your leg. I’ll be riding along, and it’s like, “What’s that? Oh, it’s just a car.” It was his job as an airplane mechanic that brought him to L.A., where he worked for Lockheed and McDonnell-Douglas, at one time even building stealth fighters like the ones used in the first Gulf War. Along the way he moved from the 400cc bike ultimately to a Honda 750 Interceptor.

that other machines turn his head now. “For me now, more and more, it’s a basic motorcycle,” Bodden says. “I’m a naked-bike guy now. I love sportbikes, and I think they’re great, and all—in the 1990s I was riding CBRs and Hayabusas and things like that. A fully faired racebike is great, but it’s a level of bike I can’t enjoy. I can’t go that fast. Nobody can, on the street.” And while the technology has been

“A scooter is something else I think about, but I’m 6-foot-3 and 250 pounds, so I think people will laugh at me. Still, I love the Honda Ruckus.” He jokes that his major accomplishment was surviving his 20s. “When you’re riding in your 20s, that’s when you’re fast and indestructible, and you have no idea what you’re doing. When you hit 30, if you live through that, you think, ‘Wait a minute—I could die out here. Maybe I’ll slow down.’ I still split lanes, but I don’t do it at 70 mph!” The comedy part came later, in the mid1990s. And it grew out of his expanding work as a trainer for new mechanics. “I had fun making them laugh,” he says. “There’s a lot of boring topics in aerospace. Blueprint reading: There are four kinds of lines on a blueprint. There are 200 kinds of fasteners. You have to make that funny or people fall asleep right in your face. “I was never the class clown, but I could make people laugh,” he says. “I was the guy who whispered something to the guy next to me, and he’d get in trouble and I looked innocent. Teaching mechanics got me in front of a group, and from there I did a comedy writing class, and I did my first five minutes on stage and never looked back.” Working in clubs led him to appearances on talk shows, and to the “Last Comic Standing” show, which he won in its third season. The night work had its advantages: He could ride motorcycles in the latemornings on weekdays, when the twisty roads in the hills around the Los Angeles basin were far less traveled. “I’ve always been a streetbike guy,” he says. “I do some track days, and I have some friends who do them with me, and I go off and ride the street, and when I come back they’re three times faster than I am, and I’m still in Group 2. Track days are fun when I can do them, but I don’t think I’ll ever give up on the street.” Though his interest in motorcycles hasn’t changed, the types that light him up have. After enjoying sportbikes for years, he’s finding

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getting more and more impressive, the basic attraction of a motorcycle—the way it moves him—hasn’t changed. “With bikes, there’s the frame, and there’s the engine, there’s the wheels. Motorcycles are more hands-on. It’s a visceral thing,” Bodden says. “But there’s still an attraction to something like a Gold Wing. I’m 90 percent sure that’ll be my 50th birthday present to myself. I’ve rented them when I’m out on the road, and when you sit back and hit the cruise control and the stereo is playing— maybe I’m getting old, but that ain’t a bad way to ride!” The favorite bike he used to own? It’s a tough call, but it just might be his ’99 Hayabusa, one of his unofficial nominees for “Greatest Bike of All Time.” “The Hayabusa is just amazing, with how good an all-purpose bike it is,” he says. “You can do anything on it. You can go fast. You can tour. There’s nothing like opening up the throttle on a Hayabusa. You’re just not ready for it. On the track, the magazines said it could do 194—the fastest stock bike of all time. My quote about the ‘Busa is that it doesn’t accelerate. It just sucks the world toward you. It’s a bike that there’s no reason for, and I love it for that.” As he gets more successful, the list of bikes he’d love to have grows. And most of them are bikes he missed the first time they came around. “One of them is definitely a Valkyrie Interstate. I love that whole hot-rod thing,” he says. “The CBX is another one. I love that bike. Talk about mechanical—it’s just amazing what they built when they built the CBX, that they would even do it. Someone had to say, ‘We need 24 valves and two cams, because one cam wouldn’t be long enough to get across the engine.’” Others that catch his eye: the original BMW R100RS sport-tourer with the lightweight fairing, 1970s-era SuperSport

Ducatis, and the relatively rare Interceptor 1000. “You know, the red, white and blue one,” he says. “I almost bought one two years ago, but it wasn’t the right one.” Then there’s the crazier stuff. “A scooter is something else I think about getting. But I’m 6-foot-3 and 250 pounds. I think people will laugh at me,” Bodden says. “Still, I love the Honda Ruckus. I think I could have a scooter as long as I have a motorcycle at home.” The bottom line? “I like anything that’s built for no reason at all. Like a Boss Hoss. There’s no reason for building a bike like that. So I


want one. Ducati builds a bike that only Casey Stoner can ride fast? I need one of those.” Not content just to contemplate existing bikes, he’s also having a one-of-a-kind bike built. Though he’s not a big fan of raked-out choppers, he does like custom machines, and he’s having his Ducati Multistrada tricked out as a modern-day café racer—for no reason. “I’m going to use that to hang with the café crowd,” he laughs. “I think they’ll let me in with that. I think it’s cool and different enough.” It’s nice, he notes, that his work and passion have intersected. A motorhead, he’s been able to live that life on TV, first with

Speed’s “101 Cars You Must Drive,” and now with “America’s Worst Driver,” a show that he says only reinforced everything he’s thought about crazy drivers from the seat of a motorcycle. “The thing about America’s Worst Driver is that I was already tuned in to how bad people drive because I ride a bike,” he says. “In traffic you’ll see people do things that you just can’t believe. I don’t even get mad anymore. I just shake my head. “People are turned all the way around to scold their kids. They’re putting on makeup. They’re changing clothes. You just notice

that stuff on a bike because you’re out there in a different way. I was taught to ride like everyone is out to actively kill you, so I’m really attuned to it.” Still, there are things he’d change about motorcycling, if he could. They’re pretty basic, and they involve everyone just getting along. “You see it everywhere, but you really see it in L.A.: You go to the Rock Store, and the cruisers park on one side and the sportbikes park on the other,” Bodden says. “I’ve always gone to both sides. I’ve had a Valkyrie and a CBR, and now I have a Triumph Rocket III and a Ducati.

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“When I’m on the Rocket III, the cruiser guys wave and the sportbike guys don’t. When I’m on the Duc, the sportbike guys wave and the cruisers don’t. And I’m like, ‘Really? I’m the same guy, on the same road. I’m just waving to say hello.’ I don’t understand that division. I never have. Ride whatever you want to ride. A guy on a Ruckus is cool. A guy on a built Ruckus is cooler.” He’s also not a fan of too much motorcycle sound. “The loud-bike thing is bad. I can tell you,” he says. “You’ll see sportbikes with loud exhausts, and Harleys with open pipes rolling by, with just this explosive noise. There’s this ‘Loud Bikes Save Lives’ culture that you just can’t argue with them about. It’s one of those ‘Don’t confuse me with the facts’ things, like helmets. With helmets, it’s like, ‘full-face helmets will kill you.’ Yeah. Right. That’s why all professional riders and racers wear them—because they’re so dangerous. You just can’t convince some people of facts, no matter what you say.” The sound issue, he says, just gives all motorcyclists a bad name. “The problem is that when a guy rides a bike that’s so loud it rattles windows, or when he starts his bike at 6 a.m. and wakes everybody up, it’s a guy who buys into that image. He likes the idea that it’s bad. I don’t know that we’ll get regulated off the road because of it—maybe we will—but it’s bad for us. It’s bad.” He doesn’t dwell on it, though. These days, he’s having too much fun, traveling and working comedy clubs, and riding motorcycles, both his own and the ones he rents when he can find time in his schedule.

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“I can have fun on a bike anywhere—even something like riding a scooter in Bermuda,” he says. “Bike culture is what it is, and I love finding it. In Bermuda, they had this scooter roadracing. It was the coolest thing I’ve ever seen. It’s like, ‘These scooters are what we’ve got, and we’re going to go racing and make the best of it.’ That feeling is kind of universal.” There’s still a lot of things on his motorcycling to-do list, though. “I haven’t ridden through Europe. I would love to do that. I’d like to go to the Isle of Man. I’d like to ride the Nurburgring in Germany. I’d like to do a track day on Phillip Island. It makes it so much more fun to watch the races. When I see them race at Laguna Seca, I know that I rode that track, too. The corkscrew is amazing.” He’s got plans for the future. He’s working hard. He’s pitching a few ideas for TV shows. He’s auditioning for movie parts. Whatever the future holds, though, it will definitely include motorcycles. “There was a period of about five or six years in the mid-’80s or early ’90s that I didn’t have a bike for a number of reasons, most of them financial,” he says. “But through it all, I could never imagine never having a motorcycle, and I got right back into it. “I know those guys who get married and their wives won’t let them. That’s not me. I will always be doing bikes. I may switch bikes—different types or different brands— but I’ll always be riding. I was once asked if there’s anything I loved as a kid that I still love as much today, and that’s an easy one for me: motorcycles.” •


Sitting On The Sidelines Is Not An Option

As a motorcyclist, you wear a target.

Last year, 2 million acres were lost to inappropriate federal Wilderness designations. Every week we learn of motocross tracks under threat of closure. Cities large and small target street motorcyclists with unfair sound ordinances and laws. Street riding is also under attack from safetycrats who point to increasing motorcycle crashes and fatalities on our highways. As an AMA member, you’re already part of the solution. Why not ask your friends to join the battle as well?

Tear out this page, put it in your tankbag, and hand it off to a riding buddy. Tell them to join by calling or going online. The future you save may be your own.

(800) AMA-JOIN • AMerIcANMOtOrcyclIst.cOM


Two-Wheeled Rush!

Your AMA Membership Is More Than Just A Card. It’s 7:15 a.m. on your first race day of the season. You’re zoned out, standing in line at sign-up. There’s a chill in the air, dew on your shoes and the smell of nylon, coffee and pre-mix wafting through the crowd. The faint sound of a two-stroke cracking to life on the other side of the pits shakes you to attention, and the scene around you comes into focus. Kids are clutching helmets for inspection. Parents are clutching kids to keep them from wandering off before practice. And racers of all ages who’ve joined the American Motorcyclist Association or renewed their memberships at the track are clutching a temporary membership card.

For Racers Since the AMA was established in 1924, racing has been a core function of the Association’s activities. That is evident in the benefits racers realize from competing in AMA-sanctioned events. Here’s a quick rundown of everything you get with your AMA membership: • Access: Your AMA card is your license to race, giving you access to thousands of local, regional and national championship events all over the United States. As a member of the AMA, you are a card-carrying motorcycle racer. • Rules: The AMA offers a standardized national rulebook, written by AMA Congress, that ensures fairness and legitimacy. When you win an AMA event, it means something.

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As they’re walking back to gear up they’re all probably thinking the same thing, “Boy, racing’s not cheap.” And they’re right. There’s $10 to the track just to get in the gate, $20-$40 per class to the promoter to race, $15-$30 to an AMA District for a District membership and $39 to join the AMA. Each fee has a purpose, whether it’s to support the landowner, make the event financially viable for the promoter, fund a purse for A-class riders or provide funds to the District to support its activities. Certain events, like Loretta Lynn qualifiers, have an additional fee from the promoter. But what do you get for the $39 that goes to the AMA for your AMA membership? A lot. Here’s a look…

• Results: The AMA Racing department compiles results submitted by clubs and promoters from all over the country in all racing disciplines sanctioned by the Association. Submitted results are available at AMARacing.com. • Classification: Skill-based class assignments at an AMA-sanctioned event are based on a standardized classification process detailed in the rulebook. They are not based on the honor system. When you line up at an AMA race, the guys and gals to your left and right are about your speed. • A higher standard: To be eligible for an AMA sanction, a club or promoter must undergo risk-management training. The organizer must work to minimize risk to participants, and for when injuries still occur, the organizer must have competent medical staff on location.

• Protection: AMA events must carry suitable insurance coverage. AMA organizers are given access to excellent insurance through Wells Fargo. Other carriers may be used if they provide comparable coverage. (The AMA receives no income from this sale of this insurance.) • Fraternity: The greatest motorcycle racers in the country are AMA members, and many of them still compete in AMA events, even after their pro careers are behind them. • National championships. Only AMA racers are eligible for AMA Racing National No. 1 plates and to compete in the series and events that award them. More than any other symbol, that No. 1 plate represents the gold standard of AMA-sanctioned competition.


Protecting Your Rights Your AMA membership also gives your Association the resources it needs to watch your back in Washington, D.C.—working to keep riding areas and tracks open despite challenges from municipalities and nearby landowners. Not only is the AMA the largest amateur motorsports sanctioning body in history, but it is also the country’s leading defender of motorcyclists’ rights. The AMA is on the front lines of many fights, including keeping trails open, fighting discriminatory insurance policies that deny motorcyclists coverage, and battling local ordinances that shut down streetbike access to public roads, or even aim to stop you from riding your dirtbike on your own land. When you become a member, a portion of your $39 annual membership fee funds the efforts of the AMA Government Relations Department. With staff in Washington, D.C., at AMA headquarters in Pickerington, Ohio, and on the West Coast, these dedicated people come to work every day with a single purpose: to make America a better and fairer place to be a motorcyclist. To learn more, visit the Rights section of AmericanMotorcyclist.com.

Protecting Your Bank Account Then, there are all the practical benefits of membership, such as American Motorcyclist magazine, AMA Roadside Assistance, discounts through the AMA’s benefit partners and products and services not available to non-members. Members can access full benefit and partner discount information online in the Members Area of AmericanMotorcyclist.com. Some benefits kick in just by giving your AMA number at the point of sale. Others need a special discount code, also available on the website. Examples of these money-saving benefits include a 10 percent discount on parts purchased at online retailer BikeBandit.com, a 20 percent discount on Garmin GPS units, discounts on lodging for when you’re on the road, and a break on AMA Supercross, Arenacross and Dragbike tickets. That’s just a sample. For the full list, see the website. For racers—or anyone who spends a lot of time traveling—AMA Roadside Assistance is a great benefit for just $35 a year. It covers bikes, cars, RVs and more for the AMA member and his or her family members.

Better yet, members who auto-renew or buy a three-year membership receive AMA Roadside Assistance at no additional charge. That’s because these members help the AMA save big bucks on membership renewal notices. To take advantage of this opportunity, visit AmericanMotorcyclist.com > Membership > Member Services.

And More ... Other benefits of joining the AMA and competing at AMA-sanctioned events include: • AMA National Championship-level events receive public relations and marketing services provided by a fulltime communications staff. • AMA promoted and sanctioned events receive coverage in AMA media outlets, including American Motorcyclist magazine, the electronic magazine AMA Racer and at AmericanMotorcyclist.com. • At many AMA Racing Grand Championship events, participants are provided free high-resolution event photography.

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No. 1

‘Everybody’s Dream’ “Everybody’s dream is to wear the No. 1 plate. That’s my dream. Like my dad says, ‘Your time will come.’ All the other stars, like Ricky Johnson or Jeff Ward, they all started at the bottom, too.” A young AMA member named Jason Raines wrote those words in February 1990 for a school project—and they proved prophetic. Raines went on to win the AMA National Hare Scrambles Championship in 2003, 2004 and 2007, the 2008 AMA Eastern and National Hare Scrambles Championships and the 2009 AMA Eastern Hare Scrambles Championship. For many AMA racers, an AMA Racing National No. 1 plate represents the pinnacle of achievement. It validates a passion. It certifies a profession. It symbolizes the payoff for a season, or a career, built around a lifetime of motorcycling competition. Whether you want to be the next Ricky Johnson, Jeff Ward or Jason Raines—or if you’re just looking for an experience worthy of launching a national championship career—you’ll find it at an AMA-sanctioned race. At those events, the AMA not only expects organizers to provide a No. 1 experience to all members. We help them deliver it. AMA Racing is not only where dreams come true, but it’s also where they begin.

Fair Representation

AMA Congress Writes The Rules A core benefit from competing in AMA-sanctioned events is a rulebook that has stood the test of time, with regulations based on the collective knowledge of lifetime racers and organizers from around the country to provide consistency from track to track. This is what the AMA Racing Rulebook, and all its discipline variations, provides. The AMA Racing Rulebook is written and updated by AMA Congress, a group of enthusiasts elected from each AMA District. AMA-chartered clubs and promoters in each District choose these representatives. AMA Congress members include, for example, International Six Days Enduro competitors, former AMA National Championship contenders and lifetime amateur racers. And, bottom line, they answer to you—AMA members. You can find your representative in AMA Congress by going to AmericanMotorcyclist.com > About Us > Find An AMA Congress Rep.

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Where Your Race Dollars Go

Understanding The Costs Of Competition While motorcycle racing remains one of the most affordable motorsports in the country, it’s undeniable that the fees can add up on race day. And only a part of these typical race fees go to the AMA’s national office to support the AMA and the part of its mission focused on fostering amateur racing. To understand why racing costs what it does, it helps to know where that money goes. For example, consider this scenario. A family of three has an 8-year-old son who is starting to race motocross. In addition to the cost of fuel, food, gear and a bike, at the first race of the year that family could easily incur almost $240 in fees alone. Based on the typical costs at an actual event in an actual AMA District, here’s the breakdown for a family of three, with one kid racing three classes: • • • • •

Three gate entries which typically go to the promoter or landowner .............................. $30 Transponder fee, to the promoter and/or a technology supplier (paid once a year) ........ $25 One District membership, which typically goes to a regional organization focused on keeping points on a District level, coordinating a regional race calendar and often hosting a year-end banquet (paid once a year) .......................................................................... $30 Three entry fees, which typically go to the promoter.................................................... $114 One AMA membership, which allows access to a host of AMA member benefits and a national staff dedicated to keeping riding areas and racetracks open, and working to stop bad laws that discriminate against motorcyclists (paid once a year) .................. $39

ToTal ............................................................................................................................. $238 Other costs you pay at the gate might include mandatory contributions to legal defense funds or additional fees that are necessary to participate in a season-long series, or to qualify for a national-championship event. Of course, not all of these fees are paid every race. For example, the transponder can likely be used at other events, and the District and AMA membership fees are only paid once a year. Perhaps the more important point is that in many cases, you reap the dividends for much longer than one day. Take your $39 AMA membership. It funds AMA activities, support for national series and Grand Championships, the rulebook, AMA Congress activities, government relations efforts, American Motorcyclist magazine, the AMA Racer publication, gives you access to AMA member discounts and benefits, and helps fund the end-of-year AMA Championship Awards Banquet where AMA National Champions are honored with their AMA Racing National No. 1 plates.

one DisTRiCT membeRship (annual) Goes to District to fund District-level activities.

one ama membeRship (annual)

Funds AMA activities, support for national series and Grand Championships, rulebook, Congress activities, Competition member benefits, government relations, American Motorcyclist magazine, AMA member discounts and benefits, etc. GaTe fee foR familY of ThRee (peR RaCe) Goes to landowner and/or promoter.

$114

$30

$39

ThRee Class enTRies (peR RaCe) Goes to promoter.

Race Day Costs

$30

$25 TRansponDeR fee (annual) Goes to promoter.

This hypothetical situation, based on actual costs in certain Districts, is designed to be representative of the costs incurred by a family of three, with one child racing, at the first event of the season. August 2010

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It’s Not Just Rights And Racing AMA Racers Are Recreationists Too

Although many AMA racers live for the thrill of competition, each of us enjoys a fun ride now and then, or all the time, whether on the road or trail. The calendar of AMA-sanctioned recreational events includes both—and your AMA membership offers access to all of them. The AMA Premier Touring Series includes rallies, rides and tours around the country. These gatherings let you experience the country’s most iconic large rallies or just hang out with local riders in smaller events. They include National Conventions, Grand Tours, Gypsy Tours, Signature Events and District tours and rallies. In addition, two national series mix onroad with off: the AMA KTM National Dual Sport Trail Riding Series and the AMA BMW National Adventure Riding Series. These events, set up much like an enduro without the timekeeping or competition, offer a designated route that includes public roads and trail, on both public and private land. Most events span two days and all include optional bypass routes around hardcore offroad sections (which can get pretty serious). Find out more in the Riding section of AmericanMotorcyclist.com.

Get RAMPed

Coverage Designed For Racers Another benefit of AMA membership is access to the Rider Accident Medical Plan (RAMP). RAMP is supplemental insurance designed for AMA racers, support crew and officials at AMA-sanctioned amateur events. Once you sign up, it pays an amount up to the maximum benefit amount (after the deductible) for covered medical expenses that are above and beyond other insurance you may have. For example, RAMP coverage includes doctor-provided services, hospital room and board, prescriptions, necessary dental work, physical therapy, artificial limbs, braces, and ambulance fees. It also includes accidental death and dismemberment (AD&D) benefits. Three plan levels are available. Why RAMP? One issue that, unfortunately, affects motorcycle competitors is insurance discrimination. Some companies will deny coverage simply because you were riding a motorcycle at the time of your injury, although other sports may be covered. RAMP is designed specifically for participants in AMAsanctioned events, and you won’t be denied coverage simply because you were riding your motorcycle. For more information and to apply for RAMP, see Insurance4AMA.com.

Get The Rules

Going To Race? Then Race By The Rules! The rulebooks governing competition in AMA-sanctioned events are broken down by discipline, so you can grab just what you need for whatever you race. Visit AmericanMotorcyclist.com > Racing > Rulebooks to find: • AMA Racing Rulebook • AMA Racing Motocross-only Rulebook • AMA Racing Track Racing-only Rulebook • AMA Racing Off-Road-only Rulebook • AMA Racing All-Terrain Vehicles (ATVs)only Rulebook • National Enduro Championship Supplemental Regulations • ATV Hare Scrambles National Championship Supplemental Regulations • East & West Hare Scrambles Championship Supplemental Regulations • East & West Youth Hare Scrambles Championship Supplemental Regulations • National Hare & Hound Supplemental Regulations • Youth Observed Trials Championship Supplemental Regulations

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Thank you to our sponsors and partners for your continued support of the American Motorcyclist Association. AmericanMotorcyclist.com/joinama

MEMBER BENEFITS

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MOTORCYCLE ADS.COM

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go ride

A few of the hundreds of AMA-sanctioned events this month, detailed on the following pages.

2 3 7

6 5

1

6

7

4

1 1

1 1

1

The Titanic Grand Tour presented by the Great Lakes Motorcycle Club runs to Sept. 15. On April 14, 1912, the 46,000ton cruise liner Titanic was sunk by just one iceberg. How many “tons” can your “berg” bring down? Visit one town ending in “berg” and as many as you can find ending in “ton” on this self-guided tour that awards prizes. Info: GLMC.org.

2

If you want to see or take part in a great event don’t miss the Big Sky XC hare scrambles Aug. 21-22 in Big Sky, Mont. Held at Big Sky Resort, this family-friendly event is part of the AMA Racing West Hare Scrambles Championship Series. Info: AMARacing.com.

3

Take a scenic ride through the Wisconsin countryside and have a great time while helping raise money for the Pediatric Brain Tumor Foundation. The Wisconsin Ride for Kids is set for Aug. 1 at Fireman’s Park next to the high school in Middleton, Wis. Registration opens at 8 a.m. The escorted ride starts at 10 a.m., rain or shine. Info: RideForKids.com.

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4

The Buffalo 500 Dual-Sport Adventure Ride hosted by the Stoney Lonesome Motorcycle Club will be held Aug. 21-22 in Columbus, Ind. Pick a road and trail or road ride for an enjoyable 80-100-mile trek. This event is part of both the AMA BMW National Adventure Riding Series and the AMA KTM National Dual Sport Trail Riding Series. Info: StoneyLonesomeMC.com.

5

The Endless Mountain District Tour is a road-riding event that covers about 150 miles in the Endless and Pocono mountains of northeastern Pennsylvania Aug. 29. The tour, a rain or shine event, features technically challenging routes that consist of scenic, two-lane roads less traveled and is part of the AMA Premier Touring Series. Info: BMER.org.

6

The warriors of the motocross track battle this month in the Lucas Oil AMA Pro Motocross Championship Series. The pros will be in New Berlin, N.Y., on Aug. 14 and in

Southwick, Mass., on Aug. 28. Info: MXSportsProRacing.com.

7

The all-American sport of professional flat track makes the rounds in the Midwest this month racing on the dirt oval in Grove City, Ohio, on Aug. 14 and at the famed Peoria TT in Peoria, Ill., on Aug. 22. Info: AMAProRacing.com.

COMING UP The AMA Legends & Champions weekend is set for Nov. 19-21 in Las Vegas, Nev. The weekend kicks off with the 2010 induction ceremony for the AMA Motorcycle Hall of Fame on Friday, Nov. 19. Festivities continue with the 2010 AMA Concours d’Elegance on Saturday, Nov. 20, featuring some of the country’s most impressive original and restored classic motorcycles. The AMA Racing Championship Banquet bookends the weekend on Sunday afternoon, Nov. 21. Info: AmericanMotorcyclist.com. The 24th annual Land Between the Lakes 200 dual-sport ride is set for Sept. 11-12 in Cadiz, Ky. Info: LBL200.com.


THE

GuidE TO EvEnTS

The following pages list AMAsanctioned events for this month, up to date at press time. Current listings are in the Riding and Racing sections of www. AmericanMotorcyclist.com. The biggest events—pro races, national-championship amateur competition, and major rides and rallies—are highlighted. For these series, Type of Event

Date MOTOCROSS

we list all of the remaining events for the entire year. Then there are the local events, the backbone of the AMA’s riding and racing calendar. These events are listed by state and are broken down by type, so you can quickly find the ones near you. Here’s a guide to what you’ll find in these local listings:

Event Class (Competition events only) S - Standard (Amateur classes) Y - Youth Classes T - ATV classes M - Pro-Am classes R - Recreational Location/City

Directions

Contact Phone Number

CALiFORniA SHORT TRACK AUG 21 (S,T,Y): LODI: VINTAGE; LODI MOTORCYCLE CLUB, JEFF G TAYLOR; LODI CYCLE BOWL/5801 E MORSE /HWY 99 TO 8 MILE/N ON FRONTAGE/R ON MORSE; (209) 3687182; LODICYCLEBOWL.COM AUG 28 (S,T,Y): LODI: VINTAGE; LODI MOTORCYCLE CLUB, JEFF G TAYLOR; LODI CYCLE BOWL/5801 E MORSE /HWY 99 TO 8 MILE/N ON FRONTAGE/R ON MORSE; (209) 3687182; LODICYCLEBOWL.COM SCRAMBLES AUG 7 (S,T,Y): LODI: VINTAGE; LODI MOTORCYCLE CLUB, JEFF G TAYLOR; 1 PM; LODI CYCLE BOWL/5801 E MORSE /HWY 99 TO 8 MILE/N ON FRONTAGE/R ON MORSE; (209) 3687182; LODICYCLEBOWL.COM AUG 14 (S,T,Y): LODI: CHARITY; LODI MOTORCYCLE CLUB, JEFF G TAYLOR; LODI CYCLE BOWL/5801 E MORSE /HWY 99 TO 8 MILE/N ON FRONTAGE/R ON MORSE; (209) 3687182; LODICYCLEBOWL.COM SPEEdWAY AUG 6 (S,Y): AUG 13 (S,Y): AUG 20 (S,Y): AUG 27 (S,Y): AUBURN: FAST FRIDAYS SPEEDWAY, DAVID A JOINER; 6:30 PM; GOLD COUNTRY FAIRGROUNDS /1 MILE S OF I-80; (530) 878-7223; FASTFRIDAYS.COM ROAd Run AUG 22 (R): VALENCIA: CYCLE GEAR, MIKE SHIRLEY; 8 AM; VALENCIA TOWN CENTER MALL /I-5 TO MAGIC MTN PKWY-WEST TO MALL; (661) 8571188; DOWNEDOFFICERS.COM AUG 27 (R): BIG BEAR: 3 DAY EVENT: SOUTH COAST BMW RIDERS CL, ROBERT MILLER; 9 AM; INN DER BACH /1351 MIDWAY BLVD/NEAR BALDWIN; SCBMWRC.COM

DUAL-SPORT ADVENT, MIKE LINGSCH; PO BOX 331 /EAST OF I-5 ON HWY 89; (530) 925-0151; MCCLOUDDUALSPORTADVENTURES. COM HARE SCRAMBLES AUG 22 (S,T,Y): LUCERNE VALLEY: INVADERS MC, KEN MEESTER; ANDERSON DRY LAKE /OFF CAMP ROCK RD; (626) 523-6970 MOTOCROSS AUG 1 (S,T,Y): ADELANTO: AMA-DIST 37 SPORTS COMM, BILL HOWELL; 6 AM; RACETOWN MX PARK /HWY 395 N OF TOWN; (760) 220-6575; DISTRICT37AMA.ORG AUG 15 (S,T,Y): SAN BERNARDINO: VINTAGE; HUNTINGTON BEACH MC, JIM J HRUBY; 6 AM; 18585 VERDEMONT RANCH ROAD /HWY 215 EX PALM AVE HEAD SW, RT ON VERDEMONT; (760) 559-2562; HTTP:// AMASOCALMOTOCROSS.COM

COLORAdO

AUG 21 (S,Y): WHITE CITY: CAHOKIA CREEK DIRT RIDERS, BOBBY G BROWN; 8 AM; I-55 EXIT 44 HWY 138 WEST 2MIL; (618) 946-4316; CCDIRT. COM AUG 1 (S,Y): BYRON: FOREST CITY RIDERS MC, RYAN MOSS; 7 AM; MOTORSPORTS PARK /2525 ASH ROAD; (815) 624-6535; FORESTCITYRIDERS.COM AUG 15 (S,T,Y): FOSTERBURG: SPLINTER CREEK DIRT RIDER, MATT REYNOLDS; 6:30 AM; 2996 TERPENING LN /8 MI N OF RT 140/L ON TERPENING; (618) 372-4355; SPLINTERCREEK.COM AUG 26 (S,T,Y): TAYLORVILLE: SOUTH FORK DIRT RIDERS, MICHELLE; 8 AM; ORV PARK/794 IL RT 104 /5 MI W OF TOWN; (217) 237-4752; SOUTHFORKDIRTRIDERS.COM OBSERvEd TRiALS AUG 29 (S): OTTAWA: VARIETY RIDERS MOTORCYCLE, ERIC MILLER; 8 AM; 1414 US RT 6 /USRT 6 WEST OF OTTAWA; (815) 434-3669; VARIETYRIDERS.COM MOTOCROSS AUG 1 (S,T): AUG 8 (S,T,Y): AUG 22 (S,T,Y): BYRON: MOTOSPORTS PARK, AARON J VINCER; 6 AM; MOTORSPORTS PARK /2525 ASH ROAD; (815) 234-2271; MOTOBYRON. COM AUG 1 (S,T,Y): WILMINGTON: JOLIET MOTOSPORTS PARK, JUSTIN R MARTINO; 7 AM; 27950 KELLY RD /I55 TO ARSENAL RD/FOLLOW SIGNS; (815) 476-7433; JOLIETMX.COM

AUG 1 (S,Y): MILLIKEN: TWO RIVERS RACING LLC, DAVID B LEAHY; 22437 WELD CT RD 19; (970) 587-5770 AUG 7 (S,Y): LAKEWOOD: 2 DAY EVENT: COLORADO MOTORSPORTS PROM, DAVID CLABAUGH; THUNDER VALLEY MX /701 S ROONEY RD; (303) 988-3889; MXTHUNDERVALLEY.COM

AUG 8 (S,T,Y): TAYLORVILLE: SOUTH FORK DIRT RIDERS, MICHELLE; 6 AM; ORV PARK/794 IL RT 104 /5 MI W OF TOWN; (217) 237-4752; SOUTHFORKDIRTRIDERS.COM

AUG 15 (S): DACONO: IMI MOTORSPORTS INC, BRAD LINKUS; 5 AM; 5074 SUMMIT BLVD /I-25N OF DENVER/EX 232/2 MI E; (303) 8334949; IMIMOTORSPORTS.COM

AUG 15 (S,T,Y): WALNUT: 4P PROMOTIONS INC, JAN PISTOLE; 6 AM; SUNSET RIDGE/24558 1100 E ST /4 MI S OF NORMANDY/GPS N4130 W8938; (815) 379-2358; SUNSETRIDGEMX.COM

AUG 29 (S,Y): MILLIKEN: TWO RIVERS RACING LLC, DAVID B LEAHY; 5:30 AM; 22437 WELD CT RD 19; (970) 587-5770

COnnECTiCuT BiKE SHOW

AUG 15 (R): SANTA MONICA: SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA MOTOR, MITCH FRIEDMAN; (310) 387-3974; SC-MA.COM

AUG 15 (R): HADDAM NECK: BRITISH IRON ASSOCIATION, KENNETH WOOLLEY; 10 AM; HADDAM NECK FAIRGROUNDS /3 MILES S ON RT 151 W/INTERSECTION W/RT 66; (860) 5855102; CTBRITIRON.ORG

AUG 21 (R): MCCLOUD: NATIONAL: 2 DAY EVENT: MCCLOUD

HiLLCLiMB

AUG 6 (S,T,Y): GEORGETOWN: PLEASURE RIDERS MC, KELLY BRADY; 4 PM; FAIRGROUNDS /RT 1 E TO 234 (MILL ST); (217) 247-2216; PLEASURERIDERS.NET

MOTOCROSS

POKER Run

duAL SPORT RidE

AUG 8 (R): OTTAWA: VARIETY RIDERS MOTORCYCLE, STEVE CHURCHILL; 8 AM; 1414 US RT 6 /USRT 6 WEST OF OTTAWA; (815) 434-3669; VARIETYRIDERS.COM

HARE SCRAMBLES Event Promoter

JUL 6 (S,Y): BREAUX BRIDGE: QUALIFIER; 2 DAY EVENT: DIRT BIKE MIKE LLC, 6 AM; 1640 MILLS HWY; (870) 342-5373; DIRTBIKEMIKE.COM Sign-in Time

REC TRAiL RidE

iLLinOiS

AUG 21 (S,T): CASEY: LINCOLN TRAIL MOTOSPORTS, TIM JACKSON; 6 AM; 649 CR2150E /5 MI W OF TOWN ON RT 40; (217) 932-2041; LINCOLNTRAILMOTOSPORTS.COM AUG 28 (V,T,Y): FOSTERBURG: SPLINTER CREEK DIRT RIDER, TODDD ROMANN; 6 AM; 2996 TERPENING LN /8 MI N OF RT 140/L ON TERPENING; (618) 372-4355; SPLINTERCREEK.COM AUG 29 (S,Y): FOSTERBURG: SPLINTER CREEK DIRT RIDER, TODD E ROMANN; 6 AM; 2996

TERPENING LN /8 MI N OF RT 140/L ON TERPENING; (618) 372-4355; SPLINTERCREEK.COM AUG 29 (S,T,Y): NASHVILLE: EURO RACEWAY LLC, FRANK P BARTOLOTTA; 7 AM; 7342 RICE RD; (618) 327-9530; EURORACEWAY.COM

indiAnA ROAd Run AUG 28 (R): KOKOMO: CHARITY: MIDNIGHT RIDERS MC, CHARLES T KIRKMAN; 11 AM; 1929 N WASHINGTON ST /MARTINOS ITALIAN VILLA NORTH SIDE OF KOKOMO; (765) 566-3807; MIDNIGHT-RIDERSMC.COM AUG 28 (R): INDIANAPOLIS: CHARITY: PEDIATRIC BRAIN TUMOR FOU, KYLE CLACK; 4:45 PM; INDIANAPOLIS MOTOR SPEEDWAY /4790 W 16 ST; (800) 253-6530; RIDEFORKIDS.ORG AdvEnTuRE RidE AUG 21 (R): COLUMBUS: NATIONAL: 2 DAY EVENT: STONEY LONESOME M/C, NATHAN GASKILL; 8 AM; 14001 W HWY 46 /8 MI W OF COLUMBUS ON HWY 46; (812) 343-9772; STONEYLONESOMEMC.COM duAL SPORT RidE AUG 21 (R): COLUMBUS: NATIONAL: 2 DAY EVENT: STONEY LONESOME M/C, NATHAN GASKILL; 8 AM; 14001 W HWY 46 /8 MI W OF COLUMBUS ON HWY 46; (812) 343-9772; STONEYLONESOMEMC.COM HARE SCRAMBLES AUG 15 (S,Y): COLUMBUS: STONEY LONESOME M/C, BEN B BREEDLOVE; 7 AM; 14001 W HWY 46 /8 MI W OF COLUMBUS ON HWY 46; (812) 3505732; STONEYLONESOMEMC.COM EnduRO AUG 14 (S): ROSELAWN: HILL AND GULLY RIDERS, JOHN C RYAN; 10 AM; RT 55 & RT 10 /I65 TO ROUTE 10 WEST 3 MI. TO STREET; (708) 424-1969; MIDWESTENDUROS.COM AUG 15 (S): ROSELAWN: HILL AND GULLY RIDERS, JOHN C RYAN; 7:30 AM; RT 55 & RT 10 /I65 TO ROUTE 10 WEST 3 MI. TO STREET; (708) 4241969; MIDWESTENDUROS.COM EnduROCROSS AUG 27 (S,Y): INDIANAPOLIS: INDOOR; SOURCE INTERLINK MEDIA, BECKY J KOONS; 9 AM; 1202 E 38TH ST /PEPSI COLISEUM; (817) 246-6751; ENDUROCROSS.COM MOTOCROSS AUG 8 (S,T,Y): AUG 22 (S,T,Y): CROTHERSVILLE: LET’S GO RACING LLC, SCOTT B WOOLLS; 5:30 AM; 11312 EAST 700 SOUTH /I-65 EX 36 TO 31 S TO 700 SOUTH FIRST LEFT; (812) 374-8228; HIGHFLYMX.COM AUG 15 (S,T,Y): CAYUGA: PLEASURE RIDERS MC, KELLY BRADEY; STATELINE RD /MAIN ST,WESTVILLE E TO FOREST GLEN E STATELNE; (217) 247-2216; PLEASURERIDERS.NET AUG 29 (S,Y): PARIS CROSSING: HOOSIER HILLTOPPERS, BOB LEWIS; 6:30 AM; 10665 S CO RD 410 W /I-65 S. OF SEYMOUR, EX 41 EAST ON ST RD 250; (502) 713-3495

August 2010

49


IOWA

MASSACHUSETTS

DUAL SPORT RIDE

ROAD RUN

AUG 15 (R): HALE: EASTERN IOWA TRAIL TAMERS, QUINTIN M DAVIS; 11 AM; 1 MI EAST OF TOWN ON CO RD B-45; (319) 465-5680

AUG 1 (R): RAYNHAM: CHARITY: KEVIN MOREIRA - SAFETY DI, KEVIN MOREIRA; 7 AM; 115 NEW STATE HIGHWAY (RT 44) /ROUTE 24 TO ROUTE 44 IN RAYNHAM, MA; (508) 889-3697; SEMMSF.ORG

HARE SCRAMBLES AUG 8 (S,T,Y): MOUNT PLEASANT: BURLINGTON VALLEY DUSTERS, DAVID K CROMER; 8 AM; GREENHURST FARM /2.3 MI S OF TOWN; (319) 753-6961; IERA.COM AUG 22 (S,Y): FREMONT: TURKEY SCRATCH ENDURO RID, MARK O NEFF; 8 AM; 5 MI N OF TOWN; (641) 660-1326; IERA22.COM ENDURO AUG 22 (S): DAYTON: CENTRAL IOWA ENDURO RIDER, JIM SPENCER; 7 AM; 2.4 MI E-175,2.8M S ON P70,1.5 MI E ON GRAVEL; (515) 795-3440 MOTOCROSS AUG 7 (S,T,Y): MONTEZUMA: 2 DAY EVENT: FV MOTO X, CHIP BOYAN; 7 AM; FUN VALLEY SKI AREA /1066 500TH AVE/ 2.5 MI SW OF TOWN; (641) 623-3456; FVMOTOX.COM AUG 14 (S,T,Y): AUG 21 (S,T,Y): CEDAR RAPIDS: CEDAR VALLEY TRAIL RIDERS, CURT HEJDA; 1 PM; HAWKEYE DOWNS /4400 6TH ST SW; (319) 363-7800; CVTR.ORG

KANSAS ROAD RUN AUG 28 (R): WICHITA: MARCH OF DIMES-KS, JENNIFER BAIG; 8:30 AM; INDIAN MOTORCYCLE /9501 W KELLOGG; (316) 267-9255; BIKERSFORBABIES.ORG

MAINE ENDURO AUG 22 (S): NORTH BERWICK: NATIONAL; SEACOAST TRAIL RIDERS, PETER E ANANIA; 3 PM; NOBLE HIGH SCHOOL /388 SOMERSWORTH RD; (603) 436-4331; SEACOASTTRAILRIDERS.ORG OBSERVED TRIALS AUG 21 (S,Y): BERWICK: SEACOAST TRAIL RIDERS, JARETH JOHNSON; 9 AM; DURANT RD; (207) 604-2323; SEACOASTTRAILRIDERS.ORG

AUG 22 (R): GLOUCHESTER: CHARITY;: PAUL W COTE, CONSULTANT, PAUL COTE; 9:30 AM; STAGE FORT PARK /OFF ROUTE 127; (978) 535-8222; MASSMSF.ORG HILLCLIMB AUG 22 (S,T,Y): MONSON: QUABOAG RIDERS INC, RONALD J GUERTIN; 8 AM; KING AVE /RT 32 TO KING AVE; (413) 267-4414; QUABOAGRIDERS. COM

AUG 15 (S,Y): BARRYTON: BATTLE CREEK MOTORCYCLE C, BYRON L KIBBY; 7 AM; CORNER OF 20 MI & 70TH AVE /M66 NORTH THRU ARRYTON TO 20 MI WEST 3.9 MI; (269) 660-1613; BATTLECREEKMOTORCYCLECLUB. COM AUG 22 (S): MIDLAND: POLKA DOTS M/C, THOMAS P WOODS; 7 AM; 760 W BROOKS RD /8 MI N OF M46 OR 5 MI S OF M20; (989) 832-8284; POLKADOTSMC.NET ENDURO AUG 8 (S): BOYNE FALLS: STUMP JUMPER M/C, ALAN RANDT; CHANDLER HILLS RD; (517) 243-3971; AUG 29 (S): SHERIDAN: KNUCKLE BUSTERS RIDERS CL, THOMAS J COUSINAW; 317 S SHERMAN; (989) 287-0120

MICHIGAN

OBSERVED TRIALS

1/2 MILE DIRT TRACK

AUG 7 (S,Y): AUG 8 (S,Y): ROSE CITY: MICHIGAN ONTARIO TRIALS A, JEREMY MASON; 9 AM; BENT WHEELS COMP CLUBGROUNDS /I-75N EX 202/M-33N TO TOWN/M33 & ROSE CITY RD; (810) 417-2892; MOTATRIALS.ORG

AUG 15 (S,T,Y): CARO: FLINT MOTORCYCLE CLUB, LINDA LOWELL; TUSCOLA COUNTY FAIRGROUNDS; (810) 687-7379; FLINTMOTORCYCLECLUB.COM AUG 28 (S,T,Y): CROSWELL: PORT HURON MOTORCYCLE CLU, LARRY A TACK; 10 AM; CROSWELL FAIRGROUNDS /CALL FOR DIRECTIONS; (810) 531-0031; PHMCUSA.COM SHORT TRACK AUG 7 (S): AUG 21 (S,T): DEFORD: LUCKY THUMB MC, GENELDA J STOLZMAN; 8 AM; 7394 BEVENS RD /3 MI N OF M46 & M53/2 MI W; (989) 635-2282; SCRAMBLES AUG 8 (S): AUG 22 (S,T): DEFORD: LUCKY THUMB MC, GENELDA J STOLZMAN; 8 AM; 7394 BEVENS RD /3 MI N OF M46 & M53/2 MI W; (989) 635-2282 ROAD RUN

MOTOCROSS AUG 1 (S,Y): AUG 28 (S,Y): AUG 29 (S,Y): BELDING: GRATTAN RACEWAY MOTOCROSS, SAM FAASEN; 7 AM; 7201 LESSITER; (616) 691-7221; GRATTANRACEWAYMX.COM AUG 7 (S,T,Y): AUG 8 (S,T,Y): BATTLE CREEK: BATTLE CREEK MOTORCYCLE C, BYRON L KIBBY; 6 AM; CLBGRNDS/21758 WAUBASCON RD /HELMER N TO MORGAN/E TO WAUBESCON/N 3 MI; (269) 660-1613; BATTLECREEKMOTORCYCLECLUB. COM AUG 14 (S,T,Y): CRYSTAL FALLS: 2 DAY EVENT: VALLEY RACEWAY, ERIC J UREN; 12 PM; 1058 S US 2 /1 MILE SOUTH OF CRYSTAL FALLS ON US2; (906) 367-0600; VALLEYRACEWAY. COM

MARYLAND

AUG 29 (R): ANN ARBOR: CHARITY;: PEDIATRIC BRAIN TUMOR FOU, KYLE CLACK; 8 AM; WASHTENAW COMM COLLEGE /4800 E HURON RIVER DR; (800) 253-6530; RIDEFORKIDS.ORG

SHORT TRACK

POKER RUN

AUG 15 (S,T,Y): CADILLAC: CADILLAC MOTORCYCLE CLUB, RICK AUGUSTSON; 7 AM; 3747 S 39 RD, PO BOX 236 /.25 MI N OF 34 RD (BOON RD) ON 39 RD; (231) 884-3729; CADILLACMC.COM

AUG 6 (S,Y): AUG 13 (S,Y): TIMONIUM: BALTIMORE COUNTY TRAIL RI, BRETT FRIEDEL; 3 PM; MD STATE FAIRGROUNDS /I-83 TO TOWN/ TIMONIUM RD; (410) 557-7043; BCTRA. COM

AUG 1 (R): YPSILANTI: HURON VALLEY NIGHT HAWKS, HAMMER WILLIAMSON; 11 AM; 10250 GEDDES RD /.5 MI W OF RIDGE; (734) 824-8701; HVNHMC.COM

AUG 21 (S,Y): NEWAYGO: 2 DAY EVENT: BIG AIR MOTOCROSS, MATT POWERS; 7 AM; 1262 SPRING DRIVE; (231) 652-5225; BIGAIRMOTOCROSS. COM

AUG 15 (R): FARMINGTON HILL: SOARING CHICKENS, SARGE GRIFFIS; 11 AM; HARLEY DAVIDSON DEALER; (734) 397-8890

MINNESOTA

MOTOCROSS AUG 8 (S,T,Y): BUDDS CREEK: BUDDS CREEK MOTOCROSS PAR, JONATHAN BEASLEY; 8 AM; BUDDS CREEK MX PARK /27963 BUDDS CREEK RD; (301) 475-2000; BUDDSCREEK.COM AUG 28 (S,Y): BUDDS CREEK: 2 DAY EVENT: MIDDLE ATLANTIC MOTOCROSS, RUTH ANN BENSON; 6 AM; BUDDS CREEK MX PARK /27963 BUDDS CREEK RD; (410) 375-1059; MAMAMX.COM

50

AUG 15 (R): FISKDALE: CHARITY;: PEDIATRIC BRAIN TUMOR FOU, KYLE CLACK; 8 AM; TANTASQUA REGIONAL HIGH SCHOOL /319 BROOKFIELD RD; (800) 253-6530; RIDEFORKIDS.ORG

BEERBOWER; 7 AM; LOG ROAD MX PARK /I-69 EX 13/W 10 MI TO LOG RD/S 1.5 MI; (419) 636-5430; LOGROADMX.COM

AmericanMotorcyclist.com

DUAL SPORT RIDE AUG 29 (R): ANN ARBOR: CHARITY: PEDIATRIC BRAIN TUMOR FOU, KYLE CLACK; 8 AM; WASHTENAW COMM COLLEGE /4800 E HURON RIVER DR; (800) 253-6530; RIDEFORKIDS.ORG HARE SCRAMBLES AUG 1 (S,T,Y): BRONSON: JB MX MOTORSPORTS, JEFF A

1/2 MILE DIRT TRACK AUG 14 (S,T,Y): CAMBRIDGE: ON TRACK PROMOTIONS INC, ROBERT ANDERSON; 1 PM; ISANTI CO FRGRNDS /HWY 95 E OF CAMBRIDGE; (612) 328-4410; ROAD RUN AUG 13 (R): DETROIT LAKES: 2 DAY EVENT: MINNESOTA WINGS INC, LEE A SCULLY; 12 PM; COUNTRY INN & SUITES /JUNCTION OFF US HWY 10 & 59; (320) 732-6005; MNWINGS.COM

HILLCLIMB AUG 29 (S,T,Y): NEW ULM: FLYING DUTCHMEN CYCLE CLU, LES STADICK; 8 AM; 20513 110TH AVE; (507) 354-2306; FLYINGDUTCHMEN MOTORCYCLECLUB.COM HARE SCRAMBLES AUG 7 (U): AUG 8 (S,Y): HILLCITY: NATIONAL; RANGE RIDERS MC, PAUL OTTO; 7 AM; 1 MILE S OF HILL CITY HWY 169; (763) 229-1177; RANGERIDERSMC.ORG AUG 14 (V,Y): DENNISON: 2 DAY EVENT: ROUGH RIDERS QUAD CLUB, KENNETH C SNYDER; 9 AM; 13256 LAMB AVE; (952) 465-8868 AUG 29 (S,Y): CROSBY: NORTHERN LITES MC, BRETT HARDY; 7 AM; 28521 STATE HWY 6 /5 MI N OF CROSBY ON HWY 6 ON WESTSIDE; (218) 829-7985; NORTHERNLITESMC. ORG ENDURO AUG 14 (S,Y): AKELEY: 2 DAY EVENT: PAUL BUNYAN FOREST RIDER, JOE BERSCHEID; STOMPIN’ GROUNDS /3 MILES NORTH OF TOWN ON HWY 64; (218) 739-5525; PAULBUNYAN FORESTRIDERSMC.COM AUG 21 (S,Y): DUQUETTE: 2 DAY EVENT: STRAIGHT ARROW ENDURO RID, JESSICA KIGHT; NEMADJI STATE FOREST /I-35 TO MN 23/E 30 MI TO TOWN; (651) 456-0224; STRAIGHTARROWS.ORG OBSERVED TRIALS AUG 28 (S,Y): AUG 29 (S,Y): GILBERT: UPPER MIDWEST TRIALS ASSO, GORDON BOGGIE; 9 AM; GILBERT OHV PARK /HWY 37E TO 135S; (952) 881-9427; UMTA.ORG HILL DRAG AUG 28 (S,T,Y): MANKATO: KATO CYCLE CLUB, JOHN E WINCH; 1 PM; 19836 539TH LANE /7 MI S OF TOWN; (507) 381-4708; KATOCYCLECLUB. COM MOTOCROSS AUG 1 (S,Y): BROOKSTON: ECHO VALLEY MOTOCROSS PAR, TERI LUND; 6:30 AM; 4650 LAVOY RD /10 MI W OF HWY 33 ON HWY2/ MILE MARKER 235; (218) 348-4754; ECHOVALLEYMOTOCROSS.COM AUG 1 (V): AUG 15 (S): MAZEPPA: HURRICANE HILLS MX PARK I, JEFFERY GRAY; 6:30 AM; 43560 232ND AVE /6 MI E OF ZUMBROTA ON CR10 TO 232ND AVE; (507) 843-5154; HURRICANEHILLS.COM AUG 1 (S,Y): KELLOGG: MOTOKAZIE INC, LEE M THEIS; 6:30 AM; 58374 HWY 42 /ON HWY 42 BETWEEN PLAINVIEW & KELLOGG MN; (952) 244-9996; MOTOKAZIE.COM AUG 8 (S,Y): AUG 29 (G,Y): MILLVILLE: HI WINDERS, JOHN C MARTIN; SPRING CREEK MX PARK /63633 298TH AVE/9 MI E OF HWY 63 ON HWY60; (507) 753-2779; SPRINGCREEKMX.COM AUG 15 (S,Y): AUG 22 (V,Y): CAMBRIDGE: RTW RACE PROMOTIONS, JEFF M OLDENBURG; 7 AM; HWY 95 & HWY 47 /HWY 95 TO HWY 47 N 1 1/2 MI ON LEFT; (320) 9804428; OAKHILLMX.COM


AUG 22 (S,Y): BROOK PARK: BERM BENDERS RACEWAY, KURT CASWELL; 6:30 AM; 2393 SHERWOOD ST /HWY 23E 8 MI TO SHERWOOD ST CR 68N; (320) 679-2582; BERMBENDERS.COM

AUG 22 (R): MT HOLLY: MOTORCYCLISTS FOR JESUS M, FRED MCCLINCY; KRAIL ACRES/1135 SMITHVILLE RD /RT 206 S FROM NJ TRNPK; (215) 234-8611; GO2MJM.COM

AUG 1 (R): WANTAGH: QUEENSBORO MC, PHIL ROSEMAN; 9 AM; WANTAGH PARK /EXIT W 6 W OFF WANTAGH PKWY; (646) 789-5750; QUEENSBOROMC.COM

ENDURO

POKER RUN

AUG 29 (S): MAURICETOWN: COMPETITION DIRT RIDERS, DAVID BOSTROM; MAURICETOWN FIRE HALL /NOBLE ST; (856) 696-4783; COMPETITIONDIRTRIDERS.ORG

AUG 8 (R): ISLIP TERRACE: AMERICAN SPIRIT-NY SUFFOL, MICHAEL GIAMMONA; 9:30 AM; MERCY HAVEN /859 CONNETIQUOT AVE; (631) 2778300; ASMCSUFFOLK.COM

MISSOURI

NEW MEXICO

REC TRAIL RIDE

MOTOCROSS

OBSERVED TRIALS

AUG 8 (G,Y): WASHINGTON: SEAT TIME MOTORCYCLE CLUB, ED LACHANCE; 9 AM; N PARK DR / HWY 100 TO HIGH ST, N TO FRONT ST,L TO N.PARK; (636) 488-3174; LACHANCERACING.COM

AUG 7 (S,Y): SAN GERONIMO: 2 DAY EVENT: NEW MEXICO TRIALS ASSOCIA, KYLE GOON; 8 AM; 15 M WEST OF LAS VEGAS OFF A117; (505) 332-3172; NMTRIALS.ORG

AUG 22 (R): EAST QUOGUE: LONG ISLAND RECREATIONAL, ROBERT W OTT; 9:30 AM; CENTRAL BLVD / PHEASANT RUN HUNT CLUB; (516) 250-9086; LIRTC.ORG

AUG 22 (S,Y): KELLOGG: MOTOKAZIE INC, LEE M THEIS; 6:30 AM; 58374 HWY 42 /ON HWY 42 BETWEEN PLAINVIEW & KELLOGG MN; (952) 492-2090; MOTOKAZIE.COM

AUG 21 (V,Y): HUNTSVILLE: 2 DAY EVENT: HLR MOTORSPORTS INC, STEVEN J HALTERMAN; 7 AM; 8856 HWY BB; (660) 263-4321; HLRMOTORSPORTS.NET AUG 22 (S,Y): FARMINGTON: SEAT TIME MOTORCYCLE CLUB, ED LACHANCE; 6 AM; WASHITA OFF ROAD TRAILS /410 THOMAS RD; (573) 701-8674; WASHITAOFFROADTRAILS. COM

MONTANA HARE SCRAMBLES AUG 21 (U): BIG SKY: NATIONAL; LONE PEAK RACING LLC, JAMES KABISCH; 5 PM; BIG SKY RESORT; (406) 223-0478; BIGSKYXC.COM AUG 22 (S,Y): BIG SKY: NATIONAL; LONE PEAK RACING LLC, JAMES KABISCH; BIG SKY RESORT; (406) 223-0478; BIGSKYXC.COM

NEBRASKA ROAD RALLY AUG 13 (R): FRANKLIN: 2 DAY EVENT: NEBRASKA BMW NIGHTRIDERS, LYNN E WENZBAUER; 12 PM; FAIRGROUNDS /SIGNS POSTED ON HWYS; (402) 223-2508

NEVADA DUAL SPORT RIDE AUG 21 (R): FALLON: 8 DAY EVENT: COUNTDOWN, JERRY L COUNTS; 8 AM;; (775) 884-0399; DISTRICT37AMA. ORG

NEW JERSEY ROAD RUN AUG 28 (R): OLD BRIDGE: BAYSHORE WHEELERS, JIM BARGER; 9 AM; 69 OLD AMBOY RD; (732) 583-8323; BAYSHOREWHEELERS.ORG AUG 29 (R): ROCKAWAY: TRI COUNTY MOTORCYCLE CLU, EDMUND ZUZOCK JR; 9 AM; BOROUGH PLAZA 350 RT 46; (973) 347-3246; TRICOUNTYMC.COM POKER RUN AUG 15 (R): BRIDGEWATER: AMADIST 02 OF NEW JERSEY, BENTON DELLAPIETRO; 9 AM; EAGLES LODGE/350 WOODSIDE LANE /287 TO RT 28 TO WOODSIDE LANE; (732) 6038434; AMADISTRICTII.COM BIKE SHOW

NEW YORK 1/2 MILE DIRT TRACK AUG 8 (S,T,Y): WEST LEBANON: ELECTRIC CITY RIDERS, FRANK J CARPINELLO; 8 AM; LEBANON VALLEY SPEEDWAY /NYS I-90 TO US RT 20/1746 RT 20; (518) 542-2144; ELECTRICCITYRIDERS.COM SHORT TRACK AUG 15 (S,T,Y): AUG 22 (S,T,Y): PATTERSONVILLE: ELECTRIC CITY RIDERS, FRANK J CARPINELLO; 8 AM; INDIAN LOOKOUT COUNTRY CLUB /1142 BATTER STREET; (518) 542-2144; ELECTRICCITYRIDERS.COM TRAIL RIDE AUG 14 (R,T,Y): HANCOCK: BEAR CREEK SPORTSMEN, LINDA RIZZON; 9:30 AM; FIREMANS FIELD /RT 17 TO HANCOCK EXIT/ARROWED; (607) 4343441; BEARCREEKSPORTSMEN.COM ROAD RUN AUG 1 (R): CENTRAL VALLEY: CHARITY;: PEDIATRIC BRAIN TUMOR FOU, KYLE CLACK; 8 AM; CENTRAL VALLEY ELEM SCHOOL /45 RT 32; (800) 253-6530; RIDEFORKIDS.ORG

ADVENTURE RIDE AUG 7 (R): HANCOCK: NATIONAL: 2 DAY EVENT: BEAR CREEK SPORTSMEN, LINDA RIZZON; 9 AM; FIREMANS FIELD /RT 17 TO HANCOCK EXIT/ARROWED; (973) 9536308; BEARCREEKSPORTSMEN.COM DUAL SPORT RIDE AUG 7 (R): HANCOCK: NATIONAL: 2 DAY EVENT: BEAR CREEK SPORTSMEN, LINDA RIZZON; 9 AM; FIREMANS FIELD /RT 17 TO HANCOCK EXIT/ARROWED; (973) 9536308; BEARCREEKSPORTSMEN.COM ROAD RALLY AUG 22 (R): NANVET: HUDSON VALLEY HARLEY RIDE, JIM STINES; 9 AM; 17 N MIDDLETOWN; (845) 548-5553; HUDSONVALLEYHARLEYRIDERS. COM BINGO RUN AUG 1 (R): QUEENSBURY: ADIRONDACK RIDERS OF GLEN, SANDRA CORENTTO; 10 AM; MCDONALDS /I-87 NORTHWAY EXIT 18; (518) 792-1713; AMADISTRICT3. COM FUN RUN

AUG 7 (R): JAMESVILLE: MARCH OF DIMES-NY, MARK SHETSKY; 9 AM; 4110 WEST SHORE MANOR / RT 481 TO JAMESVILLE EX FOLLOW SIGNS TO BEACH; (315) 435-5252; MARCHOFDIMES.COM

AUG 22 (R): MINEOLA: NASSAU WINGS, JAIME A CRUZ; 9 AM; 336 JERICHO TPKE; (516) 248-5555; POPSRUN.ORG

AUG 8 (R): ALBANY: IRISH RIDERS, STEPHEN M DOWNS; 9 AM; LEBANON VALLEY SPEEDWAY; (518) 872-0953; IRISHRIDERSMC.COM

AUG 1 (S,T): KING FERRY: CAYUGA COUNTY RIDERS INC, LARRY E BARNES; 6 AM; CENTER RD /RT. 90 TO BARTNICK RD TO CENTER RD; (315) 364-8087

AUG 8 (R): DEER PARK: IRON SHIELDS LE MC - NY C, MARTHA JAIRALA; 9 AM; 511 GOMMACK RD /ENDING AT EDDY’S RVS MEDFORD NY; (917) 6040077; IRONSHIELDS.ORG AUG 15 (R): EAST MEADOW: ALLIANCE MC, ART CORETTE; 9:45 AM; HOOTERS /1740 HEMPSTEAD TURNPIKE; (516) 509-8143;ALLIANCEMCNY.COM AUG 29 (R): CLARENCE: REGENT RIDERS, RICHARD GIELSKI; 10295 MAIN ST; (716) 937-9524; REGENTRIDERS.COM

HARE SCRAMBLES

AUG 22 (S,T,Y): NEW BERLIN: THUNDER RIDGE SPORTS, JAMES L SIMMONS; 224 MICHAEL LANE / CO HWY 18 S EDMESTON JUST OFF STATE ROUTE 8; (607) 847-6520; THUNDERRIDGE.BIZ AUG 28 (S,T,Y): AUG 28 (S,T,Y): AUG 29 (S,Y): CORTLAND: NATIONAL; KNOBBY ACRES ASSOCIATION, CINDY DAVIS; 12 PM; BETWEEN 405 & 429 SCARS RD; (607) 756-5277; WNYOA.NET ENDURO

AUG 29 (R): STATEN ISLAND: CHARITY: MARCH OF DIMES-NY WESTCHE, LISA TUFANO; 9 AM; 2655 RICHMOND AVE; (718) 981-3000; BIKERSFORBABIES.ORG

AUG 15 (S): BERKSHIRE: ITHACA DIRT RIDERS INC, CHARLES E DAVIS; 8950 W CREEK RD /NYS RT 79 TO WESTCREEK RD; (607) 657-8248; ITHACADIRTRIDERS.COM

FIELD MEET

OBSERVED TRIALS

AUG 1 (S,Y): MONTOUR FALLS: AMADIST 4 TRIALS COMMITT, JODY BLISS; 10 AM; 2759 MILLS RD; (607) 535-9893 AUG 15 (S,Y): DALE: NIAGARA TRIALS RIDERS, DARLENE LYNCH; PFLAUM RD; (716) 434-2595; NTRTRIALS.COM AUG 22 (S,Y): CUBA: AMA-DIST 4 TRIALS COMMITT, GEORGE BRINKWART; 10 AM; HASKELL RD; (585) 247-5508 AUG 29 (S): DUANESBURG: 3-D TRIALS, PETE LACAGNINA; 9 AM; KELLY STATION RD /ELEC CITY RIDERS TRACK; (518) 393-3521 MOTOCROSS AUG 1 (S,T): CAROGA LAKE: ROYAL MOUNTAIN SKI AREA, JIM BLAISE; 3072 RT 10; (518) 835-6445; ROYALMOUNTAIN.COM AUG 8 (S,T,Y): AUBURN: FROZEN OCEAN MOTOCROSS IN, BILL M DENMAN; 7 AM; 4415 VANDERSTOUW RD /NYS THRUWAY EX 40 TO 34S; (315) 784-5466; FROZEN-OCEAN.COM AUG 13 (S,Y): NEW BERLIN: 3 DAY EVENT: UNADILLA VALLEY SPORTS CE, JILL ROBINSON; UNADILLA MX 5986 ST HWY 8 /ST HWY 8, 30 MINS. SOUTH OF UTICA; (607) 965-8784; UNADILLAMX.COM AUG 15 (V,Y): AUG 21 (S,T,Y): AUG 22 (S,T,Y): RICHFORD: BROOME TIOGA SPORTS CENTE, TOM HURD; 7 AM; 50 SHAFFER RD /I-81 EX 8/RT 79W 8 MI; (607) 849-4438; BROOME-TIOGA.COM AUG 21 (S,T,Y): WALLKILL: WALDEN MX, JAMES H WILD; 6 AM; 300 ORCHARD DR /GPS/W74 07.281, N41 37.518; (845) 895-2537; MXWALDEN. COM AUG 29 (S,T,Y): MAPLE VIEW: SMX ASSOCIATES LLC, ALBERT MORGAN; 7 AM; 3098 ST RT 11 /SEE WEBSITE; (315) 374-1524; MOTOMASTERS.COM

NORTH CAROLINA ROAD RUN AUG 29 (R): ASHEVILLE: CHARITY;: PEDIATRIC BRAIN TUMOR FOU, KYLE CLACK; 7 AM; BILTMORE SQ MALL /800 BREVARD RD (NC 191); (800) 2536530; RIDEFORKIDS.ORG MOTOCROSS AUG 22 (S,T,Y): IRON STATION: IRON STATION MOTORSPORTS, STACY LANE; 6 AM; 3636 E HWY 27 /INT HWYS 27E & 73; (704) 735-9132; TOPGUNMX.NET

OHIO 1/2 MILE DIRT TRACK AUG 14 (G): DAYTON: DAYTON MOTORCYCLE CLUB IN, KEVIN LOONEY; 3 PM; 1043 S MAIN STREET /I-75 EX 51 FOLLOW SIGNS TO FAIRGROUNDS; (937) 222-1303; OLDTIMENEWSIES.COM SCRAMBLES AUG 28 (V,Y): ORVILLE: NATIONAL; PATRIOT PROMOTIONS, WAYNE D PHILLIPS; 8 AM; WAYNE CO SPEEDWAY /NORTH OF RT 30 1/2 MI. BETWEEN 71 & 77; (330) 465-1990 RELIABLITY RUN AUG 7 (R): TORONTO: OHIO VALLEY

August 2010

51


BSA OWNERS CL, BUD KUBENA; 8 AM; CABLE’S CAMPGROUND / COUNTY RD 56; (724) 945-6018; BSACLUB-OV.HAILWOOD.COM POKER RUN AUG 8 (R): AKRON: GREATER AKRON MOTORCYCLE, RICH ROBINSON; 8 AM; 3000 KREBS DR /TADMOR TEMPLE; (330) 864-0327 AUG 14 (R): GREENVILLE: TREATY CITY MOTORCYCLE CL, DAN R KNECHT; 4 PM; CLBGRNDS/7270 MOTORCYCLE DR /3.5 MI NW OF TOWN OFF SR 571; (937) 423-1913; TREATYCITYMC.COM

AUG 7 (S,Y): TORONTO: OHIO VALLEY BSA OWNERS CL, BUD KUBENA; 8 AM; CABLE’S CAMPGROUND / COUNTY RD 56; (724) 945-6018; BSACLUB-OV.HAILWOOD.COM AUG 14 (S,Y): DAYTON: 2 DAY EVENT: TRIALS INC, STEVE BERRY; 3515 STONEY HOLLOW RD /SEE WEBSITE; (937) 294-7957; TRIALSINC.ORG GRAND PRIX

DUAL SPORT RIDE

AUG 1 (S): SUGAR GROVE: CENTRAL OHIO COMPETITION, JANET FOUT; 6 AM; 9171 BUCKEYE RD /6 MI E OF LANCASTER/LEFT AT LIGHT; (740) 983-3937; COCRMX.COM

AUG 1 (R): WELLSTON: APPALACHIAN DIRT RIDERS I, WILLIAM DEPUE; 9 AM; JAYMAR/ JOLLY MINE /5 MI E OF TOWN ON SR 32; (740) 384-6379; ADROHIO.ORG

AUG 22 (S,T,Y): ATHENS: ACTION SPORTS PROMOTIONS, DREW WOLFE; 8 AM; SALEM RD / SEE WEBSITE; (740) 594-6686; ACTIONSPORTSRACING.COM

AUG 8 (R): LOGAN: HOCKING VALLEY MOTORCYCLE, TOM COWHER; 9 AM; 13121 JAKE TOM RD /US RT 33 EX SR 328/FOLLOW ARROWS; (740) 3857655; HOCKINGVALLEYMC.COM

AUG 28 (S,T,Y): AUG 29 (S,T,Y): NELSONVILLE: FAST TRAXX PROMOTIONS LLC, SHAWNA BICKLEY; 8 AM; 5999 WARREN DR / BTWN ATHENS & TOWN ON RT 33; (740) 767-3740; FASTTRAXXRACING. COM

AUG 28 (R): ZANESVILLE: 2 DAY EVENT: ZANESVILLE TRAIL RIDERS, KORY T YOUNG; 10 AM; 5031 COOPERMILL RD /I70 TO EX 152,W ON SR40, S ON KOPCHAK RD; (614) 204-1438; ZTR.CC ROAD RALLY AUG 6 (R): BELLEFONTAINE: 3 DAY EVENT: LOGAN COUNTY RALLY AT THE, CANDACE WATSON; 5 PM; 100 S MAIN STREET / DOWNTOWN BELLEFONTAINE @ THE COURT HOUSE; (937) 599-5121; LOGANCOUNTYOHIO.COM AUG 14 (R): TIFFIN: 2 DAY EVENT: INDIAN 4 CYLINDER CLUB, ROBERT MARKEY; TIFFIN CO FRGRNDS / OFF RT 224/HOPEWELL AVE.; (717) 938-2556; AUG 20 (R): MARIETTA: 3 DAY EVENT: MOTORCYCLE SPORT TOURING, JANET CAMPBELL; HOLIDAY IN; (513) 932-3341; SWAP MEETS AUG 6 (R): TORONTO: 3 DAY EVENT: OHIO VALLEY BSA OWNERS CL, BUD KUBENA; 8 AM; CABLE’S CAMPGROUND /COUNTY RD 56; (724) 945-6018; BSA-CLUB-OV. HAILWOOD.COM HILLCLIMB AUG 7 (S,T,Y): OREGONIA: NATIONAL; 2 DAY EVENT: DAYTON MOTORCYCLE CLUB IN, KEVIN LOONEY; 6 AM; 1086 CORWIN RD /I-71 TO EX 36 TURN LEFT 2 MILES; (937) 263-9321; DAYTONMC.COM HARE SCRAMBLES AUG 8 (S,T): AMESVILLE: ATHENS MOTORCYCLE CLUB, JIM C BARNHART; 7 AM; ST RT 550 690 / OFF 33 TO 550 GO 8 MILES; (740) 5412095; ATHENSMOTORCYCLECLUB. COM ENDURO AUG 22 (S): MC ARTHUR: ENDURO RIDERS ASSOCIATION, STEVE BARBER; 6:30 AM; VINTON CO FRGRNDS /1 MI N OF TOWN ON SR93; (614) 582-7821; ENDURORIDERS.COM

52

OBSERVED TRIALS

AmericanMotorcyclist.com

MOTOCROSS AUG 1 (S,Y): AUG 29 (S,Y): DAYTON: DAYTON MOTORCYCLE CLUB IN, KEVIN LOONEY; 3515 STONY HOLLOW RD /I-75/35W/S GETTYSBURG RD/LEFT; (937) 2639321; DAYTONMC.COM AUG 1 (S,T,Y): MARYSVILLE: AMERICAN MOTOSPORTS LLC, MATTHEW D EASTMAN; 2 PM; UNION CTY FAIR /SR 33 TO TOWN TO SR4 EXIT; (937) 358-2427; AMERICANMX. COM AUG 4 (S,T,Y): GALLIPOLIS: AMERICAN MOTOSPORTS LLC, MATTHEW D EASTMAN; 4 PM; GALLIA COUNTY FAIR /OFF OF SR 35; (937) 358-2427; AMERICANMX. COM AUG 8 (S,T,Y): SUGAR GROVE: CENTRAL OHIO COMPETITION, JANET FOUT; 6 AM; 9171 BUCKEYE RD /6 MI E OF LANCASTER/LEFT AT LIGHT; (740) 746-8875; COCRMX.COM AUG 8 (S,Y): NEW VIENNA: NEW VIENNA MOTORSPORTS, MIKE COLE; 7:30 AM; 201 LAYMON RD / ST RT 28 RT ON LAYMON RD 1/10 MILE ON LEFT; (937) 987-2100; NEWVIENNAMOTORSPORTS.COM AUG 12 (S,T,Y): CROTON: AMERICAN MOTOSPORTS LLC, MATTHEW D EASTMAN; 4 PM; HARTFORD INDEPENDENT FAIR /OFF OF SR 37; (937) 358-2427; AMERICANMX.COM AUG 13 (S,T,Y): CHILLICOTHE: AMERICAN MOTOSPORTS LLC, MATTHEW D EASTMAN; 4 PM; ROSS CO FAIR /N OF SR207 ON FAIRGROUNDS RD; (937) 358-2427; AMERICANMX.COM AUG 22 (S,T,Y): MARYSVILLE: AMERICAN MOTOSPORTS LLC, MATTHEW D EASTMAN; 7 AM; 24400 YEARSLEY RD /FROM MARYSVILLE TO SR 31N TO SR 347 W; (937) 3582427; AMERICANMX.COM AUG 28 (S,T,Y): NELSONVILLE: FAST TRAXX PROMOTIONS LLC, SHAWNA BICKLEY; 8 AM; 5999 WARREN DR /

BTWN ATHENS & TOWN ON RT 33; (740) 767-3740; FASTTRAXXRACING. COM

OKLAHOMA ENDUROCROSS AUG 14 (S,Y): GUTHRIE: INDOOR; SOURCE INTERLINK MEDIA, BECKY J KOONS; 9 AM; LAZY E ARENA /15 MI N OF OKLAHOMA CITY; (817) 2466751; ENDUROCROSS.COM

OREGON ADVENTURE RIDE AUG 23 (R): HOOD RIVER: NATIONAL: 5 DAY EVENT: SOUND RIDER!, TOM MEHREN; OREGON CASCADES; (206) 329-7808; SOUNDRIDER.COM

PENNSYLVANIA SHORT TRACK AUG 8 (S,T,Y): SHIPPENSBURG: SHIPPENSBURG MC, DARRYL L BAER; 9 AM; SHIPPENSBURG SPEEDWAY; (717) 796-0294 AUG 14 (S): SPRING RUN: TWO WHEEL PROMOTIONS, VICKI L FLOWERS; 3 PM; 17911 DRY RUN RD W /PA TURNPIKE EX 189 RT 75 N, 641 W TO DRY REIN; (717) 368-5902; PATHVALLEY.COM AUG 28 (S,T,Y): DELTA: 2 DAY EVENT: BALTIMORE COUNTY TRAIL RI, BRETT FRIEDEL; 3 PM; MASON DIXON FAIRGROUNDS /6988 DELTA ROAD; (410) 557-7043; BCTRA.COM ROAD RUN AUG 1 (R): LEBANON: LEBANON VALLEY MOTORCYCLE, HENRIETTA STEINER; 9 AM; LEBANON VALLEY MC /11 S 22 ST; (717) 270-9797; LEBANONVALLEYMC.COM AUG 8 (R): CRANBERRY TWP: CHARITY: PEDIATRIC BRAIN TUMOR FOU, KYLE CLACK; 8 AM; HOME DEPOT /PA TPKE EX 3/N TO 25 DUTILH RD; (800) 253-6530; RIDEFORKIDS.ORG AUG 14 (R): LEBANON: CHARITY: LEBANON VALLEY MOTORCYCLE, HENRIETTA STEINER; 9 AM; LEBANON VALLEY MC /11 S 22 ST; (717) 270-9797; LEBANONVALLEYMC. COM AUG 15 (R): KRESGEVILLE: ZINC CITY MC, PHYLLIS KRESGE; 11 AM; ZC CLUBGROUNDS /1 MI SO. OF KRESGEVILLE ON ROUTE 209; (610) 681-9903; ZINCCITYMC.ORG AUG 21 (R): OLEY: READING M/C, CHARLES LAWHORN; 1 PM; CLUBGROUNDS /208 JEFFERSON ST; (610) 987-6422; READINGMC.COM AUG 21 (R): MUMBAUERSVILLE: FREEDOM RIDERS MOTORCYCLE, WAYNE STUMP; 10 AM; MUMBAUERSVILLE GUN CLUB / RT 663 & KLEINS MILL RD 1.5 MILE S PA TURNPKE; (215) 679-4766; FREEDOMRIDERS.COM AUG 28 (R): LEESPORT: CHARITY: CLASSIC HARLEY-DAVIDSON, DOROTHY BASILE; 2 PM; 983 JAMES DR /I MI N OF RT 222 ON RT 183; (610) 916-7777; CLASSICHARLEY.COM POKER RUN AUG 8 (R): SCHUYLKILL HAVE: SCHUYLKILL COUNTY MOTORCY,

BEVERLY A MILLER; 9 AM; 958 SCHUYLKILL MTN RD /E OFF 183; (570) 385-1460; SCHUYLKILLCOUNTY MOTORCYCLECLUB.COM AUG 29 (R): LANCASTER: GENTLEMEN MC SPORTSMEN, E DEAN VITATOE; 9 AM; GMC CLUBGROUNDS /10 MI S OF LANCASTER ON 272; (717) 284-2270; DISTRICT TOUR AUG 29 (R): DALLAS: BACK MOUNTAIN ENDURO RIDE, MARTY NOON; 11 AM; CASTLE INN; (570) 6751814; BMER.ORG REC POKER RUN AUG 21 (R): FRANCONIA: PETER ANGSTADT III MEMORI, JIM DUFFY; 9 AM; FRANCONIA COMM. PARK /FROM PA TPK 476 N ON S EX LANSDALE RT 63-113; (215) 292-3986; RAISINGDRUGFREETEENAGERS. ORG ROAD RALLY AUG 15 (R): REAMSTOWN: GARDEN SPOT MC, JOHN SNYDER; 9 AM; 1840 N READING RD; (717) 336-5451; GARDENSPOTMC.COM CARNIVAL RUN AUG 22 (R): COLUMBIA: THUNDERBIRD MOTORCYCLE CL, SAM BRINTON; 11 AM; 1472 HABECKER RD /CALL FOR DIRECTIONS; (717) 898-0871 SWAP MEETS AUG 20 (R): SPRING GROVE: 3 DAY EVENT: WHITE ROSE MC, ROBERT MARKEY; 8 AM; 5252 HILLCLIMB RD / RT 516, 14 MI SW OF YORK; (717) 9382556; WHITEROSEMC.ORG HARE SCRAMBLES AUG 1 (S,Y): CATAWISSA: NATIONAL; HIGH MOUNTAIN DIRT RIDERS, MICHAEL N SOUDA; 7 AM; SOUTHSIDE CONSERVATION CLUB; (570) 954-7799; HMDR.ORG AUG 1 (S,T,Y): HOOKSTOWN: 10 SECONDS RACING, RONALD R STETZ; 7 AM; SHAFFER RD; (412) 8779459; 10SECONDSRACING.COM AUG 8 (S): LAWTON: VALLEY FORGE TRAIL RIDERS, RICK KIVELA; 6 AM; 1969 STATE ROUTE 858; (215) 9903814; VFTR.ORG AUG 29 (S,T,Y): NEELYTON: FT OF MOUNTAIN, PIERRON P REASNER; 7:30 AM; 22295 DECORUM RD /PA TRNPK EX 180/RIGHT ON RT 522 TO RT 641; (814) 259-3873 AUG 29 (S,T,Y): MARKLEYSBURG: BRADDOCK’S TRAIL RACEWAY, HEATHER SAVAGE; 7 AM; 4834 NATIONAL PIKE /GPS: 39.770894,79.48028; (724) 880-5416; BRADDOCKSTROADRACEWAY.COM

ENDURO AUG 1 (S,Y): SKIPPACK: BLUE COMET MOTOCYCLE CLUB, JERRY DEWHURST; 7 AM; CLBGRNDS/4043 MENSCH RD /.25 MI SE JCT RTS 73 & 113; (267) 261-3580; BLUECOMETMC. COM OBSERVED TRIALS AUG 14 (S): VALLEY VIEW: 2 DAY EVENT: TRICKY TRYALERS MC, JAY F PARTNER; 8 AM; 183 BEAR VALLEY RD /SEE MAP; (717) 580-1272


AUG 22 (S): FARRANDSVILLE: DURTY DABBERS, NILS G MANTZOROS SEE WEBSITE; (570) 748-9456; DURTYDABBERS.COM

AUG 15 (S,T,Y): THREE SPRINGS: ROCKET RACEWAY, M CARLTON; 6 AM; 22404 STARR RD; (814) 448-2701; ROCKETRACEWAY.COM

MOTOCROSS

AUG 20 (S,T,Y): GREENSBURG: DBL SPORTS PROMOTIONS, D BUDD LITTLE; 5 PM; GREENSBURG/MT PLEASANT RD /RT30-GREENSBURG/ MT PLEASANT EX FOLLOW SIGNS; (724) 929-5396; DBLSPORTS.COM

AUG 1 (S,T,Y): DUNBAR: DBL SPORTS PROMOTIONS, D BUDD LITTLE; 1 PM; 132 PECHIN ROAD / RT 119 TO DUNBAR; (724) 929-5396; DBLSPORTS.COM AUG 1 (S,T,Y): LATROBE: MX PRODUCTIONS, GEORGE TESLOVICH; LATROBE SPEEDWAY / RT 119 TO RT 30N TO RT 981S; (724) 322-0415; LATROBEMOTORSPORTS. COM AUG 1 (S): ELKLAND: MILES MOUNTAIN MX, PHILLIP EGLESTON; 6 AM; 446 RIVER ST; (814) 258-5593; MILESMOUNTAINMX.COM AUG 1 (S,T,Y): OSCEOLA MILLS: WILD RIDE MOTOCROSS, DAVID FERGUSON; 211 BAUGHMAN CEMETERY RD /CHECK WEBSITE; (814) 762-9005; WILDRIDETRACK. COM AUG 6 (S,T,Y): LATROBE: MX PRODUCTIONS, GEORGE TESLOVICH; 5 PM; 5114 PLEASANT UNITY RD /RT 981 S. PAST AIR PORT 2 MILES; (724) 322-0415; LATROBEMOTORSPORTS.COM AUG 8 (S,Y): FREDERICKSBURG: SLEEPY HOLLOW MOTO CROSS, ERIC E SWARR; SLEEPY HOLLOW MOTO CROSS PARK /2 MILES E OF FREDERICKSBURG US ROUTE 22 EAST; (717) 653-4830; SLEEPYMX. COM AUG 8 (S,T,Y): AUG 28 (S,T,Y): SUGAR GROVE: MAPLE SHADE MX, SHERRY LAWSON; 7 AM; 5920 MATTHEWS RUN RD /RT 27 BETWEEN TOWN & YOUNGSVILLE; (814) 489-3266; MAPLESHADEMX.COM AUG 8 (S,T,Y): BOSWELL: DREAM PROMOTIONS INC./FIE, TINA BERKEY; 7 AM; 473 BERKEY RD / OFF RT 30 FROM JENNERSTOWN ON 985N; (814) 629-6774; FIELDOFDREAMSMX.COM AUG 8 (S,T,Y): LATROBE: MX PRODUCTIONS, GEORGE TESLOVICH; 7 AM; LATROBE SPEEDWAY /RT 119 TO RT 30N TO RT 981S; (724) 322-0415; LATROBEMOTORSPORTS.COM AUG 14 (S,T): SHELOCTA: PLUMCREEK VALLEY MX PARK, DAVID BATISTIG; 1 PM; 1267 STATE RT 210 /RT 210N/2 MI N OF RT 422; (724) 354-4961; PLUMCREEKVALLEYMXPARK.COM AUG 14 (S,T,Y): ELKLAND: 2 DAY EVENT: MILES MOUNTAIN MX, PHILLIP EGLESTON; 6 AM; 446 RIVER ST; (814) 258-5593; MILESMOUNTAINMX.COM AUG 15 (S,Y): HANOVER: HAPPY RAMBLERS, SHARON L FISHER; 7 AM; 4340 HANOVER RD /RT 116/5 MI W OF TOWN/SEE WEBSITE; (717) 6337708; HAPPYRAMBLERS.COM AUG 15 (S,T,Y): MARKLEYSBURG: STATE CHAMP; DBL SPORTS PROMOTIONS, D BUDD LITTLE; 6 AM; ROARING KNOB MOTORSPORTS CMPX /RT 40 20 MI E OF UNIONTOWN; (724) 929-5396; DBLSPORTS.COM

AUG 22 (S,T): SHELOCTA: PLUMCREEK VALLEY MX PARK, DAVID BATISTIG; 1267 STATE RT 210 / RT 210N/2 MI N OF RT 422; (724) 3544961; PLUMCREEKVALLEYMXPARK. COM AUG 22 (M,T,Y): JOHNSTOWN: PLEASURE VALLEY RACEWAY, JEFF CERNIC; 6 AM; 500 COOPER AVE; (814) 539-4114; PVRMX.COM AUG 27 (S,Y): BIRDSBORO: 2 DAY EVENT: PAGODA MOTORCYCLE CLUB, RANDY KASTLE; 7 AM; 441 RED LANE /422 TO 82 TO LINCOLN RD TO RED LANE; (610) 582-3717; PAGODAMOTORCYCLECLUB.COM AUG 28 (S,T): SHELOCTA: PLUMCREEK VALLEY MX PARK, DAVID BATISTIG; 1 PM; 1267 STATE RT 210 /RT 210N/2 MI N OF RT 422; (724) 354-4961; PLUMCREEKVALLEYMXPARK.COM AUG 29 (S,Y): SUGAR GROVE: STATE CHAMP; MAPLE SHADE MX, SHERRY LAWSON; 7 AM; 5920 MATTHEWS RUN RD /RT 27 BETWEEN TOWN & YOUNGSVILLE; (814) 489-3266; MAPLESHADEMX.COM AUG 29 (S,T,Y): CLIFFORD: HURRICANE HILLS MOTORSPOR, JOSEPH C FRITZ; 4 PM; 200 RTE 106 /RT81 EX206,374E TO 106E TRACK 3 MI ON R; (570) 222-9290; HHMOTOCROSS.COM AUG 29 (S,Y): SHIPPENSBURG: DOUBLIN GAP MX PARK INC, RODNEY YENTZER; 8 AM; 100 REASNER LANE /6 MILES NORTH OF DOWNTOWN SHIPPENSBURG; (717) 249-6036; DOUBLINGAP.COM

PRODUCTIONS INC, RITA COOMBS; LORETTA LYNNS RANCH; (304) 2840084; ATVMOTOCROSS.COM

UTAH ROAD RUN AUG 14 (R): SALT LAKE CITY: CHARITY;: PEDIATRIC BRAIN TUMOR FOU, KYLE CLACK; 8 AM; THIS IS THE PLACE HERITAGE PK /2601 E SUNNYSIDE AVE; (800) 253-6530; RIDEFORKIDS.ORG RECORD TRIALS AUG 28 (S): BONNEVILLE: NATIONAL; 6 DAY EVENT: BUB RACING INC, DELVENE MANNING; BONNEVILLE SALT FLATS /I-80 NEAR UTAH/ NV BORDER; (530) 272-4310; BUBSPEEDTRIALS.COM

VERMONT ROAD RALLY

AUG 15 (S,Y): STONE LAKE: MIDWEST OFFROAD TRAIL RID, MIKE WARD; 7 AM; HWY F S OF STONE LAKE TO SUMMIT LAKE; (715) 834-2793

AUG 15 (S,Y): MARTINSVILLE: VIRGINIA CHAMPIONSHIP HAR, DARRY DALTON; 12 PM; (276) 2526801; VCHSS.NET AUG 29 (S,Y): PENHOOK: VIRGINIA CHAMPIONSHIP HARE SCRAMBLES, DARRYL DALTON; 12 PM; (540) 5761480; VCHSS.NET CROSS COUNTRY AUG 8 (S,T,Y): DILLWYN: LONE RIDER PRODUCTIONS, TIM NORRIS; 12 PM; 257 SPROUSES LANE; (866) 967-8947; VXCS.ORG MOTOCROSS AUG 4 (S,T,Y): PETERSBURG: 2 DAY EVENT: VMP MX, STEFFANIE EDEN; 6 AM; 8018 BOYDTON PLANK RD; (804) 732-7888

MOTOCROSS

AUG 14 (V): SIOUX FALLS: NATIONAL; MICHAEL COBURN RACING, MICHAEL COBURN; 25868 477TH AVE; (605) 594-3465

AUG 1 (S,T,Y): PORT ANGELES: OLYMPIC PENINSULA MOTORCY, MELISSA BAAR; 7 AM; 1306 DEER PARK RD /HWY 101W/S ON DEER PK RD; (360) 565-0303; OPMC.ORG

AUG 14 (V,Y): HURRICANE MILLS: NATIONAL; 2 DAY EVENT: RACER

ROAD RUN

HARE SCRAMBLES

WASHINGTON

AUG 2 (S,Y): HURRICANE MILLS: NATIONAL; 6 DAY EVENT: MX SPORTS LLC, RITA COOMBS; LORETTA LYNNS RANCH; (304) 2840101; MXSPORTS.COM

AUG 29 (S,T,Y): BURNETT: BEAVER CYCLE CLUB INC, MICHAEL L SCHWARZENBACHER; 9 AM; CLUBGROUNDS /N9898 CO TRK I/3 MI S OF HWY 26; (920) 319-6889; BEAVERCYCLECLUB.COM

GRAND PRIX

SCRAMBLES

MOTOCROSS

SCRAMBLES

VIRGINIA

SOUTH DAKOTA

TENNESSEE

AUG 21 (S,T,Y): LAKE MILLS: AZTALAN CYCLE CLUB INC, JUDY E SUMNER; 1:30 PM; N 6643 GOMOL RD /I94N TO 26 S TO B-W. TO GOMOL-RIGHT; (414) 297-9367; AZTALANCYCLE.COM

AUG 1 (R): MIDDLETON: CHARITY;: PEDIATRIC BRAIN TUMOR FOU, KYLE CLACK; 8 AM; FIREMANS PARK /NEXT TO MIDDLETON HS/ LEE STREET; (800) 253-6530; RIDEFORKIDS.ORG

AUG 28 (S,T,Y): SUTHERLIN: 2 DAY EVENT: BIRCHCREEK PROMOTIONS, LL, AUBREY KEN FERRELL; 5 PM; 12725 KENTUCK RD; (434) 836-7629; BIRCHCREEKMXPARK.COM

AUG 9 (R): STURGIS: CHARITY: STURGIS MAYOR’S RIDE, BRENDA VASKNETZ; 8:30 AM; STURGIS COMMUNITY CENTER /1401 LAZELL ST; (605) 720-0800; STURGISMOTORCYCLERALLY.COM

AUG 14 (S,T,Y): AUG 28 (S,T,Y): BURNETT: BEAVER CYCLE CLUB INC, MICHAEL L SCHWARZENBACHER; 2 PM; CLUBGROUNDS /N9898 CO TRK I/3 MI S OF HWY 26; (920) 319-6889; BEAVERCYCLECLUB.COM

AUG 6 (R): WEST DOVER: 2 DAY EVENT: CONCOURS OWNERS GROUP INC, GUY B YOUNG II; 7 AM; MOUNT SNOW RESORT ROUTE 100; (804) 745-1439; COG-ONLINE.ORG

AUG 29 (S,Y): PINE GROVE: DUTCHMEN MX PARK, LLC., ROBERT PAPP; 7 AM; DMX/670 ROCK RD /3 MI E OF TOWN ON RT 895; (570) 5739800; DUTCHMENMXPARK.COM

ROAD RUN

SHORT TRACK

AUG 29 (S,Y): RAYMOND: WARD CREEK MX, LISA KLEMP; 6:30 AM; 41 WARD CREEK RD /SR6 FROM CHEHALIS/SR8 FROM OLYMPIA; (360) 942-4674; WARDCREEKMX.COM

WEST VIRGINIA ROAD RALLY AUG 13 (R): TEAYS VALLEY: 2 DAY EVENT: ROAD RIDERS FOR JESUS, CARL CRACKEL; 8 AM; 167 FLETCHER RD /EX 39 OFF WESTBOUND I64 FROM CHARLESTON; (636) 285-9005; ROADRIDERSFORJESUS.ORG

WISCONSIN

OBSERVED TRIALS AUG 8 (S,Y): BLACK RIVER FAL: WISCONSIN OBSERVED TRIALS, JAMES VOIGTLANDER; 9 AM; BLACK RIVER FALLS /SEE WEBSITE; (608) 434-5530; .WISCONSINTRIALS.ORG AUG 21 (S,Y): DICKEYVILLE: 2 DAY EVENT: WISCONSIN OBSERVED TRIALS, JAMES VOIGTLANDER; 9 AM; SEE WEBSITE /SEE WEBSITE; (608) 434-5530; WISCONSINTRIALS.ORG MOTOCROSS AUG 8 (S,Y): LAKE MILLS: AZTALAN CYCLE CLUB INC, JUDY E SUMNER; 6 AM; N 6643 GOMOL RD /I94N TO 26 S TO B-W. TO GOMOL-RIGHT; (414) 297-9367; AZTALANCYCLE.COM AUG 15 (S,T,Y): HIXTON: CMJ RACEWAY LLC, CHRIS HALVERSON; 6 AM; N9958 LIEN RD /3 MILES N OF HIXTON OFF HWY FL; (608) 220-6853; CMJRACEWAY.COM AUG 21 (S,T,Y): WITTENBERG: FANTASY MOTO LLC, SCOTT BIESE; 6 AM; MOHAWK STREET / INTERSECTION OF 292 ROBIN RD S ON ROBIN; (920) 419-2863; FANTASYMOTO.COM AUG 22 (S,T): MARIBEL: SPORTS & COMPETITION, JEREMY TABALSKE; 2 PM; ZANDAR RD /CHECK WEBSITE FOR DIRECTIONS; (920) 351-4115; DENMARKMX.COM AUG 27 (S,T,Y): HUSTLER: 2 DAY EVENT: CMJ RACEWAY LLC, CHRIS HALVERSON; 3 PM; 1 BLOCK OFF MAIN ST; (608) 220-6853; CMJRACEWAY.COM AUG 28 (S,T,Y): ATHELSTANE: PINE RIDGE RACEWAY LLC, CONNIE WALLACE; 6 AM; W11359 N LOST LAKE TRL /HWY 41N TO CRIVITZ/W ON A TO CTY C/L DEER LK; (715) 8566612; PINERIDGERACEWAY.COM AUG 29 (S,T,Y): TIGERTON: FANTASY

August 2010

53


MOTO LLC, SCOTT BIESE; 6 AM; QUAD PARK LANE /HWY 45 8 MI S F 29 EAST ON QUAD PARK LANE; (920) 419-2863; FANTASYMOTO.COM AUG 29 (S,T,Y): HILLPOINT:

SUGAR MAPLE MX LLC, JASON W ERDMANN; 5 AM; S5711 SUGAR MAPLE ROAD /1/2 MILE N OF HILLPOINT ON SUGAR MAPLE RD; (608) 393-8812;

MUSEUM EXHIBITS AMA MoTorcyclE HAll of fAME MotorcycleMuseuM.org The Hall of Fame is located on the AMA campus in Pickerington, Ohio, and is open 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. seven days a week. Closed: Easter, Thanksgiving, Christmas and New Year’s Day. Main Hall: AMA Motorcycle Hall of fame: Recognizing those who have made significant contributions to all aspects of motorcycling. Dirt-Track! All-American Motorcycle racing: Celebrating the storied history of the men and machines who battle on the dirt oval. 30-year ride: Honda’s ohio-made Motorcycles: Gold Wings aren’t the only bikes that Honda produced at its plant in Marysville, Ohio. This exhibit showcases the 30 years of production, from the CR250 to the Rune. founder’s Hall: Honoring the Hall of Fame’s generous contributors. AMA Pro rAcING AMA Pro SUPErBIkE cHAMPIoNSHIP AMAProrAcINg.coM July 16-18: lexington, ohio: Mid-Ohio Sports Car Course July 23-25: Monterey, calif.: Mazda Raceway Laguna Seca Aug. 13-15: Alton, Va.: Virginia International Raceway Sept. 3-5: Millville, N.J.: New Jersey Motorsports Park

AUG 22 (S,Y): CHEYENNE: LARAMIE COUNTY RIDERS ASS, CHRIS

AMA Pro HIllclIMB cHAMPIoNSHIP AMAProrAcINg.coM/hc/

Nov. 12-14: Valdosta, Ga.: South Georgia Motorsports Park

July 11: Avoca, N.y.: Avoca-Howard Hillclimb

AMA rAcING EAST HArE ScrAMBlES AMArAcINg.coM

Aug. 1: Muskegon, Mich.: “All-Star Challenge,” Muskegon MC Aug. 15: Dansville, N.y.: Poags Hole Productions Aug. 29: canaan, N.H.: Ridge Runners MC Sept. 12: Steel city, Pa.: Bushkill Valley MC Sept. 26: Jefferson, Pa.: White Rose MC

Sept. 18-19: lynnville, Ind.: Kenny Moore, IN, IL, KY Enduro Riders; (812) 549-8385; Blackcoal.org

July 24-25: Howard, colo.: Stan Hensley, (719) 564-6476; Rocky Mountain Trials Assoc (RMTA), webmaster@rockymountaintrials.org; RMTA.org July 31-Aug. 1: Norden, calif.: Mike Codde, (530) 426-3635; Sacramento P.I.T.S., Inc.; dsrinfo@donnerskiranch.com; DonnerSkiRanch. com AMA rAcING NATIoNAl HArE & HoUND NAtIoNAlhAreANdhouNd.coM oct. 10: lucerne, calif.: SoCal MC, Justin Shultz; (949) 981-6776; SoCalMC.com oct. 24: lucerne Valley, calif.: 100s MC, Ryan Sanders; (949) 584-9395; 100sMC.org

July 17: Milleville, Minn.: Spring Creek Motocross

Aug. 22: North Berwick, Maine: Peter Anania, Seacoast Trail Riders; (603) 436-4331; SeacoastTrailRiders.org

Sept. 11: San Diego: Pala Raceway AMA Pro flAT TrAck cHAMPIoNSHIP AMAProrAcINg.coM July 31: calistoga, calif.: Calistoga Half-mile, Calistoga Fairgrounds Aug. 7: Hagerstown, Md.: Hagerstown Halfmile, Hagerstown Speedway Aug. 14: Grove city, ohio: Beulah Park Mile Aug. 22: Peoria, Ill.: Peoria TT Aug. 28: Indianapolis: Indiana Mile, Indiana State Fairgrounds Sept. 4: Springfield, Ill.: Springfield Short Track, Illinois State Fairgrounds Sept. 5: Springfield, Ill.: Springfield Mile II, Illinois State Fairgrounds Sept. 11: Minneapolis: Canterbury Park Mile Sept. 18: knoxville, Iowa: Knoxville Half-mile, Knoxville Raceway oct. 9: Prescott, Ariz.: Yavapai Downs Short Track oct. 10: Prescott, Ariz.: Yavapai Downs Mile II

AmericanMotorcyclist.com

Aug. 7-8: Hill city, Minn.: Paul Otto, Range Riders MC; (763) 229-1177; RangeRidersMC.org

AMA NATIoNAl cHAMPIoNSHIP SErIES AMA rAcING/NATc oBSErVED TrIAlS NATIoNAl cHAMPIoNSHIP SErIES

July 25: Moorestown, Mich.: Jeff Hunt, Lansing Motorcycle Club; (231) 267-9534

Sept. 4: Delmont, Pa.: Steel City Raceway

July 31-Aug. 1: catawissa, Pa.: Mike Soudas, High Mountain Dirt Riders; (570) 954-7799; HMDR.org

Aug. 28-29: cortland, N.y.: Cindy Davis, Knobby Acres; (607) 756-5277; WYNOA.org

lUcAS oIl AMA Pro MoTocroSS cHAMPIoNSHIP MXsPortsProrAcINg.coM

Aug. 28: Southwick, Mass.: Moto-X 338

July 17-18: Valley View, Pa.; Tiffany Tobias, Rausch Creek Powersports; (570) 682-4600; RauschCreekRacing.com

oct. 10: oregonia, ohio: Dayton MC

Sept. 24-26: Birmingham, Ala.: Barber Motorsports Park

Aug. 14: New Berlin, N.y.: Unadilla

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MoTocroSS

AMA rEklUSE NATIoNAl ENDUro cHAMPIoNSHIP SErIES PrESENTED By MooSE rAcING NAtIoNAleNduro.coM

July 24: Washougal, Wash.: Washougal Motocross

GLECKLER; 5:30 AM; I-80 EAST TO EXIT 370 TURN RT; (307) 214-7861; LARAMIECOUNTYMX.COM

WyoMING

oct. 2: Matthews, Ind.: Doug Spence, Muddobbers MC; jspence@me.com; Muddobbers.org

AMA rAcING WEST HArE ScrAMBlES AMArAcINg.coM Aug. 21-22 - Big Sky, Mont.: Jamey Kabisch, Lone Peak Racing Big Sky XC; (406) 223-0478; BigSkyXC.com Nov. 6-7: rancho cordova, calif.: Ed Santin, Dirt Diggers North MC; (800) HANGTOWN; HangtownMX.com AMA rAcING VINTAGE DIrT TrAck NATIoNAl cHAMPIoNSHIP SErIES AMArAcINg.coM July 24: Mile, Du Quoin, Ill.: AMA Racing ; Ken Saillant, (614) 856-1900, AMARacing.com July 25: Half-Mile, Du Quoin, Ill.: AMA Racing ; Ken Saillant, (614) 856-1900, AMARacing.com Sept. 11: Half-Mile, Waco, Texas: Waco Eagles Motorcycle Club; (254) 875-9955 Sept. 12: Half-Mile, Waco, Texas: Waco Eagles Motorcycle Club; (254) 875-9955 AMA rAcING Pro-AM MoTocroSS ScHEDUlE AMArAcINg.coM July 4: Buchanan, Mich.: Red Bud Recreation; (269) 695-6405, RedBudMX.com July 11: kingsbury, Ind.: Motoland, (219) 9886686, Motoland.com

GEIco ENDUrocroSS eNdurocross.coM

July 11: Blountville, Tenn.: Victory Sports; (423) 323-5497, VictorySportsRacing.com

July 17: las Vegas, Nev.: The Orleans Arena

July 22-23: Washougal, Wash.: Washougal MX Park; (360) 837-3975, WashougalMXpk.com

Aug. 14: Guthrie, okla.: Lazy E Arena Aug. 27: Indianapolis: Pepsi Coliseum Sept. 11: Everett, Wash.: Comcast Arena oct. 30: Denver: Nat’l Western Complex

Aug. 2-7: Hurricane Mills, Tenn.: MX Sports; (304) 284-0084, MXSports.com Aug. 13-16, New Berlin, N.y.: Unadilla Valley Sports Center; (607) 965-8784, UnadillaMX.com

Nov. 20: las Vegas, Nev.: The Orleans Arena

Aug. 22: Armaugh, Pa.: Pleasure Valley Raceway; (814) 695-2453

cAN-AM GNcc ScHEDUlE gNccrAcINg.coM

Aug. 29: Millville, Minn.: Spring Creek MX Park; (507) 753-2779, SpringCreekMX.com

Sept. 11-12: New Berlin, N.Y.

Sept. 4-6: Millington, Mich.: Baja MX; (989) 8713356, BajaMX.com

Sept. 25-26: Lafayette, Tenn. oct. 9-10: St. Clairsville, Ohio

Sept. 5: Delmont, Pa.: Bellco; (304) 284-0080

oct. 23-24: Crawfordsville, Ind.

Sept. 5: Athelstane, Wis. Pine Ridge Raceway; (715) 856-6612, PineRidgeRaceway.com

AMA DrAGBIkE cHAMPIoNSHIP SErIES AMAdrAgBIKe.coM

Sept. 19: Prentiss, Miss.: Golden Pine Raceway; (601) 506-8669, GoldenPineRaceway.com

July 31 - Aug. 1: Indianapolis: O’Reilly Raceway Park

Sept. 19: richford, N.y.: Broome-Tioga Sports Center; (607) 849-4438; Broome-Tioga.com

Sept. 10-12: Atco, N.J.: Atco Raceway

Sept. 26: canton, Texas: Kingdom Motorsports; (214) 939-4321, BuffaloCreekMX.com

oct. 9-10: Norwalk, ohio: Summit Motorsports Park

oct. 2-3: Englishtown, N.J.: Raceway Park; (732) 446-7800, RacewayPark.com


Oct. 3: Gaylord, Mich: Baja MX; (989) 871-3356, BajaMX.com

Jesse Thomas, (270) 522-3703; ginny42211@ yahoo.com

Oct. 10: Mason, Ill.: Crossroads MX; (618) 6862769, CrossroadsMX.com

Sept. 11-12: Logan, Ohio: Nutcracker 200, Buckeye Dual Sporters, Bill Kaeppner; (740) 380-3050, KaeppnersWoods.com

Oct. 16-17: Blountville, Tenn.: Victory Sports; (423) 323-5497, VictorySportsRacing.com Nov. 6-7: Pell City, Ala.: RPM Sports; (205) 6998857, MillCreekMotocross.com Nov. 22-24: Gainesville, Fla.: Unlimited Sports MX; (813) 470-7498, UnlimitedSportsMX.com Nov. 25-27: Gainesville, Fla.: Unlimited Sports MX; (813) 470-7498, UnlimitedSportsMX.com DUAL-SPORT/ADVENTURE SERIES AMA BMW NATIONAL ADVENTURE RIDING SERIES AMADirectLink.coM/roADriDe/ADV/ July 10-11: McCloud, Calif.: McCloud Dual Sport Adven-tures, Mike Lingsch; McCloudDualsportAdventures.com Aug. 7-8: Hancock, N.Y.: Bear Creek Sportsmen, Linda Rizzon; (973) 953-6308, BearCreekSportsmen.com Aug. 21-22: McCloud, Calif.: McCloud Dual Sport Adven-tures, Mike Lingsch; McCloudDualsportAdventures.com Aug. 21-22: Columbus, Ind.: Stoney Lonesome MC, Nathan Gaskill; Stoneylonesomemc.com Aug. 23-27: North Cascades, Wash.: Sound Rider!, Tom Mehren; Soundrider.com/dsport Sept. 11-12: Cadiz, Ky.: KT Riders, Jesse Thomas; ginny42211@yahoo.com Sept. 11-12: Logan, Ohio: Nutcracker 200, Buckeye Dual Sporters, Bill Kaeppner; kaeppners@verizon.net, Kaeppnerswoods.com Sept. 18-19: McCloud, Calif.: McCloud Dual Sport Adv, Mike Lingsch; McCloudDualsportAdventures.com Sept. 18-19: Diamond Lake, Ore.: Motorcycle Riders Assn; Jeff Moffet; (541) 773-7433; jeff@ omatours.com Sept. 18-19: Morganton, N.C.: JB Saki Promotions; (704) 483-6833, millerron@ bellsouth.net Sept. 25-26: Wolverine, Mich.: Great Lakes Dual Sporters, Jeramey Valley; GLDSmc.org Sept. 25-26: Wabeno, Wis.: Wisconsin Dual Sport Riders, Duane Baer; WIDualsportriders. org Oct. 2-3: Renfro Valley, Ky.: 4-Fun Trail Riders, Vicky Stephenson; 4FunTrailRiders.com Oct. 9-10: McCloud, Calif.: McCloud Dual Sport Adventures, Mike Lingsch; McCloudDualsportAdventures.com Oct. 23-24: Chatsworth, N.J.: Meteor MC, Mike Reign; MeteorMC.com Oct. 23-24: Prescott, Ariz.: Arizona Trail Riders, Frank Staley; ArizonaTrailRiders.org Nov. 6-7: Port Elizabeth, N.J.: Tri-County Sportsmen, E. Polhaumus; TeamHammer.org Nov. 26-27: Palmdale, Calif.: L.A.-Barstow to Vegas: AMA D-37 Dual Sport, Paul Flanders; (626) 792-7384, District37AMA.org AMA KTM NATIONAL DUAL SPORT TRAIL RIDING SERIES AMADirectLink.coM/roADriDe/DS/ July 24-31: Newberry, Mich.: 26th Annual Six Days of Michigan, Cycle Conservation Club of Mich., Lewis Schuler, (517) 781-4805; ccckids@ verizon.net, CycleConservationClub.org

Sept. 18-19: Sterling, Ill.: Cow Patty Cruise, Brushpoppers MC, Jack Sumption, (815) 622-4099; tgerken@wireless.essex1.com, BrushPoppersmc.com Sept. 18-19: Diamond Lake, Ore.: Motorcycle Riders Assn; Jeff Moffet; (541) 773-7433; jeff@ omatours.com Sept. 25-26: Buck Meadows, Calif.: Yosemite Dual Sport Adv, Family Off Road Adventures, Lawrence Borgens, (209) 6493633; lawrence@familyoffroadadventures.com, FamilyOffroadAdventures.com Sept. 25-26: Wolverine, Mich.: Ted’s Chandler Hill Challenge, Great Lakes Dual Sporters, Jeramey Valley, (989) 751-6863; info@gldsmc. org; GLDSmc.org Sept. 25-26: Wabeno, Wis.: Big Woods 200, Wisconsin Dual Sport Riders, Duane Baer, (920) 350-2030; bigwoods200@hotmail.com; WIDualsportriders.org Oct. 2-3: Mt. Solon, Va.: Shenandoah 500 Dual Sport, Northern VA Trail Riders, Detter Merz; (703) 505-9123, NVTR.org Oct. 9-10: McArthur, Ohio: Baby Burr Nat’l Dual Sport, Enduro Riders Assoc., Steve Barber, (614) 582-7821; EnduroRiders.com Oct. 23-24: Chatsworth, N.J.: Meteor Ride in the Pines, Meteor MC, Mike Reign, (856) 2878170; MeteorMC.com Oct. 23-24: Study Butte, Texas: 13th Annual Terlingua Nat’l Dual Sport Ride, Trail Riders of Houston, Jack Jennings, (713) 248-7222; captjack530@aol.com; TRH-cycle.org Oct. 23-24: Prescott, Ariz.: Arizona Trail Riders, Frank Staley, (623) 826-1092; ArizonaTrailriders.org Nov. 6-7: Port Elizabeth, N.J.: Hammer Run, Tri-County Sportsmen, E. Polhaumus, (856) 7852754; mdreighn@msn.com; TeamHammer.org Nov. 26-27: Palmdale, Calif.: L.A.-Barstow to Vegas: AMA D-37 Dual Sport, Paul Flanders; (626) 792-7384, District37AMA.org AMA PREMIER TOURING SERIES AMADIRECTLINK.COM/ROADRIDE/ TOURING NATIONAL CONVENTIONS Sept. 15-19: Ruidoso, N.M.: Golden Aspen Rally: Golden Aspen Motorcycle Assn; Patric Pearson, (800) 452-8045, Motorcyclerally.com SIGNATURE EVENTS July 18: White Bear Lake, Minn.: Minnesota Ride For Kids; Century Colleage East Campus; (800) 253-6530; PBTUS.org/rideforkids

Aug. 14: Salt Lake City: Utah Ride For Kids; This Is The Place Heritage Park; (800) 253-6530; PBTUS.org/rideforkids Aug. 15: Fiskdale, Mass.: New England Ride For Kids; Tantasqua Regional High School; (800) 2536530; PBTUS.org/rideforkids Aug. 29: Asheville, N.C.: Asheville Ride For Kids; Tantasqua Regional High School; (800) 253-6530; PBTUS.org/rideforkids Aug. 29: Ann Arbor, Mich.: Michigan Ride For Kids (and Dual Sport); Washtenow Community College; (800) 253-6530; PBTUS.org/rideforkids Sept. 12: Carnation, Wash.: Puget Sound Ride For Kids; Remlinger Farms; (800) 253-6530; PBTUS.org/rideforkids Sept. 12: Indianapolis: Indianapolis Ride For Kids; Indianapolis Motor Speedway; (800) 2536530; PBTUS.org/rideforkids Sept. 12: Leeds, Ala.: Birmingham Ride For Kids; Barber Motorsports Park; (800) 253-6530; PBTUS.org/rideforkids Sept. 19: Cottleville, Mo.: St. Louis Ride For Kids; St. Charles Community College; (800) 2536530; PBTUS.org/rideforkids Sept. 19: King of Prussia, Pa.: Philadelphia Ride For Kids; IMAX Theater entrance/King of Prussia Mall; (800) 253-6530; PBTUS.org/rideforkids Sept. 26: Ellicott City, Md.: Baltimore/ Washington DC Ride For Kids; Turf Valley Resort; (800) 253-6530; PBTUS.org/rideforkids Oct. 3: Grapevine, Texas: Dallas/Fort Worth Ride For Kids; Grapevine Mills Mall/SE Parking Area; (800) 253-6530; PBTUS.org/rideforkids Oct. 3: Las Vegas, Nev.: Pediatric Brain Tumor Foundation; Las Vegas Motor Speedway; (800) 253-6530; PBTUS.org/rideforkids Oct. 3: Fairfield, Calif.: Northern California Ride For Kids; Solaro Commuity College; (800) 2536530; PBTUS.org/rideforkids Oct. 17: Mesa, Ariz.: Phoenix Ride For Kids; Desert Ridge High School; (800) 253-6530; PBTUS.org/rideforkids Oct. 17: Cardiff, Calif.: San Diego Ride For Kids; Mira Costa College-San Elijo Campus; (800) 2536530; PBTUS.org/rideforkids Oct. 17: Andersonville, Tenn.: Knoxville Ride For Kids; Norris Dam Tail Water; (800) 253-6530; PBTUS.org/rideforkids Oct. 24: Lafayette, La.: Louisiana Ride for Kids; SLEMCO; (800) 253-6530; PBTUS.org/rideforkids Nov. 7: Lithia, Fla.: Tampa Ride for Kids; SLEMCO; (800) 253-6530; PBTUS.org/rideforkids AMA GRAND TOURS WITH KOA ALONG THE WAY

July 18: Deerfield, N.Y.: Utica Ride For Kids; Deerfield Volunteer Fire Department; (800) 2536530; PBTUS.org/rideforkids

Through Sept. 15: Titanic Grand Tour: Great Lakes Motorcycle Club; Lee Bruns, motopsycho@ wat.midco.net; GLMC.org/grand-tour.html

July 18: Chicago: Chicagoland Ride For Kids; Elgin Community College; (800) 253-6530; PBTUS.org/rideforkids

Through Nov. 30: USA 4 Corners Tour: So. CA Motorcycling Assoc; David L. Johnson, (909) 2710137, USA4Corners.org

July 24: Marysville, Ohio: Marysville Ride For Kids; Scotts MiracleGro Headquarters; (800) 2536530; PBTUS.org/rideforkids

Through Nov. 30: Call of the Wild Grand Tour: Midnight Riders; Charles Kirkman, (765) 5663807, Midnight-Riders-MC.com

July 25: Overland Park, Kan.: Kansas City Ride For Kids; Johnson County Community College; (800) 253-6530; PBTUS.org/rideforkids

Through Nov. 30: I’ve Been Everywhere Classic Grand Tour: Road Winders Motorcycle Club; Joseph Sloan, hogman190530@yahoo.com

July 28-31: Stevenson, Wash.: Rally Week in the Gorge; Sound Rider!; Tom Mehren, (206) 3297808, SoundRider.com/rally

Through Dec. 31: The National Parks Grand Tour: Iron Butt Association; Mike Kneebone, kneebone@ironbutt.com; IronButt.com

Aug. 7-8: Hancock, N.Y.: Bear Creek Sportsmen, Linda Rizzon; (973) 953-6308, BearCreekSportsmen.com

Aug. 1: Central Valley, N.Y.: Hudson Valley Ride For Kids; Central Valley Elementary School; (800) 253-6530; PBTUS.org/rideforkids

Aug. 21-22: Columbus, Ind.: Buffaloe 500 D/S Adventure Ride, Stoney Lonesome MC, Nathan Gaskill, (812) 343-9772; ngaskill3@yahoo.com; StoneyLonesomemc.com/DualSport/index.html.

Aug. 1: Middleton, Wis.: Wisconsin Ride For Kids; Firemans Park/Next to high school; (800) 253-6530; PBTUS.org/rideforkids

Sept. 11-12: Cadiz, Ky.: LBL 200, KT Riders,

(800) 253-6530; PBTUS.org/rideforkids

Aug. 8: Pittsburgh: Pittsburgh Ride or Kids; Home Depot, 25 Ditilh Rd., Cranberry Township;

DISTRICT RALLIES AND TOURS Aug. 29: Dallas, Pa.: D-6 Tour – Endless Mountain District Tour: Back Mountain Enduro Riders; Marty Moon, (570) 675-1814, BMER.org Sept. 4-6: Groveland, Calif.: Hey Day Rally: Dist 36 Road Div.; Kay Neelyl, (209) 983-9106, AMA-D-36.com August 2010

55


   

JOIN THE AMA NOW

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See you at the World’s Largest Touring Rally NEXT year! June 6-11, 2011

www.americade.com

518-798-7888

GET INVOLVED

AMERICANMOTORCYCLIST.COM/RIGHTS ADVERTISER INDEX Adaptiv ....................................................56

Honda .................................................... 2-3

Aero Design .............................................56

JC Motors ................................................28

Allstate .....................................................59

Kriega ......................................................28

AMA BMW Adventure Series ..................25

Manic Salamander ..................................57

AMA Legends & Champions Weekend ..............................31

MCPRW ...................................................57

AMA KTM DS Series ...............................24

Motorcycle Tour Conversions..................57

AMA Membership....................................41

Mountain Fest Rally ...................................6

Americade ...............................................57

National Sprint Car HOF & Museum .......................................29

AMSOIL .....................................................5 Black & Gray............................................56 Black Book ..............................................56 Bohn Body Armor ....................................57

Pocahontas .............................................60 Port-A-Chopper.......................................56 Powerlet ..................................................56

Brookside/S100 .......................................23

Progressive Insurance .............................11

Discount Ramps ......................................13

Ronnie’s ...................................................23

F2P Technologies ......................................6

Star Brite, Inc.............................................7

Fed Co .....................................................15

Super-Visor ..............................................56

Foremost Insurance.................................21

VIR ...........................................................29

August 2010

57


GUEST COLUMN RIDING LIKE A WARRIOR

It’s been an amazing trip so far: Four days of rain, two days of allergies, one day of serious sunburns, three days getting lost, parts failure on the motorcycle and, finally, a bite on the thigh from a Brown Recluse spider. I am in my 13th state; every one of them so far has been a challenge. And I have loved every minute of it. I had the idea to write a book about diversity in America several years ago and decided that the only proper way to meet the people I needed to interview would be by motorcycle. I acquired my first bike, a Harley-Davidson Springer Classic, in Salt Lake City and rode it home to Virginia. It was the worst thing I could have done to myself, because ever since I have had a singular desire to be on the road. Every year that passed without a long-distance ride was a year of frustration. I needed to be pushing pavement. Finally, this year, I decided that if I didn’t do this trip now, I probably wouldn’t do it at all. I did a feasibility study and announced to the family that my trigger date was May 17th. They knew change was coming because I had that look like I had an itch I couldn’t quite reach and I was looking for a big stick to get to it. It was almost with relief that I said that I was going to do this, and they practically kicked me out of the house. I left from Fredericksburg, Va., and headed to Charleston, W.Va., in a torrential downpour. Water was pooling in the heels of my boots before I had passed the first mile marker on I-95 South. Water was already slipping into the seams and crevices of my rain suit and I knew this was the most proper sendoff for my quest. I didn’t care because I was riding. I had just started an adventure that most of my 40-something buddies envied, something I needed for my soul. Rain was the least of my concerns. I was free again. As I traveled down I-64 west into West Virginia, I was overwhelmed by the beauty of the clouds rising from the forests. I weaved through the wide, green farmland of Tennessee and clung to the edges of steep-sided roads in the Blue Ridge Mountain valleys going toward Asheville, N.C. I saw trees rising from bloated bases submerged in the swamps of Georgia, Arkansas and Louisiana, silent sentinels watching as I blasted past their stagnant surface waters. I found myself in awe at how, in just 13 states, I could be surrounded by the constant beauty of the variety of life and nature. I’m partway through my journey as I write this, but already I have experienced many more surprises that have encouraged me to continue. The books I want to write required me to talk to strangers, risking my comfort zone. I imagined politeness; I found friendships. I knew that this world on two wheels is a brotherhood, and I discovered

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how much of a family we really are. Wherever I’ve traveled, I have been embraced as a local son returning home. I have had challenges, but they pale to the rewards I have gained in such a short time. The Spanish author Carlos Casteneda wrote, “The difference between a warrior and an ordinary man is that a warrior sees everything as a challenge, while an ordinary man sees everything as either a blessing or a curse.” I like to think of myself as a warrior, so although I have had a lot of challenges on the road in the last 19 days, all of them were worth the experiences of this adventure. I know more are coming, but I know that each one means I am living a dream. I am experiencing life. Rick Jacobs is on a 50-state ride to write two books: one on diversity and one on the ride itself. A professional photographer and an up-and-coming writer, Rick enjoys fusing his love of art and the road. You can follow his travels at www.thefeelofwind.com.

Photo Dan Campbell Photography

Life Is Always Better In The Middle Of A Road Trip By Rick Jacobs


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American Motorcyclist 08 2010 Preview  

The Journal of the AMA Preview Version

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