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AUGUST 2009

THE JOURNAL OF THE


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Navigation VIEWPOINTS

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Snapshots Your Images, Your World Letters You Write, We Read Rob Dingman Time Capsule Katy Wood Elevating The Hall Of Fame Sgt. Steve Click I’m A Motor Officer

August 2009 Volume 63, Number 8 Published by the American Motorcyclist Association 13515 Yarmouth Dr. Pickerington, OH 43147 (800) AMA-JOIN AmericanMotorcyclist.com

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THE LIFE

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Protecting the Ride Pilot Motorcycle Crash Study Complete

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Living It The All-American Rejects Jump On Their Scooters

Connections LifeLock Member Benefit

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Adrenaline A New Kind of Rush

Cover Photo The AMA celebrates 85 years of protecting motorcyclists’ right to ride. Cover illustration by Mark Lapid.

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Heritage High Roller: The 1924 Ace Go Ride What To Do, Where To Go

FEATURE

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85 Years Of AMA History From Gypsy Tours, To Races On The Beach At Daytona, To Fighting Bike Bans, The AMA Has Done It All—Thanks To You

American Motorcyclist magazine (ISSN 0277-9358) is published monthly by the American Motorcyclist Association, 13515 Yarmouth Dr., Pickerington, OH 43147. Copyright by the American Motorcyclist Association/American Motorcyclist 2009. Printed in USA. Subscription rate: Magazine subscription fee of $10 covered in membership dues; $15 a year for non-members. Postmaster: Mail form 3579 to 13515 Yarmouth Dr., Pickerington, OH 43147. Periodical postage paid at Pickerington, Ohio, and at additional mailing offices.


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Snapshots Congratulations, Michael. You’re the winner this month!

Winner: Michael Okoniewski submitted this photo of his Harley-Davidson Heritage Softail shot in Yosemite, Calif. Below: 1) Kyle Allen in central California. 2) Tyler Bailey, 3, of SmithďŹ eld, R.I., already loves motorcycles. 3) Team Toyota Trucks riding the Colorado 500: (l to r) Scotty Lalonde, Dave Bergeron, Ray Toms, Al Cravens, Tom Kent, Mike Rosenbaum, Sean Balaun, Lon Plumpton and Scott Ehrlich. 4) Jon Losey in Washington state. 1

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Continued from opposite page: 5) Kenneth Bulla riding the Dragon. 6) Members of the Old Town HOG Chapter of Brandon, Fla. 7) Curtis Lenderman exploring in Vietnam. 8) Dave Teter and Mike Taylor’s trip through Yellowstone National Park. 9) Charles and Sarahjane Chase on their honeymoon in India. 10) Keith, Ronnie, Tom Cassat, Sam and Jimmy. 11) Rick Harvey and Don Banks of Nebraska at the Continental Divide. 12) Corbyn (foreground) and Canyin (background) Gan racing pocketbikes in Denton, Texas. 13) Larry and Connie Bretl took this shot in the Black Hills of South Dakota. 14) (l-r) Friends Mike Sklepko, Ohio; Fast Eddie Fichter, N.J.; Gerry Lemise, Pa.; and Bill Hartley, N.J., take a break while riding the California coast. 15) John McCoy and family. 16) Dan and Mary Poore in Oregon. 17) Leon Primus and Aley, original owner 1984 BMW R100RS. 18) Buddy Scherr photo in Death Valley. 19) Don Powers and sons along the Natchez Trace in Mississippi. 20) Tama Holeczy riding Route 66. 21) Steve Mutton. 22) Donny Paul in the Upper Peninsula of Michigan. 23) Christe Carole. 24) L-R: Tim Bielski, Dave Harlan, Russ Martin and Kris Hawk in Borrego Springs near Ocotillo, Calif. 25) Taneele Smith and sister, Calisa, strike a pose they did as kids. 26) Sophia Donadio, 8, makes a friend at the 2008 Shenandoah 500 AMA Dual Sport ride in Virginia. 27) Glenn Ferris.

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Get a GoPro Camera

Got an image that captures what’s cool about motorcycling? Send it to American Motorcyclist. Send your high-resolution photos and mailing address to: submissions@ama-cycle.org. We’ll even pick one standout photo next month, and send the photographer a free GoPro Motorsports Hero Wide camera with mounts.

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Open or Close Your Garage Door with EDITORIAL OFFICES AMA BOARD OF DIRECTORS American Motorcyclist 13515 Yarmouth Drive Pickerington, OH 43147 (614) 856-1900 submissions@ama-cycle.org

Stan Simpson, Chairman P.O. Box 1028, Cibolo, TX 78108 Jon-Erik Burleson, Assistant Treasurer 38429 Innovation Ct., Murrietta, CA 92563

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Ray Monroe, Advertising Manager (815) 885-4445, rmonroe@ama-cycle.org

Perry King c/o AMA, 13515 Yarmouth Dr., Pickerington, OH 43147

Misty Walker, Advertising Assistant (614) 856-1900, ext. 1267, mwalker@ama-cycle.org All trademarks used herein (unless otherwise noted) are owned by the AMA and may only be used with the express, written permission of the AMA.

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American Motorcyclist is the monthly publication of the American Motorcyclist Association, which represents motorcyclists nationwide. For information on AMA membership benefits, call (800) AMA-JOIN or visit AmericanMotorcyclist.com. Manuscripts, photos, drawings and other editorial contributions must be accompanied by return postage. No responsibility is assumed for loss or damage to unsolicited material. Copyright© American Motorcyclist Association, 2009.

Michael Lock 10443 Bandley Dr., Cupertino, CA 95014 Arthur More 16153 Starlight Dr., Surprise, AZ 85374 John Ulrich 581-C Birch St., Lake Elsinore, CA 92530 Bill Werner 18405 Davidson Dr., Brookfield, WI 53045

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Contributors and Staff

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CHARLES BAISDEN, Photographer Charles and his wife, Meg, make up the photographic team of Meg Baisden Photography, based in Pensacola, Fla. Charles worked with the All-American Rejects for this issue. You can see more of their cool work at megphoto.com. MONTY SOUNGPRADITH, Photographer Monty is our go-to guy for local shoots, and he always impresses with his laid-back demeanor, thoughtful compositions, and uncanny ability to get the shot in fewer than three shutter clicks. SGT. STEVE CLICK, Guest Columnist The Clicker actually searched us out, asking if we’d like a column from a motor officer. Well, duh! As down-to-earth and personable a guy as you’ll find, Click will likely appear in these pages more. BASEM WASEF, Writer Basem Wasef has tested everything from electric dirtbikes to V8-powered cruisers for Popular Mechanics, Maxim and About.com. He produced the book Legendary Motorcycles, and can’t wait to get seat time in something other than his office chair once he’s done with his follow-up entitled Legendary Race Cars. BILL KRESNAK, Government Affairs Editor Krez’s new DR350 combines two of his greatest passions: riding motorcycles, and envisioning elaborate weekends on motorcycles that almost, but not quite, work out as planned.

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MARK LAPID, Creative Director Ever the minimalist, Mark managed to do an entire weekend motorcycle camping with friends, gear included, on his Suzuki DRZ400 supermoto bike. The secret? Making his friends carry his stuff. Ka-ching! GRANT PARSONS, Managing Editor Usually, Grant loves blue-sky thinking. Then he looks at the malfunctioning automatic choke on his scooter, ponders the finicky heatsensitive dohickey used to regulate fuel flow—and wonders what, exactly, is wrong with a choke lever. JEN MUECKE, Designer In honor of Ride to Work day, Jen, who telecommutes, watched Faster for the upteenth time, then planned another track day. NORA McDONALD, Production Coordinator After a weekend spent earning her motorcycle endorsement, Nora plans to spend several more weekends looking at every kind of bike imaginable, dreaming and planning. JAMES HOLTER, Associate Editor Who would have thought that a 1972 Suzuki TC125 could hit 64 mph? James, actually, as he was tucked down over the handlebars, flat-track style, on the freeway. Other contributors include: Shan Moore, Scott Hoffman, Brad Pappalardo, Brian J. Nelson, Jeff Buchanan, Motorcycle Safety Foundation.


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Letters [ WAY TO GO! It was great to see women riders get some well-deserved recognition (“Fast Forward,” July issue). There are more and more of us on the roads these days, and the energy and enthusiasm that we women bring is really refreshing. When I first started riding nine years ago, I almost never saw another woman rider, but that really seems to be changing. Reading of the accomplishments of the women you focused on in your story only got me even more psyched up. You go, girls! Yvone Usher AMA No. 458512 Tempe, Ariz. WHAT A DYNAMIC WOMAN How cool to see Leslie Porterfield on the cover of American Motorcyclist! Ever since I heard about her impressive accomplishment of going 234 mph on the Bonneville Salt Flats last year, I’ve become a fan. I didn’t realize she also owned and ran her own motorcycle shop, and now I’m even more impressed. Thanks for highlighting such a dynamic woman! Terri Gerham AMA No. 855423 Philadelphia, Pa. You can find more copy and photos related to these amazing women by looking at the July issue of the magazine in the Members area of AmericanMotorcyclist. com. To find more women riders to psyche you up even more, check out the AMA International Women & Motorcycling Conference, set for Aug. 19-22 in Keystone, Colo. Info: WomenAndMotorcycling.com. WHAT ABOUT ME? Just a little FYI on an error in the article about Melissa Peris and her Daytona 200 experience. She did not finish 21st out of 75 men. 39th place was me—another female. Meghan Stiles AMA No. 670746 Delavan, Wis. A NEW APPRECIATION Having been to Americade several times over the years, I knew that Bill Dutcher had created an impressive event. What I didn’t know was the amazing motorcycle history behind him, as detailed in your story (“The Rally King,” June issue). His story of wearing his leathers beneath his graduation robe,

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You Write, We Read Send your letters (and a high-resolution photo) to submissions@ama-cycle.org; or mail to 13515 Yarmouth Drive, Pickerington, OH 43147.

and then racing and crashing, was hilarious! I just got back from a day trip to Americade, and, having read your story, I really got a new appreciation for the guy who made such a cool rally. Thanks for a great story. And thanks, Bill, for a great rally. Hal Tryson AMA No. 154789 Portsmouth, N.H. KEEP UP THE GOOD WORK I wanted to thank you folks at the AMA for providing roadside assistance free of charge when you opt for automatic renewal. It is one of the best deals out there. Also, thank you so much for all your efforts to lobby for so many issues and keeping us informed in the magazine, fighting for our rights as motorcyclists and working to preserve as well as increase legislation to make riding motorcycles a safer thing for all. These days, the increased use of cell phones by automobile drivers, especially the texting-while-driving issue and other distractions, calls for some stronger laws governing the punishments for automobile drivers who choose to be distracted and cause fatal accidents to motorcyclists. More severe punishment and increased fines for texting and cell-phone use when they result in serious bodily harm or death may be the only way to get the message through to those drivers who are careless and distracted. One more Bill Case thing—I’m a sidecar driver, and it would be nice if perhaps one of these days we could see an article or two that feature sidecars, their use and history, and some of those riders out there who do drive with sidecars. Thank you so much for your continued good work, and for all your efforts to make it a safer world out there for us two and three wheelers. Bill Case AMA No. 984335 Saint Augustine, Fla. A GREAT VISIT I just visited the AMA Motorcycle Hall of Fame Museum on my way around the country to try to raise money and awareness for The Leukemia & Lymphoma Society and visit the major comprehensive

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cancer research centers (CruisinforaCure. blogspot.com). You probably saw me trying to clean up my bike so that I could take some pictures of it in the front of the Museum. I want to tell you that this visit was very special to me, and I’m so glad that I had this once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to visit. Pete West AMA No. 946648 San Antonio, Texas

IN PRAISE OF DAVE Congratulations on your selection of David Hough as a member of the AMA Motorcycle Hall of Fame. All the credits you listed in your announcement are valid, but they don’t even begin to express the many and varied contributions David has made to motorcycle safety. I’m a Motorcycle Safety Foundation instructor, since 1992, and a S/TEP (Sidecar/Trike Education Program) instructor since 2007. David Hough has done so much to make motorcycling safer and more enjoyable Pat Barnes through his books and articles. When he is honored, please also specifically mention his contributions to sidecar motorcycling. David was involved with the Sidecar Safety Program (SSP), a course that led to the development of the S/TEP curriculum by the Evergreen Safety Council. Pat Barnes AMA No. 637630 Seattle WHY DID YOU PARK IT THERE? On nice sunny days, everywhere I go, I see motorcycles parked on the sidewalk. In 45 years of riding, unless invited to do so, I have never taken it upon myself to park on the sidewalk. I’m not sure what it is about some riders who think they are so cool or so special that they get a personal parking place where everyone else wants to walk. Sorry, but you’re not that special, so get over yourself and park in the lot. I hear much talk about how loud pipes tick off the non-riders. Well, I’m sure this doesn’t make them too happy either. Michael Preston AMA No. 796409 Federal Way, Wash.


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From the President Time Capsule Looking Back, And Forward To The AMA’s Next 85 Years motorcycle lifestyle and protect the future of motorcycling. To do this, the AMA had to undertake a major restructuring. Although it has not been without controversy, this restructuring was necessary to position the organization for growth over the next 85 years. Second, we strengthened the efficacy of our government relations function and changed the emphasis of the organization’s infrastructure to support member advocacy. Advocacy, by the way, is not just about government relations. It is so much more than that. This very magazine, which was redesigned to focus more on the people who make motorcycling fun, cool and meaningful, is an example of advocacy. Next, we recommitted the AMA to providing more and improved member benefits to better connect with the needs of our current—and future—members. We have added over a dozen new member benefits in just the last year, including free AMA Roadside Assistance for those who sign up for automatic renewal or purchase a three-year membership. We now offer discounts on Garmin navigation systems, SPOT satellite personal tracking devices,

MadMaps, LifeLock identity protection, and much more. One of the most visible changes has been the redefinition of the Association’s role in racing. In 2008, we sold professional racing assets to the Daytona Motorsports Group. This move eliminated the tremendous resource drain that managing professional racing placed on the AMA—including almost daily controversy—and it minimized the self-serving influence of factions on the Board of Directors. Not to be overlooked, we have expanded support for our entire amateur racing program, the lifeblood of a significant portion of our membership. All of these efforts have repositioned the AMA as the premier advocate for the motorcycle lifestyle, and I am absolutely confident in our organization’s ability to face the challenges that lie ahead of us. I am extremely optimistic about the future of motorcycling in this country, and I am especially encouraged about the future of our strong and vibrant AMA. Rob Dingman is president and CEO of the AMA.

Photo Open Image Studio

Writing a column about the 85th anniversary of the American Motorcyclist Association is a bit like trying to decide what to include in a time capsule. When the AMA is celebrating future milestones, others will look back at this edition to get a sense of what was going on during our 85th year. Looking through our archives, it may surprise some members to know that not every AMA anniversary has been worthy of celebration. Take the 50th anniversary in 1974. At that time, the organization was swamped by a million-dollar operating deficit brought about by a lack of board oversight and antiquated management systems. That sounds a lot like what I discovered shortly after becoming the CEO in April 2007. In the last two-and-a-half years, we’ve moved aggressively to reconstitute our senior management team and, under the leadership of Chairman Stan Simpson, refocused the Board of Directors. Working together, we’ve brought about some very significant changes. First, we rededicated the Association to its core mission: To promote the

by Rob Dingman

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We care about you. Ride safely, respectfully and within the limits of the law and your abilities. Always wear an approved helmet, proper eyewear and protective clothing, and insist your passenger does too. Never ride while under the influence of alcohol or drugs. Know your Harley ® motorcycle and read and understand your owner’s manual from cover to cover. © 2009 H-D. Harley, Harley-Davidson, and the Bar & Shield logo are among the trademarks of H-D Michigan, LLC.

The roar of the engine of your own H-D® motorcycle drowns out the opinions of the world. Join us on the road. Meet other women riders and share your stories at www.h-d.com/womenriders. Register for and visit us at the 2009 AMA International Women and Motorcycling Conference Presented by Harley-Davidson and Buell in Keystone, CO – August 19-22, 2009. www.womenandmotorcycling.com


Viewpoint

Elevating The Hall Of Fame Remember when visiting a museum meant trekking downtown, marching down long hallways viewing dowdy exhibits? It seemed the best part was getting out of school and hanging out with your friends. A visit to the AMA Motorcycle Hall of Fame Museum will change that impression. Not only do we have some amazing bikes on display, but we tell the stories of the cool people who made those machines come to life. As with the AMA, the Museum is going through a renaissance. Our refocused mission is to shine a spotlight on the people who have made lasting contributions to protecting and promoting the motorcycle lifestyle. Nothing embodies this concept better than the AMA Motorcycle Hall of Fame. Its members include individuals who have excelled in racing and riding, pushed the envelope in motorcycle design, and championed the rights of riders. With the recent announcement of nine more inductees into the AMA Motorcycle Hall of Fame, its ranks have swelled to 412 members. These are the people who have made motorcycling what it is today, and it’s not an exaggeration to say that the future of motorcycling stands on the shoulders of these incredible people. That’s why we are redesigning our Hall of Fame exhibit and making it the focal point for visitors. Soon it will move to the main level of the Museum, where we’ll create new displays to showcase inductees, as well as their motorcycles and memorabilia. Each and every story is unique and fascinating, and we can’t wait to share them with you and the world. To further elevate the visibility of the AMA Motorcycle Hall of Fame, we’re

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by Katy Wood

moving our induction ceremony to the capital of fame, Las Vegas. On Saturday, Dec. 5, we’ll gather at the Hard Rock Hotel & Casino to honor the Class of 2009 before their families, friends, fans and peers. It’s going to be a weekend to remember, and you’re invited too. Watch for ticket information on our website, MotorcycleMuseum.org. As we build for the future, there’s a lot going on at the Museum that you’ll want to see today. You owe it to yourself to tour our current exhibition, “MotoStars: Celebrities + Motorcycles,” and its unbelievable collection of celebrity motorcycles, gear and keepsakes. In the Hall of Legends, you can view “AwesomeNess” featuring Arlen Ness, the King of Choppers. A new must-see exhibition celebrating the AMA’s 85th anniversary opens this July, in conjunction with AMA Vintage Motorcycle Days. Speaking of AMA Vintage Motorcycle Days, it’s set for July 24-26 at the MidOhio Sports Car Course in Lexington, Ohio. The Marque of the Year is BSA, and we’ll commemorate our 85th anniversary with a parade of classic motorcycles. VMD also features North America’s largest motorcycle swap meet, vintage racing, bike shows, demo rides, seminars, stunt shows, the Manufacturers’ Midway, club displays and a used bike corral. All proceeds from this glorious weekend benefit the Museum. As a 501(c)3 charitable organization, we rely on your donations and volunteerism for our success. We’ve come a long way since our humble beginnings 19 years ago, and it’s all happened because of you. Katy Wood is the AMA Motorcycle Hall of Fame Museum operations manager.

Photo Open Image Studio

Bigger And Better Plans For The AMA’s Museum


covers each trip, there and back. has been riding to rallies since 1972.

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CeLebraTing Summer As long as there have been motorcyclists, they’ve been getting together and having fun on their bikes. Whether touring, racing or riding the plank in a contest of skill while everyone looks on, the idea is simple: Get out and ride. And with AMA Vintage Motorcycle Days coming up July 24-26 at the Mid-Ohio Sport Car Course in Lexington, Ohio, there’s no better place to celebrate summer. Photo: Eric M. Sanford, 1958

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The Life AmericanMotorcyclist.com


Protecting the Ride Page 18 Living It Page 22 Connections Page 28 Adrenaline Page 32 Heritage Page 36 August 2009

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benefits of wearing a helmet. The new crash study is being done by the Oklahoma Transportation Center, a well-respected research facility at Oklahoma State University in Stillwater. The federal government earmarked up to $2.8 million for the research, provided that the motorcycling community came up with another $2.8 million. The AMA immediately pledged $100,000 for the effort and AMA members kicked in money. Also, the motorcycle industry committed to provide $2.8 million through the Motorcycle Safety Foundation, making the new study a reality.

New Streetbike Sound Test Unveiled Simple Field Test Developed

New research into the causes of motorcycle crashes is critical for saving lives on the road.

Searching for Answers

Pilot Motorcycle Crash Study Complete The initial research has been completed in preparation for the first comprehensive motorcycle crash study in nearly 30 years. As part of a pilot study that will lay the groundwork for more complete research, workers went on-site to 53 motorcycle crashes to gather detailed information, and were able to fully document 23 of them, thanks to cooperation from law enforcement, riders and families. The next step will be a full study, which will include about 1,000 crashes, to examine the factors associated with the accidents, such as their type, the severity of injuries and nature of fatalities, and the effectiveness of protective gear. The study has been made possible through the support of the motorcycle industry, the AMA and its members. “Approximately 1,700 variables were collected per case,” said Jennifer Percer of the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, who managed the pilot study. “All of the variables that were collected covered a thorough investigation on motorcycle dynamics, motorcycle mechanics, information on the other vehicle, injury data, control motorcycle mechanics, crash environment, interviews with the rider and passenger if applicable, and interviews with the other driver.” Funding for the full study is currently budgeted at more than $5 million.

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Ed Moreland, AMA vice president for government relations, said he was encouraged by the pilot project: “The incredible amount of data collected for each crash indicates that a full study involving hundreds of motorcycles could push motorcycling safety light years ahead of where we are today to develop ways to prevent crashes. “The last full-scale study was conducted in the late 1970s,” Moreland added. “It’s critical that we update our knowlege because so much has changed about the road environment, even the vehicles on the road. The results of the new study will provide valuable information to help save lives.” The full study is expected to begin soon and will take several years to complete. The last major research into the causes of motorcycle crashes was undertaken three decades ago. The report, “Motorcycle Accident Cause Factors and Identification of Countermeasures,” is popularly known today as the Hurt Report, after lead researcher and AMA Hall of Famer Prof. Harry Hurt. The report revealed the dangers of oncoming cars turning left into motorcyclists; noted that riders with less than five months experience on the bike they were riding were much more likely to be involved in a crash; and quantified the real-world

Just as this issue was going to press, the Society of Automotive Engineers International released a new sound test procedure that can be used to determine whether a streetbike produces excessive sound. Jurisdictions around the nation have struggled with citizen complaints about excessive motorcycle sound and how to deal with the complaints because there was no uniform sound-meter test available to verify whether a street motorcycle violated the jurisdiction’s noise law. Now there is. The test is similar to the test that has been used for off-road motorcycles for many years. The streetbike test involves holding a sound meter at a 45-degree angle, 20 inches from the exhaust outlet of a running bike, to take the measurement. The new procedure spells out how to do the test with the bike at idle, at a set rpm, or by slowly increasing the revs of the bike, known as the “swept” procedure. The test suggests a limit of 92 decibels at idle for all machines, or 96 decibels for bikes with fewer than three or more than four cylinders, and 100 decibels for threeor four-cylinder machines, using the set rpm or swept test. The AMA believes that few other factors contribute more to misunderstanding and prejudice against the motorcycling community than excessively noisy motorcycles. We’ll have a full report on the new streetbike procedure in the next issue of American Motorcyclist.

Photo Crash: ©iStockphoto.com/Orientaly

The Life | Protecting the Ride


The Life | Protecting the Ride

Finish The Fight: Contact Your State Attorney General

Photo CPSC Ban: Conrad Lim

Push For A Stay Of Enforcement on Youth-Model Bike Ban Unfortunately, the fight isn’t over when it comes to the sale of kids’ dirtbikes. AMA members and other rights groups won an important victory in May when they helped convince the Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) to delay enforcing part of a ban on children’s toys containing lead that had ensnared youth-model motorcycles and ATVs. Now it’s time to make sure that statelevel officials understand the issue and agree with the CPSC to delay the bike ban—giving Congress time to sort out the complex issue while parents can continue to purchase new kids bikes legally. CPSC Chairwoman Nancy Nord has said she hopes state attorneys general, who also enforce consumer protection laws, will follow the CPSC’s direction and use restraint because, according to Nord, “enforcement discretion is an important tool that is needed to reach thoughtful and effective outcomes that enhance consumer safety.” To get clarification on the issue at the state level, Ed Moreland, AMA vice president for government relations, on May 5 wrote a letter to James McPherson, executive director of the National Association of Attorneys General (NAAG), asking whether state attorneys general would enforce the law. In a response dated May 8, Dennis Cuevas, NAAG project director and counsel, told Moreland that the association hasn’t taken a position on enforcement of the lead law. The attorney general of each state would need to be contacted to learn their positions, he said. “The state attorneys general need to understand that enforcing this law could

Boz Kerr, 1950-2009

Well-Known Motorcycle Riders Foundation Vice President Michael “Boz” Kerr, vice president of the Motorcycle Riders Foundation (MRF) and chairman of the MRF’s legislative committee, died in his sleep April 19. Kerr, 59, of Chicago, previously served as an MRF board member in the capacity of MRF Political Action Committee chairman. He was instrumental in establishing the MRF Awareness and Education Organization and was the driving force behind the National Motorcycle Awareness Day in Washington, D.C., known as Bikers in the Beltway. Kerr was past president of the Chicago Chapter of ABATE of Illinois. He earned the MRF President’s Cup of Distinction and ABATE of Illinois’ Rich Neb Award. “Boz was the finest political operative I have ever had the privilege to work with, and his concern and passion for motorcycle rights and his genuineness will be greatly missed by the MRF and the entire motorcycling rights community,” said MRF President Kirk “Hardtail” Willard.

be very dangerous for children because it could force them to ride machines that are too powerful for them,” Moreland said. That’s a position that Commissioner Nord agrees with, as she noted in a statement issued April 3: “(The) application of the lead-content mandates of the CPSIA (Consumer Product Safety Improvement Act) to the products made by the petitioners may have the perverse effect of actually endangering children by forcing youth-sized vehicles off the market and resulting in children riding the far more dangerous adult-sized ATVs.” The easiest way to contact a state attorney general is to go to the “Rights” section of AmericanMotorcyclist.com, and then click on the “Issues & Legislation” button. From there, the name and address of a state attorney general can be found so that a letter can be sent asking whether the attorney general’s office plans to follow the direction of the CPSC. You can also send a pre-written e-mail from there.

More Bikes, More Riders, More Diversity New Study Says Motorcycle Ownership Is Up

If it looks like there are more bikes on the road these days, there are. A new study by the Motorcycle Industry Council (MIC) shows motorcycle ownership has jumped an impressive 58 percent over the last 20 years. The latest figures show that there were about 10.4 million motorcycles owned or in use in the United States in 2008, compared with some 6.6 million 20 years earlier. In just the past five years, the number has jumped 26 percent. The group’s survey found that female ownership of motorcycles has gone up from 9.6 percent of motorcyclists in 2003 to 12.3 percent in 2008. Of the 25 million Americans who rode last year, women made up 23 percent, or 5.7 million. MIC President Tim Buche said motorcycling still has room for growth, but two-wheeling has made significant inroads among various key demographics.

August 2009

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The Life | Protecting the Ride

Two Questions With…

Pushing For Justice With The Black Nail Brigade Victim’s Son Advocates Awareness, Discussion And Activism When people meet Greg Zaffke II of Wauconda, Ill., they are struck by the painted black fingernails on his right hand. And that’s the way he wants it. His mother, Anita Zaffke, 56, was killed May 2 when she was hit from behind while stopped at a traffic light near Chicago by driver Lora Hunt, 48, who allegedly told police she was painting her fingernails at the time. As a result, Greg paints his fingernails black as a reminder to anyone he meets. And he has formed the Black Nail Brigade Foundation Against Distracted Driving (www.BlackNailBrigade.org) to publicize the dangers of distracted driving, push for

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legislation to impose appropriate penalties for distracted drivers who seriously injure or kill others, and to boost awareness to share the road with motorcycles. “Too many drivers are multitasking,” Greg says. “Too many are oblivious to their reckless decisions. Too many good people Anita Zaffke are dying. Something needs to be done to prevent this from happening to people in cars, pedestrians and bicyclists as well.” Hunt initially was ticketed for failure to reduce speed to avoid an accident. But that charge was dropped to give prosecutors the opportunity to file more serious charges later.

When Illinois lawmakers introduced a bill to ban kids 16 and younger from riding motorcycles or ATVs, local riders made a difference. We asked AMA District 17 (Central, Western Illinois) Motocross Director Gerhard Ward about the keys to getting it voted down. AM: Why was this bill so dangerous? Ward: It would have basically destroyed any type of youth riding in Illinois, with anyone under the age of 16 unable to ride a motorcycle, minibike or ATV. There are 50-some places to race and ride in this state, and I can’t imagine more then 10 surviving if that bill would have passed. AM: How did riders defeat the bill? Ward: The District 17 board received an e-mail from our ABATE of Illinois contact, Stacey Rigsby, telling us that this bill needed our attention. AMA headquarters also sent out an alert on this bill. The board decided that we better send out the information to our riders, clubs, tracks, etc.—basically send up the flares. I posted the information on the District 17 website, with links to the AMA’s legislative action process on AmericanMotorcyclist.com, and encouraged all the clubs/tracks to do the same. I sent over 4,000 e-mails to our riders and friends, and posted the information on 10 different message boards. Then we sent out text messages on our cell phones. The Illinois Motorcycle Dealers Association, ABATE of Illinois and AMA District 17 were represented well at the hearing on the bill. We had between 150 and 200 people show up, and probably 95 percent of the people in the room were AMA members. It was interesting to see the bill’s sponsor, Rep. Mary Flowers (D-Chicago), try to describe the “horrible” danger that OHVs pose to kids. She clearly didn’t know her own bill. She vows that she will be back and she will bring “her” people and will be “ready.” We will be seeing her again. We all will be ready—again. Gerhard Ward (blue shirt) rallied the troops.

Photos Greg Zaffke: Julie Monacella Photography; District 17: Midwest Off Road Riders

Gerhard Ward Mobilized The Troops To Defeat A State Bill To Ban Kids 16 And Under From Riding Dirtbikes And ATVs


The Life | Protecting the Ride

LouiSiana Anyone 21 or older could decide whether to wear a helmet while riding, under House Bill 639, sponsored by Rep. James Morris (R-Oil City). Maine A new law will penalize drivers or riders who commit a traffic infraction and kill others with fines of up to $5,000 and a driver’s license suspension of 14 days to four years. The bill, sponsored by Rep. Patsy Garside Crockett (D-Augusta), was signed into law on May 21. nevada A bill to require the registration and licensing of an estimated 400,000 off-road vehicles has passed out of the Assembly Ways and Means Committee. But it faces a likely veto from Gov. Jim Gibbons because it would impose a $20-$30 registration fee on ATVs, dune buggies and snowmobiles. The measure, Senate Bill 394, is supported by the AMA, rider groups, powersports dealers, law enforcement agencies, the Nevada Conservation League, the Nevada Association of Counties, the Nevada Cattleman’s Association and the Nevada Farm Bureau. Go to the “Rights” page of AmericanMotorcyclist.com to let your lawmakers know you support this bill. new JerSey The state Department of Environmental Protection would be required to designate three sites on state land where ATVs, dirtbikes and snowmobiles may be used, under Senate Bill 1059, introduced by Sen. Shirley Turner (D-Lawrenceville). However, if the department is unable to designate three suitable areas for motorized recreation, it is simply required to file a report with the governor and the Legislature explaining why appropriate locations couldn’t be made available. The complete text is available on the “Rights” page of AmericanMotorcyclist.com. new Mexico The White Sands Missile Range is now offering a basic motorcycle safety course, which saves soldiers from having to travel to get the training the Department of Defense requires for them to ride a motorcycle on a military installation. The southern New Mexico missile range began offering its certified Basic RiderCourse this spring. The initial class was filled to its 25-rider capacity, with many first-time riders taking advantage of the new course.

(R-Lancaster), would increase penalties for traffic violations that result in serious injury or death to other road users. Promoted by the Ohio Right-of-Way Working Group, a coalition of motorcyclists and bicyclists, these bills would give police and judges new tools to hold vehicle operators accountable for their actions. Urge your state senator and representative to support these bills by visiting the “Issues and Legislation” area of AmericanMotorcyclist.com.

rHode iSLand Senate Bill 133, sponsored by Sen. Tassoni (D-Smithfield), would require the owners of public buildings to provide designated parking spaces for motorcycles, with one motorcycle space set aside for every 30 car spaces. You can send an e-mail in support of the bill by visiting AmericanMotorcyclist.com and clicking on the “Issues and Legislation” tab under “Rights.”

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When the World Comes Down… The All-American Rejects Just Jump On Their Scooters If there’s a universal truth in the twowheeled world, it’s the sense of freedom and open possibilities that we experience when we head out for a ride. That goes double for members of one of the hardestworking bands in modern rock ‘n’ roll, The All-American Rejects. Their vehicles of choice: scooters. And, as we discovered when we talked to bassist/vocalist Tyson Ritter and guitarist Nick Wheeler, scooters actually played an important role in the production of the band’s latest album, When The World Comes Down. Ritter: I got started with bikes when I was a kid, on a little Honda Trail 70 that my dad bought me back in the day. But as a band, the whole scooter thing didn’t start for us until we moved down to Florida

to write our second record. Wheeler: Yeah, we were going to all go buy Vespas at the same time, but that didn’t happen. Ritter: Yeah, I actually wound up buying a 1969 Vespa Sprint, old-school. Wheeler: I went for a new Vespa. It’s funny—when I first learned to drive a car, I never learned to drive stick, so I have no idea of the concept of a manual transmission. I liked the new one. Ritter: Still, though, when we’d ride, for the first two months, he’d have to stop every four miles because I was fouling my plug. Wheeler: I’d be riding along and look back, and it was like, “Where’d he go?” Ritter: They’re great, though. Especially

when we were writing the record, Nick and I had a lot of getaway time that was on a scooter. The record is called When The World Comes Down for a reason. And when our world seemed to get away from us, we would get on the scooters and get away. It’d really help to finish a chorus or finish a verse. I used to run for escape back in the day, but the scooter has replaced that. I tell you: I’m at my happiest that I’ve ever been—and that includes playing rock ‘n’ roll—when I’m on a scooter. Wheeler: We’re so busy that scooters are kind of our only escape. We’re fortunate enough to do this for a living— play music and write music. But when we were writing When The World Comes Down, literally all we were doing was writing music, and it started to feel like a job. Then, when we were right on the cusp of finishing, almost ready to go into the studio, all four of us were down there and we had scooters, and we’d just bug out. It was awesome.

‘I’M AT MY HAPPIEST THAT I’VE EVER BEEN— AND THAT INCLUDES PLAYING ROCK ‘N’ ROLL—WHEN I’M ON A SCOOTER.’ —TYSON RITTER

Nick Wheeler, Tyson Ritter and Chris Gaylor

MORE 

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See more photos at AmericanMotorcyclist.com/Magazine

Photo Meg Baisden Photography

The Life | Living It


The Life | Living It

Here’s Your Bailout Teiz Motorsports’ Sub-$250 Riding Suit

T-Shirts! Get Yer T-Shirts! ts!

Photo Open Image Studio

New AMA T-Shirts Feature BSA, AMA Vintage Motorcycle Days What’s perfect for wearing under a motorcycle jacket on the road? The same thing that’s great for nearly every other time you’re kicking back: an AMA T-shirt. And now we’ve got you covered like never before, with a ton of new designs inspired by yesterday and today. Whether you’re into the modern-retro American Motorcyclist designs, or the historic BSA shirts produced to commemorate this year’s AMA Vintage Motorcycle Days, for which BSA is Marque of the Year, you’ll find them a perfect fit for all your T-shirt needs, from comfort to cool. To order, click on Gear at AmericanMotorcyclist.com.

The Deal: High-end gear gets a lot of attention, but you need to keep an eye on the other end of the spectrum, as well. Enter the Teiz Motorsports Cross-Continent Air riding suit. C What It Is: A mesh riding suit with CE-approved armor in the shoulders, elbows, knees and shins, reflective striping, and scads of pockets, made in Pakistan for an MSRP of $249. ( non-mesh version is available (A for $289.) N Nice Touches: Easy-open change pock pockets for tolls on the left sleeve; adju adjustable-length sleeves; waterproof pock pockets; padding in the seat; knee slide (though you really shouldn’t sliders b pushing it that hard in any mesh be gear); and straps for cinching down legs and arms. Concerns: As with most mesh motorcycle gear, we suspect it’s a crash-once-and-replace item, and won’t protect as well as leather. But it’s an easy way to wear full protection and keep cool while riding. Plus, it doesn’t break the bank. Sizing-wise, your best bet will be to measure yourself and study the sizing chart at TeizMS.com Bottom Line: Frankly, if this suit were $500, it would be tough to justify writing about it, but these days, a $250 suit with this list of features gets our attention. There are trade-offs, but in the real world, this one is worth a look.—Grant Parsons

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The Life | Living It

Congratulations, It’s A Superbike BMW Gives Birth To A Racing Offspring in a compact, lightweight in-line fourcylinder powerplant that produces an astonishing 193 horsepower at 13,000 rpm, all kept in check with Dynamic Traction Control. The bike weighs in at 403.5 pounds dry—455.3 pounds in road trim with a full tank of gas—which BMW claims is the lightest 1,000cc machine with ABS. Lastly came the order that must have had some of the Munich engineers dropping their pencils: The new machine’s price could not exceed $1,000 more than the average price of bikes in its class. Yes, it’s a move that represents BMW’s fierce intentions to be a contender in the literbike arena, focused squarely on attracting new converts, as well as satisfying the contingent of BMW devotees who have been starved for a superbike. Although World Superbike Racing is unchartered territory for BMW, the new machine—in the hands of Troy Corser and Ruben Xaus—has garnered several top-10 finishes as of mid-season, and even set the fastest race lap at the Australia round. With the S1000RR, BMW has turned a page in its colorful history and entered a new chapter that is bound to redefine its place in motorcycling.—Jeff Buchanan

Ask The Motorcycle Safety Foundation Make A Stand On A Dirtbike YOU ASK: I recently started riding off-road and I’m hoping you can clarify something for me. When standing, I usually stay on the arches of my feet so I’m in position to shift when needed. A friend of mine says I should be on the balls of my feet, and to move my foot when I need to shift. That makes me feel unstable. What’s the best position for your feet on the pegs? THE MSF RESPONDS: We agree with your friend that you should keep the balls of your feet on the footpegs. Think of any sport. What is the player’s ready position? Whether it’s football, basketball, baseball, karate or tennis, every player is on the balls of his or her feet. It should be the same with off-road riding. This position gives you the best opportunity to adjust your body to the ever-changing terrain, and also prevents accidentally hitting the shift lever or brake pedal with your boots. However, when the terrain calls for lots of possible shifting, you may be more comfortable riding with the arches of your foot centered on the footpegs. To maintain stability, try squeezing your knees against the tank. Pretend that you are holding a piece of paper between the bike and your legs at all times. Instead of being pulled by the handlebars when you are accelerating, you should be propelled forward through your legs, with minimal grip on the handlebars. This should help with your control and stability.

Photo Footpeg: Open Image Studio

One of the more anticipated introductions of a new motorcycle in the past few years has come to pass, when BMW officially unveiled its new production superbike for the American press at the seventh round of the World Superbike Championship in Salt Lake City. Journalists didn’t get to turn a wheel on the new machine (that will happen toward the end of the year) but if function follows form, we won’t be disappointed. The S1000RR represents a watershed strategy for the German marque, an unabashedly flagrant announcement that this isn’t the old BMW. Without question this is the most aggressive machine BMW has produced to date, and rightly so. It’s the poster child for dynamic change with the company. The S1000RR manages to walk the literbike walk while retaining a distinctive BMW design flow, the result of a nosacred-cows design brief. Engineers were told not to worry about trying to do things differently just for the sake of being different. As a result, the machine bears similarities to other machines in its class, with a telescopic fork and wedged, aerodynamic bodywork. Class-leading horsepower targets resulted

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The Life | Living It

Classic Cool, Modern Mods

Triumph’s ’09 Bonneville—Now With Injection Triumph’s Bonneville is a sacrosanct icon of motorcycle nostalgia, so it’s no wonder that change is being applied sparingly to its modern incarnation. But that hasn’t stopped the single biggest update to the bike in its 50-year history with two companies: fuel injection. The ’09 Bonnie features Keihin throttlebody injectors designed to look like twin carbs, feeding the 865cc parallel-twin while monitoring air temperature, pressure, engine speed and throttle position. Claiming five times lower emissions, improved fuel economy and more power, the system intends to offer the best of both worlds—at least on paper. Also new for 2009 are revised ergonomics, which incorporate a shorter seat and handlebars that are lower and pulled closer to the rider, tweaks that are no doubt intended to appeal to entrylevel riders. Cosmetic alterations include revised fenders and megaphone-style mufflers and new seven-spoke cast aluminum wheels. Die-hards are likely to prefer the T100 model, which still has traditional spoke rims. The starter Bonneville ($7,299 in black, $7,699 in white) is distinguished by black engine cases, while the SE model ($8,399) gains a tachometer, satin engine cases, and a two-tone tank with a raised Triumph badge, among other additions. The top dog T100 model ($8,799) boasts chrome engine case covers, fork gaiters, kneepads, and

“peashooter” exhaust pipes. On the road at the bike’s New Orleans introduction, the new, 29.5 inch-tall scooped seat makes pavement appear that much closer, and the repositioned bars give the bike a shrunken feel. The new dimensions are good news for the vertically challenged, but the smaller rider triangle might make six-footers feel somewhat cramped. Laps through New Orleans’s French Quarter revealed surprisingly sharp maneuverability thanks to the revised wheel setup, but ride quality feels somewhat abrupt over less-than-perfect road surfaces, due in part to the 10mm reduction in seat foam thickness. Fuel injection can feel choppy at low rpms, an issue Triumph will likely resolve before too many bikes roll off the Hinckley, U.K., assembly line. Stopping power from the two-piston Nissin units belie the bike’s intentionally antiquated appearance. Outside city limits, freeway passing exhibited the parallel twin’s eagerness to rev to the 7,000 rpm redline—somewhat unexpected. Stability is well matched to maneuverability, and the bike’s smallish feel enables it to come across as nimble, despite its archaic silhouette. Messing with success is always a tricky proposition, but the 2009 Bonneville’s amendments are clearly strategized to ensure survival while clinging to its inimitable old-world style.—Basem Wasef

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The Life | Living It

Forgotten BSA History Remembered

Photo Daytona International Speedway

In 1969, The BSA Rocket III Lived Up to its name

Yvon Duhamel made his name on modified race bikes like this one.

It may be a little-known bit of history, but it was a strong statement of how powerful the famed BSA Rocket III really was. And with BSA serving as Marque of the Year at AMA Vintage Motorcycle Days, set for July 24-26 at the Mid-Ohio Sports Car Course in Lexington, Ohio, it’s the perfect time to revisit it. The year was 1969, and BSA’s Don Brown was looking for a way to distinguish the new, three-cylinder 750cc Rocket III. He leased Daytona Motor Speedway and hired racers Dick Mann, Yvon Duhamel and Ray Hempstead for long-distance speed record attempts. “Our service manager, Herb Nease, told me he thought the new bike could go as fast as 130 mph if it was set up carefully to exact factory specifications,” Brown remembers today. “That got my attention.” As it turned out, the attempts were highly successful, with a lap certified speed of 131.790 mph for the 2.5 mile oval, set by Duhamel. Numerous other distance and speed records were also set, like 124.141 for 200 miles. The BSA records were certified at the 1969 AMA Competition Congress as being set by standard production motorcycles. “Nobody else was close, and these speeds stood until Kawasaki’s Z1 surpassed them at Daytona in 1972—but only by a relatively small margin,” Brown remembers.

And The Winner Is… Your Suggestions for AMA Motorcyclist of the Year

Last year, we announced the first-ever AMA Motorcyclist of the Year for 2008, and for 2009, we’re looking for your input. The AMA’s Motorcyclist of the Year is the person who had the most profound impact on motorcycling, either positive or negative, during the calendar year. It’s not intended to be a recognition of lifetime achievement, but to note an action taken, for better or worse during 2009, affecting motorcycling and its future. We’re still a few months out from making the choice, but we’d like to hear your suggestions for possible winners. Send your ideas, plus a few sentences about why you think your candidate deserves the recognition, to: submissions@ama-cycle.org.

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Member Discount: LifeLock Protect Against Identity Theft And Save Getting your wallet stolen has always been bad news. These days, getting your credit card numbers stolen is far worse. And few things can ruin a motorcycle tour more quickly. Now you can protect against both catastrophes—and make the recovery from them much easier, thanks to a new partnership with LifeLock, the industry leader in identity theft protection, which now offers a 10 percent discount to all AMA members. “When you’re out riding, you don’t want to have to worry about identity theft,” says Jim Moore, director of

business development for the AMA. “Now, with this outstanding offer from the most trusted company in identity theft protection, our members can have greater peace of mind while they enjoy the open road or the trails.” Identity theft has become the No. 1 crime in the nation. It costs Americans more than $1.2 billion annually, and the length of time a victim invests in clearing his or her good name can be three months or more. LifeLock works by requesting that the national credit bureaus place fraud alerts on its members’ credit files,

When you’re out riding, you don’t Want to have to Worry about identity theft.

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and requests that members’ names be removed from pre-approved credit card offers. Members also are entitled to LifeLock’s WalletLock, eRecon and TrueAddress services. WalletLock cancels and replaces all documents and personal identifying information inside a wallet if it is lost or stolen. eRecon regularly patrols the Internet in search of Social Security, credit card, and driver’s license numbers and e-mail addresses of LifeLock members to protect against the information being traded or sold online. LifeLock’s TrueAddress searches to see if members have had a change of address form filed, and alerts them to ensure they know. The company’s services are backed by a $1 million total service guarantee. To sign up, go to LifeLock.com.

Photo Jim Bowie

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The Life | Connections


Chuck Palmgren

Visionaries And Heroes

AMA Motorcycle Hall Of Fame Class For ’09 Announced It will be a night of honor for the AMA Motorcycle Hall of Fame Class of 2009 Induction Ceremony. The event, held for the first time at the Hard Rock Hotel & Casino in Las Vegas this Dec. 5. (info at MotorcycleMuseum.org), will recognize this year’s honorees: Robert Bates: Bates started Bates Manufacturing Inc. in Los Angeles in 1939 to service and overhaul motor scooters and develop accessories. In the late 1940s, the company began publishing a popular catalog that featured motorcycle accessories and leather apparel. Mona Ehnes: A long-time champion of off-highway motorcyclists’ rights, Ehnes was a founding member of both the Great Falls Trail Bike Riders Association and the Montana Trail Vehicle Association and is executive assistant to the National Off-Highway Vehicle Conservation Council. Geoff and Bob Fox: Brothers who are responsible for two of the most recognizable brands in off-road motorcycle racing, Geoff Fox gave the world the Fox head logo and launched Geoff Fox one of the most ubiquitous MX brands today, while Bob Fox, with Fox Factory Inc., made his mark producing suspension components for off-road motorcycles. Randy Bob Fox Hawkins: A seven-time AMA National Enduro Champion, Hawkins won 13 ISDE

gold medals and 73 AMA Nationals and works today as team manager of AmPro Yamaha. David Hough: A longtime motorcycle journalist who turned 25 years of experience commuting through city traffic into articles about riding skills and crash avoidance, Hough is perhaps best known for his series, “Proficient Motorcycling,” in Motorcycle Consumer News and many books. Gary Mathers: An accomplished racing director who produced 48 championships in road racing, dirt track, Supercross and moto-cross for Honda and Kawasaki, Mathers’ riders have included Eddie Lawson and Wayne Rainey, who went on to become 500cc Road Racing Grand Prix World Champions. Chuck Palmgren: A dirt-track racing ace who won five Nationals in the late-1960s and early 1970s, Palmgren placed in the top 10 in national points in 1968-70, 1972 and 1974 and was an innovator of the Yamaha 750cc motor and frame design. Gilles Vaillancourt: A pioneer in modern motorcycle suspension development, Vaillancourt’s work ultimately resulted in the creation of his Works Performance, which makes custom shocks for dirt bikes, all-terrain vehicles, street bikes and cruisers.


TAILS RE DE O M R FO HE VISIT T SECTION G N I RID ERICAN OM OF AMRCYCLIST.C O T MO

AMA MOTORCYCLE HALL OF FAMERS Van Buren Sisters

Cross-Country Pioneers By Robert Van Buren Augusta and Adeline Van Buren were true pioneers in the early days of motorcycling. They rode coast to coast on Indian Power Plus motorcycles in 1916, along the way becoming the first women to ride motorized vehicles to the summit of Pikes Peak. Part of their mission was to convince the military that women were fit to serve as dispatch riders. And although they did not achieve that goal, they clearly proved that women were capable of far more than society generally allowed them in that era. Augusta was born March 26, 1884, and Adeline was born July 26, 1889. The sisters were slender “society girls” out to prove that women could ride motorcycles across the then-treacherous continent, even though they still did not have the right to vote. They prepared for their transcontinental journey carefully. First, they incrementally accumulated long distance rides in New York, and then set off on their journey on July 4, 1916. They left from Sheepshead Bay in Brooklyn and trekked west through

Chicago and Omaha aboard Indians equipped with gas headlights. The journey got difficult, especially since they were arrested numerous times in the small towns west of Chicago, not for speeding but for wearing men’s clothes. They were dressed in leathers, and after reaching an understanding with the law, they were allowed to push on with their trip. Technical difficulties were encountered in crossing both the Rockies and the western deserts. The sisters were the first women to summit Pike’s Peak on any kind of motorized vehicle. The road to the summit was dangerous, rising to 14,109 feet, but for Gussie and Addie it was just another challenge. They completed their journey on September 8 after arriving in Los Angeles. Just for good measure, they decided to continue to Tijuana for a final crossing of the border into Mexico. Augusta and Adeline Van Buren broke the stereotypes of their time, proving a woman could do anything a man could do. In the words of Augusta: “Woman can if she will.”

Photo Van Buren Family Collection

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The Life | Connections

Order the free catalog

AMA Motorcycle Hall Of Fame Plans Open House

www.touratech-usa.com ( 800) 491-2926 ( 206) 323-2349

Save The Date: Sept. 12

Dal Smilie Indicted Grand Jury Charges Former AMA Chairman With Stealing $109,000 Former American Motorcyclist Association (AMA) Board of Directors Chairman Dal Smilie was arraigned in Ohio’s Fairfield County court on June 8 on felony charges in connection with evidence discovered by the AMA involving unsubstantiated expense reimbursement claims over a period of years. Mr. Smilie entered a plea of not guilty in response to a Fairfield County grand jury indictment on charges of theft by deception and receiving stolen property in the matter, which involves more than $100,000. He was free on a $25,000 surety bond and a $10,000 recognizance bond. The charges carry a maximum penalty of five years in prison. The criminal action is unrelated to a civil case settled last year in which Mr. Smilie satisfied the Association’s claim. The criminal case is expected to continue through the Fairfield County Office of the Prosecuting Attorney. The AMA will continue to update members as information becomes public.

We’re taking to the streets… The new Touratech Streetline parts & accessories catalog for the BMW R1200RT, R1200R, K1200GT, F800ST, Triumph Tiger 1050i, Yamaha FJR1300 and Buell Ulysses.

www.streetline-usa.com ( 800) 491-2926 or ( 206) 323-2349

Bike photo: www.brunoratensperger.com

If you’re a motorcycle nut, there’s only one place to be this Sept. 12: The AMA Motorcycle Hall of Fame Museum. That’s when Museum staff will swing the doors open for a day of fun for the family that starts with free admission and includes a host of other activities. Planned are demo rides, a kids’ fun zone, a bike exhibition and more. “The idea is to kick back, enjoy the day and make it a special time for anyone who thinks motorcycles are cool, whether you ride or not,” says Museum Operations Manager Katy Wood. “With a full slate of activities—and the world-class AMA Motorcycle Hall of Fame at the center of it all—you’ll find plenty to like.” Make plans now, and see you in September.

No new bike this year? So get to your dealer and improve what you’ve got. Our S100® “stimulus package” is just the thing.

Market-leading bike care products that have been around for over 25 years … even supplied to bike manufacturers themselves. (Some of our customers tell us they fooled their friends into thinking their bike was new!) So invest for the future by adding value to your ride with S100 Cycle Care products. See the full lineup at www.s100.com or call 203-488-6569 for a free catalog. Available at better bike shops.

August 2009

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The Life | Adrenaline

Ducati Comes Out On Top At Road America

That’s only a slightly nervous smile on Mike Lafferty’s face as he prepares for the ride of his life with AMA member and Lt. Col Jim Robinson.

A New Kind of Rush Enduro Champ Mike Lafferty Flies In A Fan’s Military Jet AMA member and off-road enthusiast Lt. Col. Jim “Danger” Robinson flew countless Air Force combat sorties over Baghdad during Operation Iraqi Freedom, Operation Northern Watch and Operation Southern Watch. Meanwhile, eight-time national enduro champion Mike “Maverick” Lafferty has one sortie to his credit—that one over the west Texas plains near Wichita Falls—and he has Robinson to thank for it. Lafferty was given the unique opportunity to fly in a high performance T-38C Talon at Sheppard Air Force Base as part of a new public relations effort by the Air Force to gain positive exposure by taking high profile athletes for flights. Lt. Col. Robinson first met Lafferty at the AMA Endurocross in Denver two years ago where he extended the invitation. In May of this year, Lafferty got his wings. “Unbelievable,” Lafferty said of the experience. “It’s like you’re in this little cockpit and there’s nothing around you. It’s almost like you’re floating in the air. I give these guys so much more credit for what they do—the maneuvers, the precision, and the ones who fly combat missions. They’re incredible.” Robinson says he couldn’t have picked

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a better candidate. “(Mike) is a very personable guy, and when I first met him, he took the time to explain some things about his bike that my brother and I asked him, and I thought that was unique,” Robinson said. “So when Public Affairs mentioned we had this opportunity to take someone up, Mike was the first person I thought of. Mike is going to reach a lot more of our target audience on a daily basis than I could…and if he influences just one person that helps us out.” Lafferty adds that while he had a great time, he wasn’t as comfortable a few thousand feet up as he is weaving his KTM through the trees at the Alligator Enduro. “I was definitely scared,” Lafferty admits. “I was not sure how it would go, but it was a chance of a lifetime, and I’m really glad I was able to be a part of it. As far as the flying part, I was totally cool with just being along for the ride, and as soon as he told me to take the stick and fly it, I did for a little bit but I wasn’t comfortable with that at all. It just didn’t seem like a very safe situation for me to be flying that thing.” —Shan Moore

It only took a decade, but Foremost Insurance Ducati rider Larry Pegram claimed his second career victory in AMA Pro Racing National Guard American Superbike presented by Parts Unlimited in the second race of the Road America doubleheader in Elkhart Lake, Wis. The Ohio native did it the hard way, too, outdueling seven-time champion Mat Mladin and his Rockstar Makita Yoshimura Suzuki GSX-R1000. As he did in the first race of the doubleheader, Pegram got an outstanding drive from the second row in the second race and claimed the lead early. Pegram led the first six laps of the 13-lap race before Mladin took point. The battle heated up on the next-to-last lap with Pegram taking the lead on the front straight heading into Turn 1 and Mladin reclaiming the position in Turn 3. Pegram finally sealed the deal on the run from Turn 3 to Turn 5 and managed to hold the front spot for a 0.342-second victory. It was Pegram’s first win since April 19, 1999, at Willow Springs Raceway in Rosamond, Calif. “I was real comfortable,” Pegram said. “When Mat would get in front of me, he wouldn’t really get me anywhere... It was weird. He was really getting through there good. It’s been such a long time. I don’t know if that was as good as the first one or not, but I don’t want to wait 10 years for another one.” For Mladin, who won the opening race of the doubleheader on Saturday, it was just the second time in 11 races this season that he did not stand atop the box. “Obviously, it was back-and-forth,” Mladin said. “In the end, we couldn’t get it done. We rode hard and that’s all we could do today.” Mladin maintains a comfortable lead in the points standings with nine races to go. Mladin leads his teammate Tommy Hayden 325 to 215. Yamaha’s Ben Bostrom is 28 more points back in third.

Photos Mike Lafferty: Shan Moore; Larry Pegram: Brian J. Nelson

Pegram Outduels Mladin In Superbike


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AMA Racer and the AMA Racing Vintage Grand Championships It’s The Vintage Issue

Taking It Outside Unpredictable Start To Lucas Oil AMA Motocross Championships The Lucas Oil AMA Motocross Championship season has just started, and already it’s been as unpredictable a year as you’ll see in motocross. With San Manuel Yamaha’s James Stewart sitting out the Lucas Oil AMA Motocross Championships after adding the 2009 Monster Energy AMA Supercross, an FIM World Championship, to his ’08 outdoor title, Monster Energy Kawasaki’s Ryan Villopoto appeared to be the early heir to the outdoor throne. Villopoto handily won the opener at Glen Helen Raceway in San Bernardino, Calif., ahead of Rockstar Makita Suzuki’s Mike Alessi, with a 1-1 moto score. Villopoto then seriously injured his knee in practice the following week, ultimately deciding that surgery was necessary. “My knee got to the point where I couldn’t race competitively,” Villopoto said. “It is disappointing that I will have to miss the rest of the season.”

With Villopoto out of the lineup, Alessi moved to the top of the order, laying down a 1-1 moto score of his own at Hangtown and winning Round 3 at Freestone Raceway in Wortham, Texas. But then came another twist: Alessi crashed while practicing the following week, breaking his kneecap. While the Suzuki rider might be back before the end of the season, the injury and subsequent surgery have ended his title hopes. Going into Round 4 in Mt. Morris, Pa., the advantage sits with Rockstar Makita Suzuki’s Chad Reed, who is second in championship points behind Alessi, 111 to Alessi’s 142. However, factory Yamaha rider Josh Grant and factory Honda’s Andrew Short are just 17 and 18 points back. Both Grant and Short have finished ahead of Reed at least twice this season, and likely would be ahead of Reed in points without one 0-point moto each. Stay tuned…

Electric Bikes Run The Isle Of Man See More At This Year’s AMA Vintage Motorcycle Days The future has arrived. The first-ever race for electric motorcycles, the TTX GP, held on the same course and at the same time as internal-combustion machines as part of the Manx TT race on the Isle of Man, finished up in June, with some impressive results.

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Does the smell of freshly spent two-stroke fuel give you goose bumps? Do you long for the days of short-travel suspension and limited rebound damping? Does the grease under your fingernails never really go away? If so, then you just might be a vintage enthusiast—even if you don’t know it yet. Put that theory to the test by checking out the photos and articles in the latest issue of AMA Racer. Issue No. 2 focuses on what makes racing old bikes so cool, with tons of information on this summer’s AMA Racing Vintage Grand Championships, going down July 24-26 at the Mid-Ohio Sports Car Course as part of AMA Vintage Motorcycle Days in Lexington, Ohio. The AMA Racing Vintage Grand Championships will crown national champions and award National No. 1 plates in vintage motocross, trials, dirttrack, hare scrambles and road racing. There are classes for both vintage and post-vintage machinery across a range of displacements, where riders as young as 12 years old can race motorcycles 249cc and smaller. Vet (30+), Senior (40+), Super Senior (50+) and Masters (60+) classes are also provided in some disciplines. Novice classes also will be run. For more info, see AmericanMotorcyclist. com/AMARacer/ and Days.com. AMAVintageMotorcycleDays.com.

Lapping the 37.73-mile mountain circuit that has made the Manx TT an icon of motorcycle racing, electric bikes from nine teams finished in two classes. The winning bike, from electric motor manufacturer Agni, lapped with an average speed of 87 mph. The fastest bike through the speed trap was timed at over 106 mph. For U.S. fans, the AMA eGrandPrix Introduction will feature several bikes from the TTX GP running spirited exhibition laps at this year’s AMA Vintage Motorcycle Days, set for July 24-26 at the Mid-Ohio Sports Car Course in Lexington Ohio. Info: AMAVintageMotorcycleDays.com.

Photos Chad Reed: Jeff Kardas; Electric Bikes: TTXGP

The Life | Adrenaline


Rookie Wins In SuMo

Patrick Smage laid the groundwork for a third AMA Racing/ NATC National Observed Trials Championship, with wins in Rounds 1 and 2 in Nehawka, Neb. It wasn’t easy for the Sherco rider, though, particularly in Round 1, after he got behind Gas-Gas USA’s Will Ibsen and Sherco’s Cody Webb at the end of the first lap. Smage kept his composure, though, and put himself in position to take the lead when his rivals faltered in the late stages. On Saturday, Smage led from the start. He increased his lead on Lap 2 after cleaning every section but one. Although Wineland and Webb finished strong, particulary in a notoriously difficult mud section, it was not enough to catch Smage. Webb was second, and Wineland rounded out the podium.—Shan Moore

Derek Costella, riding a Monster Energy Carter Powersports All Access Honda CRF450R, claimed the premier-class win at Round 3 of the AMA/XTRM Supermoto Championship in Las Vegas. It was a wild race, with both Mark Burkhart, racing for Monster Energy Burkhart Racing KTM, and Graves Motorsports Yamaha’s Brandon Currie going down while slicing toward the lead. Costella himself momentarily lost his rear brakes, letting CHM Exhaust rider Micky Dymond take the lead. Costella ultimately passed back Dymond, who survived a late charge by Troy Lee Designs Jeff Ward. Ward leads the points with 65 to CHM Exhaust rider Sylvain Bidart’s 62. Burkhart is 3 points back in third.

Shakeup In Vegas

Hancock Hauls At AMA Racing/USA Speedway Opener Sets Sites On Eighth National Championship

Greg Hancock isn’t just racing the field in the 2009 AMA Racing/USA Speedway National Championship series. He’s also racing to claim sole ownership of a record he currently shares with speedway racer Mike Bast. Both Hancock and Bast sit at the top of the record books with seven national titles each. If Hancock keeps performing like he did at the season opener at the worldfamous Costa Mesa Speedway, he will soon put even the legendary Bast in his rear-view mirror. Hancock finished the night with a

perfect score in the heats, a holeshot in the main and by leading every lap to the win. Although defending National Champion Billy Janniro tried a number of lines high and low to get around Hancock, he couldn’t make a pass stick and had to settle for second. This was the fourth straight year the AMA Racing/USA Speedway National Championship Series has kicked off at Costa Mesa Speedway. For Round 2, the series moves to Fast Fridays Motorcycle Speedway at the Gold Country Fairgrounds in Auburn, Calif.

FOR MORE DETAILS, VISIT THE RIDING SE CTION OF AMERICANMOTOR CYCLIST.COM

Comes Out Strong In Trials Opener

April 18-19, 2009 Bybee , TN • May 2-3, 2009 Buck Meadows, CA May 30-31, 2009 Waben • May 16-17, 2009 Za o, WI • May 30-31, 200 leski, OH 9 Mill Hall, PA • June June 19-20, 2009 Logan 6-7, 2009 Hood River, , OH • August 28-31, OR 2009 North Cascades Sept. 19-20, 2009 Mo , WA • Sept. 12-13, 200 rganton, NC • Sept. 199 Cadiz, KY 20, 2009 Sterling, IL Sept. 26-27, 2009 Co • Sept. 26-27, 2009 Lo lumbus, IN • Sept. 26gan, OH 27, 2009 Wabeno, WI Oct. 10-11, 2009 Hamm • Oct. 3-4, 2009, 2009 onton, NJ • Oct. 24-25, TBA, KY 2009 Delta, AL • Oct. Oct. 31 - Nov. 1, 2009 24-25, 2009 Payson, Port Elizabeth, NJ • AZ Nov. 7-8, 2009 Jenkin s, NJ • Nov. 27-28, 200 9 Los Angeles, CA

Photos Trials: Shan Moore; Supermoto: Scott Hoffman; Speedway: Brad Pappalardo

Smage Gets Two


High Roller

The 1924 ACE Was New When The AMA Was Born

Photos Open Image Studio

It was 1924. The Roaring ’20s were in full swing, the American Motorcyclist Association had just been formed, and the princely sum of $400 would buy you a powerful, lightweight, sporting ACE. ACE was the brainchild of William Henderson, who found himself at creative odds with his employer, the Excelsior Motor Manufacturing and Supply Co. While Excelsior was focusing on beefy, heavyweight motorcycles, Henderson preferred to build lighter and sportier machines, so he left to form his own company in 1919. Henderson and Max Sladkin of Haverford Cycle Co. joined forces and founded the ACE Motor Corp. in Philadelphia. Henderson was chief engineer, and he again turned to the four-cylinder concept he had used so successfully. As a result of his agreement with Excelsior, he had to be careful to design a completely different machine from the bikes he designed earlier, which he did. When the ACE was introduced in 1920, it was met with favorable reviews. Production of the machine was slow in the first year, but by 1922 the factory

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was going strong, and ACE was on stable footing. The company even made a name for itself in then-popular longdistance and cross-country contests. Erwin “Cannonball” Baker himself set a transcontinental motorcycle record on an ACE in 1922. Unfortunately, the ACE Motor Corp. didn’t survive long. Henderson was tragically killed in 1922, when a speeding car came out of a side street and hit him while he was testing an ACE Sporting Solo. ACE produced its last machine in 1924, though the name was sold and bikes were produced intermittently through 1927. This 1924 ACE is an example of one of the last machines built by the company. It features a 78-cubic-inch (1,278cc) four-cylinder motor, a threespeed transmission, 27-inch wheels and a 59-inch wheelbase. The standard model featured iron pistons, while another $20 got you the Sporting Solo model, with aluminum pistons. It is just one of the many historic machines owned by the AMA Motorcycle Hall of Fame Museum at AMA headquarters in Pickerington, Ohio.

Heritage features the machines and people of the AMA’s Motorcycle Hall of Fame Museum in Pickerington, Ohio. The Museum is a 501(c)3 non-profit corporation that receives support from the AMA and from motorcycling enthusiasts. For info and directions, visit MotorcycleMuseum.org, or call (614) 856-2222.


Heritage

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ght hts Riding to New Heights

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For 85 Years, the American Motorcyclist Association has been promoting and protecting the motorcycling lifestyle...

85 years is no small amount of time.

Since the American Motorcyclist Association was born in 1924, we’ve been through 14 presidents, a World War and more than a few societal changes. Motorcycle companies have risen, fallen, and in some cases risen again, while motorcycles have gone from finicky, low-compression gentleman’s tourers to high-tech, fuel-injected machines that have welcomed generations of new riders. Through it all, the AMA has been the one organization focused on uniting riders and their passions, with the mission of promoting the motorcycle lifestyle and protecting the future of motorcycling. It’s been an amazing journey, and on the occasion of our 85th anniversary, we’ve taken a step back to reflect on the events of the last eight and a half decades to salute riders like you who have made it all possible. It’s because of you that today – and tomorrow – we’re able to enjoy the fullness of our favorite pastime. by the staff of American Motorcyclist


1920s 1920sand and’30s ’30s The AMA GeTs ITs sTArT, MoTorcyclInG Grows At the dawn of the 20th Century, there were hundreds of U.S. motorcycle makers, and bikes were tools of transportation, not recreation. Henry Ford’s 1908 Model T changed all that, and motorcycles became objects of sport and pleasure. Out of that new focus, the American Motorcyclist Association was born in 1924 as a way to unite riders and promote their passion.

{ off To A

sTronG sTArT The first-ever AMAsanctioned race is believed to be the second National Six-Days Trial in 1924, with a start/ finish in Cleveland and covering five states and 1,357.9 miles. Despite factory riders, the best score went to private rider John Yake of Pennsylvania. As reported: “To begin with, get it out of your head that the six Days Trial is six days of pleasure touring, as it is generally defined. There is pleasure in it and heaps of satisfaction for the honest-to-goodness red-blooded sportsman who takes joy in excelling in his favorite sport.”

“ how fAsT wIll IT Go? As long as there have been motorcycles, the question has been asked. And with its mission split between competition and recreational riding, the AMA has long been a part of figuring out the answer. The AMA was there in 1924, when Freddie Ludlow, a former racing star, fired up this specially tuned Henderson DeLuxe and set a record of 127.1 miles per hour for the flying quarter mile. Special equipment involved included firestone tires pumped to 100 psi and the hammered metal streamlining on the rear of the bike designed to close the air smoothly behind the rider.

1920s and ’30s Some of the most popular events in the AMA’s early years were “Gypsy Tours.” These were held on a single weekend throughout the country, featuring rides to scenic locations for picnics, races and field meets involving such motorcycle games as slow races, stake races and plank riding. A 1935 Gypsy Tour in Keene, N.H., featured a 200-mile TT race, and attracted a massive crowd far in excess of the 15,000 who watched the race. Said AMA Secretary E.C. Smith: “To accurately state or even estimate the number of riders present at the Tour would be an impossibility.”

1924

American Motorcycle Association is born May 15 out of the former Riders’ Division of the Motorcycle & Allied Trades Association, with the goal of uniting and providing activities for riders. “The slogan of the AMA will be: An Organized Minority Can Always Defeat an Unorganized Majority.” (Western Motorcyclist and Bicyclist, May 20, 1924)

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A number of clubs that were chartered by the AMA in 1924 are still with the Association: the Billings (Mont.) Motorcycle Club; the Bridgeport (Conn.) Motorcycle Association; the Dayton (Ohio) Motorcycle Club, The Galesburg (Ill.) Motorcycle Club; the Lansing (Mich.) Motorcycle Club, The Madison (Wis.) Motorcycle Club; the Midwest Motorcycle Club in Indianapolis; The New Jersey Motorcycle Club in Bergenfield; The Reading (Pa.) Motorcycle Club; the San Francisco Motorcycle Club and the Yonkers Motorcycle Club in Mt. Vernon, N.Y.

1928

A full-time secretary is hired for the AMA in October: E.C. Smith, a former referee for the Federation of American Motorcyclists and the M&ATA, and offices were established in columbus, ohio. The AMA offices remain within about 10 miles of that first location. Smith is now in the AMA Hall of Fame.


[ Thumbs up! With America in the early stages of recovery from the Great Depression, optimism was the thought for the new year in 1934. With AMA members looking for traction, AmA racing and riding gave riders plenty of reasons for hope.

[ scouring The globe From the start, the AMA hung its helmet on events for riders, both racing and recreational riding, and uniting riders. Early successes of AMA Secretary E.C. Smith were outlined in one story from 1930: “That his work has proved successful goes almost without saying. The AMA is 300 percent stronger than last year, the sanctions granted last year number more than a hundred over the previous year, more clubs belong to the Association than before... E.C. Smith also stated that all adverse legislation was being watched very carefully in all of the states.”

[ sTick And bAll, meeT moTorcycle Think motorcycle racing in stadiums is a new thing? Think again. In 1931, cinder-track racing made its debut in New York’s Yankee Stadium, where 5,000 people watched races under the then-novel electric lights. Stars like Ginger Bower, of South Africa (above) wowed the fans, and the spectacle had both sound and fury, judging by the description of the secondplace finisher Murad Smit: “He rode a Scott job that at speed sounds like a soul in agony, but it is a fast and hot pot.”

is there such a thing as too much motorcycling? In our estimation, no—and that was the prevailing thought as well in the 1930-era AMA. In 1931, back-to-back weekend events in Syracuse and Rochester, N.Y., were cause not only for comment, but celebration.

1920s On the racing side, “Class A” racing is the pinnacle of competition, with a formula that allowed manufacturers to build exotic one-off racing machines. Factory teams spent large sums on racebike development and hired top riders like Jim Davis and Joe Petrali to claim championships. 1930s The financial realities of the Great Depression bring lower-cost productionbased racing to AMA competition. As E.C. Smith wrote: “Without a doubt, Class C competition is going to revolutionize motorcycle activities and you are going to see more good riders developing this year than for many a year, and with competition much hotter than ever before.’’

For motorcycle manufacturers, there was no better way to sell motorcycles and fire the imagination than transcontinental motorcycle runs, and the ’30s saw dozens of new records set as roads and machines improved. In 1935 alone, Earl Robinson went from New York to Los Angeles in 77 hours and 53 minutes on a Harley-Davidson; and Fred Ham made a three-flag run on another Harley from the Canadian Border at Blaine, Wash., to Tijuana, Mexico, in 28 hours and 7 minutes.

1935

American motorcycle racers arrive on the world stage in high style, with u.s. night speedway ace Jack milne claiming the World speedway title in front of 85,000 fans in England’s Wembley Stadium. Astonishingly, Americans Lammy Lamoreaux and Cody Milne, Jack’s brother, finished second and third. “The feat of the Americans in capturing the world championship and finishing one-two-three in the great championship races may well be imagined a hard pill for the British speedway fan to take,” said one report. “If this is the case there seems to have been no evidence of it at the big Wembley affair for the performance of the three Americans was wildly cheered.”

1937

The first-ever Daytona 200 is held on a course made up of sandy beach, part of Florida Route A1A paralleling it, and two 180-degree turns on the ends. To win the inaugural event, “Ironman” Ed Kretz had to battle not only a large field of racers, but also an incoming tide that narrowed the beach straightaway throughout the race.

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1940s 1940sand and’50s ’50s THE WAR YEARS AND BEYOND America was drawn into World War II as the ’40s began, and the AMA did its part, curtailing activities to conserve gas and rubber rations, and starting the publication that became the one you’re reading now as a way to hold motorcyclists together for the duration. And when the war was finally won, motorcyclists were ready to get back to what mattered: riding, racing and enjoying life.

AMERICAN MOTORCYCISTS GO TO WAR Even before the U.S. joined WWII, manufacturers and riders prepared. While Harley-Davidson and Indian built military models, the U.S. Army taught soldiers to ride and maintain motorycles. “While these courses, naturally, do not make expert riders, they do furnish a foundation upon which to build with experience,” editors wrote. Many American motorcycles also were sent to allied armies, and motorcycles even replaced horses in one of Canada’s calvary units as the 2nd Canadian Motorcycle Regiment.

{ GIRL RIDERS From the beginning, women riders were considered an important part of the motorcyclng world, and that continued in the 1940s. Many women chose to ride their own machines, and women’s activities were regularly spotlighted in the pages of American Motorcyclist. One popular yearly feature was the “Typical Girl Rider” contest, where clubs would nominate entries and members would select a winner.

” 1944 “From War to Peace” read the headline on the November,1944 issue. “The Second World War is over, and with it, the hope that never again will the youth of our Country be called upon to bear arms against the enemy. As the news flashed around the world, we could visualize some of the thoughts of our fellow members, who just four years ago were gathered at Springfield for the National Championship dirt-track races with not a care in the world.”

As America prepared for war, so did the motorcycle industry, and members of the AMA. By mid-1941, the pages of the AMA publication (The Motorcyclist, at the time) were increasingly focusing on motorcycles used in military training, and in civilian defense.

1941

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With the U.S. pulled into World War II, AMA Secretary E.C. Smith needed a way to keep the then 23,000-member AMA together for the duration, and American Motorcycle Association News was created. The inhouse publication was sent free to every member, including those in the military. To do its part in times of rationing, events and races were curtailed, and the 1942 Gypsy Tour cancellation alone was expected to save 200,000 gallons of gas. “The important objective is to win this war. Nothing else matters,” editors wrote.

1943

“The Greatest News in Motorcycle History,” proclaimed the headline of the Nov. 1 issue of American Motorcycle Association News. Though a bit overstated, the editors’ announcement of the creation of American Motorcycling, a new monthly magazine that would ultimately become the magazine you’re reading right now, clearly showed the AMA’s excitement.

1946


{ IMAGE AND REALITY It was the picture that today’s motorcyclists are still living down: The July 21, 1947, Life magazine photograph of a drunken motorcyclist in Hollister, Calif. It was the image and 116-word caption that became the basis for the Marlon Brando movie The Wild One, which created the bad-boy image of motorcyclists that persists even today. Meanwhile, in the real world, rallies and Gypsy Tours became popular as post-war riders took to the roads in record numbers. Typical rally activities included plank rides that tested riders’ balance, egg grabs that saw riders weave among cones while passengers grabbed eggs placed upon them, and a rousing game of “bite the weenie” that was far harder than it looked.

[ MAKING THE SCENE Hanging out on Daytona’s Main Street while the motorcycling world parades by has been fun since the beginning, and Bike Week really took off in the 1950s. With the race still taking place on the beach north of the pier, Daytona reasserted its position as the official kick-off to the riding season.

If it could be done on a motorcycle, it was probably tried in the carefree 1950s, when America’s youth culture turned to bikes in a big way. From speed attempts to races to precision riding—and even to cat-suit-sporting acrobatic riders who performed on police motorcycles for a 1951 Los Angeles benefit show, motorcycles were coming on strong. American and British machines dominated, though by the end of the decade, Japanese companies like Yamaha and Honda had arrived. Few realized at the time how the small-bore, high-revving, reliable machines would change motorcycling forever. {

” 1950s With the war behind them, America’s motorcyclists got down to the business of having fun. One of the most evocative events held throughout the 1960s was the Catalina Grand Prix, which threaded the serpentine, mountainous roads of Catalina Island off the California coast. As the U.S. answer to the Manx Grand Prix, it was won by a host of riders, including Bud Ekins, Steve McQueen’s stunt double in The Great Escape.

Since its founding in 1924, the AMA has long been concerned with the image of motorcycling and motorcycle sound. In 1948, the Association launched its popular “Muffler Mike” character who delivered the message: Shut up.

1948

For most riders of the day, motorcycling meant road-riding. But for a hearty few, off-road enduro racing was the only way to go, and the long-running twoday Jack Pine Enduro in Michigan was the granddaddy of them all. In 1952, Frank Piasecki rode his BSA to victory in one of the most epic Jack Pines ever, thanks to torrential rains that nearly washed out the course.

1952

The decade started with most motorcycle land-speed records having been set in Europe, but when motorcycles started running on the Bonneville Salt Flats near Wendover, Utah, the official home of motorcycle speed became the U.S. In fact, since John Allen went 193.730 mph in 1956 (a record he topped a few months later at 214.40 mph), every motorcycle absolute land-speed record has been set on the salt flats.

1956

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1960s 1960sand and’70s ’70s THE AMA FIGHTS LAWS, AND BOOMERS RIDE As the Organization Man gave way to the Summer of Love, the AMA found itself more and more at the center of fighting for motorcyclists’ rights, and it expanded its one-man government staff into a full-on Legislative Department. Meanwhile, the Japanese motorcycle invasion that started with small-bore step-throughs and Honda’s “the nicest people” advertising campaign came of age with boomer riders.

” SAFETY FIRST As motorcycles became more popular in the 1960s, the AMA and others started pushing for greater rider safety and heightened motorcyclist awareness by other road users—important goals of the AMA even today. Partnering with other motorcycling groups was key even in 1966, when the AMA worked with the Motorcycle, Scooter and Allied Trades Associaiton to urge members to “Join the Light Brigade” and turn on their headlights during the day to increase visibility. Even California legislators Philip Soto and Richard Donovan got in on the act. The family that plays together... Motorcyclists have long known that riding is a family sport, and that was only more apparent as the post-war Baby Boomers started having kids. From trail-riding on mini-bikes with their parents to going along for the ride on the road, the kids of AMA members got their own starts in motorcycling. In the case of the five-member Curtis Brown family of Pomona, Calif., that meant expanding sidecar accommodations so everyone could go along on the popular AMA-sanctioned Death Valley Run. The sidecar even sported a transistor radio for added entertainment. {

” Holy Cow! Since the early days of the Victor McLaglin Motorcycle Corps, riders have sought to master their machines—sometimes with impressive results. Harry Smith explained in 1961 how he perfected flips on a ladder mounted to a motorcycle. The short answer? Practice. “No matter how expert, how cautious and how intelligent he is,” Smith said. “The performer willl have to carry his college degrees with him to prove he’s not an idiot.”

It was the end of one era, and the start of another: The Daytona 200 motorcycle race, held in various forms since 1937 on the beach course, moved to the all new Daytona Speedway as development along the once-deserted beach and Florida Route A1A had outpaced the race. Brad Andres and HarleyDavidson were the last winners on the beach course.

1960

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Adventure-touring has always been popular, from the earliest days when venturing to the next town was an adventure, to the long-range runs of Erwin G. “Cannonball” Baker, to the 1961 adventure of Danny Liska, who paused in his trip from Alaska to Tierra del Fuego, Equador, to offer advice in the pages of American Motorcycling for riders, including: “Do not surrender your passport without a signed receipt and a written statement explaining why...under these conditions the officer will decide he will overlook the fault in your papers.”

1961

A rash of legislation in the 1960s showed how important government relations activities would become to the future of motorcycling, and throughout the decade, the Motor Scooter & Allied Trades Association began to focus efforts on behalf of the motorcycle industry, while the AMA focused on laws affecting riders. The AMA’s legislative effort was created in 1966 with the mission to “coordinate national legal activity against unconstitutional and discriminatory laws against motorcyclists, to serve as a sentinel on federal and state legislation affecting motorcyclists, and to be instrumental as a lobbying force for motorcyclists and motorcycling interests.”

1966


” 1960s Thanks to the development of lightweight two-stroke off-road machines, a heightened enthusiasm for scrambles, enduro riding and desert racing took hold in the U.S. In 1961, the AMA approved rules for a new form of racing called moto-cross. Borrowed from postwar Europe, the sport was similar to scrambles and differed only in scoring methods.

Out of Committee Recognizing that predicted motorcycling growth throughout the 1970s would draw even more attention toward anti-motorcycling forces, the AMA ups its government affairs efforts by forming a new Legislative Department in 1970. Said Chet Winter, the department’s first head: “We can protect the individual motorcyclist from legislative error or outright harassment only by repealing existing laws or blocking laws adverse to motorcycling.”

IN THE SPOTLIGHT In the early ’60s, a win in the Daytona 200 also got you a whirlwind tour of New York and an appearance on NBC’s Today Show. In 1962, American Motorcycling highlighted winner Don Burnett’s trip, which, despite a four-hour plane delay on the flight up, included seven minutes on national TV, 15 minutes on a radio sports show and other appearances. “

[ 1968 Grand National dirt-track racing picked up steam after the first World War, and it only gained in popularity through the 1960s, to the point where, in 1968, an indoor shorttrack was held in the Houston Astrodome. A paddock full of name riders, from Gary Nixon, Mert Lawwill, Dick Mann, Cal Rayborn, Roger Reiman and Bart Markel made the start line, with National No. 1 Nixon taking the win.

The AMA has long recognized the contributions of the Motor Maids to motorcycling, and it noted in 1968 that one of its most colorful members had reached the million-mile mark: then-Motor-Maid President Dot Robinson. With husband Earl, Dot competed in many events including the Jack Pine Enduro, and she became well-known for her trademark pink motorcycle.

1968

Honda motorcycles may have started in the U.S. with a 50cc stepthrough, an advertising slogan of “You Meet The Nicest People On A Honda,” and a slowly growing line of bikes. But by 1969, Japanese motorcycles were a powerful part of the U.S. market, culminating in the release of what is arguably the first superbike, the Honda CB750 inline four-cylinder, in 1969.

1969

Realizing the threat that loud motorcycles posed to indoor competition, the AMA instituted a 100-decibel limit on all hard-floor indoor races. The first test was at the January Madison Square Garden indoor short-track, where all machines were sound-tested, some were modified, and the average sound level for the machines was a successful 94 decibels.

1971

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1970s 1970sand and’80s ’80s MOTORCYCLISTS RISING The first U.S. World Champion may have come in speedway racing in 1937, but the ’70s and ’80s saw the rise of AMA dirt-track racers who took over the top spots in World Championship Grand Prix road racing, while AMA motocross and AMA Supercross drew the world’s best. Meanwhile, the threats to motorcycling, particularly against street riders, only accelerated and the AMA fought back.

{ 1980s Government intrusion into motorcycling ramped up in the 1980s, and the AMA fought the good fight on behalf of its members and all motorcyclists.

“ NOBODY DOES IT BETTER Disco was all the rage, hedonism ruled, America was celebrating its bicentennial, and the AMA came up with a T-shirt that fit the Me Generation perfectly. And how could you make it look even cooler? Add models with passing resemblances to Gabe Kaplan and Farrah Fawcett, of course.

[ HIT THE ROAD With more baby boomers taking to bikes, motorcycle touring was gaining popularity through the 1970s. Innovators such as Craig Vetter created an industry catering to tourers with windshields and hard bags, and manufacturers followed suit by creating the full-dress touring category by the end of the decade. Through it all, what many touring riders really needed after a day in the saddle was a great place to camp and a fire.

” 1979 At the height of the Ralph Nader “unsafe at any speed” era,

the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration took it upon itself to redesign the motorcycle, correcting a few “safety defects.” The result, uncovered by the AMA, was the “Backwards Bike,” which, its designers claimed, was more stable and offered greater crash protection. There was just one problem: In its only test, it reportedly proved unridable.

There have always been women competitors, but the first-ever woman in AMA history to earn an expert license in dirt-track was Diane Cox of Salem, Ore., in 1975 at the age of 18. A year later, she became the first woman to qualify for a national championship program, with a scratch heat position at the Houston Astrodome Short Track National. In 1977, she campaigned the back-up machine of Grand National Champion Gary Scott.

1974

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During the summer of 1976, the name of the AMA was changed to the American Motorcyclist Association to better reflect its service to motorcyclists.

1976

His skills honed with two AMA Grand National Championship titles, Kenny Roberts headed to Europe to compete against the world’s best road-racers. Winning the world title three years in a row, Roberts revolutionized road-racing with the steer-from-the-rear dirt-track style, and paved the way for others (such as Freddie Spencer) to follow his trail to Europe. Spencer ultimately won another three championships, making the point that Americans were contenders on the world stage.

1978


{ 1980s The face of motorcycling was changing, as the so-called “Rich Urban Biker” was coming of age. Generally well-off, perhaps with some motorcycle history in their youths, middle-age-and-older riders were returning to the sport, and no one personified the type more than AMA member and Forbes magazine founder Malcolm Forbes, an avid convert to motorcycling. As he said in an interview in American Motorcyclist at the time: “I don’t know if ‘serious’ is the right word. ‘Enthusiastic,’ maybe. Whatever I’ve gotten into, it’s because I have found it a turn-on.”

” SUPERBIKE

[ RACING GONE TO THE DOGS If you’ve seen On Any Sunday, you likely remember Kookie, the boxer-pitbull-basenji mix who rode on owner John McCown’s gas tank during races. By 1981, though, it was Kookie’s offspring, KJ, who was out there with McCown. “I just think it’s the love and the rapport you have that makes them want to be there with you,’’ he said.

[ WE ARE THE CHAMPIONS It was a total Cinderella story when Team USA— Danny LaPorte, Donnie Hansen, Johnny O’Mara and Chuck Sun—showed up for the 1981 Motocross des Nations and became the first-ever Americans to win the event. Since then, Americans have won the event 18 more times, reinforcing the U.S. position as the premier home of motocross.

BAN It was a potentially serious blow to motorcycling: Sen. John Danforth of Missouri in 1987 introduced a bill to stop the sale of high-performance motorcycles, based on flawed logic from an insurance-industry backed study. With help from AMA members, the AMA fought the measure, and ultimately convinced Danforth to withdraw his bill.

A SCIENTIFIC CRASH STUDY Until AMA Hall of Famer and Prof. Harry Hurt actually went out and studied motorcycle crashes in the late ’70s to learn exactly what caused them, the best anyone had were guesses. Turned out that left-turning cars were the single biggest precipitator of motorcycle crashes, and unlicensed riders wearing minimal protective gear and riding new-to-them motorcycles were over-represented in crashes. Until another study is completed (it’s in the works), the 28-year-old “Hurt Report” is still the best information on motorcycle crashes available. {

It took three years of effort, but the AMA was ultimately able to help reverse a St. Louis ban on motorcycles in its parks, illustrating how difficult legislative battles attles often require tenacity.

1982

We may take it for granted now, but back in the 1980s, motorcyclists simply sim weren’t allowed in High-Occupany Vehicle Veh lanes, designed to promote gas savings, on federal f highways. Thanks to work by the National Natio Motorcycle Commuters Association, along with the AMA and its members, to get the proper prope language inserted into a highway bill, we are now. no

1989

Blacklisted. State Farm, the largest insurer of motorcycles at the time, wouldn’t write policies for 38 sport-styled machines, meaning that even if you could buy one of those bikes, you couldn’t insure it. AMA officials met with top State Farm officials who rescinded the blacklist several weeks later.

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1990s 1990sand and’00s ’00s STRENGTHENING NUMBERS As the AMA enjoyed continued growth, passing the 200,000-member mark, some of the winningest racers of all-time emerged, from “Mr. Daytona” Scott Russell to Jeremy McGrath to Ricky Carmichael. The AMA’s growing influence also helped it to fend off threats of insurance discrimination, bike bans and more, while anti-motorcycling forces vowed to keep up the pressure against motorcyclists.

THE KING OF SUPERCROSS As it turned out, 1996 was only the middle of Jeremy McGrath’s charge to become the most dominant AMA Supercross rider of any era. He followed up his fourth title with three more, earning titles on two brands of motorycles: Honda and Yamaha. Ricky Carmichael may have ultimately won more combined MX/SX titles, but McGrath still holds the SX title record. “

” NO, YOU’RE NOT COVERED As the ’90s dawned, motorcyclists faced a new threat: insurance companies that wanted to deny benefit coverage for any injuries received when one of their policyholders was riding a motorcycle. The AMA and its members went to Congress, and got a federal law made to end insurance discrimination. Unfortunately, when federal agencies wrote the rules that interpreted Congress’ intentions, they actually upheld discrimination. It’s a battle the AMA is still fighting today on behalf of all motorcyclists.

” 1990 On August 16, 1990, the longtime vision of preserving motorcycling history became a reality when the AMA’s Motorcycle Heritage Museum officially opened its doors to over 4,000 motorcycle enthusiasts and dignitaries gathered for the occasion. The inaugural exhibits focused on “Women in Motorcycling’’ and “Decades of Development,’’ which showcased over 80 antique and classic motorcycles.

The AMA launched its Pro-Rider campaign that used famous racers, such as former World Grand Prix Champion “Fast” Freddie Spencer, to encourage motorcyclists to ride responsibly. That involved being licensed, wearing protective gear and avoiding drinking and riding.

1990

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Scott Russell edged out Doug Polen at the line to earn the first of his five Daytona 200 Superbike race wins in the 1990s. His record-setting achievement ultimately earned him the nickname “Mr. Daytona.”

1992

In 1994 through 1998, Scotty Parker became the first rider in history to win five straight AMA Grand National Championships. Before he retired in 2000, he earned nine titles and had 94 national wins.

1998

The AMA reaches the 200,000 member mark. Tom Porrier of Granville, N.Y., was the 200,000th member.

1993

BROWSE MORE AMA HISTORY ONLINE If this cruise down memory lane has made you all misty-eyed for motorcycling’s years gone by, the fix is as close as books.google.com. Just search there for “American Motorcyclist” and you can browse (or search) nearly every issue of this magazine from the 1950s on. Check it out! AmericanMotorcyclist.com


Photos Wildereness: Royce Wood; Lead Ban: Conrad Lim

” KEEP OUT The threats keep coming at motorcyclists, especially off-road, where federal “Wilderness” designations, designed for lands that are substantially untouched by human hands, are applied more and more broadly to close down motorized recreation to vast acreages of managed public lands. The AMA and its members are continuing the fight.

[ RENEWED FOCUS As part of a new

THE ERA OF THE CUSTOM If there was one big trend in motorcycling through the ’90s and ’00s, it was the rise of the custom chopper. A longtime staple of motorcycle shows, custom choppers busted out to a high-profile art exhibit at New York’s Guggenheim Museum, then to TV and popular culture, with bike-builders elevated to near-rock-star status. {

emphasis on putting AMA members at the center of everything it does, the Association redesigned the magazine you are reading now. With a spotlight shining on the stories of members, we’re launching the AMA into its next 85 years.

“ A NEW WAY FORWARD In 2008, the AMA announced the sale of AMA Pro Racing assets to the Daytona Motorsports Group, the organization best positioned to help professional racing grow. AMA President and CEO Rob Dingman rededicated the AMA to its members, with more benefits and, in 2009, free AMA Roadside Assistance.

2009 In one of the h bigges biggest potential threats of the decade, kids’ dirtbikes and ATVs are under siege. A consumer product safety law aimed at banning lead in toys for kids under 12 ensnared youth OHVs. Some 80,000 AMA members, the industry and rider groups ban together to earn a delay in the ban’s enforcement, but the final chapter on the law itself is yet to be written. {

After three years burning up the 125 class of AMA Motocross and eclipsing every record there—most wins, most consecutive wins, most championships—Ricky Carmichael made the jump to the 250cc class at the Daytona Supercross and preceded to do the same—even after jumping to 450s. By the time he retired from competition in 2007 he had amassed 150 National wins—far more than any other rider, ever, earning him the nickname “GOAT”: The Greatest Of All Time.

2000

The winningest rider in AMA Superbike, Mat Mladin, takes a moment to talk to AMA members in American Motorcyclist: “We’re having a good time, mate, and that’s the thing, you know. We’re racing motorcycles and having a bit of fun, and that’s the bottom line.”

2006

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Go Ride [

A few of the hundreds of AMA-sanctioned events this month, detailed on the following pages.

]

1

5

4

2 3

1

A week of amateur racing action is set for Aug. 1-9 at the Straddleline ORV Park just north of Elma, Wash. Dubbed “WORCS Bike Week,” the festivities will include two rounds of the WORCS Hare Scrambles series, an AMA Western Hare Scrambles round, a WORCS X-cross and a motocross-only race. Info: WORCSracing.com.

2

AMA Vintage Motorcycle Days promises to be bigger and better than ever this year at the Mid-Ohio Sports Car Course in Lexington, Ohio, July 2426. Info: VintageMotorcycleDays.com.

3

Have fun riding and help raise money for medical research as well. The Kansas City Ride for Kids will be held July 26 with registration starting at 7:30 a.m. at Johnson County Community College in Overland Park, Kan. The

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ride begins at 9:30 a.m. the minimum donation is $35. The money benefits the Pediatric Brain Tumor Foundation. Info: Pbtfus.org/rideforkids.

4

If you’re looking for a thrilling dual-sport ride then check out the event set for Aug. 22-23 in McCloud, Calif. Hosted by Norcal DualSport, this event is part of the AMA KTM National Dual-Sport Trail Riding Series. All-day routes go to locations such as Trinity County’s high alpine lakes, Medicine Lake and Lava Beds National Park. This event is the first of its kind out of the Mount Shasta Board and Ski Park. Info: Norcaldualsport.com.

5

Sturgis! If you’re a motorcyclist then you know what that means: A weeklong motorcycling extravaganza. The Jackpine Gypsies Motorcycle Club

is holding its gypsy tour Aug. 4 in Sturgis, S.D. Info: (605) 920-1156.

COMING UP The best of the best amateur road racers in the nation will compete on neutral ground Sept. 10-13 in the AMA Racing Road Race Grand Championships at the Mid-Ohio Sports Car Course in Lexington, Ohio. Not only will racers be vying for national No. 1 plates, but they will also compete for the prestigious AMA Horizon Award, which will be awarded to the one amateur racer who has a bright professional career in the offing. Info: (614) 856-1900. One of the biggest road rallies on the planet will take place Sept. 16-20 in Ruidoso, N.M. It’s called the Golden Aspen Rally, and it attracts tens of thousands of motorcyclists. It’s a national convention in the AMA Premier Touring Series. Info: Ron Andrews (800) 4528045; motorcyclerally.com.


THE

GUiDE TO EvENTS

The following pages list AMAsanctioned events for this month, up to date at press time. Current listings are in the Riding and Racing sections of www. AmericanMotorcyclist.com. The biggest events—pro races, national-championship amateur competition, and major rides and rallies—are highlighted in color boxes.

Type of Event Date

For these series, we list all of the remaining events for the entire year. Then there are the local events, the backbone of the AMA’s riding and racing calendar. These events are listed by state and are broken down by type, so you can quickly find the ones near you. Here’s a guide to what you’ll find in these local listings:

Event Class (Competition events only) S - Standard (Amateur classes) Y - Youth Classes T - ATV classes G - Progressive M - Pro-Am classes Location/City

AMA Superbike Championship Daytona Motorsports Group AMASuperbike.com July 17-19: Lexington, Ohio: Mid-Ohio Sports Car Course; (800) MID-OHIO; midohio.com * July 31-Aug. 2: Topeka, Kan.: Heartland Park Topeka; (800) 43-RACES; hpt.com

Lucas Oil AMA Pro Motocross Championship MXNationals.com Event Promoter

MOTOCROSS

AUG 6 (S,T,Y): REYNOLDS (D-9): SILVER DOLLAR MX, C/O STEVE JONES; 6 AM; HWY 96 W/JST W OF TWN; (478) 555-4673 Sign-in Time Directions

AMA PRO RACiNG

Contact Phone Number

July 18: Millville, Minn.: Spring Creek Motocross; springcreekmx.com July 25: Washougal, Wash.: Washougal MX Park; washougalmxpk.com

AMA Pro Flat Track Championship AMAProRacing.com

ALABAMA

SPEEDWAY STADIUM-SACRAMENTO ST; (530) 878-7223

July 18: Greenville, Ohio: Darke County Fairgrounds; Half-mile.

COLORADO

July 25: Hagerstown, Md.: Hagerstown Speedway; Half-mile.

MOTOCROSS

Aug. 4: Rapid City, S.D.: Black Hills Speedway; Half-mile.

AUG 2 (S,T,Y): LAKEWOOD (D-25): COLORADO MOTORSPORTS PROM, DAVID CLABAUGH; 701 S ROONEY RD /SEE WEBSITE FOR DETAILS; (303) 988-5026

AMA Pro XTRM Supermoto Championship

ROAD RALLY AUG 1 (R): TALLADEGA (D-43): MARCH OF DIMES-AL, GINA THOMPSON; 9 AM; TALLADEGA MOTOR SPEEDWAY /I-65 TO TOWN; (205) 824-0103

CALiFORNiA ROAD RUN AUG 9 (R): CULVER CITY (D-37): SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA MOTOR, BLAKE ANDERSON; 7 AM; ‘OLD PIN RIDE’; (310) 345-9799

POKER RUN AUG 9 (R): SAN JOSE (D-36): SAN JOSE DONS MOTORCYCLE, BRUCE COLBOURN; 9 AM; SAN JOSE HARLEY /1550 PARKMORE; (408) 655-7956

AUG 16 (S,Y): MILLIKEN (D-25): TWO RIVERS RACING LLC, DAVID LEAHY; 6 AM; 22437 WELD CT RD 19; (970) 587-5770 AUG 23 (S,T,Y): LAKEWOOD (D-25): COLORADO MOTORSPORTS PROM, DAVID CLABAUGH; 5:30 AM; 701 S ROONEY RD / SEE WEBSITE FOR DETAILS; (303) 988-5026 AUG 23 (S,Y): DACONO (D-25): IMI MOTORSPORTS INC, BRAD LINKUS; 8:10 AM; 5074 SUMMIT BLVD; (303) 833-4949

ADvENTURE RiDE AUG 8 (R): MCCLOUD (D-36): : 2 DAY EVENT: NORCAL DUAL SPORT, TROY RAUH; 8 AM; MOUNT SHASTA SKI PARK; (530) 262-1342

DUAL SPORT RiDE AUG 1 (R): BIG BEAR LAKE (D-37): BIG BEAR TRAIL RIDERS CLU, JIM NICHOLSON; 6 PM; BIG BEAR LAKE CONVENTION CTR /42900 BIG BEAR BLVD; (818) 391-3031 AUG 15 (R): STONYFORD (D-36): 2 DAY EVENT: RICHMOND RAMBLERS MC, BRAD BELLAH; 8 AM AUG 22 (R): MCCLOUD (D-36): : 2 DAY EVENT: NORCAL DUAL SPORT, TROY RAUH; 8 AM; MOUNT SHASTA SKI PARK; (530) 262-1342

SCRAMBLES AUG 8 (S,T,Y): AUG 15 (S,T,Y): LODI (D-36): LODI MOTORCYCLE CLUB, JEFF G TAYLOR; 2 PM; 5801 E MORSE RD; (209) 368-7182

BiKE SHOW AUG 16 (R): HADDAM NECK (D-1) : BRITISH IRON ASSOCIATION, KENNETH WOOLLEY; 10 AM; HADDAM NECK FAIRGROUNDS /3 MILES S ON RT 151 W/INTERSECTION W/RT 66; (860) 585-5102

DELAWARE ROAD RUN AUG 29 (R): SMYRNA (D-7) : MOTORCYCLE ACCIDENT VICTI, JIM BOB GOLDEN; 10 AM; MIKE’S FARMS 450 STADIUM ST; (302) 378-3701

iLLiNOiS AUG 16 (R): OTTAWA (D-17): VARIETY RIDERS MOTORCYCLE, STEVE CHURCHILL; 8 AM; ROUTE 6 WEST /1 MI W ON RT 6; (815) 4343669

1/2 MiLE DiRT TRACK AUG 7 (S,Y): KNOXVILLE (D-17): M & M RACING, MIKE CAVES; 12 PM; KNOX CO FAIRGROUNDS /I-74 EXIT 51; (309) 335-3724

MOTOCROSS

AUG 29 (V,Y): TAYLORVILLE (D-17): OZARK MT ATV RACEWAY, ROY REED; (417) 683-1667

AUG 8 (S,T,Y): RIVERSIDE (D-37): 2 DAY EVENT: RACERS MC, DOUG EVANS; 8 AM; MILESTONE RANCH MX PARK; (951) 6864669

SPEEDWAY AUG 21 (S,Y): AUBURN (D-36): FAST FRIDAYS SPEEDWAY, DAVID A JOINER; 6:30 PM; FAST FRIDAYS MC SPEEDWAY STAD /MC

AMA Pro Hillclimb Champioinship

* Sept. 4-6: Millville, N.J.: New Jersey Motorsports Park; (866) 550-NJMP; njmotorsportspark.com Oct. 16-18: Daytona Beach, Fla.: 8 Hours at Daytona; Daytona Int’l Speedway * Pending rider safety committee evaluation

Aug. 15: New Berlin, N.Y.: Unadilla Valley Sports Center; unadillamx.com Aug. 22: Budds Creek, Md.: Budds Creek Motocross Park; buddscreek.com Aug. 29: Southwick, Mass.: Moto-X 338; moto338.com Sept. 5: Delmont, Penn.: Steel City Raceway; steelcitymx.com

Aug. 16: Grove City, Ohio: Buelah Park; Mile. Aug. 23: Peoria, ill.: Peoria Race Park; TT. Aug. 29: indianapolis, ind.: Indiana State Fairgrounds: Mile. Sept. 5-6: Springfield, Ill.: Illinois State Fairgrounds: Short track, Mile. Oct. 24: Pomona, Calif.: L.A. County Fairgrounds: Half-mile.

Games; (866) 367-9289 Sept 6: Salt Lake City, Utah: Miller Motorsports; (866) 367-9289 Sept 20: Mammoth Lakes, Calif.: Mammoth Mountain; (866) 367-9289 Productions.

AMAProRacing.com

Sept. 13: Steel City, Pa.: Bushkill Valley Motorcycle Club.

July 26: Avoca, N.Y.: Avoca-Howard Hillclimb.

Sept. 27: Jefferson (York Co.), Pa.: White Rose Motorcycle Club.

Aug. 16: Dansville, N.Y.: Poags Hole

Oct. 11: Oregonia, Ohio: Dayton Motorcycle Club.

MUSEUM EXHiBiTS AMA Motorcycle Hall Of Fame Museum MotorcycleMuseum.org The Museum is located on the AMA campus in Pickerington, Ohio, and is open 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. seven days a week year-round except for Easter, Thanksgiving, Christmas and New Year’s Day.

Sept 12: Pickerington, Ohio: AMA Motorcycle Hall of Fame Open House; (614) 856-2222. Dec 5: Hard Rock Hotel & Casino, Las vegas: AMA Motorcycle Hall of Fame Induction Ceremony; (614) 856-2222.

MotoStars: Celebrities + Motorcycles: Priceless machines, exclusive memorabilia and tales from celebrities’ favorite adventures. On display through February 2010. Awesome-Ness: The life and art of Arlen Ness: King of Choppers. On display through June 2009. Red Bikes: Large-format photographic prints by artist and motorcycle aficionado Dawn Deppi. AMA Motorcycle Hall of Fame: Bikes and memorabilia recognizing those who have made significant contributions to all aspects of motorcycling. Founder’s Hall: Honoring the Museum’s generous contributors.

REC TRAiL RiDE

AUG 23 (S,T,Y): LUCERNE VALLEY (D-37): INVADERS MC, AL GUZMAN; NORTH ANDERSON STAGING AREA; (760) 244-7368

AUG 2 (S,T,Y): ADELANTO (D-37): AMA-DIST 37 SPORTS COMM, BILL HOWELL; 6 AM; RACETOWN 395; (760) 220-6575

Aug. 1: Los Angeles, Calif.: Summer X

CONNECTiCUT

SHORT TRACK AUG 1 (S,T,Y): AUG 29 (S,T,Y): LODI (D-36): LODI MOTORCYCLE CLUB, JEFF G TAYLOR; 2 PM; 5801 E MORSE RD; (209) 368-7182

AMASupermoto.com

Aug. 14-16: Alton, va.: Virginia International Raceway; (303) 377-3278; virclub.com

SHORT TRACK AUG 22 (M,Y): GALESBURG (D-17): GALESBURG MOTORCYCLE CLUB, ROBERT D FELL; 12 PM; 7 MI N OF GALESBURG RT US 150; (309) 344-1714

SCRAMBLES AUG 29 (S,T): FOSTERBURG (D-18): SPLINTER CREEK DIRT RIDER, TODD E ROMANN; 6:30 AM; 255N TO FOSTERBURG RD/N TO

TERPENING LN/LEFT; (618) 593-7603

HiLLCLiMB

AUG 7 (S,T,Y): WESTVILLE (D-17): PLEASURE RIDERS MC, MARK SCHROEDER; IL-IN BORDER S OF DANVILLE /FRM DANVILLE: S ON IL RT 1/E ON MAIN; (217) 477-3191

AUG 1 (S,Y): WHITE CITY (D-17): CAHOKIA CREEK DIRT RIDERS, BOBBY G BROWN; 3 PM; I-55 EXIT 44 HWY 138 WEST 2 MI; (618) 946-4316

AUG 16 (S,T,Y): MASON (D-17): CROSSROADS MX, NADINE DARLING; 6:30 AM; 15 MI S OF EFFINGHAM; (618) 686-2769

AUG 8 (S,T,Y): MT VERNON (D-17): KING CITY DIRT RIDERS INC, BUZZ GREEN; 6 PM; RT 37N TO IDLEWOOD RD E TO DIRT RIDERS LANE; (618) 244-2538

AUG 23 (S,Y): KANE (D-17): GREENE ACRES MX, KRISTI GREENE; 7 AM; HWY 67 N OF ALTON /7 MI N OF JERSEYVILLE/R@SIGN 2 MI; (217) 942-6444

AUG 9 (S,T,Y): MT VERNON (D-17): KING CITY DIRT RIDERS INC, BUZZ GREEN; 10 AM; RT 37N TO IDLEWOOD RD E TO DIRT RIDERS LANE; (618) 244-2538

AUG 30 (S,T,Y): GALESBURG (D-17): GALESBURG MOTORCYCLE CLUB, ROBERT D FELL; 6 AM; 7 MI N OF GALESBURG RT US 150; (309) 344-1714

MOTOCROSS

HARE SCRAMBLES

AUG 2 (S,T,Y): AUG 16 (S,T,Y): BYRON (D-17): MOTOSPORTS ENTERPRISES LT, AARON J VINCER; 6 AM; 2525 E ASH ROAD; (815) 234-2271

AUG 16 (S,T): FOSTERBURG (D18): SPLINTER CREEK DIRT RIDER, MATT REYNOLDS; 6:30 AM; 255N TO FOSTERBURG RD/N TO TERPENING LN/ LEFT; (314) 517-2112

August 2009

51


OBSERVED TRIALS AUG 8 (S,Y): LENA (D-17): 2 DAY EVENT: NORTHERN ILLINOIS TRIALS, JENNIFER MAUPIN; 9 AM; 8835 IL RT 73 N; (630) 690-1625 AUG 30 (S): OTTAWA (D-17): VARIETY RIDERS MOTORCYCLE, STEVE CHURCHILL; 8 AM; ROUTE 6 WEST /1 MI W ON RT 6; (815) 434-3669

INDIANA ROAD RUN AUG 30 (R): INDIANAPOLIS (D-15): PEDIATRIC BRAIN TUMOR FOU, KYLE CLACK; 4:45 PM; INDIANAPOLIS MOTOR SPEEDWAY /4790 W 16 ST; (800) 253-6530

MOTOCROSS AUG 16 (S,T,Y): ROSSVILLE (D-15): WILDCAT CREEK MX, DEMETRIUS KNOP; 6 AM; 6390 S WILDWOOD /I-65 TO LAFAYETTE/SR26E TO TOWN; (765) 379-2482 AUG 23 (S,T,Y): KINGSBURY (D-15): MOTOLAND - IN, RICK HOLLAWAY; 6 AM; 7264 S FIRST RD /SEE WEBSITE; (219) 988-6686

HARE SCRAMBLES AUG 2 (S,Y): BEDFORD (D-15): HOOSIER TRAIL RIDERS, RANDY A SICHTING; 8 AM; BARTLETTSVILLE IN /FOLLOW ARROWS; (765) 516-0214 AUG 16 (S,Y): COLUMBUS (D-15): STONEY LONESOME MOTORCYCL, BEN BREEDLOVE; 8 AM; 6 MILES W I-65 ON ST ROAD 46; (812) 350-5732

ENDURO AUG 15 (S): ROSELAWN (D-15): HILL & GULLY RIDERS, JOHN C RYAN; 9 AM; RT 10&55/I-65 TO RT 10 W TO START; (708) 424-1969 AUG 16 (S): ROSELAWN (D-15): HILL & GULLY RIDERS, JOHN C RYAN; 7 AM; RT 10&55/I-65 TO RT 10 W TO START; (708) 424-1969

DRAG RACES AUG 1 (S): INDIANAPOLIS (D-15): 2 DAY EVENT: AMA DRAGBIKE, BRANDI NEITHAMER; 9 AM; OREILLY RACEWAY PARK; (513) 943-9700

AUG 15 (S,T,Y): NEWAYGO (D-14): 2 DAY EVENT: BIG AIR MOTOCROSS, MATT POWERS; 4 PM; 1262 SPRING DRIVE; (231) 652-5225

AUG 15 (U): E FREETOWN (D-1) : PILGRIM SANDS TRAIL RIDER, GORDON B COYLE; 7 AM; DE MORANVILLE FARM/ CHACE RD /ARROWED FROM EXIT 8 ON RT 140; (781) 2948355

AUG 22 (S,T,Y): AUG 23 (S,T,Y): BATTLE CREEK (D-14): BATTLE CREEK MOTORCYCLE C, JOSEPH D WATHEN; 6 AM; CLBGRNDS/21758 WAUBASCON RD /HELMER N TO MORGAN/E TO WAUBESCON/N 3 MI; (269) 729-9691

OBSERVED TRIALS

AUG 29 (S,Y): MIDLAND (D-14): 2 DAY EVENT: POLKA DOTS M/C, BOB SHINABARGAR; 7 AM; 760 W BROOKS RD /8 MI N OF M46 OR 5 MI S OF M20; (989) 832-8284

AUG 22 (S,Y): WRENTHAM (D-1) : 2 DAY EVENT: KING PHILIP TRAIL RIDERS, JAMES COPELAND; 9 AM; NORTH ST /1 MILE NORTH OF WRENTHAM CENTER ON RT 1A; (401) 934-2633

MICHIGAN ROAD RUN AUG 23 (R): ANN ARBOR (D-14): PEDIATRIC BRAIN TUMOR FOU, KYLE CLACK; 8 AM; WASHTENAW COMM COLLEGE /4800 E HURON RIVER DR; (800) 253-6530

FIELD MEET

OBSERVED TRIALS AUG 8 (S,Y): AUG 9 (S,Y): ROSE CITY (D-14): MICHIGAN ONTARIO TRIALS A, BOB CAPISTRANT; 9 AM; BENT WHEELS COMP CLUBGROUNDS /I-75N EX 202/M-33N TO TOWN; (810) 750-5258

DUAL SPORT RIDE AUG 23 (R): ANN ARBOR (D-14): PEDIATRIC BRAIN TUMOR FOU, KYLE CLACK; 8 AM; WASHTENAW COMM COLLEGE /4800 E HURON RIVER DR; (800) 253-6530

1/2 MILE DIRT TRACK AUG 1 (S,T): ADRIAN (D-14): BOULIS RACING, ETHEL M BOULIS; LENAWEE COUNTY FAIRGROUNDS; (810) 686-7083 AUG 21 (S,T): MIDLAND (D-14): BOULIS RACING, ETHEL M BOULIS; MIDLAND CO FAIRGROUNDS /1-75 TO EASTMAN RD EXIT; (810) 686-7083

AUG 8 (S,T,Y): AUG 29 (S,T,Y): DEFORD (D-14): LUCKY THUMB MOTORCYCLE CL, GENELDA J STOLZMAN; 7 AM; 7394 BEVENS RD /3 MI N OF M46 & M53/2 MI W; (989) 635-2282

AUG 15 (S,T,Y): AUG 29 (S,T,Y): CEDAR RAPIDS (D-22): CEDAR VALLEY TRAIL RIDERS, CURT HEJDA; 1 PM; HAWKEYE DOWNS /4400 6TH ST SW; (319) 363-7800

SCRAMBLES

HARE SCRAMBLES

AUG 9 (S): AUG 30 (S): DEFORD (D-14): LUCKY THUMB MOTORCYCLE CL, GENELDA J STOLZMAN; 6 AM; 7394 BEVENS RD /3 MI N OF M46 & M53/2 MI W; (989) 635-2282

AUG 2 (S,Y): MOUNT PLEASANT (D-22): BURLINGTON VALLEY DUSTERS, DAVID CROMER; GREENHURST FARM /2.3 MI S OF TOWN; (319) 753-6961

AUG 15 (S,T,Y): BRIDGETON (D-14): MUSKEGON MOTORCYCLE CLUB, RUSTY HANSON; 8 AM; DAN RAYMOND PK /112TH ST & GREEN AVE; (231) 726-6937

AUG 5 (S,Y): AUG 7 (S,Y): AUG 12 (S,Y): AUG 14 (S,Y): TIMONIUM (D-7) : BALTIMORE COUNTY TRAIL RI, RUSS IRVIN; 3 PM; TIMONIUM FAIRGROUNDS; (410) 661-6686

MOTOCROSS AUG 21 (S,T,Y): BUDDS CREEK (D-7) : BUDDS CREEK MOTOCROSS PAR, JONATHAN E BEASLEY; 7 AM; BUDDS CREEK MX PARK /RT 301 S TO RT 234; (301) 475-2000

HILLCLIMB AUG 2 (S,Y): IRON MOUNTAIN (D-16): BIG BEAR TRAX LLC, CYNTHIA HALADA; 9 AM; US 2 TO PINE MOUNTAIN RD; (715) 674-7802 AUG 15 (S,Y): AUG 16 (S,Y): BRIDGETON (D-14): MUSKEGON MOTORCYCLE CLUB, RUSTY HANSON; 8 AM; DAN RAYMOND PK /112TH ST & GREEN AVE; (231) 726-6937

MOTOCROSS AUG 1 (S,T,Y): AUG 2 (S,T,Y): BRONSON (D-14): JB MX MOTORSPORTS, JEFF A BEERBOWER; 7 AM; LOG ROAD MX PARK /I-69 EX 13/W 10 MI TO LOG RD/S 1.5 MI; (419) 636-5430 AUG 1 (S,Y): AUG 2 (S,Y): AUG 22 (S,Y): AUG 23 (S,Y): BELDING (D-14): GRATTAN RACEWAY, HUGH FAASEN; 7201 LESSITER; (616) 691-7221 AUG 1 (V,Y): BUCHANAN (D-14): 2 DAY EVENT: RED BUD, AMY PFIFER; 13638 N REDBUD TRAIL /5 MI N OF US 12/GPS 41.851747.-86.367797; (269) 695-6405

AUG 21 (S,T,Y): AUG 22 (S,T,Y): BUDDS CREEK (D-7) : BUDDS CREEK MOTOCROSS PAR, JONATHAN E BEASLEY; 6 PM; BUDDS CREEK MX PARK /RT 301 S TO RT 234; (301) 4752000

AUG 8 (S,T,Y): CRYSTAL FALLS (D-16): 2 DAY EVENT: VALLEY RACEWAY, ERIC J UREN; 6 AM; 128 WIGGINS RD /1 MI S OF TOWN ON HWY US 2; (906) 875-0269

AUG 23 (S,T,Y): BUDDS CREEK (D-7) : BUDDS CREEK MOTOCROSS PAR, JONATHAN E BEASLEY; BUDDS CREEK MX PARK /RT 301 S TO RT 234; (301) 475-2000

AUG 9 (S,T): CADILLAC (D-14): CADILLAC MOTORCYCLE CLUB, RICK AUGUSTON; 7 AM; CLBGRNDS/3747 S 39 RD /.25 MI N OF 34 RD ON 39 RD; (231) 884-3729

MASSACHUSETTS

AUG 9 (V,Y): NEWAYGO (D-14): BIG AIR MOTOCROSS, MATT POWERS; 1262 SPRING DRIVE; (231) 652-5225

ROAD RUN

AmericanMotorcyclist.com

ENDURO

AUG 16 (R): FARMINGTON HILL(D-14): SOARING CHICKENS, GARY SARGE GRIFFIS; 11 AM; MOTORCITY HARLEY /34900 GRAND RIVER; (248) 473-7433

AUG 8 (S,T,Y): MONTEZUMA (D-22): 2 DAY EVENT: FV MOTOX, CHIP BRYAN; 7 AM; FUN VALLEY SKI AREA /1066 500TH AVE/ 2.5 MI SW OF TOWN; (641) 623-3456

SHORT TRACK

AUG 23 (S,T,Y): BENTLEY (D-14): VALLEY TRAIL RIDERS, BRADLEY L BOTZAU; 7 AM; 4957 E BROWN RD; (989) 8796397

POKER RUN

SHORT TRACK

MARYLAND

AUG 16 (S,T,Y): BRONSON (D-14): JB MX MOTORSPORTS, JEFF A BEERBOWER; 7 AM; LOG ROAD MX PARK /I-69 EX 13/W 10 MI TO LOG RD/S 1.5 MI; (419) 636-5430

AUG 9 (S,Y): MARQUETTE (D-14): UP SANDSTORMER MC & ATV C, FRANK SHEPECK; MARQUETTE COUNTY FAIRGROUNDS /2 MI S OF CR 480 & CR553 JUNCTION; (906) 233-9721

MOTOCROSS

AUG 22 (R): FLORENCE (D-10): MARCH OF DIMES-OH DAYTON, KARA KASEE; 11:30 AM; 7500 TURFWAY ROAD / CONTACT OFFICE; (513) 769-3588

HARE SCRAMBLES

AUG 1 (R,Y): IRON MOUNTAIN (D-16): BIG BEAR TRAX LLC, CYNTHIA HALADA; 10 AM; US 2 TO PINE MOUNTAIN RD; (715) 674-7802

IOWA

ROAD RUN

M46 OR 5 MI S OF M20; (989) 832-8284

HARE SCRAMBLES

AUG 22 (S,T,Y): CROSWELL (D-14): PORT HURON MOTORCYCLE CLU, PATRICIA J WISNIEWSKI; 10 AM; CROSWELL FAIRGROUNDS /CALL FOR DIRECTIONS; (810) 327-1062

KENTUCKY

52

AUG 16 (R): NORTH OXFORD (D-1) : PEDIATRIC BRAIN TUMOR FOU, KYLE CLACK; 8 AM; WAL-MART PARKING LOT /742 MAIN ST(RT 12); (800) 253-6530

AUG 15 (S,T,Y): MIDLAND (D-14): 2 DAY EVENT: POLKA DOTS M/C, THOMAS WOODS; 7 AM; 760 W BROOKS RD /8 MI N OF

DRAG RACES AUG 14 (S,T,Y): BRIDGETON (D-14): MUSKEGON MOTORCYCLE CLUB, RUSS HANSON; 8 AM; DAN RAYMOND PK /112TH ST & GREEN AVE; (231) 726-6937

MINNESOTA REC TRAIL RIDE AUG 15 (R): AKELEY (D-23): 2 DAY EVENT: PAUL BUNYAN FOREST RIDERS, TOM BERNHARDT; STOMPIN’ GROUNDS /3 MILES NORTH OF TOWN ON HWY 64; (320) 333-9229

ROAD RALLY AUG 7 (R): WALKER (D-23): 2 DAY EVENT: MINNESOTA WINGS INC, LEE A SCULLY; 8 AM; HWY 371; (320) 363-8124

1/2 MILE DIRT TRACK AUG 1 (S,T,Y): ST CHARLES (D-23): 2 DAY EVENT: GOLDEN EAGLES C.C., MATT WITTLIEF; WINONA COUNTY FAIRGROUNDS; (507) 259-2935

HILLCLIMB AUG 15 (S,Y): NEW ULM (D-23): 2 DAY EVENT: FLYING DUTCHMEN CYCLE CLU, LESTER STADICK; 6 AM; CLUBGROUNDS /HWY 15S/68E/2 MI; (507) 354-2024 AUG 29 (S,T,Y): MANKATO (D-23): KATO CYCLE CLUB, JAMES R FLOREY; 19836 539TH LANE /7 MI S OF TOWN; (507) 6256505 AUG 30 (S,T,Y): NEW ULM (D-23): FLYING DUTCHMEN CYCLE CLU, LESTER STADICK; 6 AM; 5 MI S OF TOWN; (507) 3597704

MOTOCROSS AUG 2 (S,Y): AUG 9 (S,Y): BROOKSTON (D-23): ECHO VALLEY MOTOCROSS PAR, TERI LUND; 6 AM; 4650 LAVOY RD /10 MI W OF HWY 33 ON HWY2/MILE MARKER 235; (218) 348-4754 AUG 2 (S): MAZEPPA (D-23): HURRICANE HILLS MX PARK I, JEFFERY GRAY; 6:30 AM; 43560 232ND AVE /6 MI E OF ZUMBROTA ON CR10 TO 232ND AVE; (507) 843-5154 AUG 9 (S,Y): AUG 16 (V,Y): KELLOGG (D-23): MOTOKAZIE INC, LEE M THEIS; 6:30 AM; MIDWAY MX /58374 HWY 42; (952) 601-1169 AUG 16 (S,Y): AUG 30 (S,Y): MILLVILLE (D-23): HI WINDERS, JOHN C MARTIN; SPRING CREEK MX PARK /63633 298TH AVE/9 MI E OF ZUMBRO FALLS/HWY60; (507) 753-2779 AUG 16 (S,Y): AUG 23 (V,Y): AUG 30 (S,Y): CAMBRIDGE (D23): RTW RACE PROMOTIONS, JEFF M OLDENBURG; 7 AM; HWY95 TO HWY 47 /1 MI ON LEFT; (320) 980-4419 AUG 23 (S,Y): BROOK PARK (D-23): BERM BENDERS RACEWAY, KURT CASWELL; 6:30 AM; HWY 23E 8 MI TO SHERWOOD ST CR 68N; (320) 679-2582 AUG 23 (S,Y): ELKO (D-23): MOTOKAZIE INC, LEE M THEIS; 6:30 AM; ELKO MX/26350 FRANCE AVE /GPS/N44,34.20528/ W093,19.73688; (952) 601-1169

HARE SCRAMBLES AUG 30 (S): BRUNO (D-23): NORTHERN LITES MC, BRETT


HARDY; 7 AM; N HWY 23 TO TOWN/E ON 43/S ON CR22/ EASTON 148; (218) 829-7985

ENDURO AUG 8 (S,Y): AKELEY (D-23): PAUL BUNYAN FOREST RIDERS, JOE BERSCHEID; STOMPIN’ GROUNDS /3 MILES NORTH OF TOWN ON HWY 64; (218) 739-5525 AUG 22 (S,Y): DUQUETTE (D-23): 2 DAY EVENT: STRAIGHT ARROW ENDURO RID, JESSICA E KIGHT; 9 AM; DUQUETTE MN; (952) 996-9240

OBSERVED TRIALS AUG 22 (S,Y): AUG 23 (S,Y): GILBERT (D-23): UPPER MIDWEST TRIALS ASSO, GORDON BOGGIE; 9 AM; GILBERT OHV PARK /HWY 37E TO 135S; (952) 881-9427

NEBRASKA

AUG 16 (R): ISLIP TERRACE (D-34): AMERICAN SPIRIT-NY SUFFOL, EVERETT RUSHFORD; 9 AM; MERCY HAVEN /859 CONNETIQUOT AVE; (631) 277-8300 AUG 30 (R): FISHKILL (D-34): YONKERS MOTORCYCLE CLUB, BOBBY OAKLEY; 9 AM; SNOW VALLEY CAMP GROUND; (914) 663-2773

REC TRAIL RIDE AUG 8 (R): EAST QUOGUE (D-34): LONG ISLAND RECREATIONAL, ROBERT OTT; CENTRAL BLVD /PHEASANT RUN HUNT CLUB; (631) 345-2658

DUAL SPORT RIDE AUG 8 (R): HANCOCK (D-3): 2 DAY EVENT: BEAR CREEK SPORTSMEN, LINDA RIZZON; FIREMANS FIELD /RT 17 TO HANCOCK EXIT/ARROWED; (973) 953-6308

FOU, KYLE CLACK; 7 AM; BILTMORE SQ MALL /800 BREVARD RD (NC 191); (800) 253-6530

MOTOCROSS AUG 8 (S,T,Y): ELIZABETH CITY (D-29): 2 DAY EVENT: ELIZABETH CITY MOTORCYCLE, WENDY J TABLER; 6 AM; 1531 NORTHSIDE RD; (252) 771-5442 AUG 16 (S,T,Y): REIDSVILLE (D-29): BOXSTAR SPORTS LLC, CHAD LOUGH; 3:30 PM; ROLLING HILLS CYCLE PARK /156 MOTOCROSS TRAIL; (336) 577-2067 AUG 23 (S,T,Y): IRON STATION (D-29): IRON STATION MOTORSPORTS, AL LANE; 6 AM; 3636 E HWY 27 /INT HWYS 27E & 73; (704) 732-8200

OHIO

BINGO RUN

RELIABLITY RUN

AUG 2 (R): QUEENSBURY (D-3): ADIRONDACK RIDERS OF GLEN, SANDRA CORENTTO; 10 AM; MCDONALDS /I-87 NORTHWAY EXIT 18; (518) 792-1713

AUG 8 (R): TORONTO (D-12): OHIO VALLEY BSA OWNERS CL, BUD KUBENA; 9 AM; CABLE’S CAMPGROUND /COUNTY RD 56; (724) 945-6018

FUN RUN

FIELD MEET

NEVADA

AUG 23 (R): MINEOLA (D-34): NASSAU WINGS, JAIME A CRUZ; 9 AM; 336 JERICHO TPKE; (516) 420-0896

AUG 21 (R): HAMILTON (D-11): TRAIN MRO INC, MIKE BALLARD TWISTED SPOKE PRE STURGIS CAMPOUT;

ADVENTURE RIDE

1/2 MILE DIRT TRACK

POKER RUN

AUG 22 (R): FALLON (D-26): 8 DAY EVENT: COUNTDOWN, JERRY L COUNTS; 8 AM;;

AUG 1 (S,T,Y): HARPURSVILLE (D-3): SQUARE DEAL RIDERS M/C, CRAIG ESTELLE; 2 PM; ALLEN RD; (607) 206-5494

NEW JERSEY

AUG 16 (S,Y): WEST LEBANON (D-3): ELECTRIC CITY RIDERS, FRANK J CARPINELLO; 8 AM; 1746 US ROUTE 20; (518) 542-2144

AUG 9 (R): AKRON (D-12): GREATER AKRON MC, PAT TENNEY; 8 AM; 3000 KREBS DR /TADMOR TEMPLE; (330) 655-2525

DISTRICT RALLY AUG 8 (R): BEATRICE (D-33): 2 DAY EVENT: NEBRASKA BMW NIGHTRIDERS, LYNN WENZBAURER; 12 AM; FRANKLIN COUNTY FAIR GROUNDS; (402) 499-4876

ROAD RUN AUG 30 (R): MORRIS PLAINS (D-2) : TRI COUNTY MOTORCYCLE CLU, ED ZUZOCK JR; 9 AM; VFW RT 53 MORRIS PLAINS /RT 53 MORRIS PLAINS NEW JERSEY; (862) 432-2065

BIKE SHOW AUG 15 (R): MT HOLLY (D-6) : 2 DAY EVENT: MOTORCYCLISTS FOR JESUS M, FREDERICK MCCLINCY; 11 AM; 1135 SMITHVILLE RD /.5 MI W OF INTERSECTION RT 206/RT 537; (215) 234-8611

MOTOCROSS AUG 1 (S,T,Y): AUG 2 (S,T,Y): AUG 15 (S,T,Y): AUG 16 (S,Y): ENGLISHTOWN (D-2) : RACEWAY PARK, RICHARD SCHMIDT; 7 AM; 230 PENSION RD; (732) 446-7800

ENDURO AUG 30 (S): MAURICETOWN (D-2) : COMPETITION DIRT RIDERS, DAVID BOSTROM; MAURICETOWN FIRE HALL / NOBLE ST; (856) 696-4783

NEW MEXICO OBSERVED TRIALS AUG 7 (S,Y): LAS VEGAS (D-45): 3 DAY EVENT: INTERNATIONAL TRIALS SCHO, BILL MARKHAM; 8 AM; WITTERS RANCH /21 COUNTY RD A19B; (719) 942-3372

SHORT TRACK AUG 9 (S,T,Y): PATTERSONVILLE (D-3): ELECTRIC CITY RIDERS, FRANK J CARPINELLO; 8 AM; 1142 BATTER STREET; (518) 477-2552 AUG 23 (S,T,Y): PATTERSONVILLE (D-3): ELECTRIC CITY RIDERS, FRANK J CARPINELLO; 8 AM; 1142 BATTER STREET; (518) 542-2144

MOTOCROSS AUG 2 (S,T,Y): CAROGA LAKE (D-3): ROYAL MOUNTAIN SKI AREA, JIM BLAISE; 6 AM; 3072 RT 10; (518) 835-6445 AUG 9 (S,T,Y): AUG 23 (S,T,Y): AUBURN (D-4): FROZEN OCEAN MOTOCROSS IN, BILL M DENMAN; 7 AM; 4415 VANDERSTOUW RD /NYS THRUWAY EX 40 TO 34S; (315) 784-5466

AUG 9 (R): NEW CITY (D-34): SPORT TOURING MC, LAUREN M SECULAR; 4 PM; 260 N LITTLE TOR ROAD; (845) 634-4648 AUG 16 (R): EAST MEADOW (D-34): ALLIANCE MC, ARTHUR CORETTE; HOOTERS /1740 HEMPSTEAD TURNPIKE; (516) 509-8143 AUG 30 (R): STATEN ISLAND (D-34): MARCH OF DIMES-NY LONG IS, ANNETTE KOSAR; 9 AM; 2655 RICHMOND AVE / STATEN ISLAND MALL; (516) 496-8442

FIELD MEET AUG 2 (R): WANTAGH (D-34): QUEENSBORO MC, PHILIP ROSEMAN; 4 PM; WANTAGH PARK; (646) 789-5750

POKER RUN

AUG 7 (R): TIFFIN (D-12): 2 DAY EVENT: INDIAN 4 CYLINDER MC CLUB, ROBERT MARKEY; 8 AM; TIFFIN CO FRGRNDS / OFF RT 224/HOPEWELL AVE.; AUG 13 (R): BELLEFONTAINE (D-12): 3 DAY EVENT: LOGAN COUNTY RALLY AT THE, CANDACE WATSON; 9 AM; 301 EAST LAKE AVE /US RT 33 TO RT 540 EXIT FOLLOW SIGNS; (937) 599-2016

CARNIVAL RUN

SWAP MEETS

AUG 29 (S,T,Y): WALLKILL (D-34): WALDEN MX, KAREN HILLEY; 7 AM; ROUTE 300; (973) 875-1216 AUG 29 (S,T,Y): MEXICO (D-3): 2 DAY EVENT: SMX ASSOCIATES LLC, AL MORGAN; 7 AM; 3098 SR11; (315) 668-7195

AUG 2 (S,T,Y): KING FERRY (D-4): CAYUGA COUNTY RIDERS INC, LARRY E BARNES; CENTER RD; (315) 364-8087

AUG 9 (R): BAYSHORE (D-34): LONG ISLAND VTX RIDERS, GARY BENANTI; 9:30 AM; 1460 N CLINTON AVE; (631) 4353737

ROAD RALLY

AUG 14 (M,Y): AUG 16 (S,Y): NEW BERLIN (D-3): UNADILLA VALLEY SPORTS CE, JILL ROBINSON; 6 AM; 5986 STATE HWY 8 /5 MI N OF TOWN/20 MI S OF UTICA; (607) 965-8784

TRAIL RIDE

AUG 2 (R): CENTRAL VALLEY (D-34): PEDIATRIC BRAIN TUMOR FOU, KYLE CLACK; 8 AM; CENTRAL VALLEY ELEMENTARY SCHL /45 RTE 32, EX 16 OFF I87; (800) 2536530

AUG 9 (R): WELLSTON (D-11): APPALACHIAN DIRT RIDERS I, WILLIAM DEPUE; 9 AM; 5 MI E OF TOWN/SR32@CHARLES BIERHUP RD N; (740) 384-6379

AUG 8 (R): BROOKVILLE (D-11): MOTORCYCLISTS FOR JESUS M, KARL WARDLAW; 9 AM; GOLDEN GATE PARK /I-70W EXIT 21; (937) 833-3818

HARE SCRAMBLES

ROAD RUN

AUG 2 (R): NEWARK (D-11): LICKING COUNTY TRAIL RIDE, JOHN J DEVITO; 10 AM; 7091 BROWNSVILLE RD SE /3 MI N OF BROWNSVILLE ON SR668; (740) 281-6761

AUG 14 (S,Y): NEW BERLIN (D-3): UNADILLA VALLEY SPORTS CE, JILL ROBINSON; 6 AM; 5986 ST HWY 8; (607) 965-8784

NEW YORK AUG 15 (R): HANCOCK (D-3) : BEAR CREEK SPORTSMEN, CARL DAVIS; 9 AM; FIREMENS FIELD /RT 17 TO EXIT 87 OR ROUTE 97 FOLLOW ARROWS; (607) 637-3431

DUAL SPORT RIDE

AUG 9 (S,T,Y): SOUTH EDMESTON (D-3) : THUNDER RIDGE SPORTS/JK R, JIM SIMMONS; 6 AM; 224 MICHAEL LANE /1 MI S OF TOWN/HWY 18; (607) 847-6520 AUG 30 (S,T,Y): CORTLAND (D-3) : KNOBBY ACRES ASSOCIATION, CYNTHIA DAVIS; SEARS RD /RT 13N TO 281N TO 222W TO SEARS RD; (607) 756-5277

ENDURO AUG 16 (S,Y): BERKSHIRE (D-4): ITHACA DIRT RIDERS INC, CHARLES E DAVIS; 8935 WEST CREEK RD; (607) 657-8248

OBSERVED TRIALS AUG 9 (S): CAYUTA (D-4): AMA-DIST 4 TRIALS COMMITT, ERIC REED; 10 AM; 6371 MORRELL RD; (607) 738-6424 AUG 15 (S): MEDINA (D-4): 2 DAY EVENT: NIAGARA TRIALS RIDERS, DARLENE LYNCH; 10 AM; BATES RD /RT 63 TO RT 31 TO BATES RD; (585) 798-2727 AUG 23 (S,Y): CUBA (D-4): AMA-DIST 4 TRIALS COMMITT, GEORGE BRINKWART; 10 AM; 47 ABBOTTS RD; (585) 2475508

AUG 7 (R): TORONTO (D-12): 3 DAY EVENT: OHIO VALLEY BSA OWNERS CL, BUD KUBENA; 8 AM; CABLE’S CAMPGROUND /COUNTY RD 56; (724) 945-6018

MOTOCROSS AUG 2 (S,Y): AUG 30 (S,Y): DAYTON (D-11): DAYTON MOTORCYCLE CLUB, KEVIN BOOHER; 6 AM; 3515 STONY HOLLOW RD /I-75/35W/S GETTYSBURG RD/LEFT; (937) 263-9321 AUG 2 (S,T,Y): MARYSVILLE (D-11): AMERICAN MOTOSPORTS LLC, MATTHEW D EASTMAN; UNION CTY FAIR /SR 33 TO TOWN TO SR4 EXIT; (937) 358-2427 AUG 5 (S,T,Y): GALLIPOLIS (D-11): AMERICAN MOTOSPORTS LLC, MATTHEW D EASTMAN; 4 PM; GALLIA COUNTY FAIR / OFF OF SR 35; (937) 358-2427 AUG 8 (S,Y): AUG 9 (S,Y): BLANCHESTER (D-11): DIRT COUNTRY, CINDY KING; 5 AM; 6901 RT 133 /3.5 MI S OF TOWN ON RT 133; (513) 625-7350 AUG 8 (S,T,Y): NELSONVILLE (D-11): FAST TRAXX PROMOTIONS LLC, SHAWNA BICKLEY; 8 AM; 5999 WARREN DR /BTWN ATHENS & TOWN ON RT 33; (740) 767-3740 AUG 13 (S,T,Y): CROTON (D-11): AMERICAN MOTOSPORTS LLC, MATTHEW D EASTMAN; 4 PM; HARTFORD INDEPENDENT FAIR /OFF OF SR 37; (937) 358-2427 AUG 14 (S,T,Y): CHILLICOTHE (D-11): AMERICAN MOTOSPORTS LLC, MATTHEW D EASTMAN; 4 PM; ROSS CO FAIR /N OF SR207 ON FAIRGROUNDS RD; (937) 358-2427 AUG 16 (S,Y): GREENVILLE (D-11): TREATY CITY MOTORCYCLE CL, DAN R KNECHT; 6:30 AM; 7270 MOTORCYCLE DR /3.5 MI W OF TOWN OFF ST RT 571; (937) 548-7197

ROAD RUN

AUG 19 (S,T,Y): ZANESVILLE (D-11): AMERICAN MOTOSPORTS LLC, MATTHEW D EASTMAN; 4 PM; MUSKINGUM CO FAIR /I-70 TO TOWN/EX 153 TO STATE ST/ SIGNS; (937) 358-2427

AUG 30 (R): ASHEVILLE (D-29): PEDIATRIC BRAIN TUMOR

AUG 22 (S,T,Y): AUG 23 (S,T,Y): BROADWAY (D-11): AMERICAN

NORTH CAROLINA

August 2009

53


AMA NATIONAL CHAMPIONSHIP SERIES AMA Rekluse National Enduro Championship Series presented by Moose Racing NationalEnduro.com July 19: Blain Picnic Grounds, Blain, Pa.: Jim Landvater, Susquehana Off Road Riders; (717) 533-

AMA Racing National Hare & Hound Sept. 26: Wendover, Nev.: Steve Rij, Utah Desert Foxes; (801) 964-8773; steve.bmp@att.net, utahdesertfoxes.com

MOTOSPORTS LLC, MATTHEW D EASTMAN; 7 AM; AMS MX TRACK /SR33 TO SR31N TO 347W R ON YEARSLEY RD; (937) 358-2427

2242; jktm300@yahoo.com, scrrmc.org

HARE SCRAMBLES

Aug. 9: Marquette, Mich.: Frank Shepeck, UP Sandstormers; (906) 233-9721; info@upsandstormers. com, upsandstormers.com

AUG 23 (S,T,Y): MARIETTA (D-11): PIONEER MOTORCYCLE CLUB I, RUTH HUGHES ST RT 339 TO WATERFORD, FOLLOW SIGNS; (740) 373-9566

Oct. 4: Upland Lions Club, Upland, Ind.: Brent Floyd, Muddobbers MC; befloyd@sweyzee.com, muddobbers.org

ENDURO

Oct. 3: Jericho, Utah: Karl Christman, Sageriders MC; (435) 650-0411; dezchik111@yahoo.com, sageriders.com Oct. 25: Lucerne Valley, Calif.: Tommy Russell, 100s MC; (760) 578-7943; 100smc.org

AUG 8 (S,T,Y): WELLSTON (D-11): APPALACHIAN DIRT RIDERS I, WILLIAM V DEPUE JR; 1 PM; 35520 LAKEVIEW RD HAMDEN,OH /5 MILES E WELLSON SR 32 @ BIERHUP RD NORTH; (740) 384-6379 AUG 23 (S): DAYTON (D-22): CENTRAL IOWA ENDURO RIDER, JIM SPENCER; 7 AM; 3 MI EAST ON HWY 175 /1 1/2 MILES SOUTH FOLLOW ARROWS; (515) 795-3440 AUG 30 (S): MC ARTHUR (D-11): ENDURO RIDERS ASSOCIATION, STEVE BARBER; VINTON CO JR FRGRNDS /1 MI N OF TOWN ON SR93; (614) 891-1369

AMA Dragbike

(513) 943-9700

OBSERVED TRIALS

AMADragbike.com

Oct. 10-11: Summit Motorsports Park, Norwalk, Ohio, AMA Dragbike; (513) 943-9700

Aug. 1-2: O’Reilly Raceway Park, Indianapolis, Ind., AMA Dragbike; (513) 943-9700

Nov. 13-15: South Georgia Motorsports Park, Valdosta, Ga., AMA Dragbike; (513) 943-9700

AUG 8 (S): TORONTO (D-12): OHIO VALLEY BSA OWNERS CL, BUD KUBENA; 9 AM; CABLE’S CAMPGROUND /COUNTY RD 56; (724) 945-6018

Sept. 12-13: Atco Raceway, Atco, N.J., AMA Dragbike;

Grand National Cross Country Series

284-0084; info@gnccracing.com

GNCCRacing.com

Oct 3-4: St. Clairsville, Ohio, Racer Productions; (304) 284-0084; info@gnccracing.com

Sep 12-13: New Berlin, N.Y., Racer Productions; (304) 284-0084; info@gnccracing.com

Oct 24-25: Crawfordsville, Ind., Racer Productions; (304) 284-0084; info@gnccracing.com

Sep 26-27: Yadkinville, N.C., Racer Productions; (304)

World Off-Road Championship Series

worcsracing.com

WORCSRacing.com

Sept. 18-20: Devore, Calif., (435) 635-1597; info@ worcsracing.com,

Aug. 1-2: Olympia, Wash., (435) 635-1597; info@ worcsracing.com Aug. 7-9: Olympia, Wash., (435) 635-1597; info@

Oct. 23-25: Mesquite, Nev., (435) 635-1597; info@ worcsracing.com

AMA EnduroCross Championship

sourceinterlink.com

Endurocross.com

Oct. 3: Schottenstein Center, Columbus, Ohio, Source Interlink Media Motorsports; endurocross@ sourceinterlink.com

July 25: The Orleans Arena, Las Vegas, Nev., Source Interlink Media Motorsports; endurocross@ sourceinterlink.com Aug 15: Lazy E Arena, Guthrie, Okla., Source Interlink Media Motorsports; endurocross@sourceinterlink.com Sept. 12: Florence Civic Center, Florence, S.C., Source Interlink Media Motorsports; endurocross@

AMA Racing East Hare Scrambles July 19: Newark Valley, N.Y.: Dan Leonard, Beaten Trails; (607) 657-8433; leonard13736@yahoo.com, wynoa.net July 26: Valley View, Pa.: Tiffany Tobias Raush, Creek Powersports; (570) 682-4600; tiffany@

Oct. 24: National Western Complex, Denver, Source Interlink Media Motorsports; endurocross@ sourceinterlink.com Nov. 21: The Orleans Arena, Las Vegas, Nev., Source Interlink Media Motorsports; endurocross@ sourceinterlink.com

rauschcreekracing.com, rauschcreekracing.com Sept. 20: Battle Creek, Mich.: Byron Kibby, Battle Creek MC; (296) 660-1613; snydergws@comcast.net, battlecreekmotorcycleclub.com Sept. 27: Yadkinville, N.C., Racer Productions; (304) 284-0084; info@gnccracing.com, gnccracing.com

GRAND PRIX AUG 8 (S,T,Y): AUG 9 (S,T,Y): NELSONVILLE (D-11): FAST TRAXX PROMOTIONS LLC, SHAWNA BICKLEY; 8 AM; 5999 WARREN DR /BTWN ATHENS & TOWN ON RT 33; (740) 7673740 AUG 16 (S,T,Y): ATHENS (D-11): ATHENS MOTORCYCLE CLUB, JIM BARNART; 8 AM; INTERSECTION 550 & 690; (740) 5926480 AUG 30 (S,T): LITTLE HOCKING (D-11): WILDWOOD LAKE RACEWAY, BRENT WINDLAND; 7 AM; 2392 WILDWOOD LAKE RD /SR50/7 TO SR555 TO WELCH RD TO WILDWOOD LAKE; (740) 989-2866

OKLAHOMA INDOOR ENDURO AUG 15 (S): GUTHRIE (D-21): INDOOR; SOURCE INTERLINK MEDIA, BECKY J KOONS; 10 AM; LAZY E ARENA; (817) 2466751

OREGON POKER RUN AUG 16 (R): TILLAMOOK (D-28): OREGON MOTORCYCLE RIDERS, ED ARINIELLO; 8 AM; DIAMOND MILL OHV AREA /12 MI E OF TOWN; (503) 794-3739

REC POKER RUN AUG 15 (R,T,Y): TILLAMOOK (D-28): LOBOS MC INC, BILLY TOMAN; 9 AM; JONES CR EX ON HWY 6 /LEE’S CAMP/W ON HWY 26/HWY 6/MP 23; (503) 656-5801

DUAL SPORT RIDE AUG 1 (R): TILLAMOOK (D-28): NORTHWEST TOUR & TRAIL, TOM NIEMELA; 7 AM; TILLAMOOK STATE FOREST /OFF HWY 6/JORDAN CREEK RD; (503) 681-8881

PENNSYLVANIA

AMA Racing East Youth Hare Scrambles

Trails; (607) 657-8433; leonard13736@yahoo.com, wynoa.net

July 18-19: Newark Valley, N.Y.: Dan Leonard, Beaten

Aug. 15: E. Freetown, Mass.: Gordie Coyle, Pilgrim Sands Trail Riders; (781) 294-8355; lila7796@aol. com, www.pstr.org

ROAD RUN AUG 9 (R): CRANBERRY TWP (D-5): PEDIATRIC BRAIN TUMOR FOU, KYLE CLACK; 8 AM; HOME DEPOT /PA TPKE EX 3/N TO 25 DUTILH RD; (800) 253-6530 AUG 15 (R): LEBANON (D-6): LEBANON VALLEY MOTORCYCLE, HENRIETTA STEINER; 8 AM; 11 S 22ND ST / RIDE FOR THE RED CHARITY RIDE; (717) 270-9797

AMA Racing West Hare Scrambles

westernharescrambles.com

WesternHareScrambles.com

Sept. 18-20: Glen Helen, Devore, Calif., Sean Reddish, Off Road Sports, info@westernharescrambles. com

AUG 29 (R): LEESPORT (D-6) : CLASSIC HARLEY-DAVIDSON, DOT BASILE; 3 PM; 983 JAMES DR /I MI N OF RT 222 ON RT 183; (610) 916-7777

Oct. 23-25: Mesquite, Mesquite, Nev., Sean Reddish, Off Road Sports, info@westernharescrambles. com

POKER RUN

Aug. 1-2: Straddleline OHV, Olympia, Wash., Sean Reddish, Off Road Sports, info@westernharescrambles. com Aug. 29-30: Bull Hollow Raceway, Monticello, Utah, Sean Reddish, Off Road Sports, info@

INTERNATIONAL SIX DAYS ENDURO Oct. 12-17: Figueira da Foz, Portugal: Federação Nacional de Motociclismo; fnm-geral@netcabo.pt; www.fnm.pt

AUG 9 (R): SCHUYLKILL HAVE(D-6): SCHUYLKILL COUNTY MOTORCY, GERALD V PAWLOWSKI; 9 AM; 958 SCHUYLKILL MTN RD /E OFF 183; (570) 385-1460 AUG 16 (R): KRESGEVILLE (D-6): ZINC CITY MOTORCYCLE CLUB, PHYLLIS KRESGE; 11 AM; STAR ROUTE BOX 31 / ROUTE 209 CLUBGROUNDS 1 MI S OF TOWN; (610) 681-9903 AUG 16 (R): BUCK (D-6): GENTLEMEN MC SPORTSMEN, DEAN VITATOE; 9 AM;; (717) 285-3710

DISTRICT TOUR AUG 23 (R): DALLAS (D-6): BACK MOUNTAIN ENDURO RIDE, MARTY NOON; 11 AM; CASTLE INN; (570) 675-1814

54

AmericanMotorcyclist.com


CARNIVAL RUN AUG 2 (R): LEBANON (D-6): LEBANON VALLEY MOTORCYCLE, HENRIETTA STEINER; 9 AM; 11 S 22ND ST; (717) 270-9797 AUG 23 (R): COLUMBIA (D-6): THUNDERBIRD MOTORCYCLE CL, SAM BRINTON; 11 AM; 1472 HABECKER RD /CALL FOR DIRECTIONS; (717) 898-0871 AUG 30 (R): BUCK (D-6): GENTLEMEN MC SPORTSMEN, DEAN VITATOE; 9 AM; CLUBGROUNDS /10 MI S OF LANCASTER ON 272; (717) 285-3710

AMA RACING AMATEUR CHAMPIONSHIPS AMA Racing/NATC East Youth Trials July 3-4: Sequatchie, Tenn.; itstrials.com.

AMA Racing Hillclimb Grand Championships Aug. 15-16: New Ulm, Minn.; (507) 354-2306.

SWAP MEETS

AMA Racing/NATC West Youth Trials

AUG 14 (R): ETTERS (D-6): VINTAGE; 3 DAY EVENT: WHITE ROSE MC, KAY MARKEY; 7 AM; 580 OLD YORK RD /14 MI SE YORK/21ST VINT. JAPANESE BKS&SWP; (717) 938-2556

Aug. 8-10: Cotopaxi, Colo.; itstrials.com.

1/2 MILE DIRT TRACK AUG 16 (S,T): SPRING RUN (D-6): TWO WHEEL PROMOTIONS, VICKI L FLOWERS; 10 AM; 17911 DRY RUN RD WEST /PA TURNPIKE TO RT 75N/RT 641N/1 MI DRY RUN W; (717) 3685903

SHORT TRACK AUG 2 (S,T): SPRING RUN (D-6): TWO WHEEL PROMOTIONS, VICKI L FLOWERS; 10 AM; 17911 DRY RUN RD WEST /PA TURNPIKE TO RT 75N/RT 641N/1 MI DRY RUN W; (717) 3685903 AUG 29 (S,Y): LANCASTER (D-6): MASON DIXON MOTORSPORTS P, BILL BROWN; 2 PM; 851 VILLAGE RD; (443) 528-7648

AMA Premier Touring Series and Dunlop Road Riding Challenge AMADirectlink.com/RoadRide/Touring

NATIONAL CONVENTIONS

AUG 9 (S,T,Y): THREE SPRINGS (D-5): ROCKET RACEWAY, M CARLTON; 7 AM; ROCKET RACEWAY /PA TURNPIKE EXIT 180; (814) 448-2701 AUG 15 (S,T,Y): AUG 21 (S,T,Y): GREENSBURG (D-5): DBL SPORTS PROMOTIONS, KIM LITTLE; 5 PM; WESTMORELAND FAIRGROUNDS /RT 30 TO MT PLEASANT RD/4.7 MI; (724) 929-5396 AUG 16 (S,Y): SUGAR GROVE (D-5): MAPLE SHADE, DOUGLAS LAWSON; 6 AM; RT 27 /BETWEEN YOUNGSVILLE & SUGAR GROVE; (814) 489-3266 AUG 16 (S,Y): SHIPPENSBURG (D-6): DOUBLIN GAP MX PARK INC, RODNEY YENTZER; 7 AM; 100 REASNOR LANE /RT 81 EXIT 24 TO RT 696N/6 MI N OF TOWN; (717) 249-6036 AUG 22 (S,Y): BIRDSBORO (D-6): PAGODA MOTORCYCLE CLUB, RANDY KASTLE; 12 PM; 441 RED LANE /422 TO 82 TO LINCOLN RD TO RED LANE; (610) 582-3717 AUG 23 (S,Y): BIRDSBORO (D-6): PAGODA MOTORCYCLE CLUB, RANDY KASTLE; 7 AM; 441 RED LANE /422 TO 82 TO LINCOLN RD TO RED LANE; (610) 582-3717 AUG 23 (V,Y): BOSWELL (D-5): DREAM PROMOTIONS INC./ FIE, TINA BERKEY; 7 AM; 473 BERKEY RD /OFF RT 30 FROM JENNERSTOWN ON 985N; (814) 629-6774 AUG 23 (S,Y): JOHNSTOWN (D-5): PLEASURE VALLEY RACEWAY, JEFF M CERNIC; 6 AM; 500 COOPER AVE; (814) 695-2453 AUG 29 (M,Y): JOHNSTOWN (D-5): 2 DAY EVENT: PLEASURE VALLEY RACEWAY, JEFF M CERNIC; 6 AM; 500 COOPER AVE; (814) 695-2453 AUG 30 (S,Y): PINE GROVE (D-6): DUTCHMEN MX PARK, LLC., ROBERT PAPP; 7:30 AM; DMX/670 ROCK RD (RT895); (570) 345-6686

HARE SCRAMBLES AUG 2 (S,Y): CATAWISSA (D-6): HIGH MOUNTAIN DIRT

Aug 27-Sep 2: Stevenson, WA: Sportbike Northwest: Sound Rider!; Tom Mehren; (206) 329-7808; www. soundrider.com/rally/

Apr 1- Nov 30: USA 4 Corners Tour: So. CA Motorcycling Assoc; David L. Johnson; (909) 796-2277; www.usa4corners.org

Oct 29-Nov 1: Galveston, TX: Lone Star Rally: Ron Limbock; (832) 437-2318; www.lonestarrally.com

Apr 1- Nov 30: Color the World with KOA Grand Tour: Midnight Riders; Charles Kirkman; (765) 566-3807; www.midnight-riders-mc.com

REGIONAL CONVENTIONS

SIGNATURE EVENTS

AUG 9 (S,T,Y): AUG 23 (S,T,Y): CLIFFORD (D-6): HURRICANE HILLS MOTORSPOR, JOSEPH C FRITZ RT81, EX 206, 374E TO RT 106 E TRACK 3 MI; (570) 222-9290

Aug 30: Asheville, NC: Ride For Kids: Registration 8 a.m. - 9:45 a.m., Biltmore Square Mall, Asheville, NC; www.pbtfus.org/rideforkids

Oct 2-4: Sebring, FL: Run to the Heartland Rally: Heartland Riders Assn; Lora Todd; (863) 414-2851; www.hra-riders.com

AUG 2 (S,T,Y): BOSWELL (D-5): DREAM PROMOTIONS INC./ FIE, TINA BERKEY; 7 AM; 473 BERKEY RD /OFF RT 30 FROM JENNERSTOWN ON 985N; (814) 629-6591

AUG 9 (S,Y): MARKLEYSBURG (D-5): DBL SPORTS PROMOTIONS, D BUDD LITTLE; 6 AM; ROARING KNOB MOTORSPORTS CMPX /RT 40 20 MI E OF UNIONTOWN; (724) 929-5396

Sept. 10-13: Mid-Ohio Sports Car Course, Lexington, Ohio; (800) 856-1900.

AMA GRAND TOURS With KOA Along The Way

Northwest Region 5: Aug 27-Sep 2: Stevenson, WA: Rally Week in the Gorge: Sound Rider!; Tom Mehren; (206) 329-7808; www.soundrider.com/rally/

AUG 9 (S,T,Y): FREDERICKSBURG (D-6): SLEEPY HOLLOW MOTO CROSS, ERIC E SWARR; 2 MI E OF TOWN US RT 22; (717) 653-4830

AMA Racing Road Race Grand Championships

Sep 16-20: Ruidoso, NM: Golden Aspen Rally: Golden Aspen Motorcycle Assn; Ron Andrews; (800) 452-8045; www.motorcyclerally.com

AUG 2 (S,T,Y): DUNBAR (D-5): DBL SPORTS PROMOTIONS, KIM LITTLE; 1 PM; FAYETTE COUNTY FAIRGROUNDS /RT 119 TO TOWN; (724) 929-5396

AUG 8 (S,T,Y): ELKLAND (D-6): 2 DAY EVENT: MILES MOUNTAIN MX, PHILLIP EGLESTON; 6 AM; 10 MI OFF RT 15 ON RT 49; (814) 258-5593

Aug. 3-9: Loretta Lynn’s Ranch, Hurricane Mills, Tenn.; mxsports.com.

ROAD RIDING

MOTOCROSS AUG 2 (S,Y): HANOVER (D-6): HAPPY RAMBLERS, SHARON L FISHER; 6 AM; 4340 HANOVER RD /RT 116/5 MI W OF TOWN/ SEE WEBSITE; (717) 633-7708

AMA Air Nautiques Amateur National Motocross Championships

Jul 25: Marysville, OH: Ride For Kids: Registration 8 a.m. - 9:45 a.m.. 24000 Honda Pkwy, Marysville, OH; www.pbtfus.org/rideforkids Jul 26: Kansas City, MO: Ride For Kids: Registration 8 a.m. - 9:45 a.m.. Johnson Cty Comm. College, Overland Park, KS; www.pbtfus.org/rideforkids Aug 2: Hudson Valley, NY: Ride For Kids: Registration 8 a.m. - 9:45 a.m., Central Valley Elem.; www.pbtfus. org/rideforkids Aug 9: Pittsburgh, PA: Ride For Kids: Registration 8 a.m. - 9:45 a.m., Home Depot, Cranberry Twp, PA; www.pbtfus.org/rideforkids Aug 16: New England: Ride For Kids: Registration 8 a.m. - 9:45 a.m.. Wal-Mart 742 Main St., North Oxford, MA 01537; www.pbtfus.org/rideforkids Aug 22: Utah: Ride For Kids: Registration 8 a.m. - 9:45 a.m.. This Is the Place Heritage Park 2601 E. Sunnyside Ave. Salt Lake City, UT; www.pbtfus.org/rideforkids Aug 23: Michigan: Ride For Kids: Registration 8 a.m. 9:45 a.m., Washtenaw Community College, Ann Arbor, MI; www.pbtfus.org/rideforkids

RIDERS, MIKE SOUDAS; SOUTH SIDE CONSERVATION CLUB /467 INDEPENDENT ST; (570) 954-7799

Apr 1- Nov 30: Grand Tour of Ireland: Irish Riders Motorcycle Club; Maggie McNally; (518) 209-2464; www.irishridersmc.com Apr 1- Nov 30: Ride with the AMA 85th Ann. Classic Grand Tour: Dayton Motorcycle Club; Kevin Looney; (937) 263-9321; www.daytonmc.com Apr 1- Nov 30: Roadside Attractions Grand Tour: Road Winders M/C; Joe Sloan; (215) 322-4436; hogman19053@yahoo.com

STATE RALLIES Jul 16-19: Bikers Adult Rally: Alvarado, TX; Mattie Smith; (972) 551-0024; www.bikersadultrally.com Oct 9-11: Big Bike Weekend: Redding CA; Connie Grinols; (530) 245-7185; www.bigbikeweekend.com Oct 23-25: New Orleans Bikefest: Westwego, LA; Barry Lee & Kay Miller; (504) 274-0226; www. neworleansbikefest.com

DISTRICT RALLIES & TOURS Jun 20: D-24 Tour – Gyro Daze Run: Kingston, ID: Hi-Rollers M/C; Ed Harris; (509) 326-7154; community. spokane.net Sep 5-7: D-36 Rally – Hey Dey Rally: Groveland, CA: Dist 36 Road Div.; Bob Hansel; (707) 793-0251; www. ama-d-36.com

REGISTER BY 8:30 AM; (605) 920-1156

1/2 MILE DIRT TRACK AUG 23 (S,T,Y): ATHENS (D-6): RIVER RATZ MC, JOHN A BRENNAN; 6 AM; 12512 SHESHEQUIN RD; (570) 888-5581

AUG 5 (M): STURGIS (D-30): JACKPINE GYPSIES M/C, JIM PAISLEY; 10:30 AM; BALL PARK ROAD; (605) 645-2539

AUG 30 (S,T,Y): NEELYTON (D-5): FT OF MOUNTAIN, PIERRON P REASNER; 7 AM; 22295 DECORUM RD /PA TRNPK EX 180/ RIGHT ON RT 522 TO RT 641; (814) 259-3873

TENNESSEE

OBSERVED TRIALS

MOTOCROSS

AUG 2 (S): FARRANDSVILLE (D-6): DURTY DABBERS INC, NILS G MANTZOROS; 8 AM;; (570) 748-9456

AUG 4 (S,Y): HURRICANE MILLS(D-32): 5 DAY EVENT: MX SPORTS LLC, RITA COOMBS; LORETTA LYNNS RANCH; (304) 284-0101

AUG 16 (S): TREMONT (D-6): TRICKY TRYALERS, JAY PARTNER; 8 AM; RAUSCH CREEK RACING; (717) 580-1272 AUG 30 (S): MILLERTON (D-6): NIAGARA TRIALS RIDERS, DARLENE LYNCH; 10 AM; 4571 RT 328; (607) 739-4424

SOUTH DAKOTA

AUG 15 (V,Y): HURRICANE MILLS (D-32): 2 DAY EVENT: RACER PRODUCTIONS INC, RITA COOMBS; LORETTA LYNNS RANCH; (304) 284-0084

TEXAS ROAD RALLY

GYPSY TOUR AUG 4 (R): STURGIS (D-30): JACKPINE GYPSIES M/C, MEG MCDONOUGH; 9 AM; VFW HALL 868 MAIN STREET /

AUG 21 (R): LUBBOCK (D-42): 3 DAY EVENT: GS RALLY INC, MIKE GREEN; 5 PM; 9999 HIGH MEADOW RD /5 MILES E OF LOOP 289 ON E 50TH; (877) 719-4957

August 2009

55


ADVENtuRE RIDE

ADVENtuRE SERIES

AUG 28 (R): CASCADE MTNS (D-27):: 4 DAY EVENT: SOUND RIDER!, TOM MEHREN; 8 AM;; (206) 329-7808

AMA BMW National Adventure Riding Series

Stephenson, (513) 553-6662, www.4funtrailriders.com.

AMADirectLink.com/RoadRide/ADV/

Aug. 8-9: McCloud, CA; Norcal DualSport, Troy Raun; (530) 262-1342; www.norcaldualsport.com.

Oct. 10-11, 2009: Hammonton, NJ; Jack OConnor, Ocean Country Competition Riders, 732-714-8874 info@pinebarrens500.org, www.pinebarrens500.org

Aug. 28-31: North Cascades, WA; Sound Rider!, Tom Mehren; (206) 329-7808; www.soundrider.com.

Oct. 24-25: Delta, AL; Dixie Dual Sport, Robert Frey, www.dixiedualsport.com.

Sept. 12-13: Cadiz, KY; Jesse Thomas, KT Riders, 270-522-3703, ginny42211@yahoo.com

Oct. 24-25: Payson, AZ; Arizona Trail Riders, Don Hood; (602) 692-9382; www.arizonatrailriders.org.

Sept. 19-20: Morganton, NC; J.D.S.A.K.I, Ron Miller; (704) 483-6833; millerron@bellsouth.net.

Oct. 31-Nov. 1: Port Elizabeth, NJ; TriCounty Sportsmen, E. Polhaumus (856) 785-2754, www. teamhammer.org.

Sept. 19-20: Sterling, IL; Brushpoppers MC, Jack Suption; (815) 622-4099; www.geocities.com/ brushpoppers. Sept. 26-27: Logan, OH; Buckeye Dualsporters, Bill Kaeppner; (740) 380-3050; www.kaeppnerswoods. com; kaeppners@verizon.net. Sept. 26-27: Wabeno, WI; Wisconsin Dual Sport Riders, Brad Eggum; www.widualsportriders.org; bigwoods200@hotmail.com.

Nov. 7-8: Port Elizabeth, NJ; Tri-County Sportsmen, E. Polhaumus; (856) 785-2754; www.teamhammer.org.

MOtOCROSS AUG 9 (S): WASHOUGAL (D-27): WASHOUGAL MX PARK LLC, CAROLYN A HUFFMAN; 6 AM; 40205 NE BORIN RD; (541) 673-1671 AUG 16 (S,Y): RAYMOND (D-27): WARD CREEK MX, LISA KLEMP; 6:30 AM; 41 WARD CREEK RD /SR6 FROM CHEHALIS/SR8 FROM OLYMPIA; (360) 942-4674 AUG 22 (S): WASHOUGAL (D-27): 2 DAY EVENT: WASHOUGAL MX PARK LLC, CAROLYN A HUFFMAN; 6 AM; 40205 NE BORIN RD; (541) 673-1671

WESt VIRGINIA ROAD RALLY

Nov. 7-8: Jenkins, NJ; Meteor MC, Mike Reign; (856) 287-8170; www.meteormc.com. Nov. 27-28: Los Angeles, CA; AMA District 37 Dual Sport, Paul Flanders; (626) 792-7384; www. district37ama.org.

AUG 8 (R): TEAYS VALLEY (D-5): 2 DAY EVENT: ROAD RIDERS FOR JESUS, CARL CRACKEL; 8 AM; SALVAT ARMY HAPPY VALLEY RANCH; (636) 285-9005

MOtOCROSS AUG 1 (S,Y): HEDGESVILLE (D-7): 2 DAY EVENT: MIDDLE ATLANTIC MOTOCROSS, RUTH ANN BENSON; TOMAHAWK MX 836 TOMAHAWK RUN; (410) 375-1059

Sept. 26-27: Columbus, IN; StoneyLonesome MC, Nathan Gaskill; (812) 343-9772; www. stoneylonesomemc.com.

WISCONSIN

Oct. 3-4: Renfro Valley, KY; 4-Fun Trail Riders, Vicky

ROAD RuN

DuAL-SPORt AMA KtM National Dual-Sport trail Riding Series AMADirectLink.com/RoadRide/DS/

July 19-25: Gaylord, MI: Cycle Conservation Club of Michigan, Lewis Shuler, (517) 416-0126, ccckids@ verizon.net, www.cycleconservationclub.org Aug. 8-9: Hancock, NY: Bear Creek Sportsmen, Linda Rizzon, (973) 953-6308; bearcreeksportsmen.com. Aug. 22-23: McCloud, CA: Norcal DualSport, Troy Raun; (530) 262-1342; www.norcaldualsport.com. Sept. 5-6: New Straitsville, OH: New Straitsville Enduro Riders, Steve Wheeler, (740) 394-2220; nsenduro.com. Sept. 12-13: Cadiz, KY: KT Riders, Jesse Thomas, (270) 522-3703; ginny42211@yahoo.com. Sept. 12-13: Redding, CA: Redding Dirt Riders, Karl Hankins, (530) 953-7272; info@reddingdirtriders.com. Sept. 19-20: Medford, OR: Motorcycle Riders Assoc., Jeff Moffet, (541) 773-7433; jeff@omatours.com. Sept. 19-20: Sterling, IL: Brushpoppers MC, Jack Suption, (815) 622-4099; geocities.com/brushpoppers. Sept. 26-27: Boyne Falls, MI: Great Lakes Dual Sporters, Jeramey Valley, (989) 751-6863; gldsmc.org.

AUG 2 (R): MIDDLETON (D-16): PEDIATRIC BRAIN TUMOR FOU, KYLE CLACK; 7:30 AM; FIREMANS PARK /NEXT TO MIDDLETON HS/LEE STREET; (800) 253-6530

Sept. 26-27: Groveland, CA: Family Off-Road Adventures, Lawrence Borgens, (209) 649-3633; www. familyoffroadadventures.com. Sept. 26-27: Columbus, IN; StoneyLonesome MC, Nathan Gaskill; (812) 343-9772; www. stoneylonesomemc.com.

Oct. 3-4: Mt. Solon, VA: Northern Virginia Trail Riders, Dave Bludgett, (703) 791-4240; nvtr.org. Oct. 17-18: McArthur, OH: Enduro Riders Assoc., Steve Barber; (614) 891-1369; enduroriders.com. Oct. 24-25: Delta, AL: Dixie Dual Sport, Robert Frey, dixiedualsport.com. Oct. 24-25: Payson, AZ: Arizona Trail Riders, Don Hood, (602) 692-9382; arizonatrailriders.org. Oct. 24-25: Study Butte, tX: Trail Riders of Houston, Jack Jennings; (713) 248-7222; trh-cycle.org. Oct. 31-Nov. 1: Port Elizabeth, NJ: Tri-County Sportsmen, E. Polhaumus; (856) 785-2754; teamhammer.org. Nov. 7-8: Jenkins, NJ: Meteor MC, Mike Reign; (856) 287-8170; meteormc.com. Nov. 27-28: Los Angeles, CA: AMA District 37 Dual Sport, Paul Flanders, (626) 792-7384; district37ama.org.

Sept. 26-27: Logan, OH: Buckeye Dualsporters, Bill Kaeppner, (740) 380-3050; kaeppnerswoods.com.

1/2 MILE DIRt tRACK AUG 2 (S,T,Y): MERRILLAN (D-16): BUNK HOUSE, STEVE CASPER; N 11702 ELKEN RD; (715) 964-2000

SHORt tRACK AUG 15 (S,T,Y): LAKE MILLS (D-16): AZTALAN CYCLE CLUB INC, HARVEY SCHAVE; 2 PM; CLUBGROUNDS-GOMOL RD /I-94 TO 26/S TO B/W TO GOMOL; (414) 297-9367 AUG 22 (S,T,Y): BURNETT (D-16): BEAVER CYCLE CLUB INC, MICHAEL L SCHWARZENBACHER; N9898 CO RD I,1/4 MI S OF RD C; (920) 887-1469

SCRAMBLES AUG 23 (S,T,Y): BURNETT (D-16): BEAVER CYCLE CLUB INC, MICHAEL L SCHWARZENBACHER; N9898 CO RD I,1/4 MI S OF RD C; (920) 887-1469 AUG 28 (S,T,Y): NEW RICHMOND (D-16): 3 DAY EVENT: AMSOIL SANDBOX ARENA, ROB MURPHY; 1120 OLD MILL RD; (715) 248-4755

MOtOCROSS AUG 1 (S,T): TOMAH (D-16): CMJ RACEWAY LLC, CHRIS L HALVERSON; MONROE COUNTY FAIRGROUNDS; (608) 6358422 AUG 2 (S,T,Y): AUG 22 (S,T,Y): WITTENBURG (D-16): FANTASY MOTO LLC, SCOTT J BIESE; 6:30 AM; INTERSECTION OF HWY 29, 2 ROBIN ROAD; (920) 419-2863 AUG 9 (S,Y): LAKE MILLS (D-16): AZTALAN CYCLE CLUB INC, HARVEY SCHAVE; 6 AM; CLUBGROUNDS-GOMOL RD /I-94 TO 26/S TO B/W TO GOMOL; (414) 297-9367

Sept. 26-27: Wabeno, WI: Wisconsin Dual Sport Riders, Brad Eggum, widualsportriders.org.

AUG 23 (S,T): DENMARK (D-16): SPORTS & COMPETITION, GEORGE C TABALSKE; 6 AM; ZANDAR RD; (920) 465-1200

utAH ROAD RuN AUG 22 (R): SALT LAKE CITY (D-26): PEDIATRIC BRAIN TUMOR FOU, KYLE CLACK; 8 AM; THIS IS THE PLACE HERITAGE PK /2601 E SUNNYSIDE AVE; (800) 253-6530

ROAD RACE AUG 15 (M,Y): TOOELE (D-26): 2 DAY EVENT: UTAH SPORT BIKE ASSOCIATI, LANCE LEE; 7 AM; MILLER MOTOSPORTS PARK; (801) 966-7021

VIRGINIA ROAD RALLY AUG 15 (R): LEXANA (D-13): ABATE-VA INC, BRYAN REILLY; 5 PM; 13501 CAMPGROUND RD; (540) 937-3924

MOtOCROSS AUG 1 (S,T,Y): PETERSBURG (D-13): 2 DAY EVENT: VMP MX, SHERRY ROBBINS; 6 AM; 8018 BOYDTON PLANK RD; (804) 221-3689

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AUG 29 (S,T,Y): SUTHERLIN (D-13): 2 DAY EVENT: BIRCHCREEK PROMOTIONS,LLC, KEN FERRELL; 6 AM; 12725 KENTUCK RD; (434) 836-7629

GRAND PRIX AUG 16 (S,Y): MARTINSVILLE (D-13): VIRGINIA CHAMPIONSHIP HAR, DANNY MORRISON; BLUE RIDGE II; (276) 632-5931

AUG 28 (S,T): HUSTLER (D-16): CMJ RACEWAY LLC, CHRIS HALVERSON; 8 AM;; (608) 220-6853 AUG 29 (S,T,Y): TIGERTON (D-16): 2 DAY EVENT: FANTASY MOTO LLC, SCOTT J BIESE; 6:30 AM; 8 MI S OF HWY 29/45; (920) 419-2863 AUG 29 (S,T): HUSTLER (D-16): CMJ RACEWAY LLC, CHRIS HALVERSON; 3 PM;; (608) 635-8422

AUG 30 (S,Y): PENHOOK (D-13): VIRGINIA CHAMPIONSHIP HAR, DON PALMER; SANDY BOTTOM; (540) 576-2038

HARE SCRAMBLES

CROSS COuNtRY

AUG 2 (S): DENMARK (D-16): SPORTS & COMPETITION, GEORGE C TABALSKE; 7 AM; ZANDAR RD; (920) 465-1200

AUG 9 (S,T,Y): PENHOOK (D-13): LONE RIDER PRODUCTIONS, TIMOTHY L NORRIS; 6:30 AM; SNOW CREEK /1470 DANVILLE TURNPIKE; (804) 966-7595

AUG 29 (S,T,Y): KEWAUNEE (D-16): 2 DAY EVENT: RPA OFFROAD LLC, RICK P ANSCHUTZ; 6 AM; RIVERVIEW ATV PARK /E3725 CO L (MAPLE RD); (920) 901-5126

WASHINGtON

OBSERVED tRIALS

ROAD RuN

AUG 15 (S,Y): DICKEYVILLE (D-16): WISCONSIN OBSERVED TRIALS, MARK J DOLL; 1.5 M E ON MACADAM RD; (608) 875-5645

AUG 2 (R): TACOMA (D-27): TACOMA M/C, SCOTT HENDERSON; 9 AM; DRY DUCK ROAD RUN; (253) 531-4408

AUG 16 (S,Y): PLATTEVILLE (D-16): WISCONSIN OBSERVED TRIALS, MARK J DOLL; 1497 AIRPORT RD; (608) 875-5645


CLLIC CLICK ON ‘EVENTS’ AT AMERICANMOTORCYCLIST.COM FOR MORE INFO CK ON ‘EVENTS ON ‘EVENTS’ AT AMER AT AM RICANMOTORCYCLI CANM TORCYCLISTT.COM FOR MORE COM OR M RE IN INFO O


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August 2009

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Guest Column

And Just Like You, I’m A Motorcycle Nut I have one of the best jobs in the world. I really do! I am a motorcycle officer for the Ohio State Highway Patrol. I get paid to help protect the motoring public while doing what we all love to do as a pastime. I am frequently asked if the law enforcement side takes away from my off-duty enjoyment but I can assure you, it doesn’t. While many of you have seen motor officers during your travels, you may not have had the chance to talk to a motor cop and see what it is we do and why. The missions of motor units are as varied as the agencies and the motor officers themselves. Some, like the Ohio State Highway Patrol, are primarily traffic enforcement units. Some motor officers are part of street crimes units, while some are ceremonial. Some are mainly used for public relations. But they all share one trait—they are staffed by motor officers. Motor officers are male, female, young, old, tall and short. Some have many years

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on the road, while others are new to law enforcement. All love to ride and know they have one of the most sought after jobs in law enforcement. Most officers who ride for a living have survived some of the most intense training in law enforcement. The training prepares the officer for the rigors of riding a law enforcement motorcycle. Ask any officer who has completed Basic Police Motorcycle training and they will tell you that becoming a motor officer is one of the hardest things they’ve done. You crash, a lot. You pick up your bike about two million times. Just when you think you have it down, down you go again. But at the end of the training, you feel confident that you can handle the challenges of working the road on a police motorcycle. We are often called on to ride in weather that most sane motorcyclists wouldn’t even consider riding in. Do we ride in the rain? Yes we do! Do we ride in the snow? Some of us do. We ride in

by Sgt. Steve Click the cold, heat, sun, clouds and dark. We stop speeders, assist disabled motorists, handle crashes, and direct traffic. We escort dignitaries, staff roadblocks and handle special details. At the end of the day, we are law enforcement officers who happen to ride motorcycles. We are avid riders, both on and off duty. I’ve always admired the brotherhood (and sisterhood) of law enforcement. That bond is even stronger for motor officers. It’s kind of like the little wave we extend to a fellow motorcyclist we see along the road, but for motor officers, even more so. So the next time you see an officer on a motorcycle, take a minute to say hi. We love to talk bikes and riding. Like you, we have our preferences and favorite bikes, but again, like you, we share the enjoyment of the open road on two wheels. Some of us just get to have the best job in the world! Stay safe.

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I’m A Motor Officer


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For tickets please visit Ticketmaster.com, or call 800-745-3000. For room reservations please visit https://resweb.passkey.com/go/amablock, or call 1-800-473-7625 mention Group Code AMAL09E



American Motorcyclist 08 2009