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JULY 2011

ALL BIKE ALL THE TIME Everyday Riders Put Motorcycles First

THE JOURNAL OF THE


NAVIGATION

Cover

Rebecca Berneck loves her motorcycles so much that she refuses to own a car. Read how she pulls it off, and get advice from fellow believers Andy Goldfine and David Saliceti, starting on page 34. Photo by Julie Monacella.

Navigation Photo

Kawasakis will line up this July 22-24 for AMA Vintage Motorcycle Days in Lexington, Ohio, where the brand will be celebrated as Marque of the Year.

8. LETTERS

You write, we read.

10. ROB DINGMAN A Taxing Situation.

12. RIGHTS

Legislation threatens 165,000 acres in Colorado. American Motorcyclist magazine (ISSN 0277-9358) is published monthly by the American Motorcyclist Association, 13515 Yarmouth Dr., Pickerington, OH 43147. Copyright by the American Motorcyclist Association/American Motorcyclist 2011. Printed in USA. Subscription rate: Magazine subscription fee of $10 covered in membership dues; $15 a year for non-members. Postmaster: Mail form 3579 to 13515 Yarmouth Dr., Pickerington, OH 43147. Periodical postage paid at Pickerington, Ohio, and at additional mailing offices.

July 2011 Volume 65, Number 7 Published by the American Motorcyclist Association 13515 Yarmouth Dr. Pickerington, OH 43147 (800) AMA-JOIN (262-5646) AmericanMotorcyclist.com

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18. RIDING

Kawasaki is AMA Vintage Motorcycle Days Marque of the Year.

26. RACING

AMA Supercross wraps up, trials, Ken Roczen, vintage racing and more.

30. HALL OF FAME

World Champ Kevin Schwantz, Don Rosene and Randy Hawkin’s 2004 YZ250.

34. ALL BIKE, ALL THE TIME

For commuting, for traveling, for saving fuel, the utility of motorcycles is substantial.

42. WHAT HAS THE AMA DONE FOR YOU LATELY?

Rights. Riding. Racing. The AMA is at the front lines of everything motorcycling.

45. GO RIDE

What to do, where to go.

54. ELLEN FLANAGAN Going It Alone.


With every MotoGP race victory, we learn more about tires and how they perform on and off the race track. That’s good for racing and it’s even better for you. Ride on Bridgestones. And start building your own legend.

Jorge Lorenzo 2010 MotoGP World Champion

bridgestonemotorcycletires.com


EDITORIAL OFFICES

AMA BOARD OF DIRECTORS

E THE ADVENTUR

American Motorcyclist 13515 Yarmouth Drive Pickerington, OH 43147 (614) 856-1900 submissions@ama-cycle.org

Contact any member of the AMA Board of Directors at www.AmericanMotorcyclist. com/about/board Stan Simpson, Chairman Cibolo, Texas

Grant Parsons, Director of Communications James Holter, Managing Editor Bill Kresnak, Government Affairs Editor Mark Lapid, Creative Director Jen Muecke, Designer Jeff Guciardo, Production Manager/Designer

Jon-Erik Burleson, Assistant Treasurer Murrietta, Calif. Perry King, Assistant Secretary Northern California John Ulrich, Executive Committee Member Lake Elsinore, Calif.

ADVERTISING Steve Gotoski, Advertising Director (Western States) (951) 566-5068, sgotoski@ama-cycle.org

Dwight Conant, Kearsarge, N.H. Charles Goman, Winder, Ga.

Ray Monroe, Eastern Advertising Manager (Eastern States) (815) 633-8011, rmonroe@ama-cycle.org

is out there

coGetmite

Scott Miller, Milwaukee, Wis.

All trademarks used herein (unless otherwise noted) are owned by the AMA and may only be used with the express, written permission of the AMA. American Motorcyclist is the monthly publication of the American Motorcyclist Association, which represents motorcyclists nationwide. For information on AMA membership benefits, call (800) AMA-JOIN or visit AmericanMotorcyclist.com. Manuscripts, photos, drawings and other editorial contributions must be accompanied by return postage. No responsibility is assumed for loss or damage to unsolicited material. Copyright© American Motorcyclist Association, 2011.

Jim Viverito, Chicago, Ill.

Art More, Surprise, Ariz.

AMA PRESIDENT AND CEO Rob Dingman, Pickerington, Ohio

(800) AMA-JOIN (262-5646) AmericanMotorcyclist.com

CONTRIBUTORS AND STAFF

DM

EF

DEREK MONTGOMERY, Photographer After graduating from the University of Wisconsin, Derek Montgomery, who shot Andy Goldfine for this month’s cover feature, landed at the Duluth News Tribune. There he experienced being sprayed with pepper spray, the aftermath of Sri Lanka’s tsunami, a marathon at 30-below zero and a live musical performance by Vanilla Ice. Six years later, he had had enough and started Derek Montgomery Photography. ELLEN FLANAGAN, Contributor Like many motorcyclists, Ellen held the road known as The Dragon in particular regard—maybe, she’ll admit, in fear. Recently, though, she rode by herself from her New York home to conquer that fear. Her story is this month’s Guest Column on page 54.

. re. No Hassle High Adventu o, roads and tw The best routes ts. by local exper track, mapped inded nge with like-m A great challe ities, eekend’s activ riders. A full w campfires, food with camping, ll information at and prizes. Fu iding orcyclist.com/R AmericanMot

Maggie McNally, Albany, N.Y.

Misty Walker, Advertising Assistant (614) 856-1900, ext. 1267, mwalker@ama-cycle.org

GRANT PARSONS, Director of Communications “Oh, right. That.” Those were the words that occurred to Grant last week when he moved around some trash cans in his garage while searching for his Hound Dog Garden Cultivator and came across his CL350. A spark of inspiration led to an exploration of the carb, revealing it had its customary spring coating of varnish. Now, where’s that carb cleaner? JAMES HOLTER, Managing Editor Due to the rains that have inundated the Midwest, James’ clan got a slow start to riding season. They made up for lost time, though. The first trip out included tip-overs, too-deep water crossings, mud and fried clutches. Clean up was a blast. Sunshine, please.

JM

GP

BILL KRESNAK, Government Affairs Editor Krez was thrilled to learn new non-current-class rules for the AMA Racing Vintage Grand Championships (July 22-24 in Lexington, Ohio) accommodate his dream bike: Yamaha’s 1992 WR200. MARK LAPID, Creative Director With a Ninja 250 in his garage, Mark giggled like a school girl over news that Kawasaki is the Marque of the Year for AMA Vintage Motorcycle Days. But despite the promises (lies) in last month’s staff page, the bike is not quite track-worthy. Mark has sworn on completion, however, and as this is being written (on deadline day), he has shirked his official duties to escape to his garage and toss wrenches and clench cold beverages with eyes firmly fixed on a singular purpose. Look for a fully Lapidated Ninja 250 sweeping through Mid-Ohio’s esses this July 22-24 and know that Mark, once more, conquered his demons. JEN MUECKE, Designer Jen did her first track day since the end of 2009 at Blackhawk Farms a couple weeks ago. Her goals were to not barf, and to not fall off. She was successful. JEFF GUCIARDO, Production Manager/Designer Newguy Jeff is fitting in nicely, looking longingly at motorcycle buyer’s guides and starting a new-bike fund. He’s mentioned the Super Sherpa and the Hayabusa as possibilities. We’re urging him to get both. Other contributors include: Jim Kimball, the Motorcycle Safety Foundation, Shan Moore, Jeff Kardas, Jamie Elvidge.


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MEMBER LETTERS

Send your letters (and a high-resolution photo) to submissions@ama-cycle.org; or mail to 13515 Yarmouth Drive, Pickerington, OH 43147.

showing me drawings of a bike he wanted to build. I left there thinking he was a pretty cool guy to take the time to help me like he did. It was obvious that he was determined to do things a little differently than the norm. I was impressed but not surprised when Buell bikes became a reality, and now that he is on to his next venture, I am even more impressed with his determination, but certainly not surprised. Best of luck, Erik. Dan Thomson Fremont, Wis.

LETTER OF THE MONTH THANKS FOR THE CONNECTION TO HOME I am an AMA Life Member and an Army Reserve soldier currently deployed to Afghanistan. I have been able to stay in touch with my motorcycling passion through the AMA magazines my wife sends to me and the online resources available. I also provide my knowledge and guidance, as a long-time rider and Motorcycle Safety Foundation instructor, to my fellow soldiers, hoping that what they get from discussions with me will help them be better, safer riders upon their return home. Although I don’t get much chance to ride currently, there are opportunities from time to time to return to my passion. These photos were taken at a forward operating base in Uruzgan Province, Afghanistan. If these can be added to the monthly photo submissions, I would appreciate the support! Maj. Greg M. Smith Afghanistan Consider them added to our online photo gallery at AmericanMotorcyclist. com, Maj. Smith—and thanks for all you do!

GREAT GUY, GREAT INNOVATOR I met Erik Buell about 25 years ago (OK, maybe 30). He sold me my first set of race leathers. Matter of fact, he met me out on the freeway on my way to my first race. If I’m not mistaken, I thoroughly tested them that weekend… A couple years later, I went back to his farm to buy some parts for my RZ350. Erik and I bolted on parts and he sent me out

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on the backroads to test. Something tells me the neighbors were used to the noise by then. I’ll never forget when he showed me around his place. I recall he had a bunch of Suzuki square four engine parts in the shop that was pictured in the June issue article (“Erik Buell’s Second Act”). Then he took me to another building where he had a drafting table set up. I remember him

NEVER DONE RACING In the late ’70s, there were a lot of things going on in the world, but not on 77th Street in Niagara Falls, N.Y. There was only one thing going on in my world, and that was motocross and off-road racing. My next-door neighbors, the three Nye boys and myself lived for the latest Motocross Action magazine, with hopes to see the names that we heard about on ABC’s “Wide World of Sports.” The three events we waited for each year were Unadilla, Carlsbad and a place called Baja. We gazed in awe at the used 1976 RM125 with a low pipe that the middle brother, Ron, bought with his paper route money. For us, the race had begun, both on and off the track. For the next five years, I spent every weekend with the brothers from spring to fall at the track. Traveling around in a beat-up ’76 Chevy van, with more holes in it than windows. Ron, the middle brother, was a natural, fast and smooth. I spent many a practice day and race looking at the number 534 on the back of his jersey. He was always out in front. Within the next few years Ron qualified to race factory support at the Unadilla Trans-AMA. Ron’s two brothers and I made the trip with him and felt great pride that a rider from our street was riding the track that we saw on TV. In time, we all became local experts but still were never as quick as Ron. The military called myself and one of the Nyes, but Ron headed west and managed to race at Carlsbad. The years went by, we all started our own families, including Ron. He continued to race and raised a son who, some say (but not him), was faster than his dad. I would run into Ron from time to time, and he would ask when I was getting back into racing. My answer would be that I was tired of following him around, as I did in the past, and I did not want to do it again. Shortly after, I bought a KX250F to do some trail riding/racing. A few years later,


his brothers, we were all there. It’s a quick transition from the people and action and color of the starting line to the quiet and loneliness of the desert. You never know what you will see or run into in the desert after hours or riding, but I am pretty sure that off in the distance (in front of me as always) was that jersey with the 534 on it. I thank the AMA, because at age 12 or age 100, all we want to do is ride, and what a good feeling to know you will be there, protecting our rights.

Tony Fiore

my mother called and told me that Ron had been diagnosed with ALS (Lou Gehrig’s Disease). He continued to race until he could no longer hold onto the bike. I would stop and visited him from time to time, and we would only talk about the sport that we loved. When Ron passed away, I talked with his brothers and parents about the old days at the track and how we loved that time and could not wait to see the TV guide and watch for our races. When I bought my second KLX450R last year, my wife all but knew what my next course of action would be. Though she was not happy, she knew what I had to do. Ten months of planning and preparation led to my cross-country drive early this March 2011. When I rolled off the line of the Baja 250, in San Felipe, Mexico, I was 12 again. And in my mind, Ron and

Tony Fiore Niagara Falls, N.Y. A PROFESSIONAL RESPONSE Kudos to Mr. Dingman for his address in the June 2011 issue of American Motorcyclist. Thank you for your attention to clarify the Motorcyclist Of The Year award. You showed great respect for the members of the AMA. Our government should take lessons from you in the area of swift and accurate accountability. Rare, in the mass media market, our AMA president made a decision, welcomed feedback (without prejudice), evaluated the outcome, and communicated a clear change of course. Other influential leaders should follow this blueprint. Excellent! Thank you, Mr. Dingman, for your

professionalism and commitment. Dave Martin Las Vegas, Nev. MOTORCYCLES—AND MOTORCYCLISTS—RULE! I totally agree with Mr. McConnell (“Continued Support,” Letter of the Month, June issue). It’s all about wind in your face. The wave (“salute”) is part of riding. When I’m riding pavement on my dual-sport bike, I give and receive the wave by most other bikers, especially Harley riders. Also, belonging to the organizations he spoke of is something every free American should do. Here in the western states, belonging to the BlueRibbon Coalition and other local organizations is a must. As for another letter, I don’t think paying, optionally, to join the Life Member Plus program is a burden on anyone. I, for one, look at it as a privilege. Again, families who play together, stay together. Through my 40-plus years being involved with families who recreate on motor vehicles, I have seen youngsters both male and female on minibikes grow into world champions and go on to be very successful in whatever career they have chosen. Using a little fossil fuel is better than using some other recreational substances. Eldon “Cap” Kuney Fruita, Colo.

On Facebook? Us, too! Like the fan page of the American Motorcyclist Association and you could leave comments like these: www.facebook.com/AmericanMotorcyclist Wonderful choice. Congrats to Phil, he was inspirational to me in many ways over the years.— Motorcycle Hall of Famer Buzz Kanter, on hearing that former Cycle editor Phil Schilling will join him in the Hall of Fame as a member of the class of 2011 Let the good times roll! Got a 1999 ZRX1100 and 2005 ZX-6R! Love them! Thanks Kawasaki!—JC Fohl, in response to the news that Kawasaki is Marque of the Year for 2011 AMA Vintage Motorcycle Days 1968 A7SS Avenger, 1974 Z-1, 1976 KZ900 LTD, all restored to original and running. Love Team Green!—Eric Taub, responding to same My first motorcycle was a ’79 KZ400, which I still own and plan to restore someday. Gave it to my little brother one year for Christmas, got it back when he moved up to a bigger bike. Gave it to a friend so he could learn, and got it back again when he moved up to a bigger bike. Came back both times in much worse condition than it was sent out in.—Matt Knowles, ditto

You never offer them in my size. Fat boys ride dirt too!—Phil Heslep, replying to a note for fans to buy shirts to support the 2011 U.S. team for the International Six Days Enduro I would buy one even if it didn’t fit! I support ISDE and will mention this at The Lubbock Trail Riders meeting.— Marc Wischkaemper, replying to Phil

K-Dub is the embodiment of what MX is all about. You can’t find a better role model for our young racers. Congrats to Kevin on his success, and here’s to continued success in the future. —John Gepford, responding to our posting of a link to a Shoeisponsored video of Kevin Windham flying his plane around his Mississippi homestead (www.shoei-helmets.com/videos.aspx) You can connect with fellow AMA members on Facebook. You can also always find more information at AmericanMotorcyclist.com.

July 2011

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FROM THE PRESIDENT

A TAXING SITUATION “No man’s life, liberty or property are safe while the legislature is in session.” For many years, motorcyclists have willingly paid user fees to assure that there is funding available for things like rider education and off-highway vehicle (OHV) trails. Unfortunately, programs like these that benefit motorcyclists have never had broad enough support for funding unless we have been willing to pay our own way. Most of the state rider education programs across the country are selffunded by riders By Rob Dingman through additional fees tacked on to the cost of motorcycle licenses and registrations. Many states require OHVs to be registered with a portion of the registration fee going to pay for trail maintenance and development. There is even a federal program called the Recreational Trails Program (RTP) that dedicates a portion of the federal motor vehicle fuel tax attributable to certain offhighway sources to trail funding for both motorized and non-motorized trails. That’s right, in order to get the trails program enacted, OHV enthusiasts had to agree to share the funding with nonmotorized trail users. Hundreds of millions in gas tax money is paid every year by OHV enthusiasts for the fuel they consume riding off-highway. Only a portion of that amount ends up being allocated to the RTP, and an even smaller portion is spent on motorized trails.

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Now, we learn that the leadership in the U. S. Congress would like to eliminate the RTP entirely but keep our money. At the same time, we hear rhetorical pronouncements from our congressional leaders about their unwillingness to raise taxes. If a user fee is diverted from its intended purpose, it becomes a tax increase on that user. Simply stated, motorcyclists are being singled out for a tax increase! It is not just our federal government either. We are seeing the same thing happen all over the country. As cashstrapped states are looking for ways to address their budget woes, programs funded by, and for, motorcyclists are being targeted and raided. This is an issue that affects all motorcyclists alike. Whether you’re a dirt rider or a street rider, as a motorcyclist, you are subject to a tax increase. In this era of huge government bailouts and big corporate tax breaks, it is ridiculous that motorcyclists are being asked to pay more than our fair share. The reason legislators feel they can get away with it is because they perceive that we are not a strong enough constituency to do anything about it. Sometimes even our friends in Congress find it more politically expedient to be on the opposite side of our issues.

If a user fee is diverted from its intended purpose, it becomes a tax increase on that user.

AmericanMotorcyclist.com

That would not happen if the AMA had more clout in Washington and state capitals. The only way this is going to happen is for the AMA to grow substantially in size, and more letters and phone calls are made by AMA members to representatives and senators expressing our concerns and needs. When motorcyclists are viewed as a solid voting block capable of influencing the outcome of elections, we will be taken much more seriously. To some motorcyclists, that notion is far-fetched. But consider this: With an estimated 11 million motorcycles in use in this country, it’s not unreasonable to expect that an AMA populated by 25 percent of all riders would swing a pretty big stick. Longtime AMA members have been working in the trenches to make this a reality, and we are working hard at the Board and staff levels to make the AMA a relevant organization to millions more riders. You can help in an easy way. Visit AmericanMotorcyclist.com to contact your elected representatives on the Recreational Trails Program. Additionally, the next time the AMA issues an alert about a threat to motorcycling, be sure you forward it to at least one riding friend who you know is not an AMA member. Remind them why a stronger AMA is important to all motorcyclists who don’t want to be overtaxed and overregulated. Most importantly, ask them to join the AMA. Rob Dingman is president and CEO of the AMA.

Photo Open Image Studio

–Mark Twain


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RIGHTS

“What amazes me is that anti-access groups somehow keep identifying areas they claim meet the definition of Wilderness. That’s impossible. How can something that didn’t qualify for a Wilderness designation before qualify now, years later?” Nick Haris

Take Action

LEGISLATION THREATENS 165,000 ACRES IN COLORADO U.S. Rep. Jared Polis Pushes ‘Hidden Gems’ Agenda Last year, anti-access supporters of the Hidden Gems Wilderness Campaign gave U.S. Rep. Jared Polis (D-Colo.) a proposal to inappropriately designate 244,000 acres of public land in Colorado as Wilderness, hoping he would introduce the legislation. He did, but the legislation went nowhere, thanks to the involvement of thousands of responsible off-highway vehicle (OHV) grassroots enthusiasts. On May 3, Polis introduced a new bill seeking to designate some 165,000 acres in Colorado either as Wilderness—which would ban OHV riding, bicycling and most other forms of non-pedestrian recreation— or as “special management areas” that the Polis bill states must prohibit OHVs. Areas that would be affected by the bill—the Eagle and Summit County Wilderness Preservation Act—include Red Table Mountain, Pisgah Mountain, Castle Peak, Tenmile and Hoosier Ridge. This is a continuation of the Hidden Gems agenda to ultimately lock up

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379,000 acres of public land, including areas that have existing trails and other improvements that don’t meet the federal definition of Wilderness areas established by the Wilderness Act of 1964. “The AMA supports appropriate Wilderness designations that meet the criteria established by Congress in 1964, but anti-access advocates have abused the legislative process to ban responsible OHV recreation on public land,” says Nick Haris, AMA Western states representative. “Land managers completed inventories of all the federal public land many years ago to determine what land Congress should consider for restrictive Wilderness designations,” Haris says. “What amazes me is that anti-access groups somehow keep identifying areas they claim meet the definition of Wilderness,” he says. “That’s impossible. How can something that didn’t qualify for a Wilderness designation before qualify now, years later?”

What’s Going On? Ignoring the terms and conditions in the Wilderness Act of 1964, environmental extremists are trying to persuade federal lawmakers to designate land with trails, roads and other improvements as Wilderness. The designation would ban OHV riding on that land. Key Legislation: On May 3, U.S. Rep. Jared Polis (D-Colo.) introduced the Eagle and Summit County Wilderness Preservation Act in the House. What You Can Do About It: Call your lawmakers. You can find contact information for elected officials at AmericanMotorcyclist.com > Rights > Issues & Legislation. Enter your zip code in the “Find Your Officials” box. Stay Informed: Get up-to-theminute information on threats to motorcycling by subscribing to the AMA’s Action E-list at AmericanMotorcyclist.com > Rights > Resources > Action Alerts.


YOUNGSTERS SHINE IN KIDS JUST WANT TO RIDE! VIDEO CONTEST

Photos Colorado: Jeff Kardas; Kids: Malcolm, Negron and Reed families

Erin, Adi And Carter Malcolm Of Colorado Win Top Prize Scores of youngsters shared by the lead law—the Consumer their passion for riding motorcycles Product Safety Improvement Act and all-terrain vehicles (ATVs) in (CPSIA) of 2008,” Irving says. “That the AMA’s Kids Just Want to Ride! law must be changed with the video contest that ended April 24. passage of H.R. 412, the Kids Just The videos feature young riders Want to Ride Act. who point out the absurdity of a “I would like to thank all of the federal law that will effectively ban kids who took part in our AMA the sale of kid-sized bikes and Kids Just Want to Ride! video ATVs at the end of 2011 due to the contest,” Irving says. “We had a lot Faith Negron lead content of some parts. In the of excellent submissions and it was videos, kids promise not to “eat my very difficult to pick the winners.” motorcycle!” See The Winners First prize in the video contest To view the winning videos, go went to Erin, 11, Adi, 7, and Carter, to AmericanMotorcyclist.com > 5, Malcolm of Littleton, Colo. They Kids Just Want to Ride! accompanied their parents as the honored guests of the AMA Family Video Contest Winners Tell Why Capitol Hill Climb in Washington, They Just Want to Ride! D.C. The May 26 event gathered children, families and other Ellis Negron enthusiasts to urge members of Erin Malcolm said she likes riding Congress to support the Kids Just with her family and meeting people. Want to Ride Act. The Malcolm’s “We go camping with some of winning video was featured at the our really close friends,” she says. event. “Well, they’re actually like family The second prize, a $500 and there are about 20 of us. We BikeBandit.com gift card, was won all line up and hit the trail. It’s great by Faith, 10, and Ellis, 7, Negron of because sometimes we come to a Los Alamitos, Calif. really challenging section and we The $100 BikeBandit.com thirdwill stay there and work that section Cameron Reed place gift card went to Cameron until everyone can do it.” Reed, 11, of Denham Springs, La. Faith Negron expressed the sentiments “The AMA sponsored the Kids Just of many young riders at the thought of not Want to Ride! video contest to show how being able to ride at year’s end, saying: “I real children, and real families, will suffer would not have happiness in my life, and I when the de facto ban on the sale of kids’ would be sad because my friends wouldn’t dirtbikes and ATVs goes into effect at the be able to go [riding] with me.” end of the year unless this federal law Cameron Reed was elated to win the is changed,” says Jessica Irving, AMA third-place prize in the video contest. grassroots coordinator. “Winning always feels good, but it’s just “Lawmakers need to see first-hand cool that the AMA did this for us, and I’m the faces of the children who will be hurt proud to be a part of it all,” he says.

FIRST PRIZE Erin, Adi and Carter Malcolm


RIGHTS

GRASSROOTS EFFORT CREATES SAFETY ORGANIZATION Motorcycle Awareness What began as an idea among three friends to increase driver awareness of motorcyclists in Louisiana and promote motorcycling safety has grown into a 1,000-plus-member organization that hopes to have an impact nationwide. In 2004, Warren Broussard, Terry Smith and the late Ron Waguespack decided to form the Motorcycle Awareness Campaign (MAC) in Baton Rouge, La. Imre Szauter, AMA government affairs manager, says MAC has since grown into one of the leading safety organizations in the nation. MAC President Broussard says that, from the beginning, MAC was intended to promote awareness among motorists in addition to safety and training for motorcyclists. “MAC is not a social group,” Broussard says. “MAC does not support charities and does not favor one brand of motorcycle or a particular kind of riding. “We believe that right-of-way infringement, speed, lack of training and chemical, physical or mental impairment are the primary causes of crashes between motorcyclists and other motorists,” he says. “Our purpose is to do everything we can to lower the motorcycle crash rate.” It’s also important to educate riders, he says. “While many crashes involving motorcyclists are caused at

intersections by oncoming vehicles making a left turn in front of the motorcycle, motorcyclists must assume our share of responsibility, meaning that we cannot assume motorists see us,” he says. Although MAC is a purely voluntary organization, its influence is growing, not only with higher profile members but also in its outreach. Broussard and other MAC directors and supporters spend a lot of time talking about motorcycle safety and awareness at civic events, on radio and TV programs, at motorcycle rallies, in elementary schools and at safety seminars. Working in partnership with the Motorcycle Safety, Awareness and Operator Training Program, MAC also hosts an annual rally at the state Capitol to raise awareness of motorcycles in the traffic mix and to highlight the month of May as Motorcycle Awareness and Safety Month. MAC currently has 11 chapters: eight in Louisiana and one each in Alabama, Arkansas and Nebraska. For more information, go to MACorg.com.

That’s Tren t Young wit h his wife A Last summ va. er a buddy turned Tren to S100 Tota t on l Cycle Clean er. Then he wrote us: “I was absolu tely floored watched th as I e road grim e, bugs and I didn’t even dirt know was th ere…Now I don’t have to be afraid of the rain. I am absolu tely enthralle d on how well your pr oduct works .” What Tren saw was S10 t 0’s amazing penetrating power gettin g the dirt th at other cleaners m iss, especial ly in the plac he couldn’t es see or reac h. That’s whe corrosion ca re n start! Love your bike? Want to prot ect your inve stment and do it all in le ss time? Ask your dealer to set you up with some S 100 Total Cycle Clean er. Read Tren t’s entire m and lear n m ail ore at www .s100.com or call us at 20 3-488-6569 .

Photo Motorcycle Awareness Campaign

Campaign Focuses On Motorcyclist Safety


STATEWAT C H KANSAS As of June 1, motorcycle and bicycle operators stuck at traffic-actuated signals that malfunction or fail to detect their vehicles may proceed with caution through the intersection after coming to a complete stop and waiting a reasonable period of time. That’s possible because House Bill 2192, which was authored by the House Transportation Committee, was signed into law by Gov. Sam Brownback. LOUISIANA Gov. Bobby Jindal has proposed a “fund sweep” of dozens of government set-aside funds, including the motorcycle safety program fund. The proposed action would partially offset a $1.6 billion shortfall in the state’s budget. House Bill 1, sponsored by Rep. James R. Fannin (D-Jonesboro), has been assigned to the House Appropriations Committee. Louisiana motorcyclists are urged to contact their legislators to voice their strong support for rider education and their disapproval of any raids on the motorcycle safety program fund. Take action by going to AmericanMotorcyclist.com > Rights > Issues & Legislation > StateWatch. In other news, House Bill 167, sponsored by Rep. Frankie Howard (R-Many) and co-

RIGHTS sponsored by Rep. M.J. “Mert” Smiley Jr. (R-Port Vincent), would enhance penalties for those convicted or pleading guilty to any right-of-way violation resulting in serious bodily injury or death to another roadway user. This bill, to be known as the 2011 Pickholtz Act, would further enhance roadway safety by building on legislation signed into law last year covering right-ofway violations at stop and yield signs. MINNESOTA House Bill 1505, sponsored by Rep. Tom Hackbarth (R-Cedar), and Senate Bill 1226, sponsored by Sen. Al Dekruif (R-Madison Lake), would create a special “Start Seeing Motorcycles” license plate for use on a passenger automobile, one-ton pickup truck, motorcycle or recreational motor vehicle. The commissioner of the Minnesota Department of Public Safety would design the special plate in consultation with A.B.A.T.E. of Minnesota Inc. OHIO If you were charged a $20 late fee for renewing your motorcycle registration seven or more days after it expired, you may apply for a refund of the late fee by writing the Ohio Bureau of Motor Vehicles, Dealer Licensing & Specialty Plate Services,

PO Box 16521, Columbus, OH 432166521, or by calling (800) 589-8247. All Ohio deputy registrars have access to a Vehicle Registration Manual that outlines the specific vehicles considered seasonal and are exempt from the late fee. Effective Oct. 1, 2009, a $20 late fee was imposed on any vehicle registration or driver’s license renewal that was applied for seven or more days after its expiration date, but seasonal vehicles such as motorcycles, mopeds, golf carts, off-highway vehicles, snowmobiles and non-commercial trailers were supposed to be exempt. WASHINGTON Senate Bill 5800, which allows the use of modified off-road motorcycles on public roads, has been signed into law by the Gov. Chris Gregoire. The law allows motorcycle owners to convert off-road motorcycles to street use by requiring the Department of Licensing to create a declaration that must be submitted by the motorcycle owner. The declaration includes a variety of information, such as documentation of a safety inspection, verification of the vehicle identification number and a release signed by the owner that releases the state from liability.


COLLEGE WORLD SERIES OFFERS FREE MOTORCYCLE PARKING AMA Member Todd Pfitzer Spearheads Effort The NCAA Men’s College World Series in Omaha, Neb., June 18-28/29, is a special treat for baseball fans. And it’s even sweeter for fans who ride motorcycles. That’s because Omaha City Engineer Todd Pfitzer, who is a 22-year AMA member, decided it was important to have free motorcycle parking near the new 20,000-seat TD Ameritrade Park Omaha where the event will be held. “We’re trying to maximize our people-per-square-feet of parking,” Pfitzer says. “I got to thinking about a request from the daycare center for the Union Pacific World headquarters and put the two together.” The daycare center was concerned about tailgating and drinking near the center during the world series. Pfitzer decided he could address that concern by putting free motorcycle parking on the street in front of the center. “I am very proud to say we are now going to provide an entire block of motorcycleonly parking within two blocks of the stadium,” Pfitzer says. “I figure you should be able to park a minimum of five motorcycles side by side in a 25-foot stall, and maybe as many as eight if we’re careful.” That translates into at least 150 bikes. “Given the assumption that half the bikes will carry passengers, we’re looking at maybe 12 people per stall by allowing motorcycle-only parking,” he says. “The reward for riders is free parking two blocks from the stadium for any game. The benefit for the city and the promoters is triple the capacity of people on the same street than if we left it for auto parking. “I’m hoping another benefit is that the average motorcyclist won’t open the trunk and bring out a cooler full of beer and leave a mess behind when he or she is done,” he says. “Talk about win/win/win.” For more information, go to CWSOmaha.com.

STOP THE LAND GRAB TM

RESTRICTIVE WILD LANDS POLICY ON HOLD

But Battle Continues For Next Year The funding measure that keeps the federal government operating through Sept. 30 includes language that bars the U.S. Interior Department from using any money to carry out the controversial Wild Lands land-use policy. “This is a major victory for responsible off-highway vehicle (OHV) riders and others concerned about appropriate access to public land,” says Rick Podliska, AMA Washington representive. “But we can’t let up. Anti-access groups will continue pushing for implementation of the Wild Lands policy for the next federal fiscal year, which begins Oct. 1.” The stop-gap funding measure, signed into law by President Obama on April 15, blocks federal money for implementing or enforcing Interior Department Secretarial Order 3310, which created the Wild Lands land-use policy. The policy would have allowed Bureau of Land Management (BLM) officials to manage public land as if it had received a Wilderness designation from Congress, but without requiring congressional approval. This could restrict or eliminate responsible OHV use in the affected areas.

REPORT: MOTORCYCLIST FATALITIES DOWN FOR SECOND YEAR IN A ROW Reasons Why Are Unclear It appears that for the second year in a row the number of motorcycling deaths across the nation has declined. In a report issued in April, the Governors Highway Safety Association (GHSA) said that fatalities were down by at least 2 percent in 2010 compared to the previous year. Based on preliminary data, the GHSA projects that fatalities declined nationwide from 4,465 in 2009 to 4,376 or fewer in 2010. The decline comes on the heels of a dramatic 16 percent drop in 2009, which followed 11 straight years of steady increases in motorcycle deaths, the GHSA said. “We are encouraged by the further

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decline in rider fatalities,” says AMA President and CEO Rob Dingman. “We hope to see this trend in declining fatalities continue. But without hard data to support what’s behind the decline, it is difficult to speculate on the reasons.” “The lack of data underscores the need for a fully comprehensive crash causation study to understand the reasons that riders crash,” Dingman says. “If we can determine those reasons, we should know where to focus our efforts to reduce fatalities even further. That is why we are supportive of the study currently under way at the University of Oklahoma and being directed by Dr. Samir Ahmed.” The last major motorcycle crash study

was completed in 1980, and it provided a wealth of data that has been used to develop training and strategies to help keep riders safer on the road. In the decades since, the traffic environment has changed enormously, prompting the AMA to begin campaigning for a new study several years ago, which led to the Oklahoma research. The GHSA is a nonprofit association representing the highway safety offices of states, territories, the District of Columbia and Puerto Rico. Its members are appointed by their governors to administer federal and state highway safety funds and implement state highway safety plans.

Photo Pfitzer: Courtesy Todd Pfitzer

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RIDING

p “This was taken at Goltry, Okla., while participating in a local charity run. The wall just beckoned to have a picture taken with my bike. The ride is—of course—a 2002 Honda Shadow ACE DLX.”—Mike “Fat Mike” Cornelsen of Fairview, Okla. t Galen and Carrie Betz at the top of Mt. Lincoln, Colo. —Galen Betz of Wisconsin Dells, Wis.

Rodman Burkhart

u The Reading Motorcycle Club, one of the oldest AMA-chartered clubs, celebrates its 100th anniversary this year. In fact, it dates to before the founding of the association. Pennsylvania granted the club its state charter on July 11, 1911—13 years before the founding of the AMA. The club’s mission remains the same today as it did then: to promote motorcycling. “Going back to the earliest issues of our official journal, we find references to the Reading Motorcycle Club and its sanctioned events,” said AMA President and CEO Rob Dingman. “The AMA is proud of this charter and stronger because we count the Reading Motorcycle Club as one of our own. I’m pleased to wish them a happy 100th!” For more information about the club, see ReadingMC.com.

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Reading MC President Bobby Evans (left) with Rob Dingman


Photo Bill Kresnak

Motorcycle Hall of Famer Eddie Lawson in 1981.

LET THE GOOD TIMES ROLL!

AMA Vintage Motorcycle Days Will Feature Kawasaki As Marque Of The Year. Themed Activities Will Join Racing, The Swap Meet, Bike Shows And More! Motorcycle Hall of Famers Yvon Duhamel, Gary Nixon, Jimmy Weinert, Eddie Lawson, Jeff Fredette, Jeff Ward, Mike Keidrowski. The list of riders who became famous racing Kawasaki motorcycles is long and distinguished—as is the number of regular enthusiasts who have grown to love the brand and all of its renditions, from the incredible Mach III 500cc two-stroke in 1969 to the modern Ninja sportbike. That history will take center stage this July 22-24 at AMA Vintage Motorcycle Days at the Mid-Ohio Sports Car Course in Lexington, Ohio, where Kawasaki will be honored as this year’s Marque of the Year. “Kawasaki put the ‘Good Times’ in motorcycling from the very beginning, and has become a world icon,” said AMA President and CEO Rob Dingman. “We are pleased that attendees at AMA Vintage Motorcycle Days will see firsthand the company and the people that brought us incredible machines like the Samurai and Avenger models, then the Mach III triple and the 900cc Z-1, all the way to today’s Ninjas, Concours 1400s and Vulcans. “With Kawasaki as our 2011 Marque of the Year, we’re bringing the good times to AMA Vintage Motorcycle Days in a big way,” Dingman said.

Kawasaki, known as a leader in the performance category for the past 45 years in the United States, has won numerous AMA racing championships on pavement as well as dirt. The recognition as AMA Vintage Motorcycle Days Marque of the Year will include interactive opportunities for attendees to be immersed in the brand’s history, as well as providing a chance for licensed riders to demo current Kawasaki motorcycles. Kawasaki’s Chris Brull, director of marketing communications, said: “This event is one of the industry’s best opportunities for a brand to cement its historical relevance with the motorcycling community, and Kawasaki is honored to be able to build a performance bridge between its early days and the present.” Hosting a “Kawasaki City” at the MidOhio venue for the event, the company will exhibit many of its groundbreaking models, including the famed 500cc Mach III triple and the 900cc Z-1, recognized as the industry’s first true superbike. According to Brull, Kawasaki riders attending the event will enjoy special perks, including a Kawasaki-only parking area and the chance to participate in a special lap of the Mid-Ohio track. In addition to historical product

displays at AMA Vintage Motorcycle Days, Kawasaki will also showcase its Team Green amateur racing program, currently in its 30th year of providing support to young racers around the country. Since its inception, it has become the most successful program of its type, and has helped boost numerous eventual off-road national champions into the spotlight. AMA Vintage Motorcycle Days is America’s grandest celebration of motorcycling heritage, with national championship vintage racing, the world’s largest motorcycle swap meet, new bike demo rides, seminars, classic motorcycle shows, new product vendors, club displays, and more. Enthusiasts from across the country regularly attend the three-day celebration. Tickets for AMA Vintage Motorcycle Days are available now at MidOhio.com.


FROM ZERO TO NOW

Electric Motorcycle Manufacturer Charged To Go Mainstream By Jamie Elvidge It was Zero Motorcycles’ first formal press introduction, and journalists from around the globe had gathered to sample the entire range of 2011 Zero products—from the motocross-intended MX to the new Cross Urban (XU) street commuter. Changes to the Zero lineup are vast, and include a switch from chain to belt drive for Abe the street, and for the dualAskenazi sport, D and DS models, as well as suspension and brake upgrades, and “a more intelligent and rugged” powertrain for the entire line. The all-new XU model, intended for local commuting, features a removable battery pack, allowing owners who lack a streetlevel charging option to tote them into their home or office for charging. A day spent riding the new models revealed a line of motorcycles that is improved, yet still constrained by the limitations of battery-size-to-output ratios. That said, the bikes that make the most sense are the dirt models intended for backyard MX tracks and trail riding. They offer enough power and suspension to keep things exciting without annoying the neighbors. The street-legal models have a little farther to go, literally. Still, they are viable for those with a round-trip commute under 20 miles—provided you’re comfortable with the $10,000 price range. To find out where Zero is today, and where they hope to go tomorrow, we caught up with Abe Askenazi, Zero’s new vice president of engineering, who was previously the senior director of analysis, test and engineering process at Buell Motorcycles. American Motorcyclist: Who is the Zero motorcycle buyer? Abe Askenazi: On the dirtbike side, the thing that’s really neat is the lack of noise, even more than the fuel advantage and the environmental consciousness of the product. As everyone involved in the AMA knows, there’ve been a lot of land closures lately, and it’s largely due to the noise issues and neighborhood complaints. So the people who will be interested in this product are people who have backyard tracks or land with trails, who want to come home after work and ride, or ride on the weekends, without disturbing anyone. The other thing we’re finding is that people who trail ride together can really enjoy a conversation for once, and better enjoy

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their surroundings. On the street side, the average commute in the United States is about 20 miles, so these bikes are perfect for that. Socially, it’s an environmentally conscious product, so it’s more about the transportation side, the practicality and the green aspect. AM: Do you think the electric motorcycle movement will have a positive effect on the political issues surrounding off-road motorcycle usage? AA: Absolutely. Most of the debate is about the noise issue. There is the erosion factor, but many trails are established in a way to be protective of that, so in that situation, the noise is what keeps coming back to us, and is what creates a challenge. So I think addressing that issue is going to have a huge effect. AM: Is there a safety issue because the motorcycles don’t make enough noise? AA: There is some discussion going on around that, not only for electric motorcycles, but for electric cars as well. I think a lot of people are imagining these bikes are completely silent, and they’re afraid of what that means, but you can hear the tires rolling, and the electric motor does make a sound, it’s just not a mechanical sound. I think it’s an imagined perception, and less of a reality. AM: Do you see Americans gravitating toward electric motorcycles the way they are gravitating toward electric cars? AA: Will it take over as a

primary means of transportation around the entire country? It can’t. There are too many places where you can’t ride year-round, but there are lots of places where it is a possibility, California being one of them. Whether you’re talking about a gas-powered motorcycle or an electric one, either is more efficient and more fun than a car, but the electric motorcycles are much more approachable than regular motorcycles. If someone is considering a move to a gas motorcycle from his or her gas car, it would be easier to feel intimidated by needing to learn how to shift, how to use the powerband, and just by the idea you’re sitting on a hot engine. The Zeros are much more approachable. It’s a sport. It’s fun. And if you can have fun in a way that’s socially responsible, that’s even better. AM: Where do you see Zero Motorcycles in five years? AA: We will continue to make strides to be competitive against internal combustion motorcycles, and in addition we’re going to continue to enhance the electric aspects. We’re going to be pushing the boundaries of fun, efficiency and social consciousness.

Photos Courtesy Zero Motorcycles

RIDING


RIDING

Want to be an AMA tester? E-mail submissions@ama-cycle.org for an application.

PACK MORE STUFF RIGHT Tourmaster Select Tail Bag

MSRP: $84.99 Capacity: 23 liters Tourmaster.com The Tourmaster Select Tail Bag is designed to carry enough gear for several days on the road, and keep it dry with an included rain/dust cover and a 600 denier Carbolex outer shell. Initial mounting requires clever thinking, but simple straps and buckles enable a snug fit, so kiss those bungee cords goodbye. Neoprene strap protectors and a pad protect the bag from rubbing your bike. Zippered pouches along either side offer easy access. The bag’s interior features two pockets, one zippered, the other Velcro. A soft, brushed fleece lining keeps your things pristine, too. Once mounted, it rides along nicely, and rubber rings allow you to secure loose straps. A pouch in the front carries a rain

M E M B E R T E S TED

fly if the weather gets nasty. Arriving at your destination, unclip the bag and carry it like a suitcase with a handle or shoulder strap. And the added bonus? It can store a full-face helmet.—Kevin Parsons It’s a nicely made piece, fairly spacious, with two side pockets and a front pocket for the rain cover. As with all such bags, attaching it properly is paramount. Elastic bungee straps may be convenient, but I prefer the cinch-straps that this bag uses. There are two straps at each corner; four that run front to rear (for the saddlebags), and four side to side. They all tuck into under-bag pockets, stowed out of the way if not used (or just trim them accordingly). My Guzzi has removable bodywork covering the pillion, so I was pleased to find a neoprene base-pad that can be attached to the underside of the bag, discouraging slippage and protecting the finish. In addition, there are four Velcro/ neoprene strap-guards that can be positioned under the straps where they cinch across the bodywork.—Eric Diehl

Securing it to the bike is fairly easy, though more hidden straps would accommodate more models. You may have to get a little creative with the provided mounting straps, and what seems tight enough in the garage may not be when the road gets rough. The construction is what you’d expect from high-quality textile luggage, and its sculpted shape allows it to look like it belongs on your bike’s sporty tail. Riding after dark with the tail bag makes you the prime suspect—when light hits the reflective sides, back, or even top of the bag, the reflective areas explode with luminescence. —Keith Hoekstra


RIDING

Ask the MSF

LONG DAYS IN THE SADDLE You Ask: “I only take one long ride a year, and I put what for me are several long rides back-to-back. Because I normally only commute throughout the rest of the year and take short day trips, my body doesn’t adjust well to the longer rides. What can I do to make these longer rides more bearable?” The MSF Responds: Because motorcycling requires more mental focus and is more physically demanding than driving, fatigue is a valid concern and a real threat to safety. This is especially true if you’re riding alone.

Maintaining a basic exercise routine in the weeks leading up to your ride will help prepare you. Focus on your arms and hands, since they’ll be doing most of the work. Push-ups or weight lifting (with light weights) for your arms and using a traditional V-shaped spring-loaded grip exerciser or rubber ball for your hands will help. And this will help if you’re prone to carpal tunnel syndrome, which can be triggered by holding the throttle open and gripping the handlebars for extended periods. While riding, wear comfortable safety

gear, maintain good posture and, if your saddle allows, change your seating position occasionally so your spine doesn’t get locked into one position and your bottom end doesn’t go numb. Getting plenty of sleep each night during your trip is essential for both physical and mental stamina. When you’re on the road, take a short break every hour or so. Find a safe place to park and stretch. Rest your eyes. Take a long lunch break. Eating a light, protein-rich meal and avoiding caffeine and sugar-laden desserts will help prevent a mid-afternoon energy lull. Have frequent healthy snacks and drink plenty of water. Wear hearing protection, since constant wind and engine/exhaust noise can hasten your fatigue, in addition to the obvious risk it poses to your hearing. Finally, you mention planning for a week’s worth of 400- to 500-mile days. Even at mostly highway speeds, that could be up to eight hours of daily riding. You might want to start off with a shorter day, and build up the daily duration only if your brain and body say, “Hey, we’re fine with this, give us more!” Find more info about the Motorcycle Safety Foundation at MSF-USA.org.

June 11 – August 21

The Vault Is Now Open This summer, visitors will see an exotic collection of motorcycling oddities in their natural habitat: the Harley-Davidson Museum®, Milwaukee, Wisconsin. From secret prototypes to fantastic folk-art creations to “What were they thinking?” contraptions, a must-see array of treasures from the world’s largest collection of Harley-Davidson materials will be on display for a limited time. For more information on our special exhibit, events and programs visit h-dmuseum.com.

The Harley-Davidson Museum logo is among the trademarks of H-D Michigan LLC. © 2011 H-D. All Rights reserved.

1-877-HD-MUSEUM 400 West Canal Street, Milwaukee, WI h-dmuseum.com EXHIBITS | SHOP | RESTAURANTS | FREE PARKING


RIDING

v

Up to Motorcycle Hall of Famer Don Emde for launching an effort to map Hall of Famer Cannonball Baker’s entire coast-to-coast route. (Look for more on Emde’s effort in a future issue of American Motorcyclist.) Up to Polaris, the Minnesotabased maker of all-terrain vehicles and Victory motorcycles, for purchasing the rights to the Indian Motorcycle Co. in an effort to keep the brand alive. Up to the Lake Express Ferry, which has terminals in both Milwaukee and Muskegon, Mich., for allowing motorcycles to ride free for the entire season. More info: Lake-Express.com.

American Motorcyclist Archives

FEBRUARY 1971 Baja On A Sportster

What do you do if you live in Illinois and you want to ride your motorcycle in February? Well, if you’re not an ice racer, one option is to do what Mike Vancil, former AMA director of amateur activities, wrote about in the February 1971 issue: You load up your Harley-Davidson Sportster with camping supplies and point it toward the Mexican Baja Peninsula. Vancil’s trip began deep in a Midwestern winter and ended in sunny Baja, where he was as taken by the laidback, carefree lifestyle of the locals as he was the landscape. “Some of those I encountered refer to their existence as the ‘mañana life,’” which

can be interpreted as “tomorrow will come and that is good.” …Very few ranches have calendars or time pieces; I didn’t see a wristwatch anywhere. It is a beautiful, primitive place.” The real adventure, however, involved the road, or lack thereof. Vancil took his Sportster through sand washes, down whooped-out trails and signed a well-worn motorcyclist register at Anita’s in Rosario. It’s a reminder that adventure is always out there on your motorcycle, regardless of what you ride or the month on the calendar. To read more back issues of American Motorcyclist, see Books.Google.com.

Down to new Cycle News owner, MAG, for allowing the continuation of the personal anti-AMA agenda of the publication’s editor. Up to the Texas Department of Transportation for a new statewide campaign that promotes motorcycle awareness among drivers. Down to Louisiana Gov. Bobby Jindal for his proposal to raid the motorcycle safety program fund for the state’s $1.6 billion budget shortfall.

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RACING Kawasaki’s Ryan Villopoto came out on top in one of history’s most thrilling AMA Supercross Championship battles ever.

AND THEN THERE WAS ONE Ryan Villopoto Triumphs In Thrilling AMA Supercross Season Returning to competition in 2011 after missing nearly an entire season to injury, Monster Energy Kawasaki’s Ryan Villopoto emerged from one of the most competitive AMA Supercross seasons ever with the AMA No. 1 plate. Coming into the final round, four riders had a shot at the title—Villopoto, TwoTwo Motorsports Chad Reed, Rockstar Makita Suzuki’s Ryan Dungey and San Manuel Yamaha’s James Stewart. Stewart was the first contender to move out front in the final main event, only to crash on lap six, collecting AMA Supercross veteran Kevin Windham in the process. Villopoto inherited the lead, followed by Reed and Dungey. On lap 11, Reed moved out front, soon followed by Dungey. Reed and Dungey, separated by just 3 championship points

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coming into the last round, battled hard in the final laps for the win, with Reed coming out on top. That, however, wasn’t enough to wrench the championship from Villopoto, whose third-place finish gave him the title by 4 points. Reed finished second in the final tally with Dungey third. Villopoto said the realization he would win started to take hold when he witnessed Stewart’s crash. “I saw James and Kevin go down—the whoops were tough tonight,” Villopoto said. “We all had to run the same line and you couldn’t avoid it. Luckily I got around [the crash]. I wasn’t pulling away from Chad, so I just let him by, and Ryan [Dungey] was right behind him so then I let him by. I just cruised from there.” The premier 450 class has not been


Photos Ryan Villopoto: Jeff Kardas; Trials: Shan Moore

Honda’s Justin Barcia won the AMA Lites East Region Championship.

RACING

CODY WEBB, PATRICK SMAGE SPLIT IN TEXAS Trials Riders Kick Off Season Trading Wins

kind to Villopoto, who was one of the most dominant 250F riders ever. In 2009, Villopoto blew out his knee early in the outdoor season. In 2010, leading the AMA Supercross season in points and overall wins, Villopoto broke his right leg, requiring surgery. His recovery lasted well into the outdoor season. “I just have to thank everyone at Kawasaki,” said Villopoto, of Poulsbo, Wash. “The team believed in me through thick and thin. We’ll enjoy this. It was a hard-fought battle.” In addition to his 2011 title, Villopoto is a three-time AMA MX Lites Champion (2006-08) and the 2007 AMA SX Lites West Champion. He’s also a three-time class champion racing for the U.S. team at the Motocross of Nations. Other champions decided at the last round were the 2011 AMA Lites West Region Champion, Kawasaki’s Broc Tickle, and the AMA Lites East Region Champion, Honda’s Justin Barcia. Yamaha’s Ryan Sipes won the Dave Coombs Sr. East/ West Shootout.

In recent years, two riders have emerged at the top of the U.S. trials scene, battling for national titles and leading the U.S. team at the annual international Trials des Nations event. After the first round of the AMA/NATC National MotoTrial Series, it appears Cody Webb and Patrick Smage are poised to resume their rivalry for the 2011 season. Riding near the west Texas town of Blackwell, the riders traded wins at the season-opening doubleheader. The Beta-mounted Webb topped Smage by 11 points on the opening day to take the initial lead in the series standings. It was a comeback ride for Webb, who was trailing Smage on the Sherco 2.9 at the end of one lap. The two title hopefuls had little trouble with most sections of the dry-slick event, but near the end of the first lap Webb took a 5 when he displaced a marker in section 12. Smage managed a 2 on the section

Beta’s Cody Webb

and finished the lap with a total of 3. Webb finished with 6. On lap two, Smage failed to make a big wall in section four, a section that Webb would clean. Both riders cleaned the tricky 12th section, and at the end of the second lap Webb had a total of 6 points, having cleaned the entire loop. Smage had 9. On the final go-round, Webb dropped just 2 points while Smage struggled, dropping 10. Webb took the win, 8 points to 19. The second race of the doubleheader was a much closer affair, with Smage claiming the overall win by a single point. The difference came on the second lap when Webb took what he later described as “an uncalled-for point” on what should have been a simple maneuver. Keith Wineland was third both days and sits third in series points. Smage and Webb are tied for the lead.—Shan Moore


GERMAN WUNDERKIND KEN ROCZEN PULLS DOUBLE DUTY KTM Young Gun Gets Taste Of American Racing By Jim Kimball

Red Bull KTM factory racer Ken Roczen has made anything but a muted splash on the U.S. scene. Racing his first season in the United States, contesting the AMA West Region Supercross Series, the flamboyant 17-year-old German has won over numerous U.S. fans with his hardcharging, race-on-the-edge style. Even more impressive, Roczen is living his American dream while racking up a lifetime’s worth of frequent flier miles by simultaneously contesting the 2011 World Motocross GP MX2 Championship, a series he was leading at presstime. American Motorcyclist: Ken, you know motocross well, but Supercross is new to you. How has your experience been? Ken Roczen: I’ve very much enjoyed my American Supercross experience! Coming in to the Supercross series, I had absolutely no experience, and I struggled at the first couple of races. But then it got better and better, and I got on the podium at Anaheim II, and then took a second in Salt Lake City. After the long break in the West Coast Supercross series, when I raced the first two World Motocross GPs, it felt like I was coming back here for my second season in Supercross—so that helped me a lot. AM: You’ve come up to speed well, considering there is not much Supercross in Germany—not to mention Europe in general. KR: Germany does have a very short Supercross series, but it is much more like Arenacross. I have a practice Supercross track at my home, but it’s nothing like these tracks. When I decided to race the AMA West Coast Supercross Lites series, I came over here about a month prior to the season, and I practiced for that one month. Fortunately, it all came pretty quickly to me. It’s strange because I’m really used to the fast tracks of World Motocross, but I was able to adapt well to the indoor stadiums. AM: Other than the U.S. Grand Prix at Glen Helen, what are your plans to return to the United States? KR: I’ll be racing the rest of the GP series, and when we have an off weekend, I will be glad to stay home. Actually the whole style of riding and racing seems somewhat different. It had taken me some time to get used to the shorter race

practice times. But now I should be all ready, and set for next year—I’ll know how everything will go. I’ll know the stadiums, how the pits are, and how the weather will be. AM: Will you race in America full time in 2012—both Supercross and Motocross? KR: It’s not certain yet. We are thinking about racing here full time, though. It’s difficult, because I like racing the GPs, and I have lots of friends over there. If I come here full time, things will change a lot, so we just don’t know yet—but I will be here for Supercross for sure. The American fans have been so nice to me! Nobody here knew that much about me, and I have to say that I did kind of crappy in the beginning of Supercross. But yes, I have really enjoyed spending time with the Supercross fans, and I try to be as nice as possible.


Photos Roczen: Jeff Kardas; Vintage: Dan Focht Motorsports Photography; Kendall: Mark Kariya

RACING

KENDALL NORMAN WINS HARE AND HOUND

Last Year’s Champ Comes Back And Wins

AMA RACING VINTAGE GRAND CHAMPIONSHIPS REV UP Online Entry Available Now At AMAVintageMotorcycleDays.com

Looking to be a part of the biggest vintage motorcycle weekend in the universe? You can register online now using the online entry link at AMAVintageMotorcycleDays.com > Race Your Vintage Bike. Each summer, the AMA Racing Vintage Grand Championships bring AMA amateur national championship racing to AMA Vintage Motorcycle Days. Coming July 2224 to the Mid-Ohio Sports Car Course in Lexington, Ohio, the 2011 event features roadracing, motocross, hare scrambles and trials. In addition, a round of the AMA Racing Vintage Dirt Track National Championship Series goes down at the nearby Ashland County Fairgrounds on Friday evening. “We strive every year to take the AMA Racing Vintage Grand Championships to the next level,” said AMA Director of Racing Joe Bromley. “Thanks to the AMAchartered clubs that step up and help us with this event, we’ve been able to make incremental improvements every year. “Of course, it’s all to support the Motorcycle Hall of Fame, which benefits from the proceeds from AMA Vintage Motorcycle Days and the AMA Racing Vintage Grand Championships,” he continued. For more on the AMA Vintage Grand Championships, see AMAVintageMotorcycleDays.com. In addition to online entry, downloadable PDF forms are available for those who prefer to mail in a check or fax their registration. More information about AMA Vintage Motorcycle Days appears on page 19.

Reigning AMA Racing Kenda Hare and Hound National Champion Kendall Norman had been sidelined this season with a nagging knee injury he suffered just before the first round, but the JCR Honda rider stormed back at round six in Lucerne Valley, Calif., with the overall win. Kawasaki-mounted Jacob Argubright took second, while KTM’s Kurt Caselli claimed third. Norman had to battle back from a mid-pack start at the 80-mile race, charging to just a few seconds off the lead by the halfway mark. On the second lap, he overtook Caselli to put his Honda out front. “It feels great to get back to the series now that my knee is healed up,” Norman said.

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AMA Superbike Nationals and earning a ranking of seventh overall at the end of the season. In 1986, Yoshimura Suzuki debuted its new GSX-R750. While the bike showed great potential, it suffered numerous development problems. Schwantz started 1986 finishing second to future Hall of Famer Eddie Lawson in the Daytona 200, but a string of bad luck plagued him the rest of the season. The 1987 season will go down as one of the most memorable in the history of AMA Superbike racing thanks to Schwantz and future Hall of Famer Wayne Rainey. The duo’s battle was fiercer than anything ever seen before in Superbike racing. It was not uncommon for Schwantz and Rainey to bang into one another at triple-digit speeds. Rainey won the championship, but Schwantz closed out the second half of the season winning five of the six Superbike rounds. In 1988, Suzuki signed Schwantz to race Grand Prix full-time, but before he left he won the Daytona 200—despite fracturing his left forearm in a practice crash. Just two weeks after winning at Daytona, Schwantz burst onto the GP scene with a victory at Suzuka in Japan. He soon became a perennial top Grand Prix rider. His archrival throughout, as he had been at home in the United States, was Rainey. The culmination of Schwantz’ career came in 1993 when he won the world championship. During his Grand Prix racing career, Schwantz racked up 25 career 500cc GP victories, putting him second all-time among American riders behind Lawson. He was the last in the long line of U.S. riders who dominated the 500cc Grand Prix World Championships from the late 1970s to the early 1990s, following in the footsteps of Hall of Famers Kenny Roberts, Freddie Spencer, Lawson and Rainey. Schwantz retired early in the 1995 season, and was inducted into the Motorcycle Hall of Fame in 1999.

HALL OF FAME

Hall of Famer

KEVIN SCHWANTZ Kevin Schwantz came out of Texas and quickly rocketed to prominence as one of America’s best roadracers during the 1980s. By the end of the decade, Schwantz moved to international competition in the 500cc Grand Prix World Championships and became one of the most successful Grand Prix riders of his era. Schwantz was born in Houston on June 19, 1964. His parents owned a motorcycle dealership and he learned to ride motor-

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Star Roadracer On The World Stage cycles at the age of 3. As a teenager, he rode motocross, dirt track and did some roadracing. “When I started roadracing, I just used to ride like I was on the dirt. It wasn’t pretty,” Schwantz recalls. “I just used to lock up the rear brake going into the corner trying to get it stopped with the bike hopping and skittering all over the place. That was the way I thought you did it.” He raced for the Yoshimura Suzuki Superbike team in 1985, winning three


HALL OF FAME in 1967 and have one now. Besides being beautiful, it’s light, easy starting, fast and takes me back to a great time in my life.

motorcycling and motorcyclists. I have been involved in the motorcycle industry since the late ’60’s. I like to think I can help.

AMA member since: 1966. I joined the AMA at my first-ever AMA-sanctioned enduro. It was put on by my good friend [Hall of Famer] Bill Baird’s club, The Rock River Riders.

The biggest challenge facing the Hall of Fame: It seems to me the biggest challenge facing the Hall of Fame is exposure. Once a person is aware of the Hall of Fame and our events, the more they want to know and, hopefully, participate.

Why I’m an American Motorcycle Heritage Foundation (AMHF) Board member: I am a member of the AMHF Board because I care about the past, present and future of motorcycles,

HALL OF FAME BOARD MEMBER PROFILE Don Rosene Born: Rockford, Ill., April 18, 1944. First motorcycle ride: My first motorcycle was a Doodlebug that I wore out in the alley behind our house. In 1958, I got a Cushman Eagle and that pretty much hooked me on motorcycles. Motorcycling experience: My life since 1956 has been my motorcycle experience. And it’s still happening now. Work experience: After college I got a job in the new field of computers. That seemed to be a career with a future. After a few years, I quit to work with [Motorcycle Hall of Famer] Edison Dye selling motocross accessories from a truck as well as selling tickets at the early Inter-Am races. After a couple of years with Edison Dye’s company, I went to work for Penton Imports riding, racing and selling Penton motorcycles and Hi Point Accessories. Maybe those jobs didn’t have much of a future for most, but they did for me. Why I ride: I have owned a BMW, Kawasaki, KTM, Ducati, Triumph dealership in Anchorage, Alaska, for over 30 years. I might not ride as much as I once did, but almost everything I do involves motorcycles. Current bike: I have a large collection of motorcycles, but as is often said your favorite bike is your most recent purchase. I have a new Triumph Scrambler. Best bike ever: My most favorite bike is my 1967 Triumph TR6C. I bought one new

The AMHF raises funds for the Hall of Fame. Learn more, and find out how you can contribute, at MotorcycleMuseum.org.

Win these bikes!

ONE TO RULE TO RIDE Z1 restored by John Bova of Johnny’s Vintage Motorcycle Company in Wadsworth, Ohio.

Support The Motorcycle Hall Of Fame The coolest bike on the road in the early 1970s? The fire-breathing Kawasaki Z1, the machine that took the four-cylinder Superbike to new levels, with a 903cc, dual-overhead-cam engine and muscle-bike styling that re-wrote streetbike rules for decades.

The Z1’s DNA lives on today in the Kawasaki Z1000—a modern interpretation of the muscle bike, with a fuel-injected,1,043cc, dual-overhead-cam motor that can take you anywhere you want to go.

A minimum donation of $5 per ticket or $20 for five tickets is suggested, but larger donations are encouraged.

See the complete rules at MotorcycleMuseum.org or call (614) 856-2222.


HALL OF FAME

Photos Grogan Studios

RANDY HAWKINS’ 2004 YAMAHA YZ250 Hall Of Famer’s Last Championship Ride Randy Hawkins’ prowess as an enduro rider earned him a coveted spot in the Motorcycle Hall of Fame, and this is one of his championshipwinning motorcycles: a 2004 Yamaha YZ250.

Between 1987 and 2004, Hawkins earned 73 AMA National race wins. He won the AMA National Enduro Championship seven times, and was runner-up for the title four times. He also competed in the International

Six Days Enduro (ISDE), earning 13 gold medals and two silver medals. He captained his club team at the 2003 ISDE in Brazil, taking the overall second-place finish. Hawkins’ titles also include the

Hall of Fame features the machines and people of the Motorcycle Hall of Fame in Pickerington, Ohio. The Hall of Fame is a 501(c)3 non-profit corporation that receives support from the AMA and from motorcycling enthusiasts. For info and directions, visit MotorcycleMuseum.org, or call (614) 856-2222.

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HALL OF FAME

1991 and 1994 AMA 125cc National Reliability Series Championships, and three Southeastern Enduro & Trail Riders Association (SETRA) Enduro Grand Championships. In 2004, Hawkins chose this lightweight Yamaha YZ250 to be his weapon in the AMA National Enduro Championship wars. The bike boasts nothing out of the

ordinary, but in the hands of a gifted rider like Hawkins it was formidable. Powered by a two-stroke, 249cc engine, this Yamaha sported a Keihin carb, Yamaha head, piston, ignition, frame, KYB forks and rear suspension, Excel hubs and rims and Bridgestone tires. The transmission is a five-speed. Hawkins rode the wheels off the

machine in 2004 in the enduro series, earning three wins, five second-place finishes and two thirds. That was good for the 2004 AMA National Enduro Championship title. His is just one of the fascinating stories and machines highlighted in the Motorcycle Hall of Fame on the AMA campus in Pickerington, Ohio. To learn more, see MotorcycleMuseum.org.

July 2011

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ALL

PEOPLE WHO RIDE to work on motorcycles are different than people who drive to work in cars. And, arguably, they’re

BIKE

better in some fundamental

For Many Riders, Motorcycles Are Tools.

the world over on June 20.

For Commuting. For Running Errands. For Leaving Your Car At Home. For Saving

ways. Just ask former AMA Board Member Andy Goldfine, the guy who gave the world the Aerostich Roadcrafter suit and created “Ride To Work Day,” which will be celebrated by motorcyclists “By definition, motorcyclists aren’t normal,” he says. “The

Fuel. For Being Green. For Connecting to

clinical term is ‘non-

the World. And Even, Some Think, For

normative,’ which means

Making You A Better Person.

THE

ALL

TIME

that riding a motorcycle is not the normal choice, because the default in our culture is cars.” The beauty, though, is that the choice to ride makes all the difference. “It makes your life richer and better to be on a motorcycle, and ride anywhere you would otherwise be driving,” Goldfine says. It’s good on many levels. It’s good for you, and the people around you. It’s better for traffic flow. It’s better on the environment. It makes you a stronger, better and more impactful person. It’s a win-win-win.” For some, motorcycling is a passion that, by necessity or design, fits in around other things in life. For others, though, motorcycling borders Continued on page 37


BE A PART OF THE MOVEMENT ON JUNE 20

IT ALL STARTED with a tongue-incheek slogan. Instead of the classic “Ride to Live, Live to Ride,” Goldfine turned the saying on its end for a t-shirt that said, “Work to Ride, Ride to Work.” Aside from being funny and selling well in his Aerostich catalog, it captured the essence of utility riding so well that some friends at Motorcycle Consumer News magazine, Fred Rau and Patty Carpenter, urged him to call for a national Ride to Work Day. Goldfine picked a day, started

publicizing it in his publications and enlisted the help of motorcycle magazines. “It really started as a grassroots advocacy ad-hoc thing,” he says. “10 years later, the Internet came along, and I started a website. It’s taken off, and people now do it all over the world.” The idea, he says, is extremely simple: Get people to ride to work. Aside from being fun and a show of solidarity among motorcyclists, the movement helps show the public and politicians that motorcyclists—and

motorcycles—matter. Along the way, it became a national cause, and in recent years with backing by the world motorcycling body, the Federation Internationale de Motocyclisme (FIM), it’s gone global. “It’s hard to measure, but it’s possible that it’s the largest motorcycle event in the world,” Goldfine says. “There could be more than 1 million people doing it. “ This year’s observance of Ride To Work Day will be the 20th annual event. See you on the road June 20!

Photo Derek Montgomery

RIDE TO WORK DAY

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TIPS FOR A MOTORCYCLE-ONLY EXISTENCE ALTHOUGH SHE ADMITS many of them are tailored to her specific situation (see page 38), Rebecca Berneck offers these tips for anyone who is considering parking their four wheels for two. Plan to transport. “I don’t use sidebags because I like the sleek-bike look. A lot can fit in a good, proper backpack. I also carry a cargo net. My new backpack can carry my helmet.” Safety first. “Take the Motorcycle Safety Foundation course. Understand

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FLEXIBILITY AND ATTITUDE ARE KEY

your bike. Always remain alert. Learn to constantly shift your focus to the cars on the side of the road, the hole in the asphalt, pedestrians.” Respect the bike. “If you’re a new rider, you’ll be excited and constantly thinking about the fun of it, but you need to stay focused and serious.” Get a good lid. “Obviously, a helmet is critical. I like full-face.” Wear what you’re comfortable with. “I prefer my Vanson leather jacket when

possible. But leather gets hot, so you’ll want to have a choice. Vented gear is great.” When you only ride a motorcycle, you always have to be prepared. “When it rains, I have an Aerostich suit. This is awesome because it can accommodate a stretchy little back dress, and boots. I take off the suit, and, boom, I’m in a dress.” Compromise. “When I’m riding a lot, I go to my hairdresser and I say, ‘Hey, it’s helmet season, cut it short.’”


on religion. For them, the motorcycle is the first choice in the garage nearly all the time. While there’s no right way to be a motorcyclist, utility riders tend to approach the world a little differently. And they tend to come away from the choice to be daily riders with a viewpoint that’s just a little different than car drivers. Here’s a look at three people who have made that choice in a big way.

Photo Julie Monacella

Ride To Work Evangelist

A car isn’t for me anymore. I ride and race motorcycles. It’s just who I’ve become. I don’t know if I’ll ever go back.” – Rebecca Berneck

You’d have to look pretty hard to find a more dedicated daily motorcyclist than Andy Goldfine. A rider since he was 13, he converted his love for all things twowheeled into one of motorcycling’s most well-known mail-order companies, RiderWearHouse. His Aerostich suit, which debuted in the 1980s as the first mass-market textile riding suit, created a new category of riding gear that other companies are still chasing today. But in many ways, the successful company Goldfine created is merely an outgrowth of his passion, which is riding a motorcycle as much as possible. That means riding to work, even in the dead of a Duluth, Minn., winter. It means running errands on a motorcycle. Lunch meetings, pleasure riding. Thousand-mile round-trip business trips to Chicago. In fact, it means doing nearly everything on a motorcycle. Goldfine does own a car, but he estimates he puts only a few thousand miles a year on it, usually for long-distance winter trips. The rest of the time, he’s on a bike. Doing that, he says, requires making a choice. And the easiest choice is to commit to riding to work on a regular basis. “Commuting is the number one way to use your motorcycle more,” he says. “The playful aspect of motorcycling takes care of itself. The vacations and Saturday rides are things you want to do. “To make riding to work really successful, you have to make a decision that you’re going to do it. You have to decide, ‘I want do this; I want this to be a part of my life’ and execute on that,” he says. “Then you find ways to do what it takes to handle all the logistical considerations, and the financial considerations, and you just do it.” The obstacles—rain, cold, heat, the need to wear work clothes, the logistics of carrying things like groceries and more—can seem large. But Goldfine suggests that you just break them down. First off, he says, you have to set your bike up for the commute. A Honda Gold Wing, for example, may not be the best commuter for downtown San Francisco, though it would be perfect if you commuted between San Antonio and Austin in Texas. A short, intown commute would be perfect for a budget bike or a scooter. You must also budget for the proper gear. If you’re riding every day, consider whether you must arrive at work or do your errands in work attire. In other words, evaluate for your particular circumstances. “If you’re in a hostile riding environment like Los Angeles, and you’re on the freeway, then good protective clothing and everything is important,” he notes. “If you’re in a more benign traffic environment like Duluth, you can probably ride all your life in jeans and a jacket.” The need to wear work clothes can be challenging, though simple things like leaving a pair of extra shoes at work, so you can change out of your boots, can certainly help. In Goldfine’s case, though, the work-clothes dilemma is exactly what set him on the path of creating what he considered to be the ultimate commuter suit: the Aerostich Roadcrafter. Nearly every part of the suit that made Goldfine and Aerostich Continued on page 38

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Photo Chad Ainsworth

famous was designed with utility motorcycle riding in mind—the pockets throughout, the new-for-this-year waterproof zipper, and, of course, the full-length zipper that runs from left ankle to neck that allows for ease of use. “The nuances of the design are focused on everyday use, and it goes on and off quickly,” he says. Carrying stuff on your bike can be trickier, but again, a few strategies can help. Many riders favor a lockable top case for helmet and riding gear. Goldfine prefers a more straightforward approach. “My bikes have a couple of bungie cords permanently hooked to the back, and the frames have accessory points for hookups— essentially a bunch of hook points that are bolted onto the bike,” he says. “On my XR650, I have four on each side, plus a rack over the rear fender, a backpack and a spare backpack on the bike. With that, I’m able to haul all kinds of stuff.” The more you ride to work, to the store and elsewhere, the more committed you become, and the simpler the process gets, both physically and mentally, Goldfine notes. “I have a saying—‘fluency comes with frequency,’” he says. “Things like putting on a helmet or having your gear handy or carrying things on a motorcycle get easier every day. The first time you pull into a parking place, and have to lock your helmet to the bike with your gloves inside, it takes a little time, but it gets easier every time.” For his part, Goldfine says he’s gotten so used to riding every day that when he pulls into his garage, he doesn’t even use the kickstand. “I ride it to the right side of the garage, turn off the key, step off and lean it over to the right against the wall,” he says. Motorcycling regularly can save money and resources over driving a car—sometimes significantly. But perhaps the best part of using your motorcycle like a tool, Goldfine says, is the way it changes your view of yourself and the world. “The choice to be a motorcyclist makes you stronger. Your father told you to think for yourself, and riding for utility is the embodiment of that—you have to think of how to make it work,” he says. “Motorcycling is sort of a subversive activity, but in practice it makes you think. Even the way it forces you to manage risk is good. The more we outsource risk management to other people, the less complete our lives feel.” Yet, there’s great satisfaction in getting it right, Goldfine says. “It’s better for so many reasons,” he says. “You’re less impactful on the planet. You consume fewer resources. Traffic flows better. It’s like the saying goes: One less car. It makes you a better, more self-reliant person. “When I walk into the room as a motorcyclist, I feel grateful,” he says. “I’m fortunate to have the opportunity to ride.”

Rebecca Berneck: Who Needs A Car?

When AMA Member Rebecca Berneck goes in, she’s all in. The Evanston, Ill., resident has been riding motorcycles for only a few years, but in that time, she’s become such a proponent of the motorcycling lifestyle that she’s ditched her car in favor of twowheeled transportation. And her main ride around the Chicago area—Evanston is a near-north suburb—isn’t necessarily the latest and greatest commuter sled. Her day-to-day ride is a 1975 Honda CB360T. For long-distance trips, she has a 1976 BMW R90/6, and for the track there’s a 1975 Honda CB400F. “It wasn’t a decision of going vintage,” she says. “I just love the look of old bikes. The more you can see through a bike the more beautiful it is.” Continued on page 40

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Riding becomes a habit. It’s a lifestyle. It becomes a whole different way of looking at things, and it can keep you sane.” – David Saliceti


COMMUTE THE RIGHT WAY DAVID SALICETI SAYS THAT commuting the right way just takes common sense. Above all, wear all the gear all the time (ATGATT), and keep your head in the game. Gear up. “I always wear my gear. I’d rather be hot and sweaty than get a skin graft.” Use all your senses. “Motorcycling makes you focus. You notice so much more than an average driver. On a bike, you’re engaged. I always felt safer on a bike because of that engagement.” Tech is good. “Let’s just say the ABS and traction control work great on

GOING THE DISTANCE WITH STYLE

my bike. Traction control is a beautiful thing, but it’s still mechanical and can fail. Never ride to your bike’s limits.” Dress to be flexible. “I wear thermals, then sweats under my riding pants because it might be 35 in the morning and 65 in the afternoon. Always go with ballistic outer protection. For cold days, heated gear works great. I probably have 12 sets of gloves and each pair works better differently.” Spend wisely. “For some items, buy several on discount. For others, buy one good one. I bought a Shoei helmet last year, and a high-quality pair of waterproof boots are definitely worth it.”

Be smart. “When it’s dark, slow down. And every morning look at the weather. I’m constantly looking at conditions and adapting.” Ride under pressure. “Check your tire pressure every day. Even if you have pressure indicators.” Pack for you and the bike. “I always have my patch kit, extra bulbs and duct tape. I have one of those little flashlights that you can wind, compressed air canisters, extra gloves, and, of course, a rain suit.” Luggage space is good. “I have a tankbag, sidebags and net bungies.

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heels in the backpack, but it wasn’t really working. I picked riding over dressing corporate, and it’s worked well.” Berneck says that the same enthusiasm that allows her to be accepted in a business setting also attracts others who are interested in riding. She often finds herself engaged in promoting motorcycling to friends, colleagues and complete strangers. “I was at an event last night, and a CPA friend of mine asked about getting a motorcycle, so we sat and talked about it,” she says. Berneck says that she’s thrilled to embrace the role. Indeed, she’s not ready to go back to owning a car any time soon. Berneck, who also has two teenage daughters to transport around the city, admits there are challenges to being a motorcycle-only commuter. “Going to the grocery store can be a real pain,” she says. Nevertheless, she says a car is just not worth it. “I ride and race motorcycles. It’s just who I’ve become,” she says. “I don’t know if I’ll ever go back.”

Super Commuter

David Saliceti, 42, knows the secret of conquering a long commute: options. For five years as an administrator for the Coast Guard, this former paratrooper commuted daily from Culpeper, Va., to Washington, D.C.—70 miles each way using the shortest route, longer if he took his time. “I had 30 different routes I would take,” Saliceti says. “I would go north to I-66, or over to I-95, which I liked because of the HOV lanes. Then, between I-66 and I-95, there are numerous backroads. I would work my way over to Manassas, then up. There were just so many alternatives.” Saliceti says he tried driving, taking the commuter train and sharing a ride in van, but the car was “a nightmare,” taking the train was a two-and-a-half-hour affair and the van only depressed him because “it was just more office gossip, and it’s not like Vegas. What’s said in the van doesn’t stay in the van.” His motorcycle, he says, was a cure for everything. “I had a 2002 BMW R1150R,” he says. “I rode quite a bit, once putting 50,000 miles on that bike in 14 months. I always wanted to try riding the motorcycle to work, and then I just went for it, and I’ve been into it 100 percent ever since.” Saliceti says riding the motorcycle to work is relaxing and gives him time to think. He says he doesn’t listen to music. He keeps his mind clear and focuses on the ride and enjoying the feel, sights and smells of the road. “In the morning, it would wake me up,” he says. “In the afternoon, it was my de-stress time. It also is economic. The bike I ride now, a 2008 BMW K1200S, gets about 40 miles to the gallon. It saves on gas, and I ride it year round—as cold as 10 degrees and as hot as over 100.” Now, Saliceti says he could never go back to using a car as he default vehicle. “Riding becomes a habit,” he says. “It’s a lifestyle. It becomes a different way of looking at things, and it can keep you sane.” •

Photo Chad Ainsworth

The demands of her company—a small business consultancy—don’t lend themselves well to running on public transportation schedules, so despite the Chicago area’s ample alternatives, those vintage bikes get a lot of use, even during Chicago’s winters. “The best thing you can do to winterize your bike is have a heated garage,” she says. “But while I do take them out in the winter, I am pretty cautious. If the roads are somewhat slick, I don’t ride.” Berneck says that while she’s always felt at home around motorcycles—her dad always had a bike—she never got herself a two-wheeled motorized vehicle until 2002 when she bought a Vespa. “It was so much easier to zip around, and parking in Chicago was a breeze on the scooter,” she remembers. “Five years later, in 2007, a friend asked why I had never tried a motorcycle. I did, and haven’t looked back.” From there, Berneck progressed steadily but quickly. She got out of the city. She went for long rides into Wisconsin. She got on the track at Blackhawk Farms in South Beloit, Ill. She started land-speed racing. A lot of that had to do with making friends with the right people. “There’s a group of passionate riders here, ChiVinMoto,” she says. “We ride. We race. This is what we do. They helped me a lot as I was getting started.” After Berneck and her friends conquered the mechanical demons that come with owning old motorcycles, she had to tackle a professional one. Because she meets a lot with clients, a professional presence is critical. At first, she thought making the transition to a motorcycle-only existence would force her to compromise on her business appearance. Instead, she soon discovered that stressing over how she dressed was compromising her love of riding. “Motorcycles are my life now,” she says. “It’s become what I am. In addition to my business, I’m also on the board of directors of the Evanston Chamber of Commerce. I’m always showing up at meetings with my helmet and gear in tow. I’m accepted. I can be me and still be professional. I tried putting


For more than 25 years, Al Holtsberry has supported the AMA. Now we’re offering something special for him and all other AMA Life Members. Welcome to Life Member Plus! We designed the new Life Member Plus program to stay connected with our Life Members and reward them for their years of dedication to the AMA. Offering up a package that includes American Motorcyclist magazine and AMA Roadside Assistance at a special discounted rate, Life Member Plus is a money-saving value. The new program is 100 percent optional, so if you choose not to enroll, you still receive all the current benefits of life membership—a voice on behalf of motorcycling in the halls of government, the ability to sign up for AMA-sanctioned events, money-saving benefits and more. With Life Member Plus, you get all that, plus AMA Roadside Assistance and American Motorcyclist magazine. And stay tuned for additional Life Member benefits to come. AMA Life Member Plus Includes: • FREE AMA Roadside Assistance • 12 issues of American Motorcyclist magazine • AMA Life Member Plus Membership card, pin, and decal every year • A voice protecting motorcyclists’ rights at the federal, state and local levels • Continued access to AMA Rights, Riding, Racing and Rewards—including money-saving discounts

Sign up now! (800) AMA-JOIN (262-5646) or visit AmericanMotorcyclist.com

$29 PER YEAR


WHAT HAS THE AMA

DONE FOR YOU LATELY?

F

or almost 90 years, the AMA has been at the forefront in the world of motorcycling—fighting for motorcyclists’ rights, sanctioning some of the greatest racing and riding events on the planet, and ensuring a level playing field for participants in all AMA events. Did you know that you’re able to ride a motorcycle in a high-occupancy vehicle (HOV) lane thanks to the AMA? Or that the AMA successfully worked with riders to stop proposed bike bans on streets in cities such as Chicago? Or that it helped

created the federal Recreational Trails Program, which provides funds from gas taxes to develop and maintain trails? As the world’s largest motorcycling rights organization, the AMA advocates for your interests in the halls of local,

AMA RIGHTS: NOBODY FIGHTS HARDER FOR YOUR RIGHT TO RIDE Bike bans. Land closures. Checkpoints. Plenty of people don’t like motorcyclists. We work for you—to stop them cold. As the country’s premier motorcycling advocacy group, the AMA promotes the motorcycling lifestyle and targets anti-motorcycling ordinances and bills. For example, in 2010, the AMA monitored 1,380 pieces of legislation in all 50 states and Washington, D.C., taking action as necessary. YOUR VOICE, AMPLIFIED—The AMA has legislative experts and lobbyists based in Washington, D.C., Ohio and California, along with grassroots activists in nearly every state. KIDS JUST WANT TO RIDE—Through the implementation of the Consumer Product Safety Improvement Act (CPSIA) of 2008, federal bureaucrats have effectively blocked the sale of kid-sized motorcycles. The AMA and others are working diligently to stop this act. KEEP OFF MY MOTORCYCLE!—Every year, it seems, a new bill is introduced that would ban you from customizing parts of your motorcycle and stifling your creativity, style and fun. The AMA fights these laws. NO ETHANOL IN MY BIKE—The AMA is opposing the use of fuels containing increased levels of ethanol until they can conclusively be proven safe for high-revving and air-cooled motorcycle engines. MOTORCYCLE-ONLY CHECKPOINTS— Several states, including Utah, Georgia and New York, have forced motorcyclists—and only motorcyclists—to go through rigorous equipment and paperwork traffic checkpoints while other motorists rolled by unmolested. The AMA is working

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to stop this discriminatory practice. STOP THE LAND GRAB—Every year, anti-access forces try to close as much public land as they can to responsible motorized recreation. With your help, the AMA is working to stop them in their tracks. DISTRACTED DRIVERS—Distracted and inattentive drivers pose a major threat to the safety of motorcyclists. The AMA is an

state and federal government, among international governing organizations and in the court of public opinion. Through member clubs, promoters and partners, the AMA sanctions more motorsports competition and motorcycle recreational events than any other organization. AMA members also get money-saving discounts from dozens of well-known suppliers of motorcycle services, gear and apparel, bike rental, transport, hotel stays and more. Plus, through its support of the Motorcycle Hall of Fame, the AMA preserves the heritage of motorcycling for future generations. At this point, you may be thinking, “This reads like AMA promotional material,” which, indeed, it is. And all of that is fine, but perhaps what you really want to know, specifically, is, “What has the AMA done for me lately?” Here are just a few of the highlights.

active participant with federal officials in the war on distracted driving. TRACKING UNFAIR LAWS IN ALL 50 STATES— Every year, AMA legislative experts track thousands of bills in all states and in Congress, taking action and effecting change whenever a bill threatens our freedom. PUBLIC LAND ACCESS—For years, nearly 43 million acres of federal land in numerous states have been locked up by bureaucratic rules, despite that local land managers think it should be open. The AMA is working with legislators to open those


lands, where appropriate, for responsible off-highway riding. PREVENTING CRASHES BEFORE THEY HAPPEN— Thanks to the urging of the AMA and its members, the federal government has launched a national study into the causes of motorcycle crashes. HIGH-OCCUPANCY VEHICLE (HOV) LANE ACCESS—AMA lobbyists are hard at work on Capitol Hill to ensure that motorcyclists can keep their access to High-OccupancyVehicle (HOV) lanes. GETTING YOU COVERED—Some health insurance policies don’t cover medical care if you’re injured on a motorcycle. The AMA is fighting to ensure you will be covered. FIGHTING BIKE BANS—When cities try to ban bikes from streets, the AMA fights back. The AMA got Congress to pass a law barring bike bans on streets built or maintained with federal funds. VOTE LIKE A MOTORCYCLIST—The AMA produces the country’s only comprehensive national voter guide for motorcyclists so that riders know how their elected officials acted on, and voted on, motorcycle-related issues. RIDING TRAILS—When you buy gas for your off-highway vehicle, the gas tax money goes to the federal Recreational Trails Program The AMA is working to ensure that federal lawmakers don’t kill the program. ACTION MADE EASY—AMA members enjoy access to easy-to-use online tools at American Motorcyclist.com > Rights that deliver impactful messages that get results from decisionmakers.

AMA RIDING: GET THE MOST FROM YOUR MOTORCYCLE Street Or Trail, The AMA Makes The Ride Better. Nothing beats swinging a leg over your bike, firing it up, pointing the front wheel somewhere great and rolling out for another adventure. With the AMA along for the ride, you know you’re getting the most from your riding.

GREAT ROADS DATABASE—Thanks to the expert knowledge of thousands of AMA members, you can find the best roads in any state and at any time online at AmericanMotorcyclist.com. RALLIES—The best rallies in the country carry the AMA logo, from mega-rallies like Americade and the Golden Aspen Rally, all the way to local events in cities across the country. The AMA sanctions more than 3,000 rides, rallies and races. AMA TRAILS ATLAS—A thorough listing of off-road riding areas across the country is available only to AMA members online at AmericanMotorcyclist.com. STATE LAWS DATABASE—No matter where you ride, find out the local laws governing off-road bikes and riding at the AMA website. ADVICE FOR KIDS—It’s important for kids to get the safest and most fun off-road experience. AmericanMotorcyclist.com has in-depth stories and tips just for kids and parents. CRUISING—Poker runs, toy runs, one-day mini-rallies—the AMA sanctions the best, all searchable online. ORGANIZED TOURS—AMA Partner EagleRider offers a comprehensive list of full-service tours, with a discount for AMA members. AMA GRAND TOURS—Enjoy a season-long challenge ride that takes you to dozens of places organized around a central theme with AMA Grand Tours with KOA

Along the Way. Complete the challenge and get t-shirts, prizes and more. NEW RIDERS—As a motorcyclist, you know first-hand how important it is for new riders to get the right information as they come up to speed. AmericanMotorcyclist.com has a special area just for new riders. ADVENTURE TOURING—If you live for big-bore touring on gravel roads and two-track, the AMA Yamaha Super Tenere Adventure Riding Series is for you, with dozens of events nationwide. DUAL-SPORT RIDING—The AMA KTM National Dual-Sport Trail Riding Series offers up dozens of events nationwide where all you do is show up on your dual-sport bike, get a detailed map and ride local trails. WOMEN MOTORCYCLISTS—The AMA has staged four AMA Women & Motorcycling National Conferences since the late 1990s, and regularly features women riders in the pages of this magazine. TIPS AND TRICKS—This magazine and the AMA website, AmericanMotorcyclist.com, are valuable sources of information for everything from secrets for smart touring and tips for group riding to planning trips and buying a used bike. AMA CLUBS—Visit the “Clubs & Promoters” area of AmericanMotorcyclist.com and search for on- and off-road clubs in your area. Clubs range from highly organized groups that stage large events, rallies and rides, to small, informal groups of riders who enjoy loose organization and camaraderie. START YOUR OWN CLUB—Starting a club is easy. Get info online at AmericanMotorcyclist. com > Clubs & Promoters.


AMA RACING: RACE WITH THE BEST AMA Racing Is The Gold Standard for Motorcycle Competition. From local races for kids to the top rung of motorcycle racing in the country, the path is clear. And it starts with AMA Racing.

ACCESS—Your AMA card is your license to compete, giving you access to thousands of local, regional and national championship events all over the United States. RULES—The AMA offers a standardized national rulebook, written by AMA Congress, that ensures fairness and legitimacy. RESULTS—AMA Racing compiles results submitted by clubs and promoters from all over the country in all racing disciplines sanctioned by the AMA. Find them at AmericanMotorcyclist.com. FAIRNESS—Skill-based class assignments at an AMA-sanctioned event are based on a standardized classification process detailed in the rulebook. That means when you line up at an AMA race, the guys and gals to your left and right are about your speed.

TOP AWARDS—AMA Racing confers the highest honors in amateur motorcycle competition with the Horizon Award, which recognizes the best up-and-coming racers in many disciplines, as well as other national-caliber awards for up-and-coming youth riders and vets. NATIONAL AMATEUR CHAMPIONSHIPS—Only AMA racers are eligible to win the esteemed AMA Racing national No. 1 plate in their discipline, and to compete in the series and events that award them.

Membership Has Money-Saving Benefits From AMA Roadside Assistance to discounts on insurance, lodging, apparel, motorcycle parts and accessories and more, the AMA offers a comprehensive slate of money-saving benefits and services that make AMA memberships an exceptional value. For the complete and most up-to-date list of AMA benefits—from a 10 percent BikeBandit.com discount to discounts on motorcycle rentals, motorcycle shipping, lodging and more, go to AmericanMotorcyclist.com > Membership.

AMA RACING CHAMPIONSHIP BANQUET—Every year, AMA Racing honors its racing champions at a one-of-a-kind gala banquet. RIDER INSURANCE—Optional coverage is available for competitors to help pay medical bills in the event of injury.

A HIGHER STANDARD—To be eligible for an AMA sanction, a club or promoter must undergo risk-management training and have competent medical staff on location.

A VOICE IN MAKING THE RULES—AMA Racing rules are recommended by AMA Congress, a volunteer body devoted to fair, equitable and logical rules. They hear your concerns.

ALL TYPES OF COMPETITION—If you can race it on a motorcycle, the AMA is involved. AMA racers can compete in every discipline.

REFEREE AND PROMOTER TRAINING—AMA Racing requires that referees, track owners and promoters receive training, making for a better experience for racers.

THE BEST PLACE TO GROW—With a logical path from novice classes all the way to the pro level, AMA riders advance to become the best in the world.

AMA REWARDS: SAVE MONEY, HAVE FUN—ON MORE THAN JUST MOTORCYCLING

PARENTAL FOCUS—Few things are more important than a good, fair and growth-building experience for kids. The AMA keeps the focus on what’s important.

Help Is Never More Than A Phone Call Away

Even if you break down only once, AMA Roadside Assistance—which covers all of your, and your family members’, motorcycles, cars, trucks and RVs—can more than pay for the cost of your AMA membership. Best of all, AMA Roadside Assistance is available at no additional charge to AMA Members who chose the convenience of automatically renewing their AMA membership. To join, call the AMA today at (800) AMA-JOIN (262-5646).

AMA Life Member Plus

AMA Life Members are among the elite in the motorcycling world. Now, there’s a new program that rewards these riders with even more AMA benefits: AMA Life Member Plus. The $29-a-year program includes AMA Roadside Assistance, 12 issues of American Motorcyclist magazine, an AMA Life Member Plus membership card, pin and decal. There’s no obligation to join the AMA Life Member Plus program. To enroll, call the AMA at (800) AMA-JOIN (262-5646).


A few of the hundreds of AMA-sanctioned events this month, detailed on the following pages.

GO RIDE

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Photos 1: Open Image Studio; 5: Peter Mathis/KTM; 8: AMA

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Mark your calendar for July 22-24 and plan to attend one of the most spectacular events of the year: AMA Vintage Motorcycle Days at the Mid-Ohio Sports Car Course in Lexington, Ohio. Tens of thousands of enthusiasts attend this Motorcycle Hall of Fame fund-raising event every summer. Take in the nation’s largest motorcycle swap meet, vintage racing, demo rides and more. Info: AMAVintageMotorcycleDays.com.

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July marks the halfway point in the battle for supremacy in the Lucas Oil AMA Pro Motocross Championship Series. Check out the action July 2 in Buchanan, Mich., July 16 in Millville, Minn., and July 23 in Washougal, Wash. For the full schedule, see page 50.

3

The 35th annual Ramapo 500 Road Tour will be held July 16-17 on 500 miles of carefully chosen scenic roads in New York. Sign-in takes place from 7 a.m. to 9 a.m. on July 16 at the On the Way Gourmet Café in the New Duck Cedar

Plaza, 549 Route 17 in Tuxedo Park, N.Y. Info: Ramapomc.org.

Adventure Riding Series. For the full schedule, see page 51.

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There’s a full slate of action in the AMA Pro Grand National Championship Series this month, starting July 9 in Hagerstown, Md. The stars of the dirt oval then move on to Lake Odessa, Mich., to battle on July 23, and end the month on July 30 in Sacramento, Calif. For the full schedule, see page 50.

5

The Six Days of Michigan is a mustdo event for dual-sport riders. Set for July 23-30 in Newberry, Mich., this prestigious event is part of the AMA KTM National Dual Sport Trail Riding Series. Info: CycleConservationClub.org.

6

If you’re looking for big fun on your adventurer-tourer, than take a look at the Dualsport Northwest Adventure Rally that will be held July 27-31 in Stevenson, Wash. This is one of the many exciting events in the AMA Yamaha Super Tenere

The AMA Racing Dirt Track Grand Championships that feature the stars of tomorrow will be held July 25-30 at the Du Quoin (Ill.) State Fairgrounds. Info: NAActionSports.com.

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Any time is the right time to get in on the AMA Grand Tours. You can ride at your own pace and take in sights and sounds that you otherwise might miss. Get going on the AMA Right to Ride, USA Four Corners, Smoke Chasing 2011 or Travel the USA with KOA grand tour. Info, see page 51.

COMING UP For loads of atmosphere and action, check out the AMA Racing Hillclimb Grand Championships Aug. 13-14 at the famed Devil’s Staircase in Oregonia, Ohio. Info: DaytonMC.com.

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JUL 9: TAFT: 2 DAY EVENT, TAFT MOTORCYCLE CLUB, (661) 577-7178,

JUL 17: WEDRON: MOTO PRO INC, (815) 4319913, FOXVALLEYOFFROAD.COM

JUL 24: GORMAN: PROSPECTORS MC, (626) 285-9104,

JUL 24: CANON: CANTON MOTORCYCLE CLUB INC, (309) 202-1144, CANTONMC.COM

SHORT TRACK

MILE

JUL 9: LODI : LODI MOTORCYCLE CLUB, (209) 368-8718,

JUL 30: DU QUOIN: NORTH AMERICA ACTION SPORTS, LLC., (989) 871-3356, NAACTIONSPORTS.COM

JUL 16: LODI: LODI MOTORCYCLE CLUB, (209) 368-8718, JUL 29: LODI : LODI MOTORCYCLE CLUB, (209) 368-8718 COLORADO COMPETITION

ALABAMA RECREATIONAL ROAD RUN JUL 30: TALLADEGA: MARCH OF DIMES-AL, (334) 277-7691, BIKERSFORBABIES.ORG ARIZONA

JUL 22: MORMAN LAKE: ABATE-AZ INC, (602) 222-2832, FOREVERLODGING.COM ARKANSAS

JUL 10: MILLIKEN: TWO RIVERS RACING LLC, (970) 587-5770

JUL 10: PINCKNEYVILLE: EURO RACEWAY, (618) 327-9530,

JUL 17: ALAMOSA: CAT SUPER SPORTS, (719) 589-9971, CATSCLASSIC.COM

JUL 17: MASON: CROSSROADS MX, (618) 6862769, CROSSROADSMX.COM

JUL 24: BERTHOUD: ROCKY MOUNTAIN PROMOTIONS INC, (303) 477-5333

JUL 17: WALNUT: 4P PROMOTIONS INC, (815) 379-9953, SUNSETRIDGEMX.COM

RECREATIONAL DUAL SPORT RIDE

JUL 23: WALNUT: 4P PROMOTIONS INC, (815) 379-9953, SUNSETRIDGEMX.COM

JUL 15: WALDEN: FRONT RANGE RIDERS, (970) 221-1014, FRONTRANGERIDERS.COM

JUL 24: BYRON: MOTORSPORTS ENTERPRISES LTD., (815) 234-2271, MOTOBYRON.COM

RECREATIONAL

JUL 26-27: GRAYSLAKE: 2 DAY EVENT, SCHAEFER TRACKS LLC, (608) 330-3600, FAIRMX.COM

ROAD RUN

SCRAMBLES

JUL 17: HAUSER: RIDE FOR LIFE, (509) 868-4572, RIDEFORLIFE.COM

JUL 26: DU QUOIN: NORTH AMERICA ACTION SPORTS, LLC., (989) 871-3356, NAACTIONSPORTS.COM

IDAHO

ILLINOIS RECREATIONAL

JUL 11: BISMARCK: AMERICAN VOYAGER ASSOCIATION, (208) 746-3530, AMERVOYASSOC. ORG CALIFORNIA RECREATIONAL DUAL SPORT RIDE JUL 16: BIG BEAR LAKE: BIG BEAR TRAIL RIDERS CLUB, (818) 391-3083, BIGBEARTRAILRIDERS.COM

JUL 9-10: TAYLORVILLE: 2 DAY EVENT, SOUTH FORK DIRT RIDERS, (217) 237-4752 JUL 10: BYRON: MOTORSPORTS ENTERPRISES LTD., (815) 234-2271, MOTOBYRON.COM

RECREATIONAL ROAD RALLY

JUL 3: PECATONICA: PRO SHOW INC, (815) 2756686, STATELINEMX.COM

MOTOCROSS

RECREATIONAL ROAD RUN

MOTOCROSS

ROAD RUN JUL 17: ELGIN: PEDIATRIC BRAIN TUMOR FOUNDATION OF THE U.S., (800) 253-6530, RIDEFORKIDS.ORG JUL 30: ALTON: MARCH OF DIMES-MO GREATER MISSOURI CHAPTER, (314) 513-3996, BIKERSFORBABIES.ORG COMPETITION 1/2 MILE DIRT TRACK

JUL 27: DU QUOIN: NORTH AMERICA ACTION SPORTS, LLC., (989) 871-3356, NAACTIONSPORTS.COM SHORT TRACK JUL 25: DU QUOIN: NORTH AMERICA ACTION SPORTS, LLC., (989) 871-3356, NAACTIONSPORTS.COM INDIANA RECREATIONAL ROAD RUN

JUL 2: PETERSBURG: PEKIN MOTORCYCLE, (309) 231-4945, PEKINMOTORCYCLECLUB.COM

JUL 10: SOUTH BEND: PEDIATRIC BRAIN TUMOR FOUNDATION OF THE U.S., (800) 253-6530, RIDEFORKIDS.ORG

JUL 27: URBANA: CENTRAL ILLINOIS M/C, (217) 234-4250,

JUL 30: KOKOMO: MIDNIGHT RIDERS MC, (765) 566-3807, MIDNIGHT-RIDERS-MC.COM

JUL 9: STOCKTON: STOCKTON MOTORCYCLE CLUB, (209) 956-6150, STOCKTONMC.ORG

JUL 28-29: DU QUOIN: NORTH AMERICA ACTION SPORTS, LLC., (989) 871-3356, NAACTIONSPORTS.COM

ROAD RALLY

JUL 16: OAKLAND : OAKLAND MOTORCYCLE CLUB, (510) 521-1369, OAKLANDMC.ORG

HILL CLIMB

ROAD RUN

JUL 16: OREGON: ROCK RIVER RIDERS MC, (815) 946-6218

JUL 16-17: MCCLOUD: 2 DAY EVENT, MCCLOUD DUAL-SPORT ADVENTURES, (530) 925-5015, MCCLOUDDUALSPORTADVENTURES.COM POKER RUN

JUL 5: SAN JOSE: WOMEN ON WHEELS, WOMENONWHEELS.ORG COMPETITION

JUL 23-24: GEORGETOWN: 2 DAY EVENT, PLEASURE RIDERS MC, (217) 469-2672, PLEASURERIDERS.NET

MOTOCROSS

HARE SCRAMBLES

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JUL 29: MADISON: MOTORCYCLE SPORT TOURING ASSOCIATION, (812) 265-2361 COMPETITION HARE SCRAMBLES JUL 10: COLUMBUS: STONEY LONESOME M/C, (812) 350-0573, STONEYLONESOMEMC.COM JUL 17: COLUMBUS: STONEY LONESOME M/C, (812) 350-0573, STONEYLONESOMEMC.COM


SHORT TRACK

COMPETITION

JUL 30: GOSHEN: GOSHEN IRON HORSEMEN, (574) 825-3399

1/2 MILE DIRT TRACK

IOWA COMPETITION INDOOR ENDURO JUL 24: WEST LIBERTY: IOWA CITY COMP RIDERS, (319) 627-8181 MOTOCROSS JUL 9: CEDAR RAPIDS: CEDAR VALLEY TRAIL RIDERS INC, (319) 363-7800, CVTR.ORG JUL 23: CEDAR RAPIDS: CEDAR VALLEY TRAIL RIDERS INC, (319) 363-7800, CVTR.ORG JUL 30: CEDAR RAPIDS: CEDAR VALLEY TRAIL RIDERS INC, (319) 363-7800, CVTR.ORG KANSAS

JUL 16: STANDISH: LUCKY THUMB MC JUL 23: CROSWELL: PORT HURON MOTORCYCLE CLUB INC, (810) 327-1062, PHMC-USA.COM JUL 24: CROSWELL: PORT HURON MOTORCYCLE CLUB INC, (810) 327-1062, PHMC-USA.COM ENDURO JUL 17: MOORESTOWN: LANSING MOTORCYCLE CLUB, (517) 655-6605, LANSINGMOTORCYCLECLUB.ORG HILL CLIMB JUL 10: WEST BRANCH: PORT HURON MOTORCYCLE CLUB INC, (810) 327-1062, PHMCUSA.COM HARE SCRAMBLES JUL 10: BATTLE CREEK: BATTLE CREEK MOTORCYCLE CLUB, (269) 729-9691

RECREATIONAL ROAD RUN JUL 10: OVERLAND PARK: PEDIATRIC BRAIN TUMOR FOUNDATION OF THE U.S., (800) 2536530, RIDEFORKIDS.ORG

JUL 24: BENTLEY: VALLEY TRAIL RIDERS, (989) 879-6397, VALLEYTRAILRIDERS.TRIPOD.COM MOTOCROSS

JUL 23-24: NEWAYGO: 2 DAY EVENT, BIG AIR MOTOCROSS, (231) 652-2522, BIGAIRMOTOCROSS.COM JUL 30: MIDLAND: POLKA DOTS M/C, POLKADOTSMC.COM JUL 30: BUCHANAN: 2 DAY EVENT, RED BUD, (269) 695-6405, REDBUDMX.COM OBSERVED TRIALS JUL 16-17: VERMONTVILLE: MICHIGAN ONTARIO TRIALS ASSOCIATION, (616) 821-1692, MOTATRIALS.COM MINNESOTA RECREATIONAL ROAD RUN JUL 17: WHITEBEARLAKE: PEDIATRIC BRAIN TUMOR FOUNDATION OF THE U.S., (800) 2536530, RIDEFORKIDS.ORG COMPETITION ENDURO JUL 23-24: MORA: 2 DAY EVENT, NORSEMEN MOTORCYCLE CLUB, (763) 753-2287, NORSEMENMC.ORG

JUL 1: BUCHANAN: RED BUD, (269) 695-6405, REDBUDMX.COM

HILL CLIMB

OBSERVED TRIALS

JUL 2: BUCHANAN: RED BUD, (269) 695-6405, REDBUDMX.COM

JUL 16: RED WING: INDIANHEAD CYCLE CLUB, (651) 764-1220, INDIANHEADMC.ORG

JUL 23: BEDFORD: 2 DAY EVENT, SADDLEBACK EAST INC, (502) 515-6514, TRIALSINC.ORG

JUL 3: BUCHANAN: RED BUD, (269) 695-6405, REDBUDMX.COM

JUL 23: MANKATO: KATO CYCLE CLUB, KATOCYCLECLUB.COM

JUL 9: BELDING: GRATTAN RACEWAY MOTOCROSS, (616) 691-7221

MOTOCROSS

KENTUCKY COMPETITION

MARYLAND COMPETITION MOTOCROSS JUL 10: LEONARDTOWN: BUDDS CREEK MOTOCROSS PARK, (301) 475-2000, BUDDSCREEK.COM MASSACHUSETTS COMPETITION

JUL 9-10: CHRISTMAS: 2 DAY EVENT, X-MAS FAMILY MOTORSPORTS PARK LLC, (906) 2022681, UPPERACING.COM JUL 10: BELDING: GRATTAN RACEWAY MOTOCROSS, (616) 691-7221 JUL 10: CADILLAC: CADILLAC MOTORCYCLE CLUB INC, (231) 884-3729, CADILLACMC.COM

HILL CLIMB

JUL 16-17: NILES: DUTCH SPORT PARK, (269) 683-4418, DUTCHSPORTPARKMX.COM

JUL 10: GREENFIELD: NEW ENGLAND HILLCLIMB ASSOCIATION, (508) 612-2204, NEWENGLANDHILLCLIMBERS.COM

JUL 22: BARK RIVER: DEGRAVE MOTORSPORTS PARK, (906) 466-7272

MICHIGAN RECREATIONAL DUAL SPORT RIDE JUL 23: NEWBERRY: CYCLE CONSERVATION CLUB OF MICHIGAN, (517) 416-0126, CYCLECONSERVATIONCLUB.ORG ROAD RUN JUL 6: GRAND RAPIDS: MOTOR MAIDS INC JUL 16: TAYLOR: AXEMEN PROFESSIONAL FIRE FIGHTERS MC #1, (734) 776-3086, AXEMENMC. ORG ROAD RALLY JUL 10: WEST BRANCH: OGEMAW HILLS BIKE WEEK, (989) 312-1312, OGEMAWHILLSBIKEWEEK.COM

JUL 23-24: BATTLECREEK: BATTLE CREEK MOTORCYCLE CLUB, (269) 729-9691, BATTLECREEKMOTORCYCLECLUB.COM

JUL 3: LITTLE FALLS: MOTO CITY RACEWAY & RECREATION INC, (612) 919-9345, MOTORCITYRACEWAY.COM JUL 4: LITTLE FALLS : MOTO CITY RACEWAY & RECREATION INC, (612) 919-9345, MOTORCITYRACEWAY.COM JUL 10: BROWERVILLE: MOTO CITY RACEWAY & RECREATION INC, (612) 919-9345, MOTORCITYRACEWAY.COM JUL 10: MAZEPPA: HURRICANE HILLS MX PARK INC, (507) 843-5154, HURRICANEHILLS.COM JUL 10: MANKATO: MOTOKAZIE INC, (952) 6011169, MOTOKAZIE.COM JUL 15: MILLVILLE: HI WINDERS, (507) 753-3277, SPRINGCREEKMX.COM


JUL 17: KELLOGG: MOTOKAZIE INC, (952) 2449996, MOTOKAZIE.COM

HARE SCRAMBLES

JUL 24: MAZEPPA: HURRICANE HILLS MX PARK INC, (507) 843-5154, HURRICANEHILLS.COM

JUL 2-3: COVINGTON: FULLACTION RACING PROMOTIOINS, (585) 297-7274, FULLACTIONCYCLES.COM

JUL 24: BROOK PARK: BERM BENDERS RACEWAY, (320) 679-9258, BERMBENDERS.COM

JUL 17: BERKSHIRE: BEATEN TRAILS, (607) 6578433, WNYOA.NET

JUL 24: BROWERVILLE: MOTO CITY RACEWAY & RECREATION INC, (612) 919-9345, MOTORCITYRACEWAY.COM

JUL 27: CORTLAND: KNOBBY ACRES ASSOCIATION INC, (607) 756-5277, WNYOA.NET

OBSERVED TRIALS JUL 16-17: GILBERT: UPPER MIDWEST TRIALS ASSOCIATION, (507) 351-8879 JUL 30: THEILMAN: UPPER MIDWEST TRIALS ASSOCIATION, (507) 351-8879 MISSOURI COMPETITION

MOTOCROSS JUL 2-3: CAROGA LAKE: 2 DAY EVENT, ROYAL MOUNTAIN SKI AREA, (518) 835-6445 JUL 9: WALLKILL: WALDEN MX, (845) 895-5253, WALDENMX.COM JUL 10: AUBURN: FROZEN OCEAN MOTOCROSS INC, (315) 784-5466, FROZEN-OCEAN.COM

JUL 16: MT VERNON: ROAD RIDERS FOR JESUS, (740) 219-9876 SWAP MEETS JUL 30: GROVE HILL: WETZEL MC INC, (419) 5877382, WETZELMC.COM COMPETITION 1/2 MILE DIRT TRACK JUL 22: ASHLAND: AMERICAN MOTORCYCLIST ASSOCIATION, (614) 856-6190, AMERICANMOTORCYCLIST.COM GRAND PRIX JUL 17: ATHENS: ACTION SPORTS PROMOTIONS INC, (740) 594-6686, ACTIONSPORTSRACING. COM HILL CLIMB

MOTOCROSS

JUL 16-17: NEW BERLIN: 2 DAY EVENT, UNADILLA VALLEY SPORTS CENTER, (607) 9658450, UNADILLAMX.COM

JUL 16-17: RICHWOODS: 2 DAY EVENT, SEAT TIME MOTORCYCLE CLUB, (573) 701-1867, LACHANCERACING.COM

JUL 9: WATERFORD: PIONEER MOTORCYCLE CLUB INC, (740) 984-8831, PIONEERMOTORCYCLECLUB.COM

JUL 16: YAPHANK: LONG ISLAND MOTOCROSS INC, (631) 286-9411, ISLANDMOTOCROSS.COM

JUL 10: WATERFORD: PIONEER MOTORCYCLE CLUB INC, (740) 373-9566, PIONEERMOTORCYCLECLUB.COM

NEW JERSEY RECREATIONAL

JUL 17: CAROGA LAKE: ROYAL MOUNTAIN SKI AREA, (518) 835-6445 OBSERVED TRIALS

FUN RUN JUL 17: RED BANK: RARITAN ROAD RUNNERS, (732) 803-8434 NEW YORK RECREATIONAL DICE RUN JUL 24: HAVERSTRAW: SECOND GENERATION MOTORCYCLE ASSN INC, (845) 947-7113, SECONDGENERATIONMA.ORG

JUL 10: CAYUTA: AMA-DIST 04 TRIALS COMMITTEE, (607) 796-0560 SHORT TRACK JUL 16: PORT CRANE: SQUARE DEAL RIDERS M/C, (607) 693-2634, SQUAREDEALRIDERS.COM JUL 17: PATTERSVILLE : ELECTRIC CITY RIDERS, (578) 542-2144, ELECTRICCITYRIDERS.COM JUL 30: PORT CRANE : SQUARE DEAL RIDERS M/C, (607) 693-2634, SQUAREDEALRIDERS.COM

DISTRICT RALLY JUL 10: BAYSHORE: LONG ISLAND VTX RIDERS, LONGISLANDVTXRIDERS.COM ROAD RUN JUL 10: CONGERS: BLUE KNIGHTS-NY XVIII, (845) 386-6285, BKNYXVII.ORG JUL 16: TUXEDO PARK: 2 DAY EVENT, RAMAPO MOTORCYCLE CLUB INC, (914) 668-8335, RAMAPOMC.ORG JUL 17: DEERFIELD: PEDIATRIC BRAIN TUMOR FOUNDATION OF THE U.S., (800) 253-6530, RIDEFORKIDS.ORG JUL 24: MILTON: IRON RIDERS MC NY, (845) 6911931, IRONRIDERSMC.NET TRAIL RIDE - RECREATIONAL JUL 2-3: DEPOSIT: 2 DAY EVENT, RIDGE RIDERS M/C, (201) 456-5519 JUL 17: E. QUOGUE: LONG ISLAND RECREATIONAL TRAILS CONSERVANCY, LIRTC. ORG COMPETITION HILL CLIMB JUL 24: CAROGA LAKE: ROYAL MOUNTAIN SKI AREA, (518) 835-6445

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AmericanMotorcyclist.com

NORTH CAROLINA

HARE SCRAMBLES JUL 9-10: MILLFIELD: RACER PRODUCTIONS INC, (304) 284-0084, GNCCRACING.COM MOTOCROSS JUL 1: MILLFIELD: PLEASURE VALLEY RACEWAY, (304) 284-0084, SUNDAYCREEKRACEWAY.COM JUL 4: MARYSVILLE: AMERICAN MOTOSPORTS LLC, (937) 358-2427, AMERICANMX.COM JUL 9-10: CHILLICOTHE: CHILLI TOWN MX, (740) 701-3675, CHILLITOWNMX.COM JUL 16: HILLIARD: AMERICAN MOTOSPORTS LLC, (937) 358-2427, AMERICANMX.COM JUL 17: BLANCHESTER: DIRT COUNTRY, (513) 625-7350, DIRTCOUNTRYMX.COM

COMPETITION MOTOCROSS JUL 2: EAST BEND: EAST BEND MOTORSPORTS, (336) 699-3629, EASTBENDMOTORSPORTS.COM JUL 23: EAST BEND: EAST BEND MOTORSPORTS, (336) 699-3629, EASTBENDMOTORSPORTS.COM OHIO RECREATIONAL BIKE SHOW JUL 24: CLEVELAND: MYSTIC KNIGHTS, (216) 641-1525, MKMCCLEVELAND.COM DUAL SPORT RIDE JUL 17: ZANESVILLE: ZANESVILLE TRAIL RIDERS, (614) 204-1438, ZANESVILLETRAILRIDERS.COM ROAD RUN JUL 9: MASON: TRAIN MRO INC, (513) 939-4036

JUL 17: CARROLLTON: AREA 330 MX, (330) 8633605, AREA330.COM JUL 18: HILLIARD: AMERICAN MOTOSPORTS LLC, (937) 358-2427, AMERICANMX.COM JUL 19: NEW LEXINGTON: AMERICAN MOTOSPORTS LLC, (937) 358-2427, AMERICANMX.COM JUL 21: WELLSTON: AMERICAN MOTOSPORTS LLC, (937) 358-2427, AMERICANMX.COM JUL 24: SPRINGFIELD: AMERICAN MOTOSPORTS LLC, (937) 358-2427, AMERICANMX.COM JUL 25: SPRINGFIELD: AMERICAN MOTOSPORTS LLC, (937) 358-2427, AMERICANMX.COM JUL 26: MARYSVILLE: AMERICAN MOTOSPORTS LLC, (937) 358-2427, AMERICANMX.COM OBSERVED TRIALS JUL 9-10: TORONTO: 2 DAY EVENT, TRIALS INC, (440) 309-7840, TRIALSINC.ORG

JUL 23: MARYSVILLE: PEDIATRIC BRAIN TUMOR FOUNDATION OF THE U.S., (800) 253-6530, RIDEFORKIDS.ORG

COMPETITION

ROAD RALLY

REL-ENDURO - ISDE

OREGON


JUL 10: TILLAMOOK: LOBOS MC INC, (503) 2638430, LOBOSMC.COM

JUL 10: THREE SPRINGS: ROCKET RACEWAY, (814) 448-2701, ROCKETRACEWAY.COM

ROAD RACE

JUL 15: LATROBE: MX PRODUCTIONS, (724) 3220415, LATROBEMOTORSPORTS.COM

JUL 16-17: PORTLAND: 2 DAY EVENT, TTXGP LIMITED PENNSYLVANIA RECREATIONAL BIKE SHOW JUL 9: BOYERTOWN: MOTORCYCLISTS FOR JESUS MINISTRIES, (215) 234-4861, PABIKENIGHTS.COM

JUL 16-17: ELKLAND: MILES MOUNTAIN MX, (814) 258-0204, MILESMOUNTAINMX.COM JUL 16: OSCEOLA MILLS : WILD RIDE MOTOCROSS, (814) 762-9005, WILDRIDETRACK.COM JUL 17: SHIPPENSBURG: DOUBLIN GAP MX PARK INC, (717) 249-6036, DOUBLINGAP@AOL.COM JUL 24: PINE GROVE: DUTCHMEN MX PARK, LLC., (570) 345-5668, DUTCHMENMXPARK.COM

JUL 22: CARLISLE: CARLISLE PRODUCTIONS, (717) 243-7855, CARLISLEEVENTS.COM

JUL 24: HANOVER: HAPPY RAMBLERS, (717) 6337708, HAPPYRAMBLERS.COM

CARNIVAL RUN

JUL 24: NEW ALEXANDRIA: PITTSBURGH RACEWAY PARK, (724) 668-7600, PITTSBURGHRACEWAYPARK

JUL 10: LEBANON: LEBANON VALLEY MOTORCYCLE CLUB INC, (717) 270-0979, LEBANONVALLEYMC.COM POKER RUN JUL 10: BUCK: GENTLEMEN MC SPORTSMEN, (717) 285-5371 JUL 17: SCHUYLKILL HAVEN: SCHUYLKILL COUNTY MOTORCYCLE CLUB, (570) 385-5146, SCHUYLKILLCOUNTYMOTORCYCLECLUB.COM JUL 24: COLUMBIA: THUNDERBIRD MOTORCYCLE CLUB INC, (717) 898-0871 ROAD RUN JUL 17: YORK: YORK MOTORCYCLE CLUB, (717) 854-5980 ROAD RALLY JUL 25: CAMBRIDGE SPRINGS: RETREADS - MID ATLANTIC REGION, (18009) 645-1173, THERIVERSIDEINN.COM COMPETITION

JUL 29: LATROBE: MX PRODUCTIONS, (724) 3220415, LATROBEMOTORSPORTS.COM TENNESSEE COMPETITION

JUL 9-10: BLOUNTVILLE: VICTORY SPORTS INC, (423) 323-5497, VICTORY-SPORTS.COM OBSERVED TRIALS JUL 2: SEQUATCHIE: SOUTHEASTERN TRIALS RIDERS ASSOCIATION, (423) 942-2868, TRIALSTRAININGCENTER.COM TEXAS RECREATIONAL

JUL 14: ALVARADO: BIKERS ADULT RALLY, (972) 551-0024, BIKERSADULTRALLY.COM VIRGINIA

ROAD RALLY

HARE SCRAMBLES

COMPETITION

JUL 17: NEW ALEXANDRIA: PITTSBURGH RACEWAY PARK, (724) 668-7600, PITTSBURGHRACEWAYPARK

CROSS COUNTRY

JUL 24: VALLEY VIEW: RAUSCH CREEK POWERSPORTS, (570) 682-2460, RAUSCHCREEKRACING.COM MOTOCROSS JUL 10: SEWARD: PLEASURE VALLEY RACEWAY, (814) 539-4114, PVRMX.COM JUL 10: BIRDSBORO: PAGODA MOTORCYCLE CLUB, (610) 582-3717, PAGODAMOTORCYCLECLUB.COM

CONVENTIONS JUL 27-31: STEVENSON: SOUND RIDER!, (206) 3297808, SOUNDRIDER.COM/RALLY COMPETITION MOTOCROSS JUL 21-22: WASHOUGAL: WASHOUGAL MX PARK LLC, (541) 673-3167, WASHOUGALMXPK.COM JUL 23-24: HEDGEVILLE: 2 DAY EVENT, MIDDLE ATLANTIC MOTOCROSS ASSOCIATION, (410) 3751059, MAMAMX.COM WISCONSIN COMPETITION

JUL 23: BURNETT: BEAVER CYCLE CLUB INC, (920) 319-6889, BEAVERCYCLECLUB.COM HARE SCRAMBLES JUL 10: STONE LAKE: STRAIGHT ARROW ENDURO RIDERS, STRAIGHTARROWS.ORG MOTOCROSS JUL 3: HILLPOINT: SUGAR MAPLE MX LLC, (608) 393-8812, SUGARMAPLEMX.COM

JUL 17: NEKAOSA: RAPID ANGELS MOTORCYCLE CLUB INC, (715) 421-5038, RAPIDANGELS.COM JUL 20: PORTAGE: CMJ RACEWAY LLC, (608) 2206853, CMJRACEWAY.COM

RECREATIONAL

JUL 14: STAUNTON: ROADRUNNER MOTORCYCLE TOURING & TRAVEL, (336) 765-7780

JUL 24: MARKLEYSBURG: BRADDOCK’S TRAIL RACEWAY, (724) 880-5536, BRADDOCKSTRAILRACEWAY.COM

518-798-7888

JUL 10: LAKE MILLS: AZTALAN CYCLE CLUB INC, (608) 692-4648, AZTALANCYCLE.COM

ROAD RALLY

JUL 17: BLAIN: SUSQUEHANNA OFF ROAD RIDERS, (717) 533-2242, SORRMC.ORG

JUL 23: VALLEY VIEW: RAUSCH CREEK POWERSPORTS, (570) 682-4600, RAUSCHCREEKRACING.COM

www.americade.com

1/2 MILE DIRT TRACK

MOTOCROSS

ENDURO JUL 10: GILLETT: SOUTHERN TIER ENDURO RIDERS, (607) 382-8534, STER-MC.ORG

Mark your Calendar for the World’s Largest Touring Rally NEXT year! June 4-9, 2012

JUL 21: PORTAGE: CMJ RACEWAY LLC, (608) 2200685, CMJRACEWAY.COM JUL 24: WITTENBERG: FANTASY MOTO LLC, (920) 419-9286, FANTASYMOTO.COM

JUL 30: PETERSBURG: LONE RIDER PRODUCTIONS, (804) 920-2529, VXCS.ORG

JUL 30-31: ARKANSAW: 2 DAY EVENT, ARKANSAW CREEK CYCLE CLUB INC, (715) 2855679, ARKANSAWMX.COM

GRAND PRIX

OBSERVED TRIALS

JUL 24: BRISTOL: VIRGINIA CHAMPIONSHIP HS SERIES, (757) 871-1573, VCHSS.ORG

JUL 24: BARABOO: WISCONSIN OBSERVED TRIALS ASSOCIATION, (608) 434-4553, WISCONSINTRIALS.ORG

MOTOCROSS JUL 2: SHENADOAH: 2 DAY EVENT, SHENANDOAH SPEEDWAY, (540) 652-2110, SHENANDOAHSPEEDWAY.COM JUL 17: DISPUTANTA: SOUTH FORK MX CLUB, SOUTHFORKMX.COM JUL 17: WYTHEVILLE: VICTORY SPORTS INC, (423) 323-5497, VICTORY-SPORTS.COM WASHINGTON RECREATIONAL

SHORT TRACK JUL 16: LAKE MILLS: AZTALAN CYCLE CLUB INC, (262) 754-0686, AZTALANCYCLE.COM WYOMING COMPETITION MOTOCROSS JUL 17: CHEYENNE: LARAMIE COUNTY RIDERS ASSOCIATION INC, (307) 421-1228, LARAMIECOUNTYMX.COM

July 2011

49


HALL OF FAME EXHIBITS MOTORCYCLE HALL OF FAME MOTORCYCLEMUSEUM.ORG The Hall of Fame is on the AMA campus in Pickerington, Ohio, and is open 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. seven days a week. Closed: Easter, Thanksgiving, Christmas and New Year’s Day. Main Hall: Motorcycle Hall of Fame: Recognizing those who have made significant contributions to all aspects of motorcycling. Dirt-Track! All-American Motorcycle Racing: Celebrating the storied history of the men and machines who battle on the dirt oval. 30-Year Ride: Honda’s Ohio-made Motorcycles: Gold Wings aren’t the only bikes that Honda produced at its plant in Marysville, Ohio. This exhibit showcases the 30 years of production, from the CR250 to the Rune. Founder’s Hall: Honoring the Hall of Fame’s generous contributors. AMA PRO RACING AMA PRO SUPERBIKE CHAMPIONSHIP AMAPRORACING.COM June 17-19: Birmingham, Ala.: Barber Motorsports Park July 8-10: Lexington, Ohio: Mid-Ohio Sports Car Course July 22-24: Monterey, Calif.: Mazda Raceway Laguna Seca Aug. 12-14: Alton, Va.: Virginia International Raceway Sept. 2-4: Millville, N.J.: New Jersey Motorsports Park AMA PRO MOTOCROSS CHAMPIONSHIP MXSPORTSPRORACING.COM June 11: Mt. Morris, Pa.: High Point Raceway June 18: Mechanicsville, Md.: Budds Creek June 25: Lakewood, Colo.: Thunder Valley July 2: Buchanan, Mich.: RedBud July 16: Millville, Minn.: Spring Creek July 23: Washougal, Wash.: Washougal Aug. 13: New Berlin, N.Y.: Unadilla Aug. 27: Southwick, Mass.: Moto-X 338 Sept. 3: Delmont, Pa.: Steel City Raceway Sept. 10: San Diego, Calif.: Pala Raceway AMA PRO GRAND NATIONAL CHAMPIONSHIP AMAPRORACING.COM June 11: Hartford, Mich.: Hartford HalfMile, Hartford Motor Speedway June 25: Lima, Ohio: Lima Half-Mile, Allen County Fairgrounds July 9: Hagerstown, Md.: Hagerstown HalfMile, Hagerstown Speedway July 23: Lake Odessa, Mich.: I-96 HalfMile, I-96 Speedway July 30: Sacramento, Calif.: Cal Expo Fair Mile, Cal Expo Fair Aug. 6: Castle Rock, Wash.: Castle Rock TT, Castle Rock Race Park Aug. 21: Peoria, Ill.: Peoria TT, Peoria Race Park Aug. 27: Indianapolis: Indy Mile, Indiana State Fairgrounds Sept. 3: Springfield, Ill.: Springfield ST, Illinois State Fairgrounds

Sept. 24: Minneapolis: Canterbury Park Mile, Canterbury Park Oct. 1: Calistoga, Calif.: Calistoga Speedway Half-Mile, Calistoga Speedway Oct. 9: Prescott, Ariz.: Yavapai Downs Mile, Yavapai Downs AMA PRO HILLCLIMB CHAMPIONSHIP AMAPRORACING.COM June 12: Freemansburg, Pa. July 10: West Branch, Mich. July 24: Jefferson (York County), Pa. July 31: Canaan, N.H. Aug. 21: Dansville, N.Y. Sept. 11: Freemansburg, Pa. Sept. 25: Jefferson (York County), Pa. Oct. 9: Oregonia, Ohio AMA NATIONAL CHAMPIONSHIP SERIES CAN-AM GRAND NATIONAL CROSS COUNTRY GNCCRACING.COM June 25-26: Snowshoe, W.Va.: Snowshoe Mountain Resort July 9-10: Millfield, Ohio: Sunday Creek Raceway Sept. 10-11: New Berlin, N.Y.: Unadilla Raceway Sept. 24-25: TBD Oct. 8-9: St. Clairsville, Ohio: Powerline Park Oct. 22-23: Crawfordsville, Ind: Tom’s Marine Polaris AMA RACING NATIONAL HARE & HOUND NATIONALHAREANDHOUND.COM

July 10 (Youth & Amateur): Millfield, Ohio: Rita Coombs, Racer Productions; (304) 2840084, GNCCRacing.com

Aug. 12-14: New Berlin, N.Y.: Unadilla Valley Sports Center, Unadilla Valley Sports Center; (607) 965-8784, UnadillaMX.com

July 23 (Youth & Amateur): Valley View, Pa.: Tiffany Tobias, Rausch Creek Powersports; (570) 682-4600, RauschCreekRacing.com

Aug. 14: Crystal Falls, Mich.: Valley Raceway, Valley Raceway; (906) 0600, ValleyRaceway.com

Aug. 20 (Youth) Aug. 21 (Amateur): S. Edmeston, N.Y.: Jim Simmons, Thunder Ridge Sports; (607) 847-6520, ThunderRidge.biz Sept. 18 (Youth & Amateur): Lynnville, Ind.: Kenny Moore, IN IL KY Enduro Riders; (812) 549-8385, BlackCoal.org Oct. 15 (Youth) Oct. 16 (Amateur): Westfield, Mass.: Scott Fontaine, Knox Trail Riders; (508) 864-7316, WNYOA.net Oct. 30 (Youth & Amateur): Gosport, Ind.: Mike Gibbs, Mid America XC (317) 418-6084, TheMAXC.com AMA/NATC MOTOTRIALS NATIONAL CHAMPIONSHIP AMARACING.COM June 11-12: Valley View, Pa.: Tiffany Tobias, Rausch Creek Powersports; (570) 682-4600, RauschCreekRacing.com June 25-27: Sequatchie, Tenn.: Darryl Davis, Southeastern Trials Riders Association, (423) 942-8688, TrialsTrainingCenter.com AMA RACING ATV HARE SCRAMBLES AMARACING.COM July 2: Covington, N.Y.: Ken Rose, Full Action Racing; (585) 297-2742, FullActionCycles.com July 24: Valley View, Pa.: Tiffany Tobias, Rausch Creek Powersports; (570) 682-4600, RauschCreekRacing.com

Oct. 23: Lucerne Valley, Calif.: Ryan Sanders, 100’s MC; (949) 584-9395, 100sMC.org

Aug. 20: S. Edmeston, N.Y.: Jim Simmons, Thunder Ridge Sports; (607) 847-6520, Thunderridge.biz

AMA NATIONAL ENDURO NATIONALENDURO.COM

Oct. 29: TBD: Mike Gibbs, Mid America XC; (317) 418-6084, TheMAXC.com

June 19: Upton, Wyo.: Paul Douglas, Inyan Kara Riders; (307) 468-2840, NationalEnduro.com

ATV EXTREME DIRT TRACK AMARACING.COM

July 17: Moorestown, Mich.: Jeff Hunt, Lansing Motorcycle Club; (231) 267-9534, LansingMotorcycleClub.org

July 9: Danville, Va.: Birch Creek Motorsports

July 31: Cross Fork, Pa.: Peter Burnett, Brandywine Enduro Riders; (610) 368-7332, BER.us Aug. 28: Chandlersville, Ohio: Kory Young, Zanesville Trail Riders; (614) 204-1438, ZanesvilleTrailriders.com Oct. 1: Matthews, Ind.: Doug Spence, Muddobbers MC; (765) 998-2236, MuddobbersMC.org ENDUROCROSS ENDUROCROSS.COM Aug. 13: Everett, Wash.: Comcast Arena Aug. 26: Indianapolis: Pepsi Coliseum Sept. 17: Ontario, Calif.: Citizens Bank Arena Oct. 1: Denver: National Western Complex Oct. 22: Boise, Idaho: Idaho Center Nov 19: Las Vegas, Nev.: Orleans Arena AMA RACING WEST HARE SCRAMBLES AMARACING.COM June 11 (Youth) June 12 (Amateur): Elkton, Ore.: Toni Bamford, ETRA, Inc.; (541) 9681664, ETRA.net Aug. 27 (Youth) Aug. 28 (Amateur): Big Sky, Mont.: Jamey Kabisch, Lone Peak Racing; (406) 223-0478, BigSkyXC.com

Sept. 10: Knoxville, Iowa: Knoxville HalfMile, Knoxville Raceway

AMA RACING EAST HARE SCRAMBLES AMARACING.COM

AmericanMotorcyclist.com

July 31: Taylorville, Ill.: South Fork Dirt Riders, South Fork Dirt Riders; (217) 2374752, SouthForkDirtRiders.com

Oct. 9: Johnson Valley, Calif.: Justin Shultz, SoCal MC; (949) 981-6776, SoCalMC.com

Sept. 4: Springfield, Ill.: Springfield Mile II, Illinois State Fairgrounds

50

July 3 (Youth & Amateur): Covington, N.Y.: Ken Rose, Full Action Racing Promotions; (585) 297-2742, FullActionCycles.com

June 11: Sikeston, Mo.: Sikeston Race Park

July 23-24: Ashtabula, Ohio: Pine Creek Aug. 6: Franklin, Pa.: Tri-City Speedway Aug. 20: Souix Falls, S.D.: Sioux Valley Cycle Club Sept. 3: Goldsboro, N.C.: Busco Beach AMA RACING PRO-AM MOTOCROSS AMARACING.COM June 12: Mt. Morris, Pa.: High Point Raceway, Racer Productions; (304) 2840800, RacerProductions.com June 19: Mt. Carroll, Ill.: MC Motopark, MC Motopark; (815) 238-1614, MCMotoPark.com June 29: Kingsbury, Ind.: Motoland-IN, Motoland-IN; (219) 988-6686, Motoland.com July 3: Buchanan, Mich.: RedBud, RedBud; (269) 695-6405, RedBudMX.com July 10: Blountville, Tenn.: Muddy Creek Raceway, Victory Sports Inc.; (423) 3235497, VictorySportsRacing.com July 17: Carrollton, Ohio: Area 330 Action Complex, Area 330 Action Complex LLC; (330) 863-6056, Area330.com July 17: Bloomingdale, Mich.: Dutch Sport Park, Dutch Sport Park; (269) 521-7800, DutchSportParkMX.com July 21-22: Washougal, Wash.: Washougal MX Park; (360) 837-3975, WashougalMXPark.com

Aug. 21: Armaugh, Pa.: Pleasure Valley Raceway, Pleasure Valley Raceway; (814) 695-2453, Cernics.com Aug. 28: Millville, Minn.: Spring Creek MX Park, Hi-Winders; (507) 753-2779, SpringCreekMX.com Sept. 3-5: Millington, Mich.: Baja MX, Baja MX Inc.; (989) 871-3356, BajaMX.com Sept. 4: Athelstane, Wis.: Pine Ridge Raceway, Pine Ridge Raceway; (715) 8566612, PineRidgeRaceway.com Sept. 4: Delmont, Pa.: Steel City Raceway, Bellco Inc.; (304) 284-0800, RacerProductions.com Sept. 11: Walnut, Ill.: Sunset Ridge MX, 4P Promotions Inc.; (815) 379-9534, SunsetRidgeMX.com Sept. 17-18: Richford, N.Y.: Broome-Tioga, Broome-Tioga Sports Center; (607) 8494438, Broome-Tioga.com Sept. 18: Buchanan, Mich.: RedBud, RedBud; (269) 695-6405, RedBudMX.com Sept. 24-25: New Castle, Del.: Blue Diamond MX Park, Baltimore County Trail Riders; (302) 834-5867, BCTRA.com Sept. 25: Canton, Texas: Buffalo Creek Motocross Park, , Kingdom Motorsports; (214) 939-4321, Buffalocreekmx.com Oct. 2: Gaylord, Mich.: Baja MX, Baja MX Inc.; (989) 871-3356, BajaMX.com Oct. 2: Englishtown, N.J.: Raceway Park, K.R.O.C.; (734) 446-7800, Racewaypark.com Oct. 2: Danville, Va.: Birch Creek Motorsports, Birch Creek Motorsports; (434) 836-7629, BirchCreekMotorsports.com Oct. 9: Birdsboro, Pa.: Pagoda Motorcycle Club, Pagoda Motorcycle Club; (610) 5823717, PagodaMotorcycleClub.com Oct. 16: Blountville, Tenn.: Muddy Creek Raceway, Victory Sports Inc.; (423) 3235497, VictorySportsRacing.com Oct. 30: Prentiss, Mich.: Golden Pine Raceway, Golden Pine Raceway; (601) 5068669, GoldenPineRaceway.com Oct. 29-30: Leonardtown, Md.: Budds Creek Motocross Park, Budds Creek Motocross Park; (301) 481-6148; Buddscreek.com Nov. 6: Pell City, Ala.: Mill Creek, RPM Sports; (205) 699-8857, RPMSportsonline. com Nov. 13: Musella, Ga.: Hillbilly Hills, LLQ; RPM Sports, (205) 699-8857, RPMSports. online.com Nov. 21-23, Gainesville, Fla.: Gatorback Cycle Park, Unlimited Sports MX; (813) 4707498, UnlimitedSportsMX.com Nov. 24-26: Gainesville, Fla.: Gatorback Cycle Park, Unlimited Sports MX; (813) 4707498, UnlimitedSportsMX.com AMA AMATEUR GRAND CHAMPIONSHIPS AMA AMATEUR NATIONAL MOTOCROSS MXSPORTS.COM June 11-12: Hesperia, Calif.: Southwest Regional Championships, Youth/Amateur, Competitive Edge; (909) 454-1070 June 11-12: Lakewood, Colo.: South Central Regional Championships, Amateur, Thunder Valley; (303) 697-1003 June 11-12: Buchanan, Mich.: Mid-East


Regional Championships, Amateur, Red Bud; (269) 695-6405 June 11-12: Winter Garden, Fla.: Southeast Regional Championships, Amateur, Gatorback; (407) 473-4373 June 11-12: Broome Tioga - Richford, N.Y.: Northeast Regional Championships, Youth, Broom Tioga; (607) 849- 4438 June 18-19: Walnut, Ill.: North Central Regional Championships, Youth, Sunset Ridge June 18-19: Mt. Morris, Pa.: Northeast Regional Championships, Amateur, High Point; (304) 284-0084 June 25-26: Millville, Minn.: North Central Regional Championships, Amateur, Spring Creek; (507) 753-2779 Aug. 1-6: Hurricane Mills, Tenn.: AMA National Motocross Championship (final), Loretta Lynn’s Ranch AMA RACING VINTAGE GRAND CHAMPIONSHIPS AMAVINTAGEMOTORCYCLEDAYS.COM July 22-24: Lexington, Ohio: AMA Racing Vintage Grand Championships - Round 1, Mid-Ohio Sports Car Course July 22: Ashland, Ohio: AMA Racing Vintage Grand Championships - Round 2, Ashland County Fairgrounds AMA RACING DIRT TRACK GRAND CHAMPIONSHIPS AMARACING.COM July 25-30: Du Quoin, Ill.: AMA Racing Dirt Track Grand Championships, Du Quoin State Fairgrounds AMA RACING HILLCLIMB GRAND CHAMPIONSHIPS AMARACING.COM Aug. 13-14: Oregonia, Ohio: AMA Racing Hillclimb Grand Championships AMA/NATC YOUTH MOTOTRIALS NATIONAL CHAMPIONSHIPS AMARACING.COM July 2-4: Sequatchie, Tenn.: AMA/NATC East Youth MotoTrials Championships, Southeastern Trials Riders Association, Dan Brown; (423) 942-8688, TrialsTrainingCenter. com Aug. 6-8: Taos Ski Valley, N.M.: AMA/NATC West Youth MotoTrials Championships, International Trials School, Bill Markham; (719) 942-3372, ITSTrials.com AMA DUAL-SPORT/ADVENTURE SERIES AMA KTM NATIONAL DUAL SPORT TRAIL RIDING SERIES AMERICANMOTORCYCLIST.COM June 11-12: Wabeno, Wis.: Ride for Research, Wisconsin Dual Sport Riders, John Newton; (920) 350-2030; WiDualSportRiders.org June 25-26: Fort Rock, Ore.: Fort Rock National Dual Sport, Lobos MC, Billy Toman; (503) 656-5801; LobosMC.com July 15-17: Walden, Colo.: Moose Run Dual Sport Rally, Front Range Riders, Steve Eddins; (970) 221-1014; FrontRangeRiders. com July 23-30: Newberry, Mich.: Six Days of Michigan, Cycle Conservation Club of Michigan, Lewis Schuler; (517) 416-0126; CycleConservationClub.org Aug. 6-7: Hancock, N.Y.: Hancock National Dual Sport, Bear Creek Sportsmen, Mike Goetz; BearCreekSportsmen.com Aug. 20-21: Columbus Ind.: Buffalo 500 D/S Adventure Ride, Stoney Lonesome MC, Nathan Gaskill; (812) 343-9772; StoneyLonesomeMC.com Sept. 3-4: New Straightsville, Ohio: Black

Diamonds: New Straightsville Enduro Riders, Steve Wheeler; (740) 394-2220; NSEnduro. com Sep 10-11: Golden Pond, Ky.: LBL 200, KT Riders, Jesse Thomas, (270) 522-3703, ginny42211@yahoo.com Sept. 24-25: Buck Meadows, Calif.: Yosemite Dual Sport Adventure, Family Off Road Adventures, Lawrence Borge; (209) 649-3633; FamilyOffRoadAdventures.com

Buckeye Dualsporters, Bill Kaeppner; (740) 380-3050; KaeppnersWoods.com Sept. 17-18: Morganton, N.C.: Blue Ridge Adventure Ride, JB SAKI Promotions, Ron Miller; (704) 309-3271 Sept. 17-18: Taos Ski Valley, N.M.: New Mexico Natl Adventure Ride, Aerostich Tours, Roger Pattison; (575) 776-8785; AerostichTours.com

Sept. 24-25: Wabeno, Wis.: Big Woods 200, Wisconsin Dual Sport Riders, John Newton; (920) 350-2030; WiDualSportRiders.org

Oct. 1-2: McCloud, Calif.: McCloud Adventure Ride, McCloud Dualsport Adventures, Michael Lingsch; (530) 9250151; McCloudDualsportAdventures.com

Sept. 24-25: Wolverine, Mich.: Ted’s Chandler Hill Challenge, Great Lakes Dual Sporters, Jeramy Valley; (989) 751-6863; GLDSMC.org

Oct. 15-16: McCloud, Calif.: McCloud Adventure Ride, McCloud Dualsport Adventures, Michael Lingsch; (530) 9250151; McCloudDualsportAdventures.com

Oct. 1-2: Mt. Solon, Va.: Shenandoah 500 Dual Sport, NVTA, Detter Merz; (703) 5059123; NVTR.org

Nov. 5-6: Wickensburg, Ariz.: Howlin’ at the Moon Rally, AZ Trail Riders, Don Hood; (602) 692-9382; ArizonaTrailRiders.org

Oct. 8-9: McArthur, Ohio: Baby Burr National Dual Sport, Enduro Riders Association, Steve Barber; (614) 582-7821; Enduroriders.com

Nov 5-6: Port Elizabeth, N.J.: Hammer Run, Tri-County Sportsmen, E. Polhaumus; (856) 785-2754

Oct. 29-30: Chatsworth, N.J.: Meteor Ride in the Pines, Meteor MC, Jeff Fitzpatrick; (609) 654-5015; MeteorMC.com Nov. 5-6: Port Elizabeth, N.J.: Hammer Run, Tri-County Sportsmen, E. Polhaumas; (856) 785-2754; TeamHammer.org Nov. 5-6: Wickenburg, Ariz: Howlin’ at the Moon Rally, Arizona Trail Riders, Don Hood; (602) 692-9382 Nov. 12-13: Study Butte, Texas: 14th Annual Terlingua National DS, Trail Riders of Houston, Jack Jennings; (713) 248-7222; TRH-Cycle.org

Nov 25-26: Palmdale, Calif.: LA-Barstow to Vegas, AMA D-37, Paul Flanders; (626) 7927384; District37AMA.org AMA PREMIER TOURING SERIES AMERICANMOTORCYCLIST.COM/ ROADRIDE/TOURING AMA VINTAGE MOTORCYCLE DAYS AMAVINATGEMOTORCYCLEDAYS.COM July 22-24: Lexington, Ohio: AMA Vintage Motorcycle Days, AMA, Connie Fleming, (614) 856-1900 ext. 1258, AMAVintageMotorcycleDays.com NATIONAL CONVENTIONS

Nov. 25-26: Palmdale, Calif.: LA-Barstow to Vegas, AMA D37 Dual Sport, Paul Flanders; (626) 792-7384; District37AMA.org

June 6-11: Lake George, N.Y.: Americade & TourExpo, Bill Dutcher, (518) 798-7888, TourExpo.com

AMA YAMAHA SUPER TÉNÉRÉ ADVENTURE RIDING SERIES AMERICANMOTORCYCLIST.COM

Sept. 14-18: Ruidoso, N.M.: Golden Aspen Motorcycle Rally; Golden Aspen Rally Assn; Patric Pearson, (800) 452-8045, Motorcyclerally.com

June 10-12: Wynoochee Lake, Wash.: Ride the Hoh Rain Forest, AltRider, Christina Olson; (206) 922-3618; Altrider.com June 11-12: Wabeno, Wis.: Ride for Research, Wisconsin Dual Sport Riders, John Newton; (920) 350-2030; WiDualsportriders.org July 16-17: McCloud, Calif.: McCloud Adventure Ride, McCloud Dualsport Adventures, Michael Lingsch; (530) 9250151; McCloudDualsportAdventures.com June 17-20: Fairbanks, Alaska: Tag the Deadhorse Ride, Aerostich Tours, Roger Pattison; (575) 776-8785; AerostichTours. com July 20: Bloomsburg, Pa.: Giant Look Adventure Ride, AltRider, Christina Olson; (206) 922-3618; Altrider.com July 27-31: Stevenson, Wash.: Dualsport Northwest Adventure Rally, Soundrider, Tom Mehren; (206) 329-9808; SoundRider.com Aug. 20-21: Columbus, Ind.: Buffalo 500 D/S Adventure Ride, Stoney Lonesome MC, Nathan Gaskill, (812) 343-9772; StoneyLonesomeMC.com Aug. 26-28: Seattle: Ride the Hoh Rain Forest, AltRider, Christina Olson; (206) 9223618; Altrider.com Aug. 27-28: McCloud, Calif.: McCloud Adventure Ride, McCloud Dualsport Adventures, Michael Lingsch; (530) 9250151; McCloudDualsportAdventures.com Sep 15-19: Pendenton, Wash.: Sasquatch Dualsport Adventure Tour, Soundrider, Tom Mehren; (206) 329-7808; SoundRider.com Sep 17-18: Logan, Ohio: Nutcracker 200,

NATIONAL GYPSY TOURS June 11-19: Laconia, N.H.: Laconia Motorcycle Week, Laconia Motorcycle Week Assn, Charlie St. Clair, (603) 366-2000, LaconiaMCWeek.com June 23-26: Johnstown, Pa.: Thunder in the Valley, Johnstown Conv & Visitors Bureau, (800) 237-8590, JohnstownThunder.com Aug. 3-7: Las Vegas, Nev.: National Bikers Roundup, National Bikers Roundup, (702) 522-9043, NBRKCMO.com DISTRICT TOURS AND RALLIES June 18: Kingston, Idaho: Gyro Daze, Hi Rollers MC, (509) 326-7154, HiRollers.org June 20-23: Cedar City, Utah: MTA 2011 Gathering, Motorcycle Touring Assn, (828) 837-7325, MTARiders.com GRAND TOURS Jan. 1 - Dec. 31: USA Four Corners Tour, SCMA, (909) 271-0137, USA4Corners.org March 25 - Oct. 1: Smoke Chasing 2011, Eddie’s Road, smokechasing@teamstrange. com, SmokeChasing.com April 1 - Nov. 30: Ride For Your Rights Grand Tour, AMA, Dave Hembroff, (614) 856-1900 ext. 1202, AmericanMotorcyclist. com/Roadride/Touring.com April 1 - Nov. 30: Travel the USA with KOA, Midnight Riders MC, (765) 566-3807, Midnight-Riders-MC.com Jan. 1 - Dec. 31: California Parks Adventure, SCMA, (760) 985-7660, SC-MA.com Jan. 1 - Dec. 31: California Mission Tour, SCMA, (760) 985-7660, SC-MA.com Jan. 1 - Dec. 31: Three Flags Classic,

SCMA, (626) 274-2237, SC-MA.com SIGNATURE EVENTS June 12: Golden, Colo.: Charity Ride for Kids (road ride), PBTFUS, RideforKids.org July 10: Sound Bend, Ind.: Charity Ride for Kids (road ride), PBTFUS, RideforKids.org July 10: Overland Park, Kan.: Charity Ride for Kids (road ride), PBTFUS, RideforKids.org July 17: Deerfield, N.Y.: Charity Ride for Kids (road ride), PBTFUS, RideforKids.org July 17: White Bear Lake, Minn.: Charity Ride for Kids (road ride), PBTFUS, RideforKids.org July 17: Elgin, Ill.: Charity Ride for Kids (road ride), PBTFUS, RideforKids.org July 23: Marysville, Ohio: Charity Ride for Kids (road ride), PBTFUS, RideforKids.org July 31: Knoxville, Tenn.: Charity Ride for Kids (road ride), PBTFUS, RideforKids.org Aug. 7: Central Valley, N.Y.: Charity Ride for Kids (road ride), PBTFUS, RideforKids.org Aug. 7: Middleton, Wis.: Charity Ride for Kids (road ride), PBTFUS, RideforKids.org Aug. 7: Cranberry Township, Pa.: Charity Ride for Kids (road ride), PBTFUS, RideforKids.org Aug. 13: Salt Lake City: Charity Ride for Kids (road ride), PBTFUS, RideforKids.org Aug. 21: Fiskdale, Mass.: Charity Ride for Kids (road ride), PBTFUS, RideforKids.org Aug. 28: Ashville, N.C.: Charity Ride for Kids (road ride), PBTFUS, RideforKids.org Aug. 28: Ann Arbor, Mich.: Charity Ride for Kids (road ride and dualsport), PBTFUS, RideforKids.org Sept. 11: Carnation, Wash.: Charity Ride for Kids (road ride), PBTFUS, RideforKids.org Sept. 11: Leeds, Ala.: Charity Ride for Kids (road ride), PBTFUS, RideforKids.org Sept. 11: Indianapolis: Charity Ride for Kids (road ride), PBTFUS, RideforKids.org Sept. 18: Cottleville, Mo.: Charity Ride for Kids (road ride), PBTFUS, RideforKids.org Sept. 18: Phoenixville, Pa.: Charity Ride for Kids (road ride), PBTFUS, RideforKids.org Sept. 25: Lido Beach, N.Y.: 9th Annual Dee Snider Ride (road ride), March of Dimes, (561) 496-8442, BikersforBabies.org Sept. 25: Ellicott City, Md.: Charity Ride for Kids (road ride), PBTFUS, RideforKids.org Oct. 2: Las Vegas, Nev.: Charity Ride for Kids (road ride), PBTFUS, RideforKids.org Oct. 2: Grapevine Texas: Charity Ride for Kids (road ride), PBTFUS, RideforKids.org Oct. 2: Fairfield, Calif.: Charity Ride for Kids (road ride), PBTFUS, RideforKids.org Oct. 16: Mesa, Ariz.: Charity Ride for Kids (road ride), PBTFUS, RideforKids.org Oct. 16: Cardiff, Calif.: Charity Ride for Kids (road ride), PBTFUS, RideforKids.org Oct. 23: Lafayette, La.: Charity Ride for Kids (road ride), PBTFUS, RideforKids.org Nov. 6: Lithia, Fla.: Charity Ride for Kids (road ride), PBTFUS, RideforKids.org STATE RALLIES July 14-16: Alvarado, Texas: Bikers Adult Rally, Bikers Adult Rally, (972) 551-0024, BikersAdultRally.com

July 2011

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July 2011

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GUEST COLUMN GOING IT ALONE Identifying Challenges And Conquering Fears In August 2010, I decided I needed to ride the Dragon—that famous, curvy stretch of U.S. 129 on the Tennessee-North Carolina border. Still feeling the disappointment of an earlier aborted attempt with a riding partner—we made it to the northern section of the Blue Ridge Parkway—I was more determined than ever to conquer what I considered one of motorcycling’s must-ride roads. The first time, I felt like neither a leader nor a follower. This time, if I was going to disappoint anyone, it would only be myself. So, I loaded up my Honda Shadow Spirit 750 and set out alone. I left my home in Dutchess County, N.Y., and rode southward, reaching the mountains on my second day. Breathtakingly beautiful and a little ominous on the horizon, I must admit that they had me asking what I had gotten myself into. Early Sunday afternoon, I arrived in Gatlinburg, Tenn. This would be my home base for the next three nights. After spending the day getting settled and fixing an issue with my GPS, I had the whole evening to look forward to finally riding the Dragon on Monday. The next morning found me pacing around in my motel room, anxious—OK, scared silly—at the prospect of the Dragon and its 318 curves in 11 miles. Even with six years experience and 50,000 road miles of riding behind me, I was still intimidated by the thought of this stretch of road. But there was no way I had come hundreds of miles to back out now. I had about a 50-mile ride to the Dragon. The route I took was beautiful, and having some music with me proved to be calmative rather than a distraction. When I came to the intersection of Foothills Parkway and Route 129, which I recognized from all the videos, I was ready. It was go time! I relaxed, heeded the warning signs about the switchback curves and rode within my limits. I was comfortable in even the tightest switchbacks, holding my line all the way through. It was a challenge for sure, but I enjoyed every curve, and the 11 miles went by before I knew it. Of course, I stopped in at the store at Deals Gap to get my t-shirt and stickers and other goodies—not to mention a photo by the sign. I wound up riding back through the Dragon with a friendly group of riders that I met there. It turned out that it was their first time to the Dragon as well. It was great to have folks to celebrate the moment with me. Back in Gatlinburg, I made my plan for the next day, which was to ride the Dragon again and also the Cherohala Skyway. Again, I had good weather, although very hot—a heat index of 103! I think that hurt me on the Dragon, but on the Cherohala, a mile high in the Unicoi Mountains, it was mercifully much cooler, and the road allowed for enjoyment of the scenery. I did a 120-mile loop, taking in scenic Route 360 as well. It was a beautiful day of riding. I headed home on Route 441 into North Carolina. This was another fantastic scenic ride through the Great Smoky Mountains National Park. In Cherokee, I connected with the Blue Ridge Parkway. I loved every mile. The views across the valley were stunning, and I was struck by the sight of a hawk soaring on the thermals level with my bike. It is another world at those altitudes.

“ 54

This was probably the most terrifying four miles I had ever ridden, hairpin after hairpin in the pouring rain.

AmericanMotorcyclist.com

Shortly after stopping at the highest point on the parkway (6,053 feet), I ran into such a downpour I could barely see. With no shoulder to pull over on and unsure of the next pull-off, I grabbed the first road I could down into the valley. I happened to stumble on Rt. 151, a steep, narrow, extremely twisty road that I would later find out was known as Devil’s Drop. How aptly named! This was probably the most terrifying four miles I had ever ridden, hairpin after hairpin in the pouring rain with impatient drivers behind me and no free hand to wave them by and nowhere to move over. When I finally got into the valley, it had stopped raining, and I went to the first gas station to top off the tank, gather myself, check out the map and get my bearings. As I stood studying the map, a rumble of thunder to the south helped me make up my mind, and I headed into the nearest big town, which was Asheville. Although, technically, I had actually gone south that day, I still had plenty of time to make it back home, and had no regrets about that day’s ride. It was fantastic, and I survived a big challenge that was put in front of me. It doesn’t get much better than that. The views from I-26 coming out of Asheville were wonderful for an interstate highway. Sometimes the simplicity of the highways is a comfort to me. I’ve learned that I don’t always need a technical road to have an enjoyable ride. My last day was an easy 200 miles in warm weather and low humidity. It was a wonderful return ride. More importantly, I finished off those last miles with a huge feeling of accomplishment. Not only had I conquered what I considered one of motorcycling’s best-known challenges, I did it my way, on my own and on my terms. Would I do another trip to the Smoky Mountains? Bring it on! Ellen Flanagan is an AMA member from Amenia, N.Y.

Photo David W. Doonan

By Ellen Flanagan



American Motorcyclist 07 2011