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WANT TO WRITE FOR THIS MAGAZINE AS A MOTO-JOURNALIST FOR A DAY? SEE PAGE 28

MAY 2010

Electric Revolutionaries. [American designers building battery-powered bikes for the future]

THE JOURNAL OF THE


p is a proud sponsor of Foremost Insurance Grou percross. Nick Wey in 2010 AMA Su iles, homes

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Navigation Cover Mission Motors CEO Jit Bhattacharya, photographed by Brad Wenner Navigation Photo by Daniel Melguizo Moreno of New York City.

VIEWPOINTS

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Snapshots Your Images, Your World Letters You Write, We Read Ed Moreland Tell Us What You Think Mike Seate Return Of The Coffee Bar Cowboys

THE LIFE

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Protecting The Ride Think. Ride. AMA Produces New Safety Messages

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Living It My First Ride

FEATURES

36 May 2010 Volume 64, Number 5 Published by the American Motorcyclist Association 13515 Yarmouth Dr. Pickerington, OH 43147 (800) AMA-JOIN AmericanMotorcyclist.com

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Connections What’s Old Is New Again

Electric Revolutionaries A New Breed Of Engineer Is Bringing You The Next Big Thing In Motorcycling: BatteryPowered Bikes

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Adrenaline Go DTX Racing

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Taking The ‘Public’ Out Of Public Land? Facing Opposition From The AMA And Others, Anti-Access Forces Are Shifting Gears

Heritage 1928 Indian Prince Go Ride What To Do, Where To Go

American Motorcyclist magazine (ISSN 0277-9358) is published monthly by the American Motorcyclist Association, 13515 Yarmouth Dr., Pickerington, OH 43147. Copyright by the American Motorcyclist Association/American Motorcyclist 2010. Printed in USA. Subscription rate: Magazine subscription fee of $10 covered in membership dues; $15 a year for non-members. Postmaster: Mail form 3579 to 13515 Yarmouth Dr., Pickerington, OH 43147. Periodical postage paid at Pickerington, Ohio, and at additional mailing offices.


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* Sizes for mid-size cycles utilize 3LC and 5LC without Ultraction Compound.

The BT-003RS from Bridgestone is designed with 3LC + Ultraction* (dual compound) to achieve the best possible grip on streets and tracks.


1) Wolfgang Neuwirth and his son, Hunter, after Hunter finished second at an Aztalan Cycle Club (Lake Mills, Wis.) hare scrambles.—Dave Hollub of Sauk City, Wis. 2) Submitted by Rob Pasqual of Goose Creek, S.C. 3) Alex, Helen and Dennis taking a break while riding in Michigan. 4-10) The 22nd Annual AMA Motorcycle Hall of Fame Museum Breakfast at Daytona, held March 5, proved to be one of the most exciting ever. Leslie Porterfield (4), who holds multiple motorcycle land speed records, interviewed the world’s fastest motorcyclists—streamliner builder Denis Manning (5) and rider Chris Carr (6), who are both members of the AMA Motorcycle Hall of Fame. Manning and Carr talked about the challenge and excitement of setting the absolute motorcycle land speed record of 367.382 mph through the measured mile at the Bonneville Salt Flats in Utah last year. Manning even donated a one-of-a-kind replica of his recordsetting streamliner that will be auctioned off to benefit the Hall of Fame later this year (7). AMA Board Chairman Stan Simpson (10) surprised Hall of Famer John Penton with advance copies of the April American Motorcyclist, featuring Penton on the cover. Photos by Brian Pepper, Digital Imaging Direct.

Snapshots

Congratulations, Nina. You’re the winner this month! This sunset snapshot was taken by Nina Slothower of Livermore, Colo.

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Got an image that represents what’s cool about motorcycling? Send your high-resolution photos, name and mailing address to submissions@ama-cycle.org. We’ll pick one standout photo next month and send the photographer a prize pack of AMA gear. Editors decisions are final. No purchase necessary.

There’s more where these came from! We get way more cool photos than we can publish here, and now you’ll find them all online, searchable and divided by category. Just visit AmericanMotorcyclist.com and click on the “Gallery” link on the left.

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2010 RAFFLE BIKES

ENTER TO

WIN:

a 1965

HONDA CUB C100

Editorial officEs

aMa Board of dirEctors

American Motorcyclist 13515 Yarmouth Drive Pickerington, OH 43147 (614) 856-1900 submissions@ama-cycle.org

Contact any member of the AMA Board of Directors at www.AmericanMotorcyclist. com/whatis/trustees.asp stan simpson, Chairman Cibolo, Texas

Grant Parsons, Managing Editor James Holter, Associate Editor Bill Kresnak, Government Affairs Editor Mark Lapid, Creative Director Nora McDonald, Production Coordinator Jen Muecke, Designer

Jim Williams, Vice-Chairman Irvine, Calif. Jon-Erik Burleson, Assistant Treasurer Murrietta, Calif. Perry King, Assistant Secretary Northern California

advErtising Bob Buchanan, Advertising Manager (310) 505-3241, bbuchanan@ama-cycle.org

John Ulrich, Executive Committee Member Lake Elsinore, Calif.

Ray Monroe, Advertising Manager (815) 885-4445, rmonroe@ama-cycle.org

& CB750 FOUR

andy goldfine, Duluth, Minn.

Misty Walker, Advertising Assistant (614) 856-1900, ext. 1267, mwalker@ama-cycle.org

charles goman, Winder, Ga.

All trademarks used herein (unless otherwise noted) are owned by the AMA and may only be used with the express, written permission of the AMA.

a 1969 HONDA

American Motorcyclist is the monthly publication of the American Motorcyclist Association, which represents motorcyclists nationwide. For information on AMA membership benefits, call (800) AMA-JOIN or visit AmericanMotorcyclist.com. Manuscripts, photos, drawings and other editorial contributions must be accompanied by return postage. No responsibility is assumed for loss or damage to unsolicited material. Copyright© American Motorcyclist Association, 2010.

Michael lock, Cupertino, Calif. Maggie Mcnally, Albany, N.Y. scott Miller, Milwaukee, Wis. art More, Surprise, Ariz. Jim viverito, Chicago, Ill.

(800) AMA-JOIN AmericanMotorcyclist.com

contributors and staff

1965 HONDA CUB C100

All original, never sold or titled, with 1 mile on the odometer.

1969 HONDA CB750 FOUR

Restored by Vic World of World Motorcycles.

$5 donation per entry, five entries for $20. More information: (614) 856-2222 WWW.MOTORCYCLEMUSEUM.ORG ALL PROCEEDS WILL BENEFIT THE AMA MOTORCYCLE HALL OF FAME MUSEUM a 501(c)(3) charitable organization dedicated to preserving the history of motorcycling. AMERICAN EXPRESS, VISA, MASTERCARD or DISCOVER accepted or call and reserve your ticket and pay by check or money order. The drawing will be held during AMA Vintage Motorcycle Days 2010. The winner need not be present at the time of the drawing. Rules for this raffle are available wherever tickets are available or by sending a self-addressed stamped envelope to: AMA Motorcycle Hall of Fame Museum, 13515 Yarmouth Drive, Pickerington, OH 43147

BW

Jr

Brad WEnnEr, Photographer If you’re looking for impressive images that balance light as well as their subjects, Brad is your guy—and he’s our go-to guy in the San Francisco area, where he shot this month’s cover and the rest of the crew at Mission Motors. BradWenner.com. JosEPh raMos, Photographer Joseph, who shot Craig Bramscher for our electric bike feature this month, says he loves shooting new people, getting to live vicariously through their experiences and capturing a great image of them. For fun he gets on his bike (right now a Suzuki V-Strom) and takes off, shoots strangers in new places and listens to their stories. You’ll find him online at BeyondImages.com. toni clEMEns, Photographer Living and working in Daytona Beach, Fla., Toni gets plenty of motorcycle immersion therapy. She also shoots a pretty good picture, as she did with the crew from Zero Motorcycles. ToniClemensPhotography.com. MarK laPid, creative director Some ideas just die. For Mark, at least, others simmer forever, only to be restoked by a cataclysmic event—like someone donating a potential vintage-racing project CB160 to the AMA Motorcycle Hall of Fame, where it’s headed for eBay soon.

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JEn MUEcKE, designer This year, Jen is looking to make up for lost ground in the street-riding category, after many summers spent focusing on the racetrack. She’s off to a slow start, though, after missing the Frozen Snot Ride. grant Parsons, Managing Editor As is typical for Grant, he’s reminded that fuel stabilizer actually needed to be poured into the gas tank about four months ago to be effective today. At least the KLR always runs, though. nora Mcdonald, Production coordinator The latest plan? A ride on the CB360 to Hillbilly Hot Dogs in Lesage, W.Va. She says: “Glad I have AMA Roadside Assistance!” Bill KrEsnaK, government affairs Editor It’s spring, and Krez’s thoughts turn to an AMA KTM National DualSport Trail Riding Series event in May. Training starts now. JaMEs holtEr, associate Editor James won the bikewinterizing lottery, for sure. He walked out to the garage, held down the starter button on his un-winterized HarleyDavidson, and the motor just caught. Dirtbikes next. other contributors include: Mitch Boehm, Curt Comer, Jeff Kardas, Shan Moore, Ed Moreland, Open Image Studio, Brian Pepper, and David Smith.


Base MSRP for the 2010 R 1200 GS is $14,950 – with switchable ABS, heated grips, and hand protection, MSRP is $16,400. Price is subject to change. MSRP excludes $495 freight. Actual price is determined by dealer. ©2010 BMW Motorrad USA, a division of BMW of North America LLC. The BMW name and logo are registered trademarks.

R 1200 GS UNSTOPPABLE ENDURO.

Demo the R 1200 GS at your local BMW dealer now and experience instant addiction. Ride the web at www.xplorgs.com

It’s really tough to describe how exhilarating this bike is to ride, even though it’s frequently been called the “Swiss army knife of motorcycles”. The new 2010 R 1200 GS sports radial valves and double overhead camshafts derived from BMW’s race-winning HP2 Sport, redesigned pistons and a new exhaust system. On paper, this adds up to 110hp and 88 ft-lb of torque. But in the saddle, it’s a revelation: you experience responsiveness, acceleration, torque and even a growling engine sound that is much stronger right up to red line in every gear. Don’t take our word for it: just ride the damn thing and see for yourself.

JUST RIDE THE DAMN THING.

Motorcycles since 1923

R 1200 GS

BMW Motorrad USA


Member Letters LETTER OF THE MONTH CBX Times Two I saw the letter of the month in the March issue (“Two Pictures, 30 Years” by Dennis Ziolkowski) and realized that I had the same thing, only 20 years apart. My father has owned/managed Fox Valley Cycles in Aurora, Ill., for the past 30 some years. The first picture was taken on his CBX demo in 1981 or 1982. The second one was taken in 2002 when we had a good customer bring in his CBX for service. Keep up the good work. I like the way the magazine is going! John Conley Fox Valley Cycles Aurora, Ill. Congratulations! You’re our letter of the month, and you win a free AMA T-shirt!

Send your letters (and a high-resolution photo) to submissions@ama-cycle.org; or mail to 13515 Yarmouth Drive, Pickerington, OH 43147.

STRENGTHS THAT DEFINE The Action Alerts on the AMA website educate every time, and Rob Dingman’s article (“Sitting Wolfgang Agotta on the Sidelines is not an Option,” March 2010) hit dead center as well. Once a group’s rights are slowly taken away, they are seldom reinstated to any small or full measure. Those who do not share in the passion for riding or in the motorcycle lifestyle can sometimes see it through a myopic lens. They view our privilege as one that must be regulated for the common good, but often without a balanced perspective or knowledge. Though a different nation, one need only look at the restrictions placed on British motorcyclists to see what the impact might be if we are not aware or taking assertive action. It’s time to engage in word and deed with others in our community, for motorcyclists everywhere to go on the offensive and galvanize our strength within this organizational vessel. Wolfgang Agotta AMA No. 1086065 Ashland, Ore. NICE STOP IN FLORIDA If you’re ever in Florida looking for a great place to ride, there is an unusual area of the state that anyone who wants to see Florida for all its worth must see. It is located between St. Augustine Beach and Daytona Beach on A1A and is know as Matanza’s by the Spanish. Matanza’s means “slaughter” in the English language, and it has a rich history. Nowadays there is a great little restaurant on the southern side of the inlet and the fishing is really good from the bridge. Just farther south is Marineland, and they welcome bikers all year round. Michael Koutelas AMA No. 280695 Jacksonville Beach, Fla. WHAT, NO RAHLVES? In the recent issue of American Motorcyclist, you did an article on Olympians who ride motorcycles. How could you possibly do that article

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and leave Daron Rahlves out? Terrible omission, at best! Mr. Rahlves is a dangerous man on snow skis. “Google” him, if you don’t believe me. Daron is an accomplished off-road rider, and is virtually pro material on an MX track. Daron lives up here in the Tahoe area, trail rides this beautiful area, supports our local shop in Truckee, Thin Air Motorsports, and rides Mammoth MX every year. In addition, I believe Daron has a history of riding personal watercraft, both for recreation and competitively. This should be noted in the next issue! Brad Kohler AMA No. 155558 Truckee, Calif. Brad: Consider it noted—thanks! HEAR ME ROAR I have been Nancy enjoying the March Birmingham issue of American Motorcyclist, as always, but I take issue with the column on motorcycle names that make you wonder. You say that a Virago is “A woman of great stature, strength and courage.” I say, “What’s wrong with that?” That’s exactly the way riding makes me feel! Nancy Birmingham AMA No. 851571 Madison, Wis. FIRST RIDE My first motorcycle ride was in 1947. From 1948-1957, I was in the U.S. Navy. While stationed in Gitmo Bay, Cuba, I found an old Indian Scout, which I rode while there. In 1952, I returned to the States and was stationed in Clarksville, Tenn. I purchased a 1951 74-cubic-inch HarleyDavidson and rode some 40,000 miles. I went to the Mardi Gras in New Orleans and over to the 200-Mile National in Daytona. In 1954, I purchased a 1954 74-cubicinch and rode to Daytona three times and to races in Kentucky, Illinois, Tennessee, Alabama, Georgia, Arkansas and Virginia, some 70,000 miles. In 1962, I let a friend have this old panhead. A very big mistake. Family and work took up most of my time from ’62 until


’04, when I rode some dirtbikes with my sons. In 2004, I purchased an XL1200 and rode about 30,000 miles, and in 2006, I purchased a VRSCR, which I still ride (as much as 600 miles in a day). As a young man of 80 years, I still enjoy the ride as much as ever. I took a trip of more than 2,500 miles in June 2009 and plan more than that in 2010. The AMA is doing a great job keeping us all informed. Stay alert, be courteous, ride safe, but ride. Cecil Gifford AMA No. 970316 Hamburg, Ark. BUY A BIKE, SELL YOUR CAR It has been a year since I’ve become a member of the AMA, and one year since I’ve started riding my two wheels. It is such a great pleasure and freedom that one experiences, so much so, that I sold my car shortly after getting my motorscooter, and have been riding nothing but since. I do appreciate everything the AMA does to support and promote safe motorcycling.

I enjoy getting the magazine and read through it all, but I particularly enjoy the Snapshots section, as I also have a diploma in photography, and you guys really pick nice shots! Alas, I am trying this for the first time, as it would be a dream come true to have one of our shots (representing the Left to right: Oscar Iga, Harley Espinosa, Rick Perkins scooter-folk) in a future issue of American Motorcyclist. Lastly, regarding the and metropolitan areas would have similar current issue, March 2010, with regards incentives for motorcyclists, and who better to the Ask The MSF section: There’s talk than the AMA to spread the word and about parking meters and so on toward the organize efforts! last paragraph. I would like to inform you all that Austin, Oscar Adrian Montes Iga Texas, has a new ordinance in place, AMA No. 1078646 whereas all motorcycle-type vehicles Austin, Texas (scooters/mopeds/trikes) can park in any city-designated public space without a Thanks for the support, Oscar—and the parking fee. I would hope other major cities photo!

On Facebook? Us, too! Become a fan of the American Motorcyclist Association and you could be leaving comments like these: www.facebook.com/AmericanMotorcyclist

Peg Miller AMA Vintage Days. Its all there...racing, swap meet, racing, demo rides, and more racing! — in response to the question “What’s your favorite motorcycle rally.”

Terri Lackey McMichael Red Berkshire 100. LOVED IT! Was one of my favorite bikes. — responding to the post of an AMA video interview with AMA Motorcycle Hall of Famer John Penton.

Daniel Cogan Laconia and Americade in Lake George. What a PARTY! — in response to the same.

Jeff Morris This guy could win on a tricycle! He’s awesome! — in response to the news that Husaberg’s Mike Lafferty won the Alligator Enduro.

Dan LaValley Greatest movie of all time! I will go out of my way to attend this year. Malcolm Smith and Husqvarna, two of my favorites. — in response to the announcement that Malcolm Smith, who was featured in the movie “On Any Sunday,” will be grand marshal of AMA Vintage Motorcycle Days this July 9-11 in Lexington, Ohio. Donald J. McLaughlin Go to a bicycling-only trail or a hiking-only trail. Those places far outnumber areas that can be ridden on motorycles. — responding to another poster’s comment that all trails should be designated for foot traffic only.

Karen Renkel Doesn’t really matter how many wheels you ride, what matters is we all share the love for motorized fun :) — responding to a question about the popularity of trikes. Vincent Sallie Just became a fan and wanted to say thanks to the AMA. THANKS. Steven Guy Started riding again after 15 years. I am BACK. Follow AMA news—and chat with fellow AMA members—on Facebook and get the latest info at AmericanMotorcyclist.com.

May 2010

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Viewpoint

Tell Us What You Think

You’ve heard us say it before: Your voice counts. That’s true when it comes to convincing legislators to preserve off-highway riding areas. It’s true when it comes to blocking cities and towns when they’re unfairly cracking down on motorcycles. And it’s even true a little closer to home, here at the AMA, when we make plans to work with AMA members and others to fight bad laws and anti-motorcycling forces that lay siege to our lifestyle. That’s why every other year, we undertake comprehensive surveys of AMA members’ priorities on our government relations activities, for both street and dirt riders. In the past, we’ve done these surveys the oldfashioned paper-and-pencil way, with two pages of this magazine devoted to forms you filled out and mailed in. This year, we’re making the process less expensive and more efficient, with two online surveys that allow you to immediately make your feelings known on the issues. You can find the surveys in the Members Area of AmericanMotorcyclist.com. From our perspective, it’s important for you to take a moment to fill out one or both surveys because they help us better understand your priorities. At the AMA, we pride ourselves on putting our members, and their concerns, first. As we protect the motorcycling lifestyle in the halls of government, we never forget that we’re working for you. Lately, we’ve been very vocal about the myriad threats to motorcycling. There are more now than we’ve ever seen at one time. And there are no easy choices when it comes to deciding how best to combat them. The more we know about your concerns, the better we can address them. Your input helps us set our agenda for the future, both on local and state issues as well as nationally and beyond. The surveys also help us gauge the changing priorities of AMA members over time. These surveys have provided tremendously valuable information that has guided us on several major initiatives. You told us, for example, that America’s public lands must include areas where off-highway vehicle recreation is allowed and managed. As a result, we’ve gone toe-to-toe with anti-access forces in Congress and federal agencies to protect your right to ride responsibly on the public lands that our taxes support. Another example: You said that motorcycle exhaust sound has become an increasingly divisive issue in communities where MX, dirtbike and street riders want to

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enjoy the freedom to ride. That’s powered us to support reasonable and objective sound standards developed by the Society of Automotive Engineers (SAE) as part of a larger plan to combat excessive sound from all sources. You told us that we need to better understand the causes of motorcycle crashes, and work to prevent them. As a result, we advocated for and secured federal money for the first crash causation study to be done in more than three decades. Then there’s health-care discrimination. We fought for, and won, inclusion of language prohibiting insurers from denying health care claims resulting from a motorcycle crash. After an administrative revision allowed such discrimination to continue, we’ve taken the battle back to Congress as it debates comprehensive health care reform. These examples illustrate how important your direction is to us. When we walk into the offices of decision-makers and speak for hundreds of thousands of AMA members, we know you’re behind us. That carries real weight. The bottom line: Your voice counts. Please fill out the survey today at the Members Area of AmericanMotorcyclist.com and tell us what’s on your mind. Ed Moreland is the AMA’s vice president for government relations.

Photo Erin Lassahn Photography

New Online Surveys Will Help The AMA Set Priorities By Ed Moreland


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The Life

Protecting the Ride 16 • Living It 20 • Connections 26 • Adrenaline 30 • Heritage 34

Bill Baird never thought he’d see the day: The endearing feature of an AMA Racing/Rekluse National Enduro Championship Series event is the long, extended trail that makes up the course. But the geographical reality of all that awesome, remote single-track is that scores must be physically delivered to a centralized location to be tallied, requiring long waits before results could be posted. No more. Cellphone coverage has made it possible for organizers to deliver the data electronically. For competitors, this means instant results once a check has closed. For fans, it means check-by-check updates at NationalEnduro.com. “It’s not instant, but once the check closes, we load it and post it,” says the National Enduro Promotions Group’s Alan Randt. “It must be going over OK, because we had 25,000 views the day of the Alligator Enduro.” Photo by Shan Moore.

May 2010

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The Life | Protecting the Ride

AMA Awards Grants

THINK. RIDE. AMA PRODUCES NEW SAFETY MESSAGES FOR WEB, PRINT AND RADIO With the summer riding season getting under way, the AMA has expanded its new “Think. Ride.” public service announcement (PSA) campaign, which focuses on responsible riding and driver awareness. The AMA’s “Think. Ride.” PSA campaign kicked off in October with actor and AMA Board of Directors member Perry King appearing in AMA-produced video. The new additions to the campaign include print, radio and web resources. The print advertisements include full- and half-page formats. They deliver positive messages about responsible off-highway recreation, quieting excessively loud motorcycle exhausts, and avoiding drinking while riding. The print advertisements are downloadable in PDF format. Four 15- to 20-second radio spots are available that deliver the same messages, as well as a message to drivers to watch out for motorcyclists on the road. The audio messages are in MP3 format. Media outlets can also download web ads, provided in standard sizes: 160x600 pixels, 728x90 pixels and 468x60 pixels. “One of the first steps in preserving our motorcycling rights is being safe and responsible riders,” says AMA Vice President for Government Relations Ed Moreland. “Second, we need to remind

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others that we belong on America’s roads, and to be alert to our presence. We encourage all media outlets to take advantage of these resources to spread the word about responsible riding.” King, an avid off-highway and street rider, is well-known for playing the character Cody Allen in the 1980s television series “Riptide,” as well as for appearances on stage and in movies, including “Slaughterhouse Five,” “The Lords of Flatbush” with Sylvester Stallone and Henry Winkler, and “The Choirboys.” “The fact of the matter is, if we want non-riders to respect our rights, we must earn that respect,” King says. “We need to be responsible for how we ride. When we accept that responsibility, we make it easier for our rights to be recognized and considered in legislative bodies and in the court of public opinion.” King filmed the videos during AMA Vintage Motorcycle Days last summer, where he competed in the vintage hare scrambles and motocross competition. The radio spots were recorded near King’s home in California. The off-road riding videos are available in versions targeted to both off-highway motorcycle riders and all-terrain vehicle riders. Find the PSAs at AmericanMotorcyclist. com > About Us > For The Media.

The AMA Government Relations Department has awarded five $1,000 grants to help strengthen motorcycle safety and awareness programs. The grant recipients are: • ABATE of Illinois, for its “Drive Aware We’re Out There!” program. Info: ABATE-IL.org. • ABATE of Iowa, for its “Share the Road” program. Info: ABATEIowa.org. • ABATE of Maryland, for a program promoting responsibility among riders and drivers. Info: ABATEofMD.org. • CBA-ABATE of North Carolina for a program aimed at driver-education students. Info: CBA-ABATENC.org. • Share the Road Kentucky Foundation, for its program aimed at new drivers. Info: ShareKYRoads.com.

Look Out!

Signs Aimed At Increasing Safety “Look out for riders” — that’s the message of Allstate Insurance Company’s “Once is Never Enough” motorcycle awareness program, which includes placing road signs like the one shown below across the country. Helping out with the program is AMA Motorcycle Hall of Famer Dave Perewitz, who helped Allstate roll out the program at Bike Week.

Photos Dirtbiker: Shannon Price Photography; NOHVCC CD: Grogan Studios

Supporting Safety And Awareness


The Life | Protecting the Ride

Teach Kids Right

A Free CD Helps Kids Learn Responsible Riding

Youth Riding In Illinois Under Attack Lawmaker Again Aims At Young Riders

Illinois state Rep. Mary Flowers (D-Chicago) is at it again, trying to ban kids from riding ATVs and off-highway motorcycles. But her bill hit a bit of a snag in February when it was supposed to be heard by the House Elementary and Secondary Education Committee. Instead, it was sent to the Mandates Subcommittee for consideration. The bill is still alive, and concerned riders need to act, says Jessica Irving, AMA grassroots coordinator. The measure, House Bill 5029, would make it illegal for anyone under the age of 16 to operate an ATV or motorcycle. This bill is nearly identical to legislation introduced by Flowers last year that died when the House Rules Committee voted 17-3 to kill the bill. “When we learned of the bill last year, we immediately alerted Illinois AMA members who quickly contacted their lawmakers, pointing out the many positive aspects of off-highway riding for kids,” Irving says. “They obviously were persuasive and effective, since the committee members voted down the bill. “We are hoping that Illinois AMA members will, once again, speak out to protect our sport and urge their state lawmakers to oppose H.B. 5029,” she says. The text of H.B. 5029 and a pre-written response are available on the “Rights” page of AmericanMotorcyclist.com. Go to “Issues and Legislation” and select “IL” in the “Search by State” drop-down menu.

Looking for a great way to teach your kids the right way to ride off-road? A new—and free—interactive computer CD-ROM produced by the National OffHighway Vehicle Conservation Council (NOHVCC) with the help of the AMA and other groups could be just what you need for younger children. The free CD features an activities book that teaches kids about wearing the right gear, riding the right-size machine, sharing the trail with others, respecting animals and the land, riding a quiet machine, and more. In it, Little Penny and her raccoon buddy, Rascal, take kids on a trip along the Adventure Trail, teaching them about responsible off-highway riding. Besides the activities book, the CD has short, entertaining film clips that reinforce the messages contained in the book. “It’s all about keeping the sport of OHVing happy and healthy,” says Russ Ehnes, NOHVCC executive director. “If we can get the next generation of riders on the right trail as far as safety and riding ethics go, we will be helping to ensure the future of our chosen form of outdoor recreation.”

AMA Government Affairs Manager Royce Wood agrees. “It’s important that kids develop good riding, safety and outdoor ethics habits early so that they will continue to be responsible off-highway riders as adults,” Wood says. “Responsible riding not only helps protect the environment and keeps riders safe, but it also goes a long way toward gaining the respect of nonriders. And that will help keep riding areas open now and in the future.” Others helping NOHVCC produce the CD are the U.S. Forest Service, Motorcycle Industry Council, Specialty Vehicle Institute of America, U.S. Bureau of Land Management, Stay The Trail Colorado, Kansas State Parks, Montana Trail Vehicle Riders Association, Cheaha Trail Riders, Idaho State Parks and Recreation, Hatfield-McCoy Trails, Arizona State Parks, Alaska State Parks, and the Vermont All-Terrain Vehicles Sportsman’s Association. To get a free CD, e-mail your name, AMA number and mailing address to adventuretrail@ama-cycle.org. For extra copies of the CD or activities books and posters, e-mail trailhead@nohvcc.org, visit NOHVCC.org, or call (800) 348-6487.


The Life | Protecting the Ride

Statewatch

HAWAII The Sand Island Off-Highway Vehicle Association now has a permit to operate an off-highway vehicle (OHV) park on 30 state-owned acres at Sand Island. At this time the park is only open to BMX riders and RC car enthusiasts but plans are in the works for dirtbike and ATV tracks. For more information, visit SandboxHawaii.com. IOWA House Bill 2351, introduced by Rep. Geri

D. Huser (D-Altoona), would require the Transportation Department to put “Watch for Motorcycles” on all electronic message boards on Iowa’s interstate highways for four days this May, except when in the case of an emergency or other needed situation. MASSACHUSETTS The Massachusetts Motorcycle Association (MMA) announced on March 2 that four additional insurance companies have agreed to refund about $9 million in motorcycle insurance premium overcharges. This news comes less than two months after three insurance companies agreed to refund $11.1 million to motorcycle policyholders in the Bay State. For more information, visit the MMA’s website at Massmotorcycle.org and the Massachusetts Attorney General’s website at Tiny.cc/ massinsure. OHIO The AMA has produced a public service announcement (PSA) to encourage safe and responsible motorized recreation at the

Critical Forest Service Management Plan Public Meetings Scheduled Discussions Could Open Door For Potential Land Closures The U.S. Forest Service is holding a series of public meetings that will shape the future of off-highway riding in this country’s national forests. The meetings will offer a discussion on a new Forest Service Land and Resource Management Planning Rule. Indications are that off-highway riding may get forced out of the forests unless riders speak up at the meetings, which is why Royce Wood, AMA government affairs manager,

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encourages all riders to make every effort to attend these critical meetings. “U.S. Forest Service Chief Tom Tidwell says he wants ‘broad participation’ in the creation of this new planning rule,” Wood notes. “But he also goes on to say that ‘through collaboration we will be able to better address the current and future needs of the national forest system, such as restoration, protecting watersheds, addressing climate change, sustaining local economies, improving collaboration, and working across landscapes.’ “What Chief Tidwell doesn’t mention is recreation, and we need to let Forest Service officials know that they need to consider recreation in any planning they do for the future of the forests,” Wood says.

Wayne National Forest. The PSA, featuring actor and AMA Board Member Perry King, is part of the AMA’s new “Think. Ride.” PSA program. The Wayne PSA can be viewed online at Youtube.com/ AmericanMotorcyclist. Search for “Wayne National Forest.” SOUTH CAROLINA On-highway motorcycles would be included in the state’s lemon law coverage of motor vehicles under House Bill 4561, authored by Rep. Jimmy Bales (D-Eastover). UTAH Senate Bill 106, which would have required all vehicles to have an exhaust system that is “installed by the original manufacturer” or meets equivalent specifications, is dead for this session. The AMA and others argued it would have forced many older vehicles off the road due to either a lack of parts or the prohibitive cost of OEM equipment. Also, the bill didn’t give police or riders a clear standard on what equipment would be legal. He says officials need to understand that, for millions of Americans, public land recreation is what connects them to the land, introduces them to conservation and teaches them to value healthy ecosystems. “Recreation also provides sustainable employment and economic growth,” Wood says. “Ultimately, it is incumbent upon the Forest Service to actively manage recreation as it would any other use. Too often, motorized recreation has been managed by extremes—either it’s ignored until it becomes a problem or it’s prohibited. “Even when given tools designed specifically to manage motorized recreation, many forests have eliminated recreation rather than manage it,” he says. The meetings were scheduled for: • Lakewood, Colo., April 12 • Atlanta sometime during the week of April 12 • Missoula, Mont., April 13 • Juneau, Alaska, April 13 • Cheyenne, Wyo., April 14 • Washington, D.C., April 20-21 and May 11-12 • Rapid City, S.D., April 21 • Chicago sometime during the week of April 28 For meeting locations, agendas and other details, visit the Planning Rule website at FS.USDA.gov/planningrule.

Photo Jeff Kardas

FLORIDA Two bills would enhance penalties for those who commit a moving violation that causes serious bodily injury or death to a person operating or riding in/on a motor vehicle or motorcycle. They are House Bill 875, sponsored by Rep. Greg Evers (R-Milton), and Senate Bill 1918, sponsored by Sen. Dave Aronberg (D-Fort Myers). To ask lawmakers to support the bills, go to AmericanMotorcyclist.com > Rights > Issues and Legislation.


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The Life | Living It

MY FiRST RidE

You Never Forget Your First

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“Remember your first ride? Where was it? How old were you? What kind of bike were you on? Who was with you? What sights, sounds and smells do you recall? Let us know!” We asked those questions on our Facebook fan page (Facebook.com/ AmericanMotorcyclist) and got a huge response. Here’s a sample… doug Varney: Taco 20 in an empty lot next to my home. I was 5 years old, and this was the coolest thing I had ever done! That was 43 years ago, and I still feel the power of that monster. denise C. Johnson: 1971, I was 10. It was on a Honda 70, and I knew I was in love right away. It has lasted about 39 years so far, and there’s no end in sight. Now I ride a 2009 V-Star 1100 Classic. Andy Schaffner: In the mid-1990s, on a friend’s 1984 Honda V45. I remember the sound of the engine like it was yesterday. I just went up the road a few miles and have been hooked ever since! Man, am I ready for spring!

Scrambler. It was a neighbor’s bike, and he let me try riding it. I was hooked right there. Gordon Poulson: My first ride was when I jumped on my new S2 Kawasaki triple. I was a young 23! The two-stroke sounded like rattlers on a snake. (AMA Hall of Famer) Chris Sommer Simmons: I was 9, fell in love from day one... on the back of my stepdad’s Honda 750. I believe that day changed my life forever. I have been riding solo since I was 14...and I’m still going strong.

Bonnie Cousins: About 1943, I got to ride on the back of my uncle’s H-D. Must have done something to me, as I have never forgotten that moment. A short ride but memorable! Wayne Segedie: I was 17 and I was picking up my first bike, a 1966 Honda S65. I was at the dealer with my parents. My training was to ride the bike across a field and back and then home. I made it, and the rest is history. Allen Trandem: It was 1967 in southern Minnesota, riding through a late July alfalfa field on a yellow ’66 Yamaha

Christopher Eric Johnson: It was Grants, N.M., 1971. My next-door neighbor was a boy my age (13) with a red Honda Trail 70. He let me take it for a ride, and I was hooked. After that, I scrounged rides on anything I could, until getting my own first motorcycle (1975 Honda CB200T) in 1977. Except for a short time while in the Navy, I’ve had at least one bike ever since. Billy Owen: I was almost 12. It was my big brother’s friend’s little brother’s YZ60. Today, I am an accomplished motorcycle technician. I did my first Supercross (as a tech) this year at San Francisco—25 years later.

AmericanMotorcyclist.com

Tom Poppelreiter: My granddad gave my brothers and me an old Allstate. It was a rusty, oily, maybe used to be brown two-wheeled thing that wouldn’t make 10 mph. This bike taught me how to wrench. I was hooked for life. Carr Estes: I think I was about 4 or 5. It was a 3-hp rigid-framed mini-bike with a Tecumseh motor. It was like crack. The heat of that mill was between my legs, the smell of exhaust, and the thrill of the slipping centrifugal clutch. I was hooked from the first moment I moved. Bill Young: I was 6 years old on my brother’s 1971 Yamaha GT60. He was on the back working the clutch while I was gassin’ it! Tom Britton: Mine was a TM 75 Suzuki in Upstate New York. I had a few minibikes before that, and graduating to a transmission was awesome! That was 40 years ago. Still riding today. That bike is a little small for me now though! Stephen Colón: Nine or 10 years old, feet dangling off the tank of a new Honda Elsinore. Judd West: In my alley in 1988, a friend taught me on a 1980 Yamaha GT80 that I had just bought for $50. Now, 22 years and 11 bikes later, I’m still reminding myself every day that the worst day riding is better than the best day at work. Randall Blackwell: I was 10 years old. My dad bought me an El Tigre minibike with a 4 hp engine. The night he brought it home, we had a company picnic to go to. I only got to ride it for 15 minutes before we had to leave for the picnic. I didn’t want to go to that picnic!

Photo Flash 2 Pass: Grogan Studios

One from the archives: Everybody smiles when they think about their first ride.


The Life | Living It

Flash2Pass Makes Entry Easy

Because Life Has Enough Hassles What it is: Flash2Pass turns your existing headlight high-beam switch into a transmitter for your garage-door opener. What it does: Pull up to your garage door, flash your high beam twice, and the garage door opens. It’s magic! How it works: Flash2Pass works with virtually any vehicle equipped with a 12-volt system, including both

motorcycles and automobiles. It works with most automatic garage door openers manufactured since 1982. It’s weatherproof, and a single receiver accepts up to six transmitters. It comes with do-it-yourself instructions, and can be installed in less than 15 minutes with standard household tools. The deal: As an AMA member, you can buy a Flash2Pass unit for 10 percent less than the MSRP of $79.95. For the discount code, see the Members Area of AmericanMotorcyclist.com. More info: F2PTechnologies.com.

DAN’s AN origiNAl.

Worth Reading

Great Lakes Trail Rider What it is: Great Lakes Trail Rider magazine is the official publication of the Cycle Conservation Club (CCC) of Michigan, an organization committed to the conservation of our wild lands while promoting the sport of off-road motorcycling. During the riding season, the club organizes “trail tours” at various locations throughout the trail system in the northern part of the state. The editors say: Don’t forget that the CCC sponsors the “Ultimate Trail Ride” —the Michael R. Burlingham Memorial Six Days of Michigan. Six full days of off-road riding—nothing else like it! Get it: Great Lakes Trail Rider is a benefit of membership in the CCC of Michigan. Members also receive a detailed map book of the Michigan trail system, access to all CCC events and activities plus access to the members’ section of their website. To join contact the CCC office by phone at (517) 7814805, e-mail ccckids@verizon.net, or visit CycleConservationClub.org.

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The Life | Living It

ContegoDirect Has You Covered What it is: After your factory warranty has run out, ContegoDirect extended service coverage offers cost-effective protection against unexpected repairs. The deal: If you’re enrolled in the AMA’s auto-renewal program, or you buy a ContigoDirect policy within 90 days of purchasing or renewing your AMA membership, you can get a $50 discount on ContegoDirect policies. Current AMA members who are not enrolled in the AMA’s auto-renewal program can get a $25 discount. More info: ContegoDirect.com.

Three Questions With

Jason Britton

The Moto-Stuntman Talks About Riding–And Bonding –With His Family Jason Britton may be best known for his closed-course motorcycle stunt skills and his time in front of the camera on the show “Super Bikes!” but he’s also a family man for whom motorcycling fills a special need. American Motorcyclist: How much riding are you able to do with your family? Jason Britton: We love going riding as a family, but because of our schedules we don’t get to do it nearly as much as we’d like. We probably head out to the desert—Ocotillo Wells or Glamis—three or four times a year. The logistics are brutal. The kids have school, my wife Kendi’s got three full-time jobs—she’s vice president of a shipping/logistics company, she runs our household and she also manages my career—and my schedule is as busy as ever. The kids love it, and it really recharges us as a family. And watching the kids light up around all the motorcycles is really great to see. AM: Tell us a little about your kids and their riding. JB: Kendi and I have four children: girls Kailan (11) and Jasmine (16), and boys Christian (12) and Jordan (16). Jasmine wasn’t on our latest trip with Kawasaki,

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AmericanMotorcyclist.com

Ask The Motorcycle Safety Foundation Front Or Rear Brake? Is One Ever Better Than Both

Photo Riding: Kevin Wing

Peace Of Mind Rarely Comes So Easy

You Ask: “I learned long ago that the old advice to never touch the front brake is inaccurate. But is using either the front brake only or the back brake ever the preferred option?” The MSF Responds: The front brake can contribute most of the stopping power for motorcycles—around 70 percent braking force for most motorcycles, and more than that for sportbikes. But even though the front brake outperforms the rear, the rear brake contributes to the overall braking and stability of the bike. Therefore, in normal street-riding situations, using both brakes together is best. There are a few instances where the rear brake alone could help, including at deep lean angles and when you’re entering a turn. However, these techniques must be practiced and

but the other three really got into it, and it was good to see them improving. Christian is probably the most intense about riding. He wants to get out there and own the riding area! Jordan’s just coming off a broken leg, so I was surprised to see him riding so well here. He was riding confidently, jumping well, and definitely moved up a notch in terms of skill. Kailan is a people person. She

mastered because there is very little traction available from the rear tire in these situations, and overuse of the rear brake could result in a slide-out. More detailed explanations are available in the MSF’s book “Motorcycling Excellence.” Also, in a tight, slow-speed maneuver (such as a U-turn in a parking lot), it may be more convenient to slow with the rear brake while your hands concentrate on handlebar/clutch/throttle manipulation. You can also lightly tap the front brake lever or rear brake pedal to activate the brake light, for example, as a signal to a tailgating driver. Performance braking is a skill that benefits from dedicated practice, away from traffic. Be sure you have mastered these advanced techniques before applying them in real-time.

loves hanging with everyone and talking. But she’s a good rider, too, and usually rides one of the smaller ATVs. She’s cautious like Kendi, but she’s pretty good. AM: How do you see motorcycling affecting your family in the years to come? JB: I’d hope they’d continue to ride for pleasure and enjoyment. I just want them to enjoy the bikes, the experiences, the people and the interaction. Riding is such a great family thing. It brings everyone together. I don’t care if they make motorcycles their career. Kendi and I don’t push them to ride fast or be competitive, just to enjoy it. They’re riding at their own pace, having fun, learning, and that’s the way it should be.—Mitch Boehm


Get a free one-year subscription to a motorcycle magazine at your local dealer with a test ride*. See our models starting at $12,499 at VictoryMotorcycles.com . Model shown is $17,999. *Available at participating dealers. While supplies last. Subscription is valid for one year. Offer ends on May 31, 2010. Victory and Victory Motorcycles® are registered trademarks of Polaris Industries, Inc. Always wear a helmet, eye protection, and protective clothing and obey the speed limit. Never ride under the influence of alcohol. ©2010 Polaris Industries Inc.


The Life | Living It

Member Review

Yamaha GTS1000 Ahead Of Its Time

Martin Thornton: I was intrigued by the technological offerings that came with the GTS: RADD (stands for “Rationally Advanced Design Development”) forkless front end, six-caliper front brake, ABS and EFI all in a package much sportier than what other companies were offering. The GTS opened up new worlds of touring for me, and I’ve covered 43 states and several Canadian provinces. On the GTS, I achieved my first Iron Butt Saddle Sore certificate. I was also introduced to some great like-minded individuals through events such as the North America GTS Rally (www.ladj.com/gtsrally/). Through it all, the stability of the GTS has been able to make the rides enjoyable and memorable. It never fails to draw a crowd when I pull in to a meet and though it is no longer showroom or museum pretty, the plaque on the dash showing the states traveled and the Iron Butt license tag on the rear speak to the reliability of the bike. Dave “GTXDave” Biasotti: The GTS is one of the all-time great sport-touring bikes, way before its time—power, ABS, EFI, handling like no other. The RADD front end allows for superb cornering stability, whether on or off the brakes or throttle—it doesn’t get unsettled. It can handle the roughest roads without worrying about blowing out fork seals. And those brakes—with the massive front centerline disc and ABS, no liter-size bike, even today, comes close to the stopping distance of the GTS. As for the bad, the GTS is notorious for burning oil, some worse than others, but particularly at sustained highway speeds of 5,000 rpm and above and worse in hot weather. Also, the ABS pump has been known to fail on some bikes. Roger Van Santen: I’m the original owner of a ’93. I was attracted to the GTS because of the advanced engineering for its day, but especially for the RADD front end. This is the bike that got me into long-distance riding. It now has 136,000 miles, and I wouldn’t hesitate to cross the continent on it again. The handling is great, although the turning radius is limited, making slowspeed handling (parking lots) difficult. The brakes are absolutely awesome. There is no current bike that will stop in as short a distance. The front has little dive, and it’s almost like hitting a wall. Jason J. Kaplitz: I bought my GTS in October 1993. The bike was my only ride from 1993 through 2002, and I enjoyed every minute

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riding it. I toured on it. I rode it around town. I hauled camping gear on it. The GTS did have some issues. Mainly problems with front-wheel wobble after changing the OEM tire and failure of the ABS unit. My front wheel wobbles never went away, only got better or worse depending on what brand of tire I used. Randy Kuklis: I bought the GTS in November 2004 with 4,000 miles on the clock. It has about 30,000 now. I’m

a senior instructor with Stayin’ Safe Motorcycle Training (www.stayinsafe.com), and use this bike as my primary training bike and an occasional commuter. It is a wonderful backroad ride with plenty of power and precise handling to maneuver through the twisties. My only complaint is that you must wear hearing protection at speeds above 30 mph, as a lot of noise comes up over the windshield.

Member Review

bikes. With the GB500 I get all the fun and looks of those Brit café bikes, with none of the leaks, points to mess with, crap brakes, wobbly frames or breakdown issues a vintage machine can have. All the fun. None of the hassle. Can’t really go wrong. This is a real cult bike, and the guys in Northern Europe love them and the Kawasaki W650 equally. There are web sites devoted to making this bike anything from a full aluminum tanked café racer, to a scrambler, to a touring bike. It’s a great bike, and I would recommend one to anyone who wants that café look. I simply walk out to the garage, either hit the button or kick it over and it always starts, never leaks and has never given me a hint of problems.

Honda GB500 Instant Cult Bike

Scott Braman: I have an immaculate 1989 GB500, fitted with a SuperTrapp pipe and the full White Bros 600 kit. It never stops getting attention, either on the street or when zipping past some kid in the mountain twisties on a modern 600. It’s not real fast, but plenty fast enough for the real world of street riding. It’s not great for any real distance, but it does take me back to what is great about a motorcycle. It’s simple and a great deal of fun. It will go at redline all day and then putt around town with no effort. I missed the whole café racer era, but was always intrigued by the look of those


The Life | Living It

Member Review

Kawasaki KLR650 A Do-It-All Bargain Bike

Bruce Kochsmeier: I had one of the rare KLX650s for eight years and traded to get the new KLR650. I’ve been riding 42 years, have raced in about every form of motorcycle competition and owned many motorcycles, but my KLR is a favorite because it reminds me of everything good about our sport. It is simple and fun and will take me literally and figuratively everywhere I want to go.

The KLR is a nostalgia machine that is just plain fun to ride. Jeff Fulweiler: I ride my KLR as my primary motorcycle. The bike works well on paved curvy roads or on Jeep trails, with enough power for us senior riders and simple enough not to have many problems. The only things I disliked were the high front fender while riding on the road at high speeds and the weak front brake. The low fender smoothed out the ride and added to the bike’s on-road manners. The 320mm front disc solved the brake problem. Being able to ride 250 miles on the road and then riding off road on the Lost Coast is something most motorcycles don’t do well. All in all, I love the KLR and don’t plan to sell any time soon. Randy Kuklis: Since I mounted a tail trunk, I use my KLR primarily as a commuter bike except when I occasionally venture off-road. The KLR is a great dual-sport machine. It’ll keep up with the Washington, D.C., traffic flow, has a decent seat, upright seating position, and tracks well on the highway unless following a large vehicle. It’s great on the trails, but depending on the terrain, its weight and seat height can be a problem.

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Member Review

Kawasaki W650 Modern Classic

George Pio: I bought my Kawasaki W650 new in March 2001, the last year this model was sold in the United States. Nine years later, I still enjoy this bike as much as when it was brand new. It is stone reliable, easy to maintain, very comfortable, looks great (to me, anyway), and gets up to 70 mpg on trips. And the sweet engine sounds just like the great Brit-bikes of the 1960s! Too bad Kawasaki pulled the plug on this model too soon.


the life | Connections

What’s Old Is NeW agaIN

Bound For AMA VintAge Motorcycle dAys Old motorcycles never die. They’re just rebuilt to ride again. That’s one message delivered at AMA Vintage Motorcycle Days every summer. This year’s July 9-11 event, which will be held at the Mid-Ohio Sports Car Course in Lexington, Ohio, attracts riders and racers of motorcycles from all eras. Machines range from century-old classics to bikes that are barely past their prime. Here’s a quick look at some AMA members’ cool projects headed for VMD this year:

Bike: 1978 Yamaha YZ250 Owner: Dennis Albrewczynski, Erie, Pa. Why this bike? I grew up in the late 1970s and early 1980s going to motocross races with a neighbor kid who raced. I always liked the single-shock Yamahas. Why going? To race it, of course! Work done? The bike was all complete and pretty much original when I got it. I replaced the plastics/graphics and gave it a good once-over and cleaning.

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AmericanMotorcyclist.com

Bike: 1977 Yamaha TT500 Owner: Mike Bartholomew, Parma, Mich. Why this bike? I bought the bike right out of high school. Inspired by street trackers made from various old bikes, I knew that my TT would be perfect for a streettracker project. Why going? Last year was my first time at AMA Vintage Motorcycle Days, and it certainly isn’t going to be my last! Work done? The bike has gone through multiple restorations. This version includes bodywork, disc brakes, a low exhaust and a pumper carb.

Bike: 1977 Suzuki PE250B Owner: Charles Schaefer, Waynesville, N.C. Why this bike? Excellent manners, reedinduction, low seat height, reliability, an abundance of OEM new-old-stock parts and the help and experience of a longtime friend persuaded me to get the PE. Why going? To compete in the AMA Racing Vintage Grand Championships. Work done? The ’77 PE was the only model sold in the United States with an aluminum tank and street-legal equipment. Bike: 1973 Penton Berkshire 100 Owner: Stephen Markley, Kings Mountain, N.C. Why this bike? Since meeting John

Penton in 2000 at AMA Vintage Motorcycle Days, I’ve wanted a Penton motorcycle to help keep this thing going. Why going? I’m a big-time enthusiast and want to reconnect with like-minded enthusiasts from all over the U.S. Work done? Historically correct, threeyear restoration. Bike: 1978 Suzuki RM250 Owner: John Kreps Why this bike? Never had a dual-shock motocrosser before and wanted one! Why going? To race post-vintage motocross. Work done? Complete teardown and clean-up of old parts. Not a complete resto, just a lot of shining and polishing.

Bike: 1964 Suzuki T10 Owner: Glenn Rumburg, Wooster, Ohio Why this bike? I’m into old Suzukis and when I finished my last project, an X6, I had a friend who said he had an old bike in his garage that his dad bought in 1970. When he pulled the sheet off this T10, it looked like it was two years old. Why going? For the Ride ’Em, Don’t Hide ’Em parade. Work done? All it needed was a good cleaning, then went through the fuel system and the points.

Photos Restorations: Bike Owners; CB750: Grogan Studios

Bike: 1964 MV Agusta 125 Gran Turismo Lusso Owner: Peter Calles, Bethesda, Md. Why this bike? I like little MV Agusta singles, and this is a very rare bike. There are very few in the country. Why going? I’m going because my friends go there. I’ve been going the past 10 years, showing bikes. I’ve had a Ducati, another MV, a Harley, Triumph. Every year I try to bring a different bike. Work done? It was a two-year full-on restoration. I took it down to every nut and bolt. I even went so far as to send the seat to Italy to have it reupholstered.


The Life | Connections

Win Japan’s First Superbike Buy A Chance To Win

Time is running out on your best chance to win a pair of landmark Honda motorcycles and support the AMA Motorcycle Hall of Fame at the same time. One is a 1969 CB750K0 “Sandcast”— named for its limited-production-volume sandcast engine cases—fully restored by prominent restoration expert Vic World of World Motorcycles. The other is an alloriginal 1965 Honda C100 Step-thru. Together, they bookend Honda’s early development in the U.S., as the company went from “You meet the nicest people on a Honda” to the dawn of the Superbike era. You can buy a single chance to win for $5, or get five entries for $20, by visiting MotorcycleMuseum.org/support/ programs, or by calling (614) 856-1234. The drawing will be held during AMA Vintage Motorcycle Days this July 9-11, and the winner need not be present to win.

Former AMA Board Chairman Dal Smilie Sentenced Guilty Plea Brings Embezzlement Case To A Close

Former AMA Board Chairman Dal Smilie was sentenced Monday, Feb. 22, to eight months in prison and two years probation for embezzling more than $100,000 through fraudulent travel reimbursement claims to the AMA over a period of years ending in 2007. Smilie pleaded guilty to felony counts of grand theft by deception and of receiving stolen property. He was taken directly into custody to begin serving a sentence that could see him request early release after 30 days. He was also assessed a $1,000 fine and court costs. “I’ve got much to apologize for, and many people to apologize to, including AMA members, AMA staff, my fellow board members and volunteers,” he said in court. “I’ve let them down.” Fairfield County, Ohio, Assistant Prosecutor Gregg Marx said he felt the sentence was appropriate, especially in light of the fact that Smilie paid restitution to the AMA for the money in question. “We’re very pleased with the resolution of this case.” AMA President and CEO Rob Dingman echoed those sentiments. “We are satisfied that justice has been served, and we are glad to put this matter behind us,” he said.

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The Life | Connections

Be A Moto-Journalist For A Day

You Could Win A Trip To the Yamaha Champions School— And Write About Your Experiences In The Pages Of This Magazine! Ever dream of writing for a motorcycle magazine? Think it’d be fun to get expertlevel, on-track riding instruction at the Yamaha Champions School and tell others about your experiences online and in the pages of this magazine? Have we got a deal for you! In partnership with Yamaha and the Yamaha Champions School, we’re giving away a free trip to the school, based at Miller Motorsports Park near Salt Lake City, and the opportunity to write a story in this magazine detailing what you learned and what you thought of the experience. In addition, you’ll have a chance to star in your own internet video in your quest to go viral. Interested? You must be an AMA member. You must have a valid motorcycle license. You must be available to take the Yamaha Champions School in the June

time frame. You must agree to be in video and write a story. And you must complete the entry form, enter and be chosen for the assignment. Part of the entry will include an essay of 250 to 500 words telling a little about yourself and explaining why you’re perfect for the job, along with a brief video selling your case. Entry deadline is May 20. Editors’ decisions on a winner are final and will be based on your creativity and how well you make the case that you should be American Motorcyclist’s moto-journalist for a day. You can find complete information, including an entry form, at AmericanMotorcyclist.com/ YamahaChampionsSchool. For more info on the school, see MillerMotorsportsPark.com/learn/ motorcycle-school.


Rates as low as $75 a year! Quote and bind online: McGrawDirect.com/ama Talk to a service rep: 1-800-6McGRAW Members of the American Motorcycle Association get a 10% discount on insurance for all street and off-road bikes.

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The Life | Adrenaline

Circles & Arrows

Go DTX RACinG

It’s DIrt-track racIng On a MOtOcrOss BIke Dirt-track racers have fielded DTX, or “dirt-track cross,” bikes for a couple decades now, but many motocross racers, new and old, still don’t realize how easy it is to set up a motocross bike for the flat oval. And with some recent rule changes, it has become even easier, according to Tryce Welch, who has been building DTX race bikes for riders at all levels for years and advises AMA Racing on class rule structure. One of the more significant changes to the rulebook is the DTX-only class doesn’t

allow engine modifications. This creates an even playing field for motocross-tuned engines, which otherwise would give up too much horsepower to motors designed specifically for dirt track. Welch breaks the current amateur rulebook down to two levels: stage one, which is the DTX class, and stage two, which is the Modified class. Everything legal in stage one also is permitted in stage two. Don’t be confused by the class names. Although the first class is called “DTX,” DTX-style bikes are also allowed

in the Modified class, which also permits traditional custom-framed dirt-track bikes (known as “framers”). Only DTX-style bikes are allowed in the DTX class.

Stage Two: Frame. Although expensive frame modifications, which can involve moving swingarm pivots, shortening swingarms or other machine work, are rare, many Modified-class racers will change the triple clamps for a different offset and handling characteristics. Some go even further. The sky’s the limit here. Cost: $200 and up. Stage One: Front brake. For AMA Racing amateur competition, the front brake is required for TT tracks (a course that includes at least one right-hand turn and a jump). The front brake lever must be removed for short-track, half-mile and Mile courses. Cost: Free.

Stage Two: Engine. Just as a dirt-track motor would suffer on an MX track, an MX-tuned engine can’t compete with a purpose-built dirt-tracker in its element. MX engines emphasize hook-up and torque, but dirt track is about raw horsepower, Welch says. Eliminating these mods from the DTX class is what keeps costs low. Cost: $2,000-$10,000.

Stage One: Wheels. Although you can keep the stock 19-inch MX rear rim and lace a new one to the front hub, Welch says the better approach is to move the rear to the front and buy a 2.50-2.75-wide rim for out back. Unless you have infinite patience or experience lacing spokes, Welch recommends paying a pro to build your wheels. Cost: Rear rim, $200; two spoke kits, $120; wheel build, $50$75 each. Cost ranges are estimates.

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Photos Jim Grant, Curt Comer

Stage One: Suspension. Stock motocross suspension is valved and designed for big jumps, slower top speeds and rougher terrain than dirt-track courses. While local racers can get away with clicker and sag adjustments, to reach your potential, you’ll need to revalve and lower both ends. Welch says most builders do this so the suspension can be returned to stock height rather easily. Cost: $500-$700, both ends.

Stage One: Tires. Although you’ll find knobby classes run at the local level, dirt-track tires are a must, even for an occasional racer. Dirt-track tires are 19 inches in diameter. Cost: $135 each.


Bike photo: www.brunoratensperger.com

The Life | Adrenaline

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Shaking Off The Rust At Bike Week AMA Racing Short Track Winter Nationals

Depending on where you live, it can be a long off-season for dirt-track racers. That wasn’t apparent at the Daytona Flat Track facility during Bike Week, however, as serious skill was on display on the new crushed limestone track just outside Daytona International Speedway. It was a packed week of dirt-track competition in Daytona Beach. The AMA Racing Short Track Winter Nationals Feb. 27-March 2 delivered action in youth and amateur classes, and came on the heels of the first round of the new AMA Racing Dirt Track Vintage Championship Series. Wrapping up the amateur program was the AMA Racing Vet/Senior Shootout. There was some serious talent on the track during the Winter Nationals. Riders who won both days of competition in that program included Tyler Phillips, 250cc Mod 4-stroke; Andy Karadontes, Super Senior (50+); Hunter Goodwin, 50cc DTX (7-11); Dalton Gauthier, 85cc Mod (7-11); Aldan Roosevans, 50cc Shaft (4-8); Hayden Gillim, 450cc Mod; Dalton Gauthier, 65cc Mod (7-11); Daniel Bromley, 250cc DTX; Doug Cook, 50cc DTX (4-8); Brandon Wilhelm, 250cc Mod 2-stroke; Kevin Stollings, 65cc DTX (7-11); and Ryan Connelly, 451cc-Open Mod. For full class results and more on the AMA Racing Short Track Winter Nationals, as well as all the amateur racing from Bike Week, see Racing News at AmericanMotorcyclist.com.

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The Life | Adrenaline

Patrick Cappetta

Dispatch From Three Generations

Off-Road Racing Ties Families Together Skill on a racetrack tends to cross generations. A big part of this is the family involvement that often goes hand-in-hand with the sport. Our family has a trio of generations that has taken to off-road. It began when my father-in-law, Bud Norton, started taking his sons trail riding in the 1970s and ’80s. Bud, who was into sports like golfing, bowling and fishing, soon became hooked. In his early 30s at the time, Bud became a serious rider, meeting up with a regular group of guys on Saturday and taking the boys riding on Sunday. Soon, he found out those regular guys included some premier talent, including 1971 AMA Grand National Enduro Champion Ron Bohn and 1972-73 champ Bill Kain. Bud’s skills took off, and although he houred out at his first enduro, he continued to compete in hare scrambles and enduros. Finally, the year he turned 50, he won a national hare scrambles championship in the Super Senior class. Meanwhile, my brother, John, and Bud’s son, Buddy, who were good friends, were competing at both the national and local level in youth classes.

When you enter into this large family of motorcyclists from all walks of life, there are certain things you leave with people. One thing my father-in-law left with the riders he met in 40 years in the sport was his knowledge of riding and the kindness he demonstrated while telling them stories not of himself but of other great riders. One rider who is benefiting immensely from my father-in-law’s knowledge these days is my son, Patrick. Patrick has only competed for four years now, but it seems like only yesterday he was just starting out riding at 6 years old. His young career became more serious in 2008 when he competed in 34 races in four series. In 2009, he raced 37 races in multiple disciplines. Patrick’s goal is to make the Husqvarna off-road team in the next two years. He’s working hard and training every day. He’s learned from riders such as Paul Whibley and Shane Watts, Randy Hawkins and Jason Raines. His sponsor, Upstate Cycle of Greenville, S.C., is behind him all the way and he’s ready to take on a new season of racing and find success for the third generation.

Back In The Saddle Again

Into The Future With Vintage Dirt-Track Racing At home in Newport, Tenn., Mark Hawk is your typical driver’s education teacher/ football coach. In Daytona Beach during Bike Week, however, Hawk was living the dream as an AMA dirt-track racer in the 2010 AMA Racing Dirt Track Vintage Championship Series, a new AMAsanctioned national championship series. We caught up with Hawk to talk about his attraction to the sport, and his progression to flat track. American Motorcyclist: Mark, how did you get started in racing? Mark Hawk: My dad got me started on motorcycles when I was very young. I cut my teeth in the woods, riding a lot of enduros and motocross in the Southeast. I had been coming to Bike Week with my dad since I was 5 years old. We went to all the flat track races down here every year back when the National was held at Memorial Stadium in town. We would go on Wednesday night, we would go on Thursday night, and we would go on Friday night. I dreamed of being able to race flat track someday, but where I am

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from, up in the hills of Tennessee, we don’t have a chance to do that very much. However, later in life I was able to purchase a bike and do a little amateur flat track. That passion just grew and grew—I fell in love with it. My dad and I built some TT500s and went vintage racing. I progressed and have done well. Of course, you’re always looking for that championship and it eluded me two times, once by 4 points and once by 3 points. I’m hoping to do the whole AMA vintage series this year. I’m happy that the AMA is catering to us vintage bike racers. I love the old bikes, want to keep the heritage alive, and I’m just looking forward to a fun year with this 10-race series. AM: How does it feel to compete on these historic tracks? MH: It’s a dream come true. When I was a kid, I would hear of Du Quoin,

Springfield, and I would come to Daytona to watch at Memorial Stadium and later at Municipal. Riding inside Municipal is just a thrill in itself. I’ve also ridden at the Peoria TT. I’ve ridden the Springfield Mile, the Du Quoin Mile, the Syracuse Mile, and it’s just really exciting to be a part of dirt-track history.—Curt Comer

Photos Cappetta: David Smith; Mark Hawk: Curt Comer

By Jeff Cappetta


Hall of Famer

Bruce Walters A Peoria TT Original

Bruce Walters is considered the father of the famous and prestigious Peoria TT National. Walters, along with his brother, Bob, owned a Harley-Davidson dealership in Peoria, Ill., and he was a key early member of the Peoria Motorcycle Club. Walters also served on the AMA’s Competition Committee for years and helped form the rules and regulations that governed the sport of dirt-track racing. Ambrose (Bruce) Walters was born in Johnson County, Iowa, on Feb. 3, 1898. He took up motorcycling at age 15 when he bought a 1913 Indian. In 1922, Bruce and his brother opened their first motorcycle dealership in Galesburg, Ill., and nine years later they bought an existing dealership in Peoria. Bruce took over running the Peoria dealership, and in 1931 he helped form the Peoria Motorcycle Club. Walters enjoyed competition and raced motorcycles in one form or another nearly his entire life. His biggest successes in

racing came in the late 1930s and the early 1940s. He was a top competitor in regional flat-track races, enduro competition and hillclimbs. Walters even raced nationals during that period and scored a top-10 finish in the Daytona 200 in 1939. Perhaps the race Walters loved most was the Jack Pine Enduro. He rode in the famed race 26 times and finished the grueling event 21 times over the years. He rode his last Jack Pine at the ripe old age of 67. The Peoria Motorcycle Club held local competitions, and one of those events, a TT race which began in the 1930s, would go on to become one of the classic motorcycle races in America—the Peoria TT. In 1940, the club purchased an 80-acre tract of land south of Peoria. In 1947, the Peoria TT was issued a National sanction by the AMA. That year, Alabama racer Herman Dahlke won the National—in the premier 80-cubic-inch category—to become the event’s first winner. Walters earned the AMA Dud Perkins Award in 1975 for his years of service to motorcycling. He was inducted into the AMA Motorcycle Hall of Fame in 2003.


Photos Open Image Studio

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Heritage

1928 INDIAN PRINCE THE FORSAKEN SIBLING

By the 1920s, mass-produced automobiles had replaced motorcycles as a major form of transportation, forcing American motorcycle manufacturers to scramble to figure out ways to appeal to more people. This motorcycle was one of the first attempts: the Indian Prince, with a 21-cubic-inch (350cc) motor, built by the company founded by AMA Motorcycle Hall of Famers Oscar Hedstrom and George Hendee. Charles Franklin, Indian’s chief engineer at the time and a former motorcycle racer, designed the machine, a small-bore motorcycle aimed at the mass market at a time when large machines dominated the American roads. He created the Indian Scout, with a 37-cubic-inch (600cc) V-twin motor for the 1920 model year, although 45-cubicinch (750cc) versions were available later and became wildly popular among the performance set. He was also the man behind the iconic Indian Chief that started life in 1922 with a 61-cubic-inch (1,000cc) V-twin powerplant, although that motor got bumped up to 74 cubic inches (1,200cc) the next year for a new model, which got the Big Chief moniker.

Even though his Scout and Chief creations ended up offering bigger motors, Franklin moved ahead with his 21-cubic-inch (350cc) Indian Prince, which was unveiled in 1925. It boasted a single-cylinder motor that was easier to maintain than a twin, a light weight of around 265 pounds compared to the Big Chief’s approximately 440 pounds, and a low price tag of around $195 compared to about $435 for a Big Chief. The Prince had a top speed of around 55 mph. Franklin thought he might have created a good-selling machine, but even with a new 21-cubic-inch racing class to try to stimulate interest in motorcycles of that size, Americans weren’t in a buying mood. Indian continued to produce its bigger bikes, but threw the wraps over the Prince in 1928, giving it a production run of just four years. This immaculately restored 1928 Prince is one of the last of the line, and is just one of the many fascinating machines in the permanent collection of the AMA Motorcycle Hall of Fame at AMA headquarters in Pickerington, Ohio. This 1928 Indian Prince was generously donated to the Hall of Fame by the lateDonna Hawtrey of California.

Heritage features the machines and people of the AMA Motorcycle Hall of Fame in Pickerington, Ohio. The Hall of Fame is a 501(c)3 non-profit corporation that receives support from the AMA and from motorcycling enthusiasts. For info and directions, visit MotorcycleMuseum.org, or call (614) 856-2222. May 2010

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ElEctric rEvolutionariEs

A New Breed Of American Engineer Is Working To Bring You The Next Big Thing In Motorcycling: Battery-Powered Bikes By Grant Parsons

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he first realization came while looking over a spreadsheet. Engineer Craig Bramscher and his team were exploring options on building electric vehicles, and they had created an analysis of battery power, battery costs and vehicle range as part of their research. “In looking at doing a car, we kept going, ‘Wow, there’s $40,000 of batteries in there,’ Bramscher says. “Even if you didn’t count the cost of the batteries, you’d have to build the rest of the car—and how are you going to do that and compete with a Toyota Prius that costs $26,000?” Instead of disappointment, Bramscher saw something exciting in that data. “There came a moment when we realized if you do something lighter, like a motorcycle, you could spend only a few Craig thousand dollars in batteries, and you could Bramscher exceed the national average on commuting on a single charge,” he says. “Everything seemed to point to that.” It was then that Bramscher’s fledgling company, Brammo, decided to focus its energies on a prototype electric motorcycle. That led to the second realization: that the company was onto something. “When we started taking the prototype out, we realized that seven out of every 10 people who wanted to talk about it were not the people who normally noticed motorcycles,” he says. “They were saying things like ‘I’ve always wanted something like that, but…’ We figured if we could remove half the ‘buts,’ we’d have a pretty good market.” That experience of discovery is common among a group of revolutionaries that has created the small but growing market for American-made electric motorcycles in the United States. They come not from garages and racetracks, but from engineering, marketing, software, electrical and even consumer-electronics backgrounds. Their products are more than promises: Oregon-based Brammo and California-based Zero Motorcycles offer streetlegal motorcycles for purchase today. Mission Motors electric sportbikes are slated to be available next year. “People have been wanting electric vehicles since, like 1910, but the technology has not been good enough to support what people really need— and that’s all changed now,” says Zero Founder Neal Saiki, who just last month launched two new street-legal models in its four-bike lineup for 2010. “Motors were the first things to revolutionize. They got smaller and way more powerful. Now, finally, the battery technology has arrived to where you can get super-high energy density that’s usable in a small space to make electric motorcycles possible.” With the key factors coming together, the market for electric bikes will only expand, notes Jit Bhattacharya of California-based Mission Motors, which already has a working prototype of a $68,500 electric superbike it hopes to launch in the United States next year. “What we’re hoping to do as a company is convince people that the electric motorcycle future is not 10 years away,” Bhattacharya says. “It’s here now—and not because it’s ‘green’ and electric, but because it’s going to be the best motorcycle experience you’ve ever had.” Here’s a look at a few of the pioneers leading the electric motorcycle revolution in America.

T

Brammo by Beyond Images Photography Zero Motorcycles by Toni Clemens Photography Mission Motors by Brad Wenner Photography

May 2010

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John lloyd (left) and gene Banman (right)

It’s midday at Daytona Beach during Bike Week, and the Zero Motorcycle guys are out to convince the world that electric motorcycles are ready for prime time—one test ride at a time. In a parking lot next to the Ocean Center, just two blocks from Main Street, where heavyweight V-twin bikes rumble in a slow-mo parade, uncannily silent Zero motorcycles circulate on the test track. “This is the type of thing that you really have to ride to understand,” says Gene Banman, Zero’s CEO, who is working with the demo-bike crew. “When people get off the bikes, you can tell. They get it.” The evangelical mission fits right in with Zero founder Neal Saiki’s company, now 6 years old and on its third-generation design. Long past the prototype and proof-of-concept stage, Zero is now in the business of selling motorcycles. It’s a long way to come in a relatively short time. Saiki has been riding motorcycles most of his adult life, starting with a Honda CL250 scrambler. “I had a minibike when I was little, but it wasn’t until college and I was 18 that I got another one,” he says. “Since then I’ve had a bunch of Hondas and BMW streetbikes—an R60 /5, a K75S, and others.” An aeronautical engineer by training, Saiki’s interest in electric motorcycles was sparked by his work with small, high-power electric motors used in military satellites. At the time, these motors weren’t affordable, but Saiki knew they would be someday. After jobs with Santa Cruz Bicycles, Haro and Trek, as well as developing his own designs that he licensed to companies, he branched out into mountain bikes, developing motorcycle suspension technology for the industry. At one point, 40 percent of all fullsuspension mountain bikes on the market had some part that he had designed, By 2004, battery and electric-motor technology caught up to Saiki’s plan for an electric motorcycle, so he made 50 to test the market. “That first motorcycle I built in my garage,” he says. “It was like the size of a Yamaha TT-R, kind of small. One of the problems initially was that the

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Zero Motorcycles Two Streetbikes, Two Off-Road Models Bikes Zero X trailbike, Zero MX race machine, Zero DS dual-sport, Zero S Supermoto. Price Streetbikes (S and DS): $9,995; Zero X: $7,495; Zero MX: $8,295. range Up to 50 miles stop-and go in town, depending on riding behavior. At full speed (67 mph) with a full charge, 25 miles. charge tiMe Four hours from empty. The company has a long-term strategy of upgrading battery packs with new technology to fit old bikes. claiMeD toP sPeeD 67 mph. The company claims a 0-30 time of less than 2 seconds, with more than 50 pounds-feet of torque, similar to a 250cc gas-powered off-road motorcycle. Bonus California residents can qualify for a $1,400 rebate from the California Air Resources Board. Everyone qualifies for a 10 percent federal tax credit.

neal saiki

“This is a whole new paradigm,’’ says Zero CEO Gene Banman. “With an electric bike, you leave every day with a full tank. Are you going to go 40 miles today? Chances are you won’t, and chances are you can top off the battery while you’re at work. And keep in mind the cost of ownership. Maintenance is low. The motor has one moving part and longlife bearings. There are no oil changes and no rebuilds.” batteries were expensive, so I made the bike smaller so I wouldn’t have to use so many expensive batteries and I could keep the cost down.” He laughs when asked what he learned from the initial run: “That’s where I figured out that people didn’t want a small motorcycle,” he says. “They wanted a full-size bike.” Saiki also learned that with the rise

of the internet, selling something like an electric bike online, without a traditional dealer network, was not only possible, but preferable. He also saw the value in establishing the right price point. “Making a very expensive bike is not that much of a challenge,” he says. “Making something that’s affordable and priced to work in the market is. I found there’s this huge pent-up


An Exciting Time

AMA Has Been Watching Electric Bikes Since Their Start

demand, a kind of frenzy, for electric vehicles.” With a round of fundraising from venture capitalists, the company offered its second-generation bike—an electric dirtbike—in 2008. A full-size machine capable of performance more in line with existing small-bore dirtbikes, the bike found moderate success among a niche community. As a test bed for the forthcoming street-legal motorcycle, it helped engineers work out the design before ramping up. “The key was the advent of low-cost lithium-ion batteries,” says Zero CEO Gene Banman, a lifelong motorcyclist with a background working for Sun Microsystems in its early years. “With them, you get enough energy, and they’re small enough and weigh little enough that you can make a lighter motorcycle with similar performance to a gasoline-powered bike.” The bike was even featured in a Discovery Channel series called “Mean Green Machines,” which exposed the company to new audiences. In three months in 2008, the company grew to 30 employees from eight, and design work started on the third-generation street-legal versions of its machines. The street-legal certification wasn’t easy or cheap. Between the component, battery and bike testing, along with a mountain of paperwork,

the process took more than a year. But the end result was a machine that could be sold in the United States, Canada and Europe. As innovative as the product is, the company also invented a new way to market and sell motorcycles that’s proven successful, Banman notes. “By necessity, we had to sell these direct on the phone and the web, and we quickly discovered that that wasn’t an impediment at all,” he says. “That’s where people are used to going anyway, and our inside sales guys know the products well and can really answer customers questions.” What was missing was a test ride, so the company worked with dealers to offer them, and serve as secondary sales contacts. “It works for them because they’re still trying to see if this electric bike thing is going to go,” Banman notes. “This lets them get into the business without making a huge financial commitment.” What’s amazing about Zero’s history—and the point at which electric motorcycles are at today—is the fact that it’s all new. “We really are at a Henry Ford moment of the electric vehicle,” Saiki says. “We’re making something people can afford, and when they see how wonderful the technology is, it’s kind of a watershed moment.”

The AMA has been watching—and rooting for—the growing success of electric bikes in several important ways. Last year, with the assistance of U.K.-based entrepreneur Azhar Hussain, founder of the TTXGP, the AMA hosted the first-ever enthusiast-level demonstration of electric racebikes in the United States at AMA Vintage Motorcycle Days. In addition, AMA Director of International Affairs Rob Rasor has been active with world-level developments as the founding chairman of the FIM (Federation Internationale de Motocyclisme) Alternative Energy Working Group since early 2007. “What we’ve learned fairly quickly is that electric motorcycles are not novelties—they are very real, and a very important step in two-wheeled transportation,” Rasor says. “Electric motorcycles are increasingly more feasible in urban environments, especially. And the power and torque of electric motors makes them an exciting alternative in sport.” Electric bikes are a natural to complement existing technology, not necessarily replace internal combustion outright, he says. Off-road, for example, an electric bike’s quieter operation could help preserve access to racetracks and land that might otherwise draw controversy from louder machines. And on the roadrace track, the potential power, speed and parity of electric machines have the potential to create a class of racing like nothing before. Already, Rasor notes, we’re seeing the start of a burgeoning electric-bike race community. Hussain, who organized the successful TTXGP electric-bike class at last year’s Isle of Man event, has put together a four-race series that will run in conjunction with three select AMA Pro Superbike events in the United States this year, and a race in Canada (info: www.egrandprix.com). The FIM has announced its own series, as well.

An electric bike circulates at AMA Vintage Motorcycle Days

May 2010

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Walk into the Best Buy on Cascades Parkway in Portland, Ore., and you’ll be confronted with a scene that Craig Bramscher hopes will become more common over the next year or so. There, amid the computers, TVs, MP3 players and videogames, is a kiosk displaying Brammo Inertia Powercycles for sale from the country’s largest consumer electronics retailer. It’s just another example of the fresh thinking that electric motorcycle revolutionaries are bringing to the table. Bramscher, who was riding a motorcycle to work in a Kansas City suburb even before he was old enough to have a license, is a lifelong motorcyclist who says the idea of an electric version of his favorite transportation came about from a series of events that started when he went to buy a car one day. He had made money through the sale of an internet business during the dot-com boom, and when his investments took a huge leap one day, he decided to do something crazy and buy a supercar. “I went everywhere—Lamborghini, Ferrari, Porsche—and the thing was, I couldn’t fit into any of them,” he laughs. “I’m tall, and getting in and out of these cars was kind of awkward.” So, he decided to create a company and build such a car. The result was the Arial Atom, which his company built under license from its U.K.-based designer. When Bramscher later wanted to build an electric version, the

“A 42-mile range, a lot of people aren’t sure that’s enough at first, but when we ask people to keep track of their mileage, they’ll come back and say, ‘I only went 16 miles each way—I thought it was longer because I’m in the car for so long,’” Brammo founder Craig Bramscher says. “It’s street-legal, and there isn’t much maintenance. There’s a chain and brakes and tires, and other than that, there really isn’t any.” two parties couldn’t come to terms. It was then that the team had its spreadsheet epiphany. “Our idea shifted to, ‘Why don’t we create the first profitable electric vehicle company,’” Bramscher says. “Realizing that transportation companies that go from startup to success are so few that there’s none, really, in the past 30 years—Buell was the closest one, rest in peace—we thought that it was the amount of capital required that kept most of them from being successful.” The Toyota Prius, for example, cost $5 billion to bring to market. A motorcycle, being smaller, lighter and

aaron Bland and Brammo frame

Brammo Powercycles The Bike You Can Get At Best Buy Bike The Inertia, available in five colors Price $7,995. range From 42 miles in an urban stop-and-go environment to 20 miles at continuous top speed. charge time Four hours. claimeD toP sPeeD Claimed 60-plus mph. Bonus Qualifies for a 10 percent federal tax credit. Oregon residents can qualify for a residential energy tax credit of $1,069.

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less parts-intensive, seemed simpler. Also supporting the motorcycle option was the popularity of shows such as “Orange County Choppers.” “We were kind of joking that if the guys on all those shows were making money building things with a drillbit that was so inaccurate, and if people like cake decorators could make money designing motorcycles, why couldn’t we build one?” Bramscher says. “We started with a clean sheet of paper,” he says. “The idea was not to throw away whatever you think a motorcycle should be in terms of its mechanical presence, but let’s not make it look like a Jetson’s spaceship. Let’s pay homage to where motorcycling came from, and even look backward to things like boardtrackers and such. We wanted it to be timeless.” Controlling the natural torque of electric motors involved some clever software. “Once you build an electric motor, you realize that when you get on the gas, you get a little whiplash as you take off,” he says. “The subtle nuance of feathering the clutch and accelerating, you don’t have that in


an electric vehicle because you don’t have gears. That soft walk from zero to 9 mph, that’s the hardest part. Most motor controllers are out of golf carts, which tend to be much heavier vehicles, which tends to smooth out that transition.” Another hurdle to be overcome, as with all electric vehicles, was the question of how far you could ride on a charge. “There’s real-life range requirements, and then there’s ‘range anxiety’—and those are two different things,” he says. “We wound up with a bike that goes 42 miles on a charge, and that satisfies 80 percent of the commuters in the U.S., which is 80 million people.” The hook of an electric vehicle is cost. The Brammo Inertia will go 7,000 miles on $50—about as much as it costs to fill up a large automotive gas tank just once. “When people realize that, they go, ‘OK, I guess that’s worth some conscious effort to see how this will work for me.’” The real revelation, Bramscher says, came when he rode the first prototype. “It’s funny, but even with everything being my idea, the first time I got on it, my thought was that it was going to be a cool toy, and a good thing for some people, but us ‘pure motorcyclists’ aren’t going to love it,” he says. “Not at all. It was such a perfect two-wheeling experience. It was so easy to handle, and it was amazing because you not only got to smell the smells, but you

got to hear the birds chirping—it was such a different kind of exhilaration.” Looking for the best way to sell the new machine, Bramscher hit on the Best Buy idea rather simply. The first clue was the impression he got when the company started setting up its assembly line and noticed that many of the components were black-box electronics. The second clue came when Bramscher went to a local Best Buy and noticed the garage bays designed for the installation of car electronics— just as the rise of the MP3 player was killing car audio. “We realized there was 1,400 square feet of space in 1,000 stories nationwide with electronics technicians and a laptop in each one of those bays, just ready to go.” So far, sales have been rolled out through select stores in Oregon and California, with a nationwide rollout planned through this year. Along the way, the team even found ways to lower the price from the originally stated $11,995 to its current $7,995. What does the future hold? More Brammos, with plans to expand to three platforms from low-end to highend, with each having various options. The designs will likely evolve as well. “As we get more aggressive bikes out there, and bigger and bigger horsepower, you’ll probably see some more aggressive curves out of future bikes that aren’t quite as sublime as this one,” Bramscher says.

Big Performance, Big Price The Mission 1 Prototype Aims High Bike Mission 1. Price Projected at $68,995 range Claimed 150 miles. charge Time 2.5 hours with 240-volt current, 8 hours with household 120-volt current. cLaimeD ToP SPeeD Claimed 150 mph. BonuS Adjustable regenerative rear-wheel braking that generates electricity.

Brammo and Zero have done something pretty amazing: Building— and delivering to real-world buyers— American-made, street-legal electric motorcycles aimed at the mass market. They’re competing against plans from Austrian manufacturer KTM, which announced last year that it would build an electric dirtbike. And imported bikes from companies like Electric Motorsport and Vectrix are also in the marketplace. But there are other revolutionaries working at the challenge of electric bikes from the high end. They want to build electric motorcycles that match or exceed the power and performance of existing bikes. It’s a field that includes California’s MotoCzysz, whose latest raceonly bike was yet to be revealed at presstime, and the U.K.’s Mavizen, another racebike that is being marketed by entrepreneur Azhair Hussain, who organized the first-ever electric bike roadrace at last year’s Manx TT. But perhaps the performance streetbike closest to reality at the moment comes from San Franciscobased Mission Motors, whose Mission 1, with a projected cost of $68,995, puts performance as its No. 1 goal. Company founder Edward West says the characteristics of electric motors make them well suited for competition. “You can make a compelling case to motorcyclists because of the way

May 2010

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(Left to Right) Jit Bhattacharya, Seth Laforge and Edward West

electric motorcycles work,” says West, who rode dirtbikes as a kid and recently started riding on the street again. “An electric powertrain can deliver instantaneous torque at any speed, and when you combine that in a performance package, you can deliver an experience that’s unlike anything else on the road. Imagine starting out in a first gear capable of pulling to you 150 mph without shifting.” As with others in the burgeoning electric vehicle industry, West became interested in electric transportation early, building a solar-powered car in college for a race that ran from Washington, D.C., to Orlando, Fla. After a few years in the engineering and design of consumer electronics, West was working in robotics for laboratory automation. He and a few of his colleagues from that time would go on to start Mission Motors.

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One of those co-workers was Jit Bhattacharya, an enthusiast who got his first taste of motorcycles just out of college, riding an aging dual-sport to a project site in South Africa. Unlike many who come to the gasoline-powered motorcycle industry, Bhattacharya notes that his team didn’t have years to research similar motorcycles—because there were none. What they did have, though, was a solid engineering background. “Edward and I are both mechanical engineers, and being a mechanical engineer these days means you’re very well-versed in the strengths of software and electrical systems,” he says. “That diversity among engineers, and that diversity you see in Silicon Valley, is what’s driving a lot of the amazing innovation you’re seeing now.” Even something as simple as how the bike feels as it accelerates is a fairly

“At California electricity prices, a fill-up costs less than $2.” serious engineering challenge, notes chief software engineer and test rider Seth LaForge, who started riding as a kid and has a fair amount of racetrack experience on small-bore motorcycles. It’s one the team sorted out as it built its prototype, which was aimed at the TTXGP Challenge on the Isle of Man, and then at a speed record on the Bonneville Salt Flats where it achieved a two-way average of 150.059 mph. “With an electric motorcycle, everything is hard,” LaForge says. “Probably the biggest challenge is just the size and weight constraints. Nobody wants a sportbike that weighs 800 pounds or is the size of a car. Getting all the technology into the space required has been a challenge.” The upside of that challenge, though, is that you can locate all those parts on the bike in new ways. With none of the traditional constraints of a gas tank, exhaust or airbox, for example, key components such as batteries and smaller electric motors can be placed to maximize handling. Then there’s the aesthetics of the machine itself. “When it comes to looks, I would say that the market isn’t just receptive to something that looks radically different, but it’s expecting it,” notes Bhattacharya. “We need to create a bike that people are going to be passionate about.” For now, the company is focused on turning its prototype into a saleable product, something they hope to accomplish in mid-2011. In the end, as talk turns to whether the world is really ready for electric motorcycles, the Mission Motors team echoes the thoughts of others in this growing—and revolutionary—industry. “The world is hungry for this,” says LaForge. “It’s a solution that is coming from an environmental and technological perspective, but also from a bare-knuckle performance aspect. When you ride an electric bike like this, you’ll suddenly realize that, at least in some small way, the world has changed.”


Sitting On The Sidelines Is Not An Option Last year, 2 million acres were lost to inappropriate federal wilderness designations, and there are many more millions of acres – and thousands of trails – proposed. Every week we learn of motocross tracks under threat

of closure. Cities large and small target street motorcyclists with unfair sound ordinances and laws, while allowing other loud noise emitters to remain unchecked. Street riding is also under attack from safetycrats who point to increasing motorcycle crashes and fatalities on our highways. Are you ready for mandated OE-exhausts, inflatable riding suits, airbags and roll cages?

Impossible, you say? All it takes is a stroke of the pen.

If you’re an AMA member, you’re already part of the solution. But there are not nearly enough of us. Each of us has to recruit more members for the AMA army. Now is the time to join forces and stand shoulder-to-shoulder on the front lines.

americanmotorcyclist.com

Earn A Free Hat! Every army needs a uniform. This is ours. Sign up a new member and

get a free hat. Get all the details online at AmericanMotorcyclist.com


Photo Pat Bonish Photography

TAKING THE ‘PUBLIC’

OUT OF PUBLIC LAND? Members Of The AMA And Others Have Been Successful In Thwarting Off-Highway-Riding Lockouts By Congress. Now, Anti-Access Forces Are Shifting Gears.

By Bill Kresnak

T

here’s a whirlwind of activity going on right now in Washington, D.C., with angry lawmakers giving an earful to federal administration officials, making phone calls and frantically drafting new legislation—all over controlling millions of acres of public land. The sudden frenzy was sparked by a couple of revelations: • First, that President Obama’s administration is looking at designating as much as 13 million acres in 11 western states as National Monument land, bypassing Congress in the land-use decision-making process; and, • Second, that a key U.S. representative is circulating a letter he wants to send to the head of the U.S. Forest Service asking that certain public land be managed, without public debate, as if Congress had already designated it as federally protected Wilderness—banning off-highway riding, mountain biking and other responsible recreational activities. The moves follow a successful sleight-of-hand effort by a powerful

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U.S. senator, Majority Leader Harry Reid (D-Nev.), to shut off meaningful public debate on a proposal to designate 2.1 million acres nationwide as Wilderness. He did that by gutting an unrelated bill and inserting the Wilderness language. Through a little-used parliamentary procedure, the bill quickly earned congressional approval and was signed into law. These actions signal a major shift in the approach being taken by anti-access interests and the elected officials who cater to them to try to lock up public land. In recent years, they’ve been content to simply introduce legislation that would carve out thousands of acres of public land for special land-use designations that would bar a variety of recreational activities, including off-highway riding, and then let the legislation wind its way through Congress. But AMA members and members of other recreational organizations have successfully countered anti-access efforts and worked together to urge their federal lawmakers to keep public land open, stalling the anti-access proposals. Seeing that they were now


facing organized resistance, those who want to close off public land now want to shut out public debate altogether by trying to accomplish their goals administratively or through political tricks. “Thanks to AMA members and others, we’ve identified those who are using unscrupulous tactics to keep responsible offhighway riders off public land, and they know it,” says Ed Moreland, AMA vice president for government relations. “Now, they are using political hijinks to keep the public from having a voice in the disposition of public land. “Something that anti-access forces choose to ignore is that there are other ways to protect land than just simply locking it away from the public,” he adds. “The agencies that control the land already have mechanisms in place to protect it, and there are other land-use designations, such as National Forest or National Refuge, that are much more applicable than Wilderness designations.”

BYPASSING PUBLIC DEBATE IN CONGRESS

Federal lawmakers, AMA members and others are in an uproar over the recent revelation that the Obama administration is considering unilaterally designating up to 13 million acres as National Monuments, which would give the federal Bureau of Land Management (BLM) the power to decide— without public debate—whether to allow off-highway riding, mountain biking and other recreational activities on that land. According to Interior Department internal documents publicized by the AMA and others, the Obama administration is looking at naming the National Monuments under the Antiquities Act of 1906. The land under consideration is in Alaska, Arizona, California, Colorado, Montana, Nevada, New Mexico, Oregon, Utah, Washington and Wyoming. The Antiquities Act of 1906 was originally passed to protect Native American artifacts such as pottery from being taken from small tracts of federal land in the West. National Monument designations are supposed to be confined to very small areas of land under the law. But presidents haven’t interpreted the law that way in their exercise of executive power. President Bill Clinton created an uproar in 1996 when he designated 2,600 square miles in southern Utah as the Grand StaircaseEscalante National Monument just weeks after administration officials told state leaders the president had no plans to do so. And though it didn’t effect motorcycle access, President George Bush used the Antiquities Act to circumvent Congress and set the future use of thousands of square miles of the Pacific Ocean without public debate. With the mere stroke of a pen in 2006, he designated 140,000 square miles of ocean and 10 islands and coral atolls in the northwestern Hawaiian islands as a U.S. National Monument, now called the Papahanaumokuakea Marine National Monument.

PRESIDENT’S PROPOSAL TARGETS VARIED LAND

The 13 million acres eyed by the Obama administration involve a wide variety of land in Western states, including the San Rafael Swell in Utah and Owyhee Desert in Nevada and Oregon, where there is off-highway riding, and Montana’s Northern Prairie, where there is ranching and farming. The Interior Department internal documents also discuss spending some $50 million in taxpayer money over 10 years to add thousands of acres to the BLM land inventory at a time when the bureau doesn’t have enough money to properly manage the land it already controls. The land being

after learning that at least two Utah areas—the San Rafael Swell and Cedar Mesa—are targeted for National Monument designations. “The Obama administration continues to put the needs of environmentalists who want to keep the public away from public lands above the needs and desires of Utahns,” Bennett says. “While I appreciate assurances from the secretary of the interior to our governor that the administration would not move forward without input, I do feel it is essential, given past history, to introduce this legislation and ensure Utahns will have a role in determining how federal lands are managed in our state.”

“I WILL MOVE HEAVEN AND EARTH TO MAKE SURE THAT THE FEDERAL GOVERNMENT DOES NOT MAKE TWO MONUMENT DESIGNATIONS.”

Utah U.S. Sen. Orrin Hatch

eyed for acquisition is in Nevada, Oregon, California, Wyoming and Utah. “It’s clear there are forces at work who want to take steps to lock up this land without going through the process of public debate in Congress, or getting input from the residents and elected officials of the affected states,” Moreland Orrin Hatch says. “The fact that the future use of 13 million acres could be decided with the stroke of a pen is appalling. “Because anti-access forces are now faced with organized and coordinated prorecreation opposition, as well as the public outcry and congressional outrage expressed over the attempt to designate red rock areas in Utah as Wilderness, for example, they seem to have changed course and are now trying to ban off-highway riding through administrative land-use designations without any public debate. In short, they are losing the argument in public so they have decided to limit the public’s input,” Moreland says.

“THESE LANDS DON’T BELONG TO THE GOVERNMENT, THEY BELONG TO THE PUBLIC”—U.S. SEN. ORRIN HATCH

Angry bipartisan reaction to the Interior Department discussions on naming new National Monuments was swift, with Utah’s U.S. senators among the angriest. U.S. Sen. Bob Bennett (R-Utah) immediately introduced legislation, cosponsored by U.S. Sen. Orrin Hatch (R-Utah), to bar any president from designating any Utah land as National Monument without earning congressional approval. In 1950, Congress passed a law barring the designation of National Monuments in Wyoming unless approved by Congress. Bennett says he introduced his legislation

Hatch, who has represented the people of Utah in Congress for more than 30 years, says: “Regardless of how you feel about Clinton’s Grand Staircase-Escalante Monument (unilaterally designated in Utah in 1996), most Utahns take issue with the colossal abuse of government power in its designation.” In fact, Hatch is so upset about the idea of designating National Monuments in Utah without consulting with Utahns that he called the White House on Feb. 19. He spoke to White House Chief of Staff Rahm Emanuel, pressing the White House to reconsider. According to Hatch, Emanuel told him that he would discuss the issue with Interior Secretary Ken Salazar and that the administration would give him an answer. “I will move heaven and earth to make sure that the federal government does not make two monument designations in Utah, and that’s the message I delivered to White House Chief of Staff Rahm Emanuel today,” Hatch said. “I made it very clear to him that if the administration goes down this road, it will meet absolute outrage and opposition from across the state and from me representing Utah in the United States Senate,” he added. “I’m glad he’s going to discuss this with Secretary Salazar,” he said, “but, make no mistake, I will continue to do everything in my power to make sure these two designations never take place. “Based on past experience, any claim that these plans are just preliminary offers the people of Utah very little comfort,” Hatch said. “These lands don’t belong to the government, they belong to the public. But the very consideration of these designations demonstrates that Washington wants to dictate to us how our lands will be managed.” May 2010

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OUTRAGE IS BIPARTISAN

U.S. Reps. Doc Hastings (R-Wash.), Rob Bishop (R-Utah) and Jim Matheson (D-Utah) also decried the move to lock up public land. Even powerful Senate Majority Leader Reid sent a strong signal that he doesn’t want any National Monuments unilaterally designated in his home state of Nevada. Reid did this even though last year he employed a rarely used parliamentary procedure to steamroll a proposal through Congress to designate more than 2 million acres as Wilderness in various states. Hastings, the ranking member of the U.S. House Natural Resources Committee, agrees that the Interior Department is bowing to pressure from anti-access groups. “There are special interest groups whose sole purpose is to lock up land without any consideration given to the importance of wholesome outside family recreation,” Hastings says. “While they are entitled to that view, it’s deeply troubling that the president’s administration is seemingly eager to help turn that view into reality by unilaterally imposing new monument designations without the consent of the people and communities who will be directly impacted.” Bishop, chairman of the Congressional Western Caucus, notes that people from around the world visit the West for its numerous recreational opportunities. “Unfortunately, the current administration seems intent upon locking up much of the public lands throughout the West from recreational use, as witnessed in the documents that recently surfaced from the Department of Interior outlining new areas for potential National Monument designations,” Bishop says. “I commend the American Motorcyclist Association for its continued advocacy on behalf of not only motorcycle enthusiasts but all outdoor recreators, who are an important component of the West’s tourism industry.” Adding his voice to the chorus of upset lawmakers, Matheson says: “Given the lingering frustration felt by many Utahns

THE LOCAL VIEW

AmericanMotorcyclist.com

following the 1996 ‘stroke of the pen’ monument designation (of the Clinton administration’s 1.9 million-acre Grand Staircase-Escalante Monument), it is totally inappropriate for this federal agency to even have preliminary discussions without involving the stakeholders on the ground.” He also notes that congressional passage of the Washington County Growth and Conservation Act, which was put together with the input of various stakeholders and was signed into law last year, proves that contentious public land issues are best resolved using a collaborative approach. Matheson wrote to Salazar expressing concerns about the National Monument proposal, asking him to reconsider the issue. Reid also told Salazar that there is no need to name National Monuments unilaterally to protect land. “Working as a team, we (the Nevada congressional delegation) have protected millions of acres of wild lands while freeing up other areas that are essential for development and for expanding the economic foundations of our communities,” Reid says. “I have explained this history to my friend, Ken Salazar, the secretary of the interior, and he appreciates the consensus building that Nevadans have done in recent years. “When this kind of process is in place and working well, there is no need for the president to use the Antiquities Act,” Reid says. “Anyone who is concerned about recent references to a ‘Heart of the Great Basin’ monument or a similar designation of Nevada’s Owyhee country can rest at ease. Nevada has a proven public process for working on its own land issues and I will

make sure that this process is respected.” The Salt Lake (Utah) Tribune reported that Salazar told Utah Gov. Gary Herbert that he wouldn’t move ahead any time soon on National Monument designations in Utah. Interior Department spokeswoman Kendra Barkoff told the newspaper that the documents at the center of the controversy were simply the result of a “brainstorming session” at the department. Moreland is heartened that lawmakers are taking aim at the plan to avoid public debate. “It remains incumbent upon the government to responsibly protect our lands for the people, not from the people,” says Moreland. “And that means proposals for land-use designations must be fairly debated. This proposal is not only an end-run around Congress, but also around the communities and individuals who would be directly impacted by this type of administrative maneuver. “We are pleased to hear that there is bipartisan, bi-cameral support for an open dialogue on the long-contentious issue of public-land designations,” Moreland says. “We hope that this issue will serve as a catalyst for bringing together both sides of the debate to work out any differences and preserve opportunities for responsible recreation on America’s public land for all Americans.”

KEY LAWMAKER TARGETING OFF-ROAD RIDING

In the halls of Congress, there is another effort under way to thwart public debate on the use of public land, and U.S. Rep. Raul Grijalva (D-Ariz.), chairman of the House

Utah Riders React To Potential Changes

Neil Motter of Wellsville, Utah, and Joshua Campbell of Logan, Utah, are just two of the many responsible riders who enjoy riding on public land. And they both are upset at efforts to close even more riding areas. “The San Rafael Swell has some areas of majestic beauty that do need to be saved, and I believe those areas are already offlimits to vehicular activity,” Motter says. “But the greater area we call ‘The Swell’ is a vast openness of rolling desert, trails, dirt roads and open camping areas.” Motter and others have been riding in those areas for years, and they believe it makes more sense to actively manage them

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“I commend the American Motorcyclist Association for its continued advocacy on behalf of not only motorcycle enthusiasts but all outdoor recreators.” Utah U.S. Rep. Rob Bishop

to allow responsible riding—not close them off completely. Like others, they fear that designating the area a National Monument would be too far-reaching, and potentially close off recreational riding. “Many, actually most, and I might say ‘all’ of us who ride in Utah find it baffling and unfair how far-away Washington, D.C., can take our land and keep us from it without talking to anyone that uses it,” he says. Notes Campbell: “The Swell has beautiful scenery and unique trails that are very well maintained by the Sage Riders Club and others. Most of us do our best to protect our right to ride by staying on designated

Joshua Campbell

routes, but when it’s all designated off-limits, especially by some politician who has never been there” it could mean riders will sell their bikes. “Hopefully it won’t come to this,” he says.


Natural Resources Subcommittee on National Parks, Forests and Public Lands, makes no secret that he wants to shut down responsible off-highway riding with his administrative sleight of hand. Because of opposition from members of the AMA and other groups, Grijalva has been thwarted in efforts to pass legislation out of his committee that would inappropriately designate more than 3 million acres of public land as federally protected Wilderness, which would stop off-road riding, mountain biking and other activities. So Grijalva wants to take the issue out of the public spotlight by instructing government bureaucrats to manage land as Wilderness even though the land hasn’t earned that designation with the approval of the people’s representatives in Congress. “The agency is currently undertaking an important nationwide effort to designate routes of travel for motorized vehicles,” Grivalja says in a letter to U.S. Forest Service Chief Tom Tidwell that he is circulating among colleagues for signatures. “The scope of this effort underscores the need to apply consistent guidance in managing agencyrecommended Wilderness lands. “We ask that you take immediate steps to preserve the congressional prerogative to designate Wilderness by issuing national guidance on the management of agencyrecommended Wilderness,” the letter says. “This guidance should prohibit the authorization of activities, such as use of motorized vehicles, that adversely affect the Wilderness qualities of the recommended areas to a significant degree.” In other words, rather than completing plans that would designate routes for off-road riding, Grivalja wants Forest Service land managed as defacto Wilderness until he can figure out how to get it designated officially, by any means necessary.

Photo Bikes: Pat Bonish Photography

MORE TROUBLE AFOOT IN CONGRESS

Grivalja’s latest effort, Moreland says, shows just how effective AMA members and others are in Congress when public testimony and reasoned debate are allowed. So it’s clear that the anti-access forces have decided that the only way they will get their way is by banning off-highway riding and other recreational activities administratively. “All Americans have a right to enjoy the beauty of our public lands, including the young, elderly, handicapped and others who may only be able to share in the wonder of the environment by using an off-highway vehicle,” Moreland says. “Wilderness designations close off these areas to those Americans, so such a strict land-use designation must be reserved for land that truly meets the strict criteria spelled out in the Wilderness Act that allows for the designations. “And to ensure the land considered for Wilderness designation truly meets the criteria, open, public debate must be allowed,” he says. Moreland notes that anti-access forces are

more than willing to cut off public debate. Last year, AMA members, along with other off-highway vehicle riders, played a big role in killing S. 22: The Omnibus Public Land Management Act, which would designate more than 2 million acres as Wilderness. The complex bill was 1,300 pages long, and was a combination of 170 separate bills. When that effort failed, proponents took a new tact and succeeded. Senate Majority (Democratic) Leader Harry Reid of Nevada gutted a two-page bill, H.R. 146, called “The Revolutionary War and War of 1812 Battlefield Acquisition Grant Program,” inserted the language from the 1,300-page Omnibus Public Land bill, and got it passed through a rarely used parliamentary procedure. (The move was detailed in the June 2009 issue of American Motorcyclist.) Moreland fears such a tactic may be used again soon. “The proposals in Congress to inappropriately designate land as Wilderness simply don’t stand up to public scrutiny,” Moreland says.

“So the simple answer for those who want to put an end to off-highway riding is to avoid any scrutiny,” he says.

WHAT YOU CAN DO

Contact your federal lawmakers today. Tell them you believe in an open, democratic process that provides for public scrutiny and debate. Ask them to oppose administration efforts to designate areas as National Monuments without congressional input. Also ask them to ensure that all proposals dealing with land-use issues, particularly proposals for designating public land as Wilderness, allow for public input and be publicly debated in Congress. You can find contact information for your elected officials at AmericanMotorcyclist.com > Rights > Issues & Legislation, then enter your zip code in the “Find Your Officials” box. Additionally, a pre-written e-mail is available for you to send to your federal elected officials immediately by simply following the “Take Action” option and entering your information on the web. May 2010

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Go Ride

A few of the hundreds of AMA-sanctioned events this month, detailed on the following pages.

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Time to break out your dual-sport or adventure-tourer and hit the roads and trails in the AMA KTM National Dual Sport Trail Riding Series or the AMA BMW National Adventure Riding Series. The KTM series kicks off May 1-2 in Renfro Valley, Ky. The BMW series starts May 1-2 in Buck Meadows, Calif. The two series then combine for one event—the Hanging Rock 200—May 22-23 in Zaleski, Ohio. Check out the full schedules, on page 55.

2

A great way to ride at your own pace and still take part in the AMA’s Premier Touring Series is to participate in one of the AMA Grand Tours with KOA Along the Way. The Midnight Riders Call of the Wild with KOA Grand Tour is a great example. Just ride around and take photos of your bike in places with wild animals in the name, such as elk, deer, cat, ant, or at any KOA campground. For Grand Tours info, see page 55.

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Year after year, the AspenCash Motorcycle Rally—set for May 20-23 this year—dishes out heaps of camaraderie

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and good times for street riders. AspenCash is a signature event of the AMA Premier Touring Series and is being held at the Ruidoso Downs Race Track and Casino in Ruidoso, N.M. Info: MotorcycleRally.com.

4

The 2010 AMA Pro Motocross season gets under way with what promises to be a thrilling season-opener at Glen Helen Raceway in San Bernardino, Calif., on May 23. The series then heads to Hangtown in Sacramento on May 30. The full MX schedule is on page 53. Info: MXNationals.com.

5

Join hundreds of other motorcyclists for a scenic ride through Tennessee and support a good cause at the same time at the Middle Tennessee Ride For Kids that starts and ends at Jim Warren Park in Franklin, Tenn., May 16. Registration is 8-9:45 a.m. and the escorted ride starts at 10, rain or shine. Info: PBTFUS.org/ rideforkids.

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The 37th Annual Rose City Oregon 500 will be held on Saturday, May 8, with registration open from 4:30-7:30 a.m. at the W.D. Jackson Armory at 6255 N.E. Cornfoot Road in Portland, Ore. The winning time and mileage will be established by averaging all the times and mileages of all the finishing motorcycles. Info: Rose-City-MC.org.

COMING UP The nine-event AMA Pro Hillclimb series gets under way June 6 in Jefferson, Pa. At the season halfway point, Aug. 1, the series features its “All Star Challenge” at the famed Mt. Garfield hill in Muskegon, Mich. The season finale is set for Oct. 10 at Oregonia, Ohio, which is always a rockin’ good time. For the full schedule, see the “Racing News” section of AmericanMotorcyclist.com. If you’re a touring rider and haven’t experienced Americade, be there June 7-12 in Lake George, N.Y. There are motorcycle tours, meals, parties, and all the fun you can stand. Info: TourExpo.com.


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THE

GuidE TO EvEnTS

The following pages list AMA-sanctioned events for this month, up to date at press time. Current listings are in the Riding and Racing sections of www.AmericanMotorcyclist.com. The biggest events—pro races, nationalchampionship amateur competition, and major rides and rallies—are highlighted. For these series, we list all of the remaining events

Type of Event

Date MOTOCROSS

for the entire year. Then there are the local events, the backbone of the AMA’s riding and racing calendar. These events are listed by state and are broken down by type, so you can quickly find the ones near you. Here’s a guide to what you’ll find in these local listings:

Event Class S - Standard (Amateur classes) Y - Youth Classes T - ATV classes M - Pro-Am classes R - Recreational Location/City

Event Promoter

May 8 (S,Y): BREAUX BRIDGE: QUALIFIER; 2 DAY EVENT: DIRT BIKE MIKE LLC, ; 6 AM; 1640 MILLS HWY; (870) 342-5373; DIRTBIKEMIKE.COM Sign-in Time

Directions

Contact Phone Number

ALASKA ROAd Run MAY 1 (R): ANCHORAGE: ABATE-AK, CRAIG BRESHEARS; 10 AM; 9TH & I ST; (907) 2309205; ABATEOFALASKA.COM

ARiZOnA

OBSERvEd TRiALS MAY 23 (S,Y): KINGMAN: CENTRAL ARIZONA TRIALS IN, DANIEL WALSH; 8:30 AM; W RANCH RD/I40 EX 59; (602) 940-3640; CENTRALARIZONATRIALS.ORG

ARKAnSAS

ROAd RALLY MAY 7 (R): MENA: 3 DAY EVENT: MOTORCYCLE SPORT TOURING, JANET CAMPBELL; QUEEN WILHELMENIA STATE PARK; (479) 394-2863;

CALiFORniA

ROAd Run MAY 2 (R): TORRANCE: CHARITY;: PEDIATRIC BRAIN TUMOR FOU, KYLE CLACK; 8 AM; AMERICAN HONDA MOTOR CO /1919 TORRANCE BLVD; (800) 253-6530; RIDEFORKIDS.ORG GYPSY TOuR MAY 29 (R): BAKERSFILED: 3 DAY EVENT: SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA MOTOR, JOHN KATICS; (626) 274-2237; SC-MA.COM AdvEnTuRE RidE MAY 1 (R): BUCK MEADOWS: NATIONAL;: 2 DAY EVENT: FAMILY OFF-ROAD ADVENTURE, LAWRENCE BORGENS; 8:30 AM; 7613 HWY 120 /10 M. EAST OF GROVELAND CA ALONG HWY 120; (209) 649-3633; FAMILYOFFROADADVENTURES.COM duAL SPORT RidE MAY 3 (R): TECATE: 5 DAY EVENT: COUNTDOWN, JERRY L COUNTS; 8 AM;; (775) 884-0399; DISTRICT37AMA.ORG MAY 15 (R): IDYLLWILD: CHARITY;: ORANGE COUNTY DUALIES, LARRY HARMIER; SAN BERNARDINO FOREST; (562) 243-3301; DUALIES.COM MAY 22 (R): STONYFORD: 2 DAY EVENT: OAKLAND MOTORCYCLE CLUB, BRENT SNYDER; 7 AM; STONYFORD RODEO GROUND /E OF GENERAL STORE; (510) 938-1930; OAKLANDMC.ORG GRAnd TOuR MAY 17 (R): BARSTOW: NATIONAL: 3 DAY EVENT: CARRY THE FLAME, INC., KING CAVALIER; 6 PM; VFW POST 2443 /25190 W MAIN ST; (760) 253-2610; CARRYTHEFLAME. ORG SHORT TRACK MAY 1 (S,T,Y): MAY 22 (S,T,Y): CLEMENTS: STOCKTON MOTORCYCLE CLUB, BOB KENDALL; 1 PM; 19813 N HWY 88; (209) 9561505; STOCKTONMC.ORG MAY 30 (S,T,Y): LODI: LODI MOTORCYCLE CLUB, JEFF G TAYLOR; 8 AM; LODI CYCLE BOWL/5801 E MORSE /HWY 99 TO 8 MILE/N ON FRONTAGE/R ON MORSE; (209) 368-7182; LODICYCLEBOWL.COM SCRAMBLES MAY 15 (S,T,Y): MAY 29 (S,T,Y): LODI: LODI MOTORCYCLE CLUB, JEFF G TAYLOR; 1 PM; LODI CYCLE BOWL/5801 E MORSE /HWY 99 TO 8 MILE/N ON FRONTAGE/R ON MORSE; (209) 368-7182; LODICYCLEBOWL.COM MOTOCROSS MAY 20 (M,Y): RANCHO CORDOVA: 2 DAY EVENT: DIRT DIGGERS NORTH M.C. I, ED SANTIN; 6 AM; 13300 WHITE ROCK RD; (530)

50

AmericanMotorcyclist.com

758-5554; HANGTOWNMX.COM EnduRO MAY 16 (S): GEORGETOWN: CALIFORNIA ENDURO RIDERS, MIGUEL ANAYA; 6 AM; WENTWORTH SPRINGS RD /MACE MILL STAGING AREA OFF WENTWORTH SPRINGS; (805) 477-1477; CERA.ORG MAY 8 (S,Y): OMO RANCH: POLKA DOTS MOTORCYCLE CLU, CURT BACKHAUS; 6:30 AM; GOLD NOTE RIDGE /HWY 50 OR HWY 88 TO OMO RANCH RD; (530) 644-8567; POLKADOTSMC.COM EuROPEAn SCRAMBLES MAY 8 (S,T,Y): RIDGECREST: 2 DAY EVENT: BADGERS MC, JAY T WICKERS; 3 PM; SPANGLER OFF ROAD AREA /N/B HWY 395 TO SEARLES STATION RD; (661) 242-2712; BADGERSMC.ORG

COLORAdO

POKER Run MAY 16 (R): COLORADO SPRING: COLORADO SPRINGS TOURING, JERRY MANKA; 8 AM; 6880 PALMER PARK BLVD /PALMER PARK BLVD TO PERTERSON RD; (719) 635-0138; MOTOCROSS MAY 8 (S,Y): MAY 9 (S,Y): LAKEWOOD: QUALIFIER; COLORADO MOTORSPORTS PROM, DAVID CLABAUGH; 5:30 AM; THUNDER VALLEY MX /701 S ROONEY RD; (303) 9883889; MXTHUNDERVALLEY.COM MAY 16 (S): DACONO: IMI MOTORSPORTS INC, BRAD LINKUS; 5 AM; 5074 SUMMIT BLVD /I-25N OF DENVER/EX 232/2 MI E; (503) 8334949; IMIMOTORSPORTS.COM MAY 23 (S,T): BERTHOUD: E RACING LLC, ARTHUR PET EDMISTEN; 5:30 AM; 20125 I-25 FRONTAGE RD W /I-25 EX 250/S ON FRONTAGE RD 1 MI/W TO TRACK; (303) 9011480; RMXA.COM MAY 23 (S,T,Y): COLORADO SPRING: M & M CONNECTIONS, DOUG MOYES; 12500 E HWY 94 /SIX MI EAST OF COLORADO SPRINGS ON HWY 94; (303) 988-7722; SRAC.ORG MAY 31 (M,Y): BRUSH: CACTUS PROMOTIONS LLC, SUZY SWENEY; 5:30 AM; SWENEY CYCLE PARK /INT CRG & CR31/SE OF TOWN; (970) 768-0518; SWENEYCYCLEPARK.COM

dELAWARE

MOTOCROSS MAY 1 (S,Y): NEW CASTLE: BLUE DIAMOND MX, ALAN DECARLO; 6 AM; BLUE DIAMOND PARK /765 HAMBURG RD/RT 13 & HAMBURG RD; (302) 834-5867; BDMXPARK.COM

GEORGiA

MOTOCROSS MAY 22 (S,Y): MAY 23 (S,Y): CHATSWORTH: QUALIFIER; LAZY RIVER MX RANCH, VICKIE ROBERTS; 6 AM; 4779 BROWNS BRIDGE RD; (706) 278-1620; LAZYRIVERMOTOCROSS.COM

idAHO

ROAd RALLY MAY 1 (R): COEUR D’ ALENE: ABATE-ID NORTH IDAHO, NORMAN BURCH; 10 AM;; (208) 4760189; ABATEOFNORTHIDAHOBIKERS.ORG MAY 1 (R): IDAHO FALLS: IDAHO COALITION FOR MOTOR, CHUC COULTER; 11 AM; AWARENESS RALLY /BONNEVILLE HS TO FREEMAN PK; (208) 345-6231; IDAHOBIKERIGHTS.COM MAY 1 (R): BOISE: IDAHO COALITION FOR MOTOR, JUSTIN CRAWFORD; 11 AM; AWARENESS RALLY /SANDY POINT PARK (ADA CO) TO CAPITOL; (208) 863-4280;

IDAHOBIKERIGHTS.COM

iLLinOiS

SHORT TRACK MAY 30 (S,T,Y): NEOGA: CENTRAL ILLINOIS M/C, STEVE SHAFER; 9 AM; CLUB GROUND /11 MI S OF MALTOON ON RT 121; (217) 2342505; CENTRALILLINOISMOTORCYCLECLUB. ORG SCRAMBLES MAY 15 (S,T,Y): BELLEVILLE: BELLEVILLE ENDURO TEAM IN, EDWARD M HOEFFKEN; 9 AM; 3000 CENTERVILLE AVE /2 MI S OF TOWN ON RT 158; (618) 277-3478; BETDIRT.COM MAY 31 (S,T,Y): NEOGA: CENTRAL ILLINOIS M/C, STEVE SHAFER; 9 AM; CLUB GROUND /11 MI S OF MALTOON ON RT 121; CENTRALILLINOISMOTORCYCLECLUB.ORG HiLLCLiMB MAY 1 (S,T,Y): WESTVILLE: 2 DAY EVENT: PLEASURE RIDERS MC, KELLY BRADY; STATELINE RD /SEE WEBSITE; (217) 247-2216; PLEASURERIDERS.NET MAY 15 (S,Y): WHITE CITY: CAHOKIA CREEK DIRT RIDERS, BOBBY BROWN; 8 AM; I-55 EXIT 44 HWY 138 WEST 2MIL; (618) 946-4316; CCDIRT.COM MAY 29 (S,T,Y): NEOGA: CENTRAL ILLINOIS M/C, STEVE SHAFER; 2 PM; CLUB GROUND /11 MI S OF MALTOON ON RT 121; (217) 2342505; CENTRALILLINOISMOTORCYCLECLUB. ORG MAY 30 (S,T,Y): NEOGA: CENTRAL ILLINOIS M/C, STEVE SHAFER; 9 AM; CLUB GROUND /11 MI S OF MALTOON ON RT 121; (217) 2342505; CENTRALILLINOISMOTORCYCLECLUB. ORG MOTOCROSS MAY 1 (S,T,Y): BELLEVILLE: BELLEVILLE ENDURO TEAM IN, EDWARD M HOEFFKEN; 9 AM; 3000 CENTERVILLE AVE /2 MI S OF TOWN ON RT 158; (618) 277-3478; BETDIRT.COM MAY 8 (S,Y): MAY 9 (S,Y): WALNUT: QUALIFIER; 4P PROMOTIONS INC, JAN PISTOLE; SUNSET RIDGE/24558 1100 E ST /4 MI S OF NORMANDY/GPS N4130 W8938; (815) 3799534; SUNSETRIDGEMX.COM MAY 8 (S,T): MAY 9 (S,T): MAY 29 (S,T): MAY 30 (S,T): MAY 31 (S,T): CASEY: LINCOLN TRAIL MOTOSPORTS, TIM JACKSON; 6 AM; 649 CR2150E /5 MI W OF TOWN ON RT 40; (217) 932-2041; LINCOLNTRAILMOTOSPORTS.COM MAY 15 (S,T,Y): FOSTERBURG: 2 DAY EVENT: SPLINTER CREEK DIRT RIDER, TODDD ROMANN; 6 AM; 2996 TERPENING LN /8 MI N OF RT 140/L ON TERPENING; (618) 372-4355; SPLINTERCREEK.COM MAY 23 (S): MT CARROLL: MC MOTOPARK, REID LAW; 6 AM; 1 MI N OF TOWN ON RT 78; (815) 238-1614; MCMOTOPARK.COM MAY 23 (S,T,Y): PINCKNEYVILLE: EURO RACEWAY LLC, FRANK BARTOLOTTA; 7 AM; 7342 RICE RD; EURORACEWAY.COM HARE SCRAMBLES MAY 9 (S,Y): CANTON: CANTON MOTORCYCLE CLUB IN, MATT WESTLAKE; 7 AM; 26897 E BIRDSCORNER RD /7 MI EAST OF CANTON IL ON CO HWY 27; (309) 224-6367; MAY 9 (S,T): MAY 30 (S,T): CASEY: LINCOLN TRAIL MOTOSPORTS, TIM JACKSON; 6 AM; 649 CR2150E /5 MI W OF TOWN ON RT 40; LINCOLNTRAILMOTOSPORTS.COM

indiAnA

ROAd Run MAY 16 (R): COLUMBIA CITY: CHARITY;: OLD FORT MOTORCYCLE CLUB, DAVID O DEWITT; 11 AM; CLUBHOUSE/4863 E LINCOLN WAY /E OF TOWN; (260) 489-3707; MAY 31 (R): KOKOMO: MIDNIGHT RIDERS MC, CHARLES T KIRKMAN; 12 PM; VFW POST 1152 /920 N WASHINGTON ST; (765) 566-3807; MIDNIGHT-RIDERS-MC.COM POKER Run MAY 1 (R): AUBURN: AMA-DIST 15 ROAD DIVISION, DON CHISHOLM; 1130 W SEVENTH ST /PONDEROSA STEAK HOUSE AUBURN; (937) 325-8340; ROAd RALLY MAY 21 (R): WEST HARRISON: 2 DAY EVENT: MOTORCYCLISTS FOR JESUS M, KARL WARDLAW; 4 PM; 3280 LOGAN CREEK LANE /I-74 EXIT 169; (937) 833-3818; GO2MJM.COM HiLLCLiMB MAY 16 (S,T,Y): MIDDLEBURY: GOSHEN IRON HORSEMEN, RANDY DILLON; 11 AM; CLUBGROUNDS /2.5 MI E OF IN13 ON IN120; (574) 825-3399; MOTOCROSS MAY 2 (S,T,Y): WABASH: WABASH CANNONBALL MOTORCY, STEVE W HENSON;

6 AM; PO BOX 59 /595 W 250 S, WABASH; WABASHCANNONBALLMC.COM MAY 16 (S,Y): PARIS CROSSING: HOOSIER HILLTOPPERS, BOB LEWIS; 6:30 AM; 10665 S CO RD 410 W /I-65 S. OF SEYMOUR, EX 41 EAST ON ST RD 250; (502) 713-3495; MAY 22 (S,T,Y): WABASH: 2 DAY EVENT: WABASH CANNONBALL MOTORCY, STEVE W HENSON; PO BOX 59 /595 W 250 S, WABASH; WABASHCANNONBALLMC.COM HARE SCRAMBLES MAY 16 (S,Y): COLUMBUS: STONEY LONESOME M/C, BEN B BREEDLOVE; 7 AM; 14001 W HWY 46 /8 MI W OF COLUMBUS ON HWY 46; (812) 350-5732; STONEYLONESOMEMC.COM

iOWA

MOTOCROSS MAY 1 (S,T,Y): MAY 30 (S,T,Y): MONTEZUMA: 2 DAY EVENTS:FV MOTO X, CHIP BRYAN; 7 AM; FUN VALLEY SKI AREA /1066 500TH AVE/ 2.5 MI SW OF TOWN; (641) 623-3456; FVMOTOX. COM MAY 8 (S,T,Y): MAY 22 (S,T,Y): MAY 29 (S,T,Y): CEDAR RAPIDS: CEDAR VALLEY TRAIL RIDERS, CURT HEJDA; 1 PM; HAWKEYE DOWNS /4400 6TH ST SW; (319) 363-7800; CVTR.ORG HARE SCRAMBLES MAY 23 (S,Y): BROOKS: NISHNA VALLEY NOW, MATT PORTER; 7 AM; NOW 160 RIDING AREA /1.6 MI S OF TOWN; (712) 249-5031;

KEnTuCKY

duAL SPORT RidE MAY 1 (R): MT VERNON: NATIONAL;: 2 DAY EVENT: 4 FUN TRAIL RIDERS LLC, VICKY STEPHENSON; 8 AM; RENFRO VALLEY /I75 EX 62/N ON 25 TO KOA; (859) 363-8332; 4FUNTRAILRIDERS.COM MOTOCROSS MAY 15 (S,T,Y): LONDON: QUALIFIER; VICTORY SPORTS INC, SAM GAMMON; DANIEL BOONE MX PARK /I-75 EXIT 41/5 MI W ON HWY 80; (423) 323-5497; VICTORYSPORTSRACING.COM MAY 16 (M,T,Y): LONDON: QUALIFIER; VICTORY SPORTS INC, SAM R GAMMON; DANIEL BOONE MX PARK /I-75 EXIT 41/5 MI W ON HWY 80; (423) 323-5497; VICTORYSPORTSRACING. COM

LOuiSiAnA

MOTOCROSS MAY 15 (S,Y): GRAND CANE: QUALIFIER; FREESTONE COUNTY RACEWAY, TONY MILLER; DESOTO MOTORSPORTS PARK; (318) 697-0788; DESOTOMOTOSPORTSPARK.COM MAY 16 (S,Y): GRAND CANE: QUALIFIER; FREESTONE COUNTY RACEWAY, TONY MILLER; DESOTO MOTORSPORTS PARK; (318) 697-0288; DESOTOMOTOSPORTSPARK.COM

MARYLAnd

ROAd RALLY MAY 23 (R): GERMANTOWN: CLASSIC MOTORCYCLE DAY IN, BILL FORD; 10 AM; BUTLERS ORCHARD /I-270 EX 16/N ON RT 27/R DAVIS MILL RD; (301) 424-7010; CLASSICMOTORCYCLEDAY.ORG MOTOCROSS MAY 22 (S,Y): EASTON: 2 DAY EVENT: MIDDLE ATLANTIC MOTOCROSS, RUTH ANN BENSON; 6 AM; 7050 BAKER LANDING RD /DELMARVA MX PARK; (410) 375-1059; MAMAMX.COM MAY 30 (S): BUDDS CREEK: INDOOR; 2 DAY EVENT: BUDDS CREEK MOTOCROSS PAR, JONATHAN E BEASLEY; 6 AM; BUDDS CREEK MX PARK /27963 BUDDS CREEK RD; (301) 4816148; BUDDSCREEK.COM

MASSACHuSETTS

duAL SPORT RidE MAY 23 (R): NEW BOSTON: BERKSHIRE TRAIL RIDERS AS, CHRIS; 9 AM; TUCKERS RESTAURANT /1 MI S OF INT RTS 8 & 57; (860) 483-0945; MUDSLINGER.ORG HiLLCLiMB MAY 2 (S,T,Y): MONSON: QUABOAG RIDERS INC, RONALD J GUERTIN; 8 AM; KING AVE /RT 32 TO KING AVE; (413) 267-4414; QUABOAGRIDERS.COM OBSERvEd TRiALS MAY 23 (S,Y): BRIMFIELD: SPRINGFIELD MOTORCYCLE CL, STEVE TOUGIAS; 7 AM; SMC PROPERTY #219 WARREN RD; (413) 530-4617

MiCHiGAn

POKER Run MAY 2 (R): NORTON SHORES: MUSKEGON MOTORCYCLE CLUB, RUSS HANSON; 9 AM; 5803 LAKE HARBOR/MT GARFIELD /US 31/PONTALUNA RD/WEST; (231) 726-6937;


MUSKEGONMOTORCYCLECLUB.COM BIKE BLESSING MAY 16 (R): BALDWIN: PARA-DICE MC, CAROL SCHANTZ; 9 AM; BALDWIN AIRPORT /M 37; (616) 530-3827; 1/2 MILE DIRT TRACK MAY 29 (S,T,Y): ADRIAN: BOULIS RACING, ETHEL M BOULIS; 12 PM; LENAWEE COUNTY FAIRGROUNDS; (810) 686-7083; SHORT TRACK MAY 22 (S,T): DEFORD: LUCKY THUMB MC, GENELDA STOLZMAN; 8 AM; 7394 BEVENS RD /3 MI N OF M46 & M53/2 MI W; (989) 635-2282; MAY 28 (S,T,Y): ADRIAN: BOULIS RACING, ETHEL M BOULIS; 12 PM; LENAWEE COUNTY FAIRGROUNDS; (810) 686-7083; SCRAMBLES MAY 23 (S,T): DEFORD: LUCKY THUMB MC, GENELDA STOLZMAN; 8 AM; 7394 BEVENS RD /3 MI N OF M46 & M53/2 MI W; (989) 635-2282; MAY 30 (S,T,Y): ADRIAN: BOULIS RACING, ETHEL M BOULIS; LENAWEE COUNTY FAIRGROUNDS; (810) 686-7083; MOTOCROSS MAY 1 (S,T,Y): PORTLAND: PORTLAND TRAIL RIDERS, LUKE T ADAMS; 7 AM; 11999 SANDBORN RD /4 MI S OF TOWN ON CHARLOTTE HWY; (517) 547-7045; PORTLANDTRAILRIDERS.COM MAY 2 (S,T,Y): PORTLAND: PORTLAND TRAIL RIDERS, LUKE T ADAMS; 7 AM; 11999 SANDBORN RD /4 MI S OF TOWN ON CHARLOTTE HWY; (517) 647-7045; PORTLANDTRAILRIDERS.COM MAY 8 (S,Y): BELDING: GRATTAN RACEWAY MOTOCROSS, MIKE FAASEN; 7 AM; 7201 LESSITER; (616) 691-7221; GRATTANRACEWAYMX.COM MAY 9 (S,T,Y): CADILLAC: CADILLAC MOTORCYCLE CLUB, RICK AUGUSTSON; 7 AM; 3747 S 39 RD, PO BOX 236 /.25 MI N OF 34 RD (BOON RD) ON 39 RD; (231) 884-3729; CADILLACMC.COM MAY 9 (S,Y): BELDING: GRATTAN RACEWAY MOTOCROSS, SAM FAASEN; 7 AM; 7201 LESSITER; (616) 691-7221; GRATTANRACEWAYMX.COM MAY 15 (S,T): MAY 16 (S,T,Y): BRONSON: JB MX MOTORSPORTS, JEFF BEERBOWER;

7 AM; LOG ROAD MX PARK /I-69 EX 13/W 10 MI TO LOG RD/S 1.5 MI; (419) 636-5430; LOGROADMX.COM MAY 15 (S,Y): NEWAYGO: 2 DAY EVENT: BIG AIR MOTOCROSS, MATT POWERS; 7 AM; 1262 SPRING DRIVE; (231) 652-5225; BIGAIRMOTOCROSS.COM MAY 16 (S,Y): MILLINGTON: BULLDOG RIDERS M/C, DOUG EVANS; 7 AM; 9113 BELSAY RD /I-75 BIRCH RUN RD/E TO BELSEY RD; (248) 284-5570; BULLDOGMX.COM MAY 22 (S,Y): MAY 23 (S,Y): BLOOMINGDALE: QUALIFIER; DUTCH SPORT PARK, DREXEL AKIN; 6:30 AM; 13566 CR 665 /5 MI N OF GLENDALE (M43) ON CR665; (269) 683-4418; DUTCHSPORTPARKMX.COM MAY 23 (S): MIDLAND: POLKA DOTS M/C, THOMAS WOODS; 7 AM; 760 W BROOKS RD /8 MI N OF M46 OR 5 MI S OF M20; (989) 8328284; POLKADOTSMC.NET MAY 29 (S,T,Y): MAY 30 (S,T,Y): BRONSON: JB MX MOTORSPORTS, JEFF A BEERBOWER; 7 AM; LOG ROAD MX PARK /I-69 EX 13/W 10 MI TO LOG RD/S 1.5 MI; (419) 636-5430; LOGROADMX.COM HARE SCRAMBLES MAY 16 (S,T,Y): PORTLAND: PORTLAND TRAIL RIDERS, LUKE T ADAMS; 7 AM; 11999 SANDBORN RD /4 MI S OF TOWN ON CHARLOTTE HWY; (517) 647-7045; PORTLANDTRAILRIDERS.COM MAY 23 (S,T,Y): BATTLE CREEK: BATTLE CREEK MOTORCYCLE C, BYRON KIRBY; 6 AM; CLBGRNDS/21758 WAUBASCON RD /HELMER N TO MORGAN/E TO WAUBESCON/N 3 MI; (269) 660-1613; BATTLECREEKMOTORCYCLECLUB.COM OBSERVED TRIALS MAY 16 (S,Y): FLUSHING: MICHIGAN ONTARIO TRIALS A, JEFF POLLACK; 9 AM;; (248) 5831437; MOTATRIALS.ORG MAY 23 (S,Y): WHITMORE LAKE: MICHIGAN ONTARIO TRIALS A, CRAIG BOARDMAN; 9 AM; (517) 849-9231; MOTATRIALS.ORG DRAG RACES MAY 15 (S): MARTIN: 2 DAY EVENT: AMA DRAGBIKE, BRANDI NEITHAMER; 9 AM; US 131 MTRSPTS PK /US 131 EX 55/BET KALAMAZOO & GRAND RAPIDS; (513) 9439700; AMADRAGBIKE.COM

MINNESOTA TRAIL RIDE MAY 22 (R,T,Y): THEILMAN: 2 DAY EVENT: GOLDEN EAGLES CYCLE CLUB, THOMAS A EARLY; 8 AM; COUNTY RD 4 SOUTH TO WHIPPOORWILL CAMPGROUND; (715) 3070936; GOLDENEAGLESMC.ORG ROAD RUN MAY 15 (R): MANKATO: KATO CYCLE CLUB, JOHN E WINCH; 11:30 AM; 19836 539TH LANE /7 MI S OF TOWN; (507) 381-4708; KATOCYCLECLUB.COM MOTOCROSS MAY 1 (S,Y): KELLOGG: VINTAGE; MOTOKAZIE INC, LEE M THEIS; 6:30 AM; 58374 HWY 42 / ON HWY 42 BETWEEN PLAINVIEW & KELLOGG MN; (952) 244-9996; MOTOKAZIE.COM MAY 2 (S,Y): MAY 30 (S,Y): MAY 31 (S,Y): MILLVILLE: HI WINDERS, JOHN C MARTIN; SPRING CREEK MX PARK /63633 298TH AVE/9 MI E OF HWY 63 ON HWY60; (507) 753-2779; SPRINGCREEKMX.COM MAY 2 (S,Y): MAY 9 (V,Y): MAY 16 (S,Y): BROOK PARK: BERM BENDERS RACEWAY, KURT CASWELL; 6:30 AM; 2393 SHERWOOD ST / HWY 23E 8 MI TO SHERWOOD ST CR 68N; (320) 679-2582; BERMBENDERS.COM MAY 2 (S,Y): MAY 16 (S,Y): MAY 23 (V,Y): BROOKSTON: ECHO VALLEY MOTOCROSS PAR, TERI LUND; 6:30 AM; 4650 LAVOY RD /10 MI W OF HWY 33 ON HWY2/MILE MARKER 235; (218) 348-4754; ECHOVALLEYMOTOCROSS. COM MAY 2 (V,Y): MAY 9 (S,Y): KELLOGG: MOTOKAZIE INC, LEE M THEIS; 6:30 AM; 58374 HWY 42 /ON HWY 42 BETWEEN PLAINVIEW & KELLOGG MN; (952) 492-2090; MOTOKAZIE. COM MAY 16 (V,Y): CAMBRIDGE: RTW RACE PROMOTIONS, JEFF OLDENBURG; 7 AM; HWY 95 & HWY 47 /HWY 95 TO HWY 47 N 1 1/2 MI ON LEFT; (320) 980-4428; OAKHILLMX.COM MAY 16 (S): MAZEPPA: HURRICANE HILLS MX PARK I, JEFFERY GRAY; 6:30 AM; 43560 232ND AVE /6 MI E OF ZUMBROTA ON CR10 TO 232ND AVE; (507) 843-5154; HURRICANEHILLS.COM MAY 22 (S,Y): LITTLE FALLS: QUALIFIER; RM PROMOTIONS, DALE KEDLEC; 15575 HAWTHORN RD; (612) 919-3457; MOTOCITYRACEWAY.COM

MAY 23 (S,Y): MANKATO: MOTOKAZIE INC, LEE M THEIS; 6:30 AM; 44.117663,-94.114499 /169S THRU MANKATO, LT ON 169S LT ON 539TH LN; (952) 601-1169; MOTOKAZIE.COM MAY 23 (S,Y): LITTLE FALLS: QUALIFIER; RM PROMOTIONS, DALE KADLEC; 15575 HAWTHORN RD; (612) 919-3457; MOTOCITYRACEWAY.COM MAY 30 (S,Y): CAMBRIDGE: 2 DAY EVENT: RTW RACE PROMOTIONS, JEFF OLDENBURG; 7 AM; HWY 95 & HWY 47 /HWY 95 TO HWY 47 N 1 1/2 MI ON LEFT; (320) 980-4428; OAKHILLMX. COM MAY 30 (V): MAZEPPA: 2 DAY EVENT: HURRICANE HILLS MX PARK I, JEFFERY GRAY; 6:30 AM; 43560 232ND AVE /6 MI E OF ZUMBROTA ON CR10 TO 232ND AVE; (507) 843-5154; HURRICANEHILLS.COM HARE SCRAMBLES MAY 2 (S,Y): MONTICELLO: NORSEMEN MOTORCYCLE CLUB, JAY S WAALEN; 8 AM; 9842 BRIARWOOD AVE NE /HWY 25 S. OFF 194 RT ON CHELSEA RD LT CR39,LT; (763) 2639835; NORSEMENMC.ORG MAY 16 (S,T,Y): MILLVILLE: HI WINDERS, JOHN C MARTIN; SPRING CREEK MX PARK /63633 298TH AVE/9 MI E OF HWY 63 ON HWY60; (507) 753-2779; SPRINGCREEKMX.COM OBSERVED TRIALS MAY 16 (S,Y): MANKATO: UPPER MIDWEST TRIALS ASSO, GORDON BOGGIE; 9 AM; 49624 OLD RIVER BLUFF RD; (952) 881-9427; UMTA. ORG MAY 29 (S,Y): MAY 30 (S,Y): THEILMAN: UPPER MIDWEST TRIALS ASSO, GORDON BOGGIE; 9 AM; COUNTY RD 4 SOUTH TO WHIPPOORWILL CAMPGROUND; (952) 881-9427; UMTA.ORG

MISSOURI ENDURO MAY 16 (S,Y): PARK HILLS: NATIONAL; MISSOURI MUDDERS, MICHAEL SILGER; 6:30 AM; ST JOE ORV PARK /I-55S/HWY 67S/HWY 32W/1 MI; (636) 639-6373; MOMUDDERS.COM

NEVADA

MOTOCROSS MAY 7 (G,Y): LAS VEGAS: SOURCE INTERLINK MEDIA, BECKY KOONS; 9 AM; ORLEANS ARENA 4500 TROPICANA /MINI MOTO SX; (817) 246-6751; MINIMOTOSX.COM

Lake George, NY June 7-12 Plan Your NEXT Motorcycle Vacation at the World’s Largest Touring Rally

www.tourexpo.com

518-798-7888


GRAND PRIX MAY 1 (S,T,Y): PRIM: 2 DAY EVENT: SUNLAND SHAMROCKS, RONALD G MAAS; 6 AM; BUFFALO BILLS; (818) 767-4594; ARENA CROSS MAY 8 (M,Y): LAS VEGAS: NATIONAL; 2 DAY EVENT: FELD MOTOR SPORTS, JAYME DALSING; 6:30 AM; SAM BOYD STADIUM; (800) 216-7482; ARENACROSS.COM MAY 9 (M,Y): LAS VEGAS: FELD MOTOR SPORTS, JAYME DALSING; SAM BOYD STADIUM; (800) 216-7482; ARENACROSS.COM

NEW HAMPSHIRE MOTOCROSS MAY 15 (S,Y): WINCHESTER: QUALIFIER; WINCHESTER SPEEDPARK, SUZANEE BOISVERT; 4 PM; WINCHESTER SPEEDPARK /517 KEENE RD; (603) 239-6406; WINCHESTERSPEEDPARK.COM MAY 16 (S,Y): WINCHESTER: QUALIFIER; WINCHESTER SPEEDPARK, SUZANNE BOISVERT; WINCHESTER SPEEDPARK /517 KEENE RD; (603) 239-6406; WINCHESTERSPEEDPARK.COM

NEW JERSEY POKER RUN MAY 8 (R): FLANDERS: ROCKAWAY FLORHAM PARK ROT, GEORGE BERRY; 10 AM; 272 EMMANS RD/PIG ROAST AFTER /RT 206/E RT613/L ON HILLSIDE/L ON EMMANS; (973) 627-9337; FLORHAMPARKROTARY.ORG ROAD RALLY MAY 30 (R): BRIDGEWATER: DAWN PATROL MOTORCYCLE CL, PATRICIA GORGI; ROBERT ST /OLD YORK RD/BRADLEY GARDENS SECTION; (908) 722-4664; DAWNPATROLMC. ORG HARE SCRAMBLES MAY 1 (U): MAY 2 (S,Y): DORCHESTER: NATIONAL; TRI-COUNTY SPORTSMEN MC I, DENNIS MCKELVEY; 6 AM; HUNTERS MILL RD /BTWN CR548 & RT347; (609) 390-3772; TEAMHAMMER.ORG ENDURO MAY 23 (S): CHATSWORTH: PINE BARONS ENDURO RIDERS, PETER LANGE; HEDGER HOUSE /RT 563; (609) 654-6300;

NEW MEXICO

ROAD RUN MAY 23 (R): ALBUQUERQUE: CHARITY;: PEDIATRIC BRAIN TUMOR FOU, KYLE CLACK; 8 AM; JOURNAL PAVILION /I-25 S OF I-40/5601 UNIVERSITY BLVD SE; (800) 253-6530; RIDEFORKIDS.ORG ROAD RALLY MAY 20 (R): RUIDOSO: 4 DAY EVENT: GOLDEN ASPEN RALLY ASSN I, PATRIC PEARSON; 8 AM; CONVENTION CENTER /111 SIERRA BLANCA DR/OFF HWY 48N; (800) 452-8045; MOTORCYCLERALLY.COM

NEW YORK ROAD RUN MAY 23 (R): LIDO BEACH: MARCH OF DIMES-NY LONG IS, LINDA SHAPIRO; 6 AM; TOWN PARK POINT LOOKOUT /LOOP PARKWAY TO LIDO BEACH; (516) 496-8198; BIKERSFORBABIES.ORG MAY 29 (R): MELVILLE: IDONTKNOW MC, GERRY DOUGLASS; 6 AM; PARK & RIDE / NORTH SERVICE RD/LIE 495; (641) 715-3900; IDONTKNOWMC.COM ROAD ENDURO MAY 2 (R): OAKDALE: CROSS ISLAND M.C., ROBERT GOLDMAN; 9 AM; 4030 SUNRISE HWY /FORMULA ONE MOTORSPORTS, 10AM KEY TIME; (917) 679-2488; CROSSISLANDMC. NET DICE RUN MAY 2 (R): GOWANDA: ZOAR VALLEY RIDERS M/C, KATHY PARENT; 10:30 AM; GOWANDA HARLEY /2535 ZOAR RD; (716) 338-2623; 1/2 MILE DIRT TRACK MAY 1 (S,T,Y): MAY 15 (S,T,Y): PORT CRANE: SQUARE DEAL RIDERS M/C, CRAIG ESTELLE; 2 PM; 163 ALLEN RD /EX 5 I-88 RT 7 W TO ALLEN RD; (607) 206-5494; SQUAREDEALRIDERS.COM SHORT TRACK MAY 16 (S,T,Y): PATTERSONVILLE: ELECTRIC CITY RIDERS, FRANK J CARPINELLO; 8 AM; INDIAN LOOKOUT COUNTRY CLUB /1142 BATTER STREET; (518) 542-2144; ELECTRICCITYRIDERS.COM MOTOCROSS MAY 2 (S,T,Y): NEW BERLIN: ROBINSON ENTERPRISES, LLC, JILL ROBINSON; UNADILLA MX 5986 ST HWY 8 /ST HWY 8,

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30 MINS. SOUTH OF UTICA; (607) 965-8784; UNADILLAMX.COM MAY 8 (S,T,Y): MAY 9 (M,T,Y): MAY 22 (S,Y): MAY 23 (S,Y): RICHFORD: BROOME TIOGA SPORTS CENTE, TOM HURD; 7 AM; 50 SHAFFER RD /I-81 EX 8/RT 79W 8 MI; (607) 849-4438; BROOME-TIOGA.COM MAY 23 (S,T,Y): MAPLE VIEW: SMX ASSOCIATES LLC, ALBERT MORGAN; 7 AM; 3098 ST RT 11 /SEE WEBSITE; (315) 374-1524; MOTOMASTERS.COM MAY 30 (S,T): CAROGA LAKE: 2 DAY EVENT: ROYAL MOUNTAIN SKI AREA, JIM BLAISE; 3072 RT 10; (518) 835-6445; ROYALMOUNTAIN. COM HARE SCRAMBLES MAY 2 (S,T,Y): VAN ETTEN: DREAM RIDERS, JAMES STEINER; 12 PM; 1022 LANGFORD CK RD /20 MILES S OF ITHACA; (607) 589-6337; OBSERVED TRIALS MAY 2 (S,Y): ELMIRA: AMA-DIST 4 TRIALS COMMITT, REGAN FAUGHT; 10 AM; 147 CLARK HOLLOW RD; (607) 732-3027; MAY 16 (S,Y): BOLIVAR: AMA-DIST 4 TRIALS COMMITT, RICH FREER; 10 AM; 1100 WHITES HILL RD #2; (716) 372-4576; MAY 23 (S,Y): LANSING: AMA-DIST 4 TRIALS COMMITT, MIKE CHISMAN; 10 AM; 1060 SALMON CREEK RD; (479) 739-6631;

NORTH CAROLINA

ROAD RUN MAY 2 (R): PITTSBORO: CHARITY;: PEDIATRIC BRAIN TUMOR FOU, KYLE CLACK; 8 AM; WHITE OAK RECREATION AREA /OFF US64 1/2 MI E OF LAKE BRIDGE; (800) 253-6530; RIDEFORKIDS.ORG ROAD RALLY MAY 28 (R): SPARTA: 4 DAY EVENT: MOTORCYCLE SPORT TOURING, JANET CAMPBELL; ALLEGHANY INN; (888) 372-2501; MOTOCROSS MAY 23 (S,T,Y): IRON STATION: IRON STATION MOTORSPORTS, STACY LANE; 3636 E HWY 27 /INT HWYS 27E & 73; (704) 735-9132; TOPGUNMX.NET MAY 30 (S,T,Y): ELLERBE: WINDY HILL SPORTS, JOE USSERY; 6 AM; 2782 US HWY 220N /3 MI N OF TOWN; (910) 895-4387; WINDYHILLSPORTSMX.COM HARE SCRAMBLES MAY 8 (V,Y): MAY 9 (S,Y): YADKINVILLE: RACER PRODUCTIONS INC, RITA COOMBS; (304) 2840084; RACERPRODUCTIONS.COM

OHIO

ROAD RUN MAY 16 (R): AKRON: GREATER AKRON MOTORCYCLE, PAT TENNEY; 10 AM; 1540 SMITH RD; (330) 655-2525; POKER RUN MAY 2 (R): GREENVILLE: TREATY CITY MOTORCYCLE CL, DAN R KNECHT; 12 PM; CLBGRNDS/7270 MOTORCYCLE DR /3.5 MI NW OF TOWN OFF SR 571; (937) 548-7197; TREATYCITYMC.COM MAY 2 (R): PORTSMOUTH: PORTSMOUTH CYCLING CLUB, ALAN F ODLE; 11 AM; CLUBHOUSE/101 FRONT ST / (AT END OF STREET); (740) 352-7200; PORTSMOUTHCYCLEINGCLUB.COM ADVENTURE RIDE MAY 22 (R): ZALESKI: NATIONAL;: 2 DAY EVENT: BUCKEYE DUAL SPORTERS, WILLIAM A KAEPPNER; 7 AM; LAKE HOPE STATE PARK /1.25 MI N OF LOGAN ON SR33; (740) 380-3050; KAEPPNERSWOODS.COM DUAL SPORT RIDE MAY 22 (R): ZALESKI: NATIONAL;: 2 DAY EVENT: BUCKEYE DUAL SPORTERS, WILLIAM A KAEPPNER; 7 AM; LAKE HOPE STATE PARK /1.25 MI N OF LOGAN ON SR33; (740) 380-3050; .KAEPPNERSWOODS.COM MOTOCROSS MAY 1 (S,Y): MAY 2 (S,Y): MILLFIELD: QUALIFIER; RUSSELL RACING INC, CARRIE RUSSELL; SUNDAY CREEK RACEWAY /RT 13N (FROM ATHENS) TO JACKSONVILLE; (304) 2840084; SUNDAYCREEKRACEWAY.COM MAY 2 (S,Y): MAY 23 (S,Y): DAYTON: DAYTON MOTORCYCLE CLUB IN, KEVIN LOONEY; 3515 STONY HOLLOW RD /I-75/35W/S GETTYSBURG RD/LEFT; (937) 263-9321; DAYTONMC.COM MAY 9 (S,T,Y): BLANCHESTER: DIRT COUNTRY, CYNTHIA KING; 6901 RT 133 /3.5 MI S OF TOWN ON RT 133; (513) 625-7350; DIRTCOUNTRYMX.COM MAY 15 (S,T,Y): NELSONVILLE: FAST TRAXX PROMOTIONS LLC, SHAWNA BICKLEY; 8 AM; 5999 WARREN DR /BTWN ATHENS & TOWN

ON RT 33; (740) 767-3740; FASTTRAXXRACING. COM MAY 16 (S,Y): GREENVILLE: TREATY CITY MOTORCYCLE CL, DAN R KNECHT; 7 AM; CLBGRNDS/7270 MOTORCYCLE DR /3.5 MI NW OF TOWN OFF SR 571; (937) 548-7197; TREATYCITYMC.COM MAY 30 (S,T,Y): SUGAR GROVE: CENTRAL OHIO COMPETITION, JANET FOUT; 6 AM; 9171 BUCKEYE RD /6 MI E OF LANCASTER/LEFT AT LIGHT; (740) 983-3937; COCRMX.COM MAY 31 (S,T,Y): MARYSVILLE: AMERICAN MOTOSPORTS LLC, MATTHEW D EASTMAN; 7 AM; 24400 YEARSLEY RD /FROM MARYSVILLE TO SR 31N TO SR 347 W; (937) 358-2427; AMERICANMX.COM HARE SCRAMBLES MAY 30 (S,T,Y): LITTLE HOCKING: WILDWOOD LAKE RACEWAY, BRENT WINDLAND; 7 AM; 2392 WILDWOOD LAKE RD /SR50/7 TO SR555 TO WELCH RD TO WILDWOOD LAKE; (740) 989-2866; WILDWOODLAKERACEWAY.COM ENDURO MAY 30 (S): WELLSTON: APPALACHIAN DIRT RIDERS I, WILLIAM DEPUE; 10 AM; JAYMAR/ JOLLY MINE /5 MI E OF TOWN ON SR 32; (740) 384-6379; ADROHIO.ORG GRAND PRIX MAY 1 (S,T,Y): LOGAN: FIVE BROTHERS RACEWAY, MARCIE WESSELHOEFT; 7 AM; 5207 SR312 /SR33 TO SR 93/N TO SUTTON RD/TURN RIGHT; (740) 385-3532; FIVEBROTHERSRACE.COM MAY 2 (S,T,Y): ATHENS: DYNAMIC PROMOTIONS LTD, WILLIAM W ALLEN; 8 AM; 3252 FISHER RD /SEE WEBSITE; (740) 5936704; DYNAMICPROMOTIONSRACING.COM MAY 9 (S,T,Y): MAY 23 (S): ATHENS: ACTION SPORTS PROMOTIONS, DREW WOLFE; 8 AM; SALEM RD /SEE WEBSITE; (740) 594-6686; ACTIONSPORTSRACING.COM MAY 15 (S,T,Y): NELSONVILLE: FAST TRAXX PROMOTIONS LLC, SHAWNA BICKLEY; 8 AM; 5999 WARREN DR /BTWN ATHENS & TOWN ON RT 33; (740) 767-3740; FASTTRAXXRACING.COM MAY 16 (S,T): ATHENS: ATHENS MOTORCYCLE CLUB, JIM C BARNHART; 7 AM; 13426 DUTCH CREEK RD /RT 550 TURN RIGHT ON DUTCHCREEK 1.6 MILES; (740) 541-2095; ATHENSMOTORCYCLECLUB.COM MAY 29 (S,T,Y): LOGAN: FIVE BROTHERS RACEWAY, MARIE WESSELHOEFT; 7 AM; 5207 SR312 /SR33 TO SR 93/N TO SUTTON RD/TURN RIGHT; (740) 385-3532; FIVEBROTHERSRACE.COM

OKLAHOMA

ROAD RUN MAY 23 (R): TULSA: CHARITY;: PEDIATRIC BRAIN TUMOR FOU, KYLE CLACK; 8 AM; TULSA HEALTH DEPARTMENT /5051 S 129TH EAST AVE; (800) 253-6530; RIDEFORKIDS.ORG OBSERVED TRIALS MAY 1 (S): TISHOMINGO: NATIONAL; 2 DAY EVENT: TEXHOMA TRIALS CLUB, ROBERT SHAW; 7200 ROCK CREEK RD /SEE WEBSITE; (580) 504-6750; TEXHOMATRIALSCLUB.COM

OREGON

ROAD ENDURO MAY 8 (R): PORTLAND: ROSE CITY MOTORCYCLE CLUB, CHAR L MESSINGER; 4:30 AM; WD JACKSON ARMORY /6255 NE CORNFOOT RD; (503) 706-3969; ROSE-CITYMC.ORG REC POKER RUN MAY 1 (R): BEND: CENTRAL OREGON MOTORCYCLE, DAVE SLAGHT; 7 AM; E FORT ROCK OHV STAGING AREA /HWY 20/20 MI E OF TOWN/R ON PAVED RD 23 TO 25; (541) 5466462; COMACCLUB.ORG

PENNSYLVANIA

POKER RUN - OFF-ROAD MAY 30 (R,T,Y): MARKLEYSBURG: BRADDOCK’S TRAIL RACEWAY, HEATHER SAVAGE; 10 AM; 4834 NATIONAL PIKE / GPS: 39.770894,-79.48028; (724) 880-5416; BRADDOCKSTROADRACEWAY.COM ROAD RUN MAY 8 (R): HORSHAM: MOTORCYCLISTS FOR JESUS M, FREDERICK MCCLINCY; 9:30 AM; NEBRASA BRAZILIAN STEAK HOUSE /RT 611 ACROSS FROM WILLOW GROVE NAVAL STATION; (215) 260-4957; MJMCALVARYRIDERS.COM MAY 31 (R): LEBANON: LEBANON VALLEY MOTORCYCLE, HENRIETTA STEINER; 9 AM; LEBANON VALLEY MC /11 S 22 ST; (717) 2709797; LEBANONVALLEYMC.COM POKER RUN MAY 2 (R): LYNC: GENTLEMEN MC

SPORTSMEN, DEAN VITATOE; 9 AM; GMC CLUB GROUNDS /10 MI SOUTH OF LYNC, RT 272 SOUTH; (717) 285-3710; MAY 8 (R): LEBANON: MOTOR MAIDS-PA CHAPTER, DIANE RUMBEL; 4 PM; LEBANON VALLEY MC /11 S 22 ST; (570) 889-5114; PAWNYMOTORMAIDS.COM MAY 9 (R): MARIETTA: AMERICAN LEGION RIDERS PA, SAM BRINTON; 11 AM; 19 S GAY ST /CALL FOR DIRECTIONS; (717) 898-0871; MAY 9 (R): RED HILL: FREEDOM RIDERS MOTORCYCLE, WAYNE STUMP; 10 AM; CLUB HOUSE/331 6TH ST /RT 29 TO SIXTH ST; (215) 679-4766; FREEDOMRIDERS.COM MAY 16 (R): YORK: YORK MOTORCYCLE CLUB, JERRY MYERS; 9 AM; 2333 WHITEFORD RD /83-30E MT ZINN RD(NORTH) WHITEFORD RD(LF); (717) 755-1311; YORKMOTORCYCLE. COM MAY 16 (R): KRESGEVILLE: ZINC CITY MC, PHYLLIS KRESGE; 11 AM; ZC CLUBGROUNDS /1 MI SO. OF KRESGEVILLE ON ROUTE 209; (610) 681-9903; ZINCCITYMC.ORG MAY 16 (R): COLUMBIA: THUNDERBIRD MOTORCYCLE CL, SAM BRINTON; 10 AM; 1472 HABECKER RD /CALL FOR DIRECTIONS; (717) 898-0871; MAY 16 (R): NORRISTOWN: H.O.G.-PA VALLEY FORGE CH, JERRY N RHODES; 1217 S TROOPER RD; (610) 666-5122; MAY 30 (R): SCHUYLKILL HAVE: SCHUYLKILL COUNTY MOTORCY, BEVERLY A MILLER; 9 AM; 958 SCHUYLKILL MTN RD /E OFF 183; (570) 385-1460; SCHUYLKILLCOUNTY MOTORCYCLECLUB.COM DUAL SPORT RIDE MAY 16 (R): LAWTON: BACK MOUNTAIN ENDURO RIDE, MARTY NOON; 5 PM; ALLEN FARM /.8 MI OF JNCT RTS 267N & 706E; (570) 675-1814; BMER.ORG ROAD RALLY MAY 21 (R): SOMERSET: 2 DAY EVENT: CONCOURS OWNERS GROUP INC, GUY B YOUNG II; 7 AM; 215 RAMADA ROAD/QUALITY INN; COG-ONLINE.ORG 1/2 MILE DIRT TRACK MAY 15 (S,T,Y): MECHANICSBURG: SHIPPENSBURG MC, DARRYL BAER; 8 AM; 600 COLONIAL VIEW RD /SHIOPPENSBURG SPEEDWAY; (717) 796-0294; MAY 30 (S,T): SPRING RUN: NATIONAL; TWO WHEEL PROMOTIONS, VICKI FLOWERS; 10 AM; 17911 DRY RUN RD W /PA TURNPIKE EX 189 RT 75 N, 641 W TO DRY REIN; (717) 3685902; PATHVALLEY.COMSHORT TRACK MAY 2 (S,T,Y): MECHANICSBURG: SHIPPENSBURG MC, DARRYL BAER; 9 AM; 600 COLONIAL VIEW RD /SHIOPPENSBURG SPEEDWAY; (717) 796-0294; MAY 29 (S): SPRING RUN: NATIONAL; TWO WHEEL PROMOTIONS, VICKI FLOWERS; 3 PM; 17911 DRY RUN RD W /PA TURNPIKE EX 189 RT 75 N, 641 W TO DRY REIN; (717) 368-5902; PATHVALLEY.COM SCRAMBLES MAY 9 (S,Y): PARKESBURG: E PA PISTON POPPERS MC IN, CURT WISE; 8 AM; RT 30 W END COATESVILLE/DOWNINGTON BYPASS; (484) 336-9160; MYSPACE.COM/ PISTONPOPPERS MAY 21 (S,T,Y): BIRDSBORO: 2 DAY EVENT: PAGODA MOTORCYCLE CLUB, RANDY KASTLE; 7 AM; 441 RED LANE /422 TO 82 TO LINCOLN RD TO RED LANE; (610) 582-3717; PAGODAMOTORCYCLECLUB.COM MAY 29 (S,T): SPRING RUN: NATIONAL; TWO WHEEL PROMOTIONS, VICKI FLOWERS; 9 AM; 17911 DRY RUN RD W /PA TURNPIKE EX 189 RT 75 N, 641 W TO DRY REIN; (717) 368-5902; PATHVALLEY.COM MOTOCROSS MAY 2 (S,T,Y): CLIFFORD: HURRICANE HILLS MOTORSPOR, JOE FRITZ; 200 RTE 106 /RT81 EX206,374E TO 106E TRACK 3 MI ON R; (570) 222-9290; HHMOTOCROSS.COM MAY 2 (S,Y): MAY 16 (S,Y): SHIPPENSBURG: DOUBLIN GAP MX PARK INC, RODNEY YENTZER; 8 AM; 100 REASNER LANE /6 MILES NORTH OF DOWNTOWN SHIPPENSBURG; (717) 249-6036; DOUBLINGAP.COM MAY 2 (V): PINE GROVE: DUTCHMEN MX PARK, LLC., ROBERT PAPP; 7 AM; DMX/670 ROCK RD /3 MI E OF TOWN ON RT 895; (570) 573-9800; DUTCHMENMXPARK.COM MAY 2 (S,T,Y): MAY 16 (S,T,Y): MAY 16 (M): DELMONT: BELLCO INC, RITA COOMBS; STEEL CITY RACEWAY /JCT COUNTY RD & THORN RUN RD; (304) 284-0084; RACERPRODUCTIONS.COM MAY 7 (S,T,Y): MAY 21 (S,T,Y): LATROBE: MX


PRODUCTIONS, GEORGE TESLOVICH; 5 PM; 5114 PLEASANT UNITY RD /RT 981 S. PAST AIR PORT 2 MILES; (724) 322-0415; LATROBEMOTORSPORTS.COM MAY 8 (S,T,Y): ELKLAND: 2 DAY EVENT: MILES MOUNTAIN MX, PHILLIP EGLESTON; 6 AM; 446 RIVER ST; (814) 258-5593; MILESMOUNTAINMX.COM MAY 9 (S,Y): FREDERICKSBURG: SLEEPY HOLLOW MOTO CROSS, ERIC SWARR; SLEEPY HOLLOW MOTO CROSS PARK /2 MILES E OF FREDERICKSBURG US ROUTE 22 EAST; (717) 653-4830; SLEEPYMX.COM MAY 9 (S,T,Y): JOHNSTOWN: PLEASURE VALLEY RACEWAY, JEFF M CERNIC; 6 AM; 500 COOPER AVE; PVRMX.COM MAY 16 (S,T,Y): MAY 30 (V,Y): CLIFFORD: HURRICANE HILLS MOTORSPOR, JOSEPH C FRITZ; 200 RTE 106 /RT81 EX206,374E TO 106E TRACK 3 MI ON R; (570) 222-9290; HHMOTOCROSS.COM MAY 16 (S,T,Y): THREE SPRINGS: ROCKET RACEWAY, M CARLTON; 6 AM; 22404 STARR RD; (814) 448-2701; ROCKETRACEWAY.COM MAY 23 (S,Y): HANOVER: HAPPY RAMBLERS, SHARON L FISHER; 7 AM; 4340 HANOVER RD /RT 116/5 MI W OF TOWN/SEE WEBSITE; (717) 633-7708; HAPPYRAMBLERS.COM MAY 23 (S,T,Y): BOSWELL: DREAM PROMOTIONS INC./FIE, TINA BERKEY; 7 AM; 473 BERKEY RD /OFF RT 30 FROM JENNERSTOWN ON 985N; (814) 629-6774; FIELDOFDREAMSMX.COM MAY 23 (S,T,Y): OSCEOLA MILLS: WILD RIDE MOTOCROSS, DAVID FERGUSON; 7 AM; 211 BAUGHMAN CEMETERY RD /CHECK WEBSITE; (814) 762-9005; WILDRIDETRACK.COM MAY 29 (V,Y): DELMONT: NATIONAL; 2 DAY EVENT: BELLCO INC, RITA COOMBS; STEEL CITY RACEWAY /JCT COUNTY RD & THORN RUN RD; (304) 284-0084; RACERPRODUCTIONS.COM MAY 30 (S,Y): FREDERICKSBURG: SLEEPY HOLLOW MOTO CROSS, ERIC E SWARR; SLEEPY HOLLOW MOTO CROSS PARK /2 MILES E OF FREDERICKSBURG US ROUTE 22 EAST; (717) 653-4830; SLEEPYMX.COM HArE ScrAMBlES MAY 1 (S,Y): SKIPPACK: BLUE COMET MOTOCYCLE CLUB, JERRY DEWHURST; 7 AM; CLBGRNDS/4043 MENSCH RD /.25 MI SE JCT RTS 73 & 113; BLUECOMETMC.COM MAY 16 (S,T,Y): MARKLEYSBURG: BRADDOCK’S TRAIL RACEWAY, HEATHER SAVAGE; 7 AM; 4834 NATIONAL PIKE / GPS: 39.770894,-79.48028; (724) 880-5416; BRADDOCKSTROADRACEWAY.COM MAY 22 (V,Y): MAY 23 (S,Y): SOMERSET: RACER PRODUCTIONS INC, RITA COOMBS; MTN RIDGE TRAILS RESORT; (304) 284-0084; RACERPRODUCTIONS.COM MAY 23 (S,T,Y): BERWICK: BP PROMOTIONS, BERNADETTE BROMLEY; 7 AM; EVANSVILLE MX PARK /RT 80 EX 256 RT 93 NORTH; (215) 357-2192; BPPOINTS.COM MAY 30 (S,T,Y): NEELYTON: FT OF MOUNTAIN, PIERRON P REASNER; 7:30 AM; 22295 DECORUM RD /PA TRNPK EX 180/RIGHT ON RT 522 TO RT 641; (814) 259-3873; ENDUro MAY 30 (S): SAINT CLAIR: READING OFF ROAD RIDERS, MARK MOYER; 6 AM; BURMA ROAD / I78 EX 29 NORTH ON 61 FOR 20 MI., ARROWS; (610) 921-3592; RORR.ORG oBSErVED TrIAlS MAY 1 (S): SPRING GROVE: 2 DAY EVENT:

WHITE ROSE MC, BOB MARKEY; 12 PM; 5252 HILLCLIMB RD /RT 516, 14 MI SW OF YORK; (717) 229-2621; WHITEROSEMC.ORG MAY 16 (S): ELIZABETHTOWN: CANDYTOWN MOTORCYCLE CLUB, KEVIN HIGGINS; 9 AM; 2650 STEINROCK RD /283 E TOLL/EX 341 E; (717) 246-2116; CANDYTOWNMC.ORG

FERRELL; 12725 KENTUCK RD; (434) 836-7629; BIRCHCREEKMOTORSPORTS.COM MAY 15 (S,Y): MAY 16 (S,Y): DILLWYN: QUALIFIER; ACTIONTOWN MX CLUB, CARL REYNOLDS; 257 SPROUSES LANE; (434) 836-7629; MAY 29 (S,T,Y): AXTON: 2 DAY EVENT: LAKE SUGAR TREE, APRIL COLLIER; 400 MOVIE MOVERS EAST /US 58 15MI. W OF DANVILLE N ON MOVINE MOVERS; (276) 650-1158; LAKESUGARTREE.COM GrAND PrIX MAY 2 (S,Y): MARTINSVILLE: VIRGINIA CHAMPIONSHIP HAR, DARRYL DALTON; (276) 252-6801; VCHSS.NET MAY 16 (S,Y): BRISTOL: VIRGINIA CHAMPIONSHIP HAR, DARRYL DALTON; HARLEYWOOD FARM /I-81 EXIT 7; (276) 6690981; VCHSS.NET MAY 30 (S,Y): SURRY: VIRGINIA CHAMPIONSHIP HAR, DARRYL DALTON; SURRY CO /FRM RT 31 & RT 10 W .75 MI TO COMMERCE DR; (757) 356-0354; VCHSS.NET croSS coUNTry MAY 23 (S,T,Y): JAVA: LONE RIDER PRODUCTIONS, TIM NORRIS; 12 PM; 2500 ELKHORN RD; (866) 967-8927; VXCS.ORG

rEc TrAIl rIDE MAY 2 (R): DAHLGREN: NORTHERN VIRGINIA TRAIL R, JOE EPPERSON; 10 AM; FOLLOW ARROWS FROM US 301; (301) 932-5179; NVTR. ORG MoTocroSS MAY 1 (M,Y): PETERSBURG: 2 DAY EVENT: VMP MX, STEFFANIE EDEN; 6 AM; 8018 BOYDTON PLANK RD; (804) 732-7888; VMP-MX.COM MAY 1 (V,Y): SUTHERLIN: NATIONAL; 2 DAY EVENT: BIRCHCREEK PROMOTIONS, LL, KEN

roAD rUN MAY 1 (R): GILMAN: ROAD WOLF PRODUCTIONS, DEAN HOMMEL; 10 AM; MAIN ST /HWY 29 TO 73N TO 64W; (715) 785-8025; PokEr rUN MAY 16 (R): WEST BEND: KETTLE MORAINE SPORT RIDE, MIKE VRANA; 4 PM; WASHINGTON COUNTY COURT HOUSE /HWY 33E; (262) 334-1743; KETTLEMORAINESPORTRIDERS.COM roAD rAlly MAY 21 (R): SPRING GREEN: 3 DAY EVENT: MOTORCYCLE SPORT TOURING, JANET CAMPBELL; ROUND BARN LODGE; (608) 588-2568;

SHorT TrAck MAY 8 (S,T,Y): MAY 22 (S,T,Y): BURNETT: BEAVER CYCLE CLUB INC, MICHAEL L SCHWARZENBACHER; 2 PM; DODGE CO FAIRGROUNDS /3 MILES EAST OF BEAVER DAM ON HWY 33; (920) 319-6889; BEAVERCYCLECLUB.COM MAY 15 (S,T,Y): LAKE MILLS: AZTALAN CYCLE CLUB INC, JUDY E SUMNER; 1:30 PM; N 6643 GOMOL RD /I94N TO 26 S TO B-W. TO GOMOLRIGHT; (414) 297-9367; AZTALANCYCLE.COM ScrAMBlES MAY 23 (S,T,Y): BURNETT: BEAVER CYCLE CLUB INC, MICHAEL L SCHWARZENBACHER; 8 AM; DODGE CO FAIRGROUNDS /3 MILES EAST OF BEAVER DAM ON HWY 33; (920) 3196889; BEAVERCYCLECLUB.COM HIllclIMB MAY 23 (S,T,Y): NEKOOSA: RAPID ANGELS MOTORCYCLE C, TODD ELLINGSON; 7 AM; DYRACUSE MOTORCYCLE PARK /15 MI S OF WISCONSIN RAPIDS OFF STATE RD 13; (715) 712-0068; RAPIDANGELS.COM MoTocroSS MAY 1 (S): MAY 2 (S): TIGERTON: QUALIFIER; FANTASY MOTO LLC, SCOTT J BIESE; 6 AM; QUAD PARK LANE /HWY 45 8 MI S F 29 EAST ON QUAD PARK LANE; (920) 419-2863; FANTASYMOTO.COM MAY 9 (S,Y): LAKE MILLS: AZTALAN CYCLE CLUB INC, JUDY E SUMNER; 6 AM; N 6643 GOMOL RD /I94N TO 26 S TO B-W. TO GOMOLRIGHT; (414) 297-9367; AZTALANCYCLE.COM MAY 16 (S): MARSHFIELD: MARSHFIELD T & T RIDERS I, LARRY ECKES; 5 AM; 51227 W MANN RD /3 MI S OF SPENCER ON CTY V; (715) 384-4555; MAY 16 (S,T): MARIBEL: SPORTS & COMPETITION, JEREMY TABALSKE; 2 PM; ZANDAR RD /CHECK WEBSITE FOR DIRECTIONS; (920) 351-4115; DENMARKMX. COM MAY 23 (S,T,Y): TIGERTON: FANTASY MOTO LLC, SCOTT BIESE; 6 AM; QUAD PARK LANE /HWY 45 8 MI S F 29 EAST ON QUAD PARK LANE; (920) 419-2863; FANTASYMOTO.COM MAY 30 (M,T,Y): ATHELSTANE: PINE RIDGE RACEWAY LLC, CONNIE WALLACE; 6 AM; W11359 N LOST LAKE TRL /HWY 41N TO CRIVITZ/W ON A TO CTY C/L DEER LK; (715) 856-6612; PINERIDGERACEWAY.COM MAY 30 (S,T,Y): HIXTON: CMJ RACEWAY LLC, CHRIS HALVERSON; 6 AM; N9958 LIEN RD /3 MILES N OF HIXTON OFF HWY FL; (608) 2206853; CMJRACEWAY.COM HArE ScrAMBlES MAY 2 (S,Y): HILLPOINT: MADISON MOTORCYCLE CLUB, DAN MANCL; 6 AM; S5711 SUGAR MAPLE ROAD /1/2 MILE N OF HILL POINT ON SUGAR MAPLE RD; (608) 2204784; MADISONMOTORCYCLECLUB.ORG MAY 15 (V): MAY 29 (U): RHINELANDER: NATIONAL; SUGAR CAMP AREA RACING EN, SCOTT SCHWALBE; 6 AM; 6345 HWY 17N /10 MI N OF TOWN ON HWY 17; (715) 272-1101; SUGARCAMPENT.COM MAY 22 (S,Y): PEARSON: MADISON MOTORCYCLE CLUB, DAN MANCL; 6 AM; AUGUSTYN SPRINGS RD /15 MI NE OF ANTIGO WI; (608) 220-4784; MADISONMOTORCYCLECLUB.ORG oBSErVED TrIAlS MAY 15 (S,Y): WAUZEKA: 2 DAY EVENT: WISCONSIN OBSERVED TRIALS, JAMES VOIGTLANDER; 9 AM; SEE WEBSITE /SEE WEBSITE; (608) 434-5530; WISCONSINTRIALS. ORG

SoUTH DAkoTA

SHorT TrAck MAY 22 (S,T,Y): SIOUX FALLS: NATIONAL; SIOUX VALLEY CYCLE CLUB, DEAN STRABLE; 3 PM; 25868 477TH AVE /INTERSTATE 29 EX 86 E THROUGH RENNER 5 MI; (605) 480-0268; SIOUXVALLEYCYCLECLUB.COM MAY 23 (S,T,Y): SIOUX FALLS: NATIONAL; SIOUX VALLEY CYCLE CLUB, DEAN STRABLE; 10 AM; 25868 477TH AVE /INTERSTATE 29 EX 86 E THROUGH RENNER 5 MI; (605) 480-0268; SIOUXVALLEYCYCLECLUB.COM ScrAMBlES MAY 22 (S,T,Y): SIOUX FALLS: NATIONAL; SIOUX VALLEY CYCLE CLUB, DEAN STRABLE; 10 AM; 25868 477TH AVE /INTERSTATE 29 EX 86 E THROUGH RENNER 5 MI; (605) 480-0268; SIOUXVALLEYCYCLECLUB.COM

TENNESSEE

roAD rUN MAY 16 (R): FRANKLIN: CHARITY;: PEDIATRIC BRAIN TUMOR FOU, KYLE CLACK; 8 AM; JIM WARREN PARK /705 BOYD MILL AVE; (800) 253-6530; RIDEFORKIDS.ORG MoTocroSS MAY 1 (S,Y): BLOUTVILLE: QUALIFIER; VICTORY SPORTS INC, SAM GAMMON; MUDDY CREEK RACEWAY /450 RIDGEWAY DR; (423) 323-5497; VICTORYSPORTSRACING.COM MAY 2 (M,Y): BLOUTVILLE: QUALIFIER; VICTORY SPORTS INC, SAM R GAMMON; MUDDY CREEK RACEWAY /450 RIDGEWAY DR; (423) 323-5497; VICTORYSPORTSRACING.COM

TEXAS

roAD rUN MAY 10 (R): HOUSTON: SAN JACINTO HIGH ROLLERS, DARREN EBANKS; 8 AM; 4400 TELEPHONE ROAD /TELEPHONE RD @SO LOOP 610 TO GALVESTON ISLAND; (832) 7524497; SJHR.ORG fUN rUN MAY 1 (R): CAMILLA: SAN JACINTO HIGH ROLLERS-, JESSE COBURN; 8 AM; AMERICAN LGN HALL POST 629 /FM 3278, 59N TO FM150, R ON 3278 APRX 4 MI R; (936) 327-2064; MAY 21 (R): LIVINGSTON: 2 DAY EVENT: SAN JACINTO HIGH ROLLERS-, JESSE COBURN; 6 AM; 6755 WEST FM 942 /59N TO 190W TO 350N TO 942/2ND DRIVE; (936) 328-9627;

UTAH

HArE & HoUND MAY 15 (S,Y): JERICO: NATIONAL; SUGARLOAFERS MC, ROB DAVIES; JERICO REC AREA; (435) 743-4180; SUGARLOAFERSMC.COM

VIrGINIA

WASHINGToN

PokEr rUN MAY 2 (R,T,Y): BELFAIR: TACOMA M/C, GAIL M SAXTON; ELF-ENDAL STAGING AREA; (253) 460-9377; TACOMAMC.COM MoTocroSS MAY 1 (S,T): BELLINGHAM: 2 DAY EVENT: GREATER SEATTLE MOTORCYCL, ANNIE MCCARTHY; HANNEGAN SPEEDWAY; (253) 840-0466; MAY 16 (S,Y): RAYMOND: WARD CREEK MX, LISA KLEMP; 6:30 AM; 41 WARD CREEK RD / SR6 FROM CHEHALIS/SR8 FROM OLYMPIA; (360) 942-4674; WARDCREEKMX.COM MAY 29 (S,Y): MAY 30 (S,Y): WASHOUGAL: QUALIFIER; WASHOUGAL MX PARK LLC, CAROLYN HUFFMAN; 6 AM; WASHOUGAL MX PARK /40205 NE BORIN/205 TO HWY 14E; (541) 673-1671; WASHOUGALMXPK.COM

WEST VIrGINIA

MoTocroSS MAY 8 (S,Y): HEDGESVILLE: 2 DAY EVENT: MIDDLE ATLANTIC MOTOCROSS, RUTH ANN BENSON; 6 AM; TOMAHAWK MX/863 TOMAHAWK RN RD /I-81 EX 16W/6 MI TO RT 7/L; (410) 375-1059; MAMAMX.COM MAY 23 (S,T,Y): HEDGESVILLE: TOMAHAWK MX LLC, CHAD M GOCHENOUR; 7 AM; TOMAHAWK MX/863 TOMAHAWK RN RD /I-81 EX 16W/6 MI TO RT 7/L; (304) 582-8185; TOMAHAWKMX.COM

WIScoNSIN

MUSEUM EXHIBITS

AMA Pro rAcING

Laguna Seca

Motocross

AMA MoTorcyclE HAll of fAME MUSEUM MotorcycleMuseuM.org

AMA SUPErcroSS cHAMPIoNSHIP SErIES supercrossonline.coM

Aug. 13-15: Alton, Va.: Virginia International Raceway

July 3: Buchanan, Mich.: RedBud

The Hall of Fame is located on the AMA campus in Pickerington, Ohio, and is open 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. seven days a week. Closed: Easter, Thanksgiving, Christmas and New Year’s Day.

April 17: St. louis: Edward Jones Dome, TicketMaster.com, (800) 745-3000

Sept. 3-5: Millville, N.J.: New Jersey Motorsports Park

April 24: Seattle: Quest Field, TicketMaster. com, (206) 381-7500

Sept. 24-26: Birmingham, Ala.: Barber Motorsports Park

MotoStars: celebrities + Motorcycles: Priceless machines, memorabilia and tales from celebrities’ favorite adventures. On display through April 2010.

May 1: Salt lake city: Rice-Eccles Stadium, TicketMaster.com, (801) 581-UTIX

lUcAS oIl AMA Pro MoTocroSS cHAMPIoNSHIP MXsportsprorAcing.coM

May 8: las Vegas, Nev.: Sam Boyd Stadium, TicketMaster.com, (702) 895-3761

May 22: rancho cordova, calif.: Hangtown Motocross Classic

AMA Pro SUPErBIkE cHAMPIoNSHIP AMAprorAcing.coM

May 29: San Bernardino, cailf.: Glen Helen Raceway

May 14-16: Sonoma, calif.: Infineon Raceway

June 5: Wortham, Texas: Freestone Raceway

June 4-6: Elkhart lake, Wis.: Road America

June 12: Mt. Morris, Pa.: High Point Raceway

July 16-18: lexington, ohio: Mid-Ohio Sports Car Course

June 19: Mechanicsville, Md.: Budds Creek Motocross

July 23-25: Monterey, calif.: Mazda Raceway

June 26: lakewood, colo.: Thunder Valley

Awesome-Ness: The life and art of Arlen Ness: King of Choppers. AMA Motorcycle Hall of fame: Recognizing those who have made significant contributions to all aspects of motorcycling. founder’s Hall: Honoring the Hall of Fame’s generous contributors.

July 17: Milleville, Minn.: Spring Creek Motocross July 24: Washougal, Wash.: Washougal Motocross Aug. 14: New Berlin, N.y.: Unadilla Aug. 28: Southwick, Mass.: Moto-X 338 Sept. 4: Delmont, Pa.: Steel City Raceway AMA Pro flAT TrAck cHAMPIoNSHIP AMAprorAcing.coM May 1: Prescott, Ariz.: Yavapai Downs Mile May 29: Springfield, Ill.: Springfield TT, Illinois State Fairgrounds May 30: Springfield, Ill.: Springfield Mile I, Illinois State Fairgrounds June 5: Gas city, Ind.: Gas City Short Track, Gas City I-69 Speedway

May 2010

53


June 19: Lexington, Ky.: The Red Mile

Aug. 14: Guthrie, Okla.: Lazy E Arena

June 26: Lima, Ohio: Lime Half-mile, Allen County Fairgrounds

Aug. 27: Indianapolis: Pepsi Coliseum

July 10: Lake Odessa, Mich.: I-96 Half-mile, I-96 Speedway July 25: Castle Rock, Wash.: Castle Rock TT, Castle Rock Fairgrounds July 31: Calistoga, Calif.: Calistoga Half-mile, Calistoga Fairgrounds Aug. 7: Hagerstown, Md.: Hagerstown Half-mile, Hagerstown Speedway Aug. 14: Grove City, Ohio: Beulah Park Half-mile Aug. 22: Peoria, Ill.: Peoria TT Aug. 28: Indianapolis: Indiana Mile, Indiana State Fairgrounds

Sept. 11: everett, Wash.: Comcast Arena Oct. 30: denver: Nat’l Western Complex nov. 20: Las vegas, nev.: The Orleans Arena CAn-AM GnCC SCHeduLe GNccraciNG.com April 24-25: Hurricane Mills, Tenn. May 8-9: Yadkinville, N.C. May 22-23: Somerset, Pa. June 5-6: Millfield, Ohio June 26-27: Snowshoe Resort, W.Va.

Sept. 4: Springfield, Ill.: Springfield Short Track, Illinois State Fairgrounds

Sept. 11-12: New Berlin, N.Y.

Sept. 5: Springfield, Ill.: Springfield Mile II, Illinois State Fairgrounds

Oct. 9-10: St. Clairsville, Ohio

Sept. 11: Minneapolis: Canterbury Park Mile Sept. 18: Knoxville, Iowa: Knoxville Half-mile, Knoxville Raceway Oct. 9: Prescott, Ariz.: Yavapai Downs Short Track Oct. 10: Prescott, Ariz.: Yavapai Downs Mile AMA nAtIOnAL CHAMPIOnSHIP SeRIeS AMA RACInG/nAtC ObSeRved tRIALS nAtIOnAL CHAMPIOnSHIP SeRIeS May 1-2: tishomingo, Okla.: Robert Shaw, Texhoma Trials Club; (580) 504-6750; roshaw@cableone.net; TexhomaTrialsClub.com June 19-20: exeter, R.I.: Bob ONeil, Stepping Stone Ranch; Rhode Island Trials Club; (508) 285-6074; trialsriders@hotmail.com; RITrialsClub. com June 26-27: Cayuta, n.Y.: David Reed, (607) 796-9558; District 4 Trials, District4Trials.org July 24-25: Howard, Colo.: Stan Hensley, (719) 564-6476; Rocky Mountain Trials Assoc (RMTA), webmaster@rockymountaintrials.org; RMTA.org July 31-Aug. 1: norden, Calif.: Mike Codde, (530) 426-3635; Sacramento P.I.T.S., Inc.; dsrinfo@donnerskiranch. com; DonnerSkiRanch.com AMA RACInG nAtIOnAL HARe & HOund

NatioNalHareaNdHouNd.com April 25: Johnson valley OHvA, Lucerne, Calif.: Vikings MC, Alex Rodriguez; (760) 834-5006; alex@ arrowdevelopment.net; VikingsMC.com

Sept. 25-26: Lafayette, Tenn. Oct. 23-24: Crawfordsville, Ind. AMA dRAGbIKe CHAMPIOnSHIP SeRIeS amadraGBiKe.com May 15-16: Martin, Mich.: US 131 Motorsports Park June 12-13: Montgomery, Ala.: Montgomery Motorsports Park July 31 - Aug. 1: Indianapolis: O’Reilly Raceway Park Sept. 10-12: Atco, n.J.: Atco Raceway Oct. 9-10: norwalk, Ohio: Summit Motorsports Park nov. 12-14: valdosta, Ga.: South Georgia Motorsports Park AMA RACInG eASt HARe SCRAMbLeS amaraciNG.com April 18: Youth Only: berwick, Pa.: Duane Fisher, Evansville MX Park; (570) 759-2841; EvansvilleMXPark.com May 1-2: dorchester, n.J.: Dennis McKelvey, Tri-County Sportsmen; (609) 390-3772; TeamHammer.org July 17-18: valley view, Pa.; Tiffany Tobias, Rausch Creek Powersports; (570) 682-4600; RauschCreekRacing. com July 31-Aug. 1: Catawissa, Pa.: Mike Soudas, High Mountain Dirt Riders; (570) 954-7799; HMDR.org Aug. 7-8: Hill City, Minn.: Paul Otto, Range Riders MC; (763) 229-1177; RangeRidersMC.org Aug. 28-29: Cortland, n.Y.: Cindy Davis, Knobby Acres; (607) 756-5277; WYNOA.org Sept. 18-19: Lynnville, Ind.: Kenny Moore, IN, IL, KY Enduro Riders; (812) 549-8385; Blackcoal.org AMA RACInG WeSt HARe SCRAMbLeS amaraciNG.com

May 15: Jericho, utah: Sugarloafers, Rob Davies; (435) 743-4180; offrdsp@ hotmail.com; SugarloafersMC.com

April 17-18: Chappie-Shasta OHv Area, Calif.: Kurt Schneider, Redding Dirt Riders; (530) 245-0342; ReddingDirtRiders.com

Oct. 10: tbA: SoCal MC, Justin Shultz; (949) 981-6776; SoCalMC.com

June 19-20: elkton, Ore.: Toni Bamford, (541) 688-5428; ETRA.net

Oct. 24: Lucerne, Calif.: 100s MC, Ryan Sanders; (949) 584-9395; 100sMC.org

Aug. 21-22 - big Sky, Mont.: Jamey Kabisch, Lone Peak Racing Big Sky XC; (406) 223-0478; BigSkyXC.com

*The U.S. Bureau of Land Management does not allow ATV competition at these locations.

nov. 6-7: Rancho Cordova, Calif.: Ed Santin, Dirt Diggers North MC; (800) HANGTOWN; HangtownMX.com

AMA ReKLuSe nAtIOnAL enduRO CHAMPIOnSHIP SeRIeS PReSented bY MOOSe RACInG NatioNaleNduro.com

AMA vIntAGe nAtIOnAL dIRt tRACK CHAMPIOnSHIP SeRIeS amaraciNG.com

April 18: West Point, tenn.: Paul Traufler, NATRA; (256) 837-0084; NATRA.DirtRider.net May 16: Park Hills, Mo.: Michael Silger, Missouri Mudders; (636) 6396373; MOMudders.com June 20: upton, Wyo.: Paul Douglas, Inyan Kara Riders; (307) 468-2840; NationalEnduro.com July 25: Moorestown, Mich.: Jeff Hunt, Lansing Motorcycle Club; (231) 267-9534 Aug. 22: north berwick, Maine: Peter Anania, Seacoast Trail Riders; (603) 436-4331; SeacoastTrailRiders.org Oct. 2: Matthews, Ind.: Doug Spence, Muddobbers MC; jspence@me.com; Muddobbers.org GeICO enduROCROSS eNdurocroSS.com July 17: Las vegas, nev.: The Orleans Arena

April 17: Short track, Orangeburg, S.C.: Orangeburg Motoplex; Ed Salley, (803) 664-2942, Orangeburgmotoplex. com April 18: tt, Orangeburg, S.C.: Orangeburg Motoplex; Ed Salley, (803) 664-2942, Orangeburgmotoplex.com June 26: Short track, Harpursville, n.Y.: Square Deal Motorcycle Club; Don Miller, (607) 725-3069, Squaredealriders.com July 9: Half-Mile, Ashland, Ohio: AMA Racing; Ken Saillant, (614) 856-1900, AMARacing.Com July 24: Mile, du Quoin, Ill.: AMA Racing ; Ken Saillant, (614) 856-1900, AMARacing.com July 25: Half-Mile, du Quoin, Ill.: AMA Racing ; Ken Saillant, (614) 856-1900, AMARacing.com Sept. 11: Half-Mile, Waco, texas: Waco Eagles Motorcycle Club; (254) 875-9955

Sept. 12: Half-Mile, Waco, texas: Waco Eagles Motorcycle Club; (254) 875-9955 AMA PRO-AM MOtOCROSS SCHeduLe amaraciNG.com April 18: Pell City, Ala: RPM Sports; (205) 699-8857, MillCreekMotocross. com April 25: Whitney, texas: RPM Sports; (817) 270-1814, MillCreekMotocross. com May 1-2: Petersburg, va.: VMP MX; (804) 732-7888, VMPMX.com May 2: blountville, tenn.: Victory Sports; (423) 323-5497, VictorySportsRacing.com May 9: Walnut, Ill.: 4P Promotions Inc.; (815) 379-9534, SunsetRidgeMX.com May 9: Richford, n.Y.: BroomeTioga Sports Center; (607) 849-4438, Broome-Tioga.com May 16: London, Ky.: Victory Sports; (423) 323-5486, DanielBooneMX.net May 16: delmont, Pa.: Bellco; (304) 284-0080, RacerProductions.com May 21: Sacramento, Calif.: Dirt Diggers North MC; (800) 426-4869, info@hangtown.com, HangtownMX.com May 23: bloomingdale, Mich.: Dutch Sport Park; (269) 521-7800, dspmx@ msn.com, DutchSportParkMX.com May 30: Athelstane, Wis.: Pine Ridge Raceway; (715) 856-6612, PineRidgeRaceway.com May 31: brush. Colo.: Sweney Cycle Park; (970) 768-0518, SweneyCyclePark.com June 5-6: Hesperia, Calif.: Competitive Edge; (909) 456-1070, RideCEMX.com June 6: Wortham, texas: Freestone County Raceway; (713) 880-5533, FreestoneMX.com June 6: Richford, n.Y.: BroomeTioga Sports Center; (607) 849-4438, Broome-Tioga.com June 13: Mt. Morris, Pa.: Racer Productions; (304) 284-0800, RacerProductions.com June 20: Mt. Carroll, Ill.: MC Motopark; (815) 238-1614, reidabook@centurytel. net, MCMotoPark.com July 4: buchanan, Mich.: Red Bud Recreation; (269) 695-6405, RedBudMX.com July 11: Kingsbury, Ind.: Motoland, (219) 988-6686, Motoland.com July 11: blountville, tenn.: Victory Sports; (423) 323-5497, VictorySportsRacing.com July 25: Washougal, Wash.: Washougal MX Park; (360) 837-3975, WashougalMXpk.com Aug. 2-7: Hurricane Mills, tenn.: MX Sports; (304) 284-0084, MXSports.com Aug. 13-16, new berlin, n.Y.: Unadilla Valley Sports Center; (607) 965-8784, UnadillaMX.com Aug. 22: Armaugh, Pa.: Pleasure Valley Raceway; (814) 695-2453 Aug. 29: Millville, Minn.: Spring Creek MX Park; (507) 753-2779, SpringCreekMX.com Sept. 4-6: Millington, Mich.: Baja MX; (989) 871-3356, BajaMX.com Sept. 5: delmont, Pa.: Bellco; (304) 284-0080 Sept. 5: Athelstane, Wis. Pine Ridge Raceway; (715) 856-6612, PineRidgeRaceway.com Sept. 19: Prentiss, Miss.: Golden Pine Raceway; (601) 506-8669, GoldenPineRaceway.com Sept. 19: Richford, n.Y.: BroomeTioga Sports Center; (607) 849-4438, Broome-Tioga.com Sept. 26: Canton, texas: Kingdom Motorsports; (214) 939-4321, BuffaloCreekMX.com Oct. 2-3: englishtown, n.J.: Raceway Park; (732) 446-7800, RacewayPark. com Oct. 3: Gaylord, Mich: Baja MX; (989) 871-3356, BajaMX.com Oct. 10: Mason, Ill.: Crossroads MX; (618) 686-2769, CrossroadsMX.com Oct. 16-17: blountville, tenn.: Victory Sports; (423) 323-5497, VictorySportsRacing.com


Nov. 6-7: Pell City, Ala.: RPM Sports; (205) 699-8857, MillCreekMotocross. com Nov. 22-24: Gainesville, Fla.: Unlimited Sports MX; (813) 470-7498, UnlimitedSportsMX.com Nov. 25-27: Gainesville, Fla.: Unlimited Sports MX; (813) 470-7498, UnlimitedSportsMX.com DUAL-SPORT/ADVENTURE SERIES AMA BMW NATIONAL ADVENTURE RIDING SERIES

AMADirectLink.coM/roADriDe/ADV/

Apr 17-18: Bybee, Tenn.: JB SAKI Promotions, John Strange; jbsaki@ gmail.com May 1-2: Buck Meadows, Calif.: Family Off Road Adventures, Lawrence Borgens; FamilyOffroadAdventures. com May 22-23: Zaleski, Ohio: Buckeye Dualsporters, BillKaeppner; Kaeppnerswoods.com June 5-6: Lock Haven, Pa.: Durty Dabbers, Nils Mantzoros; Durtydabbers.com June 12-13: Wabeno, Wis.: Wisconsin Dual Sport Riders, Duane Baer; WIDualsportRiders.org June 12-13: McCloud, Calif.: McCloud Dual Sport Adventures, Mike Lingsch; McCloudDualsportAdventures.com June 17-21: Fairbanks, Alaska: Aerostich Tours, Roger Pattison; AerostichTours.com July 10-11: McCloud, Calif.: McCloud Dual Sport Adventures, Mike Lingsch; McCloudDualsportAdventures.com Aug. 7-8: Hancock, N.Y.: Bear Creek Sportsmen, Linda Rizzon; (973) 9536308, BearCreekSportsmen.com Aug. 21-22: McCloud, Calif.: McCloud Dual Sport Adventures, Mike Lingsch; McCloudDualsportAdventures.com Aug. 21-22: Columbus, Ind.: Stoney Lonesome MC, Nathan Gaskill; Stoneylonesomemc.com Aug. 23-27: North Cascades, Wash.: Sound Rider!, Tom Mehren; Soundrider.com/dsport Sept. 11-12: Cadiz, Ky.: KT Riders, Jesse Thomas; ginny42211@yahoo. com Sept. 11-12: Logan, Ohio: Nutcracker 200, Buckeye Dual Sporters, Bill Kaeppner; kaeppners@verizon.net, Kaeppnerswoods.com Sept. 18-19: McCloud, Calif.: McCloud Dual Sport Adventures, Mike Lingsch; McCloudDualsportAdventures.com Sept. 18-19: Morgantown, N.C.: JB Saki Promotions; (704) 483-6833, millerron@bellsouth.net Sept. 25-26: Wolverine, Mich.: Great Lakes Dual Sporters, Jeramey Valley; GLDSmc.org Sept. 25-26: Wabeno, Wis.: Wisconsin Dual Sport Riders, Duane Baer; WIDualsportriders.org Oct. 2-3: Refro Valley, Ky.: 4-Fun Trail Riders, Vicky Stephenson; 4FunTrailRiders.com Oct. 9-10: McCloud, Calif.: McCloud Dual Sport Adventures, Mike Lingsch; McCloudDualsportAdventures.com Oct. 23-24: Chatsworth, N.J.: Meteor MC, Mike Reign; MeteorMC.com Oct. 23-24: Prescott, Ariz.: Arizona Trail Riders, Frank Staley; ArizonaTrailRiders.org Nov. 6-7: Port Elizabeth, N.J.: TriCounty Sportsmen, E. Polhaumus; TeamHammer.org Nov. 26-27: Palmdale, Calif.: L.A.Barstow to Vegas: AMA D-37 Dual Sport, Paul Flanders; (626) 792-7384, District37AMA.org AMA KTM NATIONAL DUAL-SPORT TRAIL RIDING SERIES AMADirectLink.coM/roADriDe/DS/ May 1-2: Renfro Valley, Ky.: Renfro Valley Dual Sport Ride, 4Fun Trail Riders, Vicky Stephenson, (859) 363-8332; rvstephenson53@fuse.net, 4FunTrailRiders.com May 22-23: Zaleski, Ohio: Hanging Rock 200, Buckeye Dualsporters, Bill

Kaeppner, (740) 380-3050; kaeppners@ verizon.net; Kaeppnerswoods.com June 5-6: Bixby, Mo.: Show Me 200, Midwest Trail Riders Assoc., Robert Kaufman, (314) 434-5095; ridemtra@ hotmail.com; RideMTRA.com June 5-6: Custer, Mich.: Whiskey Creek Classic, Great Lakes Dual Sporters, Jeramey Valley, (989) 751-6863; ridemtra@hotmail.com; GLDSmc.org, RideMTRA.com June 5-6: Lock Haven, Penn.: Durty Dabbers Nat’l Dual Sport, Durty Dabbers, Nils Mantzoros, (570) 7489456; DurtyDabbers.com June 12-13: Wabeno, Wis.: Ride for Research, Wisconsin Dual Sport Riders, Duane Baer, (920) 3502030; bigwoods200@hotmail.com; WIDualsportRiders.org June 19-20: Bend, Ore.: China Hat Dual Sport National, Lobos MC, Billy Toman, (503) 656-5801; n7wxd@aol. com; Lobosmc.com July 24-31: Newberry, Mich.: 26th Annual Six Days of Michigan, Cycle Conservation Club of Mich., Lewis Schuler, (517) 781-4805; ccckids@ verizon.net, CycleConservationClub. org Aug. 7-8: Hancock, N.Y.: Bear Creek Sportsmen, Linda Rizzon; (973) 9536308, BearCreekSportsmen.com Aug. 21-22: Columbus, Ind.: Buffaloe 500 D/S Adventure Ride, Stoney Lonesome MC, Nathan Gaskill, (812) 343-9772; ngaskill3@yahoo.com; StoneyLonesomemc.com/DualSport/ index.html. Sept. 11-12: Cadiz, Ky.: LBL 200, KT Riders, Jesse Thomas, (270) 522-3703; ginny42211@yahoo.com Sept. 11-12: Logan, Ohio: Nutcracker 200, Buckeye Dual Sporters, Bill Kaeppner; (740) 380-3050, KaeppnersWoods.com Sept. 18-19: Sterling, Ill.: Cow Patty Cruise, Brushpoppers MC, Jack Sumption, (815) 622-4099; tgerken@wireless.essex1.com, BrushPoppersmc.com Sept. 25-26: Buck Meadows, Calif.: Yosemite Dual Sport Adventure, Family Off Road Adventures, Lawrence Borgens, (209) 649-3633; lawrence@ familyoffroadadventures.com, FamilyOffroadAdventures.com Sept. 25-26: Wolverine, Mich.: Ted’s Chandler Hill Challenge, Great Lakes Dual Sporters, Jeramey Valley, (989) 751-6863; info@gldsmc.org; GLDSmc. org Sept. 25-26: Wabeno, Wis.: Big Woods 200, Wisconsin Dual Sport Riders, Duane Baer, (920) 3502030; bigwoods200@hotmail.com; WIDualsportriders.org Oct. 2-3: Mt. Solon, Va.: Shenandoah 500 Dual Sport, Northern VA Trail Riders, Detter Merz; (703) 505-9123, NVTR.org Oct. 9-10: McArthur, Ohio: Baby Burr Nat’l Dual Sport, Wisc. Dual Sport Riders, Enduro Riders Assoc., Steve Barber, (614) 582-7821; EnduroRiders. com Oct. 23-24: Chatsworth, N.J.: Meteor Ride in the Pines, Meteor MC, Mike Reign, (856) 287-8170; MeteorMC.com Oct. 23-24: Study Butte, Texas: 13th Annual Terlingua Nat’l Dual Sport Ride, Trail Riders of Houston, Jack Jennings, (713) 248-7222; captjack530@aol.com; TRH-cycle.org Oct. 23-24: Prescott, Ariz.: Arizona Trail Riders, Frank Staley, (623) 8261092; ArizonaTrailriders.org Nov. 6-7: Port Elizabeth, N.J.: Hammer Run, Tri-County Sportsmen, E. Polhaumus, (856) 785-2754; mdreighn@msn.com; TeamHammer.org

798-7888, TourExpo.com Sept. 15-19: Ruidoso, N.M.: Golden Aspen Rally: Golden Aspen Motorcycle Assn; Patric Pearson, (800) 452-8045, Motorcyclerally.com NATIONAL GYPSY TOUR Jun 12-20: Laconia, NH: Laconia Motorcycle Week: Laconia Motorcycle Week Assn; Charlie St. Clair, (603) 3662000, LaconiaMCWeek.com SIGNATURE EVENTS April 18: Jacksonville, Fla.: Northeast Florida Ride For Kids: Registration 8-9:45 a.m., Florida State College; PBTUS.org/rideforkids April 18: San Bernardino, Calif: Southern CA Ride For Kids – Dual Sport Ride: Registration 8-9:45 a.m., Glen Helen Raceway Park; PBTUS.org/ rideforkids April 25: Humble, Texas: Ride For Kids: Registration 8-9:45 a.m., Humble Civic Center; PBTUS.org/rideforkids May 2: Raleigh, N.C.: Triangle Area Ride For Kids: Registration 8-9:45 a.m., White Oak Recreation Area; PBTUS.org/ rideforkids May 2: Torrance, Calif.: Los Angeles Ride For Kids: Registration 8-9:45 a.m., American Honda Motor Co.; PBTUS. org/rideforkids May 16: Franklin, Tenn.: Middle Tennessee Ride For Kids: Registration 8-9:45 a.m., Jim Warren Park; PBTUS. org/rideforkids May 23: Albuquerque, N.M.: Albuquerque Ride For Kids: Registration 8-9:45 a.m., Journal Pavilion; PBTUS. org/rideforkids May 23: Tulsa, Okla.: Oklahoma Ride For Kids: Registration 8-9:45 a.m., Tulsa Health Dept.; PBTUS.org/rideforkids June 6: Alpharetta, Ga.: Atlanta Ride For Kids: Registration 8-9:45 a.m., North Point Mall; PBTUS.org/rideforkids June 6: Mechanicsville, Va.: Richmond Ride For Kids: Registration 8-9:45 a.m., Richmond Times-Dispatch; PBTUS.org/ rideforkids June 6: Rocky River, Ohio: Cleveland Ride For Kids: Registration 8-9:45 a.m., Rocky River HS; PBTUS.org/rideforkids June 13: Golden, Colo.: Colorado Ride For Kids: Registration 8 a.m.-9:45 a.m., Jefferson Cty Human Services Bldg; PBTUS.org/rideforkids May 20-23: Ruidoso, N.M.: Aspencash: Patric Pearson, (800)4528045, Motorcyclerally.com July 28-31: Stevenson, Wash.: Sportbike Northwest: Sound Rider!; Tom Mehren, (206) 329-7808, SoundRider.com/rally/ AMA GRAND TOURS WITH KOA ALONG THE WAY April 1- Nov. 30: USA 4 Corners Tour: So. CA Motorcycling Assoc; David L. Johnson, (909) 271-0137, USA4Corners. org April 1- Nov. 30: Call of the Wild Grand Tour: Midnight Riders; Charles Kirkman, (765) 566-3807, Midnight-Riders-MC. com April 14- Sept. 15: Titanic Grand Tour: Great Lakes Motorcycle Club; Lee Bruns, motopsycho@wat.midco.net; GLMC.org/grand-tour.html DISTRICT RALLIES AND TOURS

Nov. 26-27: Palmdale, Calif.: L.A.Barstow to Vegas: AMA D-37 Dual Sport, Paul Flanders; (626) 792-7384, District37AMA.org

June 19: Kingston, Idaho: D-24 Tour – Gyro Daze Run: Hi-Rollers MC; Ed Harris, (509) 326-7154, Community. Spokane.net

AMA PREMIER TOURING SERIES AMADIRECTLINK.COM/ROADRIDE/ TOURING

Aug. 29: Dallas, Pa.: D-6 Tour – Endless Mountain District Tour: Back Mountain Enduro Riders; Marty Moon, (570) 675-1814, BMER.org

NATIONAL CONVENTIONS June 11-13: Lake George, N.Y.: Americade & TourExpo – AMA 2010 Grand National Rally: Bill Dutcher, (518)

Sept. 4-6: Groveland, Calif.: Hey Day Rally: Dist 36 Road Div.; Kay Neelyl, (209) 983-9106, AMA-D-36.com


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57


Guest Column Return Of The Coffee Bar Cowboys

For Many, The Café Racer Never Went Out Of Style—And Never Will By Mike Seate

58

AmericanMotorcyclist.com

sportbike. Instead, they can pick up a good-condition used machine and, with a few adjustments and couple of grand—or in some cases, a few hundred dollars—create a completely different ride. To American Ton-Up fans, the 1970s Japanese streetbike is not only cheap and reliable, but also makes a fine café racer. Lucky for us, there are plenty of cool, older, used motorcycles around for customizing. And every time I see one, I remember how exciting it was—and still is—to create a unique café racer of your own. Mike Seate is editor and publisher of Café Racer Magazine. Find it online at CafeRacerMag.com.

Photo Ken Frick Photography

About 16 years ago, I traveled to London where I fell in with a fast crowd. On Friday nights, hundreds of motorcyclists gathered for an informal meet along Chelsea Bridge, a span across the Thames River that had been attracting motorcycle riders since before World War II. The old school rockers—also known as Ton-Up Boys— were distinctive for their black leather riding gear and their antique cafe-racer-style motorcycles. They’d challenge riders on modern sportbikes to blasts around the area, and I was so impressed with the their Triumphs, BSAs and Nortons that I returned home to Pittsburgh with parts to build a Triton café racer of my own. In the following years, I displayed the Triton at various shows, where I enjoyed the puzzled stares and off-hand comments the shiny, silver machine garnered. These days, I seldom hear questions when displaying my café racers. Instead, I’m greeted with enthusiastic tales from people amassing parts to build their own classic and neo-classic café racers. Not only is this groundswell of interest in these stripped-down street racers burgeoning in cities from coast to coast, but much of the innovation is taking place among Generation X and Y riders—kids who were too young to even remember kickstarters. I’m impressed. And I’m not alone. The number of custom motorcycle builders who are embracing the retro-café racer craze is growing, with machines from the likes of Roland Sands, Jesse Rooke, Santiago Choppers, Roger Goldammer and others slowly replacing the choppers and bobbers that have captured the public’s imagination for the past two decades. A smallbut-growing cafe parts aftermarket is also showing signs of life, but the scene remains relatively underground. The somewhat obscure nature of the café racer cult, I believe, is part of its allure with the current generation, which is wary of being marketed to and sick of focusgroup, demographic-specific advertising. The café racer represents perhaps motorcycling’s last unexplored subculture. Unlike the chopper and cruiser scenes, there are no off-the-shelf kit bikes to purchase and no massproduced aftermarket catalogs to choose parts from. To build a genuine café racer requires getting your hands dirty and discovering success through trial and error—just like the Ton-Up Boys did in Mid-Century Great Britain. Another part of the appeal of turning a 30- or 40-yearold streetbike into something that looks and handles better than the factory ever intended has to do with the Great Recession, an unfortunate turn of events that has caused new motorcycle sales to falter. As a result, younger riders and motorcyclists interested in customizing machines can’t afford to spend tens of thousands of dollars on a big bore V-Twin or new


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American Motorcyclist 05 2010  

The Journal of the AMA

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