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FEBRUARY 2010

Actor. Motorcyclist. Perry King. P [ making a difference for motorcyclists everywhere. ]

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Navigation

Cover Photo by Jesse Leake Navigation Photo This stunning 75cc GP bike, owned by Guy Webster and designed by the famed Fabio Taglioni, took top honors at the AMA Motorcycle Hall of Fame Concours d’Elegance. Photo by Holly Carlyle

VIEWPOINTS

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Snapshots Your Images, Your World Letters You Write, We Read Ed Moreland Protecting Public Land Jack Penton Elevating The AMA Hall Of Fame Molly Carbon Putting Your Mind To It

February 2010 Volume 64, Number 2 Published by the American Motorcyclist Association 13515 Yarmouth Dr. Pickerington, OH 43147 (800) AMA-JOIN AmericanMotorcyclist.com

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THE LIFE

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Protecting The Ride A Look At Cable Road Barriers Living It Kawasaki Concours Improved Connections A Night Of Fame And Honor

Heritage The First Modern Factory MX Four-Stroke, The YZM400F

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Go Ride What To Do, Where To Go

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Land Grab Why Do Anti-Access Groups Want To Keep Dedicating Land As Wilderness? Simple: They Want You Out Of It.

Adrenaline Champions Celebrated

FEATURES

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King Of Cool Motorcyclist, Actor And AMA Board Member Perry King Finds Motorcycling Nirvana Outside His Door In Tiny Cool, Calif.

American Motorcyclist magazine (ISSN 0277-9358) is published monthly by the American Motorcyclist Association, 13515 Yarmouth Dr., Pickerington, OH 43147. Copyright by the American Motorcyclist Association/American Motorcyclist 2010. Printed in USA. Subscription rate: Magazine subscription fee of $10 covered in membership dues; $15 a year for non-members. Postmaster: Mail form 3579 to 13515 Yarmouth Dr., Pickerington, OH 43147. Periodical postage paid at Pickerington, Ohio, and at additional mailing offices.


1) Brion Cooke (left) and his brother, Fiachra, in New Mexico while on a 3,400-mile, two-week ride. 2) Pete Jasinski’s Valentino Rossi-replaca Yamaha R6 in front of the replica Leaning Tower of Pisa in Skokie, Ill. 3) Linda Kelly took this photo while riding pillion with her husband, Michael, as they rode with six friends through the Rocky Mountain National Park in Colorado, riding 3,500-miles in 10 days. 4) Erin Groff self portrait. 5) Chuck Hansen ridea Utah. 6) Rebecca McMurdy and her daughter, Bethany. 7) Chris Kruger near Covington, Ind. 8) Tony Lisanti photo at Lake George, N.Y., during Americade. 9) Dana Locatell in Colorado. 10) 2007 AMA Road Rider of the Year Carl Bergman at the Bonneville Salt Flats in August when he set a speed record on his Triumph Trophy 250. 11) John Little outside Telluride, Colo. 12) (L-R) Tim Nguyen, Vanus Warren and Darin Heredia near Coalinga, Calif. 13) Ryan Richardson, 10, at Washougal in Washington. 14) Marty Stevens (left) and friends in New Mexico. 15) Tam and Bill Rodier. 16) Tom Culbertson in California. 17) Photo submitted by Ron Daniel. 18) Skip and Sarah Otto.

Snapshots

Congratulations Alex! You’re the winner this month! Alex Jamison captured his dad, Rob (facing Mt. Rushmore), and Thad Wolff at the North American V-Strom gathering in Rapid City, S.D. held June 26 - 29.

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Got an image that represents what’s cool about motorcycling? Send your high-resolution photos, name and mailing address to submissions@ama-cycle.org. We’ll pick one standout photo next month and send the photographer a prize pack of AMA gear. Editors decisions are final. No purchase necessary.

There’s more where these came from! We get way more cool photos than we can publish here, and now you’ll find them all online, searchable and divided by category. Just visit AmericanMotorcyclist.com and click on the “Gallery” link on the left.

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February 2010

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Editorial officEs

aMa Board of dirEctors

American Motorcyclist 13515 Yarmouth Drive Pickerington, OH 43147 (614) 856-1900 submissions@ama-cycle.org

Contact any member of the AMA Board of Directors at www.AmericanMotorcyclist. com/whatis/trustees.asp stan simpson, Chairman Cibolo, Texas

Grant Parsons, Managing Editor James Holter, Associate Editor Bill Kresnak, Government Affairs Editor Mitch Boehm, Contributing Editor Mark Lapid, Creative Director Nora McDonald, Production Coordinator Jen Muecke, Designer

Jim Williams, Vice-Chairman Irvine, Calif. Jon-Erik Burleson, Assistant Treasurer Murrietta, Calif.

advErtisinG

Bill Werner, Assistant Secretary Brookfield, Wis.

Ray Monroe, Advertising Manager (815) 885-4445, rmonroe@ama-cycle.org

John Ulrich, Executive Committee Member Lake Elsinore, Calif.

Misty Walker, Advertising Assistant (614) 856-1900, ext. 1267, mwalker@ama-cycle.org

andy Goldfine, Duluth, Minn.

All trademarks used herein (unless otherwise noted) are owned by the AMA and may only be used with the express, written permission of the AMA. American Motorcyclist is the monthly publication of the American Motorcyclist Association, which represents motorcyclists nationwide. For information on AMA membership benefits, call (800) AMA-JOIN or visit AmericanMotorcyclist.com. Manuscripts, photos, drawings and other editorial contributions must be accompanied by return postage. No responsibility is assumed for loss or damage to unsolicited material. Copyright© American Motorcyclist Association, 2010.

charles Goman, Winder, Ga. Perry King, Northern California Michael lock, Cupertino, Calif. Maggie Mcnally, Albany, N.Y. arthur More, Surprise, Ariz.

(800) AMA-JOIN AmericanMotorcyclist.com

contributors and staff

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JEssE lEaKE, Photographer When we needed a photographer to take pics of movie star and motorcyclist Perry King—as well as a few cows—we turned to Jesse. He did a stellar job shooting it all. Check out his work beginning on page 36. JesseLeake.com.

Grant Parsons, Managing Editor For Grant, cold weather means one thing: more quality time with motorcycle racing videogames. While the latest MotoGP installment is good, you can never beat the classics like “Road Rash,” which, chunky graphics aside, still rocks.

Molly carBon, Guest columnist Molly doesn’t just sit around and dream big—she goes out and lives big, as you’ll see in her guest column this month.

MarK laPid, creative director One of the great things about being a creative type is that you can do amazing things entirely inside your head—like meticulously restoring a CB160 into a full-on vintage racebike. In his mind, Mark has just got the engine back in the frame, and should soon be ready to fire it up and bask in the glow of a job well-done.

Holly carlylE, Photographer You’ve seen Holly’s work in this magazine plenty, with cover shoots of Neil Peart and Carson Daly. This month, Holly worked long hours with the rest of the AMA crew at the AMA Motorcycle Hall of Fame Induction Ceremony and AMA Racing Championship Banquet, producing her usual stellar images. nora Mcdonald, Production coordinator Deep into wedding planning, Nora’s latest conundrum involves choosing wedding dresses based on how well they function while she’s riding a motorcycle. The rest of us are already planning on tying strings of cans on the back of the CB. Bill KrEsnaK, Government affairs Editor Deep in training for his next dual-sport ride, Krez has lately been perfecting the $5, 2,500-calorie-a-day diet. Amazingly, pretty much all those calories come from lunch.

JEn MUEcKE, designer Milwaukee winters being what they are, Jen has managed to get a few rides in, but knows she’ll soon be sitting on her bike in the house, making “zoom” noises in between bouts of motorcycle racing DVDs. JaMEs HoltEr, associate Editor James is remembering that changing a motorcycle tire is all technique. While swapping tires on his Yamaha 250F, he managed to pinch the tube an astounding four times. Yeah, it was a mess. other contributors include: Matt Polito, Adam Campbell, Erin Lassahn, Grogan Studios, Number 9 Photography, Shannon Price, Neale Bayly, Adam Campbell, Jeff Kardas, Open Image Studio, Tom Bear, Steve Cox.


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Member Letters LETTER OF THE MONTH DESERVING CHAMPION Randy Hawkins is a very deserving individual to be inducted into the Hall of Fame. Randy has had a successful riding career, he is a great ambassador to the off-road racing community, and he has a growing career as team manager. It is his qualities as an individual that make him a special person. I have ridden enduros all over the Midwest for years and have made many great friends. Two of the best are Randy and his mechanic, Dale. They always have time to give advice, sign an autograph, pose for a picture or just have a friendly conversation. The picture of Randy and our daughter was taken almost 20 years ago at the Alligator enduro. (She is now a senior in college.) It doesn’t matter what color of bike you ride, or where you are from, Randy and Dale always have time to acknowledge you. They are both down-to-earth individuals who represent off-road racing quite well. Congratulations on a very deserving award. Rodney, Lyn and Kalyn Brown AMA Life Member No. 216247 Port Crane, N.Y. Congratulations! You’re our letter of the month, and you win a free AMA T-shirt!

Send your letters (and a high-resolution photo) to submissions@ama-cycle.org; or mail to 13515 Yarmouth Drive, Pickerington, OH 43147.

LIFE SAVER I wanted to continue a thread that deserves more time: I agree with Dr. Noel A. Taylor’s January 2010 letter to the editor regarding David Hough’s books. I have made the time to read both of his books: the updated Proficient Motorcycling and More Proficient Motorcycling — Mastering the Ride. Both of these books are a must for your learning library. Dave’s years of experience and street smarts are packed into these two volumes and provide excellent insights and information for the interested rider. These books are worth the investment, and Dave clearly communicates the important points, provides some technical information, no-nonsense common sense and an overall professional attitude toward the motorcycling lifestyle. It is amazing how much of the information that I’ve read, from Dave, that comes back to mind when I am riding. Between the Steve Reichman Sr. MSF Courses (Basic RiderCourse, Experienced RiderCourse) and Dave’s writings, I know I have changed my whole attitude toward riding, and also increased the satisfaction every time I’m on two wheels. It was very fitting that he was inducted into the AMA Motorcycle Hall of Fame. His works will provide future generations a lifesaving, healthy perspective and mindset on motorcycling that begins in the heart and mind of every rider well before they turn the key and twist the throttle. I also appreciate all the work and support of the AMA. Congrats to Dave and my thanks for helping to make my every ride that much safer. Steve Reichman Sr. AMA No. 1078237 Perkasie, Pa.

Lyn and Kalyn Brown with Randy Hawkins

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LAST RIDE Dad was a lifelong rider, as passionate as anyone I have known regarding motorcycling. He had six children, and four of us are avid riders. He was responsible for forming the Garden Island Motorcycle Club, which lives to this day. He also started the Labor Day Hare & Hound, which continues to this day, and, I have been told, is now the longest continuously running hare and hound in the nation.

My father died after a life well spent. In the accompanying photo, he is getting his last ride. We Mr. Andrade’s started from Last Ride his home, and took him around the island that he loved until he died. Included on the ride was the road pictured in the December issue Snapshots. We were joined by many family members and friends who rode for a while then peeled off, only to be joined by others who had gotten wind of Dad’s last ride. It was a memorable day. W. Pierre Andrade AMA No. 399938 Steilacoom, Wash. POOR POSITION The alleged misconduct between BLM employees and anti-access groups (December issue), if true, is serious and one we should all be very concerned about. However, the comment from an AMA member printed on page 11, “We voted in a different group of miscreants for that purpose” is one that many AMA motorcyclists, including myself, find offensive and not directly related to the very serious issue of the alleged wrongdoing between BLM employees and anti-access groups. I think it is important for the AMA and its membership to remember they represent all motorcyclists regardless of their political affiliation or their positions on social issues unrelated to motorcycling. The motorcycling community represented by the AMA is a very diverse group who share a common bond and love of motorcycling. The AMA and its membership should embrace its diverse members by sticking to non-biased motorcycle advocacy. Eric Neff AMA No. 922548 Columbus, Ohio RAW DEAL Just thought I needed to let you know how I felt in regard to your article about Johnny Rock Page in the November issue. I personally do not know the man, and I do not care for the image he represents, but I defend his rights as well as all of ours. I saw the YouTube video with Al (Ludington), and


(Ludington) was obviously out of line. But, you know, I have been riding motorcycles since I was 15. I started roadracing 15 years ago, and one of the things that was strongly emphasized was that it is the overtaking rider’s responsibility to make a clean, safe pass. All riders are to hold their line so that the overtaking rider can make the safe pass. The last thing you want is someone standing it up in the corner while you’re trying to pass. I have worked as a race instructor, and we stressed this to help ensure safety for all. While I have raced with the likes of Rich Oliver, Jimmy Filice, John Ulrich, Ed Sorbo, and Bruce Lind, I am an amateur racer and generally a mid-pack guy. I love to ride. I have never liked the blue flag. If you’re faster than me, prove it. It’s safer than having someone try to get out of the way. Anyways, you’re all about safety and whether Johnny Rock Page got a raw deal or not. I don’t know. I wasn’t there. But I support all of our rights to be there, and I will never turn around or get out of the way. Daniel Qualtire AMA No. 463449 Clifton, Colo.

SOUND MANAGEMENT Thanks for your article on exhaust noise measurement. It’s nice to know there is some effort to establish objectivity in measuring what is in actuality a matter of rudeness and lack of consideration. Irritating noise from motorcycles has done, and continues to do, more damage to motorcycling in general than all other public irritants to motorists combined. Would that the problem could be resolved by education, but it would have taken parents teaching their children how rude it is to blast through quiet neighborhoods for the sheer joy of making noise. Still, the truly irritating noise comes not from the gentle conditions described in your article— steady idle, steady rpm, J. D. Howe gentle rpm

increase. It comes from flat-out acceleration and high-load conditions, as well as decelerating backfire. Why not just measure maximum-load noise? Hang the meter on a rack behind the bike and let the irresponsible motorcyclist (or his surrogate) hammer around a track and let the meter stick at the highest reading? J. D. Howe AMA No. 196254 Sedona, Ariz. The SAE J2825 sound test procedure is designed to be as simple as possible to do in the real world, with repeatable results. The engineers who devised the procedure used the lower rpm figures and lower decibel figures after ensuring that they would extrapolate out to higher rpm readings. A peak load test is impractical for law enforcement because it becomes more expensive and cumbersome to replicate in the real world compared to the J2825 procedure.

CORRECTION The story on page 16 of the December issue, “Next-Gen Crash Study Launches,” incorrectly attributed the statement in the last paragraph to a press release from the Motorcycle Industry Council (MIC). The statement in question was contained in a press release issued by the Motorcycle Safety Foundation (MSF), the 501(c)(6) trade association that is the sister organization of the MIC.

On Facebook? Us, too. Become a fan of the American Motorcyclist Association and you could be leaving comments like these: www.facebook.com/AmericanMotorcyclist Toby Self It’s all about riding—regardless of what you are riding on! — in response to a suggestion that real motorcyclists only ride a particular brand of motorcycle. Lori Struck DeSilva Just got back to N.J. What a wonderful program! Many thanks to all who made it an enjoyable night! Great seeing friends and meeting new ones! Congrats to all the new inductees! — on the 2009 AMA Motorcycle Hall of Fame Induction Ceremony. Sean Daugherty So stoked…got my Alligator enduro sign-up sheet today. Did my first one last year and won 250C. Tough race, but well worth it to be a part of Bike Week. — on his plans for March 2010. Gordon Poulson Oh, how I wish it were me! Congrats! — on the announcement that Doug Crossett of Katonah, N.Y., won the 2009 Harley-Davidson Rocker raffled by the AMA Motorcycle Hall of Fame Museum.

James Sofchek Keep up the great work at AMA. You are an organization I’m proud to belong to. Thanks for everything you do for all motorcyclists around the nation. Bob Burns Eddie James was the reason I joined the AMA. He was the reason I convinced friends of mine to join the AMA. And he was the reason that even when the AMA didn’t quite get things right I still supported the AMA. Rest in peace, Eddie. — on the passing of former AMA Road Riding Manager Eddie James, who died as the result of injuries suffered in a motorcycle accident in the Atlanta area. Follow AMA news—and chat with fellow AMA members—on Facebook. You can also always get the latest info at AmericanMotorcyclist.com. Eddie James

February 2010

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Viewpoint

Protecting Public Land For Future Generations, Not From Them

There’s a lot of debate surrounding designating vast acres of land as Wilderness, with a lot of rhetoric bantered about on both sides. But, really, who doesn’t support wilderness? Everyone does, right? So then why are people so passionate about the Wilderness issue? To better understand what is at stake, consider the following: 1.) The Wilderness Act of 1964, which empowers Congress to designate land as Wilderness, specifically states “there shall be no temporary road, no use of motor vehicles, motorized equipment or motorboats, no landing of aircraft, no other form of mechanical transport, and no structure or installation within any such area.” In short, land designated as capital “W” Wilderness brings with it a host of restrictions, and completely eliminates traditional uses like motorcycling, ATVing and bicycle riding. 2.) The Wilderness Act of 1964 made it clear that approved acreage must meet strict criteria to qualify for a Wilderness designation. Again, the law states that the land must be “an area where the earth and its community of life are untrammeled by man,” and that it “generally appears to have been affected primarily by the forces of nature, with the imprint of man’s work substantially unnoticeable.” The Wilderness Act led to a massive survey of all federally managed public lands to see which areas met those criteria. That led to official Wilderness designations across the country. Since 1964, Congress has designated about 107 million acres of public land as Wilderness. That’s an area bigger than the entire state of California. The bottom line: federal land has been surveyed for Wilderness designation, and a lot of land didn’t qualify, including areas with power lines, roads, dams or buildings. Missing in the debate is the concept that land can be protected without designating it as Wilderness. The two ideas are not mutually exclusive. Land can be designated as national forest, national refuge, national monument or national park, to name just a few. Land managers have a lot of experience working with user groups, including motorized interests, to protect the land while accommodating all users’ needs.

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For the record, the AMA will continue to support appropriate Wilderness designations as they are introduced, but will vigorously oppose recommendations that are overly broad, eliminate traditional uses or threaten the very existence of trail riding. The AMA believes that all Americans have a right to enjoy the beauty of our public lands. Furthermore, with this great opportunity comes great responsibility. That means packing in and packing out. It means keeping sound to a reasonable level and staying on marked trails. And it means sharing the land with other users. Managing public land with designations other than Wilderness has a stellar record of success. One that Gifford Pinchot would recognize serves all the people, and not just an elite few. Help us deliver this message. Ask your motorcycling friends who aren’t members to join the AMA. For information on writing your representatives, see AmericanMotorcyclist.com > Rights > Issues & Legislation. Ed Moreland is the American Motorcyclist Association’s vice president for government relations.

Photo Erin Lassahn Photography

“The earth and its resources belong of right to its people.” — Gifford Pinchot, the first chief of the U.S. Forest Service. By Ed Moreland


Viewpoint

Giving Our Heroes Their Due

As I write this, we’ve just returned from an incredible evening at the AMA Motorcycle Hall of Fame Induction Ceremony at the Hard Rock Hotel & Casino Las Vegas on Saturday, Dec. 5. In the audience of more than 550 were the families, friends and colleagues of the nine inductees, plus industry stalwarts and three dozen other AMA Hall of Famers. It was a stellar event, with inspiring videos and speeches from the inductees and their presenters. Our master of ceremonies, actor and AMA board member Perry King hosted the occasion as only a seasoned pro can. (See pages 26-27 and 30-31 for highlights.) Every year, the AMA Motorcycle Hall of Fame inductions honor men and women who have excelled in road riding, off-road riding and racing, as well as those known for their contributions in motorcycle design and engineering, safety, business and advocacy. Each member of the 2009 class has, in his or her own distinct way, made a significant contribution in one or more of these areas. In the same manner that the AMA shines the spotlight on its members, the AMA Motorcycle Hall of Fame is shining a bright beam on the achievements of our inductees. Bringing the induction ceremony to Las Vegas was the AMA’s way of sending a resounding message to the motorcycling world that we hold the accomplishments of our inductees in the brightest light. In turn, every AMA Hall of Famer is a beacon, illuminating the way for each of us as we pursue the passion of motorcycling. To that end, we have refocused the mission of the AMA Motorcycle Hall of Fame Museum so that we are shining our exhibit spotlight on these legendary people for all to appreciate. While there are any number of motorcycle museums in America—and some very fine ones at that— there can be only one AMA Hall of Fame. That’s because only the AMA represents every discipline in racing, reaches out to every street and trail rider, and advocates for the future of this great sport and way of life. If you’ve ever visited the Museum, you know that our AMA Hall of Fame wall—which honors our inductees—is downstairs. And honestly, it’s not been a featured part of the Museum. While the Museum has hosted some incredible exhibits over the years, none of them has paid proper tribute to these incredible achievers. That is about to change. Over the next year, we’re redesigning the permanent

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display for the Hall of Fame by relocating it upstairs in the main exhibit hall. In addition, each year we will have an area dedicated to our latest inductees. This will allow us to showcase our legends. Soon, visitors to the Museum—and our website (MotorcycleMuseum.org)—will learn more about their heroes and the people who have shaped the sport and the lifestyle we all enjoy so much. We’re in the design phase now, and we’re gearing up for a fundraising drive to ensure that the new Hall of Fame exhibit is first class. Don’t be surprised if you get a call from me, or one of our board members, asking for your support. Because, chances are, each of us has been touched or inspired by what the members of the AMA Motorcycle Hall of Fame have achieved. Jack Penton is chairman of the American Motorcycle Heritage Foundation, a 501(c)3 organization that raises money for the Hall of Fame. He is also a member of the AMA Motorcycle Hall of Fame.

Photo Grogan Studios

Elevating the AMA Motorcycle Hall of Fame By Jack Penton


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The Life Protecting the Ride 18 • Living It 22 • Connections 26 • Adrenaline 30 • Heritage 34 Ringing in a new tradition: Members of the AMA Motorcycle Hall of Fame class of 2009 are the first to receive all-new Hall of Fame rings, available only to those who have earned motorcycling’s most prestigious honor—induction into the AMA Motorcycle Hall of Fame. For more from this year’s induction ceremony, held at the Hard Rock Hotel & Casino in Las Vegas, see page 26. Photo: Holly Carlyle

February 2010

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The life | Protecting the Ride

Mark Bloschock is a transportation safety expert keeping tabs on cable barriers, including whether they pose a danger to motorcyclists.

the use of cable barriers removes the threat of a head-on collision with an oncoming car, so motorcycle safety may actually be improved. In a crossover crash, the motorcyclist is sure to lose. So, it appears that cable barriers improve all of our odds of survival. Another reason is that I think most motorcycle crashes into barriers happen when the motorcycle and the motorcyclist are both down and sliding. Compared to continuous concrete barriers and guardrails, cable barriers offer a much bigger space under which a motorcyclist can slide. This space gives the sliding motorcyclist a greatly improved chance to get through the barrier without contacting a vertical post. We’re all waiting for the single motorcycle crash that makes the headlines and, in some minds, negates the entire prior discussion. But with all the current miles of cable barriers we, fortunately, haven’t seen that headline yet.

Pioneer safety Expert and aMa Motorcycle Hall of famer Dies of Heart attack Three Questions With

MArk Bloschock

of VRX EnginEERing on CablE baRRiERs Cable barriers are showing up in highway medians across the country to keep vehicles from crossing over into oncoming traffic. The barriers have sparked a lot of debate in the motorcycling community, with some claiming they are extremely dangerous for motorcyclists. To get some answers, we turned to motorcyclist Mark Bloschock, senior vice president for special projects with VRX Engineering in Plano, Texas, who is an expert on cable barriers. American Motorcyclist (AM): What are cable barriers and what are they used for? Mark Bloschock (MB): Cable barriers are a fully crash-tested and federally accepted highway safety barrier system that is composed of multiple horizontal strands of twisted wire cable attached to small steel posts vertically to catch most of the errant vehicles travelling along the roadways and safely redirect them. AM: Why are they becoming popular in states across the nation? MB: They aren’t just becoming popular in the United States, but internationally. These barriers provide undeniable

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protection for motorists as evidenced by the decrease in highway fatalities attributed to crossover crashes. While rigid concrete and steel barriers offer very similar, and some say better, protection, those are sometimes a little like running into a brick wall. Cable barriers dynamically deflect six or more feet under impact and may offer a bit more protection from injury and death due to this flexibility. This is indicated by the number of times that crashes into cable barriers are noticed by damage to the system but there is no accident report. The errant vehicle was drivable, and the motorist wasn’t injured enough to wait for medical help. AM: Do these barriers pose a danger to motorcyclists? MB: Data points indicate that cable barriers are not a clear danger to motorcyclists at this time. How can this be? After all, some motorcyclists call them “cheese cutters.” This initial response is well understood, on a gut level. But the data don’t support it. It’s too early to tell for sure, but perhaps

AMA Motorcycle Hall of Famer Hugh H. “Harry” Hurt, who set the benchmark for motorcycle safety research in 1981 with the publication of his study into the causes of motorcycle crashes, died of a heart attack on Nov. 29 in California. He was 81. Professor Hurt was an award-winning author best known in the motorcycling community for conducting a landmark motorcycle safety research study in 1981 entitled “Volume I: Technical Report, Motorcycle Accident Cause Factors and Identification of Countermeasures, January, 1981 - Final Report.” Commonly referred to as the “Hurt Report,” the study was widely viewed to be the most comprehensive motorcycle safety study of the 20th century. “Harry Hurt was an icon in the motorcycling community, and there’s no doubt that his research prevented many motorcycle crashes and saved many lives,” said Rob Dingman, AMA president and CEO. “On a personal level, he was such a good friend to so many people. He will be missed greatly, and yet his legacy will live on and inspire all of us to achieve excellence.”

Photo Bloschock: Number 9 Photography

hugh h. ‘harry’ hurt — 1927-2009


The Life | Protecting the Ride

New Mexico Off-Road Funds Saved Governor Rejects Raid Of Money

Lawmakers in cash-strapped states are looking for ways to balance their state budgets, and diverting money away from off-highway vehicle (OHV) programs is an easy way for them to get some cash. Governors and lawmakers around the nation look at those funds for raids, and have taken millions of dollars over the past several years. So it was refreshing to learn that New Mexico Gov. Bill Richardson rejected a proposal to raid the state’s OHV trail safety fund as part of a plan to balance the state budget. On Nov. 9, Richardson used his lineitem veto power to ensure that $800,000 targeted for transfer to the state general fund remained in the trail safety fund. He noted the program “is funded by fees and designed to protect the safety of outdoorsmen and other New Mexicans who use off-highway vehicles.” The New Mexico Trail Safety Fund was set up primarily to build and maintain trails.

“This is a wonderful express their thanks for 11th-hour reprieve for a vital protecting OHV funds in program that was created New Mexico,” he said. by users and is funded by The AMA has kept users,” said AMA Western a close watch on state States Representative Nick efforts to raid designated Haris. “At a time when motorcycle funds. In state lawmakers around the August, Ohio Gov. Ted nation will soon begin their Strickland’s administration legislative sessions and backed away from a plan to will once again be looking raid that state’s Motorcycle for ways to balance their Safety and Education state budgets, they need to Program of $800,000 after remember that motorcyclists a public outcry related to Gov. Bill Richardson and ATV riders pay the same raids on special funds. taxes and fees as other “When lawmakers or citizens and, in addition, pay for their government bureaucrats talk about own programs as well. raiding our programs’ funds, it’s crucial “The New Mexico Off-Highway that all motorcyclists and ATVers Vehicle Alliance did a great job alerting let them know that this is simply concerned OHVers in New Mexico to unacceptable,” said Ed Moreland, AMA let the governor know that the fund vice president for government relations. shouldn’t be raided,” Haris said. “Gov. “Even when it appears that the money Richardson obviously listened, and is lost, we need to keep the pressure recognized the importance of the OHV on. New Mexico and Ohio are good program. examples of enthusiasts not giving up, “The AMA thanks the governor for his and ultimately winning these battles.” veto, and we encourage New Mexico To stay on top of what’s happening in riders to contact him through his website your state, go to AmericanMotorcyclist. (Governor.State.NM.us/index2.php) and com > Rights.

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The Life | Protecting the Ride

2009 Summary

The AMA Government Relations Department monitors approximately 1,400 pieces of state legislation related to both on- and off-highway riding in all 50 states each year and takes action when necessary. Those actions include informational mailings to AMA members, news releases, testimony and providing information to key legislative committees. Here’s a breakdown of the off-highway legislation followed during the 2009 legislation sessions around the country through Oct. 31. (On-highway legislation was featured in the January issue.)

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6

65

20 25

25

63 28

29 34 30

Land Use: Regulation of motorized recreation (65 bills) Other: Equipment requirements, helmet usage, emissions regulation, alcohol/impaired operation, sound regulation, rider education and utility vehicles (63) OHV Road Use: The use of vehicles designed for off-road use on public roads (34) Motorized Trail Program: Programs that create and maintain motorized trails (33) Snowmobile: Trends in snowmobile program funding and regulation often precede similar trends for other OHVs (30)

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OHV: Regulation of off-highway vehicles other than dirtbikes and ATVs (28) Registration: (25) Youth: Regulations involving the use of dirtbikes and ATVs by youngsters (25) ATV: Regulations specific to all-terrain vehicles (20) Tax: Taxes levied on dirtbikes and ATVs that don’t directly benefit a motorized trails program (8) Titling: (6)

Liability and Insurance: Includes legislation affecting liability exposure for private and public motorized recreation property owners and operators, racing facility liability, and individual liability insurance requirements (29)

Statewatch AmericanMotorcyclist.com/Rights

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The Life | Protecting the Ride

Act Now To Restore Kids’ Riding Rights

Photo Shannon Price Photography

Mail The Postcard In This Issue

The clock is ticking on the availability of kids’ motorcycles and ATVs in the United States. That’s because a delay in enforcing part of a federal law that effectively bans the sale of OHVs for kids 12 and under expires in May 2011. If the law, called the Consumer Product Safety Improvement Act (CPSIA), isn’t changed by then, the ban goes back into effect. All motorcyclists and ATV riders must take steps now to make sure the law is changed. The AMA is urging motorcyclists and ATV riders to contact their federal lawmakers. “AMA members and motorcyclists everywhere have shown that we can make a difference when we pull together and act as a group,” said Ed Moreland, AMA vice president for government relations. “Now is the time to let your representatives know how important it is to continue to allow responsible and safe family enjoyment in riding dirtbikes and ATVs.” The first step is to contact the leaders of the congressional committees in the U.S. House and Senate that oversee the Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) and encourage them to hold hearings on the unintended consequences of the CPSIA. To simplify that action, we’ve included a pre-written card to U.S. Sen. John D. Rockefeller IV (D-W.Va.), and U.S. Rep. Henry A. Waxman (D-Calif.), between pages 14-15 and pages 46-47 of this issue. All you need to do is sign the card, add a stamp and drop it in the mail to make your voice heard. Step two is to ask your U.S. senators and representative to support a change in the law to allow kids’ dirtbikes and ATVs to continue to be sold. The best way to contact your senators and representative is to call them. To get contact information, just go to AmericanMotorcyclist.com > Rights > Issues & Legislation, and enter your zip code in the “Find Your Officials” box. The CPSIA limits the amount of lead allowed in products meant for children 12 and younger. While aimed at toys originating in China, the law also covers youth-model off-highway motorcycles and ATVs because certain parts, including batteries and valve stems, may have lead. “Unfortunately, while Washington bureaucrats bicker over the meaning of words, the intent of Congress to protect kids from dangerous toys is being ignored,” said U.S. Rep. Denny Rehberg, (R-Mont.), who is a member of the House

Appropriations Committee and a major proponent of changing the law. “The federal government is now forcing children to ride adult-sized motorcycles, ATVs and snowmobiles—a serious danger that’s much more real than the invented threat of chewing on a battery cable or valve stem.” In May 2009, the CPSC said it wouldn’t enforce the ban on the sale of kids’ dirtbikes and ATVs until May 1, 2011. CPSC Commissioner Thomas Moore, an admitted opponent of allowing kids said at the time that he supported the delay in enforcement so that proper-sized vehicles would be available for children, rather than full-sized machines only, and to give the industry time to prove that certain vehicle components can’t be made with lead below a certain level without compromising safety. The law requires kids’ dirtbike and ATV makers and importers to certify that their machines comply with the law. This was to begin Feb. 10, but at presstime, the CPSC had delayed that until Feb. 10, 2011. We’ll have more details in this late-breaking development in American Motorcyclist next month.

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The Life | Living It

Bike Impression

From Good To GreaT

KawasaKi ConCours improvements As one of Kawasaki’s most enduring models, the Concours 1000 — with the exception of a major front-end upgrade in 1994 — went nearly two decades with only minor design changes. Now, it’s successor, the Concours 14, is getting serious attention only two years into its life cycle. Sounds like Kawasaki is aiming to get its sports-touring rocket ship fully dialed for a similarly long endurance run. Thankfully, the new high-tech bits for 2010 are on target, making an alreadygreat machine better. This makes sense since Kawi says ideas for the changes come not only from their own engineers, but also from some of the best experts on the Concours 14 around—owners. Though the previous 14 was certainly no slouch in the technology department, the ’10 model is packed to the brim with a host of new electronic rider aids, as well as some extra wind protection and heatdispersing changes to the body work.

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One of the most noticeable changes from the cockpit is the revised adjustable fairing. A full 2.75 inches taller and a tad wider, the fairing is electronically adjustable via a handlebar switch through a stepless range. The programming even defaults the height to the rider’s pre-set position at start-up. It makes for great comfort changes on the fly when you encounter differing temperatures. Speaking of comfort, one concern of Concours owners was the heat that reached the rider. Thanks to improved venting in the front fairing and a new seal between the engine and fairing, heat management is improved, especially at low speeds and stopped traffic. Also tweaked is Kawasaki’s keyless ignition key system, which includes the previous proximity-based key but also allows use of a new remote that allows the bike to be started only when it’s a few centimeters from its sensor. Now those

who want something that functions more like a regular key can be happy. Another big change comes in the form of the new-fo-2010 traction control system. A completely new system for Kawasaki, it is not only sophisticated, but it works really well, as journalists at the intro discovered on a skidpad with an outrigger-equipped bike. Even with the throttle pinned, all I could produce were a few wiggles. Without the system engaged, I was quickly on the outriggers. You can even turn the system on and off on the fly. Making things safer when it’s time to stop, the Concours features an updated, linked, always-on, two-setting anti-lock brake system for 2010. In high mode, the amount of front wheel braking is increased for sportier riding, while standard mode is suitable for most situations. There’s even a fuel-saving device. A switch on the handlebar toggles a leaner mapping circuit that works at less than 30 percent throttle or under 6,000 rpm. What hasn’t changed much is the part that worked very well the first time out— the lightly revised 1,352cc ZX-14 power plant, which is still monstrously powerful. And in the handling department, new Bridgestone BT021U tires and suspension tweaks make for better handling. The changes are all in the right direction, and they make a good package better. With them, the new Concours 14 has a great chance of remaining in Kawi’s line-up for years. — Neale Bayly


Wyatt Seals now wrenches for Husqvarna and the company’s Guest Factory Rider for a Day program that has given many riders, including returning military vetarans, the race of their lives.

4 Questions With

Wyatt Seals

Photos Kawasaki Concours: Adam Campbell; Seals: James Holter

Factory Wrench

Wyatt Seals has worked as a mechanic at all levels, including local races, the World Championships and for AMA National motocross and Supercross teams. These days, the former factory mechanic is running his own shop and spinning wrenches for Husqvarna’s Grand National Cross Country team. American Motorcyclist (AM): How did you get your break? Wyatt Seals (WS): In the mid-’80s, I was working for amateur racer Hank Morrie. Shaun Kalos and his grandfather, Lloyd Meeks, were at Hank’s house riding before the Atlanta Supercross. Lloyd mentioned he needed a mechanic for Shaun, and we worked something out. I worked for Shaun for Supercross and part of the outdoors. After that, I worked with Jeromy Buehl, an Ohio boy. In ’91 and ’92, Jeromy got his ride on the Peak Honda team. In ’93, Dan Betley told me he was not going to continue as Jeff Stanton’s mechanic. I stayed on (Honda’s) Dave Arnold the rest of the season and got the job. After Stanton retired, Mark Johnson asked if I would go back to Pro Circuit for Ryan Hughes. Then, in ’97 I was with Jeremy McGrath his year with Suzuki. That was a rough year for everyone involved. AM: How did that affect your career? WS: I got out of the sport for awhile, but it wasn’t six months and I was consulting for the Plano Honda team. I ended up going to work for them in ’98 and ’99. Then, I was talking to Ryan Hughes at the Dallas Supercross, and he asked if I would want to come to Europe and wrench for him. The TAMO Honda team folded after that season. I then went with Damon Bradshaw for Arenacross in 2001. After Damon got hurt, I moved to North Carolina, got married and started my own shop called Moto Works. In 2008, (Husqvarna rider) Glenn Kearney asked if I would wrench for him in the Grand National Cross Country Series. AM: That must be a big change from the Supercross scene. WS: It’s been great. I don’t have to fly. Everything’s a day’s drive. It feels like the good old days of motocross, working out of a box van. I really enjoy it. Also, the Husky team has been great to work for. One thing we’ve done this past year is the Guest Factory Rider for a Day program. This program was conceived by (Husqvarna Sales and Marketing Manager and AMA Motorcycle Hall of Famer) Scot

Harden to showcase the new Husky offroad line. Basically, select riders, including many returning military vets, were given factory rider treatment for a day. AM: In general, what goes into a solid race program? WS: Mitch Payton and his team are a good example. Everything trickles down. When you have a leader like Mitch, success trickles down to the mechanics, riders, everyone. Even when he hasn’t had the equipment, he has made it successful. One thing he’s always said is that when

you make it about the money, don’t count on it happening. We also need to remember that these riders we work with are 16 years old. They’re kids. Even 18, 19, 20. They’re still kids. They’ve been doing nothing but racing all their lives, and we expect them to act like adults and do a job like adults. A successful team needs to remember these are just kids and everyone else needs to set a good example. Mitch set a good example and always brought the best out in his people.

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The Life | Living It

Hall of Fame Raffle Bike Winner The Bike’s A Keeper

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One is a 1969 Honda CB750K0 Sandcast restored by worldclass restoration expert Vic World (WorldMotorcycles.com). The other is an original 1965 C100 Super Cub with only one mile on the odometer. Along with the Dream and the Benly, the Super Cub was among the first Hondas sold in the United States, beginning in 1959. The donation is $5 per entry, five entries for $20. The drawing will be held during AMA Vintage Motorcycle Days at the Mid-Ohio Sports Car Course in Lexington, Ohio, in July. The winner need not be present at the drawing to win. To buy tickets, visit MotorcycleMuseum. org, or call the AMA Motorcycle Hall of Fame at (614) 856-2222. Doug Crossett

Cool Stuff

Get Your T On

AMA Shirts Show Your Pride The deal: When it comes to motobased T-shirts, you can never have enough, which is why we’ve made a selection of AMA-themed shirts. What’s available: The Logo T, available in black or charcoal, is a classic, with the AMA logo on the chest. The AM 77 T-shirt and the AM 85 Ringer T are throwbacks to the American Motorcyclist logos of years gone by. A selection of AMA Vintage Motorcycle Days T-shirts offer that vintage feeling, and International Six Days Enduro shirts show your off-road colors. Get ’em: Your choice is $20 each, AmericanMotorcyclist.com.

Photo Bike Winner: Grant Parsons

When Doug Crossett of Katonah, N.Y., learned that he won the 2009 HarleyDavidson Rocker with an additional gas tank signed by H-D styling guru Willie G. Davidson raffled by the AMA Motorcycle Hall of Fame Museum, his wife, Nancy, was more excited than he was. “I was thrilled because he goes on all these charity rides and buys all these raffle tickets, and he finally won one,” she said when she and her husband arrived at the AMA Motorcycle Hall of Fame in Pickerington, Ohio, on Dec. 9 to pick up the Rocker, which was donated by the Harley-Davidson Motor Company. “But I wondered where we would put it, because there’s no room left in the garage,” she said. Crossett joked they would put it in the house. Crossett said when he learned that he had won the bike, he figured he would sell it to help pay for the education of his son, Mark, who is a junior at Endicott College in Beverly, Mass. After all, Crossett said, he already has a stable of Harleys—a 1972 Sprint, which was the first bike he ever bought, a 2001 Fat Boy, a 2007 Road Glide and a 2008 V-Rod. Then he gazed at his new Rocker and said: “I was going to sell it. But now that I see it, I’m going to keep it.” The Rocker was just one of several bikes raffled in 2009 to raise money for the AMA Motorcycle Hall of Fame. For 2010, enthusiasts have the opportunity to win two milestone Honda machines with just one raffle ticket.


The Life | Living It

Ask The Motorcycle Safety Foundation Drive Better To Ride Better

Cool Stuff

VMD On Your Wall

Vintage-Themed Poster Available In Limited Numbers What it is: A limited-run event poster for 2009 AMA Vintage Motorcycle Days, the country’s premier gathering of vintage motorcyclists. Conceived by illustrator Clinton Reno, the poster features a lighthearted, hand-drawn motorcyclist aboard a BSA, the event’s featured marque in ’09. What else: The 16-by-23.5-inch poster also commemorates the AMA’s 85th Anniversary, with a special message on the bike’s front fender, with the tower of Mid-Ohio Sports Car Course in the background. Bonus: Suitable for framing and equally at home in either your garage or living room, the poster sells for $10 plus shipping. A special, hand-screen-printed version, signed and numbered by the artist, is available for $25. Get it: AmericanMotorcyclist.com.

You Ask: “What can I do when I drive my car that will make me a better rider when I’m on my motorcycle?” The MSF Responds: We often hear from motorcyclists that they’re better car drivers because of the enhanced situational awareness and defensive riding skills they’ve developed while on two wheels. Your question is a unique variation on the subject. The physical skills of driving aren’t directly transferable to riding, but the mental skills definitely are. Anything you can do to make a habit out of those important skills will help you be safer on the road, regardless of vehicle type. These tactics apply if you’re driving on the same roads you’ll be riding on: check for surface conditions that could affect your vehicle, look for blind spot areas where car drivers could miss seeing you, and notice escape areas that could come in handy if someone cuts you off. Noticing these nuances could help you plan your defensive strategies for when you take this route on your motorcycle.

Use these tactics wherever you drive: maintain a 360-degree awareness of your surroundings by constantly scanning the road ahead, to the sides, and in your rear-view mirrors. Assume that any vehicle you spot that CAN enter your path of travel WILL enter your path—whether from an adjacent lane, a side street or driveway, or approaching you from the other side of an intersection—and be ready to brake, swerve or accelerate as required. Maintain a 2- or 3-second following distance to give yourself a chance to react if the car in front of you stops unexpectedly. Communicate your intentions to other motorists by using turn signals for all turns and lane changes. Turn your head to check the adjacent lane before making a lane change. Finally, pretend you’re invisible, and act as if all other traffic is operating without regard to your existence. Safe driving and riding both rely on an array of good practices that can only become habits through constant use.


A Night Of fAme ANd hONOr

AMA Motorcycle HAll of fAMe clAss of 2009 inducted in lAs VegAs gAlA eVent It was a night of heroes and legends at the 2009 AMA Motorcycle Hall of Fame Induction Ceremony in December, as nine of motorcycling’s brightest lights were honored by fellow riders for their contributions to the motorcycling lifestyle. Celebrating in high style at the Hard Rock Hotel & Casino Las Vegas, hundreds of riders from across the country converged to pay tribute not only to the class of 2009, but to all members of the AMA Motorcycle Hall of Fame. In all, more than three dozen members of the AMA Hall of Fame, including the nine members of the 2009 class, were among more than 550 enthusiasts in attendance. “Tonight begins a new era for the AMA Motorcycle Hall of Fame,” noted AMA President and CEO Rob Dingman. “From this point forward, we will shine the light of

achievement on each and every member of the AMA Hall of Fame like we’ve never done before.” Moving the Induction Ceremony to Las Vegas this year is part of that, Dingman noted, as is a new tradition of bestowing special AMA Motorcyle Hall of Fame rings to inductees. “These rings are a fitting symbol of their accomplishments, and a visual tribute that will be recognized by everyone in the motorcycling community— and beyond,” he said. Jack Penton, an AMA Motorcycle Hall of Famer who also serves as chairman of the American Motorcycle Heritage Foundation, which raises money for the Museum, noted that the new focus would extend to the Hall of Fame itself. “While the Museum has hosted some incredible exhibits over the years, none

of them has paid proper tribute to these incredible achievers—and that’s about to change,” Penton noted. “Over the next year, we’re redesigning the permanent display for the AMA Hall of Fame by moving it upstairs to the main exhibit hall in the Museum. In addition, each year we will have an exhibit area dedicated to our latest inductees, allowing us to truly spotlight our legends, which is only fitting as a tribute to their contributions to motorcycling.” The ceremony, hosted by motorcyclist and actor Perry King, honored the AMA Hall of Fame class of 2009: industry innovator Robert Bates, off-road champion Randy Hawkins, motorsports giants Bob and Geoff Fox, suspension pioneer Gilles Vaillancourt, off-highway rights activist Mona Ehnes, longtime motorcycle safety author David Hough, legendary race team manager Gary Mathers and successful dirt-track racer and tuner Chuck Palmgren. Each took the stage to offer his or her appreciation to those who helped them achieve their success.

2009 AMA Motorcycle Hall of Fame Inductees: (Back row, L-R) Chuck Palmgren, Bob Fox, Geoff Fox, Randy Hawkins, Gary Mathers. (Front row, L-R) David Hough, Mona Ehnes, Gilles Vaillancourt, Bob Bates Jr. (for the late Robert Bates Sr.)

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Photos Holly Carlyle

the Life | Connections


The Life | Connections

Jim Moore

Jim Moore

More online at AmericanMotorcyclist.com > Gallery

February 2010

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The Life | Connections

Hall of Famer

Jimmy Filice

DIRT TRACKER TURNED ROADRACER Jimmy Filice was one of the most versatile AMA professional racers from the 1980s to early 2000s. He was AMA Flat Track Rookie of the Year in 1981, and later turned to road racing to become one of the elite riders in the history of AMA 250 Grand Prix racing. The Californian won a total of 29 AMA nationals in both the AMA Grand National Championship and AMA 250 Grand Prix Series, and was a three-time AMA 250 Grand Prix Champion. His single biggest victory came in 1988 at the U.S. round of the 250cc Grand Prix World Championship at Mazda Raceway Laguna Seca in Monterey, Calif. Filice was also a factory AMA Superbike rider for Yamaha in the mid-1980s. Filice was born in San Jose, Calif., on Nov. 18, 1962. In grade school, Filice was picked on due to his small size, but he never backed down. As a result, he was often in trouble. His father told him if he would focus on his schoolwork and stay out of trouble, he could get a motorcycle. It was an offer a 9 year old couldn’t refuse. He got a Yamaha 60cc. Fast forward to 1981. That was Filice’s rookie expert season and he landed on the Roberts/Lawwill team, which brought together an all-star squad made up of

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owners Kenny Roberts and Mert Lawwill, with Dick Mann as suspension tuner and Bud Askland as roadracing mechanic. Filice had an excellent rookie campaign, earning the AMA Flat Track Rookie of the Year Award. He also found success in roadracing, winning the AMA 250 Grand Prix at Pocono in Pennsylvania, and finishing second to Eddie Lawson in the final standings. By the mid-1980s, Filice joined the AMA Superbike series and ended the 1985 season ranked sixth. Yamaha then signed him, along with a young John Kocinski, to lead its new factory AMA Superbike effort in 1986. Unfortunately, the team suffered numerous engine failures. The next year he scored three podium results at a time when the series was loaded with talented riders such as Wayne Rainey, Kevin Schwantz, Doug Polen, Doug Chandler and Bubba Shobert. In 1988, Filice filled in for an injured GP rider and raced a Honda NSR250 in the 250GP event at the United States Grand Prix at Laguna Seca. He won the race by a 12-second margin—and decided to concentrate solely on roadracing. The 1991 season was a roller-coaster ride for Filice after suffering serious injuries as a passenger in a car crash the year

before. He began the year racing in World Championship Grand Prix, but ultimately returned to America, won four races and earned the AMA 250 Grand Prix title—his first professional championship. In 1993, Rainey offered him a ride on his Otsuka Electronics Yamaha AMA 250 Grand Prix team and he dominated the AMA Series, winning nine of the 10 rounds on his way to his second championship. He then raced occasionally in Europe for four years. In 2000, Filice made a comeback to racing in America with a limited schedule. In 2001, Filice raced a full season in AMA 250 Grand Prix and won the title over Rich Oliver by 1 point. Filice tried to jump to AMA Supersport racing in 2002, but without a great deal of manufacturer support. While his results were not what he expected, Filice looked back fondly on his final season of pro racing, because both his retired father and his son traveled with him to the races as part of his race team. Jimmy Filice was inducted into the AMA Motorcycle Hall of Fame in 2000.


The Life | Connections

ON THE WEB The AMA Great Roads Database: Located in the Members Area of AmericanMotorcyclist.com, the Great Roads Database is a collection of roads recommended by AMA members in every part of the country. Searchable by state, they’re handy whenever you’re planning a trip. Long Range Weather Planning: Thinking of scheduling a trip next April and want to know what the weather will be like at the time? Look no further than the U.S. government’s climatological data at: http://cdiac.ornl.gov/epubs/ndp/ushcn/ushcn_map_interface.html. State Laws: One more thing to check before you take to the road on that trip: The motorcycle laws in the states where you plan to travel. The best resource is at (where else?) AmericanMotorcyclist.com > Riding > State Laws.

CRASH COURSE

ALL THE GEAR, ALL THE TIME

Throwback

A Look At Past Issues On...

Photo Egg: ©iStockphoto.com/gmnicholas

November, 1972—Military Motorcyclists On Patrol “Recon

Cycles” was the headline of the cover story from the November 1972 issue of American Motorcyclist, which detailed the test by the U.S. Army of soldiers mounted on 185cc Suzuki trailbikes. “The current evaluation of the new breed of motorcycle, the trail-bike, was the brainchild of the Army’s second-incommand, General Bruce Palmer,’’ the article states. “Palmer’s experience on cycles began just prior to World War II... For some reason, the uncomfortable time he spent aboard a bulky, 600-pound ‘Harley Hog’ didn’t sour him against the usefulness of the motorcycle, as it did so many other World War II cyclists. With a gentle shove from Palmer last winter, the request for the test sailed across the desks of five generals with the speed of a flat rock skimming across smooth water.” Want to search past issues of American Motorcyclist On Google Books? Visit Books.Google.com and search for “American Motorcyclist.”

I was out on a simple, two-mile trip to the library and the grocery store. As I approached an intersection in the right turn lane, a woman in an SUV in the left lane reacted poorly to the fact that a fire engine was approaching with its siren on in the far distance behind us. She decided to gas it, move over in the right lane in front of us, and then stop, blocking both lanes. Of course, I was there on the bike, and I kept moving over to keep some inches between us, until she moves over so far that the curb finally flipped me. My bike slid gently in the grass, but I was slammed onto the sidewalk hard. It was dark, and I didn’t see the ground coming at all, so I didn’t get a chance to catch my fall. I hit hard on the back of my head, my spine and my pelvis. Luckily, I was wearing a helmet, padded gloves, and a jacket with at least a little padding. The week before, I almost went to the gas station without a helmet because the weather was still nice. Good thing I haven’t done that in a couple decades. You never know how close to home something so stupid can happen. Curt Tricarico AMA No. 545340 Got a Crash Course? E-mail your story, and the lesson learned, to submissions@ ama-cycle.org.

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CHAMPIONS CELEBRATED

HANCOCK HONORED AS ATHLETE OF THE YEAR FOR UNPRECEDENTED EIGHTH SPEEDWAY TITLE A sell-out crowd of AMA Racing champions and their families, friends and fans gathered at the Hard Rock Hotel & Casino in Las Vegas on Dec. 4 to celebrate the successful seasons of the country’s most-talented motorcycle and all-terrain vehicle (ATV) racers at the AMA Racing Championship Banquet, presented by KTM North America. In addition to national championship trophies and No. 1 plates for 2009, a number of special awards also were presented to those who went above and beyond this season. The Athlete of the Year award went to speedway racer Greg Hancock, from Costa Mesa, Calif. Hancock, the 2009 AMA Racing/USA Speedway National Champion, claimed an unprecedented eighth national speedway championship this year, surpassing the career total of the legendary AMA Hall of Famer Mike Bast. Chris Borich was the ATV Athlete of the Year. Pennsylvania’s Borich had a remarkable season in the Can-Am Grand National Cross Country (GNCC) ATV series. Borich won 10 of 13 races to give Suzuki its first GNCC ATV title.

Both of the Athletes of the Year also took home special automatic chronograph watches, courtesy of Swiss watch maker Tissot. The personalized watches feature an automatic, self-winding function, a clear caseback and day-and-date-display. Eli Tomac, who won two titles at the Air Nautiques/AMA Amateur National Motocross Championships as well as the FIM World Junior Championship in Taupo, New Zealand, won the 2009 Sportsman of the Year award. The Sportsman of the Year recognizes an individual’s unselfish demonstration of outstanding sportsmanship. The Female Rider of the Year was Kacy Martinez, from Sunol, Calif. Martinez won three national championships. This season, she earned No. 1 plates in the AMA West Hare Scrambles Championship, the World Off-Road Championship Series (WORCS) and at WORCS Week. Paula Shank, from Petersburg, Va., was honored as the ATV Female Rider of the Year. Shank successfully defended her AMA Racing Extreme Dirt Track National Championship. The Youth Riders of the Year were

motorcycle racer Jake Lewis and ATV racer Mark Madl. Not only did Lewis win a national title in TT racing at the AMA Racing Dirt Track Grand Championships, the Kentucky rider also won the Expert 125 GP class at the AMA Racing Road Race Grand Championships. Florida’s Madl took the Youth Production (13-15) class championship in the ITP Tires/ Moose Racing AMA ATV Motocross Championship. Michigan’s John Grewe, who won two championships in the AMA Racing Arenacross Series, received the Vet/ Senior Rider of the Year Award. Ohio’s Dave Simmons brought home ATV Vet/ Senior Rider of the year honors for his performance in the Senior A (40-plus) class in the GNCC ATV series. Winners of other awards were the Square Deal Motorcycle Club for Club of the Year, Reads Racing for Motocross Organizer of the Year, the North American Trials Council for Off-Road Organizer of the Year, BUB Racing Inc. for Track Racing Organizer of the Year, and Miles Mountain MX for ATV Organizer of the Year. Dick Lague won the 2009 Media Award. The racing banquet was part of a larger celebration of motorcycling greats that included the 2009 AMA Motorcycle Hall of Fame Induction Ceremony the following evening. For details and photos from that event, see page 26.

AMA Racing Horizon Award Winners: (L-R) Mike Avila (Dirt Track), Miles Thornton (Road Race), Dean Wilson (Motocross)

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Photos Holly Carlyle; Watch: Grogan Studios

The Life | Adrenaline


The Life | Adrenaline More online at AmericanMotorcyclist.com > Gallery

Tissot honored the AMA Racing Athlete of the Year Greg Hancock and AMA Racing ATV Athlete of the Year Chris Borich with personalized automatic chronograph watches. February 2010

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National No. 1 plates and the honors of AMA Off-Road and Track Racing Vintage Grand Champions. Immediately after the vintage event, the AMA Racing Roadrace Grand Championships take over MidOhio from July 12-14. This even features some of the best amateur roadracers in the country. Riders on singles, inline fours, twins, triples, two-strokes and four-strokes will battle for AMA Racing National No. 1 plates. The best of the best will earn special awards, such as the AMA Racing Roadrace Horizon Award, which recognizes the amateur racer poised to make an impact in the pro ranks. For more event information, see AMAVintageMotorcycleDays.com and AMARacing.com. To buy tickets, see Mid-Ohio.com.

Calling All Racers, Riders, Fans Motorcyclists From All Eras Will Converge On North-Central Ohio July 9-14

Send In Your Racer Release Form Now

Make 2010 The Year You Spend Less Time In Line To spend less time in line on race day, take advantage of the AMA Annual Release and Waiver form. The AMA Annual Release and Waiver meets release, waiver and assumptionof-risk requirements for AMA-sanctioned events. When you have an annual release on file, the AMA does not require you to complete additional AMA waivers at registration. (Event organizers may have additional requirements.) The AMA Annual Release and Waiver is valid from Jan. 1 to Dec. 31. Upon receipt and validation of your notarized annual release, the AMA will mail you an Annual Release Verification Card (above) that you can present along with your AMA membership card at registration to certify that you have a valid release on file. To download the release, visit AmericanMotorcyclist.com > Racing > AMA/ATVA Annual Release.

Get RAMPed

Extra Protection When You Need It What is it? Rider Accident Medical Plan. Who’s it for? AMA/ATVA racers, support crew and officials at AMAsanctioned amateur events. What does it do? RAMP pays an amount up to the maximum benefit amount (after the deductible) for covered medical expenses that are above and beyond other insurance you may have. For example? Some of the care RAMP covers includes doctor-provided services, hospital room and board, prescriptions, necessary dental work, physical therapy, artificial limbs, braces, and the ambulance ride. Anything else? RAMP also includes accidental death and dismemberment (AD&D) benefits. Three plan levels are available. Why RAMP? This insurance is designed specifically for participants in AMA-sanctioned events, and you won’t be denied coverage simply because you were riding your motorcycle. For more information and to apply for RAMP, see Insurance4AMA.com.

Photos VMD: James Holter; Supercross: Jeff Kardas; AMA Dragbike: Matt Polito

Put in for the vacation days now. The AMA is bringing a nearly weeklong motorcycling extravaganza to northcentral Ohio’s Mid-Ohio Sports Car Course this July 9-14. It kicks off with the country’s biggest vintage motorcycling weekend: AMA Vintage Motorcycle Days. AMA Vintage Motorcycle Days, which features North America’s largest motorcycle swap meet, bike shows, a Marque of the Year honor, stunt shows, demo rides of current models, and motorcycling seminars, also the AMA Racing Vintage Grand Championships. Running July 9-11, the AMA Racing Vintage Grand Championships include racing in vintage and post-vintage classes in roadracing, motocross, hare scrambles, trials and dirt-track racing. Top riders will compete for AMA Racing


The Life | Adrenaline

Supercross Rolls Out AMA Members Receive Ticket Discount

The 2010 season of Monster Energy AMA Supercross, an FIM World Championship, fired off the line at Anaheim I early in January, and it’s headed your way soon. While the look of the riders at the front of the pack may have changed a bit this year, one thing that hasn’t is the AMA member ticket discount. Together with series promoter Feld Motor Sports, the AMA offers a ticket discount to AMA members—and it applies to AMA Arenacross, as well. Here are the details: • Buy tickets online at Supercrossonline.com (www. Arenacross.com for Arenacross tickets) and use password: AMA5OFF (listed as AMA membership discount) • Discount also available at the box office by showing your AMA card up to the day prior to the event. Not valid day of show. • Discount not valid on any ticket priced $15 or less. • Discount only valid for up to four tickets. • This offer cannot be combined with any other offers. In addition, at Supercross events, fans can go to the box office the day of the race and show their AMA card to receive one free pit pass. The free pit pass offer is only available the day of the event at the box office window selling pit passes from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.

History Made

AMA Dragbike Races To New Heights In 2009 It was a season of bold new accomplishments in AMA Dragbike in 2009, as championships were won and records were shattered. Larry “Spiderman” McBride took an unprecedented 10th Top Fuel title, far eclipsing the No. 2 man on the list, Tony Lang, who had five championships in the 1990s. McBride earned his first No. 1 plate in 1991 and won the title nine out of the last 10 years. In 2009, the undisputed King of Top Fuel won four events in six final round appearances. Rickey Gadson continued to turn back young upstarts with a title in the hotly contested SuperSport class. Counting single-event shootout championships, Gadson can now claim a total of 11 No. 1

plates in seven different classes. Sportsman competitor Mike Konopacki of Canada cemented his position as one of the great all-time sportsman racers in drag racing history, taking AMA Dragbike championships in three different classes—a feat that has never happened before. In 2010, he will hold the No. 1 plate in Top Gas, Super Comp and Pro ET. Only three riders have earned two championships in a single season with Konopacki doing it twice. With his 2009 titles, Konopacki has a total of 16 AMA Dragbike obelisks in his trophy room, more than any other rider. Another rider of note is Indiana’s Keith Lynn, who took his fourth Funnybike championship.—Matt Polito

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Heritage

And THen CAme THe Four-STroke In the mid-1990s, two-stroke dirtbikes ruled motocross and Supercross. With the exception of a few exotic and lowvolume alternatives from companies like Husaberg, four-strokes were for trails and fire roads. Tracks were ruled by the lightweight and explosive power of twostroke MX bikes. But then came AMA Motorcycle Hall of Famer Doug Henry on a shocking new works racebike from Yamaha: the YZM400F. A full-factory prototype, the YZM launched the modern four-stroke revolution and proved that valves and cams could not only compete with reed cages and pre-mix on a Supercross track, they could beat them. The bike that Henry raced was more than just a different motor, though. To encourage development of new raceproven technology, in 1997 the AMA

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started offering manufacturers a one-year exemption from a long-time rule that required teams to start with production motorcycles when building their race bikes. Yamaha took full advantage. The YZM400F featured a hand-built main frame; a carbon-fiber subframe, airbox and engine mounts; magnesium clutch and flywheel housings; a hand-built aluminum gas tank; and a titanium exhaust. In its first race, at the AMA Motocross opener in Gainesville, Fla., Henry rode the YZM to eighth overall, following that with a fourth and a sixth in the next two rounds. But the biggest race of this bike’s maiden run, and one of the most memorable of Henry’s career, came indoors, at the Las Vegas finale of the

1997 AMA Supercross Championship. Henry, who raced a YZ250 two-stroke in the early Supercross rounds before he was temporarily sidelined by a minor injury, fielded the now-familiar YZM400F and won, showing the world that a fourstroke could beat two-strokes on their own turf. Henry’s win, and what it demonstrated to the riding public, was arguably the most significant of the modern era. Within a few years, four-strokes from all manufacturers dominated professional motocross and Supercross competition, and it all started with Henry and the YZM. You can see this bike in person at the AMA Motorcycle Hall of Fame Museum in Pickerington, Ohio, where the YZM is on display in the Museum’s Hall of Legends, which pays tribute to the members of the AMA Motorcycle Hall of Fame.

Photos Open Image Studio

How Doug Henry CHangeD MotoCross Forever


Heritage features the machines and people of the AMA Motorcycle Hall of Fame Museum in Pickerington, Ohio. The Hall of Fame is a 501(c)3 non-proďŹ t corporation that receives support from the AMA and from motorcycling enthusiasts. For info and directions, visit MotorcycleMuseum.org, or call (614) 856-2222. February 2010

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of KING COOL

Few people are more passionate about motorcycling than actor Perry King, who finds riding nirvana right outside his door in tiny Cool, Calif. Now he’s working to give back. By Grant Parsons. Photographed by Jesse Leake.

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P

erry King has been riding motorcycles for more than 40 years, throughout a Hollywood career that has included roles as a motorcycle gang member in “The Lords of Flatbush,” to the president of the United States in “The Day After Tomorrow,” to Cody Allen on TV’s “Riptide.” And if you think he’s not a serious rider, well, you’ve never seen him fire up the Triumph desert sled that’s been sitting in his garage long enough for both tires to go nearly flat. “No problem,” he says, when asked if he can start the bike before beginning what for him is a well-known ritual on his 1965 Triumph TR6. “This is a great bike.” He rolls the Triumph out from a crowd of machines, most of them well-ridden dirtbikes or dual-sports. A sampling of more than two-dozen bikes he owns, they’re stored in the garage at his house in the rolling foothills of the Sierra Nevada Mountains about an hour King’s easy-going nature belies the fact that he’s spent hours tuning this Triumph to start just right. A longtime mechanic who is as comfortable working on a motorcycle as he is on his 1968 Ford Mustang GT— the same year, make and model as Steve McQueen’s car in “Bullitt”—King is clearly a motorhead’s motorhead. In a career where the people who do the hiring shun actors who ride motorcycles, King has ridden consistently since the early 1970s, still landing parts in more than 50 movies and TV shows along the way. He estimates he has about 28 motorcycles these days, both here and at a second residence in Los Angeles, “not really because I collect them, but because I can’t bear to get rid of any of them.” He’s so much a motorcyclist that in a neighborhood where the 100-plus acre ranch home sites typically feature gates with horse designs, his iron gate sports a dirtbike doing a wheelie. He may be a rancher with 100 head of cattle, but he and his ranchhands heard them with motorcycles, not horses. At the same time, he’s also a thoughtful rider who recognizes not only the relaxing quality of motorcycles, but also where motorcycles fit into an environmentally sustainable world. On top of all that, he’s a recent addition to the AMA Board of Directors, bringing a fresh view to your Association as it takes on the new challenges of the 21st century. In short, he’s exactly the kind of guy with whom you’d want to talk bikes, riding and the world. And that’s exactly what we did recently on a beautiful fall afternoon. If you were to pick a place to live based

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north of Sacramento, Calif. He opens the petcock. Tickles the carb. Kicks the bike through a few times with the ignition off to put a charge in the cylinders and free the clutch. He fiddles with the carb again. Only then, does he turn the ignition. “Now let’s see how this does,” he says. He throws his weight onto the kickstarter, gooses the throttle— and the machine roars to life. King smiles with satisfaction. “Nice, huh?” Anyone who’s ever tried to start a 50-year-old self-maintained motorcycle with one kick would have to agree.

solely on having great motorcycle roads nearby, you could do a lot worse than the area around Cool, Calif. Once you get off the interstate in Auburn and aim overland for King’s ranch, the roads get wonderful almost immediately. The asphalt twists through a narrow river valley before giving way to the rolling hills of Northern California, and the houses slowly thin out. Soon, you’re at the paved secondary road that leads to King’s ranch, and after about five miles, after the pavement turns to dirt, you’ve arrived. A steep concrete driveway leads toward the sky, and ends at a nice-but-notostentatious house with a front yard full of farm trucks and a garage full of motorcycles. The front door stands open. Inside, King is making coffee, and after offering a cup, he walks outside to sit on the front steps and enjoy the morning. The talk quickly turns to bikes and riding. “I’m one of those guys for whom there is almost nothing else in my life,” he says. “Even though I love acting and always enjoyed it, and I adore my two children, it’s very hard for me not to be thinking about motorcycling. I really consider myself lucky that I have something like this that I love so much.” King’s fascination with the sport started early, with a movie. “My oldest sister took me to see Marlon Brando in “The Wild One” when I was about 6 or 7 years old,’’ King says. “I don’t know what made a bigger impression on me, Brando himself on that bike—a Triumph—or the fact that my sister, who was 15 at the time, was just squirming in the seat because of what was on the screen. I thought at the time that it was incredible, the effect it was

having on her. I didn’t understand it.” Then there was a random encounter with a rider that really stuck with him. “We were coming back from Nantucket when I was a kid, and I remember seeing a guy on the freeway on a BSA,” King says. “It was in the late ‘50s, and he was in full leathers. There was a lot of luggage on the bike, and he had a sign on the back that said ‘California or bust.’ “I just remember seeing this guy, and thinking, I want all of that: the bike, the leathers, the luggage, the destination— everything!” King says. Only problem was, King’s father, a surgeon, forbade him from having a motorcycle. So it never crossed his mind that he could own one until he was married and in college. King and his wife had won a car, an Opel Kadett (“the worst car I’ve ever had”), and after selling it, his wife encouraged him to buy something he always wanted. “Easy answer,” King says. “I said I wanted a motorcycle, but I told her I couldn’t have one. She asked why not, and I said, “My father said I can’t.” The next thing she said just exploded my head. She said: ‘So what?’” So he ran out and bought “the first thing with two wheels and a motor I could find”—a Gilera 125. That machine didn’t hold his attention for long, and he soon moved on to a BMW R51 /3 with a sidecar. Not only did it have more power and more passenger room, but it was better in the New England snow. “For a while, that was our only transportation, and it was a very good winter vehicle,” King says. “Even when the cars couldn’t get around, I could always go


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places. And if I did get stuck, I‘d just get out and push.” A few years later, his motorcycling passion received a setback: a serious crash when a car turned left in front of him. He stayed off bikes for three years, but the attraction was too strong. “At the end of those three years, I thought that, for me, life without motorcycles was just not worth living, so I started riding again,” he says. “The key was that I came back with a different mindset—I’m going to be as smart as I can about it.” That attitude led to a view of riding that involves taking responsibility for what happens when you’re on the road. “The bottom line for me is that everything that happens is your fault,” he says. “I’m not talking legally, which could be a different answer. But in my mind, if you go through a green light, and someone hits you, it’s your fault because you should have anticipated it. Without that attitude, you can miss all kinds of things.’’ These days, King has all the cool motorcycling stuff he wanted as a kid and more: He lives in California, he’s done many long road trips—including a memorable honeymoon trip through the Canadian Rockies, and he has more motorcycles than

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anyone really needs, but he loves them all. His favorites include a Triumph like the one Brando rode in “The Wild One,” a well-ridden Cagiva Elefant, a twice-rebuilt 1968 Triumph Bonneville he’s owned since the 1970s and a Dan Gurney Alligator, the innovative feet-forward motorcycle built by the car-racing legend. “That thing is amazing,” he says. “The Alligator really is a performance rocket, and it handles better than any other roadbike I’ve owned. People look at it, and don’t get it, but ride it once, and you know.” That’s not to say he doesn’t lust after other bikes, as well. The once-rumored allnew Cagiva Elefant still holds his interest— and he remains wistful about the one that got away, a Brough Superior he had a chance to buy many years ago for $3,000. “That was back when $3,000 to me may as well have been $100,000,” he says. “But I wish I could have gotten that one.” By late morning, a handful of friends have shown up at King’s place for a ride and photo shoot on his land. Not surprisingly, dual-sport bikes play a big role in keeping tabs on his 500 acres and 100 cattle. “I still love my horses, many of which are rescued, but it’s so much easier and quicker

with dirtbikes,” King says. “By the time you get to the horses, saddle them up and make sure everything’s ready to go, you’re so much ahead of the game on motorcycles. And you can cover ground so much more quickly.” Everyone else mounts up on dual-sports, but King, for the sake of photos, jumps on his quirky Dnepr sidecar, a Russian-built two-wheel drive military model complete with an empty machine-gun mount on the car. He looks right at home. Soon, the procession has come down the hill from King’s home, hangs a couple of lefts and heads into the rolling grazing land. Almost immediately, the group comes up on part of his cattle herd that is a little too close to the gates, so they huddle for a few moments to make plans, then slowly split up on the dual-sports. In no time, they’re slowly herding the group of about 15 cows through a wash and over toward the back acreage. King’s right—dual-sports work just fine for this. The cows, which have clearly played this game before, aren’t bothered in the least by their motorized managers as they amble along. The bucolic setting, with the auburn hills of California providing a counterpoint to the crystal-blue sky, is a long way from


Hollywood. But that’s just the point for a man who has made a career on the screen. “I just love it out here,’’ King says. The acting bug, he admits, also hit him at a young age, when he played the stenographer in “The Caine Mutiny Courtmartial” in high school. “All during rehearsals, I wasn’t paying much attention to it, but when the performance came and the curtain went up, I thought, ‘Wow, this is it!’” He continued acting in college at Yale, and then for a brief stint at the Juilliard School, which he left after a few months because he had received a few acting parts. He had planned to return when the work ran out, but it never did. In general, he didn’t make a big deal out of his motorcycling to the movie-makers who hired him. “They hate it when you ride in Hollywood,” he says. “They get upset, and I can’t really blame them—if you do get hurt, there goes your movie. But throughout my career, I’ve never been asked to sign anything, and I figured if I could show up Monday morning, it was none of their business what I was doing over the weekend.” One time, though, his ability to ride a motorcycle helped. The film was 1974’s

“The Lords of Flatbush,” which was about a 1950s New York City motorcycle gang. “I was cast, and we were shooting, and after a few weeks they asked, ‘Hey, can you ride a motorcycle?’ I was like, ‘Yeah, I can ride a motorcycle!’ So I rode in the movie.” That movie, in particular, was a lot of fun, Perry notes. Working with Sylvester Stallone and Henry Winkler and Paul Mace, the four gang members bonded as motorcycle toughs. “It’s funny—that film was so low-budget that we were in wardrobe all the time, and when we went around the corner for lunch, we were the Lords. We even got into a few fights, like in the movie—especially Sly (Stallone), and we’d all jump in.” He also spills a bit of movie trivia: the bike his character rides in the film changes partway through. Seems the chopper he rode early in the film was stolen after someone left it out on the street in New York overnight, so they rounded up another bike for King. Problem was, it was a full-dress Harley-Davidson. “I thought, ‘You can’t do that—it’s a totally different bike!’ But they said, ‘No, this is a movie, no one will ever notice,’” King says. “So on one scene I’m on a chopper, and the next I’m on a dresser. I’m playing a

kid who didn’t even have enough money for one bike. How did he have two? But they’re right, no one ever noticed.” Being a motorcyclist also came in handy on that movie when his chopper backfired through the carb and caught fire on the set. “When that happens, if you just open the throttle and kick it, or spin the starter, it sucks the flames back in through the carb and puts the fire out,” he says. “I looked up to say, ‘Don’t worry about it. I got it,’ and everyone was gone. Everyone. No one even said, “Run for your life, Perry!” I just fired it up and killed the fire.” Still, for the most part, directors and producers don’t want their actors anywhere near a motorcycle—a fact King has exploited from time to time when he finds himself doing an audition as a courtesy for a part he doesn’t really want. “For those, I show up on a bike, and I make sure they know I’m on a bike—I walk in with my helmet,” he says. “And when I do that, I never get the job. It just kills the job right away.” Thankfully, though, King has gotten far more roles than he has not, and he’s worked steadily since his first part in “Slaughterhouse Five” in 1972, through more than 50 episodes as Cody Allen of

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TV’s “Riptide,” more than a dozen episodes of “Melrose Place,” and appearances on “Spin City,” plus scores of other parts in films and TV.

By early afternoon, it’s time for lunch, so King suggests a place in nearby Cool. Even better, he can get there “the back way,” using a motorcycle over his acreage, and stringing together a selection of dirt and secondary roads. You really do get the feeling that Perry picked his ranch not because of what it offers in general, but what it offers specifically for a motorcyclist. And that fits in just fine with the way King uses motorcycles. To him, his 28 bikes are tools, not style accessories. “I consider that I have more of a European mentality than the typical American motorcyclist,” he says. “I use my bikes for a number of purposes, but I also use them in very realistic ways. Some people ride motorcycles almost as a styling exercise, but I’ve never been that way. Back when I started riding in the late 1960s, it was not socially acceptable. It was not something you did to exhibit yourself to anybody. You rode because you wanted to ride.” Motorcycles, to King, are vehicles not just of transportation, but transcendence. “Riding a bike is like meditation,” King says. “It requires a simple, constant involvement to stay upright and focused. It’s not like a car, which would keep rolling until it came to a stop if you fell asleep. And because of that involvement, it’s a deeply peaceful experience.” Because of that, riding is great therapy. “When I want to think something out, I’ll go out for a ride,” he says. “When I get frustrated by my life, as we all do, my solution is to get on my bike and ride. Experiencing that peaceful, simple, repetitive process seems to sort everything out.” That’s a feeling, King notes, that is only increased by the quiet of modern electric motorcycles, which he got to sample on a recent ride with friends in Colorado aboard Zero motorcycles. The ride was actually a working vacation, as King and director Russ Rayburn filmed their exploits as a pilot for a potential TV show. In the process, King thinks the pair could have set a record for the highest elevation aboard an electric motorcycle, had they actually thought ahead to let anyone know they were riding over Imogene Pass’ 13,114 feet. “It wasn’t hard,” King says. “The bikes are electric, so they don’t need anything special to ride at that altitude—the Zero guys said you could even ride them on the bottom of a pool if you could find a way to do it. It’s just

that no one had done it before.” Though King came to electric bikes almost on a lark, he says he became deeply hooked by what many think will be the next big thing in motorcycling. “No one loves gasoline motors more than I do,” he says. “I’ve spent my whole life working with motors and making them work well. But electric bikes are really something. It’s like sailing. Going out on a motorboat is fun, but when you go out on a sailboat, there’s something peaceful and satisfying about it that a motor spoils.” The main difference? The silence of an electric motorcycle actually heightened the experience. “We could ride and talk, on the road! We could hear the waterfall when we passed it. It was amazing.” Even better, electric bike technology is still in its infancy. “Electric bikes are amazingly good already,” he says. “And if they’re this good now, they’ll really be amazing in the future. You usually don’t hear this from people who love four-stroke motors, but I can see that electrics can be better.”

Back at King’s home atop the hill, another beautiful California afternoon has played out, and the sun is setting behind the Coastal Ranges just visible on the western horizon. But King isn’t finished talking motorcycles quite yet. Like many riders who have been in the sport a long time, he’s seen a lot of changes. And he’s not exactly thrilled with some of them. Over his years in California, he’s seen offroad riding areas shrink and disappear, he’s seen attitudes toward motorcyclists change for the worst, and, frankly, he’s worried. “It should be obvious to all of us, and it certainly is to me, that we motorcyclists are digging ourselves into a really big hole,” he says. “And it’s because of motorcycle sound. We’re our own worst enemies. There are a lot of people who hate us because of the noise we make, and I don’t blame them. Not one bit.” The problem, he says, is that riders who replace quiet pipes with louder aftermarket versions are drawing the ire of others on the road. There’s simply no need for motorcycles to be that loud, he notes. “My concern about noise is purely practical,” he says. “If we want to protect our right to ride these wonderful machines, we have got to pay attention to how we can be offensive to people.” That danger seems even worse off-road, where motorcyclists see more and more riding areas disappear every year, he says. “Off-road, we’re losing ground,” he says. “It worries me a lot, and it saddens me tremendously. In my off-roading life, I’ve seen access reduced by two-thirds at

least—more really. A lot of it comes from misconceptions. Clearly, many people buy the easy assumption that anyone who goes off-road damages the world by doing it. But that’s not the case. On my land, we run cows with dirtbikes all the time, and you won’t see any damage there.” King figures the real misconception comes because the vast majority of antiaccess supporters never really get out into our national forests and other areas where motorcycles are allowed. They only see the edges of that land, near populated areas, where over-use tends to happen. “That’s where the irresponsible, troublemaking people jump off the road and dig holes and make illegal trails and roost something,” he says. “We know, though, that when you go into the forest, there’s no damage. Everybody who goes in there loves it deeply and would never hurt it.” Sadly, motorcyclists only have access to one half of 1 percent of public land—and that’s disappearing, too. Those are just two reasons—sound and off-road access—why King decided to work with the AMA as a member of the Board of Directors that guides the Association. “I got involved because I love motorcycling, and I thought maybe I could be of use,” he says. “There are real problems looming, but I also see a real future if we could get past these problems.” He’s also been able to play a more visible role, as well, appearing in public service announcements for AMA issues (available online at AmericanMotorcyclist.com), and as emcee of the AMA Motorcycle Hall of Fame’s 2009 Induction Ceremony, held recently in Las Vegas in conjunction with the AMA Racing Championship Banquet. “I was very proud of the AMA that weekend,” he says. “Both nights were home runs—it served the membership well, and it did something that everyone there was really excited about. And I know I was touched by it all as well.” He’s been particularly heartened, he says, by the AMA’s new direction. “What (AMA President and CEO) Rob Dingman has brought to the AMA is the realization that we’ve been doing a whole lot of things, but much of it poorly,” he says. “So what we’re doing now is what we can do well, and what is most important to do well—which all revolves around one central thing: Advocacy.” The idea, he says, is simple. “The AMA is refocusing on being the premier advocate for motorcycling, at precisely the time when motorcycling needs advocacy more than ever before,” he says. “The stakes are high. We’re fast approaching a time when we could lose a lot of what we love. And we just can’t let that happen.” •

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land Grab More than 40 years ago, Congress approved a survey of all public land and designated those areas that met the strict rigors of a specific new definition of “Wilderness.” So why do anti-access groups want to keep designating more? Simple: They want all motorized vehicles out.

You don’t have to let them win.

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here are people in America who don’t want off-highway riding on public land, and they’ll stop at virtually nothing to accomplish their goals. They’ll push legislation through Congress to shut down millions of acres of land, even though the elected representatives of the people affected most by the bill don’t like it. They’ll even rewrite completely unrelated legislation to bar off-highway riding from millions of acres of public land, and then rush the bill through Congress for final approval in a matter of days without public debate. If that doesn’t work, they’ll maneuver to get government bureaucrats to shut down areas to motorized recreation administratively—that is, with no one voting at all. These days, anti-access forces are on the offensive like never before. And we riders are under attack. When U.S. lawmakers gather in the halls of Congress early this year for another legislative session, among the issues they will be debating will be the future of offhighway riding in America.

“The AMA supports appropriate Wilderness designations. But the groups pushing for these Wilderness designations are trying to make this public land their own private playgrounds,” says Ed Moreland, AMA vice president for government relations. “They want to block off-highway vehicle (OHV) riders from using any public land. They believe they are the only Americans who have the right to enjoy the outdoors.” Those in the motorized recreation community who keep close tabs on antiaccess groups say those organizations are well organized, well funded and passionate in opposing OHVs. “If these groups had their way, they would wipe OHVs off the face of the earth,” says Royce Wood, AMA government affairs manager. “They trot out celebrities in their public efforts, and work behind closed doors in their private efforts, to try to ban motorized recreation from public land.” Brian Hawthorne, public lands policy director for the BlueRibbon Coalition (BRC), a national non-profit organization dedicated to preserving responsible

By Bill Kresnak

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Photos Jeep & Mountain Bikes: Tom Bear Photography; Motorcycles: Steve Cox

No matter how you enjoy federal lands—on four wheels or two, moto-powered or pedal-powered —anti-access groups want you out. Designating land as ‘Wilderness’ is their tool to make that happen.


recreational access to public land (www. ShareTrails.org), says the anti-access groups are well-oiled because they have millions of dollars flowing into their coffers. “They derive a majority of their funding from a common source—coordinated grants from charitable organizations— and this helps all of the various groups coordinate,” Hawthorne says. “For OHV users, there is no sugar daddy, no foundation, no government grants,” he says. “Although the manufacturers are doing a lot more, especially in recent years, the overwhelming majority of the funding available to counter the extremists comes directly from memberships and donations from individual OHVers.” Dan Kleen, president of the National Off-Highway Vehicle Conservation Council (NOHVCC) that develops and provides a wide variety of programs to foster responsible OHV recreation (www.nohvcc. org), says the anti-access groups use an unfair tactic that’s difficult to counter. “Unfortunately, one of their tactics is to throw out unproven accusations of damage and/or environmental concerns, leaving it up to us to prove them wrong,” Kleen says. “These tactics are a real threat to the future of our off-highway vehicle riding opportunities.” The Anti-Access Groups’ Major Weapon Anti-access forces are currently trying to bar off-highway riders from some 35 million acres of public land. How? By trying to get that land designated as

federal Wilderness, which would impose a variety of restrictions, including banning off-highway motorcycles, all-terrain vehicles (ATVs), mountain bikes and even landings by aircraft. Wilderness designations, because of their ban on roads, motorized vehicles and such, don’t just impact off-highway riders and mountain bikers. They also create problems related to clearing dead wood from forests to prevent fires, protecting towns from wild fires and managing water, among other things. Only Congress can designate land as Wilderness. Legislation calling for land to be designated as Wilderness is possible because of the National Wilderness Act of 1964. The law is intended to preserve land that “generally appears to have been affected primarily by the forces of nature, with the imprint of man’s work substantially unnoticeable.” That means no roads, power lines, buildings, bridges, or dams. After that law was passed, there was a nationwide survey of public land to determine what land qualified. The survey led to congressional approval of Wilderness areas around the nation. Since 1964, Congress has designated about 107 million acres of public land as Wilderness, barring motorized recreation. That’s an area bigger than California. Now, anti-access forces are making a renewed push to get even more areas designated as Wilderness—even if those areas aren’t the pristine, untouched land envisioned and strictly defined by the

“There is no threat to these lands. Much of the Wilderness debate has become simply an acre hunt.” —Brian Hawthorne, public lands policy director for the BlueRibbon Coalition

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1964 National Wilderness Act. While there are several bills alive in Congress to designate some 35 million acres of public land as Wilderness, there are more proposals in the wings, waiting for sponsorship. And lawmakers in 2009 pulled some political sleight-of-hand to shut down more than 2 million acres by declaring it Wilderness through a byzantine bait-and-switch of unrelated legislation. Moreland doesn’t want that to happen again. “What was most alarming about this particular land grab was that the Senate leaders who were in charge of steering this bill subverted what is supposed to be an open process to push legislation through Congress quickly and without the opportunity for full public input and congressional debate,” he says. “This is not the way to produce thoughtful legislation, and we need to let lawmakers know that these kinds of legislative manipulations are simply unacceptable.” Russ Ehnes, NOHVCC executive director, says it is no coincidence that there are “a wide variety of bills ranging from the wildly absurd bills like the Northern Rockies Ecosystem Protection Act to small locally driven bills” in the hopper. “The strategy is clear: the absurd bills... serve one purpose—they make the smaller, locally driven bills look ‘reasonable’ by comparison,” Ehnes says. “But make no mistake, the small bills can devastate our riding opportunities, and in


the current political climate they have a real chance of being passed.” 24 Million Acres: Going, Going... One of the most shocking anti-access efforts under way right now involves H.R. 980: The Northern Rockies Ecosystem Protection Act, which would designate as Wilderness some 24 million acres of public land in Idaho, Montana, Oregon, Washington and Wyoming. That’s an area the size of Connecticut, Delaware, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, New Jersey, Rhode Island and Vermont combined. What makes this effort so outrageous is that it doesn’t even come from a lawmaker in an affected state. It was introduced by U.S. Reps. Carol Maloney (D-N.Y.) and Raul Grijalva (D-Ariz.), who also happens to chair the Natural Resources Committee’s Subcommittee on National Parks, Forests, and Public Lands. “Rep. Maloney, who represents a part of New York City, should leave the management of public land in western states to those who represent the people who live in western states,” Moreland says. “This just goes to show how far anti-access forces will go to accomplish their goal of banning people from public land. They can’t get a lawmaker from one of the affected states to introduce the bad legislation, so they went to someone clear across the country.” The U.S. House Subcommittee on National Parks, Forests and Public Lands held a hearing on the legislation, and the AMA was among those submitting testimony against it. “Our public lands are for the enjoyment of all Americans—not just an elite few who would have you build a fence around them for those who are physically able to enjoy them,” Moreland said in the testimony. “Enthusiasts who enjoy the public lands of our nation are not just the nimble and fit, but also families with small children who wish to recreate together, as well as active senior citizens and the handicapped who enjoy the freedom to access the outdoors that OHVs and ATVs provide.” Among opponents is Wyoming Democratic Gov. Dave Freudenthal, who wrote to U.S. Rep. Cynthia Lummis (R-Wyo.): “I have no doubt that the sponsors of H.R. 980 are well-intentioned. But even the best of intentions, when illconceived and poorly informed, can have a devastating impact on those of us that must live and work in their wake. “Please communicate to your colleagues that this legislation should be soundly defeated in the event it is even granted further hearing,” he wrote. Lummis called the proposal a

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[ ACT NOW W]

ilderness is a nonpartisan issue. There are lawmakers on both sides of the aisle who are on both sides of the debate. Riders need to let their federal lawmakers of all political stripes— Democrat, Republican or Independent—know they enjoy motorized recreation and want a full public discussion, with citizen input, before any more land is designated as Wilderness. Representatives of national public land-access groups—the people on the front lines fighting for your right to ride, including AMA Vice President for Government Relations Ed Moreland, AMA Government Affairs Manager Royce Wood and the rest of your AMA government relations staff—all agree on measures you should take to help in the battle:

Contact your federal lawmakers by going to AmericanMotorcyclist.com > Rights > Issues & Legislation. There, you can find the names of the members of your congressional delegation, as well as their addresses and telephone numbers, and you can let them know how you feel. You can also send a letter from the website. Individuals are urged to sign up for the AMA Government Relations Department’s Action E-list to be notified by e-mail when their support is needed to make a difference. “recycled” mess that has failed to pass the House or the Senate over the years. Some of the sharpest criticism comes from U.S. Rep. Denny Rehberg (R-Mont.). The proposal, he says, “models its philosophy for 24 million acres of land after the approach taken in the 843 acres of Central Park. Look, but don’t touch. This approach may work in Manhattan, New York, but it doesn’t work in Manhattan, Montana.” He adds: “This is about Washington, D.C., thinking it knows how to manage the Northern Rockies better than the people who live there.” Two-Pronged Effort To Close 9.4 Million Acres Of Public Land U.S. Rep. Maloney isn’t the only New Yorker who wants to close off vast amounts of western land to off-highway riders. U.S. Rep. Maurice Hinchey (D-N.Y.) sponsored H.R. 1925—America’s Red Rock Wilderness Act of 2009—which would close 9.4 million acres in Utah. Hinchey is working overtime to close these riding areas. At the same time that he is pushing the bill in Congress, he is also attempting an end run, asking government bureaucrats to use their administrative power to close the land. The legislation, if approved, would close forever areas around Moab, the San Rafael Swell and Chimney Rock. These are popular riding areas for OHVers

and certainly don’t meet the definition of land that “generally appears to have been affected primarily by the forces of nature, with the imprint of man’s work substantially unnoticeable” as required by the National Wilderness Act. “It’s unfortunate that Rep. Hinchey would attempt to bypass congressional procedures to put into motion the intentions of a bill that lacks the support of even one representative from the state that bill would impact,” Moreland says. “This attempt is even more shocking given that much of the land in question doesn’t even meet the definition of Wilderness included in federal law.” U.S. Sen. Orrin Hatch (R-Utah), who has served the people of Utah for more than 30 years, calls the legislation a “monument to a failed approach to Wilderness designation.” Addressing the U.S. House Resources Subcommittee on National Parks, Forests and Public Lands, Hatch called the bill the work of special-interest groups who seem more intent on raising money than producing more Wilderness. He also noted none of the bill’s sponsors or cosponsors is from Utah, and added they have neglected to consult with Utahns, the very people who would be most impacted by legislation. “The authors of the legislation were careful to name it ‘America’s Red Rock Wilderness Act,’ not ‘Utah’s Red Rock

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Register to vote, and vote accordingly. all stakeholders’ views were considered. He says that bipartisan Wilderness bills involving Oregon, Idaho and Colorado have become law through a consensusdriven process. “Wilderness needs to be home-grown,” he says. “It cannot be the work of only one group of stakeholders, no matter how extensive or sincere.” With powerful opposition from the entire Utah congressional delegation and its governor, and the fact that this proposal has never come up for a vote in the past 20 years that it has been pushed in Congress, Hinchey and 88 other U.S. representatives sent a letter to U.S. Interior Secretary Ken Salazar asking him to administratively “step in and temporarily protect these lands.” Effectively they want to prohibit access without congressional approval to do so.

THE HIT LIST

Here are major Wilderness bills being considered in Congress that would bar motorcyclists from some 35 million acres of public land. H.R. designates the House version, and S. designates the Senate version. The AMA’s position on the bill is noted.

Another Battle Is Brewing People who want to shut riders out of public land are already working on new battlegrounds. The Hidden Gems Wilderness Campaign, a project of the White River Wilderness Coalition, is pushing to designate more than 400,000 acres in Colorado’s White River and Gunnison National Forests, as well as some nearby federal Bureau of Land Management land, as Wilderness, which would block any offhighway riding or even mountain biking. The coalition has a massive public

H.R. 192: Central Idaho National Forest and Public Land Management Act would designate more than 300,000 acres as Wilderness in the Sawtooth and Challis National Forests and in the Challis area. Conveys 1,000 acres near Boise, Idaho, from the federal Bureau of Land Management (BLM) to the state for a motorized park. The AMA opposes this because it will designate the prime areas for riding as Wilderness and the OHV community is left with a yet-to-be-designated area as a trade off. H.R. 170, S. 183: Domiguez-Escalante National Conservation Area and Dominguez Canyon Wilderness Area Act would designate 66,280 acres in Mesa, Montrose, and Delta Counties in Colorado as Wilderness, to be known as the Dominguez Canyon

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Wilder Wilderness Act,’ even though the bill’s only purpose is to designate mor more than onesixth of my state as formal Wilderness,” Hatch said. “According to the authors of this legislation, Utahns have no special claim to those 9 million acres within our state’s boundaries. After all... ‘those are federal lands, and they belong to all Americans,’ they argue. “Well, there may be some truth to that point of view, but it’s an intentionally simplistic view, and any member of Congress with federal lands within his or her district will quickly recognize that,” Hatch said. “And I would be surprised if there were many members of Congress who would not take at least some offense at a proposal to set aside a sixth of their state or district without their consultation or input,” he said. Adding his voice to the bi-partisan opposition to the proposal is U.S. Rep. Jim Matheson (D-Utah), who says: “In Utah, there is probably no more contentious public lands issue than the establishment of Wilderness areas. Much of Utah is land that has wild character. But discussions about Wilderness in Utah have usually taken on a polarized dynamic that has led to a great amount of emotional rhetoric and very little progress.” Matheson notes that recent Wilderness designations in Utah have resulted from a collaborative, inclusive process where

AmericanMotorcyclist.com

relations campaign currently under way in Colorado to try to gather support. Even a local U.S. Forest Service supervisor says the Hidden Gems proposal is a bad idea. The Forest Service studied the area before and determined in 2002 that only 82,000 acres could even qualify as Wilderness, and certainly not the more than 400,000 acres that’s proposed. White River National Forest Supervisor Scott Fitzwilliams told the Glenwood Springs (Colo.) Post Independent that Wilderness designations should be used only for areas that truly qualify for the designation, otherwise the special quality of Wilderness is lost. Fitzwilliams is referring here to the very strict definition contained in the Wilderness Act of 1964 that requires the land to be pristine. The law states that the land must be “an area where the earth and its community of life are untrammeled by man.” “We could make (all forest lands) Wilderness and the issues are still right here, the ones that are really going to monumentally change the characteristics and natural resources of the valley—like (bark beetles) and the huge fuel build up, development of private land and conservation of open spaces,” Fitzwilliams told the newspaper. Those pushing the Hidden Gems proposal are shopping the idea but haven’t secured a congressional sponsor, yet. Moreland suggests other, more

Wilderness Area, and about 210,000 acres as the DominguezEscalante National Conservation Area to be managed as part of the National Landscape Conservation Area. The AMA opposes this because it restricts OHV use to only a few designated roads and trails in the Conservation Area. H.R. 765: The Nellis Dunes National Off-Highway Vehicle Recreation Area Act would convey 1,150 acres of federal BLM land to Clark County, Nev., for use as the Nellis Dunes National OffHighway Vehicle Recreation Area. The AMA supports this. H.R. 980: The Northern Rockies Ecosystem Protection Act would designate more than 24 million acres of public land in Idaho,


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Join a local, state and national OHV group, such as the AMA. “More members means more political clout,” says Ed Moreland, AMA vice president for government relations. “If every AMA member got just one additional rider to join, that would go a long way in the fight against anti-access groups.”

appropriate ways to manage the land than by applying restrictive Wilderness designations. “There are plenty of land-use designations that could be used that would allow land managers to conserve the land while, at the same time, accommodate users,” he says. “Just closing off the land is poor management, and a disservice to the public.” Hawthorne agrees, and says that is the case with most, if not all, of the Wilderness proposals now in Congress. “There is no threat to these lands,” Hawthorne says. “Much of the Wilderness debate has become simply an acre hunt.” A lot of the land “is very remote and not experiencing much in the way of recreational pressure.”

“I have no doubt that the sponsors of H.R. 980 are well-intentioned. But even the best of intentions, when ill-conceived and poorly informed, can have a devastating impact on those of us that must live and work in their wake.”—Wyoming Gov. Dave Freudenthal (D), in response to a Wilderness bill

Plus, new U.S. Forest Service plans are very restrictive, reducing all human access in certain areas anyway, he says. Subverting The People In Congress, anything can happen. Antiaccess forces can get their way quickly. In March, Congress fast-tracked a law to shut OHVs out of 2.1 million acres of public land in six days. No public input was allowed on the issue. The AMA and others worked hard to defeat the bill in the House by a single (based on twothirds majority of those present) vote of 282 to 144. What happened next was disappointing, to say the least. Using political sleight of hand, U.S. Sen. Harry Reid (D-Nev.) took a bill entitled The Revolutionary War and War of 1812

Montana, Oregon, Washington and Wyoming as Wilderness or Wilderness Preservation System land. Affected areas include Glacier/ Northern Continental Divide, Yellowstone, Salmon/Selway, Cabinet/ Yaak/Selkirk, Hells Canyon, Islands in the Sky and Blackfeet. The AMA opposes this because it will make 24 million acres of public land off-limits to OHV riders without officials being required to demonstrate that all that land meets the legal definition of Wilderness. H.R. 1925, S. 799: America’s Red Rock Wilderness Act of 2009 would designate 9.4 million acres of public in Utah as Wilderness. Areas affected include the Great Basin, Zion and Mojave Desert, Grand Staircase-Escalante, Moab-La Sal Canyons, Henry Mountains, Glen Canyon, San Juan-Anasazi, Canyonlands Basin, San Rafael Swell and Book Cliffs and Uinta Basin. The AMA opposes this sweeping because it closes popular OHV riding areas, including spots in Moab, the San Rafael Swell and Chimney Rock, among others.

Battlefield Protection Act and then added the language from the already-Houserejected Omnibus Public Lands Act—a 1,300-page bill that was the combination of 170 land measures. Suddenly, The Revolutionary War and War of 1812 Battlefield Protection Act would designate as Wilderness more than 2.1 million acres in nine states, shutting out off-highway riders. Reid added a 1,300-page amendment to a two-page bill that had nothing to do with it. When the Omnibus Public Lands Act was rejected by the House earlier, U.S. Rep. Rob Bishop (R-Utah), a leading opponent, called it a poor product of a poor process. “It would have cut off reasonable access for a whole host of activities on our

Become active in your community’s governance. “Local citizens need to understand that those who recreate on public land are environmentalists too,” Moreland says. “We are stewards of the land. We recreate there because we love it. It’s important not to cede the argument that only anti-access forces can be environmentalists. Help your community understand that thoughtful and active management of public lands will allow and, indeed, encourage, responsible multiple use.”

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Fighting For Our Recreational Lives The bottom line, Moreland says, is that there are ways to properly plan for existing and future uses of public public land without designating it as Wilderness and locking out most Americans. “We can’t afford to let the anti-access groups win this battle,” says Moreland. “We need to ensure that riders’ voices are heard. Every one of us has to contact our U.S. lawmakers and let them know the importance of responsible motorized recreation for us and for our children, for now and for the future.” Responsible recreational groups are working with land managers nationwide to provide for the multiple use of public land without user conflicts, he says. Simply applying a Wilderness designation, instead of actively managing federal land wisely and thoughtfully, short-circuits that process. The AMA’s Wood notes: “In many cases, we are seeing Wilderness designations being proposed for areas that have no business getting the designation. This is a reflection of a lack of imagination, leadership and willingness to allow for proper multi-use management.” Moreland agrees. “Land must be actively managed,” he says. “Active management is so much more than hanging a sign on a fence that reads: ‘Closed.’ Let those users living in a state decide what’s best for their land. Let responsible recreational groups work cooperatively.” •

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WHERE THE AMA STANDS The Wilderness Act of 1964 states that to earn a Wilderness designation the land must be “an area where the earth and its community of life are untrammeled by man,” and that “generally appears to have been affected primarily by the forces of nature, with the imprint of man’s work substantially unnoticeable.” That means no roads, no dams, no power lines, no houses, no bridges—nothing that shows human involvement with the land. The AMA wholeheartedly supports that definition of Wilderness. “Pristine land should be protected for current and future generations,” says Ed Moreland, AMA vice president for government relations. “Public land that meets the strict criteria of the Wilderness Act deserves to be protected. But we have to be careful to protect the land for future generations and not from future generations. The way to do that is to use the designation process prudently,” he says. “Public land that can’t meet the strict requirements of the Wilderness Act should be governed by another equally forceful federal law—the Multiple Use-Sustained Yield Act of 1960 that serves as a road map for federal public land managers,” he says. “That law encourages a wide variety of activities, provided that

they take place in harmony with natural resource values,” he adds. The AMA supports responsible recreational access to public land that doesn’t deserve to be designated as Wilderness. The AMA believes this access should be administered by professional land managers to meet the needs of participants, protect the land and promote responsible use. While the AMA recognizes that no single recreation type is appropriate for every setting, there are certainly many places where OHV use can—and does—exist in harmony with other uses while preserving important natural and cultural resources, Moreland says. The AMA supports actions by land managers and local jurisdictions to protect access to historic and established routes of travel into and across public lands. “An important point for everyone to remember is that off-highway riders are environmentalists as well. We enjoy the outdoors, outdoor recreation, and care deeply for the land,” Moreland says. “We believe that reasoned, active management of public land is the best way to protect the land, and the best way for all Americans to be able to enjoy this treasured resource,” he says. The best way to protect America’s land is for all interested parties to work together, he says.

Photo Mark Kariya

public lands,” he said. Senators can count votes, and knew they couldn’t get the revived bill approved if it needed a two-thirds majority in the House. Since the Revolutionary War and War of 1812 Battlefield Protection Act had already passed the House it had “preferential status”—meaning the amendments added by the Senate would only need a simple majority vote in the House, not a two-thirds vote. In layman’s terms, the Senate leadership now only had to get a simple majority of 218 House votes instead of the two-thirds majority of those present needed before. Despite complaints from lawmakers that they hadn’t even seen many of the proposals in the bill, and complaints about the procedure used, the measure passed the Senate and then the House. President Barack Obama then signed it into law. “The parliamentary maneuvers used on this bill were clearly aimed at winning passage of a bill that had already failed by conventional means,” Moreland said. “The Senate leadership changed the rules halfway through the game. The result was that outdoor recreationists’ concerns were ejected from the process.”


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February 2010

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Go Ride

A few of the hundreds of AMA-sanctioned events this month, detailed on the following pages.

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Catch the high-flying action of Monster Energy AMA Supercross, an FIM World Championship, in San Diego, Calif., Feb. 6; Anaheim, Calif., Feb. 13, Indianapolis Feb. 20, and Atlanta Feb. 27. For the full schedule, see page 52.

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There are a couple poker runs on tap in California that you won’t want to miss. The Southern California Motorcycling Association is hosting its annual Sweetheart Ride poker run Feb. 14 in Encinitas. Sign in is from 8 a.m. to 10 a.m. For info go to www.sc-ma.com, or call (310) 387-3974 or (951) 677-3644. And then on Feb. 28, ABATE-CA Local 1 is holding a poker run in Sun Valley, beginning at 8 a.m. at Big Jim’s Restaurant, 8950 Laurel Canyon Blvd. Info: (818) 244-9898.

3

If you like your motorcycle racing action indoors, then check out the AMA Arenacross Series that is in full swing. Races in February will be held Feb. 6-7 in Tulsa, Okla., Feb. 12-14

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in Youngstown, Ohio, Feb. 20-21 in San Antonio, Texas, and Feb. 27-28 in Fresno, Calif. For the full schedule, see page 53.

4

Go riding and help out a good cause by taking part in the Pediatric Brain Tumor Foundation Ride For Kids charity ride set for Feb. 14 in Coral Springs, Fla. Registration opens at 8 a.m. and closes at 9:45 a.m. at the Sportsplex, 2575 Sportsplex Dr. The police-escorted ride starts at 10 a.m. sharp, rain or shine. Info: www. RideForKids.org or (800) 253-6530.

5

This year’s AMA/Rekluse National Enduro Championship Series presented by Moose Racing promises to be one of the most exciting in the history of the sport. Get in on the action early at the second round of the series in Greensboro, Ga., on Feb. 21. For the full schedule of events, see page 53.

6

The Ramapo Motorcycle Club is hosting a road enduro on Feb. 28 beginning at noon at the Nathan’s/Kohls parking lot on Route 100 (Central Park Ave.) in Yonkers, N.Y. Info: www. RamapoMC.org or (201) 767-3594.

7

Don’t let the cold and snow stop you from having some motocross fun at Budds Creek MX Park in Budds Creek, Md. Races are set for Feb. 14, 21, 27 and 28. Call the Budds Creek Ride Line at (301) 475-2000 prior to race day after 7 p.m. to confirm the event is still happening. Info: www. BuddsCreek.com.

COMING UP The AMA Pro Racing Superbike season gets under way with the 69th annual Daytona 200 event weekend March 3-5 under the lights at Daytona International Speedway in Daytona Beach, Fla. Start making your vacation plans now. Info: www.AMASuperbike.com.


THE

GUIDE TO EVENTS

The following pages list AMAsanctioned events for this month, up to date at press time. Current listings are in the Riding and Racing sections of www. AmericanMotorcyclist.com. The biggest events—pro races, national-championship amateur competition, and major rides and rallies—are highlighted in color boxes.

Type of Event Date

For these series, we list all of the remaining events for the entire year. Then there are the local events, the backbone of the AMA’s riding and racing calendar. These events are listed by state and are broken down by type, so you can quickly find the ones near you. Here’s a guide to what you’ll find in these local listings:

Event Class (Competition events only) S - Standard (Amateur classes) Y - Youth Classes T - ATV classes G - Progressive M - Pro-Am classes Location/City

OHIO

ENDURO FEB 21 (S,Y): GREENSBORO: NATIONAL; CHEROKEE CYCLE CLUB INC., GARRETT MCCKEY; 5 AM; 2040 SHILOH ROAD /3 MI. NORTH OF GREENSBORO, HWY 15; (678) 231-5858; SETRA.ORG/

HARE SCRAMBLES FEB 28 (S,T,Y): LOGAN: HOCKING VALLEY MOTORCYCLE, KEVIN FLEAHMAN; 8 AM; 13121 JAKE TOM RD / US RT 33 EX SR 328/FOLLOW ARROWS; (740) 385-7695; HOCKINGVALLEYMC. COM ARENACROSS FEB 12 (S,Y): YOUNGSTOWN: 3 DAY EVENT: FELD MOTOR SPORTS, JAYME DALSING; 10 AM; COVELLI CENTRE; (800) 216-7482; ARENACROSS.COM

ILLINOIS HARE SCRAMBLES FEB 28 (S,T,Y): KEITHSBURG: BURLINGTON VALLEY DUSTERS, DAVID CROMER; 8 AM; SANDY OAKS CAMPGROUNDS /NORTH OF OQUAWKA; (319) 753-6961;

MARYLAND Event Promoter

MOTOCROSS

FEB 6 (S,T,Y): REYNOLDS (D-9): SILVER DOLLAR MX, C/O STEVE JONES; 6 AM; HWY 96 W/JST W OF TWN; (478) 555-4673 Sign-in Time Directions

GEORGIA

Contact Phone Number

CALIFORNIA

FLORIDA

POKER RUN FEB 14: LAKE FOREST: SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA MOTOR, KENN HATKE; (951) 677-3644; SC-MA.COM FEB 28: SUN VALLEY: ABATE-CA LOCAL 1, PETER DANIELS; 8 AM; BIG JIMS RESTAURANT /8950 LAUREL CANYON BLVD; (818) 244-9898; HARE & HOUND FEB 14 (S,T,Y): RIDGECREST: NATIONAL; FOUR ACES MC, RICHIE WOHLERS; SPANGLER HILLS /HWY 395 TO TRONA RD; (805) 358-2668; FOURACESMC.ORG OBSERVED TRIALS FEB 7 (S,Y): SAN DIEGO: SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA TRIAL, DIAHANN TANK; 10 AM; CORRAL CANYON /SEE WEBSITE; (951) 334-3034; SOCALTRIALS.COM GRAND PRIX FEB 6 (S,T,Y): TAFT: 2 DAY EVENT: DIRT DIGGERS-SOUTHERN CAL, JOSEPH J PEARSON; 6 AM; HONOLULU HILLS RACEWAY /26217 HONOLULU HILLS RD; (562) 436-7289; DIRTDIGGERSMC.COM ARENACROSS FEB 27 (S,Y): FRESNO: 2 DAY EVENT: FELD MOTOR SPORTS, JAYME DALSING; 10 AM; SAVE MART CENTER; (800) 216-7482; ARENACROSS.COM

ROAD RUN FEB 14: CORAL SPRINGS: CHARITY;: PEDIATRIC BRAIN TUMOR FOU, KYLE CLACK; 8 AM; SPORTSPLEX 2575 SPORTSPLEX DR; (800) 253-6530; RIDEFORKIDS.ORG POKER RUN FEB 14: FORT WALTON: CHARITY;: SAND DOLLAR MC INC, SAM ENGLER; 8 AM; 661 BEAL PRK / AT BIKE BURGER; (850) 244-0376; SANDOLLARMOTORCYCLECLUB.COM MOTOCROSS FEB 7 (S,Y): GAINESVILLE: UNLIMITED SPORTS MX INC, WYN KERR; 6 AM; GATORBACK CYCLE PARK; (813) 4707498; UNLIMITEDSPORTSMX.COM FEB 21 (G,T,Y): CITRA: VINTAGE; MOTOCROSS OF MARION COUNT, CAROL; 6:30 AM; MOTOCROSS OF MARION COUNTY /2035 NW 146TH PLACE; (352) 591-2377; MXMARIONCOUNTY.COM FEB 26 (S,Y): CITRA: QUALIFIER; 3 DAY EVENT: MOTOCROSS OF MARION COUNT, CAROL BLACKBURN; 6:30 AM; MOTOCROSS OF MARION COUNTY /2035 NW 146TH PLACE; (352) 591-2377; MXMARIONCOUNTY.COM ENDURO FEB 28 (S): WEBSTER: CENTRAL FLORIDA TRAIL RID, KEVIN SIMMONS; RICHLOAM STATE FOREST; (407) 8593006; FLORIDATRAILRIDER.ORG

MOTOCROSS FEB 7 (S,T,Y): FEB 14 (S,T,Y): FEB 21 (S,T,Y): FEB 28 (S,T,Y): BUDDS CREEK: BUDDS CREEK MOTOCROSS PAR, JONATHAN BEASLEY; 8 AM; BUDDS CREEK MX PARK /27963 BUDDS CREEK RD; (301) 475-2000; BUDDSCREEK.COM

MISSISSIPPI HARE SCRAMBLES FEB 7 (S,Y): MERIDIAN: RIDGE RUNNERS ENDURO TEAM, GREGORY E GUY; MERIDIAN OHV PARK; (601) 626-8700;

NEW YORK ROAD ENDURO FEB 28: YONKERS: RAMAPO MOTORCYCLE CLUB IN, DICK ROBERTS; 12 AM; NATHAN’S/KOHL’S PARKING LOT /RT 100(CENTRAL PARK AVE); (201) 767-3594; RAMAPOMC.ORG ICE RACE FEB 13 (S,T,Y): LAKE GEORGE: 2 DAY EVENT: ELECTRIC CITY RIDERS, FRANK CARPINELLO; 9 AM; SIGN UP at DUFFY’S TAVERN /20 AMHERST STREET; (518) 477-2552; ELECTRICCITYRIDERS.COM

NORTH CAROLINA MOTOCROSS FEB 5 (S,T,Y): FLETCHER: INDOOR; VICTORY SPORTS INC, SAM GAMMON; WESTERN NC AG CENTER /I-26 EX 40 at ASHEVILLE AIRPORT; (423) 323-5497; VICTORYSPORTSRACING.COM FEB 6 (S,T,Y): FLETCHER: INDOOR; VICTORY SPORTS INC, SAM GAMMON; WESTERN NC AG CENTER /I-26 EX 40 at ASHEVILLE AIRPORT; (423) 323-5497; VICTORYSPORTSRACING.COM FEB 20 (S,Y): ELIZABETH CITY: QUALIFIER; 2 DAY EVENT: ELIZABETH CITY MOTORCYCLE, WENDY TABLER; 6 AM; 1520 NORTHSIDE RD /RT 17 SOUTH TO 158 EAST; (252) 771-5442; ECMX. COM

MOTORCYCLE SHOWS

Thanksgiving, Christmas and New Year’s Day.

CYCLE WORLD INTERNATIONAL MOTORCYCLE SHOWS MotorcycleShowS. coM

MotoStars: Celebrities + Motorcycles: Priceless machines, exclusive memorabilia and tales from celebrities’ favorite adventures. On display through April 2010.

Jan. 15-17: Washington, D.C.: Washington Convention Center; DCConvention.com Jan. 22-24: New York: Javits Convention Center; JavitsCenter.com

Awesome-Ness: The life and art of Arlen Ness: King of Choppers.

Jan. 29-31: Cleveland, Ohio: I-X Center; IXCenter.com

AMA Motorcycle Hall of Fame: Bikes and memorabilia recognizing those who have made significant contributions to all aspects of motorcycling.

Feb. 5-7: Minneapolis, Minn.: Minneapolis Convention Center; MplsConvCtr.org

Founder’s Hall: Honoring the Hall of Fame’s generous contributors.

Feb. 19-21: Chicago: Donald E. Stephens Convention Center; Rosemont.com

AMA PRO RACING

Mar. 3-10: Daytona Beach, Fla.: Ocean Center; OceanCenter.com

2010 MONSTER ENERGY AMA SUPERCROSS, AN FIM WORLD CHAMPIONSHIP SupercroSSonline.coM

MUSEUM EXHIBITS

Jan. 23: Anaheim, Calif.; Angel Stadium, TicketMaster.com, (714) 940-2000

AMA MOTORCYCLE HALL OF FAME MUSEUM MotorcycleMuSeuM.org The Hall of Fame is located on the AMA campus in Pickerington, Ohio, and is open 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. seven days a week year-round except for Easter,

Jan. 30: San Francisco; AT&T Park, TicketMaster.com, (415) 972-2000 Feb. 6: San Diego; Qualcomm Stadium, TicketMaster.com, (619) 525-8266

OKLAHOMA MOTOCROSS FEB 27 (S,T,Y): WELLSTON: QUALIFIER; 2 DAY EVENT: REYNARD RACEWAY, ROBBIE L REYNARD; 9473 S HWY 177; (405) 833-1717; REYNARDRACEWAY. COM ARENACROSS FEB 6 (S,Y): TULSA: 2 DAY EVENT: FELD MOTOR SPORTS, JAYME DALSING; 10 AM; BOK CENTER; (800) 216-7482; ARENACROSS.COM

PENNSYLVANIA MOTOCROSS FEB 20 (S,T,Y): HARRISBURG: 2 DAY EVENT: TRAIL-WAY SPEEDWAY, BRAD HOSTETTER; FARM SHOW COMPLEX; (717) 359-7056; MOTORAMAEVENTS. COM

SOUTH CAROLINA ENDURO FEB 27 (S,Y): AIKEN: 2 DAY EVENT: COLUMBIA ENDURO RIDERS AS, RHONDA DENNIS; HOLLOW CREEK RD; (803) 788-4220;

TENNESSEE MOTOCROSS FEB 12 (S,T,Y): WHITE PINE: INDOOR; VICTORY SPORTS INC, SAM GAMMON; SMOKEY MTN EXPO ARENA /1615 PAVILION DR; (423) 323-5497; VICTORYSPORTSRACING.COM FEB 13 (S,T,Y): WHITE PINE: INDOOR; VICTORY SPORTS INC, SAM GAMMON; SMOKEY MTN EXPO ARENA /1615 PAVILION DR; (423) 323-5497; VICTORYSPORTSRACING.COM

TEXAS ARENACROSS FEB 20 (S,Y): SAN ANTONIO: 2 DAY EVENT: FELD MOTOR SPORTS, JAYME DALSING; 10 AM; ALAMO DOME; (800) 216-7482; ARENACROSS.COM

Feb. 13: Anaheim, Calif.; Angel Stadium, TicketMaster.com, (714) 940-2000 Feb. 20: Indianapolis; Lucas Oil Stadium, TicketMaster.com, (317) 262-8600 Feb. 27: Atlanta, Ga.; Georgia Dome, TicketMaster.com, (404) 223-9200 March 6: Daytona Beach, Fla.; Daytona Int’l Speedway, DaytonaInternationalSpeedway.com, (800) PITSHOP March 13: Toronto, Ontario; Rogers Centre, TicketMaster.com, (416) 341-3000 March 20: Arlington, Texas; Cowboy Stadium, TicketMaster.com, (817) 892-4161 March 27: Jacksonville, Fla.; Jacksonville Municipal Stadium, TicketMaster.com, (904) 633-6100 April 10: Houston; Reliant Stadium, TicketMaster.com, (832) 667-1400 April 17: St. Louis, Mo.; Edward Jones Dome, TicketMaster.com, (314) 342-5036 April 24: Seattle; Quest Field, TicketMaster. com, (206) 381-7500 May 1: Salt Lake City; Rice-Eccles, February 2010

53


TicketMaster.com, (801) 581-UTIX May 8: Las Vegas, Nev.; Sam Boyd Stadium, TicketMaster.com, (702) 895-3761 AMA Pro SuPerbike ChAMPioNShiP March 3 - 5: Daytona beach, Fla.; Daytona International Speedway March 26 - 28: Fontana, Calif.; Auto Club Speedway April 16 - 18: braselton, Ga.; Road Atlanta May 14 - 16: Sonoma, Calif.; Infineon Raceway June 4 - 6: elkhart Lake, Wis.; Road America July 16 - 18: Lexington, ohio; Mid-Ohio Sports Car Course Aug. 13 - 15: Alton, Va.; Virginia International Raceway Sept. 3 - 5: Millville, N.J.; New Jersey Motorsports Park Sept. 24 - 26: birmingham, Ala.; Barber Motorsports Park LuCAS oiL AMA Pro MotoCroSS ChAMPioNShiP MXSportSproracing.coM May 22: Sacramento, Calif.: Hangtown Motocross Classic May 29: San bernardino, Cailf.: Glen Helen Raceway June 5: Wortham, texas: Freestone Raceway June 12: Mt. Morris, Pa.: High Point Raceway June 19: Mechanicsville, Md.: Budds Creek Motocross June 26: Lakewood, Colo.: Thunder Valley Motocross July 3: buchanan, Mich.: RedBud July 17: Milleville, Minn.: Spring Creek Motocross July 24: Washougal, Wash.: Washougal Motocross Aug. 14: New berlin, N.Y.: Unadilla Aug. 28: Southwick, Mass.: Moto-X 338 Sept. 4: Delmont, Pa.: Steel City Raceway AMA NAtioNAL ChAMPioNShiP SerieS AMA AreNACroSS ChAMPioNShiP SerieS arenacroSS.coM Jan. 15-17: baltimore, Md.; 1st Mariner Arena, TicketMaster.com, (410) 347-2020 Jan. 22-24: hampton, Va.; Hampton Coliseum, TicketMaster.com, (757) 838-4203 Jan. 30-31: kansas City, Mo.; Kemper Arena, TicketMaster.com, (816) 949-7100 Feb. 6-7: tulsa, okla.; BOK Center, TicketMaster.com, (918) 596-7177

54

March 26-28: Denver, Colo.; Denver Coliseum, TicketMaster.com, (720) 865-4220

May 16: Park hills, Mo.: Michael Silger, Missouri Mudders; (636) 639-6373; MOMudders.com

AMA rACiNG /NAtC obSerVeD triALS NAtioNAL ChAMPioNShiP SerieS

June 20: upton, Wyo.: Paul Douglas, Inyan Kara Riders; (307) 468-2840; NationalEnduro.com

May 1-2: tishomingo, okla.: Robert Shaw, Texhoma Trials Club; (580) 504-6750; roshaw@ cableone.net; TexhomaTrialsClub.com

July 25: Moorestown, Mich.: Jeff Hunt, Lansing Motorcycle Club; (231) 267-9534

June 19-20: exeter, r.i., Bob ONeil, Stepping Stone Ranch; Rhode Island Trials Club; (508) 285-6074; trialsriders@hotmail.com; RITrialsClub. com June 26-27: Cayuta, N.Y., David Reed, (607) 796-9558; District 4 Trials, District4Trials.org July 24-25: Pueblo, Colo., Stan Hensley, (719) 564-6476; Rocky Mountain Trials Assoc (RMTA), webmaster@rockymountaintrials.org; RMTA.org

oct. 2: Matthews, ind.: Doug Spence, Muddobbers MC; jspence@me.com; Muddobbers.org GeiCo eNDuroCroSS endurocroSS.coM July 17: Las Vegas, Nev., The Orleans Arena

July 31-Aug. 1: Norden, Calif., Mike Codde, (530) 426-3635; Sacramento P.I.T.S., Inc.; dsrinfo@donnerskiranch.com; DonnerSkiRanch. com

Aug. 14: Guthrie, okla., Lazy E Arena

Schedule subject to change and revision

oct. 30: Denver, Colo., Nat’l Western Complex

AMA rACiNG NAtioNAL hAre & houND nationalHareandHound.coM

Nov. 20: Las Vegas, Nev., The Orleans Arena

Jan. 24: Johnson Valley ohVA, Lucerne, Calif.: Desert M/C, Dale Shuttleworth; (909) 578-1599; desertmotorcycleclub@yahoo.com; DesertMC. com

Aug. 27: indianapolis, Pepsi Coliseum Sept. 11: everett, Wash., Comcast Arena

CAN-AM GNCC SCheDuLe gnccracing.coM Feb. 27 - March 2: River Ranch, Fla. March 6-7: Washington, Ga.

Feb. 14: Spangler hills ohV, ridgecrest, Calif.: Four Aces MC, Richie Wohlers; (805) 3582668; richie@fouracesmc.org; FourAcesMC.org

March 20-21: Morganton, N.C.

March 7: Superstition ohVA, el Centro, Calif.: Roadrunner Off-Road Racing, Kirk Hester; (760) 275-9852; roadrunneroffroad@hotmail.com; RoadRunnerOffroad.org

April 24-25: Hurricane Mills, Tenn.

March 21: Murphy, idaho: Dirt Inc., Bill Walsh; (208) 459-6871; braaap@cableone.net; DirtIncRacing.com

June 5-6: Millfield, Ohio

April 10: Jericho, utah (no AtVs)*: Sageriders MC, Kari Christman; (435) 851-1138; dezchik111@ yahoo.com; Sageriders.com

Sept. 11-12: New Berlin, N.Y.

April 25: Johnson Valley ohVA, Lucerne, Calif.: Vikings MC, Alex Rodriguez; (760) 8345006; alex@arrowdevelopment.net; VikingsMC. com May 15: Jericho, utah: Sugarloafers, Rob Davies; (435) 743-4180; offrdsp@hotmail.com; SugarloafersMC.com

April 10-11: Union, S.C. May 8-9: Yadkinville, N.C. May 22-23: Somerset, Pa. June 26-27: Snowshoe Resort, W.Va. Sept. 25-26: Lafayette, Tenn. oct. 9-10: St. Clairsville, Ohio oct. 23-24: Crawfordsville, Ind. AMA DrAGbike ChAMPioNShiP SerieS aMadragBiKe.coM March 5-7: Valdosta, Ga.: South Georgia Motorsports Park

June 5: Wendover, Nev. (no AtVs)*: Utah Desert Foxes, Steve Rij; (801) 964-8773; steve. bmp@att.net; UtahDesertFoxes.com

April 10-11: Commerce, Ga.: Atlanta Dragway

oct. 10: tbA: SoCal MC, Justin Shultz; (949) 981-6776; justins@bgainsurance.com; SoCalMC. com

June 12-13: Montgomery, Ala.: Montgomery Motorsports Park

oct. 24: Lucerne Valley, Calif.: 100’s MC, Ryan Sanders; (949) 584-9395; ryansanders24@ hotmail.com; 100sMC.org *The U.S. Bureau of Land Management does not allow all-terrain vehicle (ATV) competition at these locations.

Feb. 12-14: Youngstown, ohio; Covelli Center, TicketMaster.com, (330) 746-5600

AMA rekLuSe NAtioNAL eNDuro ChAMPioNShiP SerieS PreSeNteD bY MooSe rACiNG nationalenduro.coM

Feb. 20-21: San Antonio, texas; Alamo Dome, TicketMaster.com, (800) 884-3663

Jan. 31: Wedgefield, S.C.: Johnny McCoy, SERMA; (803) 481-5169; SERMAClub.com

Feb. 27-28: Fresno, Calif.; Save Mart Center, TicketMaster.com, (559) 347-3401

Feb. 21: Greensboro, Ga.: Garrett McKey, Cherokee Cycle Club; (678) 231-5858; SETRA.org

March 5-7: reno, Nev.; Livestock Event Center, TicketMaster.com, (775) 688-5750

March 4: Daytona beach, Fla.: Steve Pettenger, Daytona Dirt Riders; (386) 615-0722

March 12-14: Council bluffs, iowa; Mid America Center, TicketMaster.com, (712) 3230536

March 28: kalgary, texas: Kelly Simmons, Lubbock Trail Riders; (806) 548-1260; LubbockTrailRiders.org

March 20-21: Dayton, ohio; Ervin J. Nutter Center, TicketMaster.com, (937) 775-2060

April 18: West Point, tenn.: Paul Traufler, NATRA; (256) 837-0084; NATRA.DirtRider.net

AmericanMotorcyclist.com

Aug. 22: North berwick, Maine: Peter Anania, Seacoast Trail Riders; (603) 436-4331; SeacoastTrailRiders.org

May 15-16: Martin, Mich.: US 131 Motorsports Park

July 31 - Aug. 1: indianapolis: O’Reilly Raceway Park Sept. 10-12: Atco, N.J.: Atco Raceway oct. 9-10: Norwalk, ohio: Summit Motorsports Park Nov. 12-14: Valdosta, Ga.: South Georgia Motorsports Park AMA rACiNG eASt hAre SCrAMbLeS aMaracing.coM March 7: No Youth: Washington, Ga.: Rita Coombs, Racer Productions; (304) 284-0084; GNCCRacing.com April 11: No Youth: union, S.C.: Rita Coombs, Racer Productions; (304) 284-0084; GNCCRacing.com April 18: Youth only: berwick, Pa.: Duane Fisher, Evansville MX Park; (570) 759-2841; EvansvilleMXPark.com May 1-2: Dorchester, N.J.: Dennis McKelvey, Tri-County Sportsmen; (609) 390-3772; TeamHammer.org


May 29-30: Rhinelander, Wis.: Scott Schwalbe, Sugar Camp Racing; (715) 272-1101; SugarCampEnt.com July 18: Valley View, Pa.; Tiffany Tobias, Rausch Creek Powersports; (570) 682-4600; RauschCreekRacing.com July 31-Aug. 1: Catawissa, Pa.: Mike Soudas, High Mountain Dirt Riders; (570) 954-7799; HMDR.org Aug. 7-8: Hill City, Minn.: Paul Otto, Range Riders MC; (763) 229-1177; RangeRidersMC.org Aug. 28-29: Cortland, N.Y.: Cindy Davis, Knobby Acres; (607) 756-5277; WYNOA.org Sept. 18-19: Lynnville, Ind.: Kenny Moore, IN, IL, KY Enduro Riders; (812) 549-8385; Blackcoal.org AMA RIDING SERIES AMA BMW NAtIoNAL ADVENtuRE RIDING SERIES AMADirectLink.coM/roADriDe/ADV/ Apr 17: Bybee, tenn.: JB SAKI Promotions, John Strange; jbsaki@gmail.com. May 1: Buck Meadows, Calif.: Family Off Road Adventures, Lawrence Borgens; www. familyoffroadadventures.com May 22: Zaleski, ohio: Buckeye Dualsporters, BillKaeppner; www.kaeppnerswoods.com June 5: Bixby, Mo.: Midwest Trail Riders Assn., Robert Kaufman; www.ridemtra.org June 5: Custer, Mich.: Great Lakes Dual Sprters, meramey Valley; www.goldsmc.com June 5: Lock Haven, Pa.: Durty Dabbers, Nils Mantzoros; www.durtydabbers.com June 12: Wabeno, Wis.: Wisconsin Dual Sport Riders, Duane Baer; www.widualsportriders.org June 12: McCloud, Calif.: McCloud Dual Sport Adventures, Mike Lingsch; www. mcclouddualsportadventures.com June 18: Fairbanks, Alaska: Aerostich Tours, Roger Pattison; www.aerostichtours.com June 19: Logan, ohio: Buckeye Dualsporters, Bill Kaeppner; www.kaeppnerswoods.com July 10: McCloud, Calif.: McCloud Dual Sport Adventures, Mike Lingsch; www. mcclouddualsportadventures.com Aug. 21: Columbus, Ind.: Stoney Lonesome MC, Nathan Gaskill; www.stoneylnesomemc. com/DualSport/index.html Aug. 21: McCloud, Calif.: McCloud Dual Sport Adventures, Mike Lingsch; www. mcclouddualsportadventures.com Aug. 24: North Cascades, Wash.: Sound Rider!, Tom Mehren; www.soundrider.com/ dsport Sept. 11: Cadiz, Ky.: KT Riders, Jesse Thomas; ginny42211@yahoo.com Sept. 18: McCloud, Calif.: McCloud Dual Sport Adventures, Mike Lingsch; www. mcclouddualsportadventures.com Sept. 25: Wolverine, Mich.: Great Lakes Dual Sporters, Meramey Valley; gldsmc.org Sept. 25: Logan, ohio: Buckeye Dualsporters, Bill Kaeppner; www.kaeppnerswoods.com Sept. 25: Wabeno, Wis.: Wisconsin Dual Sport Riders, Duane Baer; www.widualsportriders.org Sept. 25: Buck Meadows, Calif.: Family Off Road Adventure, Lawrence Borgens; www. familyoffroadadventures.com oct. 2: Refro Valley, Ky.: 4-Fun Trai. Riders, Vicky Stephenson; www.4funtrailriders.com oct. 9: McCloud, Calif.: McCloud Dual Sport Adventures, Mike Lingsch; www.

mcclouddualsportadventures.com oct. 23: Chatsworth, N.J.: Meteor MC, Mike Reign; www.meteormc.com Nov. 6: Port Elizabeth, N.J.: Tri-County Sportsmen, E. Polhaumus; www.teamhammer. org AMA KtM NAtIoNAL DuAL-SPoRt tRAIL RIDING SERIES AMADirectLink.coM/roADriDe/DS/ May 22: Zaleski, ohio: Hanging Rock 200, Buckeye Dualsporters, Bill Kaeppner, (740) 380-3050; kaeppners@verizon.net; www. kaeppnerswoods.com. June 5: Bixby, Mo.: Show Me 200, Midwest Trail Riders Assoc., Robert Kaufman, (314) 434-5095; ridemtra@hotmail.com; http://www.ridemtra. com. June 5: Custer, Mich.: Whiskey Creek Classic, Great Lakes Dual Sporters, Jeramey Valley, (989) 751-6863; ridemtra@hotmail.com; www. gldsmc.org, http://www.ridemtra.com. June 5: Lock Haven, Penn.: Durty Dabbers Nat’l Dual Sport, Durty Dabbers, Nils Mantzoros, (570) 748-9456; www.durtydabbers.com. June 12: Wabeno, Wis.: Ride for Research, Wisconsin Dual Sport Riders, Duane Baer, (920) 350-2030; bigwoods200@hotmail.com; www. widualsportriders.org. June 19: Bend, ore.: China Hat Dual Sport National, Lobos MC, Billy Toman, (503) 6565801; n7wxd@aol.com; www.lobosmc.com. Aug. 21: Columbus, Ind.: Buffaloe 500 D/S Adventure Ride, Stoney Lonesome MC, Nathan Gaskill, (812) 343-9772; ngaskill3@yahoo.com; www.stoneylonesomemc.com/DualSport/index. html. Sept. 11: Cadiz, Ky.: LBL 200, KT Riders, Jesse Thomas, (270) 522-3703; ginny42211@yahoo. com Sept. 25: Wolverine, Mich.: Ted’s Chandler Hill Challenge, Great Lakes Dual Sporters, Jeramey Valley, (989) 751-6863; info@gldsmc.org; www. gldsmc.org/ Sept. 25: Logan, ohio.: Nutcracker 200, Buckeye Dualsporters, Bill Kaeppner, (740) 380-3050; ridemtra@hotmail.com; kaeppners@ verizon.net; www.kaeppnerswoods.com. Sept. 25: Wabeno, Wis.: Big Woods 200, Wisconsin Dual Sport Riders, Duane Baer, (920) 350-2030; bigwoods200@hotmail.com; www. widualsportriders.org. oct. 9: McArthur, ohio.: Baby Burr Nat’l Dual Sport, Wisconsin Dual Sport Riders, Enduro Riders Assoc., Steve Barber, (614) 582-7821; sbarber@att.net; www.enduroriders.com. oct. 23: Chatsworth, N.J.: Meteor Ride in the Pines, Meteor MC, Mike Reign, (856) 287-8170; sbarber@att.net; www.meteormc.com. oct. 23: Study Butte, texas: 13th Annual Terlingua Nat’l Dual Sport Ride, Trail Riders of Houston, Jack Jennings, (713) 248-7222; captjack530@aol.com; www.trh-cycle.org. Nov. 6: Port Elizabeth, N.J.: Hammer Run, Tri-County Sportsmen, E. Polhaumus, (856) 7852754; mdreighn@msn.com; www.teamhammer. org.


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February 2010

57


Guest Column

Putting Your Mind To It

Growing up, I wasn’t like all the other girls. Instead of riding a pink bicycle with streamers on the ends of the handlebars, I rode dirtbikes. I started riding when I was 6 years old. I remember riding around the backyard with my dad on the back of the bike with me. After riding around the yard for a bit, I would realize my dad wasn’t on the back anymore, and I would fall over. Even though my dad would trick me, his way of teaching me worked. I started doing hillclimbs when I was 8 years old, and I still love it. I am now 19 years old, and going into the 2009 season I had one main goal on my mind: to win the 2009 AMA National Hillclimb Championship. After breaking my femur during a race in 2008, I was disappointed I couldn’t attend the 2008 Nationals. I made my dad promise me that we would go to the Nationals in 2009, no matter where it was being held. Soon after, the Nationals were announced for Minnesota, so I started saving my pennies and counting down the days. After months of racing competitively in the 125 class, the 250 class and the women’s class in New England, the Nationals finally arrived. While my dad was at work, I loaded the bikes and got everything ready. I sat in the van until my dad came home from work, and we set off. The GPS told us we would arrive in 21 hours, but after the van overheated and broke down a few times, we finally arrived in New Ulm, Minn., 28 hours later. The racing weekend had finally arrived. I couldn’t wait to ride, and I was very excited. When the women’s class started, I watched my competition get great times, and I was ready to show them why I drove all the way from Massachusetts just to race. I took my first run, with my front tire in the air the whole way up. My time placed me second to last. My dad and I knew we had to do something different for the next day’s run. I was very upset, but I knew I couldn’t let my run bother me, and Sunday was the day that mattered. It seemed like it took forever for Sunday to come, but when I woke up, my head was in it to win. The women’s class arrived, and once again I watched my competition. All the riders were beating their times from day one. I knew I had to get an amazing run. When I came to the line, I thought to myself, “Ride to have fun!” That was exactly what I did. I came down the return trail to hear my competitors telling me I had a smoking run, and I was currently in first place! I was thrilled, but I knew there were two great riders to go. Time went by so slowly, but when I saw my dad walking toward me with a smile on his face and one finger up, I knew I had won!

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I was the happiest girl alive. Tears of joy rolled down my cheeks. I couldn’t believe my dream finally came true! I gave my dad a hug, and the other New England riders came over to congratulate me. When we walked by the hill, the announcer told the crowd I was the women’s class champion, and everyone cheered! It was the best feeling in the world, and it will stay with me the rest of my life. The feeling of achieving my goal was more than I could have ever imagined. After winning the Nationals, I have come to realize, I can do anything as long as I put my mind to it. Molly Carbon is the 2009 AMA Racing National Hillcimb Women’s class champion. She lives in Bellingham, Mass.

Photo Holly Carlyle

Achieving Success On The Hillclimb Course By Molly Carbon


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