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2008 AMA MOTORCYCLIST OF THE YEAR

JANUARY 2009

STAN SIMPSON TAKING THE AMA TO THE NEXT LEVEL

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THE LIFE

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Snapshots Your Images, Your World Letters You Write, We Read Rob Dingman Who Had The Most Impact On Motorcycling In 2008? Guest Column: DJ Jones 50 States Of Consciousness

January 2009 Volume 63, Number 1 Published by the American Motorcyclist Association 13515 Yarmouth Dr. Pickerington, OH 43147 (800) AMA-JOIN www.AmericanMotorcyclist.com

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Protecting the Ride Tough Road Ahead Living It Small Bikes, Big Ideas Connections Motor Maids And More Featured Partner Black Book Value Guide Adrenaline Bobbitt Wins Enduro Heritage Post-War Runabout

Cover Photo by Michael Thad Carter Navigation Photo by Ken Frick

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Go Ride What To Do, Where To Go Marketplace Oakley Inmates, Risk Racing’s LED Light Mine, And More

FEATURES

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AMA Motorcyclist Of The Year The Rider Who Most Changed Motorcycling In 2008? Stan Simpson

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Motorcycle Icons The AMA Motorcycle Hall Of Fame Class Of 2008

American Motorcyclist magazine (ISSN 0277-9358) is published monthly by the American Motorcyclist Association, 13515 Yarmouth Dr., Pickerington, OH 43147. Copyright by the American Motorcyclist Association/American Motorcyclist 2008. Printed in USA. Subscription rate: Magazine subscription covered in membership dues; $15 a year for non-members. Postmaster: Mail form 3579 to 13515 Yarmouth Dr., Pickerington, OH 43147. Periodical postage paid at Pickerington, Ohio, and at additional mailing offices.


Some discounts, coverages, payment plans, and features are not available in all states or in all GEICO companies. Boat and PWC coverages are written through non-affiliated insurance companies and are secured through Insurance Counselors Inc., the GEICO Property Agency, doing business as GEICO Insurance Agency in CA, MA, MI, NJ, NY, OK, SD, UT. Motorcycle and ATV coverages are underwritten by GEICO Indemnity Company. GEICO auto insurance is not available in Mass. Government Employees Insurance Co. • GEICO General Insurance Co. • GEICO Indemnity Co. • GEICO Casualty Co. These companies are subsidiaries of Berkshire Hathaway Inc. GEICO: Washington, DC 20076. © 2008 GEICO


Snapshots Pat Regan and his ’07 Triumph Bonneville, taking a break in Southeast Utah. Congratulations, Pat, you’re the SPOT winner this month!

“The Twins,” from Jack Jensen (we’re assuming fraternal, not identical).

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Carl Gooch, stopping on the LBL 200 dual-sport ride to smell (and photograph) the flowers.

You, too, could win a SPOT. So get snapping.

Get a SPOT

Got an image that captures what’s cool about motorcycling? Send it to American Motorcyclist so we can feature it on these pages. We’ll even pick one standout photo of the month, and send the photographer a free SPOT Satellite Messenger, the perfect companion for your next ride. Send your high-resolution photos and mailing address to: submissions@ama-cycle.org. Editors decisions are final. No purchase necessary. SPOT device does not include activation or service.


The AMA’s Motorcycle Hall of Fame Museum held its 7th Annual Concours d’Elegance on Saturday, Oct. 11, as part of the annual Hall of Fame Induction Ceremony. From Roger Smith’s ’67 Yamaha Big Bear Scrambler to Gary Maucher’s ’52 Manx Norton, which won the Jim Davis Best-in-Show trophy, more than 100 classic motorcycles from a variety of eras and marques competed for top honors. The event was capped by the induction of the AMA Motorcycle Hall of Fame class of 2008. Photos by Ken Frick.

Gary Maucher and his ’52 Manx Norton won Best of Show. Check out video online at www.motorcyclemuseum.org.

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Jim Bowie

Snapshots


Motorcycle industry luminaries and stars converged on the AMA’s Motorcycle Hall of Fame Museum to celebrate the lives and careers of six amazing motorcyclists, the 2008 class of the AMA’s Motorcycle Hall of Fame (clockwise from left): Rolf Tibblin, Terry Poovey, Scot Harden, Larry Huffman, Vaughn Beals and Margery Coates (representing Rod Coates). You couldn’t be there in person? Then catch all of the action from the comfort of your own couch with a special DVD available directly from the AMA’s Motorcycle Hall of Fame Museum. The DVD includes highlights from the induction ceremony, along with multimedia bios on each individual Hall of Famer honored at the event. To order yours for $24.95 (shipping is free), call (614) 856-1900, ext. 1234.

January 2009

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Letters [ BRAVO, MR. BARBER The article about George Barber and his wonderful Barber Vintage Motorsports Museum in Alabama was right on target. The place is beautiful. I raced off-road there with AHRMA in 2006 and vowed to be back. Last year, I told a couple of friends I was going back for the vintage festival and the museum, and we wound up with a caravan of 17 cycles from the Washington, D.C., region. Mr. Barber, if you wanted to attract folks to Birmingham, you have done a fine job. I will be back for a track day next season, for sure. Jeffrey Brady AMA No. 353142 Beltsville, Md. BIKES RULE, PART 1 Noel Squitieri recently wrote about an event in Pittsburgh in the 1970s, where the motorcyclists took up one parking space per vehicle in an effort to get dedicated spaces for motorcycles. I don’t know if that one was true, but I can verify a similar story at Texas Instruments in Dallas about that same time. I was there and participated. Parking at TI was limited. We had been parking our motorcycles on a concrete island where 20 or so bikes fit comfortably; everything was fine until the security guards ticketed our bikes, saying we had to park like the cars in a regular space. So one day, by prearrangement, we arrived very early, and each bike parked in a car’s spot, taking up virtually all of the close parking. The anger of the drivers was directed to the security shack, and the next day we were allowed to park in the good location. Leslie Read AMA Charter Life Member No. 771248 Dallas, Texas BIKES RULE, PART 2 Although I was stationed in Germany during the early and mid ’70s when the Shadyside parking problem for motorcyclists apparently was going on, I solved a parking issue I had the old fashioned way, as well. At the U.S. Army HQ in Zweibruecken, parking in front of the main building was limited. Motorcycles would typically park in one location, as many in one spot as we could fit. One day, the MPs ticketed all of the bikes for parking “multiple vehicles to a

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You Write, We Read Send your letters (and a high-resolution photo) to submissions@ama-cycle.org; or mail to 13515 Yarmouth Drive, Pickerington, OH, 43147.

spot.” The Admin Officer brushed off our complaints and said, “don’t park more than one to a spot.” So I gathered the other riders, and we agreed to arrive at 7 a.m. the next day, parking one bike per spot, as the Admin Officer had directed, directly in front of the building. By 0805, I was summoned to the Colonel’s office. After the Colonel finished his expletives (I think he used every one he knew at least once), I calmly explained the MPs actions and the Admin Officer’s recommendation— following it up with, “We were only following the MPs and the Admin Officer’s orders, sir.” The Colonel then picked up his phone and chewed out the Provost Marshall, making his men’s motorcycles off-limits to the MPs. We then rolled our bikes back to the end zone and squeezed all the bikes into one spot later that morning. I still chuckle about it today. Ed O’Brien (retired Master Sergeant) AMA Life Member No. 1256346 Winter Springs, Fla. I’VE BEEN INSPIRED I enjoyed reading the story about the mother and daughter duo who set out across the country in your October issue. What a wonderful way to spend time together! As I was reading, I was daydreaming about the day when my 3-year-old-daughter will be tall enough to reach the passenger pegs to take her first ride with mommy! It is not very often that you hear about this type of “adventure,” and I was pleased to see that American Motorcyclist decided to have this as a feature. Mother and daughters share a special bond, and what better way to enhance that relationship than through a cross-country ride together! Linda Bruce Gerz AMA No. 439397 Philadelphia, Pa. A DIFFERENT TYPE OF SPEED Just in case you are not aware of the latest accomplishment of AMA Road Racer Ben Bostrom, I wanted to pass on a great story. October’s 24 Hours of Moab mountain bike race was a grueling race held on a 15-mile loop with a total of 1,300 feet of vertical climbing each lap. As it turned out, several AMA Superbike racers competed,

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including AMA Superbike Champion Ben Spies, and Eric and Ben Bostrom. Most racers in the event are part of fourperson teams. Each team member does three to four laps. But during the race I was surprised to learn that Ben Bostrom was racing solo! The top pro and semi-pro riders compete in this type of event several times a year, and one even rode in this year’s Tour de France. The winning rider at Moab this year did 17 laps. To my amazement, B-Boz did 16 laps and finished in 4th place! That’s 240 miles and 20,800 vertical feet in 24 hours! Not bad for a post-AMA race season relaxation time. As a side note, E-Boz’s team took first in their division, and he rode four very respectable lap times, also. Spies rode two laps with decent times. My team took second in our division. Mark Benigni AMA No. 731330 North Ogden, Utah THANKS FOR SHOWING WOMEN RIDERS I want to thank you for showing more female riders, racers and motorcycle owners! We are a growing number, and we ride large bikes, small bikes, medium-sized bikes and racing bikes. We are young, middle-aged and older. Thank you for acknowledging us. I have a 2004 Honda VTX 1300, and I am a short 5-foot-3—but not once have I had any negative comments in more than 20,000 miles. I went to Springfield, Mo., last year for a women’s Ride-In, and this year I went to the Upper Peninsula of Michigan for another Ride-In. Everywhere I have ridden, mostly by myself, I have had people come up to me and talk to me. Thank you. Because you have changed, I am now a member of AMA as well as ABATE and Women on Wheels. Kathy Reitinger AMA No. 08771313 Erie County, Pa. Thanks for your support, Kathy. If you’re looking for a great place to ride in 2009, don’t forget the AMA’s International Women & Motorcycling Conference, set for August 19-22, in Keystone, Colo. For more info, check out www.womenandmotorcycling. com.


Linda Bruce Gerz and her daughter

L-R: David Dillingham, Malcolm Smith and Larry Roeseler Jeffrey Brady

Mark Benigni Ed O’Brien

MALCOLM AND MORE I have had the honor of being a friend of off-road legend Malcolm Smith’s for about 13 years, and have ridden hundreds of miles with him, in Baja and Colorado. This year, at the Colorado 500, I had the privilege of riding with him every day. It was a great week, dining at Crested Butte with Don Mackey, Mark Mitchell and Malcolm, and riding with old friends Lloyd Liebatrau and Don Riggle from Colorado. Above is a picture from one of my highlights of my week, when Malcolm, Larry Roeseler and I (I’m the one on the left that you don’t recognize) were sitting atop Alpine Trail, and I started asking questions about their racing days. They just opened up, and the talk was great. It made for one of the best memories I may ever have. David Dillingham AMA No. 395873 Warrensburg, Mo. STOP MOTORCYCLE CRASHES A recent story in the Ogden, Utah, Standard-Examiner proclaimed: “More motorcyclists dying.” The story included a chart from the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration showing that the number of motorcycle deaths as a

percent of all traffic fatalities has risen approximately 7 percent in the last 10 years, while all other motor-vehicle deaths have decreased. The article blames distracted drivers, lack of training for motorcyclists, more powerful motorcycles and the lack of helmet use as probable reasons for the increase. I was shocked to learn that motorcycle deaths are increasing. If these statistics are true, and I assume they are, then it appears to me that some drastic changes must be initiated ASAP to decrease the number of deaths. First, automobile drivers must be forced to be more attentive. Stricter penalties must be put in place and enforced. Even though I hate mandatory anything, I believe laws must be passed providing strong penalties for the use of cellphones. Next, I believe motorcycle licenses should only be given to those who have passed a Motorcycle Safety Foundation (MSF) course. As I say, I hate mandatory anything, but it appears to me that this is the only way that the motorcycle death rate is going to decrease. David Mueller AMA No. 403908 Willard, Utah

You make some interesting points, David. Any increase in motorcycle-related deaths is cause for concern. As the number of motorcyclists has increased in recent years, with more riders riding more miles, the potential for more crashes has increased, too. And why are motorcyclists crashing? We need more research. That’s why the AMA continues to champion a rigorous study on crashes that should start next year. More research into the causes of crashes would allow for thoughtful, measured approaches to eliminating those crashes that are based on fact, which is what we really need.

CORRECTION: An item in the December issue’s gift guide mis-characterized the Christini all-wheel-drive kit for off-road motorcycles. The kit provides mechanical, not hydraulic, power to the front wheel. Info: www.christini.com.

January 2009

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aMa MEMBEr discoUnts For full info on all AMA benefits and discounts, visit AmericanMotorcyclist.com and click “Member Services.”

Get a discount of up to 25% off prevailing rates at any Avis or Budget car rental agency. www.avis.com and www.budget.com

Use your AMA Visa card at a qualified motorcycle retailer and get a 3% rebate on your credit card bill. www.bankofamerica.com

When you purchase a Black Book Motorcycle & Powersports Value Guide, Black Book refunds a portion of the sale back to the AMA, which in turn uses those funds to help support your right to ride.it. www.BlackBookUSA.com

Editorial officEs

aMa Board of dirEctors

American Motorcyclist 13515 Yarmouth Drive Pickerington, OH 43147 (614) 856-1900 submissions@ama-cycle.org

Stan Simpson, Chairman P.O. Box 1028, Cibolo, TX 78108 Carl Reynolds, Vice Chairman 5011 Cobblestone Dr. P.O. Box 4423, Danville, VA 24540-0108

Grant Parsons, Managing Editor James Holter, Associate Editor Bill Kresnak, Government Affairs Editor Mitch Boehm, Contributing Editor Mark Lapid, Creative Director Nora McDonald, Production Coordinator

Jon-Erik Burleson, Assistant Treasurer 1119 Milan Ave., Amherst, OH 44001 Jim Williams, Assistant Secretary 9950 Jeronimo Rd., Irvine, CA 92618-2084 Joseph Bromley 230 Pebble Ridge Rd., Warrington, PA 18976

advErtising Ray Monroe, Advertising Manager (815) 885-4445, rmonroe@ama-cycle.org

Erik Buell 2799 Buell Dr., East Troy, WI 53120

Tracey Powell, Ad Coordinator (614) 856-1900, ext. 1248, tpowell@ama-cycle.org

Choice Hotels offers members 15% off best available rates at participating Comfort Inn®, Comfort Suites®, Quality Inn®, Sleep Inn®, Clarion®, MainStay Suites®, Suburban Extended Stay®, Rodeway Inn® and Econo Lodge® hotels. www.choicehotels.com

AMA members can save as much as 20% on Garmin GPS navigators and software. www.garmin.com

All trademarks used herein (unless otherwise noted) are owned by the AMA and may only be used with the express, written permission of the AMA. American Motorcyclist is the monthly publication of the American Motorcyclist Association, a 300,000-member organization representing motorcyclists nationwide. For information on AMA membership benefits, call (800) AMA-JOIN or visit www.AmericanMotorcyclist.com. Manuscripts, photos, drawings and other editorial contributions must be accompanied by return postage. No responsibility is assumed for loss or damage to unsolicited material. Copyright© American Motorcyclist Association, 2008.

Protect All offers AMA members a 15% discount on its line of products for appearance, performance and protection. www.protectall.com

AMA Members can purchase RoadLok brake calipers, which combine superior braking performance with an integrating lockingfeature, at a 15 percent discount. www.roadlok.com

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Arthur More 16153 Starlight Dr., Surprise, AZ 85374 John Ulrich 581-C Birch St., Lake Elsinore, CA 92530

(800) AMA-JOIN AmericanMotorcyclist.com

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MichaEl thad cartEr, Photographer Mountain adventurer, would-be Nashville musician and former gymnastics standout, Michael’s true passion was photography, so the self-taught shooter established a freelance career. This month, our cover feature is seen through Michael’s lens. JaMEs holtEr, associate Editor Anyone want to buy a somewhat haphazzardly restored 1972 TC125? Anyone? Is this thing on? It has eight speeds. Mark kariya, Photographer A rare asset who can sling a Canon as fast as he can ride a KLX250S, Mark is a longtime dirt riding enthusiast and freelance motojournalist who specializes in covering off-road motorcycle racing. JiM kiMBall, contributor When Jim’s not spending time on the motocross track himself, he covers the pros on the motocross and Supercross circuits. In this issue, Jim catches up with Endurocross star and off-road wildman Taddy Blazusiak. See page 36.

Save $20 on the SPOT Satellite Messenger and get a free service upgrade. www.findmespot.com

Michael Lock 10443 Bandley Dr., Cupertino, CA 95014

contributors and staff

AMA Members get a membership discount from the Medical Air Services Association. www.medairservices.com

AMA members receive a $5 discount on admission to the AMA’s Motorcycle Hall of Fame Museum. www.motorcyclemuseum.org

Andy Goldfine 8 S. 18th Ave., West, Duluth, MN 55806

Bill krEsnak, government affairs Editor “...and then there was that time I held off Ricky Johnson on the motocross track. Yeah, and Jeremy McGrath and Chad Reed were behind me, too! Yeah, that’s the ticket!”

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Mark laPid, creative director Mark proves that sleep is optional and swears that soon he will put a flip book in the margin of this magazine. Look for it. nora Mcdonald, Production coordinator Nora is who you’re going to call when you absolutely, positively have to get a magazine put out overnight. As she recently said, “It will all be better Thursday because it has to be out by then.” grant Parsons, Managing Editor Grant’s favorite story this month is on the riders who pour their hearts and souls into customized Suzuki Savages (page 22). “Those guys prove the adage, ‘Anything worth doing is worth over-doing,’ and those are always great words to live by.” MikE sEatE, contributor Mike lives in Pittsburgh where he works as a mild-mannered newspaper columnist and publishes Café Racer magazine (www.caferacermag.com) a too-hip quarterly mag about classic and modern naked bikes. He has never learned to drive a car but has seven motorcycles for transportation and the frozen appendages that go with being car-less in Pittsburgh. Other contributors include David Scearce, T. Scavo, DJ Jones, Paul Windham, Ken Frick, S. Moore, John Kuntz, Bob Manifold, Terry Jordan and the Motorcycle Safety Foundation.


trim saf ety

From the President

Who Had The Most Impact On Motorcycling In 2008? With the renewed focus of our Association on the people of motorcycling and our fellow members, it only stands to reason that we name an AMA Motorcyclist of the Year. This inaugural selection may seem self-serving—and in a way it is—but I am confident that you will agree that there is only one clear choice for this distinction. One of the criteria used to select the AMA Motorcyclist of the Year is that the motorcyclist should be the person who has had the most profound impact on motorcycling. This could be a positive or negative impact on our chosen lifestyle, sport or favorite means of transportation. This award is not intended to be recognition of a lifetime of achievement. Rather, it is intended to recognize a contribution made, for better or worse, to motorcycling and its future by an individual throughout the course of the previous calendar year. If you have been paying attention to AMA Pro Racing this year, you may be thinking that Roger Edmondson deserves to be the AMA Motorcyclist of the Year. Certainly, Roger deserves an honorable mention because of his tremendous impact on professional motorcycle racing this season and beyond. Yet there is another individual without whom Roger would not have been in a position to have the impact he’s had. Our 2008 AMA Motorcyclist of the Year has had a greater impact on the AMA and motorcycling than any single person in America. As we’ve often said in these pages, motorcyclists need a strong advocate

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against adverse government action, and that a strong, unified national association can best provide this. To put it mildy, the AMA has been anything but strong and unified in recent years. It had become mired in racing controversy and was no longer equipped to fend off adversity, let alone adverse government action. The Association’s menu of benefits was paltry at best. This very publication was less than what our membership deserved. The lack of fiscal controls allowed the former chairman of the Board of Directors to help himself to a great deal of money (before we got it back). With our organization in disarray, who would stand up for the future of motorcycling? For one man, there was no option but to fix the AMA once and for all so that it could serve all motorcyclists—whether they were members of the AMA or not. He saw the need to change the AMA from a giant club into a professional organization. Realizing that he had enjoyed a lifetime of motorcycling because of the programs and efforts of the AMA, he decided that it was time to give back not only to the AMA, but also to motorcycling and its future. With the urging of friends, this man got himself elected to the AMA Board of Directors and soon rose to a leadership position. Soon, he became chairman of the American Motorcycle Heritage Foundation (AMHF) Board of Directors, which guides the AMA’s Motorcycle Hall of Fame Museum. Shortly after that, he was thrust into the position of AMA Board Chairman in

by Rob Dingman the wake of the resignation of the aforementioned chairman who was caught submitting fraudulent travel reimbursement claims. Our 2008 AMA Motorcyclist of the Year, by the way, accepts no reimbursement from the AMA for his travel. In fact, he contributes a great deal of his time and money to both the AMA and the AMHF. This one man had the wisdom and courage to do what needed to be done, rather than follow the path of least resistance. He realized that the Board of Directors was complicit in keeping the AMA weak, and that something had to be done about it. He became convinced that the AMA’s professional racing properties had become a significant drain on the Association and its identity. As Board chairman, he guided the AMA through a very tumultuous time, and his efforts are now paying dividends. The professional racing properties are in the hands of people who are very capable of elevating the sport. The fiscal side of the AMA’s house is now in order. The menu of member benefits continues to grow. This magazine is a much better representation of the AMA and its members. Perhaps most importantly, the AMA is now in a better position to focus on protecting the future of motorcycling. Without a doubt, this one man has had the most significant impact on motorcycling in all of 2008. I ask all of you to join me in honoring the AMA Motorcyclist of the Year: AMA Board of Directors Chairman Stan Simpson.

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Choosing The AMA Motorcyclist Of The Year


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WHEN NATURE ISN’T CORE ENOUGH, YOU ROLL YOUR OWN The AMA Maxxis National Endurocross Series is getting more popular every year, and big, freakin’ rocks like these have a lot to do with that. Manufactured for optimum rider frustration and primo fan enjoyment, Endurocross courses include logs, water crossings, jumps, boulders and tractor tires—some even placed vertically. Here, captured at the fifth round of the ’08 series in Columbus, Ohio, Red Bull KTM’s Taddy Blazusiak shows the field the quick way over the rocks. Blazusiak won the main event despite a first-turn crash and a persistant charge by Geoff Aaron on his Christini all-wheel-drive bike. See page 36 for an interview with the talented Polish rider. Photo: T. Scavo

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THE LIFE AmericanMotorcyclist.com


Protecting the Ride Page 18 Living It Page 22 Connections Page 28 Adrenaline Page 34 Heritage Page 40 January 2009

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© 2008 JupiterImages Corporation

The life | Protecting the Ride

TOUGH FIGHT AHEAD

Rights At Risk Pending Rewrite Of Federal Transportation Bill Next year will be a big one for motorcyclists in the halls of government nationally, and the AMA’s Government Relations experts are gearing up to look out for your interests. That’s because beginning in 2009, federal lawmakers will be rewriting a massive piece of legislation known as the Safe, Accountable, Flexible, Efficient Transportation Equity Act: A Legacy for Users (SAFETEA-LU). The Act is a wide-ranging law that covers everything from federal highway construction funding to money for motorcycle safety training. It’s in this legislation that many road rules are formulated to govern how motorcycles are treated. “There are a lot of transportation interests fighting for limited federal dollars in this transportation bill, and motorcyclists’ concerns should come through that mix loud and clear,” said Ed Moreland, AMA vice president for government relations. “As lawmakers

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turn their attention to this massive transportation bill, our goals are clear: We will be working to protect the programs now in the law that motorcyclists have fought so hard for over the years, as well as champion new ones.” The AMA wants to ensure that the federal law continues to require local jurisdictions to allow motorcycles access to any road that was constructed or maintained using federal money. This law has stopped many efforts by local jurisdictions to ban motorcycles from federally funded roads. Federal law also currently requires all jurisdictions to allow motorcyclists to use HOV lanes. Despite the law, some police departments have issued motorcyclists tickets for riding in those lanes, and New York City has already banned motorcycles from those lanes. The AMA has been fighting that ban.

OTHEr HIGH-prIOrITy ITEms InclUDE: Renewing funding for motorcycle safety training, and ensuring that money can’t be diverted for other uses. Ensuring that motorcycles are allowed to use public roads after those roads are privatized. Seeking funding for a study on the effectiveness of motorcycles to provide traffic congestion relief. Maintaining, and increasing funding for, the Recreational Trails Program that provides money for the construction and maintenance of trails through gasoline taxes paid by off-highway motorcyclists, ATVers, 4x4ers and others. Ensuring that motorcycles are considered in federally funded Intelligent Transportation Systems research, which involves such things as crash-avoidance systems using ultra-high-tech sensors.


The Life | Protecting the Ride

Doug Morris

AMA’s Robert Rasor Re-Elected As FIM Vice President

AMA Staffers Actively Protect Forests

Forest Service Seeks AMA Expertise Regarding Side-By-Side Utility Vehicles The popularity of side-by-side utility vehicles, or UTVs, has exploded in the United States, and U.S. Forest Service officials have asked the AMA Government Relations Department for advice on how to manage them on trails. At issue is the fact that some UTVs are wider than the 50-inch maximum width that most national forest ATV trails are designed to handle. Wider aftermarket tires can make potential issues worse. To get a better understanding of how UTVs work on standard ATV trails, officials

at the Wayne National Forest recently sought the advice of AMA Government Affairs Manager Royce Wood and AllTerrain Vehicle Association Director Doug Morris. They spent an afternoon evaluating UTV trail-use with officials. “The potentially bigger footprint of a UTV does present a challenge to trail managers, and it’s one we’re reviewing,’’ said Wood. “When it comes to preserving the country’s trail systems, rising to that challenge effectively is key.”

Robert Rasor, the AMA’s director of international affairs, has been re-elected as a vice president of the FIM (Federation Internationale de Motocyclisme), the international governing body for motorcycle sport and touring. Rasor was re-elected to a four-year term at the opening of the 124th FIM Congress in Durban, South Africa, Oct. 20. He is one of six FIM vice presidents. “It is a privilege to be able to serve motorcycling as a member of the FIM Management Council, and to represent the interests of the AMA and riders in North America,” Rasor said. AMA President and CEO Rob Dingman said, “This is a very prestigious position that gives Rob Rasor the opportunity to counsel the FIM in ways that will not only benefit the AMA and riders in the United States, but also riders around the world. There is nobody more capable to serve in this important position.” Robert Rasor

Biofuels Industry Pushes For More Ethanol

Ethanol Promotion and Information Council

Caution Urged For Motorcyclists

Decades after they appeared, gasolines with ethanol blended into them continue to raise controversy. The latest involves a push by the biofuels industry to increase the allowable amount of ethanol to 20 percent in gasoline—and a response from motorcycle manufacturers and others that the new level should only be allowed after a study determines whether the blend could harm motorcycle engines. Even the EPA acknowledges such concerns. In a letter recently sent directly to gasoline station operators, EPA officials noted that pumps which allow users to individually dial in the percentage of ethanol fuel could be dangerous.

“Gasoline containing more than 10 percent ethanol may cause damage to certain emissions control devices and systems and increase emissions from gasolineonly vehicles and engines,” the EPA wrote in the letter. “For this reason, the Clean Air Act prohibits retail gasoline stations from selling gasoline blended with more than 10 percent ethanol for use in gasoline-only vehicles and engines,” the EPA wrote. The industry group urging caution, the Alliance for a Safe Alternative Fuels Environment (ALLSAFE), supports that message. The AMA is a part of the ALLSAFE group.

January 2009

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The Life | Protecting the Ride

Riders Helping Riders

The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) has launched a new program to combat impaired motorcycle riding called “Riders Helping Riders.” The AMA is helping NHTSA roll out the program at the Cycle World International Motorcycle Shows that are going on nationwide from now through February. (See schedule on page 60.) NHTSA says that while motorcyclists have a strong sense of community, riders are hesitant to step in when other riders drink and ride. To convince riders that it’s appropriate to intervene in such cases, NHTSA put together an instructional program. The short program runs on a personal computer and teaches ways to keep riders away from alcohol when they’ll be riding, alternatives to drinking, ways to recognize when another rider is impaired, how to discourage an impaired rider from riding, and—when necessary—ways to prevent an impaired rider from riding.

CALIFORNIA Regulations are being revised for the state’s Off-Highway Vehicle Division’s Grants and Cooperative Agreements Program, which provides for wellmanaged OHV recreation in the state by providing financial assistance to cities, counties, districts, federal agencies, state agencies, educational institutions, federally recognized Native American tribes and nonprofit entities. For more information go to www.ohv.parks.ca.gov/?page_id=1164. KENTUCKY Rep. Mary Marzian (D-Louisville) has introduced legislation to be considered during the 2009 legislative session that would add a representative of the Brain Injury Association of Kentucky to the Kentucky Recreational Trails Authority. The Marzian bill, and other legislation is available online at www. AmericanMotorcyclist.com.

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Bill Kresnak

New Program Aimed At Impaired Riders

Doug Morris helps out a rider.

Have Fun And Support The Sport Trail Patrol Is A Great Way To Volunteer

If you’ve ever ridden in the Wayne National Forest in Ohio, maybe you’ve seen them: AMA Government Affairs Manager Royce Wood and Doug Morris, director of the AMA’s sister organization, the All-Terrain Vehicle Association, decked out in fluorescent Trail Patrol bibs. Or maybe you’ve ridden Wisconsin trails and bumped into riders like Randy and Karen Groth, who are part of the trail patrol program there, which is called the Ride Smart, Trail Ambassador program.

By whatever name, these volunteers and countless others are out on the trail explaining forest rules to riders in a friendly way, helping to educate users to preserve the environment and ride safely. “Volunteering for the trail patrol at your local national forest is a great way to help out other riders and get to ride the forest trails at the same time,” Wood said. For information on trail patrol and other volunteer opportunities near you, contact your local national forest.

NEW JERSEY New riders who get their motorcycle licenses by taking a road test on a bike with an engine displacing less than 231cc would be issued licenses that limit them to operating motorcycles with engines smaller than 500cc, under Assembly Bill 3292. Introduced by Assemblyman Joseph Cryan (D-Union), this measure also provides that a person who successfully completes an approved motorcycle safety education course or takes a road test on a motorcycle with an engine displacement of more than 230cc would receive a license or endorsement without an enginesize restriction.

changes to rules related to ATVs. Riders are reminded that safety training becomes mandatory as of Jan. 1, 2009, for anyone under age 16 wishing to ride on public land. For more information, go to www. rideatvoregon.org.

OREGON The state Parks Department has announced a new website to keep ATV riders up-to-date on recently enacted regulations resulting from the passage of Senate Bill 101, which made a variety of

VIRGINIA Riders under 16 years old would be restricted to riding dirt bikes with motors of no more than 90ccs under Senate Bill 803, introduced by Sen. Yvonne Miller (D-Norfolk). Riders under 12 would be restricted to dirt bikes of no more than 70cc. The bill can be reviewed on www. AmericanMotorcyclist.com. Also, state lawmakers during the 2009 legislative session will consider House Joint Resolution 626, which calls for the establishment of a joint subcommittee to study replacing the state motor fuel tax with a mileage-based fee predicated on vehicle-miles traveled in Virginia.

Statewatch


RIDE INTO POLITICAL ACTION!

LEARN TO FIGHT ANTI-MOTORCYCLE LAWS WITH AMA EXPERTS AT THE ANNUAL GOVERNMENT RELATIONS SEMINAR

This November’s elections brought sweeping changes in the nation’s Capitol. We can’t afford to be left in the dust by laws and regulations that threaten our right to ride. Join dozens of concerned motorcyclists who want to fight for their rights. Attend the AMA’s “Ride Into Political Action” seminar and learn how you can protect and preserve motorcycling for future generations. For more information, contact Sharon Smolinka at (614)856-1900 x1252, ssmolinka@ama-cycle.org, or go to: www.AmericanMotorcyclist.com/RideIntoAction

FEBRUARY 21-24, 2009 WASHINGTON, D.C.


The Life | Living It

Sluggo’s bobber

Demin’s bobber 07S40Rider’s cruiser

Miles Douglas

Small Bikes, Big Ideas

Custom Cool Doesn’t Have To Break The Bank by Paul Windham Suzuki’s LS650 Savage, also known as the S40 Boulevard, may not be the highest-tech, highest-horsepower or flashiest factory cruiser out there, but for backyard bike-builders like me—and hundreds of others I’ve found through websites like www.suzukisavage.com— these bikes are a dream come true. Not only are they inexpensive (the MSRP for an ’09 model is $4,599), they feature classic lines that give them an old-school look that is missing on many newer bikes. For those of us who are eager to express ourselves with the paint and metal that make up a motorcycle, Suzuki’s S40 is a surprisingly inspiring canvas that won’t break the bank. The S40 is wonderfully simple. It’s a single-cylinder 650cc cruiser that produces approximately 30 to 35 horses at the wheel. As expected from a

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thumper, it emphasizes low-end torque, which makes it fun to ride. The fivespeed gearbox will run highway speeds with no problem. Miles-per-gallon is in the high-50s to low-60s. The singlecylinder engine is easily maintained by most riders. In its stock configuration, it’s capable of providing miles of smiles, but none of us is really interested in leaving our bikes stock for long. For Savage customizers, that means really doing it ourselves. There’s relatively little aftermarket support for this bike. So, if you want a bit more legroom or just the right hard bags, you’ll have to go beyond picking up a catalog and spinning a few bolts. That’s where the real fun begins. Bike building on a budget is what this bike is all about, and that’s been my philosophy as I’ve modified my 2000 Suzuki Savage

into “Firelizard,” an old-school chopper. Others have been equally creative when it comes to their Savages (see examples above), and the end results can be amazing, whether you’re building a bobber, a chopper, a café racer or anything else you can imagine—and members of suzukisavage.com have imagined a lot. From a few add-ons to full-on conversions, the possibilities discovered by this dedicated group are endless. As one member of www.suzukisavage.com says, “Line up 10 of our customs, and you would barely recognize them as the same model.” What better compliment could you give a would-be custom than that? Paul Windham, AMA No. 979839, lives in Clovis, N.M.


Major OEMs Plan Electric, Hybrid Bikes An Alternative Answer To The Motorcycle Question

Motorcycles powered by something other than gasoline have been available for a few years, but on a relatively small scale. That’s all about to change. Honda and Yamaha recently announced plans to sell hybrid scooters as early as 2010. Both machines will rely on gasoline and electric-powered motors for

AP Photos

The Life | Living It

conveyance. In addition, Piaggio which has a hybrid version of its MP3 threewheeler, is now marketing the scooter to the European market. Even KTM is getting involved, first leaking images of, and then announcing the production of, a fully electric off-road race bike that weighs a claimed 198 pounds.

The Sport Of Kings Well, Of Princes, Anyway

KTM electric dirt bike

Few things help motorcyclists’ image more than the good works we do, particularly when those works happen on the world stage. And few motorcyclists have made a bigger splash when doing those good works than Britain’s Prince William and Prince Harry, when they recently took part in a 1,000-mile, eight-day, 80-rider charity enduro across South Africa. On this particular ride, the royal brothers said they hoped to raise $373,000 for the charities Sentebale, UNICEF and the Nelson Mandela Children’s Fund. They also helped remind the world that motorcyclists care—and that’s something we all can feel good about.

Help The AMA Celebrate 85 Years Get Involved In A Special Parade, Tell Your Story

Your Association will commemorate 85 years of protecting riders’ rights in 2009 with a number of activities and events, culminating with a special celebration at AMA Vintage Motorcycle Days, July 2426, at the Mid-Ohio Sports Car Course in Lexington, Ohio. And you can be a part of the festivities. One of the eye-catching activities at AMA Vintage Motorcycle Days will be a motorcycle parade with a bike representing each year the AMA has been protecting riders’ rights, from 1924 through 2009. To pull together that parade, officials at the AMA’s Motorcycle Hall of Fame Museum have created a list of bikes, and they’re asking AMA members with prime examples of these machines to be part of the parade. To get involved, visit www.motorcyclemuseum.org to check out

the list of machines and learn how you can be in the parade. “Pulling together so many machines won’t be easy, but it will be very cool,” says Museum Executive Director Mark Mederski. “If you or anyone you know has a great example of the bikes on our list, consider yourself encouraged to apply.” In addition, the AMA is asking its members to help the Association tell its story. Why did you join the AMA? What does motorcycling mean to you? What events, bikes or people form your most memorable motorcycling moments? Remember that a picture tells a thousand words, so please include photographs. E-mail your memories to 85thmemories@ama-cycle.org. Tickets for AMA Vintage Motorcycle Days are available at www. midohio.com or (800) MID-OHIO.


The Life | Living It

New Models Keep Coming More Marques Show Off ’09 Lineups The motorcycle shows at Cologne and Milan are always good for a few surprises when it comes to new bike models, and this year was no different. Highlights: Ducati’s Monster gets a new look, while the new GT1000 Touring adds a windscreen, luggage rack and some chrome bits to the standard GT1000. The wild-looking Streetfighter is equipped with a desmo-valved 90-degree 1099cc V-twin, a trellis frame, side-mounted exhaust and a look that’s two parts Monster, one part Hypermotard and three parts Transformer. In the scooter world, Piaggio has new displacements in the works for their MP3 threewheeler, as well as 14-inch rear wheels and fly-by-wire throttle. Also, a new Triumph Thunderbird will debut in 2009, with a 1,600cc vertical twin engine that puts out a claimed 100 pounds-feet of torque.

BMW’s S1000RR is a bold stroke, 1,000cc inline-four-based machine that reportedly will weigh less than 452 pounds with fuel and offer both dynamic traction control and ABS. The bike will provide the platform for Ruben Xaus’ and Troy Corser’s assault on the World Superbike Championship for the factory BMW team in 2009. The all-new K1300 line will offer bikes in GT (touring), R (naked) and S (sport) trim, all built around a 1,293cc boxer motor, with a laundry list of technogoodies, including traction control, electronically adjustable suspension and gearshift assist, which accommodates fullthrottle, no-clutch upshifts.

Ducati Streefighter

KTM 990 Supermoto T

The hottest U.S.-bound machine from the Piaggio Group is undoubtedly the 2009 Aprilia RSV4 Factory, with a 998.9cc V-four that puts out a claimed 177 horsepower, and is packed with trick bits such as variable intakes, fly-by-wire throttle, multi-mapping fuel injection and a slipper clutch.

KTM’s 990 Supermoto T offers long-distance touring comfort in a supermoto package, while an R version tilts decidedly toward the performance end of the spectrum. The 990 Adventure gets up to a claimed 20 percent power boost and is available in both an S and a more aggressive R trim.

There also will be an MX version of Aprilia’s 449cc V-twin supermoto and enduro bikes that features lighter weight (no electric start) and slim ergonomics.

BMW S1000RR Aprilia RSV4

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The Life | Living It

Ask The Motorcycle Safety Foundation Crossing Railroad Tracks Correctly YOU ASK: I’ve been told that I need to ride over railroad tracks at a right angle. However, sometimes the rails cross the street at an extreme slant, requiring me to make an excessive swerve in my lane to accomplish the right-angle crossover. Is this correct, or is there a better way to cross tracks in these cases? THE MSF RESPONDS: The general rule for crossing railroad tracks or similar long obstacles (pavement seams, lumber) is to approach them at as close to a 90-degree angle as possible. From a practical standpoint, if the tracks are not perpendicular to the road, turning to take them head-on could be more hazardous than approaching at somewhat less than a 90-degree angle— your path may carry you into another lane of traffic. So, if the tracks are between 45 degrees and 90 degrees from your path of travel, it may be safer to ride straight within your lane. See diagrams 1 and 2. For tracks that are less than 45 degrees

Diagram 1: Correct

Diagram 2: Incorrect

Diagram 3: Correct

Diagram 4: Incorrect

from your path, including those parallel to your path, move far enough away from the tracks to cross at an angle of at least 45 degrees. Then, make a deliberate turn. See diagrams 3 and 4. Edging across could cause your tires to be caught or deflected, which could throw

you off balance. By continually using MSF’s SEE strategy (Search, Evaluate, Execute), you can plan your maneuver well in advance of a close encounter with railroad tracks or other obstacles.


The Life | Living It

Café Redux

Café Racer Spirit In A Unique Package by Mike Seate When it comes to motorcycle builders, Erik Buell stands alone. The self-described engineering geek and former roadracer charts his own course, experimenting with concepts like mass-centralization and alternative placement of fuel and oil storage units. Now, Buell has set his sights on the resurrection of the café racer with the all-new 1125 CR, released to the world’s press for two days of testing in Berlin— on the Sprewald Ring roadracing circuit and along the fastest roads ever paved by a Teuton. Buell, an always cheerful, accessible sort, explained that as a younger man, he ran a Velocette Thruxton, one of the most handsome and quick British factory café bikes ever produced. “They were road-warriors’ machines: Fast, aggressive and all about handling on tight roads,” he said. “They were geared for quick acceleration, not outright top speed like so many of today’s sportbikes. That’s what we were after with the 1125 CR.”

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Buell’s is a bold move. The last time an American motorcycle was introduced bearing the café racer designation, it cost Harley-Davidson dearly, as most of the XLCR models sat unsold in crates until collectors discovered them years later. This latest creation, however, is no cosmetic exercise. Along with the half-

faired 1125 R that the CR is based on, it uses Buell’s unique Trilogy Of Tech design philosophy, which emphasizes centralized mass (underslung exhausts), low unsprung weight (single front disc) and chassis rigidity (massive frame spars). The result is a motorcycle embodying the essence of the café-racer tradition.


The Life | Living It

rotor toward a no-speed-limit stretch of Germany’s Autobahn. Riding the ’Bahn is no joke—impatient Audi sedans will crowd a less able motorcycle’s rear wheel at 120 mph-plus speeds, and if the Buell suffered any power or design inconsistencies, this is where they’d surface. That this impression made it to print is proof that the 1125 CR handled itself just fine at Autobahn speeds. Like all Buell motorcycles, the CR’s looks are a matter of taste. Whether it’s the pair of outsized air scoops cooling dual,

The 1125 CR is propelled by a 72-degree, water-cooled V-twin engine built by Rotax, the firm behind the powerplants for Aprilia’s RSV and Tuono. At full throttle, the CR makes a claimed 146 horsepower at the crank, although it’s geared lower than the 1125 R. Also, on the track at high revs, the 1125 CR vibrates considerably less than Buell’s air-cooled XB series. Chalk that up to counterbalancers in the Helicon motor, as explained by Platform Director Tony Stefanelli. No ivory tower plutocrat, Buell fully encourages testers to beat the snot out of his new toys, a challenge that involved pointing the front wheel with its single 375mm, eight-piston perimeter brake

side-mounted radiators or the underslung exhaust, you either love it or hate it. Quick acceleration, race-level cornering agility, and unique, home-brewed styling make the $11,695 Buell 1125 CR a userfriendly eye-turner with attitude. Heck, even café-style clubman handlebars or flat, drag-style tillers are optional. Unfortunately, however, you’ll have to supply your own white silk scarf. Mike Seate is editor of Café Racer Magazine at www.caferacermag.com.


the Life | Connections

CLUB sPOtLiGht Motor Maids { www.motormaids.org } What it is A diverse group of women motorcyclists united through a passion for riding while fostering a positive image and promoting safe riding skills. “The club believes it is important to have fun riding while preserving the club’s history and tradition.” the club’s website says. “We believe that presenting a positive image of women motorcyclists demonstrates our respect for each other and for ourselves.”

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BaCKGROUND Around 1938, a young woman rider from Providence, Rhode Island, decided there must be a number of women motorcyclists around the country who would like to get to know each other. With that thought in mind, Linda Dugeau started writing to dealers and riders who she thought might know women motorcyclists. She contacted hundreds of people, and out of this effort the Motor Maids was born in

1940 with 51 charter members from all over the country. AMA Charter No. 509 was issued to the club in 1941. eveNts The Motor Maids organizes a variety of events each year, from charity rides to campouts in the Great Smoky Mountains to rides to air shows. WRite Motor Maids, 44 W. Poinsetta Ave., Toledo, OH 43612.


Bob (at the controls) and Robert navigate the Manx Two-Day Trial.

Trials For Two

Riding The Manx Two-Day Trial On The Isle Of Man by Bob Manifold It may be a niche sport that many haven’t even heard of, but I’m a great fan of sidecar trials—motorcycle observed trials with a two-person team riding a specially made bike with a stand-up platform attached. Aside from being a blast, sidecar trials are a great way to add some life to your riding, as well as get some use out of old bikes instead of letting them depreciate in the back of the garage un-ridden. In fact, my love of sidecar trials stretches all the way to the Isle of Man. Most recently, I competed in the Manx Two-Day Trial with my son, Robert. Not only is the Manx Trials a great way to spend some time off, but the Augustbased event is only a small part of the crazy, motorcycle-centric week that is the Manx GP, the amateur version of the world-famous TT races held every year on the island in June. The Manx Trials meet is the most popular event of the year for the sidecar crews, with 37 teams signing up for the event. We rode all over the 30-mile-long

island, stopping to ride through specially laid-out technical sections where a checker watched, recording penalty points whenever either of our feet touched the ground. A lot of the fun was in just getting to the sections, with smiles and waves from the locals. Many of them even manned gates as riders and spectators were let in and out of fields where sheep and cattle grazed. For us, watching the eventual winners, Jon Tuck and Matt Sparkes, ride some of these sections was amazing—they were breezing through hazards that appeared to be impossible. I’m keeping our final score close to the vest, but I’ll admit we took well over 200 penalty points. The winners recorded only 5! Still, we did come away with one hardfought award: We were recognized as the team that had traveled the farthest to compete. As a bonus, we were the first sidecar crew from the U.S. to ever contest the event! It was well worth the effort, to be sure. Bob is hard at work constructing another trials machine out of his 1979 Bultaco Sherpa to complement the trusty Fantic 200 he rides in local events in New England. He can be reached at bmanifold@spinpass.com.

AMA Board Elections

Southeast Region AMA Members To Vote It’s again time for elections to the AMA Board of Directors. AMA members living in the AMA’s Southeastern Region (District 2) will find a ballot in the center of this magazine that will allow them to cast a vote for their representative to the AMA Board of Directors. Running for the seat occupied by outgoing Vice Chairman Carl Reynolds are two members: C.R. Gittere of North Carolina and Charles Goman of Georgia. If you’re an AMA member in good standing and you live in Kentucky, Virginia,

Tennessee, North Carolina, South Carolina, Georgia, Florida, Louisiana or Puerto Rico, and you did not receive a ballot in this issue, you may call the AMA offices at (800) AMA-JOIN to request one. Only official ballots will be counted (duplicates will not be counted), and they must be returned prior to Jan. 15, 2009. AMA members in the South Central region will not receive ballots because only one candidate was nominated to run. In that region, incumbent Stan Simpson will continue serving on the board.


The Life | Connections

WORTH READING

On The Web

Sport Rider Magazine

Motorcycles In Pixel Form

WHAT IT IS The largest-circulation magazine dedicated exclusively to sportbikes and road racing, offering a comprehensive and in-depth look at everything related to the sport. THE SPORT RIDER STAFF SAYS According to Editor Kent Kunitsugu, who has been riding for more than 30 years (with half of that racing), Sport Rider is “directed at the sportbike enthusiast who is looking for real, undiluted, and unbiased information on the sport, from incredibly thorough bike and product tests and shootouts to riding tips to behindthe-scenes racing coverage. Our staff and contributors are all highly competent riders, and our ability to understand and convey to our readers the hows and whys of an increasingly sophisticated sportbike world is an added plus that separates us

WWW.JAYLENOSGARAGE.COM If you’re looking for some great dream time on the web, this site is it, with tons of pictures and video of the coolest cars and motorcycles of one of the country’s most famous motorcyclists, Tonight Show host Jay Leno.

from the rest. Because when it comes down to it, the more you know, the more fun you’ll have riding.” FIND IT At newsstands around the country, and online at www.sportrider.com.

WWW.DIRTBIKESCHOOL.COM

ON DISPLAY

The Motorcycle Safety Foundation isn’t just about streetbikes, as its Dirtbike School website shows. In addition to links to MSF off-road courses around the country, you’ll find safety tips and more for parents and kids.

Solvang MC Museum

WWW.SHARETRAILS.ORG

www.motosolvang.com

WHAT IT IS The Solvang Motorcycle Museum, in Solvang, California, displays a collection of vintage and rare motorcycles as well as European race bikes from the private collection of Virgil Elings.

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WHAT’S INSIDE The collection is quite broad, with something for everyone, ranging from a 1910 FN to the present. The emphasis is tilted toward racing motorcycles. At the museum, you will find names such as AJS, BMW, Ducati, Gilera, Matchless, Moto Guzzi, MV, Norton, Triumph, Velocette and Vincent.

FIND IT The museum is located in the former Solvang Designer Outlet Center, now owned by Elings. The museum is open weekends from 11 a.m. until 5 p.m., and by appointment mid-week. Admission is $10 for adults and free for accompanied children who are under the age of 10.

One of the heavyweights of the landaccess fight for motorcyclists and other OHV users, the BlueRibbon Coalition’s website is the home base for the group’s 10,000 individual members and 1,200 organization and business members.


(800) aMa-JOIN

www.aMERICaN MOTORCYCLIST.com/ TRaVEL

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Know Your Price Black Book Takes The Guessing Out of Buying, Selling Used Motorcycles It’s never easy to admit that a relationship is over, but the time always comes to move on. And when you’ve decided it’s time to part company with your reliable two-wheeled companion, your next step should be to pick up the latest copy of Black Book USA’s Motorcycle & Powersports Value Guide, an officially licensed product of the AMA. The guide includes current retail values, trade-in values for various conditions, auction wholesale

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values, original MSRP, and more for pretty much every on- or off-road motorcycle, ATV, scooter, personal watercraft and snowmobile sold in the United States since 1981. Updated monthly, the guide allows you to set a fair price for your used ride—or negotiate a fair price for a used bike, says Black Book Editor Scott Yarbrough. “Buying or selling a bike is often an emotional decision, and the guide is a good reality check on where the market really is each month,”

Yarbrough notes. “We’ve seen bikes’ values change more than $1,000 in a single month. Current information helps you make smart decisions. ” Plus, when you purchase a Black Book Motorcycle & Powersports Value Guide, you help support the AMA. Black Book refunds a portion of every sale back to the AMA, which in turn uses those funds to help support your right to ride. More information about Black Book’s products can be found at www.blackbookusa.com.


AMA MOTORCYCLE HALL OF FAMER

Joe Petrali

The End Of An Era Joe Petrali, known as Smokin’ Joe to his friends, was arguably the country’s finest racer from the mid-1920s to the mid-1930s, and perhaps one of the greatest motorcycle racers of all time. Petrali was one of the last great Class A factory racing stars who competed in board-track racing, dirt track, speed records and hillclimbs. Petrali won 49 AMA national championship races, a mark that wouldn’t be surpassed for 55 years, until 1992, when Scott Parker won his 50th AMA national. By the time Petrali retired from racing in 1938, Class A racing, which featured purpose-built, high-dollar racing machines, had faded. Class C racing, which used lightly modified production motorcycles, was taking center stage. Petrali’s retirement symbolically marked an end of the great three-decade era in motorcycle racing, when the best racers in the country competed on the finest racing machinery the factories could build. Petrali was born in San Francisco on Feb. 22, 1904. His big break in racing came in 1921 at a Pacific Coast championship race in Fresno, Calif. Indian agreed to let Petrali have a tryout. He was just 17 and battled all of the top stars of the day. He didn’t win but nearly did. The next significant chapter in

Petrali’s career came on July 4, 1925, in Altoona, Pa. Altoona’s mile-plus-long board track was the site of that year’s AMA 100mile championship. Petrali won the race aboard an injured rider’s Harley-Davidson with an average speed of 100.36 mph. That record, for a 100-mile board-track race, was never broken. Petrali then won three national titles (the 10-, 25- and 50-mile championships for 61inch motors) on Sept. 7, 1925, on the boards in Laurel, Md., once again setting a new record in the process and becoming national boardtrack champion. He then became the most dominant rider of the next 10 years. Petrali won two national titles in 1926, both on Harley-Davidsons. In 1927, he earned his first championship for Excelsior, winning the 10-mile AMA dirt track championship in front of the Harley brass on the Milwaukee Mile. In 1929, he won both the 45-inch and 61inch hillclimb national championships riding an Excelsior at Muskegon, Mich. The 1931 season was an outstanding one for Petrali. He won eight of the 16 dirt track and hillclimb nationals that year. The following season, Petrali earned the distinction of being the only rider in AMA history to win both the dirt track and hillclimb national championships in the same year. He repeated that feat three more times in 1933, 1935 and 1936. Petrali’s only foray into Class C racing was on November 1938 at the Oakland 200. It also was his last. The track was an oiled-down dirt-track mile. Bikes were sliding everywhere, and Petrali was almost hit several times. The last great Class A champion then pulled off the track and hung up his leathers for the final time. Read more about Joe Petrali and other members of the AMA’s Hall of Fame at www.motorcyclemuseum.org.

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S. Moore

The Life | Adrenaline

Russell Bobbitt: 2008 National Enduro Champion

Bobbitt Wins National Enduro Title

Lafferty Pushes, But Can’t Overcome Points Deficit A few wins and a season of consistency put Red Bull KTM Factory rider Russell Bobbitt at the top of the points chase when the dust settled on the 2008 AMA FMF Racing National Enduro Championship Series. Although eight-time and defending champion Mike Lafferty, Bobbitt’s KTM teammate, made up as many points as he could in winning the final round, it wasn’t enough to overcome a deficit that dated to his missing the fourth round in Fluvanna, Texas. (Lafferty broke his foot in a practice crash and was off his bike

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for roughly eight weeks.) Bobbitt’s second-place finish was more than enough to give him the title, 245 points to Lafferty’s 239. Another KTM rider, Cole Kirkpatrick, finished third, 49 more points back. “I am very excited about this championship,” Bobbitt said. “I worked hard all season long, and I’m glad I was able to have everything come together at the final round. It was a close title chase all year. I am happy for the entire team to earn first and second in the series.” Bobbitt’s three wins on the year were

second to Lafferty’s five in the 10-round series. Lafferty returned after his injury to score a fourth, two seconds and three wins, including the final round in Arizona. “I was happy with my ride today but knew that Russell would have to make some pretty big mistakes to lose the championship,” Lafferty said after the race. “I got the race win, but not the championship. Now I will go home and continue my training to come back and try to win the championship next year.”


The Life | Adrenaline

D. Scearce

David Knight, clinching the title.

“I feel bad for Paul Whibley though. He’s ridden really well all year, so to see him run out of fuel here, which handed me the championship, isn’t how I hoped things would end. I’ve also had some disappointing races this year, but despite the conditions here everything went really well. I can relax a little bit now and enjoy the last few rounds of the series.” And that’s exactly what Knight did, lining up at the final round in Crawfordsville, Ind., on a KTM ATV, competing against some of the country’s fastest four-wheeled off-road racers. The new champion finished 22nd out of 27 riders, completing the same number of laps as overall winner Chris Borich.

Knight Repeats In GNCCs

Isle Of Man Rider Makes It Two For Two In U.S. KTM’s David Knight wrapped up his second title in the AMA Grand National Cross Country Series (GNCC) two rounds early, with seven wins through the first 11 rounds. It was Knight’s second GNCC championship, which he first won last year after a successful run in the FIM World Enduro Championships. Knight captured the ’08 title at the Unadilla event in New Berlin, N.Y. With a torrential downpour leading up to the start of the race, the conditions were brutal. With a combination of Knight’s win and his closest championship rival, New Zealand’s Paul Whibley, running out of fuel, Knight was able to secure the championship with two rounds to go. “We’ve had some great races, some disappointing races, but to win the title is amazing,” Knight said after the race. D. Scearce

David Knight

August 19-22, 2009 WomenandMotorcycling.com


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Edmunds J. KTM Images

June 1-6, 2009 Mark Your Calendar!

Taddy’s Back

Polish Off-Road Star Recovers, Wins

D. Scearce

Taddy Blazusiak made an immediate impact when he won his first Endurocross last year in Las Vegas. However, while a successful trials career and a surprise win at the infamous Erzberg Hare Scrambles have made him a well-known competitor in Europe, Blazusiak remains a bit of a mystery in the U.S. We caught up with the Polish star at the Columbus, Ohio, round of the AMA Maxxis Endurocross Series—a race he won a mere seven weeks after a crash that broke numerous bones in his face.

Taddy, you really gained a lot of notoriety last year with your Erzberg win and then your Endurocross win at Las Vegas—what about before that? My background is from observed trials riding. There I was a professional, and was riding for three different factory teams before I came to off-road. Actually, it happened that I had some little issues with my team, and I stayed home for a few weeks to solve the problems. At that time, the Erzberg event was going on, so I went to Erzberg, which many consider the world’s toughest off-road race. This was a new opportunity that came up, so I just took it—that doesn’t happen twice, right? I decided to give off-road a try for a year. It’s now been a year, and I’m still here. I’m happy with my decision. It was really just by chance that you ended up going to Erzberg. Here it’s your first off-road race and you win it! Yes, it was my first off-road race. I mean, I never really rode a dirt bike before. I had one at home, but I used it maybe once every two years! It was my first experience racing them. I went there just to have some fun, look around and enjoy myself, and end up winning the race. Here in America it seems like many of the off-road guys come from motocross; yet you came from trials. Definitely, it is a big help because I

Raines Wins Battle Of East Vs. West First Hare Scrambles Shootout Goes To The East

Jason Raines

Jason Raines, who earlier this year nailed down the AMA Eastern Hare Scrambles Championship, has claimed the overall title and the AMA National No. 1 plate to go with it with a dominating win at the first AMA East vs. West Hare Scrambles Shootout, held at the Cross Bar Ranch in Davis, Okla. The Shootout featured the best riders from the AMA East Regional and AMA West Regional Hare Scrambles Series. Although all riders were welcomed to race, only

participants who earned points in at least three regional events in the class they contested at the Shootout were eligible for an AMA National Championship. The course featured a brutal 23-mile loop with a pro lap time that was more than an hour long. With a four-loop race, Raines’ race time was 4-1/2 hours—an uncharacteristically long time for a hare scrambles. “It was a long, tough course, but there was a lot of variety,” the 30-yearold Raines said. “There was everything from wide-open grass fields to tight trails to tough technical hills. There were sections where the West Coast guys did


never rode any different bikes before that. Skills that I have on the bike came from my trials riding. I had some things to learn as far as speed, because it’s not so easy to go from trials where there’s no speed at all, to racing with 10 people around you. What about going to the Las Vegas Endurocross for the first time and winning? I went to Vegas knowing that I could do well because I signed with KTM in July, and I had about three months on the bike, and with the team. I had a bike at home and was practicing. Also, they were sending me to different kinds of races in Europe before Vegas. I wasn’t thinking about winning with (fellow KTM rider and favorite) David Knight there, but I knew that I could ride smooth, fast, and I can be there to challenge. The race was pretty good for me. I had a few lines that nobody else had and ended up winning.

coocase

T. Scavo

What racing does your deal at KTM consist of? My deal with KTM is for the Endurocross series. This is my goal in U.S. I raced the old indoor enduro series back in Europe, which is basically like Endurocross in the U.S. It’s Endurocross in the summer. Then we start straight into the indoors back in Europe because it’s through winter. In the end, there is no time to race anything else, but sometimes I do one-off events, but there’s no way to focus on 10 championships. You have to choose something and just go for it, because there’s nobody who can be good in everything.—Jim Kimball

well and places where the East Coast riders could excel.” After starting in third, Raines quickly passed KTM’s Nate Kanney for second before reeling in early leader Tony Joiner. After making the pass, Raines built a 2-minute lead by the end of the first lap. The gap only increased from there, reaching 8 minutes by race end. Kanney finished second, with Joiner claiming the last spot on the podium. For a full list of the 2008 AMA East vs. West Hare Scrambles Champions see the Racing section of www. AmericanMotorcyclist.com.

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The Life | Adrenaline

John Kuntz

Phil Libhart, climbing Devil’s Staircase

Libhart, Strank Split Hillclimb Both Riders Plan To Bring The Fight Next Year

Phil Libhart and Tiger Strank came out on top in the 2008 AMA Hillclimb Championship, with Libhart winning a season-long battle with Strank for the AMA Xtreme Hillclimb title and Strank running away with the AMA Unlimited Hillclimb No. 1 plate. Xtreme Hillclimb, which features a variety of engine sizes and configurations under 770cc, was the closest of the two. Libhart edged defending champion Strank by 4 championship points. “It only took us 11 years to win this title, and I think we were the bridesmaid seven times,” Libhart says. “It’s definitely good to build a bike from scratch and go out and win a championship on it.” Strank, however, would not be denied

for the Unlimited Hillclimb title, which features various engine types 701cc and larger. The Johnstown, Pa., rider was the only multi-time winner on the season, riding his Yamaha R1-powered machine to four wins and 123 championship points. Alex Benner, from Niles, Mich., finished second, 7 points back. “It was kind of an up-and-down year. We put a new motor in the bike. It made a lot more horsepower, and it took awhile to figure it out,” says Strank, who rides for the Dr. Bob Racing Pro Hillclimb Team and receives factory support from Yamaha. “This bike is pushing around 300 horsepower, and I’m only 130 lbs. It’s a lot for me to hold onto.” Strank is gracious in coming up second

in the Xtreme Hillclimb class, but he’s clear that next year he wants to get back the No. 1 plate. “(Libhart) is probably the best rider out there who had never won a national title before, so he deserves it,” Strank says. “Next year, though, I want to win them both. Plain and simple, I’ve had enough. I want both titles back next year.” In the AMA Pro Sport Hillclimb class, which features 400cc to 450cc fourstroke, single-cylinder production bikes, Brownstown, Pa.’s Robby Debusk, 16, dominated the class all year. The Yamaha rider, who rides with Strank on the Dr. Bob Racing Pro Hillclimb Team, took the title with 130 championship points to Scott Wentz’s 57.

Eddie Wins Laguna!

Yamaha-powered superkart to victory at the Super Stars of Superkarts event at Laguna Seca Raceway. Lawson started on pole and led every lap, just beating Australian Sam Zavaglia. This was the third time that Lawson and Yamaha have won the Super Stars of Superkarts race, which runs in conjunction with the American Le Mans Series weekend at Laguna.

Lawson Goes Fast On Four, Too

Eddie Lawson may be famous for his four world motorcycle championships, but that hasn’t kept the likeable star from building an impressive resume in the superkart racing world. In October, Lawson piloted his No. 7


Heritage The AMA’s Motorcycle Hall of Fame Museum tells the exciting stories and preserves the history of American motorcycling through world-class exhibitions. The Museum continues its mission thanks to individual and corporate donations, and the support of the AMA. Here are a few ways you can help:

–vISIT Come see our expansive exhibit halls in Pickerington, Ohio. Current exhibits include: bikes of the stars in “Motostars: Celebrities + Motorcycles”; Arlen Ness creations in “Awesome-Ness”; motorcycle photography in “Red Bikes”; and the Motorcycle Hall of Fame.

-GIve -WIN Enter for a chance to win a Harley-Davidson Rocker signed by Willie G. Davidson, or a pair of Triumph Bonnevilles, a ’59 and an ’09—and help support the Museum at the same time.

Your tax-deductible gifts to the AMA’s Motorcycle Hall of Fame Museum help preserve our motorcycling heritage. You can donate cash, appreciated securities, or even donate a motorcycle to be sold to raise funds for the Museum through the Cycle Donor program.

w w w. m o t o r c yc l e museum.org

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Post-War Runabout

The Rumi 125 Super Sport Grew Out Of War-Torn Italy Moto Rumi isn’t well-known in America, but there was a time in the 1950s when the Italian company’s 125cc racers were winning praise—and trophies. It was only expected that European

lads fanatical about motorcycling, such as current General Motors Vice Chairman Bob Lutz, who grew up in Switzerland, sought the street version of these racers: the Rumi 125 Super Sport. The company didn’t always

produce two-wheelers, however. Rumi manufactured small submarines and torpedoes for the Italian military during World War II and switched production from implements of war to scooters and small motorcycles following Italy’s defeat. Conceived as a source of cheap transportation for war-torn Italy, the Rumis were no less competitive on the track. In 1954, Rumi won the 125cc Italian national roadrace championship. Lutz, who followed roadracing closely

Heritage features the machines and people of the AMA’s Motorcycle Hall of Fame Museum in Pickerington, Ohio. The Museum is a 501(c)3 non-profit corporation that receives support from the AMA and from motorcycling enthusiasts. For info and directions, visit www.motorcyclemuseum.org, or call (614) 856-2222.


Heritage riding with up to 350cc. “I loved that bike,” he says. The quick, two-cylinder two-stroke has a four-speed transmission, telescopic front forks, twin rear shocks, aluminum drum brakes front and rear, and a top speed of 60 mph. Young Lutz rode his Rumi 125 Super Sport year-round in Switzerland. He ultimately moved on to other bikes. His current stable includes a Suzuki Hayabusa, BMW K1200S, BMW R1100S

and BMW K1. Lutz has fond memories of his 1956 Rumi 125 Super Sport. So when he had the opportunity to buy one many years after owning one as a young man, he did. Lutz’s Rumi 125 Super Sport is just one of the many motorcycles now on display as part of the “MotoStars: Celebrities + Motorcycles” exhibit at the AMA’s Motorcycle Hall of Fame Museum at AMA headquarters in Pickerington, Ohio. Grant Parsons

and was thrilled by performance, bought a 125 Super Sport street machine in 1956. “It had two great big Dell’Orto carburetors with velocity stacks, and all of 11 horsepower, which was twice the horsepower of most 125s back then, and more than most of the German, English or Italian 250s,” Lutz says. “So here was a 125, which you could engage in racing on the highways and byways of Switzerland, and you could wax people who were

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T A S I AM RCYCL R O T A E O M THE Y F O orld W e Th n O act p son p m I m t i S tes n a a t e r S e G 2008? h T d In Ha g o n i h l W rcyc had Carter o t o Of M y Michael T os b

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S

ometimes the world evolves. Other times it changes, rapidly. Theorists call it punctuated equilibrium. In 2008, the motorcycle world changed dramatically—thanks to the efforts and vision of one man. The most visible part of that change came in the form of the sale of AMA Pro Racing, announced early this year. But the real change—reinventing of the world’s largest motorcyclist advocacy organization— started much earlier, and is proving to be even more far-reaching. Stan Simpson, as chairman of the AMA’s Board of Directors, sparked that change. He led the effort that allowed the AMA to get its house in order, first by restoring fiscal integrity, then by focusing on advocacy and improving member communications and benefits. It was also during this time that Simpson recognized the drain that the management of professional racing had placed on the AMA. Under his leadership, the Board made the historic decision to safeguard the future of the AMA and the sport of professional motorcycle racing by selling roadracing, motocross, flat track, supermoto, hillcilimb and ATV racing to the Daytona Motorsports Group, the company best able to direct its success. Less visible but equally significant are Simpson’s many other achievements in the world of motorcycling and, in particular, on behalf of the AMA. An accomplished off-road racer in his day, he remains

On His First Motorcycle Experience My first experience on a motorcycle was on an Indian Scout that my dad had, probably in the late ’40s or early ’50s. My dad was far from being what you’d call an avid motorcyclist, but he did have an Indian Scout. When I was about 10 years old, he fired it up out there where we lived in the country and let me ride it around a little bit, and I thought that that was something pretty special. On What That Experience Helped Instill In Him I was actually enamored with anything that was mechanical. My dad had a nursery business—landscaping and trees—and he had this maintenance shop for the tractors and the pickup trucks, and I thought it was pretty neat to be able to do that kind of stuff, so I hung out there a lot. Probably by the time I entered high school, Dad had decided that maybe I ought to be an engineer. He was kind of aiming me in that direction, and I spent a great deal of time playing with mechanical stuff that moved and made power. On Getting Bitten By The Motorcycle Bug A friend of mine in high school is the one who really brought me into the motorcycle community. He and his dad and all of his uncles rode dirtbikes, and he was always talking about them. One day he said, “You ought to come over sometime and you can try.” I rode one of his bikes in the dirt—it was a 175 Harley-Davidson two-stroke— and I thought, “This is the answer!” That was probably in ’55, maybe, and I was fortunate in the fact that I worked for

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an avid rider on both the dirt and the street. The founder and owner of a highly successful business, Simpson started “giving back” to the AMA, first as a member of AMA Congress, and then as a member of the AMA Board. He became chairman of the AMA’s Motorcycle Hall of Fame Museum board, and then in 2008, assumed the helm of the AMA Board of Directors after the resignation of its disgraced former chairman, Dal Smilie, following the discovery of unsubstantiated expense reimbursements. The wave of change that Simpson helped start will continue well into the future. Years from now, motorcyclists will look back at 2008 as a crucial turning point that put the AMA and American motorcycling on a path of sustained growth and long-term success. The AMA selects as its inaugural AMA Motorcyclist of the Year the person who had the most impact on the world of motorcycling during the previous year. In the historic year of 2008, we can think of no better recipient of the award than Stan Simpson. For a closer look at the man at the center of it all, American Motorcyclist caught up with him at the offices of the materials-handling company he founded in Cibolo, Texas.

my dad and he paid me, and all I had to do was save 30 percent of it for school and some other stuff. So I did have a little folding money back then, and in 1956 I bought a 175 Bridgestone and rode it in the dirt. I never claimed to be bright, but I sure wasn’t back then! On His First AMA Race It was, I think, in 1957. I entered a hare scramble on that Bridgestone. That motorcycle was not the best dirt bike by any means, but I thought that was the greatest thing I’d ever done. The fact that it was an AMA race meant that I had to pay—I think it was $7—to join the American Motorcycle Association, not “motorcyclist” then, and I thought that was kind of like an entry fee. I became an AMA member in 1957, which kind of meant at the end of the day that I could say in 2007 that I was a 50-year member. After that race, I rode at the local off-road club on weekends and on Thursday nights, whenever I could. I tried things like short track and flat track, and I liked all of it. It didn’t take me long to figure out that the kind of riding I liked the most was the one I got to do the longest! On His Love Of Racing I really started riding a lot—I mean, where it was a passion—when I got out of college. And then I found that the people I wanted to be around, in business and in personal life, were all competitors. For quite some time, I was one of the local fast guys. I rode motocross in the late ‘60s, and I actually got a sponsored ride from Edison Dye. It wasn’t that I was the fastest guy. It was because you could race

motocross 45 weekends a year then. I had a job that would let me race every weekend, and my wife was raising our family and letting me race. I’d finish in the top three, depending on conditions. But because I rode every weekend, that let me gain more points than the other guys, so that made me the motocross champion. On How His View Of The AMA Changed I would start out by saying that I, like so many folks my age, and the next couple of generations down, I was a user of AMA, all the years that I was racing motocross and enduros and all the other stuff. I figured that AMA was there to serve my needs, and I got to race every weekend. But when I got to be a little older, I started realizing that there was a difference between what we used to say were Brand X trail rides and the AMA races I was doing. All these Nationals—there was a difference in AMA. And I started hanging around with folks like Tom and Jack Penton and all the old guys— Dave Mungenast, Bill Baird, then later on, Dick Burleson. I got to the place where, if you go to all the National stuff, pretty soon you become part of the group. And again, I was never really one of the fast guys, but I rode a lot, so I ended up winning classes here and there, and I won a few National enduro overalls back in the old days. On The Moment He Decided To Get Involved About 8 or 10 years ago, my late friend, Dave Mungenast Sr., came to see me here in San Antonio, and we had what’s ended up being described as a “school bus meeting.” I had an old school bus that I’d fixed up to go dirtbike riding, and there were


“I really started rIdIng a lot—I mean, where It was a passIon—when I got out of college. and then I found that the people I wanted to be around, In busIness and In personal lIfe, were all competItors.” —stan sImpson


“I thInk we’re over the top of the hump. I keep tellIng (AmA presIdent And Ceo) rob dIngmAn on A weekly bAsIs to look out the wIndow, thAt we reAlly Are gAInIng momentum And CorreCtIng thIs, you know.” —stAn sImpson


a lot of people in the office, so we ended up so AMA would be a rights-advocacy group, stepping into. I feel really honored to be able in the school bus talking. And Mungenast like Rob talks about. That way, if you had to hang around with him and try to help him said that I needed to reprioritize my life, that some kind of big problem in motorcycling—I do his job. He is surrounding himself with I needed to spend more time being thankful call it a “meteor attack”—the AMA would be people who understand what the business for the things that the man upstairs gave the one that could help the community. is about and what the mission is. me. Dave talked a lot about that, and now I And then, after we talked about that for believe and fully understand it, and I have On His Involvement In The Colorado 500 a while, he said, “You’ve got to quit being a kind of taken the oath that that’s exactly Charity Ride user, and you’ve gotta start paying it back.” what we need to be. I’ve been riding in Colorado since the And Dave and I, we already had a good Bringing Rob in, I mean that was ’70s, and I have a place out there. But the relationship at the races, we started visiting obviously the catalyst that we needed to do. Colorado 500 was this thing where I knew with each other a lot after that. Early on, he told the Board that we’d hired a bunch of people who went and rode for In the late ’90s, Mungenast and I were him to be the CEO and run the company a week, and it was an organized trail ride. sitting at a restaurant, and he Then a guy by the name of said, “Stan, we have some Don Riggle said, “Stan, you’ve problems at AMA.” And he gotta come ride the 500.” “One thing for sure, is Stan is a friend to everyone on the ride. He’s a said, “We’ve lost our way on And then the next year Wally go-to guy, and we enjoy his association with us. Stan has not only been some stuff. We’ve got this Hall Dallenbach Sr.,—he created such a good ambassador for motorcycling—road bike, dirt bike—but of Fame Museum, and we’re the 500—called me because he’s helped us with a lot of other issues, such as doing the inspection doing this and we’re doing I’d known him in Indy Car of the motorcycles for each Colorado 500 to make sure they’re street that, but we’ve got some racing, and he said, “Stan, you legal, quiet and safe for the trail. That work has paid off considerably. The things we’ve got to fix.” And he need to come out and ride with motorcycles have been quieter every year. Stan is deserving of all the said, “I’d like you to run for the us,” and so I did. I rode three accolades he can receive. He’s been an asset to us, and I’m sure he’s Board of Directors.” years as just a rider, and had a been an asset to the AMA.” What he didn’t tell me lot of fun. By that time we were was that he wasn’t going to starting to work on all these Wally Dallenbach Sr., Colorado 500 Founder be around to help finish this land-use issues, noise and and member of the AMA Motorcycle Hall of Fame. (Mungenast passed away in some other stuff. 2006). I mention that to him We were at Ouray one every time I get a chance, that I’m mad that and that the major stuff, he needed to night, about 5 or 6 years ago, and Ben he’s not here to see what all we’ve gotten run by us first to get our agreement and Cheatwood and Lloyd Liebetrau were done. Because I‘m sure he’s pleased now. support, but that we needed to let him run interviewing people for a Colorado 500 I think we’re over the top of the hump. the company. And that has not been without video. And Ben said, “Stan you’re a I keep telling (AMA President and CEO) some contesting from some of the guys on nationally known guy, and you’re involved in Rob Dingman on a weekly basis to look the Board. But at the end of the day, I think the AMA. What do you think the No. 1 issue out the window, that we really are gaining everybody has to say, we’re sure lucky to is?” And I yelled at the top of my lungs, momentum and correcting this, you know. have Rob Dingman. “Noise!” Riders need to read what Rob puts in our That evening in the restaurant, Wally On His Goals For The AMA magazine. There’s only one Rob Dingman. asked me, “What do you want to do about Mungenast kept telling me that we had to He doesn’t have five agendas. He’s the it?” And I said, “Wally, it’s a grassroots thing. convert the Association from a Midwestern greatest thing we’ve ever coerced into You have to make it the socially correct club into a business. And he wanted it done stepping into a thing he didn’t know he was thing to do to reduce the sound level.”

Preserving The Future Of Motorcycling’s History

Stature Of The AMA’s Motorcycle Hall Of Fame Museum Grew Under Simpson’s Leadership Before he became chairman of the AMA Board of Directors, Stan Simpson led the AMA’s Motorcycle Hall of Fame Museum, and his efforts there both helped re-dedicate the Museum to its mission, as well as expand its reach well beyond its Pickerington, Ohio, campus. Stan brought a real, life-long, hard-core commitment to motorcycling and a powerful entrepreneurial background to his position as chairman of the AMA’s Museum Board. Under his leadership from 2006 to 2008, the Museum was able to raise its level of professionalism and its stature within the motorcycling community. His hands-on style and big-picture focus

raised expectations for what the AMA’s Motorcycle Hall of Fame could be, and helped both Museum staffers and its volunteer Board members to broaden their thinking, not only when it came to planning potential exhibits, but also in terms of long-term strategy as the AMA’s Museum. Simpson was also part of the group that realized the need to expand the AMA’s Motorcycle Hall of Fame Museum beyond its own walls. The Museum may be based in the Midwest, but that doesn’t mean it shouldn’t work to be a part of the broad enthusiasm that exists for motorcycling on the East and West Coasts. The results have been traveling exhibits,

such as the one currently touring at the Cycle World International Motorcycle Shows, detailing the history of motorcycling, and the sales of Museum exhibits at the ends of their runs at the Museum itself, which brings the rich heritage of motorcycling to new audiences. Beyond the institutional changes Simpson was able to help bring about, there are the personal connections that have helped the Museum make broader inroads among enthusiasts and industry representatives alike. And going forward, those connections can only help an institution that is dedicated to telling the stories and preserving the history of American motorcycling.

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And he said, “Well how do we do that?” And Cheatwood says, “You turn over tech inspection to Stan and have a sound test.” And Wally, who is one of the greatest guys on Earth, I mean he is the Wally Dallenbach, he said, “Why don’t you do that and tell me how we’d make it work.” And the next year we did. On What He Did To Quiet Down Bikes In The Event The first year, we set the sound level at

“IT Was 1,206 MIlEs, anD I Only sTOppED fOr gas anD TO gET a BOTTlE Of WaTEr anD a canDy Bar Or sOMETHIng.” —sTan sIMpsOn

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102 db, and we had people who didn’t pass. The next year, we lowered it to 99. We did two years of 99, and then we’d been mailing to people, and people were starting to understand what the importance was. We took it from 99 db to 96 db the third year. And the first year we had 96, we tested the 300 bikes for two days. Team Kawasaki and the other guys who were there, the support people, worked until midnight both nights repacking and fixing bikes. So if we fast-forward to this year, in 2008,

when we had the Colorado 500 dirt ride, we had 318 motorcycles, and the sound limit is now 96 db max. We tested 318 motorcycles, and we had just four that were above 95 db. The mood is changing. On His Motorcycling Heroes Well, you’re going to find this really strange. My motorcycling heroes are Dave Mungenast, Sr.—because he rode some really crappy motorcycles and did really well on them—he was a superb International Six


Days Enduro rider. I mean, he could do stuff had probably 10 or 15 of them—I left there On His Riding These Days on the sixth day that most of us could only at about 6 o’clock in the morning and rode It depends on the year and what’s going do on the first day. Besides being a great to San Antonio. It was 1,206 miles, and I on, but typically I’ll ride 20,000 miles a year human being, good businessman, good only stopped for gas and to get a bottle of on the road, and 10,000 off. I’d like to ride family guy, he was one hell of a competitor. water and a candy bar or something. a lot more, but people keep telling me I’m Others? I grew up in the Midwest, and I was just riding, and I was really supposed to be at work or something. I always thought that Bart Markel was enjoying things, and I kept seeing things an amazing guy. He wasn’t the most that I liked, and next thing you know it On The Greatest Priorities For friendly guy, but he was sure an artist on a was 9 or 10 at night. I kept on riding, Motorcyclists Today motorcycle. and I pulled into the house early the next I see two things as threats. The first And I think from there it goes to the guys morning, and I’d had a wonderful day. one is sound, noise. An awful lot of people like Malcolm Smith, a superb human being haven’t yet signed on to the fact that when who is now helping the AMA and others. On His Best Memories Of Racing you have a growing number of riders who Dick Mann was a talented guy, too. Dick Probably the most rewarding thing I’ve don’t like the sound levels coming out of Burleson was and still is a great rider. done on a motorcycle would either be riding some of our motorcycles—what do you I think most of the motorcycle greats and completing the Six Days, or when I think the non-motorcyclists are thinking? are, or were, better human beings because won a national enduro, where the other No. 2, I’d say, is membership. I’m not of their involvement in racing. I try to hire guys who were faster than me didn’t have a pessimist, but I can tell you that it’s a competitors in my business, because problems. shame that the AMA has 300,000 members people who know the when there are millions and difference between first and millions of active motorcyclists. second gear are the guys Five years ago, I’m not sure “If we have some kind of a ‘meteor attack,’ regardless of what rights it and girls you want making that I could testify that AMA targets, all these owner clubs and groups that I belong to, none of them decisions for you. deserved to have most of can help us. The only group that can go preach the gospel and make a them as members. But I can difference is the AMA. That’s a rider’s group.” On What He Does When tell you today that the AMA He’s Not Riding deserves to have them as Stan Simpson, Chairman of the AMA Board of Directors Well, my wife says when members. We have got to find I’m not riding, I’m talking to the way, message-wise, now people about riding. That’s that that AMA is becoming not true—I work too. I have been really Through the luck of the draw or what it should be, to gain a whole bunch blessed. I am the president and CEO of a whatever, I actually won when the other of members. Because if we don’t, I think $100-million-a-year company that produces guys didn’t break down.That’s probably we’re going to wake up some morning and forklifts and material-handling equipment as much pride as I’ve ever had in a single there’s going to be something that says, for the military. It was Simpson Machine thing. “Unless you’ve ridden this many miles and for years, and several years ago I wound The Six Days, I rode four times for you’ve kept a log book for this many years, up selling to a worldwide company called Canada. I had a lot of friends, and I had a you can’t ride that motorcycle.” Cargo Tech. I’ve been fortunate to surround business up in Canada, and Canada was If we have some kind of a “meteor myself with 10 or 15 really good people always short of riders. So by default I got attack” like that, regardless of what rights it who make me look great all the time. And I to go. I think I’ve been to six of them, and I targets, all these owner clubs and groups get to go play on motorcycles! finished three of them with one gold medal that I belong to—I belong to HOG, I belong and two silvers. to the GWRRA, I belong to the Kawasaki On The Craziest Thing He’s Ever Done The Six Day Trials – the ISDT – was owner’s group because I have bikes from A Bike about just knowing how to keep your all of them—none of them can help us if I think the craziest thing that I have ever motorcycle together and not mess up for we have a meteor attack. The only group done on a motorcycle was back in about six days straight. And I liked that because that can go preach the gospel and make a 1990. I was in Daytona Beach, and I left the it meant that you got to ride for six days in difference is the AMA. Hilton on A1A on my Honda Transalp—I’ve a row! That’s a rider’s group.


MOTOr CyCLe ICOnS MeMbers Of The AMA’s MOTOrcycle hAll Of fAMe clAss Of 2008 fOund fAMe The Old-fAshiOned WAy: They earned IT. An ironmAn off-roAd rAcer. A titAn of industry. An eArly mXrAcing giAnt. A “supermouth” rAce Announcer. A dirt-trAck legend. A triumph pioneer in the u.s. these hAll of fAmers didn’t wAit for the world to cAtch up with them. words by grAnt pArsons, photos by terry JordAn

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MOTOCROSS PIONEER

Long Before The Sport Of Motocross Was As American As Apple Pie, It Was Very European. And Sweden’s Rolf Tibblin Was One Of The Best. At a time when some racers would happily pose with cigars in their mouths, Rolf Tibblin understood the need for physical fitness. In fact, it was one of the cornerstones of his success in an MX career that included winning the 1962 and 1963 500cc World Motocross Championships, as well as being part of Sweden’s 1962 Motocross of Nations championship team. On his early aspirations to play soccer: I was drafted to play for Liverpool, in England, when I was 16, but my dad said,

ROLF TIBBLIN “Rolf, there’s no money in football.” Of course, he was wrong. One of my uncles helped me to buy a bike, and my dad said, “No way, no racing. It’s too expensive.” So, I started racing behind my mother’s and father’s backs. I went so far as to win the European championship before I had my parents’ support. On devising a plan to get in shape for motocross: Whatever you do in life, whether it’s racing or whatever else, you have to have the desire to do well. I had the desire to try to come out on top. It didn’t take me long to realize that I can’t get up there if I don’t get in shape. So I actually looked into what other athletes did, not necessarily in the motorcycle industry—skiers, skaters, wrestlers, football. I looked up the best people. I was a

little bit shy at that age, but I phoned them up and asked them if I could come and see them. I found out how they trained by interviewing different athletes. Then I went home and put a program together that I thought would fit into my own body and my sport. That physical fitness helped me get on top. If you’re fit physically, you’re fit mentally. And if you’re racing, you can’t afford to get tired mentally because that’s when you make small mistakes. On an unorthodox type of training that really made a difference: I did a lot of ballet training for balancing, because on a bike, coordination is so important. On the track, you’re always focusing forward: the corner over there or whatever. And you have to know how to control your body without looking at your body.


Scot Harden Raced Off-Road Flat Out For 40 Years—Then Took On The World’s Toughest Bike Race At The Age Of 48. Scot Harden boasts a 40-year off-road-racing career as one of the world’s best, racing in North and South America, Europe and Africa. He’s notched two Baja 1000 overall wins, three Baja 500 wins, three SCORE championships, four Best in the Desert championships, three International Six-Day Enduro medals, and a thirdplace in the 1,900-mile Incas Peru Rally. He capped it off by entering the grueling Dakar Rally at the age of 48. On the moment of realization that he would be starting the world’s toughest motorcycle race, the Dakar Rally, at age 48 and with no advance notice after another racer on the team he was managing went out with injuries: For me it was the day before the start, the bike’s at impound, and you know it’s about to start and you have a couple of hours to yourself. I remember laying in my bed in a hotel room in Barcelona. Everybody who’s ever raced knows what butterflies are like—well, I had that times 1 trillion. You know that for the next few weeks, your life is going to be holy hell because Dakar is about suffering, living on the edge, living like an animal, sleeping on the ground at night, hanging off the back of a motorcycle at 100 mph across terrain you’ve never seen before, extreme danger, extreme risk, and it never stops. Even when you’re off the bike, you’re still in that mode. It was that moment where I was like, “Man, my life is going to be nothing but pain and suffering for the foreseeable future.” His advice for anyone contemplating living a motorcycle dream like the Dakar Rally: Go do it. Go mortgage your house. Sell everything you have. Take loans out. Do whatever you need to do, but go do it. The experience of Dakar is unequalled in this world. At the end of the day, there’s the material things you acquire, and all the other things that mean absolutely nothing, but it’s the experiences you’ve had that really tell you that you’ve lived a full and complete life. Not just Dakar but any two-wheeled dream you have. Track it down, chase it down and do it.

SCOT HARDEN

IRONMAN


RACING MACHINE

In A Dirt-Track Career That Spanned More Than Three Decades, Terry Poovey Was Always A Threat. Terry Poovey’s stats spell out the success and staying power of his career in AMA Flat Track: 350 AMA National mainevent starts, more than 200 top-10 finishes, 80 top-five finishes and 11 Grand National main event wins. On his favorite racetrack: It’d have to be the Daytona Short Track. It’s the first big race I ever won. When I came here as a Junior in 1974, I won two

TERRY POOVEY out of three nights. I won the Junior night, then came back the following night and won the Junior-Expert night. The best was probably 1975, the first time I won it as a pro. I had gone there every year when I was a kid, and I just dreamed of winning races there. And in 1975, I finally did. If you combine the old short track and the new track, I have 20 wins at Daytona. On the biggest help to his career: My brother Teddy has been the biggest influence in my career. He was a National number in 1973 and ’74. He built my first mini bike I started racing on in 1968, and he built the last XR750 I raced at Springfield.

On one of his biggest accomplishments: While racing as a privateer in 1982, Poovey won the Knoxville, Tennessee, half-mile on a Honda. He was recruited by the factory Honda team in 1983, and won the season-opener at the Houston, Texas, short track. That same year, he debuted the Honda RS750 machine at California’s Ascot Speedway and helped develop the platform that racers Ricky Graham and Bubba Shobert had success with in later years. “That ’83 race really was something. I had just gotten my contract with Honda, and it was the first race with their new bike. It was a really big race for them, and I won it.”


ROD COATES RIDER, RACER, INDUSTRY GREAT

Rod Coates Helped Build Triumph Into A Major U.S. Force In The 1950s And ’60s, Winning A Few Races Himself Along The Way. An accomplished engineer with experience with Eastman Kodak Co. and the Lawrence Aeronautical Corp., Rod Coates turned his interest to motorcycling in the 1950s with Triumph and BSA. He is credited with building Triumph’s impressive East Coast dealer network and later overseeing race operations, contributing to Triumph’s achievements on the track. Coates, who passed away in 1990, was posthumously inducted into the AMA’s Motorcycle Hall of Fame. His early motorcycling experience: Growing up in Upper Montclair, New

Jersey, Rod owned an Austin Bantam that he customized with an insulated compartment. He drove around town, selling ice cream from the car. By 1937, Coates was racing, entering all types of competition, including hill climbs, scrambles, road races, TT races, half miles, observed trials and endurance runs. He won the Sandy Lane Endurance Run (known as the “Jack Pine of the East”) in 1948, the 1950 Daytona 100, and many other AMA-sanctioned events. His work in the motorcycle industry: In 1950, Coates moved to Maryland to work as service manager for the Triumph Corp., a position he held for 20 years. This was the newly formed U.S. East Coast distributor for Triumph motorcycles, where Coates was credited with building an outstanding dealer-support program, which included annual service schools for dealers. Coates also organized and improved

Triumph’s racing efforts, by developing a dealer sponsorship program and supporting product developments that increased the brand’s performance. His efforts helped earn AMA National wins and championship titles for Triumph, with such racing greats as Bill Baird, Ed Fisher, Gary Nixon and Don Burnett. Transitioning out of racing motorcycles: Coates’ last race was in 1957, where he took first place in the Lightweight Class at Long Island’s Bridgehampton Road Race. In the 1960s, he built a small dirt track on his property, and held annual AMAsanctioned scrambles races to benefit the Boy Scouts of America. With Triumph’s merger with BSA motorcycles in 1970, Coates turned his attention to other endeavors, including establishing, with his wife, Marge, Laurelbrook Foods, a pioneer wholesale distributor of natural and organic products.


Larry Huffman Announced For Every Major Type of Motorcycle Racing, Both In The United States And Japan. If you’ve ever been to an AMA Supercross race, or even watched one on TV, chances are good that you’ve heard Larry Huffman’s energetic voice calling the action at one time or another. The former radio disc jockey parlayed his love of the sport and enthusiasm for motorcycling into a memorable career that’s still going strong.

LARRY HUFFMAN

‘SUPERMOUTH’

On his strangest race-announcing job ever: I was hired to be the announcer of the Kyoto Supercross in Japan in ’83. Kyoto was the ancient Japanese capital, and President Roosevelt said we would not bomb it during the war, so as a result Americans are very popular in Kyoto. We took a number of riders over there. We got there at late morning and people had been lined up since 5 a.m. to get in, the crowd was a total sellout—maybe 15,000 or 20,000 people. In Kyoto, almost nobody speaks English, and I got to the broadcast booth, and they said, “There’s your broadcast booth, Larry-san, there’s the crowd, go ahead and announce.” I said, “Fine, where’s my interpreter?” They said, “Well, you have no interpreter Larry-san. They all know who you are from magazine articles in Japan, and they want you to announce as you would to an American audience—in English.” I said, “You’ve got to be kidding! You want me to announce in English?” So, I announced the whole thing, the whole race, in English, and I got very excited, and every once in a while, I would yell, “Banzai!” and the crowd would just go crazy. So, I guess it worked.

January 2009

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VAUGHN BEALS HARLEY-DAVIDSON VISIONARY

Vaughn Beals Was One Of 13 Harley-Davidson Execs Who Rolled The Dice On Buying The Company From AMF—And Built H-D Into A Brand Known Around The World. It may be a textbook case of turning around a company that’s routinely taught in business schools these days, but when Vaughn Beals and 12 other Harley execs bought the then-troubled manufacturer from AMF with hopes of a turnaround, it was anything but a sure thing.

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On the risk involved in buying HarleyDavidson in a leveraged buyout: You know that if you bet your net worth at an age when you’re approaching retirement, that’s scary. And we fully understood the Japanese threat. We had visited the Japanese manufacturers, and we saw what they did and what they didn’t do, which sometimes is more surprising. It was a tremendous challenge. The good news is that it worked. On the constraints imposed on day-today operations in the early years: We ran the company for five years—five years—with zero cash. When we collected

for a motorcycle—when a motorcycle was sold to a dealer—we paid the bank. When we needed money, we went to the bank. The management group and the employees understood how this worked, and made it work, and the results are what they are today. For the company to get from 23 percent to 46 percent marketshare in a five-year period against new Japanese heavyweight motorcycles, that says that what we did worked, and we put those guys in the minority. That’s when I retired with my fingers crossed—and legs crossed. That was wellrewarded because the marketshare is still there today, in the mid- to high-40s.


DONALD F ABEL, SIDNEY H ABEL, RUDY L ABELE, RUSSELL ABERNATHY, KATHY M ACKLER, JESSE J ACOSTA, DONALD F ACREE, GREGORY E ADAMS, JOHN V ADAMS, BROOKS T ADCOCK, THOMAS E ADY, GUS AHLADAS, JAMES AIKEN, AHMET S AKAYDIN, DREXEL M AKIN, RONALD W ALCORN, JIM ALES, DONALD E ALLARD, DONALD ALLEN, WILLIAM J ALLEN, HAMILTON ALLPORT, JOHN S ALTHAUS, JOHN E ALTON, ROY ALVAREZ, FRANCIS P AMARAL, DENNIS B AMBRECHT, JAMES E AMBROSE, ROBERT L AMEN, MACK R AMES, MIKE AMES, RAMON ALF DE AMUSATEGUI, HOWARD E ANDERSEN, RON ANDERSEN, DAVID E ANDERSON, KEVIN ANDERSON, LEONARD ANDERSON, DIRK ANDREWS, JIM ANDREWS, JOHN L ANDREWS, ROBERT H ANDREWS, KELLY D ANDRIS, EDDIE F ANEWALT, CHARLES C ANGLE, VINCENT R ARDIZZONE, DAVID ARMENTROUT, ROBERT W ARNDT, RICHARD ARNOLD, JAMES ASH, GLENN ASHCRAFT, CHRISTOV K ASHTON, LAWRENCE F ASHTON, WAYNE L ATEN, MIKE J ATKINSON, JOHN R AUSTIN, RICHARD J AYLMER, WES BACA, DAVID L BACHMAN, BRANDON BACKES, GARRY BACON, RICHARD C BADER, DAVID L BAILEY, JAMES R BAILEY, TOM BAILEY, LARRY J BAINBRIDGE, KEITH M BAIRD, BURT BAKER, DEAN A BAKER, MICHAEL W BALDWIN, JAMES A BALSILLIE, RICHARD J BANCROFT, CHARLES E BANKS, RONALD L BARD, BARRY L BARKER, LARRY C BARLAGE, DAVID M BARLOW, MARTIN W BARNES, MICHAEL L BARNHILL, ROBERT BARR, CARL DEREK BARRETT, RON L BARRICK, ROY G BARTLETT, WILLIAM H BATCHELOR, STEVEN W BATES, KENT BAUER, KURT R BAUER, BLAINE W BAXTER, DAN N BEAGLE, MARK A BEAMER, RICHARD A BEAUCHAMP, DAVID BECKER, DAMON BEE, MIKE BEERY, LARRY BEILKE, ARTIS O BELT, ROBERT W BELTZ, NEIL D BELVOIR, DANIEL L BENHAM, GAYLAND U BENNETT, KEVIN R BENNETT, TERRY BENNETT, TIMOTHY BENNETT, GARY BENSON, CHARLES BENT, JOHN G BENZ, DONALD R BERKHOFER, TONY A BERLUTI, PHIL BERNDT, STEVEN BERRA, KIM BERTHELOT, TOM BEUSSINK, PATRICK BEYERS, BARRY J BIBB, DAVID BIELEC, MICHAEL BILARDELLO, ARLIN D BILLINGTON, BERNARD W BINGHAM, MARY ELLEN BINNS, WILLIAM T BIRCHFIELD, MARK BIRD, DON T BISCEGLIA, HOMER D BISHOP, MICHELE BISSON SAVOY, MICHAEL W BITNER, BOB BLACK, CHUCK H BLACKMON, KEVIN BLACKWELL, JAMES L BLAIR, RHYS B BLAIR, ROBERT C BLAKE, RUSS D BLAKE, RALPH BLANCHARD, STEPHEN A BLAUMAN, CHARLES D BLEDSOE, KENNETH G BLEWIS, KELLY R BLOCK, REID A BLOCK, DAVID W BLOOMFIELD, ROBERT BLUE, JOHN M BOAEN, FRED BODE, DAVID BOENING, STEVEN BOGARDUS, ROBERT H BOGART, PAUL T BOHANNON, DON R BOHN, NORMAN BOIS, LEWIE R BOLOPUE, ROBERT BOLTON, PETER BOOTH, ALAN BORCHARDT, JAMES BORHO, JAY M BORR, JOHN K BOTH, GLENN M BOTHWELL, RICK BOTSFORD, NATHAN E BOWE, WILLIAM H BOWE, JAMES BOWEN, JOHN F BOWEN, PHILIP E BOWLES, BILL BOWMAN, DAN BOWMAN, LARRY A BOWMAN, MICHAEL J BOWMAN, STEVE BOWMAN, PHILLIP E BOWMER, RUSSELL BOYD, WADE M BOYD, PATRICK D BOYLE, LOUIS M BRACONI, ALLAN BRADENBURG, MICHAEL BRADLEY, RUDOLPH E BRADLEY, WILLIAM H BRADY, JIM A BRANAM, JOHN W BRANT, WILLIAM W BRATTON, JAMES H BRECHEEN, BEN B BREEDLOVE, S M BRIGHT, DANIEL E BRISTOL, BRUCE BRITAIN, GEORGE BRITNELL, BRIAN BROADWELL, STEVEN W BROCK, DAVID H BRODOWSKI, JOHN R BROOKMAN, ANNE M BROOKS, RAY D BROOKS, WILLIAM BROTEN, EDWARD G BROUILLET, ANTHONY R BROWN, DONALD K BROWN, DONALD L BROWN, JAMES R BROWN, MICHAEL J BROWN, ROBERT W BROWN, RONNIE E BROWN, STEPHEN R BROWN, TERRY N BROWN, R L BRUGGEMAN, ELMER E BRUNNER, RICHARD BRYAN, PAUL BUCHER, MIKE A BUCHHOLZ, DON BUFF, F L TOBY BULLINGTON, CHRIS BUMPERS, MILO J BUNDA, GARY L BUNTING, ALLAN BURBANK, GERARD T BURCH, JAMES BURCH, GENE BURGESS, RICHARD W BURGESS, BRENT A BURK, EVAN BURKITT, JON ERIK BURLESON, DAVE BURNETT, BOB BURNS, MAX E BURNSIDE, JOHN BURZYNSKI, DAVID R BUSCHYNSKI, GENE R BUSH, ROGER L BUSS, EDWARD G BUSSE, DAVID L BUTCHER, ROBERT L BUTLER, JIMMY BUTTON, MARVIN L BUTTRICK, CHARLES E BUTZ, ART BYRD, WILBURN H BYRD, KEVIN S CABY, JAMES J CALANDRO, DENNIS L CALKINS, JEFFREY L CALLIHAN, NATHAN J CALLISON, WADE W CAMLIN, KEVIN J CAMMON, KENNETH E CAMPBELL, MICHAEL CAMPILONGO, ISIDORO E CAMPISI, J R CANAGUIER, LEONARD J CANDELA, JACK CANDY, SAMUEL L CANTER, MIKE CANTRELL, DONALD D CAPORALETTI, JASON E CARBEN, AARON J CARLSON, NICHOLAS E CARLSON, RENE A CARMENATY, PATRICK J CARMON, MICHAEL G CARPENTER, FABIAN A CARRO, MICHAEL J CARROLL, SHAWN CARSLEY, DAVID E CARTWRIGHT, KEN CARUSO, ROBERT V CASAGRANDA, DAVID C CASPER, JON L CASTIN, LES CASWELL, KAREN CATES, JERRY A CAUDLE, DOUGLAS L CAVE, JAMES CECH, DANIEL W CHAPEL, TIM CHAPIN, RONALD W CHAPMAN, ARTHUR M CHAVEZ, DAVID CHESLER, JIM E CHESTER, GARY A CHRISTIE, KEVIN E CHRISTMAN, PHIL CIAVARELLA, JIM CLARK, KERRY M CLARK, EVELYNE CLARKE, KEITH J CLARKE, JOSEPH CLEGG, ANDREW CLELAND, ALAN CLEMENS, BUCK CLEMSON, TODD CLEVELAND, LYLE K CLINANSMITH, STEPHEN M CLINE, LARRY COHEE, STEPHEN COLAO, CASEY COLBERT, CHARLES L COLBURN, CLARK L COLLINS, MICHAEL COLLINS, JOE COLOMBERO, TERRY COLSON, FRED J COMPTON, BONNIE J CONFESSORE, DEBORAH CONN, SEAN T CONNELLY, JAMES T CONQUEST, MARC A CONTI, DAVID M COOK, GEORGE E COOK, JACK C COOK, JOHN W COOK, STEPHEN H COOK, WILLIAM H COOK, GLENN M COOPER, JOHN S COOPER, MARK T COOPER, JACK G COPELAND, JOHN CORLISS, WILLIAM J CORWIN, VERNON R COTTRELL, D F COURTNEY, FRED S COUSINS, KEVIN L COZADD, HAROLD L CRABTREE, RALPH E CRANDALL, STEVE CREVIER, STEVE CREWS, PETER A CROFT, JAMES W CROOK, PAUL CROSBY, STEPHEN W CROWE, DENNIS L CULLISON, SID P CULP, MICHAEL W CUMMINGS, G S CUNNINGHAM, RICHARD CUNNINGHAM, PAUL M CUPP, JAMES E CURRY, CURT A CURTIS, DAN CURTIS, MICHAEL S DAKOVICH, PEPPY DALLENBACH, BRUCE DALTON, DAVID M DAMARCO, RONALD A DAMM, TONY G DANTZLER, EDWARD F DARGA, DAVE DAUB, HAROLD D DAVIDSON, LEONARD L DAVIDSON, NANCY DAVIDSON, E FRED DAVIS, JEFFREY L DAVIS, JOHN C DAVIS, JOHN MICHAEL DAVIS, LOUIS T DAVIS, ROCKEY A DAVIS, THOMAS G DAVIS, BRADLEY R DAY, GUY DE LA HOUSSAYE, BRIAN A DECELLO, BEN DECKER, DENNIS DEETER, DENNIS DEHAAN, JOE DEINTINIS, ROBERT DEISS, STEVE C DEITCH, STEPHEN D DELOY, JAMES D DELZER, WILLIAM H DENNING, RICKY G DENNIS, MIKE DEPRIE, MARK R DESANTO, VINCENT P DESBOROUGH, O ANTHONY DEVITIS, ROBERT J DEWEY, ANTHONY J DIBATTISTA, ROBERT D DILLON, A R DILWORTH, ROBERT DIROCCO, JOSEPH DISTEFANO, PETER DOBROTIN, DON W DOERKSEN, MICHAEL T DOLNEY, JULIE DOLOSIC, ROBERT J DONNELLY, MICHAEL P DONOHUE, EDWARD J DONOVAN, RONALD R DONOVAN, STUART B DOON, AUGUSTUS T DORMAN, GLENN R DOUGHERTY, GEORGE D DOUGHTY, JOHN DOWD, ALLEN P DOWDY, PHILLIP C DOYLE, WAYNE A DOYLE, TIMOTHY D DRAKE, LARRY D DRAWHORN, WILLIAM D DROKE, BERNIE DROSTE, CHARLES M DRUMMOND, JAY DRYBREAD, PETER DUDEK, DENNY DUERMIT, TOM DUFFEK, MIGUEL DUHAMEL, JERRY DUKE, RUSSELL DULLER, FRANK J DUNN, DONALD DUPUIS, ARMAND C DUVERGER, RICHARD S DYER, JEFF M EARL, KENNETH D EAVES, THOMAS L EDGAR, FREDERICK EDMUNDS, JOHN W EDWARDS, MICHAEL EDWARDS, JON W EICHELBAUGH, ROBERT EIKENBARY, IKE EISENMANN, GEORGE T ELDIS, DAVID ELLER, MARK E ELLISON, ROBERT B ELLMAN, KEVIN C ELSWORTH, STEPHEN A EMMETT, HAROLD E EMRICH, WM SCOTT ENGLEBRICK, JOHN A ENNEY, JOHN J ENRIGHT, LEE W ERICKSON, ROBERT ESCOBAR, RICKY ESKRIDGE, NEAL B EULER, RONALD D EVERLEY, SCOTT C EWELL, ERON Q EZERINS, MICHAEL P FACCHIANO, CHRIS FAHAN, FRANK B FARQUHARSON, BRENT E FARRELL, KEN R FASTNER, JACK FELL, BOB FENDALL, JAMES RYAN FENN, ALAN J FERDMAN, ROBERT FERGUSON, DALE A FETT, WILLIAM J FIELD, JOHN FIGAS, ANGEL D FIGUEROA, BRIAN L FINCH, THOMAS FINCH, CORNELIUS FIOCCO, RON FISCHER, WM P FISHER, WAYNE P FITCH, SAM FITE, DAVID M FLAMM, JOHN FLANDERS, FRANK A FLICKINGER, CHRIS C FLIEGAUF, KENNETH J FLYNN, GERALD J FOGARTY, GRANT D FOLEY, TERRY FORD, ROBERT L FORINGER, NORMAN H FORSTNER, RICHARD FORTUNE, JAMES FOUSEK, WILLIAM B FOX, DOUG FRAME, M LEE FRANCKE, RICHARD H FRANTZ, FREDERICK FRANZ, MICHAEL A FRANZ, DON FRAUENBERGER, GREGORY W FRAZIER, R E FREDERICK, FRANK FREELAND, DAVID L FREY, MARK A FROELICH, DENNIS FRONHEISER, CHUCK FROSETH, RICHARD D FROST, DAN FRUGE, DAVID L FUHRMAN, WALTER H FULFORD, WILLIAM N FULLER, DONALD R FULTON, ALAN G FUNK, TONY FURIA, MAJOR GAETAN, PAT GALBRAITH, JOE W GALE, GARRY GALLAGHER, TOM GAMBLE, BOB GARELICK, STEVE GARETS, GEORGE R GARRISON, MANNY GARZA, ROBERT S GATES, DAVID J GAULD, WENDELL R GAWTHORP, GARY S GAY, THOMAS M GEARING, HARRY R GEBHART, ANDREW G GEHRINGER, THOMAS GEIGER, THOMAS L GEIS, JAMES GEISE, JOHN GENNAI, DUANE B GERKIN, D GERSHENFELD, BOB GETTE, HAMMOND M GEYER, DAVID GIACOMINO, JOSEPH N GIAMMONA, TOM W GIBBS, ALAN GIBSON, DAN R GIBSON, ROY GIFFORD, FREDERICK GILES, ARTHUR M GILL, MICHAEL J GILL, ROBERT S GIVENS, TIMOTHY R GLASOW, TIMOTHY P GLEASON, DAN GOBLE, WILLIAM T GODDEN, ALBERT E GOETZ, CLIFF R GOLBY, ALAN GORANSON, PETER A GOTTFRIED, ROB ALLEN GOUPILL, TIMOTHY P GRADY, JOHN GRAF, GORDON L GRAHAM, RUSSELL K GRAHAM, CLINTON R GRANT, MARTIN L GRAVER, ALLEN GRAVITT, PHIL S GREEN, ROBERT D GREEN, JOSEPH E GREENE, HAROLD L GREER, JOHN C GREGORY, NORMA J GREGORY, CRAIG A GRIFFITH, MORRILL GRIFFITH, I E GRIGG JR, MICHAEL GRIMM, KENNETH E GRINDSTAFF, GARY W GRISWOLD, ROGER GROCHOW, DAVID L GROGG, LAURA L GROSCHOPF, MICHAEL GROSS, SEAN H GROSSARTH, GORDON L GRUETZMACHER, SAMUEL E GRUMPP, JOSEPH GRUNTKOSKY, JOSEPH GRYCKIEWICZ, NICHOLAS GSCHOPF, STEVEN GUARINO, RUBEN A GUERRA, GARY GUILFORD, MIKE GUNDERSON, TIM GUNDLACH, RICHARD J GUSMANN, MARK HAAS, RONALD E HAAS, RONNIE HACKETT, JOHN HAGG, JEFFREY D HAGGARD, MICHAEL R HAGLEY, ERIC HAGLUND, RANDY HALE, DANIEL K HALL, JOE A HALL, MARK D HALL, STEVE HALL, ROBERT HAMANN, EDWARD V HAMILTON, JOHN HANKO, BILL HANKS, ROBERT L HANSON, ALAN HARDACRE, STEPHEN E HARDIN, DAN HARDING, RANDY J HARDING, FRED C HARDWICK, DAVID L HARDY, H L HARDY, SHELLY A HARENS, DEWAYNE HARKOV, TERENCE D HARMES, EDWIN D HARMON, JAMES R HARMON, JAMES D HARNEY, ALAN HARPER, ROCKY HARPER, TONY HARRELL, DAVID HARRIS, EDWARD J HARRIS, FOYIL R HARRIS, RALPH D HARRIS, ROBERT E HARRIS, BILLY R HARRISON, JOHN M HARRISON, ALLAN W HARROLD, MICHAEL J HART, EARL L HARTLAUB, DAVID N HARTLEY, KEITH HARTLEY, FRANK E HARTMAN, MAXWELL C HARTMAN, ROD HARTZEL, SHANE E HARVEY, HAROLD HASKINS, J T HASLEY, CRAIG N HAUGLAND, JAY K HAUSER, MARK D HAYES, MICHAEL D HAYES, MICHAEL P HAYES, TRAVIS P HAYES, JOHN M HAYS, DAVID M HAZEL, ALAN P HAZELWOOD, LLOYD D HEACOCK, JERRY HEDLEY, RICHARD D HEETER, DAVE A HEIDER, CHRIS HEIFORT, KENT E HELLER, DOUGLAS C HELMAN, RICHARD M HENDEL, WILLIAM J HENRY, JAN B HERMANSEN, GREG M HERWEG, ANTHONY S HESS, BLANE T HESS, GLEN P HETHERINGTON, JOE HEWITT, RON HEWITT, STEPHEN G HEYL, JAMES HICKEY, BRENDA L HICKLING THATCHER, JOHN E HIGGINS, GABRIEL E HILDEBRAND, ALAN F HILL, JAMES HILL, JAMES M HILL, JOHN W HILL, ROBERT H HILL, JIM HILLESHEIM, JOHN HILPERTSHAUSER, PETER W HIPP, EARL HOAR, DALE L HODGE, JOHN HODGE, LARRY L HODGES, MICHAEL T HOFFMAN, WILLIAM C HOFFMAN, RICHARD A HOLCOMB, HARVEY R HOLCOMBE, TOM HOLDENRIED, BRYAN E HOLDER, GREG L HOLDER, ED HOLLINGSWORTH, DWAYNE E HOLMAN, JERAMIE HOLMES, DALE HOLSOPPLE, NEIL HOLT, VINCE M HOLT, STEPHEN B HOLTZ, LYLE HOLTZLEITER, BURL R HOOK, CHRIS HOOPER, JOSEPH F HOPKINS, ROBERT S HORNADY, MICHAEL A HORY, ALAN S HOSKINS, EDWARD J HOSSFELD, RONALD HOUGH, DERRICK HOUK, ALLEN J HOUSEHOLDER, GLENN HOUSER, MIKE HOUSER, BARRY L HOWARD, EDWARD L HOWARD, TED HOWELL, THOMAS A HRUTKY, WILLIAM T HUBBARD, HANK A HUBER, RUSSELL L HUENERS, BURTON W HUFF, A F HUFT, MARK T HUGHES, PHILLIP T HUGHES, DALE L HULING, HERB HUMMEL, JOHN L HUNDERTMARK, JIM HUNT, ADAM A HUPPERT, RICHARD L HURD, WILLIAM R HUSSION, CHRISTOPHER HUTCHASON, GERALD HUTCHINSON, SAM E HUTCHINSON, HIROSHI IKEUCHI, DAN P ILLIES, MICHAEL M ILOVIC, VAN A ISAACSON, STEVE ISLEIB, ELLIOTT G IVERSON, STACY R IWATA, JUNIOR M JACKSON, VINCENT L JARMER, SID G JENNINGS, CHRIS JENSEN, GERALD D JESSUP, KENNETH JIVIDEN, KAY JOHANNES, BILL JOHANNS, CHARLES T JOHNSON, CHARLIE E JOHNSON, CORINNE M JOHNSON, DAVID T JOHNSON, DEXTER JOHNSON, JACK JAY JOHNSON, MIKE JOHNSON, NICHOLAS J JOHNSON, RICHARD P JOHNSON, SCOTT JOHNSON, VERNON K JOHNSON, DAVID C JOHNSTON, RICHARD JOHNSTON, BRIAN K JONES, DYLAN JONES, GARY D JONES, GREG H JONES, JAMES LYNN JONES, JOHN K JONES, KERRY B JONES, LLOYD B JONES, MICHAEL D JONES, PAUL GERALD JONES, RICK JONES, ROY A JONES, HARVEY JORDAN, GEORGE A KAECHELIN, WILLIAM J KAIN, DAVID KAISER, MARK A KANE, DAVID KAPLAN, STEVE KAROLEK, RAYMOND E KARSTEN, JEFFREY J KASPER, RICHARD D KATZER, GEORGE KAVALIAUSKAS, HANS KECK, STUART A KECK, EDWARD J KEELEY, ROBERT B KEEN, WILLIAM F KEENAN, JOE KEGLEY, ROBERT J KEHOE, LEO S KEIM, MIKE KELLEY, BART KELLOGG, DAVID KELSON, DENNIS W KEMMERER, DANIEL J KENDRA, BREE KENDRICK, THOMAS F KEOHANE, DENNIS S KERN, GERALD T KERR, DONALD A KILGOUR, JOE KIMBLE, JED J KIMLA, GERALD C KING, GLENN KING, JOE E KING, MICHAEL KING, O J KING, KATHLEEN KINGSLEY, DAVID W KIRBY, L R KIRK, DANIEL L KISER, MEL S KIYAMA, PHIL K KLEE, DAVID KLEIN, RICHARD KLEPEIS, CRAIG J KLESH, RICHARD KLINE, DAVID R KNEPP, JAMES J KNIGHT, DONALD C KNOWLDEN, GLEN V KOCH, JOHN H KOEHNLEIN, MICHAEL J KOEHNLEIN, CHRIS G KOELLER, KURT A KOESTER, KENNETH W KOHNHORST, RAYMOND F KOLLMANN, JAY KOONZ, STEVEN A KOPP, GARY KOPPERDAHL, PAUL L KOPS, HENRY M KORENT, KEITH KOUBA, MATTHEW B KOUE, KIRK W KOVALEFF, DOUGLAS KRAMER, JOHN KREH, DONALD E KREISER, GREG T KREMER, ELMAR KRUZA, ROBERT KUNDA, ANTHONY J KWIATKOWSKI, GEORGE LACCORN, ALBERT R LAESE, ANDREA LAESE, DALE LAMBERT, DEAN LANE, JAMES L LANG, RICHARD L LANNING, PAUL R LAPHAM, MANUEL LARA, THOMAS C LARSON, EDDY LASSITER, MICHAEL LAUTERBACH, BILL LAW, GREG E LAWRENCE, DONALD E LAWSON, PAUL R LE MIRE JR, TOM LEA, WILLIAM F LEAVITT, REMIGIO P LEDESMA, ELWIN D LEE, JERRY B LEE, ORLAND J LEITCH, DONALD LEITMAN, DAN LELIEVRE, TOM LEONARD, D LESSIAK, J MICHAEL LEVENGOOD, PHILIP C LEWELLEN, CHRIS W LEWIS, DANIEL LEWIS, FRANK D LEWIS, KYLE LEWIS, DARWIN L LILLEY, MARK L LINDBERG, BRAD LINDHORST, ERNEST LINDSAY, KEITH LINDSAY, AARON C LINDSEY, ROBERT L LINDSEY, TERRY K LINNEMANN, RICHARD H LISK, GREG LITVIN, DICK LLOYD, FRANK J LO GIOCO, MICHAEL S LOCKE, RICHARD W LOCKWOOD, GARY LOFTESNESS, JOEL LOHR, DAVID M LOIKITS, GUY E LONGWELL, DAVE E LORD, TONY LORUSSO, PAUL F LOUIS, JAMES W LOVE, MICHAEL K LOVRICH, MICHAEL LOWER, ROCHELLE LOWRY, RAYMOND W LUCAS, DANIEL M LUCHON, IVAN H LUDWIG, SONNY W LUMADUE, GLENN LYLES, JIMMY W LYNCH, RUSSELL LYNCH, TERESA L LYNCH, DAVID MACHOUKAS, KENNETH MACKENZIE, BILL MADDEN, MICHAEL MAGERS, JOSEPH MAHONEY, WILLIAM MALONEY, DANIEL L MANN, JOEL E MANN, ROBERT M MANN, RICHARD MANNSCHRECK, MYRON MAPLE, MELANIE A MARRA, REX E MARSHALL, DAVE C MARTIN, FRED M MARTIN, JOSEPH MARTIN, JAMES E MARTINSON, JERRY MASCARO, DAVID F MASON, PEPPER MASSEY, HUBERT MASTON, JAMES I MATHERS, TIMOTHY J MATHEWSON, MARK MATHIS, KEITH MATTESON, DAVID P MATTHEWS, WILLIAM E MAY, K F MC CREA, LARRY MCBRAYER, RANDY L MCCAULEY, JERRY MCCLARY, A S MCCORD, JOE MCCORMICK, JAMES R MCCOWN, CHRIS MCCRATE, PAUL C MCDANIEL, TOM B MCENTIRE, DONNA M MCFARLAND, JAMES P MCGARRY, RONALD W MCGEARY, HERB M MCGLOTHIN, KEN MCGREGOR, TOM C MCINTYRE, STEVE MCKENZIE, RAYMOND E MCKINZEY, JEFF MCLAUGHLIN, JAMES H MCLEAN, PATRICK J MCMANUS, RICHARD MCMANUS, DENNIS MCMICHAEL, MIKE MCNEIL, ROBERT MEADOWS, MICHAEL MEAGHER, BENNY A MEANS, VINCENT J MEEHAN, WILLIAM M MEEHAN, GARY MEEKER, RICK MENAPACE, MORRIS A MERCER, JAMES F MERIL, DAVID MERRILL, DON M METHFESSEL, DEREK MEYER, GARY F MEYER, JOHN P MEYER, LA NELLE MEYER, WALTER MEYER, MARK MIKOVICH, MARTIN F MILES, CURT MILLER, DWIGHT MILLER, GUS MILLER, JEFFREY S MILLER, JON W MILLER, JOSEPH A MILLER, MARK A MILLER, MERL L MILLER, RONALD B MILLER, ROY MILLER, STEVE MILLER, STEVEN D MILLER, WAYNE A MILLER, WILLIAM H MILLER, GEORGE MILLIGAN, SCOTT D MINDICH, DONALD E MINER, PHILIP E MINER, ROBERT MINER, EUGENE MINIX, WILLIAM MINNICH, ERIC MISCHLER, THOMAS E MISHLER, ALFONSO C MITCHELL, JAMES MITCHELL, ROBERT V MITCHELL, MICHAEL S MOHRMAN, DAVID L MOLINARO, MATTHEW MOMENT, THOMAS MONCHAK, ROBERT MONCRIEF, MARK L MONISMITH, STEVEN J MONROE, JOHN F MONTEYNE, DAVE MONTGOMERY, RANDOLPH A MONTGOMERY, WILLIAM A MONTGOMERY, RICHARD A MOOR, GARY R MOORE, JEFFREY D MOORE, ROBERT J MOORE, ROBERT W MOORE, WILLIAM W MOORE, RONNIE MORAN, DALE E MORGAN, JAMES W MORGAN, MIKE MORGAN, THERESA MORGAN, RICHARD K MORRIS, RICHARD MORRISON, SCOTT D MORRISON, JAMES T MORROW, ERIC J MORTENSON, W JAMES MORTON, CHARLES MOSER, LARRY MOSKOWITZ, BILLY J MOUTON, CARL H MUELLER, TOM P MULLANEY, JOHN C MULLARKEY, RONALD F MUMAW, MICHAEL J MURPHY, ANTHONY J MUSEL, PHILIP MUTTON, DONALD C MYERS, SHANE G MYERS, DAVID A NAIL, NICK J NAZZISI, RANDY L NEAL, RICHARD A NEEDLES, BILL NEILAN, GLEN D NELSON, STEPHEN D NERON, STEVEN R NICHOLS, TERRY NICHOLS, MICHAEL NICOLETTI, ALEXANDER NICULESCU, FRED C NIELSEN, BILL P NIEMIEC, DAVID E NIHISER, JOHN NILES, GARRY L NISSEN, KIRK M NIXON, DANA NORRIS, DAVID J NORTON, JOSEPH M NOSEK, LARRY F NOSKO, JOHN C NOTO, SERGIO NUNES, GREGORY M NUSPL, WALTER L OAKEY, GARY E OAKFORD, CHRIS M OBRIEN, JOHN OCHKIE, GARY OESTERLE, PATRICK E OGRADY, PAUL J OLAH, JOSEPH W OLDHAM, DAVID OLIVE, MARC S OLSON, MICHAEL W OLSON, CURT L OLUND, STEPHEN OLVEY, P NORMAN OSBORNE, RICHARD OSBORNE, DANIEL F OTOOLE, JAY OTTENS, CLIFFORD D OYER, SHERMAN PACKARD, RAYMOND H PAFFORD, TIMOTHY E PAGE, MARK J PAHANISH, JOEL PALMER, ROBERT W PALMER, TIMOTHY PALMER, MICHELLE PANILA GINDA, CHRIS PARASKEVAS, JOHN A PARENT, BOB PARIANO, DAVIS A PARKER, REV RON PARKER, ROBERT M PARO, BRUCE L PARRY, JAMES W PARTON, DOUG PARTRIDGE, ERNEST PASSEOS, BILL H PATRIDGE, KEN PATTON, JOHN A PAUL, GEORGE PAYETTE, BOBBIE PAYNE, RICHARD PEACHMAN, FOSTER L PEARSON, JIM PEASLEY, EDWARD A PECK, HERSHELL PECK, CHARLES A PEDERSEN, RICHARD M PEDERSEN, RONNIE L PENDERGRASS, MICHAEL PEPLASKI, MITCH R PERRI, MERLYN E PETERS, DANA F PETERSON, RICHARD D PETERSON, MARTIN W PFLEIDERER, JODY E PHELPS, JEFF C PHILLIPS, LARRY T PHILLIPS, RON PIAZZA, TIM PICKARD, STEVE PIEHL, ALVIN H PIERCE, NANCY E PIERCY, BENJAMIN F PINE, STEVEN J PINE, JOSEPH E PINEDA, JAMES B PINSKY, JEFFREY S PINSLER, SCOTT PIRTLE, JEFFREY A PISCITELLI, THOMAS B PITMAN, GEORGE PLAYEZ, RICHARD PLEINES, MICHAEL PLESKOVITCH, SCOTT PLESSINGER, STEVE PLEVEL, LEROY PLOEGSMA, MARLIN R PLUMMER, WILLIAM C POHL, FRED POLI, WILLIAM H POLLEY, JAMES POLSTON, DENNIS POPP, RONALD E POPPLEWELL, CLARENCE R PORTER, MADISON B PORTER, RICHARD S POTIKER, BOB POTTER, ANDREW POWELL, ROGER POWELL, ROBERT L PRATT, STEPHEN W PREWITT, EDD PRICE, ROBERT PRIESTER, A E PRIESTLEY, DANIEL W PROFFER, JOHN J PUJOL, RICHARD O PUTHOFF, RUSSELL T QUARTERMAN, JIM QUINLAN, REV JOHN J QUINLAN, MICHAEL J QUINN, ROBERT QUINN, KENNETH RABBITT, BENJAMIN RAMOS, PENROD G RANDALL, JERRY RANEY, CLIFFORD A RANNEY, SCOTT B RAPP, J DAVID RASCHE, MICHAEL J RASCOE, STIG RASMUSSEN, HAROLD RASP, GEORGE RAU, JAMES H RAY, MARK A RAY, PATRICK M RAY, BILL REDIES, RICHARD C REED, ROSS N REED, DOUGLAS REESE, LAWRENCE REESE, WILLIAM P REESE, HENRY REHA, HOWARD REICHERT, MICHAEL REICHERT, ALAN REID, ANTON J REPHOLZ, EUGENE A REYNOLDS, BASCOM A RHODES, DONALD RHODES, KEITH RHODES, ROBERT J RHODES, GORDON F RICE, HAROLD B RICE, RONALD F RICE, THOMAS W RICE, WILLIAM RICE, RANDALL A RICHARDS, KEN RICHARDSON, JOHN G RICHTAREK, WILLIAM RICK, GEORGE A RICKENBRODE, JEFF RICKETTS, RICK RIEBSOMER, ROBIN S RIGGLE, RAYMOND K RIKIMARU, BRANDY RILEY, PATRICK L RILEY, LEON R RINGL, FRANK RISTEEN, MICHAEL F RIZZO, FRANK L ROACH, JOHN ROBERTS, RICHARD ROBERTS, THOMAS J ROBERTS, KAREN ROBIDOUX, G TUPPER ROBINSON, GARY F ROBINSON, JIM A ROBINSON, JIM M ROBINSON, WILLIAM J ROCHETTE, WAYNE ROCHKIND, JOHN E RODECK, EDWARD A ROEHLER, RANDALL ROETHLISBERGER, BILL ROGERS, FRANK J ROGG, GEOFFREY L ROGG, RICHARD W ROLLO, HOLLY ROLLS, EDWIN E ROMACK, HOWARD L ROQUET, JOHN L ROSBERG, ROBERT ROSE, ROGER K ROSE, G JAKE ROSS, GREGG T ROSS, THOMAS L ROTELLO, JACK R ROTEN, STEPHEN J ROTHSTEIN, GARY D ROWAN, CURTIS E ROWLEY, ROBERT H ROYS, CARL RUBINO, DAVE A RUFF, SCOTT RUGENSTEIN, VINCENT J RUGGIERO, JONATHAN RUMMEL, DAVID A RUPE, DENNIS D RUSCH, DANA G RUSSELL, ROBERT H RUSSELL, JEFFREY E RUTH, PAUL RUTKOWSKI, MICHAEL P RYAN, TIM RYAN, ALFRED SACCHETTI, WILLIAM SADLER, GLEN SAGEL, DION R SALFEN, JOHN SAMPSON, SCOTT SANDEFUR, NORMAN L SANDER, STEVEN R SANDS, JOE SANFILIPPO, JOHN H SANFORD, FRANK SANTUCCI, JEFFERY A SARGENT, GREGORY A SASSAMAN, GREGORY SAULTER, FRANK SAUNDERS, LES SAUNDERS, PHILIP SAUSE, RICHARD SAVALA, LARRY C SAXTON, ERIC SCHAEDLICH, PAUL SCHAFFER, ROBERT J SCHAIBLE, MARK P SCHARBER, JERRY H SCHAUER, ROGER G SCHECK, JEFFREY SCHELLENBERGER, LARRY A SCHIFERL, ROBERT A SCHILLINGER, PETER E SCHINKEL, DAVE D SCHMALENBERG, GREG A SCHMIDT, JOE SCHMIEDER, MICHAEL SCHNIRRING, JOHN SCHOENER, WALTER I SCHOONMAKER, RAYMOND D SCHOONOVER, DAVID M SCHRIEFER, DARRELL R SCHROEDER, MARK B SCHROEDER, TERRY D SCHROTH, JOHN SCHULTZ, RONALD L SCHULTZ, ALAN SCHWARTZ, BILL SCHWARTZ, KARL A SCOTT, LONNIE L SCOTT, RICHARD L SCOTT, TED SCOTT, WENDY L SCOTT, DAVID L SCOTTOW, NOEL C SEALE, TIM SEAWEL, JAMES E SEGARS, DOUGLAS W SEITZ, BROCK SELLARDS, BRADLEY S SELLS, PETER E SERRA, DONALD M SEVERSON, ERIC G SEYMOUR, DON W SHACKELFORD, GLEN SHADRICK, BEN SHAFFER, JOHN L SHAFFER, DANIEL R SHAHA, RANDALL P SHANK, DONALD A SHAR, SAM SHAW, KENNY M SHEERER, RICHARD E SHEETS, KENNETH SHEETZ, MICHAEL SHELDON, CHARLES T SHEPARD, WILLIAM J SHEPPARD, DALE SHERO, JOSEPH SHEVALIER, JAMES SHEWMAKER, WARREN R SHIREY, KEITH SHOEMAKER, JEFF SHOPE, GENE E SHORTS, DAVID L SHRADAR, MATT R SHUE, STACEE SHULTZ, PAUL SHUMAN, WALTER S SIEGER, KENNETH R SIEVING, ROBERT SIKORA, PETER SILFVEN, MILES SILLS, ROBERT A SILVERNAIL, WILTON T SIMONEAU, RICK SIMS, DAN SINGER, ED A SINNER, RBT D SITZ, MIKE SIXBERY, ROBBIE SKAGGS, GIOVANNI SKILAN, CHRIS M SKILLICORN, CHARLES H SKINNER, BART D SKLAR, DAVID J SKRILETZ, SEAN SKUTNIK, RAYMOND D SLINGERLAND, TODD V SLOTHOWER, C S SMALLHOUSE, RICHARD B SMALLWOOD, RAYMOND F SMART, ALLAN J SMELTZER, CARL T SMITH, CHARLES A SMITH, CHARLES R SMITH, DAVID W SMITH, GEORGE R SMITH, HENRY L SMITH, JEFFERY W SMITH, JOSEPH E SMITH, ROBERT H SMITH, ROSS G SMITH, TONY SMITH, WAYNE N SMITH, RONALD J SMOLINKA, STEPHEN SNYDER, MARK SOUCIE, STEVEN SOULS, BARRY SOUTHWOOD, MICHAEL SOUTHWORTH, SCOTT SOUTHWORTH, JAMES R SPARKS, KENNETH SPARKS, JAMES R SPEAR, DAVID L SPEER, BRAD S SPENCER, DENNIS SPENCER, TOM SPENDIARIAN, MATTHEW T SPIGELMYER, KEVIN SPITLER, JAMES C SPITZNAS, CRAIG SPLIHTE, MICHAEL W SPRADLIN, HOWARD R SPRAGUE, THOMAS E SPRUILL, CARL D SPURGEON, SAM H STACY, ANTHONY T STAJKOWSKI, WALTER A STAMPER, NORMAN F STANWOOD, DAVID STARKEY, DONALD L STATLER, MICAH T STATLER, ROBERT SCOTT STEARNS, MICHAEL STEDMAN, WILLIAM R STERMER, JEFFREY A STERN, JIMMIE D STEVENS, JOHN STEWARDSON, RON STEWART, JOHN M STIREWALT, BRUCE STJERNSTROM, ROBERT S STOCKARD, DAVID G STOCKBRIDGE, BILL STOLLER, DALE J STONE, NORMAN STOVALL, JOHN H STRAND, GUY B STRATTON, DAVID R STRECKER, BRUCE M STREICHER, DAVID C STREICHER, S RAY STREVILS, EDWARD J STRZELECKI, TIM W STUBBS, JOHN C STUCKEY, OLIVER D STYMUS, CHARLES SULLIVAN, DOUG SULLIVAN, DUANE SUMMERS, JACK H SUMPTION, JAMES E SUTTER, TIM SWAIN, DAVID C SWAN, DONALD C SWANN, DALE C SWARTZ, JOHN D SWEEM, MIKE SWEENEY, ALAN SYLVIA, JOHN M SZKOLKA, JOSEPH R SZOMBATHELYL, PAUL R TANG, ROBERT G TANGERINI, ED TASHJIAN, MICHAEL TATE, ERIC S TAUB, DOUGLAS TAUZIN, GEORGE E TAYLOR, JAMES D TAYLOR, JOHN J TAYLOR, WARREN TAYLOR, E CLIFF TENNEY, TERRY TERRILL, STAN L TESENEER, LARRY THERRIAULT, HARMON JOHN THOLEN, WILLIAM THOMAS, JOHN E THOMPSON, LARRY W THOMPSON, L PIERCE THORPE, MICHAEL M THUILLIER, KEVIN J TINNELL, PAUL A TOBIN, JIM TODD, RON W TODD, DAVID C TOLBERT, KIRK TOLLY, GEORGE TRANOS, DALE M TREGO, ALLEN TRIBOLET, CHARLES L TRIMMER, SCOTT T TROSPER, ROCKWELL T TROTH, ROBERT D TROYER, LARRY F TRUITT, TERRY TRUMBLY, WILLIAM TUBLIN, BOB TURCK, GREGG TURK, NORMAN E TURNBERG, STEPHEN C TWISS, WILLIAM A TYNDALL, FRED F ULLRICH, ROBERT ULRICH, ANGELO J UMBRIANNA, WILLIAM A URBANSKI, EDWARD J USTICO, RAYMOND VAILLANCOURT, JAMES VALENTE, DAVID VALEO, JOHN W VALETTA, CHRISTOPHER E VAN NOTE, ROSEMARY E VAN TESLAAR, DOUGLAS R VANBUREN, TIM VANCE, RUSSELL A VANDERVEEN, MICHAEL W VANDERWEIDE, WILLAIM W VANN, JAMES E VAUGHN, TOMMY VEATOR, ALAN P VERACKA, CHAD A VIERS, GEORGE VIGNOVICH, FRANK VILLA, BRIAN L VINCENT, JOHN M VITUCCI, MICHAEL J VOGEL, FRED J VOGT, CLAYTON G VOIGT, CRAIG S VONATZSKI, THOMAS M VOORHIS, JOSEPH VOSKUIL, ROGER VREELAND, GARY L WADDING, ROBERT WADE, JOSEPH WAGNER, KEN WAGNER, KENT WAGNER, WILLIAM E WAGNER, MATTHEW WAIT, NATHAN WAIT, JOHN WALIGROSKI, EARL H WALKER, JAY A WALKER, PAUL WALL, EUGENE L WALLACE, DREDSEL L WALTERS, JEFF WALTERS, JOHN P WALTON, CHARLES L WARD, HARRIET B WARD, KEVIN S WARD, QUINTON WARD, ROGER L WARD, WENDELL WARE, MIKE WASSENBERG, HAROLD E WATERHOUSE, ANTHONY J WATKINS, CHRIS WATSON, STUART W WATSON, JESSE F WAUGHTEL, JAMES K WEATHERHEAD, RONALD WEATHERS, CHARLES F WEAVER, ROGER M WEAVER, AUBREY WEBB, BOB WEBER, MARK E WEBSTER, DAVID A WEICHT, ROBERT WEIDA, PAUL WEIMANN, SHELDON H WEINBAUM, MARK S WEISS, WILLIAM J WELCH, THOMAS B WENBAN, WILLIAM G WERGOWSKE, ROBERT L WERTZ, DAVID P WESTON, GERALD E WHEELER, EDWARD WHELPLEY, GARY WHISMAN, AARON L WHITE, ROBIN E WHITE, ROGER L WHITE, STEVEN E WHITE, HARVEY WHITEMAN, WAYNE A WHITFIELD, THOMAS W WHITTLES, CHARLES D WIDMANN, THOMAS R WIENCZKOWSKI, BRENT S WILCOX, GEORGE C WILDING, RICHARD WILEY, GARY R WILHELM, SCOTT WILHELM, DAVID T WILLIAMS, RENDA P WILLIAMS, BRET WILLIAMSON, DONALD WILLMOT, D WILSON, FRANCIS M WILSON, JEFFERY S WILSON, JOHN A WILSON, MICHAEL WILSON, RUSSELL E WILSON, WARD G WILSON, ROBERT WILT, MARK A WILZEN, GENE L WINFREY, ALAN WINNER, MICHAEL L WIRT, ELMER F WIRTA, GERALD C WITMAN, ROBERT E WITTORFF, RAY WITTWER, W M WOHLGEMUTH, SCOTT A WOLCOTT, MICHAEL S WOOD, KENNETH G WOODRING, STEVEN M WOODS, JAMES E WORTHINGTON, RON WORTHINGTON, H ROY WREN, JIMMY R WRIGHT, MARK WRIGHT, SCOTT F WRIGHT, ROBERT J WROBEL, THOMAS M WROBLEWSKI, ROBERT C WRUBLEVSKI, RANDALL A WYNN, MARK H WYZGALA, JOE YATES, JACK J YOST, MICHAEL YOUNG, MICHAEL L YOUNG, TRAVIS B YOUNG, JOHN L YOW, TED G ZAGNOLI, JOHN ZANOTTO, RODNEY A ZEHFUS, BEN J ZEPPA, DENNIS H ZICKRICK, BRUCE A ZIEGLER, KELLY ZIEGLER, JOHN ZISKA, IAN ABRAHAM, CHANSE ABRAMS, ASHOK ACHARYA, DONALD W ADAMS, TODD C AILES, BARRY K ALLEN, GREG ANDERSON, PARKER ANTHONY, RANDY BALABAN, RICHARD BATES, COLIN K BERGER, LARRY BLAIR, KENNETH BLECK, EDWARD BONFOEY, JIM G BOUGALIS, KEVIN BRADBURN, CHRIS BRADLEY, FELIX BREZNIKAR, B BROWN, LAURIE CALKINS, THOMAS J CAMMORATO, ADAM D CAREY, DOUGLAS R CAREY, GREGORY CHINSUE, PAUL COHEN, DAVID COOPER, ROBERT CROMBY, JOHN CUTONILLI, BRYAN DAVIS, LEO N DRAGANI, SCOT DUNCAN, BRANDON E DUNN, JOHN DUNN, JAMES EVANS, DON FILIPPO, MYLES FISHEL, BRENT FORDEN, MATHEW TODD FRANCE, WILLIAM D FRAZIER, DAVID C GARNER, DAVID GIESELMAN, RICHARD S GOWER, IAIN GRAE, GREGORY GRAMMER, KIM T GRAY, DARRELL GREEN, BRIAN GRIESBACH, GUY HARPER, STEPHEN HARRELL, MICHAEL HARRIS, WILLIAM R HARTLEY, NICK HAUTH, ROBERT HENRICHS, AMMON D HONTZ, SILUS HOPKINS, ROBERT HOWLAND, TIMOTHY HUSTON, JOSEPH JANEIRO, WILLIAM JESSEN, MICHAEL JORDAN, RITCHIE JULIAN, BUZZ KANTER, JACK KEMP, JUSTIN C KERR, DUANE KERZIC, MIKE KIEDROWSKI, DOUGLAS P KLINGERMAN, JUDY K LA FOLLETTE, FRANCESCO S LA ROCCA, DENNIS LAFOREST, ROD LAKE, CARYL LANGE, LON J LARSEN, ROBERT LERTORA, ALEX M LEVINSON, LOCHLAIN LEWIS, SVEND LINDBAEK, ERIC LOGE, FRED A MARSALISI, ED MILLER, NICK E MOGDEN, CHARLES NEELEY, MARK NISLY, ANDREA NOE, MATTHEW R OTT, SHERRY PAYNE, NEIL PEART, RONNY PELEG, DAVID PERRIN, JOE POKOY, TIMOTHY E PRITCHARD, DAVID M PULLEN, BRUCE R RAMSEY, BARRY REDDICK, WILL RUTLEDGE, BRIAN SACKETT, DANIEL SADOWSKI, FOTIOS SAKADARIS, RON SCARBOROUGH, STEVE D SEIDL, ANTHONY SHAFFER, TOM F SHEEHAN, CRAIG SHOEMAKER, HEATHER SIMPSON, CHARLIE SMALL, DERRIK SMITS, GRAYSON STANLEY, MICHAEL STANLEY, CHRISTOPHER J STEENROD, ADAM STEINER, MATTHEW STEVENS, JOHN STICH, JACK TENCZA, EVAN THOMSON, RAYMOND TREPANIER, DAVE TURNER, CHARLES A WALLACE, SANFORD WEBSTER, BRAD WHITWORTH, ALAN WICKS, JOANNA WOJTOWICZ BHATTI, KENNETH WOLF, DANIEL WOODMAN, SHANNON L WORTHEN, JOHN WRONSKI, COLLIN YENERICH, SCOTT A ARKEBAUER, LINDA G BONNER, VIRGINIA A BOONE, JUDITH E BORING, JERRY L BRICKEY, JEFFREY L BURCK, DAWN COE, MARK C COLE, SANDRA A CRABTREE, TERESA CRANFORD, PATTI A CROCKETT, JACKLINE L CRUSE, JANETTE DAMASO, DEBRA K DIRIENZO, DENNIS DUBOIS, KATHLEEN R ENDERS, LARRY G ERICKSON, GRACE FOX, NANCY J FRANCKE, PAULINE E FRONHEISER, NANCY C FROST, CONSTANCE M GIAMMALVO, DOROTHY M GLENN, RONNIE W HALE, JONATHAN L HARKAVY, KATHY L HARRIS, SANDRA L HICKS, CAROLYN M HILL, KATHY L HOENIG, LAURA HULNIK, NEELA J HUNDERTFUND, VICKI J HUTCHISON, DEBORAH F JOHNSON, HUNTER E JONES, JANE KEELEY, AILEEN E KOCH, GEORGIA KOCH, MARIO J KOWALSKI, GLADYS M KREISER, DEBORAH L KWAPIS, COLLEEN R LANNEN, SHIRLEY K LANNEN, SHIRLEY A LEE, JUDITH LEITCH, M DENISE MATHERS, DAVID MAW, SCOTT MCCOY, EVELYN L METHFESSEL, ILENE MINDICH, SHARI MOORE, ALLAN E MORIARTY, ALAN MORTENSON, MARGARET H MYERS, MARGARET F NELSON, RUTH A PARKER, DONNA PERSONS, LINDA L PETERS, JIM PETROVITS, JAMES R PLACK, ROBERT W RAES, JAMES RAFFAE, CARY REGISTER, MARY A RHODES, ELYSE L ROSS, PHYLLIS J ROWAN, BONNIE R RUNKEL, BRENDA D RUSTEMEYER, SANDRA SAVITZ, JULIA A SCAFE, BRIAN ST LOUIS, DONNA M STAMPER, MARILYN M STEWART, LEE STILLMAN, BILL TERRELL, MARY ELLEN TYNDALL, BETTY VALIANT, PATRICIA A VOGT, DONNA WHITE, JOHN R YATES, ADAM BOSCH, MARY LOVE, MICHAEL NOE, BILL PAYNE, DEBRA THOMPSON.

members For FLiFe For a complete, slightly more readable list of the motorcyclists who became Life Members in the past 12 months, visit www.AmericanMotorcyclist.com/08LifeMembers.


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Go Ride [

A few of the hundreds of AMA-sanctioned events this month, detailed on the followig pages.

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With defending champion Chad Reed and former champ James Stewart switching teams for the 2009 season, the Monster Energy AMA Supercross, an FIM World Championship season opener Jan. 3 in Anaheim, California, should prove to be one of the most exciting season-openers ever. Can’t get to the opener? Then catch the action Jan. 10 in Phoenix, Jan. 17 back in Anaheim, Jan. 24 in Houston or Jan. 31 in San Francisco. The full schedule is on page 60.

run. Early registration is Dec. 28. Proceeds benefit DAMAR Services, which helps the developmentally disabled. For more information, call Bob at (317) 557-2130.

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The 2009 AMA National Hare and Hound Series kicks off Jan. 25 at the Johnson Valley Off-highway Vehicle Recreation Area in Lacerne, Calif. Hosted by the Desert Motorcycle Club, this is the start of the seven-event desert-racing series. For more information, go to www.desertmc.com.

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COMING SOON

The gladiators in the Toyota AMA Arenacross Series pull into Grand Rapids, Mich., to do battle Jan. 2-4. Then they head to Baltimore Jan. 9-11; Dayton, Ohio, Jan. 17-18; Louisville, Ky., Jan. 23-25; and Greensboro, N.C., Jan. 31-Feb. 1. For the complete schedule, see page 60.

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A good way to get in your first ride of 2009 and benefit charity at the same time is to take part in the 28th annual Hangover Rally conducted by the Midwest Motorcycle Club in Indianapolis on Jan. 1. The rally begins at the clubs’ clubhouse on South Harding Street at 10 a.m. and involves a poker run as well as a timed

The Lone Star Rally, an AMA National Convention and part of the AMA Premier Touring Series presented by Cycle Trader, is set for Dec. 11-14 in Galveston, Texas. The rally was originally scheduled for Oct. 30 through Nov. 2, but was postponed because of the effects of Hurricane Ike on Galveston Island. The rally will feature a pirate theme, a leather and lace ball, numerous live concerts, poker runs, demo rides, a ghost ship tour, vendors, the Lone Star Lady Riders Conference and more. For more information, go to www.lonestarrally.com. Can Mike Lafferty pull off a record-setting ninth championship title in the 2009 AMA FMF National Enduro Championship Series? Or will defending champion Russell Bobbitt, or one of the other top guns in the circuit, spoil Lafferty’s dreams? The action begins with the season opener Jan. 25 in Wedgefield, S.C. Get more info at www.sermaclub.com.

Daytona! The opening race of the AMA Superbike Championship presented by Parts Unlimited at Daytona International Speedway in Daytona Beach, Fla., March 4-6 is always special, with racebikes reaching 200 mph on the high banking. But this season-opener wil be very special, since it will be run at night under the lights. Start making your plans now. For more information, go to www.amasuperbike.com.

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AMA PRO RACiNG

YOuR GuiDe tO eVeNts Looking to go riding, racing or spectating this month? You’ve come to the right place. The following pages list the AMAsanctioned events for December, up to date at the time this issue went to press. You can also find listings of AMA sanctioned events in the Riding and Racing sections of www. AmericanMotorcyclist.com. The biggest events—pro races, national-championship amateur competition, plus rides and rallies that are part of the AMA Premier Type of Event Date MOtOCROss

Touring Series—are highlighted in color boxes. For these series, we list all of the remaining events for the entire year. Then there are the local events, the backbone of the AMA’s riding and racing calendar. We sanction 83 different types of road and competition events for riders of all types. These events are listed by state, so you can quickly find the ones near you. Here’s a guide to what you’ll find in these local listings:

Event Class (Competition events only) S - Standard (Amateur classes) Y - Youth Classes T - ATV classes G - Progressive Location/City M - Pro-Am classes

Event Promoter

Sign-in Time

Contact Phone Number

iNDiANA

POKeR RuN JAN 1 (R): iNDiANAPOLis (D-15): MIDWEST MOTORCYCLE CLUB, BOB SHACKELFORD; 10 AM; 3101 S HARDING/2 MI N OF 465S/ HARDING EXIT; (317) 694-1305

KeNtuCKY

AReNA CROss JAN 23 (M,Y): LOuisViLLe (D-10): INDOOR; 3 DAY EVENT: LIVE NATION, JAYME DALSING; BROADBENT ARENA/937 PHILLIPS LANE; (800) 216-7482

MARYLAND AReNA CROss

JAN 9 (M,Y): bALtiMORe (D-7) : INDOOR; 3 DAY EVENT: LIVE NATION, JAYME DALSING; 1ST MARINER ARENA/201 W BALTIMORE ST; (800) 216-7482

MiChiGAN AReNA CROss

JAN 2 (M,Y): GRAND RAPiDs (D-14): INDOOR; 3 DAY EVENT: LIVE NATION, JAYME DALSING; VAN ANDEL ARENA/130 W FULTON; (800) 216-7482

MiNNesOtA

ROAD RuN JAN 1 (R): bLOOMiNGtON (D-23): TRAVELERS MOTORCYCLE CLUB, BETTY VALIANT; 10:31 AM; CHIEFS TOWING/8610 HARRIET AVE S; (952) 445-4379

NeW YORK

shORt tRACK JAN 18 (s,Y): CAiRO (D-3) : ELECTRIC CITY RIDERS, FRANK CARPINELLO; SKIDMORE LAKE/220 HERVEY SUNSIDE RD; (518) 5422144 iCe RACe JAN 4 (s,t): CAiRO (D-3) : ELECTRIC CITY

RIDERS, FRANK CARPINELLO; SKIDMORE LAKE/220 HERVEY SUNSIDE RD; (518) 5422144

NORth CAROLiNA

AReNA CROss JAN 31 (M,Y): GReeNsbORO (D-29): INDOOR; 2 DAY EVENT: LIVE NATION, JAYME DALSING; GREENSBORO COLISEUM; (800) 216-7482

OhiO

AReNA CROss JAN 17 (M,Y): DAYtON (D-11): INDOOR; 2 DAY EVENT: LIVE NATION, JAYME DALSING; ERVIN J NUTTER CENTER; (800) 216-7482

OReGON

ROAD RuN JAN 1 (R): PORtLAND (D-28): TRINITY ROAD RIDERS, BRUCE TILLER; 10 AM; CYCLE GEAR/89TH & SE STARK ST; (503) 314-4757

sOuth CAROLiNA

eNDuRO JAN 17 (s): ehRhARDt (D-29): 2 DAY EVENT: FAMILY RIDERS, DOUG COCHRAN; BROXTON BRIDGE PLANTATION/6 MI S OF TOWN; (843) 572-2008

texAs

MOtOCROss JAN 3 (s,Y): JAN 17 (s,Y): DONNA (D-20): BILLMAN FARMS LLC, MARC FANTICH; EX HWY83 & PROC. W ON FRONTAGE/GPS/ N26.11.15.4, W98.04.45.5; (956) 928-0500

WisCONsiN

POKeR RuN JAN 1 (R): MADisON (D-16): MADISON MOTORCYCLE CLUB, NORA MADSEN; 12 PM; INN ON THE PARK/CAPITAL SQUARE; (608) 441-2518

MOtORCYCLe shOWs Cycle World international Motorcycle shows www.motorcycleshows.com Dec 12-14: Seattle, WA Dec 19-21: San Mateo, CA

Jan 2-4: Novi, MI Jan 9-11: Washington, DC Jan16-18: New York, NY Jan 30-Feb. 1: Cleveland, OH Feb 6-8: Chicago, IL Feb 13-15: Minneapolis, MN Feb 20-22: Greenville, SC

MuseuM exhibits AMA’s Motorcycle hall of Fame Museum The Musuem is located on the AMA campus in Pickerington, Ohio, and is open 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. seven days a week year-round except for Easter, Thanksgiving, Christmas and New Year’s Day. Info: www.motorcyclemuseum.org. Motostars: Celebrities + Motorcycles: Priceless machines, exclusive memorabilia and tales from celebrities’ favorite two-wheel adventures. On display through February 2009. Awesome-Ness: The life and art of Arlen Ness: King of Choppers. On display through June 2009. Red bikes: Large-format photographic prints by artist and motorcycle aficionado Dawn Deppi. Motorcycle hall of Fame: Bikes and memorabilia recognizing those who have made significant contributions to all aspects of motorcycling. Founders hall: Honoring the Museum’s generous contributors.

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www.amasupercross.com

Jan. 3: Anaheim, CA: Angel Stadium of Anaheim; (714) 9402000 Jan. 10: Phoenix, AZ: Chase field; (602) 4626000;

DeC 6 (s,t,Y): ReYNOLDs (D-9): SILVER DOLLAR MX, C/O STEVE JONES; 6 AM; HWY 96 W/JST W OF TWN; (478) 555-4673 Directions

Monster energy AMA supercross, an FiM World Championship

Jan. 17: Anaheim, CA: Angel Stadium of Anaheim; (714) 9402000; Jan. 24: houston, tx: Reliant Stadium; (832) 667-1400 Jan. 31: san Francisco,

CA: AT&T Park; (415) 972-2000

Superdome; (504) 5873663

Feb. 7: Anaheim, CA: Angel Stadium of Anaheim; (714) 9402000

March 21: st. Louis, MO: Edward Jones Dome; (314) 342-5036

Feb. 14: san Diego, CA: Qualcomm Stadium; (619) 525-8266

March 28: toronto, ON: Rogers Centre; (416) 341-3000

Feb. 21: Atlanta, GA: Georgia Dome; (404) 223-9200

April 4: Jacksonville, FL: Jacksonville Municipal Stadium; (904) 633-6100

Feb. 28: indianapolis, iN: Lucas Oil Stadium; (317) 262-8600

April 18: seattle, WA: Qwest Field; (206) 3817500

March 7: Daytona, FL: Daytona International Speedway, (800) PITSHOP

April 25: salt Lake City, ut: Rice-Eccles Stadium; (801) 581-8849

March 14: New Orleans, LA: Louisiana

May 2: Las Vegas, NV: Sam Boyd Stadium; (702) 895-3761

AMA sPORts AMA National enduro Championship series schedule Jan. 25: Manchester state Forest, Wedgefield, SC: SERMA, Johnny McCoy; (803) 481-5169; jmccoy@sc.rr. com; www.sermaclub.com Feb. 22: Greensboro, GA: Cherokee Cycle Club, Garrett McKey; (678) 2315858; gmckey@bellsouth.net; www. setra.org March 5: tomoka Farms Rd., Daytona beach, FL: Daytona Dirt Riders, Steve Pettenger; (386) 6156722; www.floridatrailriders.org/ddr/; daytonadirtriders@aol.com March 29: Kisatchie National Forest, Forest hill, LA: Acadiana Dirt Riders, Darin LaFleur; (337) 3634229; b_faster@yahoo.com; www. acadianadirtriders.org April 26: West Point, TN: NATRA, Paul

Traufler; (256) 837-0084; wintrak@ hiwaay.net; www.natra.dirtrider.net June 21: upton, WY: Superfly Race Productions, Scott Bright; (970) 3024045; pinned2win@hotmail.com; www. racermec.org June 28: bull Run Guest Ranch, Great Falls, Mt: MTVRA, Russ Ehnes; (406) 781-0967; russehness@bresnan.net; www.mtvra.com July 19: blain Picnic Grounds, blain, PA: Susquehana Off Road Riders, Jim Landvater; (717) 533-2242; jktm300@ yahoo.com; www.scrrmc.org Aug. 9: Marquette, Mi: UP Sandstormers, Frank Shepeck; (906) 233-9721; info@upsandstormers.com; www.upsandstormers.com Oct. 4: upland Lions Club, upland, iN: Muddobbers MC, Brent Floyd; befloyd@sweyzee.com; www. muddobbers.org

AMA sPORts AMA National hare & hound Championship series schedule Jan. 25: Johnson Valey OhVA, Lucerne, CA: Desert M/C, Gary Cyr; (909) 865-3935; desertmotorcycleclub@yahoo.com; Feb. 8: spangler hills, Ridgecrest CA: Four Aces MC, Richie Wohlers; (805) 573-5128; richie@fouracesmc.org; www.fouracesmc.org March 15: superstition OhVA, el Centro, CA: Roadrunner Off-Road Racing, Kirk Hester; (760) 275-9852; captain@dc.rr.com; http//groups.msn. com/RoadRunnerOffRoadRacing/ April 26: Lucerne Valley, CA: Vikings MC, Nick Balderas; (714) 775-6880;

balderas4@sbc.global.net; www. vikingsmc.org May 17: Jericho, ut: Sugarloafers, Rob Davies; (435) 743-4818; rdavies02@ frontiernet.net; www.sugarloafersmc. com sept. 26: Wendover, NV: Utah Desert Foxes, Steve Rij; (801) 964-8773; steve. bmp@att.net; www.utahdesertfoxes. com Oct. 25: Lucerne Valley, CA: 100’s MC, Ryan Sanders; (949) 584-9395; ryan.sanders@district37ama.org; www.100smc.org Oct. 31: Jericho, ut: Sageriders MC, Kari Christman; (435) 650-0411; dezchik111@yahoo.com; www. sageriders.com


Marketplace MADe in the ShADeS Oakley inmate Sunglasses Oakley’s Inmate sunglasses offer a minimalist, assertive look that should work well with many helmets. The frame, made of a lightweight alloy based on five metal compounds, employs bridge and temple pads made of a material formulated to increase grip with sweat. The lens blocks 100 percent of UVA, UBV and UVC light. $215 from www.oakley.com.

Shine A Light On Me Risk Racing’s LeD Light-Mine Puts it Where You Want it Working on a motorcycle in dim light (or no light) is no fun, especially if you’re holding a flashlight in your mouth. Now you can save your sanity and your teeth with Risk Racing’s LED LightMine, with a spherical design that includes 12 rare earth magnets that allow the light to stick to any metal surface. Smaller than a golf ball, it can fit in even tight spaces, like the one between your fuel tank and cylinder head. $7.99 from www.riskracing.com.

WheeL-LOcking SYSteM WORkS AnYWheRe keep Your Bike Where You Put it The Condor Pit-Stop is a fully adjustable wheel-locking system that will secure your bike in the upright position on pavement, concrete, dirt, sand, gravel and all forms of transport platforms. When not in use, it folds down flat. The system can accommodate bikes up to 3,000 pounds and front and rear wheels from 14 to 22 inches in diameter. $250 from www.condor-lift.com.

A MuSeuM exhiBit fOR YOuR BOOkSheLf the comprehensive MotoStars Book “MotoStars: Celebrities + Motorcycles” is one of the most dynamic and engaging exhibits ever displayed at the AMA’s Motorcycle Hall of Fame Museum. If you can’t get to the Museum in person, the official book of the exhibit is the next best thing. Curator David Morris has compiled hundreds of pictures and talked with dozens of celebrities whose bikes are featured, including Pat Boone, Arlen Ness, Neil Peart, Francesco Quinn, Roland Sands and many more. The in-depth stories will draw you in, proving this is much more than just a book of pretty pictures. Buy it in the Museum gift shop or at www.motorcyclemuseum.org.

January 2009

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Perfect gift for new and veteran riders! By Bill Kresnak

www.buy.com

January 2009

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WWW. american motorcyclist .COM /riGHts

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Advanstar IMS...................................13 Adventure New Zealand....................62 Aero Design.......................................64 AMA Daytona Tour.............................31 AMA D.C. Seminar.............................21 AMA Women’s Conference..................35 AMA’s Motorcycle Hall of Fame........39 Americade.........................................36 American Motorcycle Specialties.........65 Best Wholesale Oil...............................64 Bike Bandit.....................................63,67 Bike Log...............................................64 Black Book..........................................65 BLACK+GRAY...................................63 Bob’s BMW..........................................63 Bohn Body Armor..............................64 Canadian Supershow...........................33 CheapCycleParts.com......................64 Clarke Manufacturing...........................65 Cycle Pump.........................................63 Cycoactive........................................62 Deltran/Battery Tender.......................27 Draggin’ Jeans.....................................63 EagleRider Motorcycle Rental........37,64 Federal Company.................................29 Fulmer Helmets...................................64 Geico Insurance.....................................5

Gerbing’s Heated Clothng...................62 JC Motors............................................33 Klempf’s British Parts........................63 KTM North America...........................68 Laconia Bike Week..............................36 Leader Accessories.............................65 Manic Salamander...............................62 Motel 6.................................................36 Motion Pro...........................................62 Motoquest Tours..................................65 Motolight...........................................64 Motorcycle.com..........................58 Motorcycle Tour Conversions..............63 Motorcycles Costa Rica......................62 Motorcycling for Dummies................63 Port-A-Chopper.................................62 Powerlet............................................63 Progressive Insurance.........................15 Ride Like a Pro..................................25 Roadrunner........................................64 Rollie Free Story................................62 Ronnie’s Mail Order..............................27 Sportreaders.....................................62 Super-Visor........................................65 Suzuki..............................................2-3 Touratech..........................................62 Twisted Throttle....................................37

January 2009

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Guest Column 50 States of Consciousness Live Life To The Fullest: Make Your Dream Rides Come True The motorcycle bug combined with my lifelong wanderlust in 1998, when I embraced motorcycling in a very big way. Ultimately, that merger turned me into what some have called a road warrior, a mile-monster and a downright crazy, extreme and extraordinary life force on two wheels. For me, it has been all about living life to the fullest—which is how I came to hatch a plan for an unimaginable 50-state solo journey to raise money and awareness for heart disease and pediatric cancer. On May 6, 2006, in Albuquerque, N.M., I couldn’t have asked for a better send-off from my friends and the New Mexico State Police. After two years of planning and preparation, I rode into the sunset on my beloved motorcycle, Big Bertha, a 1999 Honda Valkyrie, to start my cross-continent journey. Not only would I honor both my parents, who died of heart disease, but also a young family friend who is a brain cancer survivor. To my surprise, after a few days, I realized that raising money this way would be more difficult than I imagined. I revised my goals, because I was not going to surrender my plan. I made the best of every pleasantry. I managed to enjoy

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the simple pleasures of an occasional mouthwatering home-cooked meal and heartfelt moments of sidesplitting laughter with friends old and new. Over the course of my 169-day, 25,000mile odyssey, there were bound to be a few unexpected challenges. For instance, sweat poured from my body as I traveled through the Deep South, while being eaten alive by insects. I survived a tornado in Wisconsin, a motorcycle accident in California, grizzlies in the Yukon Territory and the foreboding Alaska Highway. There were serious gut checks while riding through all kinds of weather and road conditions, as well as dodging large animals like bear, buffalo and moose. On most days, a tent was my home, and an occasional shower was a luxury. I was challenged by mechanical difficulties and I dealt with all kinds of animals, both twoand four-legged. Through it all, I did my best to keep a positive attitude, stay in the moment and enjoy this ride of a lifetime. In the end, I was able to successfully

by DJ Jones complete my 50-state journey. When I rolled Big Bertha onto Hawaiian soil on Sept. 13, 2006, I could proudly say, “I did it.” Thanks to God’s blessings, the love of my husband and devoted friends, I accomplished what many said I could not do. For me, it was more than just crossing dotted lines on the map. It was like I had ridden through 50 states of consciousness— there were so many lessons the road taught me during that challenging journey. I encourage anyone with a dream ride to get out there and experience our wonderful country. With a multitude of roads to be ridden, sights to be seen and memories to be made, there’s no time like the present to make your dreams come true. Life may not always be sunshine and rainbows, but what you live through will make you a better person and a better rider. DJ Jones would like to hear from any other riders who have accomplished a solo 50-state feat on the same bike. E-mail DJ at irronbutt@aol.com.


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