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HOLIDAY SHOPPING MADE EASY: GIVE THE GIFT OF AMA MEMBERSHIP. SEE PAGE 57.

JANUARY 2010

2009

Motorcyclists of the Year ...KIDS!

[at the center of the year’s biggest story]

THE JOURNAL OF THE


MOTION

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©2009 Bombardier Recreational Products Inc. (BRP). All rights reserved. ®, ™ and the BRP logo are trademarks of BRP or its affiliates. Products are distributed in the U.S.A. by BRP US Inc. Always ride responsibly and safely and observe applicable laws. Remember that riding and alcohol/drugs don’t mix.

EMOTION


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Navigation Cover They just want to ride: 9-year-old Eli Otterbach and the Torres sisters, Autumn, 9, and Jaden, 6. Like all kids, they found their love of motorcycles threatened when the federal government said it would ban youth bikes and ATVs in 2009 (see page 36). Photo by Shannon Price Navigation Photo Erik Buell, back in the day, honing his vision of what a Buell motorcycle could be. Like most riders, we here at American Motorcyclist were saddened to see the proud brand ride into the sunset (see page 20).

VIEWPOINTS

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Snapshots Your Images, Your World Letters You Write, We Read Rob Dingman Motorcyclists of the Year Davey Coombs Help Your Kids Have The Fun You Had

THE LIFE

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Protecting The Ride New Bike Test Procedure Gaining Ground On Sound

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Adrenaline Strange Days: Team USA’s Six Days Effort

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Living It Buell Motorcycles: 1983-2009

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Heritage 1940 Triumph Tiger 100

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Watching, Waiting And Working The lead law that threatens to end motorcycling for kids could still destroy the sport

FEATURES

36 January 2010 Volume 64, Number 1 Published by the American Motorcyclist Association 13515 Yarmouth Dr. Pickerington, OH 43147 (800) AMA-JOIN AmericanMotorcyclist.com

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Connections A Matter Of Priorities

2009 AMA Motorcyclists Of The Year: Kids! Promising not to eat their motorcycles, kids were at the heart of 2009’s biggest story

Go Ride What To Do, Where To Go

American Motorcyclist magazine (ISSN 0277-9358) is published monthly by the American Motorcyclist Association, 13515 Yarmouth Dr., Pickerington, OH 43147. Copyright by the American Motorcyclist Association/American Motorcyclist 2009. Printed in USA. Subscription rate: Magazine subscription fee of $10 covered in membership dues; $15 a year for non-members. Postmaster: Mail form 3579 to 13515 Yarmouth Dr., Pickerington, OH 43147. Periodical postage paid at Pickerington, Ohio, and at additional mailing offices.


Bike Week in Daytona Beach, FL is known far and wide as one of the greatest festivals in America that's enjoyed by bikers world-wide. It's a passage and a passion many look forward to year after year. With 10 days of fun activities and thousands of things to see and do, its easy to find yourself in bikers paradise at Bike Week. Wake up to the bright, crisp Daytona Beach area sunshine while you take in some of the most spectacular bikes around and meet the best people from all walks of life.

The manufactures and vendors you know and love will be here too along with a few new surprises and great new event locations to discover along the way. Need help planning your stay? No problem. Let our professional travel staff work with you to find your perfect lodging right here in the Daytona Beach area. We've even got on-line searches and special event pricing to make it even easier to fully enjoy your spring Bike Week get-away.

Find out more about this incredible event and all there is to see and do at

www.GetNews.BikerBeach.com

Your resource for event information and everything you’ll need to plan your perfect Bike Week get-away direct from our Daytona Beach area professionals. Look for us on popular social network sites including Twitter@BikerBeach and FaceBook.com/bikerbeach for the most up to the minute event details and announcements. Or call our toll free Biker Beach Bike Week hot line at

1-866-250-6181

for personalized service your way.


1) L-R: Vernon Markworth, Rob Watt, Kerry Simpson, Stan Simpson, Doc TR, and Will Hendrix riding in Utah. 2) Phyllis and Dave Hunter. 3) Arnold Rosling of Nampa, Idaho. 4) Ed Henderson and Bob Gregorio with Orange County Choppers patriarch Paul Teutul in New York. 5) Crosby Grindle of Bend, Ore., just doing what he likes to do. 6) Bay Area Riders Association of Triumph ride, submitted by Victor Castellanos. 7) Jim Connelly’s Honda Shadow in front of a Boy Scout building in Union Grove, Wis. 8) Doug Justus and friends in Colorado. 9) Marianne Taylor in the Rocky Mountain National Park in Colorado. 10) Johnnie Ross. 11) Dell Hickle’s first trip to Deal’s Gap. 12) Krystal Azelkas. 13) L-R: Jim Sheerin, Steve Noyes, Marty Shaw, Dave Noyes, Jack Burkhard, and Scott Carpenter. 14) Ron and Brenda Glowatcky at the Biltmore Estate in Asheville, N.C. 15) Martin Twofeather in Virginia on Memorial Day. 16) Photo by Randy Peterson. 17) Al Bowman. 18) Laura Rodrigues and son, Nicolas, during a two-week family motorcycle trip from Arizona to Oregon and back via the coast highway. 19) Rose Bromberg shot of Greg Cowan at Cycle Ranch Motocross Park in Floresville, Texas.

Snapshots

Congratulations! You’re the winner this month!

Andy Tawata snapped this shot of his wife, Kalelei, as the couple rode near Waimea Canyon on the Hawaiian island of Kauai.

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Get A Pair Of Dunlop Tires. Got an image that represents what’s cool about motorcyling? Send your high-resolution photos, name and mailing address to submissions@ama-cycle. org. We’ll pick one standout photo next month and send the photographer a certificate for Dunlop tires. Editors decisions are final. No purchase necessary.

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Editorial officES

aMa Board of dirEctorS

American Motorcyclist 13515 Yarmouth Drive Pickerington, OH 43147 (614) 856-1900 submissions@ama-cycle.org

Contact any member of the AMA Board of Directors at www.AmericanMotorcyclist. com/whatis/trustees.asp Stan Simpson, Chairman Cibolo, Texas

Grant Parsons, Managing Editor James Holter, Associate Editor Bill Kresnak, Government Affairs Editor Mitch Boehm, Contributing Editor Mark Lapid, Creative Director Nora McDonald, Production Coordinator Jen Muecke, Designer

Jim Williams, Vice-Chairman Irvine, Calif. Jon-Erik Burleson, Assistant Treasurer Murrietta, Calif. Bill Werner, Assistant Secretary Brookfield, Wis.

advErtiSing

John Ulrich, Executive Committee Member Lake Elsinore, Calif.

Ray Monroe, Advertising Manager (815) 885-4445, rmonroe@ama-cycle.org

Erik Buell, East Troy, Wis.

Misty Walker, Advertising Assistant (614) 856-1900, ext. 1267, mwalker@ama-cycle.org

andy goldfine, Duluth, Minn.

All trademarks used herein (unless otherwise noted) are owned by the AMA and may only be used with the express, written permission of the AMA. American Motorcyclist is the monthly publication of the American Motorcyclist Association, which represents motorcyclists nationwide. For information on AMA membership benefits, call (800) AMA-JOIN or visit AmericanMotorcyclist.com. Manuscripts, photos, drawings and other editorial contributions must be accompanied by return postage. No responsibility is assumed for loss or damage to unsolicited material. Copyright© American Motorcyclist Association, 2009.

charles goman, Winder, Ga. Perry King, Northern California Michael lock, Cupertino, Calif. Maggie Mcnally, Albany, N.Y. arthur More, Surprise, Ariz.

(800) AMA-JOIN AmericanMotorcyclist.com

contributors and Staff

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Bill KrESnaK, government affairs Editor Bill is one of the few people who not only owns a set of custom-made Kevin Schwantz MotoGP-replica leathers from back in the day, but he keeps them in an unobtainium Corin bag from Japan.

tHE SUSqUEHanna PHotograPHic, Photographers Allison and Philip run this small photography group out of central Pennsylvania. When not photo-blogging about small towns and businesses, they love to travel around and meet new people, like Dennis Haggerty this month. You can see more of their work at SusquehannaPhoto.com.

grant ParSonS, Managing Editor Grant is wrestling with the eternal question for the bikes in his garage: To winterize, or not? The safe money is on “not,” for two reasons: 1) He’s hoping for the occasional riding days through the winter; and 2) He’s lazy. Tune in in March when he’s cleaning every carb and throttle body he owns.

JEnni HaHn, Photographer Jenni took some great photos of Bill Hearne for this issue in the foothills of South Dakota. And the weather was actually perfect! More of her work can be found at JenniHahnPhotography.com.

MarK laPid, creative director The key to learning to ride off-road? Covering every inch of the bike you’re riding with mud, of course. And as Mark discovered, the best way is to submerge said bike in a giant puddle to a point that is (thankfully) just below the intake snorkle.

nora Mcdonald, Production coordinator The resto on the CB360 has begun, starting with a clean set of carbs—just in time for the usual slushy Columbus winter. What’s wrong with this picture? AmericanMotorcyclist.com

BK

Monty SoUngPraditH, Photographer Monty is one of our go-to photographers locally, and his easy-going nature and get-it-in-one-click style is reflected in this month’s Heritage spread on page 34. Look for more of his work in that space going forward.

davEy cooMBS, guest columnist The publisher of Racer X and Roadracer X magazines, and a member of the family that runs the Air Nautiques AMA Amateur National Motocross Championships as well as MX Sports Pro Racing, Davey took time out to pen this month’s guest column. And yes, the bike he’s on in his picture is an exact replica of his first bike.

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JEn MUEcKE, designer Ah, democracy. It’s been 20 years since the fall of the Berlin Wall, and Jen celebrated by going for a ride on a bike that was made in former East Germany. JaMES HoltEr, associate Editor After riding the Suzuki owned by Hollywood Joe’s partner in crime, Tom Desideri, James suddenly finds himself answering everyone’s question of “What bike should I buy next” with a shout of “Hayabusa!” other contributors include: Steve Beckner, Mark Kariya


Member Letters NICE WORK, BOB AND SHERM! The article in your November issue about New Hampshire state legislators Bob Letourneau and Sherm Packard epitomizes what it means to live in a state whose motto is “Live Free or Die!” These two men stand for and by that pledge. They stand tall among motorcyclists, legislators, and are truly fine examples to us all. If more folks got as involved as these two are, we would have a less difficult time passing legislation favorable to motorcycles, as well as enhancing the overall enjoyment and safety of our sport. May their flags wave long and proudly! William Darling AMA No. 221856 Longs, S.C.

TELL ME MORE ABOUT SOUND METERS I just got around to reading the September issue (loved it, by the way) and had one comment. You told us nothing about the sound measurement device pictured on page 46. Who makes it (or them)? Who can purchase it? Is there training on its use? Are there certifications required? Are there periodic recalibrations? Will the manufacturer or AMA be offering tests at upcoming rallies? Allen Hook AMA No. 251555 Avon Lake, Ohio Thanks for the questions, Allen. We answer a lot of them in this issue, on page 16, which offers a simplified view of how to conduct a sound test, and offers information on a video we’ve posted on AmericanMotorcyclist.com. As for the cost, good “Type 2” sound meters typically run a couple hundred dollars. Because of the high price, the AMA encourages clubs and promoters to purchase the devices for use at motorcycle gatherings, and we offer a grant program. Equipment info: ChemHelp.com.

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Send your letters (and a high-resolution photo) to submissions@ama-cycle.org; or mail to 13515 Yarmouth Drive, Pickerington, OH 43147.

THEY REALLY MAKE A DIFFERENCE If the November issue is an example of the new format, keep up the good work. The cover and article on two old freedom fighters for bikers’ rights were right on. It’s good to see people with that kind of integrity being recognized. These two, Sherm and Bob, show that bikers can and do achieve positions that can directly represent us in the legislature. If only every state could have this caliber of representation. Thanks for recognizing these two and letting the world know what they do. Chuck Coulter AMA No. 482961 Boise, Idaho GOOD JOB ON THE SOUND ISSUE I recently picked up an issue of American Motorcyclist and read about your efforts to promote motorcycle noise control. My cycling experiences go back 45 years and yes, I once owned a bike with a megaphone exhaust. Being older and, hopefully, wiser, I realize that’s not good for my ears or others’ ears as well. Kudos for taking on this important topic. Good luck! Chuck Prince AMA No. 1086758 Columbus, Ga. IMPRESSED WITH DAVID HOUGH Last weekend I found David Hough’s book, Proficient Motorcycling, in the public library. Today, I found him in Dr. Noel Taylor your magazine as an inductee into the AMA Motorcycle Hall of Fame, and I find myself moved to say, “Hip, hip, hooray!” for this wise writer. A little bit of what he shares isn’t new to me, since I’ve lived on bicycles all my life. But after teaching myself to ride something with not only two wheels, but also an engine, at age 55, I find Hough’s discussions of such things as countersteering, traction with throttle, decreasing radius turns, and situational awareness to be the next best thing to a motorcycle safety course, which I’m now

committed to taking when they start up again next year. Thanks for honoring Hough’s work. Dr. Noel A. Taylor AMA No. 1089614 Columbus, Ind. A SHOUT OUT TO ONE OF OUR OWN Karl Duffner, a wellknown member of the antique motorcycle community worldwide, has taken ill. While some AMA members might Karl Duffner not recognize Karl by name, many will recognize his motorcycles: His “People’s Choice”-winning “Dick Mann Special” 1960 BSA Gold Star Café Racer has been on the front cover of more than one big-name magazine, and is prominently featured in the Metro Racing catalog; his ribbon-winning 1954 BMW R68 purchased by Karl for $550 on March 18, 1959, from a friend’s dad, who purchased it new on May 19, 1954; his blue-andwhite 1962 Harley Davidson Sportster CH which he bought new in ’62; or his BMW 1974 R90S bought new in 1974 that has 313,000-plus miles. Karl has attended Daytona for 40-plus years, and at times has chosen to ride the 2,000-mile round trip on a Honda 250 Rebel or on the R90S. Karl is a lifelong enthusiast whose generosity and easy-going manner has touched many fellow riders. We wish him all the best! On behalf of Karl’s many friends, Steve Rooney AMA No. 648168 Williamstown, N.J. CONGRESS AT WORK The following letter was received from a delegate to AMA Congress, the group that formulates AMA rule-changes for approval by the AMA Board of Directors. After attending the AMA Congress meeting in October, I know that the spirit of democracy, and the conduct of representative governing, is alive and well among the members and leaders of the American Motorcyclist Association. Three days of discussion, disagreement and consensus revealed to this rookie representative the true essence of a democratic society. Issues concerning the past, present and future operation of the


LETTER OF THE MONTH Who Needs A Garage?! American Motorcyclist Association and its component parts were actively sought, thoroughly discussed, and democratically decided upon, in multiple areas and disciplines. The president and CEO of the AMA, and his staff, were present, and accessible, throughout Charles Schaefer the conference. This fact alone made the get-together a successful event for this rookie representative. Committee and subcommittee chairs were highly proficient in the conduct of meetings… In addition to my individual points of interest, I was intrigued by, and drawn into, discussions about numerous motorcycle-related subjects that were presented in a highly in-depth manner. From my first-hand observations, I believe the American Motorcyclist Association Congress was, and will continue to be, a

The moms and dads of the AMA may think they have it bad with all their kids and their motorcycles, but check out these pictures of my wife, Penny’s flattrack bike. Honest, that’s where she stores it in our house for the winter. Terry Heath AMA No. 675652 Port Crane, N.Y. Congratulations Terry, you’re our letter of the month, and you win a free AMA T-shirt!

highly professional and useful vehicle in the initiatives for enhancing the various motorcycling opportunities in North Carolina.

Charles W. Schaefer AMA No. 750721 District 29 Off-Road Recreation Delegate Waynesville, N.C.

On Facebook? Us, too. Become a fan of the American Motorcyclist Association and you could be leaving comments like these: www.facebook.com/AmericanMotorcyclist

Franklin Marino Even a bad day of riding is better than a good day of sitting around the house.—after a (hopefully good) ride. Lisa Thornberry Hettman I conquered doubles, whoops and tabletops at Mt. View MX in Sandy, Ore., this year, and officially graduated from newbie to intermediate. Yayyyy!! I love MVMX.—on a highlight of her year. Curt Wise Done...times 2—on taking advantage, twice, of the AMA’s gift-membership program (see page 57). Frank Pichardo AMA Roadside Assistance is totally awesome. I have used it in Southern California, and the customer service, towing, and everyone is totally cool and a pro. Thanks, AMA! Ed Nugent I feel, at least in Florida, it is too easy to get a motorcycle endorsement. The three-day MSF class is excellent and remains a foundation of my rider skills, but we need more. Many people seem more inclined to spend $200 for a piece of chrome than putting it toward an advanced riding class.—in a motorcycle safety thread. Bob Maddocks What I’m trying to articulate is that WE are

fundamentally and ultimately responsible for trying to avoid the legions of caged morons out there trying to kill us. That responsibility includes keeping our motorcycles in sound mechanical condition and wearing appropriate protective gear. We can’t prepare for every contingency, but often I see motorcyclists putting themselves in situations that should have been avoided.—in the same discussion. Britt Lambert Dennis Manning and Chris Carr, what a team! Might as well go for 425 mph and forget 400! — responding to a video of land-speed racing record holder (and AMA Motorcycle Hall of Famer) Denis Manning, posted on AmericanMotorcyclist.com. Scott Weber Great riding, TEAM USA! Congratulations on winning the FIM Motocross of Nations, making Team USA the 2009 World Champions in the 450, 250 and Open classes and bringing the USA its 20th win!—on MXoN. Robert Corum IT’S ABOUT TIME!!! I thought we’d NEVER win that thing! (except for the last 50 times we did :x)—joking, in response. Follow AMA news—and chat with fellow AMA members— on Facebook. You can also always get the latest info at AmericanMotorcyclist.com.

January 2010

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From the President

Motorcyclists Of The Year

The selection of our 2009 AMA Motorcyclist Of The Year (MOTY) was notable for the number of candidates that we considered. When we announced the MOTY last year, we said that the recipient should be someone who has had the most profound impact on motorcycling, positively or negatively. In other words, a contribution made—for better or worse—to motorcycling and its future by an individual throughout the course of the previous calendar year. In a year marked by the struggling economy and a number of not-so-veiled threats to motorcycling, it wasn’t hard to identify candidates. Some of you had excellent suggestions, and not all of them were heroes. Early in the year Congress passed the 1,300-page Omnibus Public Land Management Act that inappropriately designated some 2 million acres as Wilderness in several states. The “bad guys” were easy to spot. Our federal legislators are not done and, as I write this, efforts are afoot to close off 9.4 million acres of Utah’s public land. Yet, there was an even bigger story in 2009: the implementation of the Consumer Product Safety Improvement Act (CPSIA), which was signed into law by former President Bush in August 2008. In a cruel testament to the “Law of Unintended Consequences,” the CPSIA was the same bill that the off-highway vehicle (OHV) manufacturers lobbied Congress to pass in an effort to codify the voluntary all-terrain vehicle safety design standards that those companies have observed for two decades. Apparently unforeseen was that another section of the same legislation—which mandated the elimination of lead in children’s toys—would ultimately lead to the banning of the sale of youth-model motorcycles and ATVs. Suddenly, it became illegal for dealers to sell kids’ OHVs because regulators feared that parts such as battery terminals, valve stems, engine cases and controls might somehow end up in a youngster’s mouth. Just as suddenly, young riders were exposed to unnecessary risk because only adult-sized vehicles remained for sale. Also, no thought was given to the economic hardship small businesses and their employees would suffer in a depressed economy. Responding to the immediate threat, manufacturers, distributors, dealers, the aftermarket and tens of thousands of families mobilized to pressure Congress and the Consumer Product Safety Commission (which was charged with enforcing the law) to exempt these products from implementation of the CPSIA. While it’s easy to single out the villains, at the center of

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Photo Open Image Studio

Our Youngest Riders Were At The Center Of The Year’s Biggest Story By Rob Dingman

the biggest story in motorcycling of 2009 were the clear victims—kids. When 6-year-old AMA member Chase Yentzer spoke at a CPSIA protest rally in the U.S. Capitol Building in April, his words cut to the heart of the matter. “I ride dirtbikes with my family. I race dirtbikes. Please give me my dirtbike back. I promise not to eat it.” On that day, young Chase spoke for the hundreds of thousands of youngsters who represent the future of the sport, lifestyle and pastime that we cherish and defend so passionately. A future that remains in jeopardy, as you will read about in one of this month’s features (see page 46). Because this devastating issue cast aside the hopes and dreams of thousands of young OHV riders in 2009, it was only appropriate that we considered bestowing the honor of MOTY to each and every one of America’s kids who ride dirtbikes and ATVs. I am therefore very proud to announce that Kids are the 2009 AMA Motorcyclists Of The Year. In the spirit of “paying it forward,” it is for them that we toil today, and it is for their future that we will fight tomorrow. Rob Dingman is the AMA’s president and CEO.


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The Life

Protecting the Ride 16 Living It 20 Connections 24 Adrenaline 30 Heritage 34


In some places, the scene doesn’t change much over the decades, and the only difference between the view back then and the view now is that it’s motorcycles, rather than horses, that are parked in front of the feed store. It’s never too early to start planning the epic rides that lead you to such places, and the best way to find the best roads, no matter where you’re headed, is is the AMA’s Good Roads Database, available only to members. Find it in the Members Only Area of AmericanMotorcyclist.com. Photo: Neale Bayly

January 2010

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The Life | Protecting the Ride

Sound expert and motorcyclist Chris Real is at the forefront of educating people about motorcycle sound.

How To Conduct A Sound Test Conducting an SAE J2825 sound test procedure on an on-highway motorcycle may seem daunting, but it’s easy. Here’s how to do it:

1

Find a clear test site. No wall or sign should be within 8 feet of the motorcycle. Decide whether you want to use the idle, set rpm or swept rpm test procedure. The idle test procedure requires that the motorcycle engine run for at least 5 seconds at idle. The set rpm procedure requires that the motorcycle operator run the engine at the test speed for that motorcycle—5,000 rpm for threeand four-cylinder motors, and 2,000 rpm for all others—for at least two seconds. The swept rpm procedure requires that the engine be slowly accelerated to the test rpm. When the specified engine speed is reached, the throttle is quickly closed. The acceleration should take at least two seconds.

3 NEW BIKE TEST PROCEDURE GAINING GROUND ON THE ISSUE OF MOTORCYCLE SOUND SOUND GURU CHRIS REAL EXPLAINS THE NEW STREETBIKE TEST When Chris Real rides his motorcycle near his home in Upland, Calif., he always passes a sign at the border of a private community that upsets him: “No Motorcycles Allowed Beyond This Point.” “I hate that sign,” said Real, a nationally recognized sound expert and president of DPS Technical (www.ChemHelp. com). “They have dealt with noise by not allowing motorcycles there.” When there is a sound problem, Real explained in a talk to delegates at the AMA Congress held in Columbus, Ohio, Oct. 8-10, people need to understand it, identify it, study it and then control it. A new Society of Automotive Engineers (SAE) sound test procedure—SAE J2825, “Measurement of Exhaust Sound Pressure Levels of Stationary On-Highway Motorcycles”—is a tool to be used when dealing with sound issues, said Real, who helped develop the procedure. “It was developed for roadside sound

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measurement and control of excessively loud motorcycles with significantly modified exhaust systems,” he said. Only very loud motorcycle exhausts would fail the procedure, he said. The new procedure sets a decibel limit of 92 dB(A) at idle for all motorcycles. Motorcycles with three or four cylinders have a decibel limit of 100 dB(A) at 5,000 rpm or 75 percent of maximum engine speed, whichever is less, when using what is known as the “set” rpm test; or for a “swept” test that involves slowly accelerating to the specified rpm. All other motorcycles have a decibel limit of 96 dB(A) at 2,000 rpm, or 75 percent of maximum engine speed, whichever is less, for the set or swept test. “The 100 dB(A) is with your ear 20 inches away from the exhaust pipe, not at a sidewalk cafe,” Real said, addressing the source of many citizen complaints about motorcycle sound.

Have someone sit on the motorcycle in a normal riding position with one or both feet on the ground. Or you can put the motorcycle up on its center stand, if it has one, or put the front wheel in a restraint so that the bike is vertical. If you are conducting just the “idle” test, you can put the motorcycle on its side stand or center stand without someone sitting on the bike.

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Set the sound meter for an A-weighting and for slow dynamic response. (For the swept test the meter should be set for a fast dynamic response.) Hold the sound meter microphone 20 inches from the exhaust outlet at a 45-degree angle to the normal line of travel of the motorcycle and at the same height as the exhaust outlet.

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If the motorcycle has more than one exhaust outlet, test each side of the motorcycle that has an outlet.

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Take three readings to confirm your data.

To see a video that shows how to conduct a sound test, go to YouTube.com/ AmericanMotorcyclist.

Photos Real: Conrad Lim; Throttle & Podliska: Grogan Studios

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AMA Members Are Making A Difference On Capitol Hill Riders Speak Out, Lawmakers Listen

More than 100,000 people have stepped up to make their voices heard in Washington, D.C., this year by using tools provided by the AMA, said AMA Washington Representative Rick Podliska. E-mails sent by riders registered for Action Alerts through the AMA website have let federal lawmakers and government officials know how they feel on a variety of issues. Those issues range from an unreasonable law regulating the lead content allowed Rick Podliska in youth-model motorcycles and ATVs to the inappropriate designation of new “Wilderness” that shuts out responsible offhighway vehicle (OHV) use.

Aftermarket Exhaust Industry Responds To Need For Quiet Street Pipes BUB Enterprises Creates EPA-Approved Aftermarket Muffler Denis Manning of BUB Enterprises (www.BUBEnt.com) appears to be the first aftermarket exhaust maker to get pipes certified by the federal Environmental Protection Agency for street use. What’s that mean? The pipe, the BUB 7 Stealth Mufflers for Harley-Davidson touring models, is stamped to certify that it meets EPA emissions and sound requirements, just like stock pipes. Or, in other words, the exhaust system can be legally used on the road. Pipes without the stamp are illegal. In 1972, Congress passed the federal Noise Control Act, which required the EPA to set sound standards for a variety of products. The EPA set sound standards for motorcycles beginning in 1983. The limit

started at 83 dB(A) but went to a stricter 80 dB(A) beginning in 1986 using an EPA drive-by test. To be able to sell their bikes in the United States, motorcycle manufacturers must certify their products meet federal emissions and sound standards and stamp a compliance notice on the pipe. So why have aftermarket exhaust system makers all these years sold their pipes “For Competition Use Only” even if they were made for Harley-Davidson touring motorcycles, for example, rather than get the EPA certification? The necessary research and testing to get certified is very expensive. That means that for a small company trying to make a profit, the cost can be prohibitive.

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The Life | Protecting the Ride

2009 Summary

The AMA Government Relations Department monitors around 1,400 pieces of state legislation in all 50 states each year and takes action when necessary. Those actions include informational mailings to AMA members, news releases, testimony and providing information to key legislative committees. Here’s a breakdown of the on-highway legislation followed during the 2009 legislative sessions around the country through Oct. 31. Distracted driving issues are broken out further. (Off-highway legislation will be featured next month.) Distracted/Inattentive Vehicle Operation: (304 bills)

Licensing, endorsements and permits (29)

Traffic offenses: Vehicular assault/homicide, right-of-way and related violations, seizure, banning motorcycles from public roads, parking, riding two abreast and stunt riding (110)

Taxes: Registration and titles, taxes on miles traveled and fuel-efficient vehicles (28)

License plates: Special plates and vertical mounting (72)

Miscellaneous: Definition of a motorcycle, discrimination, lead, traffic calming, congestion, traffic management and study committees (23)

Equipment: Sound, exhaust systems, lighting, emissions, fuels and alcohol interlocks (62) Safety: Rider education programs, safety and awareness, and mandatory training (62) Vehicle laws: Rebuilt vehicles, registrations, lemon laws, inspections, high-occupancy-vehicle lanes, titles, lane splitting and right to repair (51)

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Insurance: Vehicles, liability and denial of medical benefits (21) Mopeds (14) Passengers: Age restrictions (10) Traffic-actuated signals (9)

Helmets (50)

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Tolls (27)

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• Cellphone usage: Restricting or prohibiting use (95 bills) • Bans: Text messaging, internet use, drowsy driving (75) • Hands-free: Use of cellphone (43) • Distracted/Inattentive driving (29) • Restricting video displays (12) • After crash: Police reports to include distracted-driver info, enhanced penalties (8) • Committees: To study cellphone use (2)

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The Life | Protecting the Ride

AMA, Others Meet With New Forest Head U.S. Forest Service Chief Hears Concerns

Efforts To Fight Distracted Driving Move Into High Gear Photos Traffic: Kevin Wing; Moreland: Erin Lassahn Photography

Federal Officials, Lawmakers Addressing The Problem

As motorcyclists, we see it all the time: car drivers talking on, or texting with, cellphones, putting on makeup or even reading while driving. Those distracted drivers pose a danger not only to motorcyclists but to other road users as well. Federal officials and lawmakers have decided to tackle the issue head on. In October alone, President Obama signed an executive order banning federal workers from text-messaging while driving government vehicles, and U.S. Transportation Secretary Ray LaHood told federal lawmakers at hearings that he will work to “raise the awareness (of the dangers of distracted driving) and sharpen the consequences.”

“One motorcyclist killed on our highways is one too many, so it’s encouraging to see that decision makers at the federal level are taking the dangers of distracted driving seriously,” said Ed Moreland, AMA vice president for government relations. “The AMA has adopted a position statement that endorses enhanced penalties for those who injure or kill others while operating a motor vehicle when distracted or inattentive operation is involved. But the goal must be to prevent the crashes.” To read the AMA’s position statement on distracted and inattentive driving, go to AmericanMotorcyclist.com > Rights > Resources > AMA Position Statements. LaHood hosted a distracted-driving summit involving transportation and other experts from around the nation Sept. 30Oct. 1 to gain insights into how to battle the problem. The AMA was an invited guest to the summit and strongly urged that motorcyclists be considered in all future distracted driving discussions.

The access group Americans for Recreational Access (ARRA) arranged a meeting Oct. 15 in Washington, D.C., with new U.S. Forest Service Chief Tom Tidwell to discuss forest trails. The AMA is part of ARRA and attended the meeting, along with representatives of a number of other outdoor recreation groups: the BlueRibbon Coalition, the Motorcycle Industry Council/Specialty Vehicle institute of America/Recreational Off-Highway Vehicle Association, Specialty Equipment Market Association, Personal Watercraft Industry Association, and the American Council of Snowmobile Associations. Government Relations Vice President Ed Moreland and Government Affairs Manager Royce Wood represented the AMA. They and the others discussed travel management plans for the forests, planning efforts related to various uses of forest land, and national forest policies. “Chief Tidwell seemed genuinely interested in what we had to say concerning recreational use of the national forests,” Moreland said. “We’re hopeful that there will be a lot of collaboration between U.S. Forest Service land managers and recreational users of the forests under Tidwell’s leadership.” The U.S. Forest Service manages 193 million acres of public land Ed Moreland nationwide.


the life | Living It

Buell Motorcycles: 1983-2009

RideRs React to H-d Pulling tHe Plug on Buell MotoRcycles

erin Hunter, land-speed racer: I had the privilege this year to set a land-speed record on Tom “Santa Claus” Anderson’s Buell. My first pass on the Buell was exciting… The motor shut off at every upshift down the 5-mile Bonneville Salt Flats course! I had to reach over the tank to turn the bike back on after every shift. I took her back to the pits, fixed the engine switch, and proceeded to break the record on my next two passes. Andrew Nightingale, ’08 1125r: The true passion for the Buell brand, in my mind, can be traced to the less tangible things. The owners of Buell motorcycles can find a sense of family in the brand… Erik Buell is a racer and motorcycle enthusiast in the truest sense of those terms, and his company reflects that more than any other brand. Mike cobb: I will buy more Buell bikes in the future—even when they don’t exist. I’ll buy it in parts, as Harley has to supply all parts for seven years. I will do this very thing in a year just to prove you can still get a new Buell, even though they say production is

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dead. I might even do it a second time in five years to prove a second point. They can’t keep Buells—or our drive to have them—down. tim Peters, XB9sX: In 1987 at the Milwaukee Speedway Indy car race, I stopped a guy who was pushing a Buell to ask a few questions, and after about five minutes of conversation, he held out his hand and said, “Hi, I’m Erik Buell.” Five minutes quickly turned into 25. That conversation, his ideas and his ability to speak honestly with someone he didn’t know really struck me, and I decided that a Buell would definitely be my next road bike… He was a man describing the joys and passions of doing something different and it spoke to me. The Buell in my garage will always be there, and hopefully, someday, another Erik Buell-designed motorcycle will join it. Thank you, Erik. Brandon osborne: I have owned three Buells, and I still own two of them. Every one has served me well and been a trustworthy bike. I have always been drawn to innovation, superior performance, diversity, excellence, honor, dedication, devotion, cutting-edge technology, and the ability to stand out. Buell has accomplished all of this and more.

Photo Buell Motorcycles

It was heartbreaking, to say the least. First came news that Buell motorcycles—which saw life when founder Erik Buell built the RW750 in 1983 to compete in AMA Formula 1— would cease production. Then came the video of an obviously crestfallen Buell, saying, “I will always be proud of America’s little sportbike company that took on the world, and with brilliant innovations produced some of the best-handling motorcycles of all time.” On the AMA’s Facebook page (Facebook.com/ AmericanMotorcyclist), we asked Buell owners to sound off about their passion for the brand. Here’s what they had to say:

Mark steffy: The game-changer for me came when I noticed that Buell got serious and jettisoned the Harley-Davidson engine for the Rotax power plant. The 1125R is the most amazing thing I’ve ever owned. It is like driving a Formula 1 car on the street. Jason ecker, XB12s: I have owned my Buell XB12S for one year now, and I will always own a Buell. This is the 12th bike I have owned, and none has done everything as well as the Buell. I also love the attention this bike gets. I love that people are genuinely interested in the Buell and walk right past the $30,000 chopper parked right next to it. Kurt Bennet, Buell ulysses: I’m saddened at H-D Inc.’s closure of Buell and the company’s unwillingness to sell the brand. My best regards to Erik and the Elves. Their magic is responsible for some truly wonderful sport and adventure bikes. Thank you Buell Motorcycle Company for creating an endless series of smiles.


The Life | Living It

Bike Impression

Road Rockets

KTM’s ’10 Street Lineup Shines Tarmac may not be the first word that springs to mind at the mention of KTM, but three new offerings are nudging the Austrian manufacturer further into the onroad realm. For 2010, the new top of their performance heap is the RC8 R, a 170-horsepower spinoff of the 2-yearold RC8 superbike. The angular chassis houses a slightly enlarged 1,195cc twin powerplant producing 15 more horsepower than its predecessor. The six-speed gearbox has been revamped for smoother shifting, and a slipper clutch is incorporated for track duty. Top-shelf four-piston Brembo monoblocs also gain 11 percent in thickness to help handle the brutalities of racing. As substantiated by a day spent lapping Mazda Raceway Laguna Seca, KTM has diligently honed the road manners of its new flagship, infusing fatigue-free ergonomics, facile handling, and fierce acceleration into the distinctive superbike. For starters, the seat/peg/handgrip relationship is far more accommodating than the bike’s sharp-edged lines might suggest, and feedback feels intuitive; stiffened WP suspension components with revised geometry and lightweight Marchesinis yield quick turn-in and strong mid-corner stability. Progressive power production peaks at a shrieking 10,250 rpm. Likewise, Brembo binders produce indefatigable stops, while slower speed maneuvers reveal a manageable throttle response, and snarling but unobtrusive notes emanate from the exhaust. On a milder, but nonetheless compelling, note, KTM’s 990 SM R is an orange-framed supermoto with enough punch to gobble Laguna Seca with

alacrity. Tucked in the heart of the naked bike’s athletic outline is a 999cc 75-degree twin that produces 115 horsepower and 71.5 pounds-feet of torque, routing exhaust through twin stainless steel cans. The bike’s chromoly trellis frame weighs a mere 21.6 pounds and merges with WP inverted forks and a rear monoshock that enable the forged Marchesini wheels to travel a generous 160 mm up front, and 180 mm at the rear. Twin-disc four-piston 305 mm Brembos and a single 240 mm unit at the rear effectively counteract the bike’s momentum. Track time on the 990 SM R reveals an upright posture, which allows for commanding leverage of the shot-peened aluminum handlebar. Though steering is significantly (and unsurprisingly) slower than the RC8 R’s, the SM R proves entirely entertaining on Laguna’s 2.24 mile, 11turn course. The torquey twin allows for plenty of front-end lightness, and a wellpositioned rear brake lever stays true to

the bike’s supermoto DNA. Described by KTM brass as “an extended-range supermoto,” the new 990 SM T utilizes the same 999cc powerplant as the SM R, but adds an extra gallon of fuel capacity (for a total of 5.02 gallons) and standard soft bags. Adding approximately 16 pounds (for a total of 432 pounds without fuel), the SM T’s cupped saddle offered a comfortable perch during a brief ride on Laureles Grade, a twisting canyon road connecting the racetrack to Carmel Valley. An erect seating position enables revealing perspective from the 33.6-inch tall saddle, and handling feels nimble and flickable, aided by light controls and a slick shifter. If these three new road offerings are any indication, the same diligence KTM has applied to its dirtbikes is being successfully translated to the street, which should satiate performance enthusiasts looking for distinctive ways to roll down the road.—Basem Wasef

RC8 R

SM T

SM R

January 2010

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The Life | Living It

Yes, That’s A Cake!

Groom’s Full-Size Ducati Cake Is Edible have been quite a few. I like to take long bike trips. So far, I’ve done big round-trip rides from Scottsdale to Daytona, to Sturgis and Whistler. But the best trip has to be the 5,200-mile ride I took to Baltimore and back last month. I left Scottsdale, headed through Texas, Oklahoma, Arkansas, Tennessee and Virginia. On the craziest thing he’s done on a motorcycle: I took a run at the land-speed record at the Bonneville Salt Flats on a BMW sport bike in 2007. I missed it by a wide margin. I think I averaged 144 mph for the 1-mile run. Even my mom said that was slow! But it was a thrill going that fast and being legal. On commissioning a motorcycle cake: Why not? I love motorcycles, and if there’s any event that is in itself about love, it’s a wedding. So to have a Ducati motorcycle cake at my wedding seemed perfect. There are two things in my life that I simply don’t stop thinking about. First it’s Renee. Next it’s motorcycles. Seems like it just fits.

Product Impression

A New Luxury Lid Arai’s RX-Q Aims High

What it is: The latest from Arai is claimed to be “the ultimate street helmet,” promising new levels of stability, quiet and comfort. What it features: A new shell shape offers a wider peripheral view. A new cheekpad shape offers better support and moves away from a “pressure fit” to what the company calls a “cradle fit” around the jawline. The same cheekpad also makes for a quieter seal around the helmet opening. The shell’s shape also lowers the center of gravity for more stability. Which heads it’s aimed at: Those with “intermediate oval” shapes, similar to the current Corsair-V and Vector models, not

Grogan Studios

Photos Cake:Nick Fuller; BarPack: Grogran Studios; Cold: Philip Casey

Bob Parsons, the founder and CEO of Internet domain name registry GoDaddy.com, is so much of a motohead that he had Duff of the TV show “Ace of Cakes” build him a life-size Ducati Monster cake for his recent wedding. We caught up with him to talk motorcycles and passion. On his zest for bikes: Like most guys, I always liked motorcycles. I used to ride my friend’s Honda 90 when I was a kid, and later, while a Marine in Okinawa, I would ride a buddy’s Honda 750. I actually got my license more than three years ago and have since ridden more than 75,000 miles. On when he rides: I like to get up early in the morning, often 4:30 a.m., and ride through the desert on one of my sportbikes, when it’s just me and the birds. Often I think about nothing but the ride and the bike. Also, I typically ride a Ducati Hypermotard to work and back every day. On his best motorcycle experience: That’s hard to say, since in the past three years there

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The Life | Living It

Ask The Motorcycle Safety Foundation Stay Smart In Cooler Weather

the “round oval” shapes of the RX-7 and Quantum series. Where it’s positioned: Arai considers its Corsair-V its top-of-the-line race helmet, and the new RX-Q the top-of-theline street helmet. Though the previous Quantum-2 has been discontinued, the new RX-Q is said to come in above the retired helmet. Info: The RX-Q will be available after Jan. 1. Pricing ranges from $539.95 to $679.95.

Product Impression

A Smarter Map Case

CycoActive’s BarPack Transforms What it is: A Cordura case with a trick: It unfolds. Mounted in the customary position, it offers a 5-inch by 6-inch map window. Unfolded, it quadruples in size, to 12 inches by 18 inches. What’s good: The problem with tightly folded maps is that you lose the context of what’s been folded under. This offers another way to see the big picture—when you’re stopped, of course—although you’ll need maps for both windows. Bonus: Inside pockets also hold a pen, a notepad and other items. Extra mounting kits allow switching between bikes. Get it: $36 from CycoActive.com.

You ask: “It’s the time of year when the riding season starts winding down in some parts of the country. I know I need to be more vigilant against the cold and its effects on my riding, but are there other things to watch out for, as well?” The MSF responds: Since you already understand the importance of keeping warm and dry to stay comfortable and avoid the debilitating effects of hypothermia, we’ll just provide a short list of things to keep in mind about your bike and the road when riding in cold weather: • Check fluid level and quality more often, especially the coolant in liquid-cooled bikes. Change your oil if your owner’s manual calls for a different weight of oil in colder weather. • Check tire pressure more often because cooler temperatures will lower the pressure. Allow more time/miles for the tires to warm up before attempting maximum braking and cornering. • Clean your bike more frequently because moisture and the salt used to melt snow may rust and pit metal surfaces. • If you wear a full-face helmet, you may

• •

find that opening the visor slightly will minimize fogging on cold mornings. Anti-fogging chemicals and visors are also available. Search the road surface for patches of snow, slush or ice. There might be a thin, nearly invisible layer of black ice where you least expect it. Heed the “Bridge freezes before road” signs. Wind rushing under and over bridges has the effect of cooling the structure more quickly than the asphalt or concrete roads leading up to it. Assume that any leaves in the roadway are as slippery as ball bearings. If you happen upon an unplowed road, minimize any change in direction or speed and be prepared to use your feet as outriggers. Because freezing and thawing stress the road surface, watch out for potholes and loose gravel.

A good winter ride can relieve the boredom of “cabin fever” and keep your skills fresh. Prep your bike and adjust your risk-management strategies according to the seasonal variations in your environment.


A MAtter Of PriOrities

What You Get out of RacinG DepenDs on YouR state of MinD by Dennis haggerty I’ve been riding dirtbikes for the last six years and have been racing hare scrambles for the last five. Like many of you, I have invested blood, sweat, tears, time, heart, soul and vast amounts of money into this sport. And like most of you, I do it because I love it. My wife and I recently had our first child, and lately I have been giving a lot of thought to my future in the sport. I didn’t start riding until I was about 23 years old because I played sports growing up, earning two college scholarships in baseball and football. It wasn’t until after I graduated that I started to pursue my lifelong dream of racing a dirtbike. When I started, I constantly asked myself if I was giving absolutely everything

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I had to become the best rider I could be. My goal was to achieve AA status, but with the arrival of Travis, I realize my priorities will change again. In some ways, I feel a little upset, or unsatisfied. If I had reached the professional level, I could walk away knowing that I did something unbelievable. Instead, I lined up with the 250 A class, one step down. The seriousness and dream was slowly fading away. The realization that I will always do this for fun, and not for money, was a tough understanding to get used to. Then, one day, I started to think about all the great things I experienced while riding, and I felt grateful and lucky. I’ve made some really good friends and met some really great people. I met X-Games

Legend Travis Pastrana, shook hands with AMA Motorcycle Hall of Famer Jack Penton Jr., ate lunch at eight-time National Enduro Champion Mike Lafferty’s house, and picked up 10-time World Trials Champion Geoff Aaron from the airport! I’ve even raced with some of the greatest riders in the world, riders like Juha Salminen, David Knight and Lafferty. I raced on the world-famous Unadilla motocross track and dropped into Gravity Cavity on my birthday. Four weekends in a row, I raced in four different states. I share some of the same sponsors as the greatest riders in our sport. I have raced through some of the gnarliest terrain you can think of, and I’ve never DNF’ed a race. I even get to see my dad out on the track, even though he only sees me for a couple of seconds when I pass him. The best part about all of this is that I experienced it with my dad and close friends. And only we can share these experiences. If I stayed upset because I didn’t know what it felt like to get to the sport’s highest level, then I’m forgetting what we all do this for—the love of riding. These days, I realize that for most of us—and for me—motorcycling isn’t a job. It’s a part of life. Dennis Haggerty sr., travis and Dennis Jr.

Photos Haggerty: The Susquehanna Photographic; Tire & Guide: Grogan Studios

the Life | Connections


The Life | Connections

CRASH COURSE

SOMETHING STRANGE? CHECK IT IMMEDIATELY

Throwback

A Look At Past Issues On...

September 1977 With more than 600 issues of American Motorcyclist available online for free at Books.Google.com, there’s plenty of good reading to be found. Each month, we highlight a past story or issue. For much of this magazine’s early existence, it was known by the name “AMA News.” But all that changed in September 1977. That’s when the name—and editorial focus—of the official journal of the AMA became “American Motorcyclist.” As then-communication director Dave Despain (now of Speed TV fame) wrote at the time: “Given our progress (plus the fact that some people kept confusing AMA NEWS with that doctor book or the American Muscatel Aficionados…no relation in either case) we felt it was high time the cover caught up with what was going on inside. “You see, conveying news of the American Motorcyclist Association—i.e. AMA News—to the membership is only one of the things this magazine does. We wanted a title with an additional dimension, addressing not only the magazine it covers, but more importantly the people who read it. You are what this magazine is all about. You are the American Motorcyclist. And from this moment forth, this magazine goes on record as being officially and unequivocally yours.” Search past issues by visiting Books. Google.com and searching for “American Motorcyclist.”

After reading a recent Crash Course, I wanted to share my fishtail experience. I was returning home on the freeway at 65 mph in the center lane of heavy traffic when I felt the back end of my bike start to wobble. I did a quick traffic check, put on my signal and started to pull over to the shoulder. Closer to the shoulder, I used only my front brake, not wanting to put any extra load on the rear tire. In just a few seconds I was on the shoulder and stopped, and amazed that the bike did not go down, or I was not hit. The rear tire was completely flat. I pulled out my wallet and cellphone and called AMA Roadside Assistance, and in about 30 minutes a flatbed tow truck showed up, complete with AMA stickers on the windows, and I was home before too long. Needless to say, my experience had a much happier ending than some other Crash Courses I’ve read. But I believe that it was due to all the safety articles I’ve read over the years and participation in Motorcycle Safety Foundation courses that prepared me for this unexpected event.

The bottom line? When something feels weird on the bike, get over and check it out. Don’t keep riding until you are sure what is wrong. Carl Graham AMA Life Member No. 785053 Morrison, Colo. Send your experience, and the lesson learned, to submissions@ama-cycle.org

Come Along For The Ride

AMA Ride Guide To America, Volume 2, Shows You The Way If you can’t ride where you are in the winter—and even if you can—a new book from the AMA and Whitehorse Press will make the chilly months better by offering up vicarious thrills in the form of 28 great rides in every region of the country. With many of the tours taken from the pages of this magazine over the years, AMA Ride Guide to America, Volume 2, features well-researached rides that should be on every motorcyclists’ to-do list, from the Oregon coast in the northwest to Florida’s mountains in the southeast, and plenty of stuff in-between, like Death Valley, Calif., and the Nachez Trace in Tennessee and Alabama. Get your copy for $24.95, at WhitehorsePress.com.

January 2010

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The Life | Connections

North Central Region AMA Members To Vote For Board Of Directors Member New Online Election System Simpler For Members

If you live in the North Central Region of the U.S., you can vote for a member of the AMA Board of Directors from Dec. 15, 2009, through Jan. 15, 2010. The election is open for voting for AMA members living in Indiana, Northern Illinois (District 17), Michigan, Iowa, Wisconsin, Minnesota, Nebraska, South Dakota and North Dakota. Vote online by visiting http://eballot.

previous paper ballots that were distributed in this magazine. Paper ballots are still available for those who request them by calling (866) 476-5650. The AMA Board of Directors includes 12 members—six elected by corporate members, and six by the general membership. Elections in two of six general-membership regions occur every year.

votenet.com/ama-cycle and signing in using your AMA or ATVA number and last name. Votes will be tallied by an independent organization. At the website, you can read platform statements from the candidates to fill the seat: Bill Werner of Brookfield, Wis., and Jim Viverito of Chicago, Ill. Those statements also are reproduced below. The electronic election replaces the

Jim Viverito Chicago, Ill.

Bill Werner Brookfield, Wis.

My name is Jim Viverito, candidate for the North Central Region seat on the AMA Board. I have been involved in motorcycling for the better part of 40 years. My experience in motorcycling is varied and diverse. I have been an AMA member since 1971. I have raced at the pro and amateur level. I have competed in several disciplines of motorcycle competition, including both modern and vintage racing. I have maintained a membership in my local district (17) for over 20 years. I am an avid off-road rider, and I have logged 30-plus years worth of road and touring miles as well. As an AMA member, I have been involved in motorcyclists’ rights, and the challenges that assault motorcycling and threaten to restrict or eliminate it. I have also been involved at the local level with ABATE of Illinois, Chicago Chapter. I served four terms as chapter president and two terms as the chapter representative to the ABATE of Illinois Board of Directors. During this time, I was a strong advocate of unity in the motorcycle rights community. I also worked closely with AMA personnel both past and present on several issues both local and national, including going to Washington to lobby my congressman on the health insurance discrimination issue. My experience gives me a broad understanding and qualifies me to be your representative on the AMA Board. One thing that has concerned me is a lack of open and responsive representation of the AMA membership. With your support, I will be your voice. It is of the utmost importance that the members have their concerns addressed and incorporated in the future direction of this Association, especially in these challenging times for motorcycling. Feel free to e-mail me with questions, comments or concerns at JimV4amabod@comcast. net.

Being a life-long motorcyclist, starting in my teens on a Honda step-through 50cc, and having owned many different motorcycles over the years, my passion for motorcycling has not diminished. I presently own six motorcycles, the majority of them for competition. I was fortunate enough to work for Harley-Davidson for 38 years in the racing department, which broadened my knowledge about motorcycling. I have traveled extensively and have seen how other countries use motorcycles for competition and recreation. Upon retirement in 2004, I became chairman of the AMA Motorcycle Hall of Fame Dirt Track Committee, and I currently hold that position. I was inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2000. I am currently on the AMA Board of Directors, having been appointed to fill a vacancy in the North Central region in 2008. I would like to continue serving members of the AMA as an elected board member. I think there is still work to do on both the sports side and expanding the AMA’s role in fighting for motorcyclists’ rights. There are constant threats to motorcycling through land closures and road restrictions that need our attention. In my short time on the board, I have learned of the many challenges facing motorcyclists and am anxious to continue working on solving current issues. I also believe my expertise on the sport side has been an asset to the board. I would like to continue on with that work and ask for your support in the upcoming election to be the representative for the North Central region.

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AMA Members in the following states are eligible to cast ballots: North Dakota, South Dakota, Nebraska, Minnesota, Iowa, Wisconsin, Michigan, Indiana and District 17 in Northern Illinois.

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The Life | Connections

Perry King Unopposed In AMA Board Election Northwest Region Incumbent Will Serve Another Term

Museums

The Moto Museum www.themotomuseum.com

What it is: The free Moto Museum is the creation of father-son team of collector Steve and curator Zach Smith. Focusing exclusively on seldom-seen European machines, the museum houses about 100 motorcycles from 20 different countries.

ON THE WEB

What’s inside: The German gallery has brands such as Horex, Adler and Wanderer. In the western European gallery, visitors see a mint Motosacoche (Swiss),

ShockingBarack.com From Oct. 12 to Oct. 30, two motorcyclists rode Brammo electric motorcycles from Detroit to Washington, D.C., in a bid to generate good press and give Barack Obama an electric bike. They chronicled their entire journey online, of course.

Photo Jesse Leake Photography

Perry King, who serves on the AMA Board of Directors representing the Northwest Region, will serve another term. King, an actor and avid motorcyclist from Northern California who has served on the Board since December, 2008, received no challengers for the Northwest Region seat in this year’s election and will, therefore, serve a full three-year term. An avid supporter of the AMA, King has been involved in a number of Association projects, including a series of recently launched public service announcements promoting safe motorcycling.

a beautiful Gnome et Rhone (France), a rare Sarolea (Belgium) and more. There are galleries for Britain (with a Scott Flying Squirrel) and Italy (with a 1956 Maserati motorcycle). The Eastern Gallery features a 1928 Bohmerland, an MZ-BK 350 (East Germany) and a Polish Junak. Find it: The Moto Museum is at 3441 Olive St. in St. Louis, about 10 minutes from the Gateway Arch. Admission is free during the week from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The museum is attached to the motorcycle-themed Triumph Grill restaurant (www.TriumphGrill. com) so a museum visit can be coupled with a nice meal.

Mavizen.com Speaking of electric bikes, Azhar Hussain, the guy who brought electron-powered motorcycles to the Isle of Man TT and AMA Vintage Motorcycle Days, has launched the Mavizen, an electric racebike for which the company is now taking orders.

KillaCycle.com Keeping with the electric theme, you can find out more about a battery-powered motorcycle that can run the quarter-mile in 7.867 seconds with a top speed of 169 mph, at the website of this one-of-a-kind dragracer.

January 2010

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Hall of Famer

Jim Davis FROM THE BOARD TRACK TO THE DIRT TRACK, DAVIS EXCELLED An extraordinary racer on board and dirt tracks, Jim Davis won the first National sanctioned by the AMA. That was the 25-mile AMA National Championship held on a one-mile dirt oval in Toledo, Ohio, on July 26, 1924. Davis was one of the few who also won titles under the banner of the predecessors to the AMA, the Federation of American Motorcyclists (FAM) and the Motorcycle and Allied Trades Association (M&ATA). Riding for both the Harley-Davidson and Indian factory racing teams during his career, Davis earned 21 AMA national championships and a reported 50-plus pre-AMA national titles under the auspices of the FAM and M&ATA. In addition to being a great racing champion, Davis went on to become an AMA official, making his mark on both sides of the sport. Davis was born in Columbus, Ohio, on March 23, 1896. He started riding a Yale

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motorcycle in the fifth grade and raced other neighborhood boys. In 1915, the 19-year-old Davis happened to be at his neighborhood Indian dealership when Frank Weschler, head of sales for Indian, came to visit. The dealership owner introduced the two, and Weshler was impressed with the 19-yearold’s racing exploits. A few weeks later, a brand-new eight-valve closed-port Indian factory racer arrived at the dealership for Davis. In 1916, Davis went to Detroit to race in the FAM 100-Mile National. Davis put his Indian first into turn one and never lost the lead for the entire 100 miles. Later, he took a train up to Saratoga, N.Y., to race another National, and won there. After those high-profile wins, Davis found himself traveling all across the country racing, drawing a salary of $25 per week plus expenses. Davis’ employment as a factory Indian

rider came to an abrupt end in 1920, when he dummied up a telegram from MT&A President A.B. Coffman and used it to trick officials into letting him ride in an invitation-only race in Phoenix. The following week he was suspended for a year by Coffman, and Indian fired him. In less than 24 hours after being fired by Indian, Harley-Davidson hired him, took care of his suspension, and he continued to race the rest of the season. Davis raced for Harley-Davidson until 1925. Indian re-hired him for the 1926 season and he immediately rewarded the company by winning three national titles that year on both board tracks and dirt ovals. He continued to be a top competitor until 1935. After that, he signed on as an AMA official, serving in various capacities, including deputy chairman of competition. Davis was inducted into the AMA Motorcycle Hall of Fame in 1998.


Some discounts, coverages, payment plans, and features are not available in all states or in all GEICO companies. Boat and PWC coverages are written through non-affiliated insurance companies and are secured through the GEICO Insurance Agency, Inc. Motorcycle and ATV coverages are underwritten by GEICO Indemnity Company. Government Employees Insurance Co. • GEICO General Insurance Co. • GEICO Indemnity Co. • GEICO Casualty Co. These companies are subsidiaries of Berkshire Hathaway Inc. GEICO: Washington, DC 20076. © 2009 GEICO


the Life | Adrenaline

Strange DayS Breakdowns, Bad luck Hamper ama Team usa six days efforT

The 84th running of the International Six Days Enduro (ISDE) in Figueira da Foz, Portugal, Oct. 12-17 was one of AMA Team USA’s best-prepared efforts in recent years. However, mechanical breakdowns, crashes and bad luck undermined an otherwise solid attempt. The first blow came on Day 1 of competition. Monster Energy Kawasaki’s Ricky Dietrich, the top U.S. finisher at last year’s ISDE, crashed, smashing his exhaust and somehow managing to burn up his clutch in the process. “When I got going, the clutch just started to fade,” said Dietrich. “By the end of the test there was nothing left.” With Dietrich out, AMA Team USA lost its throwaway score—only the best five of six finishes on each day count toward the team score. At the end of the first day, the Trophy Team was in fifth. On Day 2, AMA Team USA suffered

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another significant setbacl when veteran Destry Abbott crashed hard. Abbott continued, but lost precious time. The team slipped to sixth in the standings. The third day was uneventful, with AMA Team USA hanging on in sixth place. On Day 4, the U.S. riders climbed up one spot in the rankings when the Finnish team ran into problems, losing rider Juha Salminen. Then, between Day 4 and Day 5, Trophy Team member Timmy Weigand was bitten by a serious stomach bug, accompanied and a temperature as high as 103 degrees. “I said to myself that I was starting today no matter what, even though I was still cramping pretty bad when I got up,” Weigand said. Fate did not reward Weigand well. On an early trail section, the JCR Honda rider crashed hard, seriously injuring his right index finger. The impact split Weigand’s finger to the bone and tore off

his fingernail. Day 5 was also tough for U.S. rider Damon Huffman, who was nearly sidelined by severe tendonitis in both arms. At the end of Day 5, AMA Team USA had dropped to seventh. Kurt Caselli, who serves as team co-captain along with Abbott, acknowledged the hard week. “As it turns out, this year’s Six Days was not one of our best results. But that effort is still moving forward,” Caselli said. “Right now, we have to just finish as a team and get to the final motocross (test).” The motocross test traditionally is a strong point for the American contingent. This year was no different, with the U.S. riders doing well enough to move ahead of Portugal for sixth overall. Nor was the U.S. Junior Trophy Team, which ultimately finished third, immune to bad luck. David Kamo had an ignition failure on Day 2. Then, Cory Buttrick’s engine oil plug blew off a work surface while he was servicing his bike. The plug was run over by a passing car. The stopper that Buttrick substituted in its place turned out to be less than perfect. “I was in near panic mode when I looked down and saw oil all over my boot and the side of the bike,” Buttrick said In terms of bad luck, the Women’s World Cup Team had the least eventful Six Days in Portugal. U.S. rider Maria Forsburg put on a stellar performance on the world stage. Forsburg finished her Six Days with a second overall. For the event, the Women’s World Cup Team finished fourth.—Steve Berkner

Photos ISDE: Steve Berkner; GNCC: Jeff Kardas; Barlow: Don Adams Jr. Photography

For Damon Huffman and the rest of team USa, if it weren’t for bad luck, they’d have no luck at all in this year’s ISDe.


4 Questions With...

Anthony Barlow, Promoter Extreme On Ice

How do you make motorcycles that can go zero to 60 in 3 seconds even cooler? Take away the brakes and race them on ice. That goes down in the AMA Racingsanctioned Extreme International Ice Racing Series (XIIR.com) run by Anthony and Marlene Barlow. We ran down Anthony, who also races the series, to find out more about these incredible shows. AM: What happens at an XIIR event? Anthony Barlow: Lots of racing! We have four guys in a heat. For the main, we have six guys and a six-lap final. The bikes are basically speedway bikes with spikes on the tires, and the top riders might never let off the throttle. There’s a lot more contact on the ice than what there is on normal speedway racing. If you come into a corner and the guy pulls a locker, you can try to pull the locker but nine times out of 10 you’re going to tag him. Some of the best speedway riders in the world can come over and be absolutely useless. AM: How has the series grown? AB: We started out with seven rounds. Then we did 10 rounds. Now we’re doing more than 20, and we get riders from all over the world. AM: What’s a typical venue like? AB: These are inside arenas that might have held a concert the previous weekend. It’s also fairly inexpensive. You can buy a ticket for $10. Kids are $5 most places. That’s not a bad deal for a 2- to 2 ½-hour show with normally 20-24 heats.

Whibley Gets Kawi Its First GNCCs Go Green

Kawasaki locked up its first Grand National Cross Country (GNCC) overall title in history at the Ironman GNCC finale in Crawfordsville, Ind., Oct. 24-25. With New Zealander Paul Whibley’s fourth-place finish, the Geico Kawasaki rider clinched Team Green’s first title in what has become the premier AMA Racing-sanctioned off-road series in the eastern United States. “The (final) race was pretty uneventful for me,” Whibley said. “I didn’t push too much and tried to be smart. I could tell the guys at the front were really pushing it, and I knew what I needed to do to win the championship.” The GNCC series has crowned a national champion since 1984. KTM has won eight GNCC titles. Both Honda and Suzuki have five. Husky has won four titles, and Yamaha has bagged three.

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The Life | Adrenaline

3 Questions With...

Godfrey Runyard 104 And Counting

Few people can claim as much historical connection to off-road motorcycle racing as Godfrey Runyard. That’s because few people have existed as long as Godfrey Runyard. The 104-year-old English-born former trials rider (and personal friend of T.E. Shaw, a.k.a, T.E. Lawrence or Lawrence of Arabia) came to the United States in 1947 on the Queen Mary I, and quickly found a home in the U.S. motorcycle industry. Eventually, that path led him to the AMA, where, along with his late wife, Mary, he served as one of the Association’s first motocross technical inspectors. We caught up with Mr. Runyard, who’s also the father of former nationally ranked motocross racer and amateur national champion Michael Runyard, just before the elder Runyard’s 104th birthday. AM: When were you originally involved with the AMA? Godfrey Runyard: I was the tech

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inspector with the AMA when the AMA did their first motocross at the old Ontario Speedway. Before that, I was a technical inspector with the ACA (American Cycle Association). My wife did it with me. She checked to make sure the riders had their blood-type ticket in their pocket, and she checked their numbers to make sure they had the right numbers. She had a can with numbers in it so when the guy came in for tech, he’d pull the ticket out and that would be the number he was called to the racing line. I made sure that all the spokes in the wheels were tight, made sure the handlebars would move right. All that kind of stuff. They had to have round number plates. They didn’t allow square ones. The last race I went to was held when Evel Kneivel tried to jump the Snake River Canyon. We did a motocross race then. AM: How long were you involved in motorcycling? GR: I rode trials in England and was a rider for Douglas. The trials then were on old country roads with hillclimbs. The Douglas I rode was a single-cylinder, four-valve head, very similar

New Arenacross Format For 2009

Qualifying To Race In Vegas A new format to crown the country’s top amateur Arenacross champions is just one of the enhancements planned for the 2010 AMA Racing Amateur National Arenacross Championships. The 2010 Arenacross Championships will be held the day following the final round of the 2010 AMA Monster Energy Supercross, an FIM World Championship, giving the top amateurs the opportunity to ride on the same track as the world’s best Supercross racers. Amateur racers will qualify for a spot at the championship Arenacross race based on their finishes in regional events. The top four riders from each of the five regions— North, South, Central, East and West—will be invited to the championship. Also new for 2010 will be the opportunity for the top eight finishing riders in the Expert class to receive an AMA Supercross Lites endorsement for the following year.

Photos Runyard: Chelsea Anne Photography; Hare & Hound: Mark Kariya

Godfrey and Michael Runyard

to what you see now. I love motorcycles, and it was important to pass that on to my sons. Michael and Kenneth. They had the same bike. It was a 100cc Italian bike. I bought two of them. They were about the first motocross bike you could buy. It wasn’t a converted street bike, but strictly a motocross bike. They really enjoyed it until Kenneth came off and broke his collarbone and gave it up because he couldn’t afford to lose time off work. Of course, Michael did very well. He went into the film business as a stunt rider and a stunt coordinator. AM: Do you get to spend much time around motorcycles now? GR: A few years ago, my son Michael took me to a park in Ohio. It was a vintage motorcycle meet (AMA Vintage Motorcycle Days). There was everything there—trials, motocross, road racing. It was a beautiful thing. The thing that amazed me most was the number of Harley-Davidson motorcycles ridden by women. I was shocked to see it.


Better Desert Racing AMA Racing National Hare & Hound Championship Gets Upgrade

As the 2009 AMA Racing Hare & Hound Championship Series came to a close, crowning champion privateer Russ Pearson, who rides a Pearson Brothers Construction/Chaparral Motorsports KTM 450XC-F, some big news emerged for 2010 (see page 52 for the series schedule). The AMA has partnered with the newly formed National Hare & Hound Association to promote the series. The partnership is similar to the arrangement the AMA has with the National Enduro Promoting Group for the AMA/Rekluse National Enduro Championship Series, presented by Moose Racing. That agreement has paid big dividends in terms of sponsorship and rider participation. “Our goal is to return the AMA Racing National Hare & Hound Championship Series to its position as a premier national championship,” said the NHHA’s Ryan Sanders. “We intend to do that by securing sponsorship and working with the clubs to achieve uniformity. We want our racers to be greeted by the same format, the same sign-up procedures, and the same signage at every event. “We’ve also teamed up with accomplished desert racer Chris Blais,” Sanders continued. “Chris brings his years of racing experience to help make sure we keep this a series built for racers and not necessarily a series built just for profit.” Another benefit? The NHHA has a cool website with articles, photos, video, and other series information. Check it out at NationalHareandHound.com.

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Heritage

1940 TriumpH Tiger 100

A HigH-PerformAnce Twin wiTH STunning LookS

photos Open Image Studio

British motorcycle riders of the 1930s favored the simplicity and performance of single-cylinder machines, despite the best efforts of manufacturers to create a popular twin- or even four-cylinder mount. Then Triumph engine designer Edward Turner proved that a twin-cylinder bike could be as practical and inexpensive as a single with his 1938 Speed Twin 498cc touring machine. When that first Speed Twin proved extremely popular, Triumph ushered in the sporting twin-cylinder era in 1939 and 1940 with the 498cc twin-cylinder Tiger 100, so named because its top speed was said to be in excess of 100 mph. Proving its name, Freddie Clarke set a lap record of 118.02 mph at England’s famed Brooklands circuit on a bored-out 503cc Tiger 100 in 1939. Even the stock 378-pound Tiger 100, complete with full road equipment, including lights, reached a top speed of more than 97 mph in motorcycle magazine testing of the day. The Tiger 100 boasted forged alloy

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pistons and cylinders forged in a single casting, held in place by eight studs. It also used gears instead of a chain to drive the camshaft. Both cylinders were fed by a single Amal carburetor. The bike’s looks were striking, with chrome used throughout the machine: on the four-gallon gas tank, wheels, fenders, and even on the front number plate. The exhaust had special megaphone mufflers—the ends could be removed, including the baffles, leaving racing megaphones. This 1940 Triumph Tiger 100 was one of the last bikes to roll out of the Triumph factory before the facility was destroyed in the early days of World War II in the Coventry Blitz, a bombing raid by 515 German bombers on Nov. 14, 1940. The machine was donated to the AMA Motorcycle Hall of Fame Museum by the late Benny Bootle of Greenville, S.C., and is just one of the many historic machines that now calls the AMA Motorcycle Hall of Fame home.


Heritage features the machines and people of the AMA Motorcycle Hall of Fame Museum in Pickerington, Ohio. The Hall of Fame is a 501(c)3 non-proďŹ t corporation that receives support from the AMA and from motorcycling enthusiasts. For info and directions, visit MotorcycleMuseum.org, or call (614) 856-2222. January 2010

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2009 AMA MOTOrCyClIsTs Of ThE yEAr I

f there was one event that brought motorcyclists together in 2009, it was the federal government’s move that stopped the sale of youth-model motorcycles and ATVs. When a law aimed at eliminating lead in children’s playthings suddenly made it illegal to sell kids’ motorcycles and ATVs because of lead in parts like batteries and valve stems, motorcyclists everywhere reacted. Using online tools provided by the AMA, parents wrote more than 70,000 letters and e-mails to Congress and the Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC), which was charged with enforcing the law, called the Consumer Product Safety Improvement Act (CPSIA) of 2008. The AMA worked with—and met with—members of the CPSC to convince them of the harm the law would do to motorcyclists’ way of life. This magazine and others campaigned for change. Industry groups like the Motorcycle Industry Council (MIC) rallied supporters. Race promoters circulated petitions among their competitors. Dealers were moved to action, with one of them—Malcolm Smith

Motorsports in California—staging a much-publicized flouting of the law with seven-time champion and AMA Motorcycle Hall of Famer Jeff Ward and others openly buying bikes in defiance of the CPSIA. Motorcyclists even rallied in Washington, D.C., voicing opposition. One young rider, 6-year-old AMA member Chase Yentzer, who took the podium with AMA Vice President for Government Relations Ed Moreland at a rally in the U.S. Capitol Building in April, spoke for tens of thousands of kids when he said, “I ride dirtbikes with my family. I race dirtbikes. Please give me my dirtbike back. I promise not to eat it.” The effect of all that pressure? The CPSC issued a two-year stay of enforcement that resulted in some level of sanity being restored to the sale of kids’ bikes and ATVs while efforts continue to permanently exempt these products from the CPSIA. As the dust continues to settle on the biggest issue impacting motorcycling in 2009, the real victors were our youngest riders—the riders who the AMA has named the 2009 AMA Motorcyclists of the Year: Kids.

Photos Shannon Price and AMA Staff

Who Was At The Center Of The Biggest Event In Motorcycling In 2009? Kids


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dirtbikes with “myI ride family. I race

dirtbikes. Please give me my dirtbike back. I promise not to eat it.

Chase yentzer, 6-year-old MX racer, addressing a crowd of onlookers at a protest rally in the U.S. Capitol building.

THe dreAm LIveS On – every Weekend To See Why Motorcycling Is So Important To Kids And Families, Look No Further Than Your Local Riding Area. By James Holter

I

t’s a sunny Saturday at the Fox Valley OffRoad riding park in northern Illinois, and kids and families are everywhere. They’re laughing together in the pits, cheering each other at the racetrack, practicing their skills on the trails, and making new friends all around. The common elements? Smiles. Hugs. Encouragement. Bonding. And the best kind of family time you’ll find anywhere. The event is an end-of-year awards gathering and riding day at the Wedronbased track, a fixture of AMA District 17 (Central, Western Illinois). But in most ways that matter, it’s also a typical Saturday at the Fox Valley Off-Road riding park, where this kind of fun, growth and excitement happens nearly every weekend as families make a point to spend time with each other doing something they love. It’s also the kind of experience that will evaporate if the federal government’s ban on the sale of youth-model motorcycles and ATVs is not lifted for good. No one knows better how devastating that would be to families who treasure motorcycling than the families themselves. On a recent weekend day, many of them

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shared some of their personal insight into motorcycles, family time and the CPSIA “lead law.” They also told us very clearly why it’s so important that the AMA’s 2009 Motorcyclists of the Year—kids—be allowed to continue to enjoy something as simple as a relaxing weekend doing what they love. WHAT IT’S ALL ABOUT Ask a parent, and they’ll tell you that motorcycle racing and riding is not just about competitive success. Families with kids who ride say that motorcycling builds relationships, teaches kids responsibility, encourages healthy activity and allows them to spend time together that they wouldn’t normally have. That’s clearly the case for the family of Bryce, 11, and Eli Otterbach, 9, of Mendotta, Ill., who are enjoying the day with their Dad, Kenny. Most weekends, Kenny says, the family, including mom, Kathy, can be found at a hare scrambles race somewhere in District 17. Motorcycle racing is just a part of their lives. “It’s a nice family sport for us,” Kenny says, “We work through the week for Sundays, the day we go out and ride. It’s

just a great day for us.” Other families here share that sentiment. Nick Christman and wife Holly, also from Mendota, have five kids. Two of them, Kelly, 14, and Nicholas, 12, have joined them today. It’s a time that is precious to the family, Nick says. “Just a couple years from now, Kelly will go off to college,” he says. “Here and now is your time to spend it with your kids because once that time is gone, you can’t get it back.” Holly adds that riding “is part of our life now.” Jeff Oldenburg, from Ottawa, Ill., has two granddaughters who ride, Autumn, 9, and Jaden Torres, 6. Oldenburg says he got his granddaughters involved in riding so he could teach them about a sport he loved growing up. The girls have taken to the sport well—particularly Autumn, who flies around the Fox Valley kids’ track. Oldenburg says they’re hooked. “If I was ever to go riding alone now— which I could never do—somebody would be heartbroken,” he says. “And these two just got a new little sister four weeks ago, and it will only be a matter of time before


Clockwise from left: Eli and Kenny Otterbach; Jeff Oldenburg and his granddaughters, Jayden and Autumn Torres; Nick Christman, his wife, Holly, and their kids, Nicholas and Kelly.

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she’s riding, too.” Although many families’ roots in the sport go back generations, some have just discovered it. Rob Kelly, who also calls Mendota home, has two sons who race, Logan, 14, and Luke, 13. Last year, Kelly bought a couple used bikes, and the two kids started playriding. This year, Logan and Luke started racing hare scrambles. In just their first year of competition, they’ve raced in 19 events. “When I get them out of bed, they always have smiles on their faces on Sunday,” Kelly says. “Once we pull into a race, they get signed up, go put on their gear. They’re excited about it. It’s great for them. “This was a great summer of Sundays,” Kelly says. REAL BENEFITS Although quality time is a nearly universal benefit of riding together, families say there are a number of other reasons to ride. “It’s an individual sport,” Kelly says. “On the track, it’s just the kids and their bikes,

and I think that it gives them a sense of freedom when they ride.” Otterbach says his kids have learned how to build relationships. “They’ve made a lot of new friends because we’re traveling all over,” he says. “They get to know kids from other towns because they’re with them every weekend. So, they make a lot of new friends, and I believe they get a lot out of it. “They also learn to respect other kids,” he says. “The camaraderie they share with the other kids—that’s what I enjoy, because they make all new friends and they just get along so well together.” Kelly says that he’s seen racing bring his sons closer together. “They get off the bikes, and I have one who always finishes ahead of the other one, so he’s waiting to see where his brother is,” Kelly says. “Then they’ll talk non-stop for 25 minutes about how they got over a log or something. Then, all week, they talk about the race, at least until the next one starts.” The sportsmanship lessons don’t end with the kids. Although the families say that racing, like all sports, is competitive, everybody knows how challenging off-road racing is, and a helping hand is nearby during the races. “At an off-road kids’ race, all the parents are usually around the whole track, and that’s what’s nice about it,” Otterbach says. “Everybody gets along really well. So if, say, my son gets stuck in a mud hole, there’s usually another parent there who will help him out. Everybody helps each other out.” Christman says fun is the bottom line. “You’re not going to get rich, and you’re not going to get famous doing this,” Christman says. “It’s all about having fun,

whether that means you beat someone you’ve never beaten before, just enjoyed yourself or just finished the race—that was my goal.” Kelly adds: “It also teaches you a lot of responsibility, and not just at the track. It’s become a bargaining chip. I can get them to do a little more around the house. If they want to go race on Sunday, they wash their bikes, clean them up and change the oil in them. They’re learning a valuable skill, to take care of things.” Brian Doughty, from Utica, Ill., has four kids. He’s brought two, Donovan, 11, and Shea, 7, to Fox Valley today. He says that riding with his kids keeps them out of trouble and provides “a little stress release.” In addition to what they get out of it now, Doughty says riding also prepares his kids for any motorcycling ambitions they may have later in life. “As they get older, if they decide to get on a motorcycle when they’re adults, they’ll be more experienced if they’ve ridden and raced as kids,” Doughty says. EFFECT OF THE ‘LEAD LAW’ Looking around at all the families having fun together, it’s chilling to think that all of this could have begun vanishing when the CPSIA went into effect in early 2009. Aimed at eliminating lead from children’s toys, it also unreasonably ensnared motorcycles and ATVs because of lead in motorcycle parts. And for a while, bikes, ATVs and even replacement parts were pulled from dealer showrooms. Ultimately, the voices of tens of thousands of parents and concerned motorcyclists prevailed. The enforcement of the law was delayed for two years, allowing

Brian Doughty and sons, Donovan and Shea.

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time to permanently revise the CPSIA. But the threat is still out there. And the families at Fox Valley are hopeful that the lead issue will be fully resolved. All those interviewed for this story were baffled when motorcycles and ATVs were suddenly targeted. They figure it must have been a mistake—an unintended consequence of good intentions. “I don’t think they planned on it,” Oldenburg says. “I think it was a good law for toys, for babies that chew on toys, but I don’t think they knew what was coming, what it was going to do to the motorcycling community.” Otterbach saw very real consequences from the law, when bikes and ATVs were actually pulled off showroom floors as the issue was sorted out. “We already had our bikes for this year before the law, but there were other families that were looking for bikes, and they weren’t able to get them,” he says. “I don’t believe lead in motorcycles is a problem at all. I don’t really understand why there would be an issue with lead in a motorcycle.” Others faced real difficulties in maintaining their bikes due to the law. Terry Virgil is at Fox Valley with his grandson, Jay Pelka. Jay is 8 years old. Both Virgil and Pelka, who rides a Yamaha

TTR-50, had to deal with the law this spring. “It was a nightmare,” Virgil says. “You couldn’t buy parts. The only place I could get parts for that Yamaha was in Canada. Now I can buy parts, but earlier in the year when there was more of an issue I had to go through Canada to get OEM Yamaha parts. “I was real unhappy. I had a brand new 2008 Yamaha, and he couldn’t use it. It shut down our family time.” Although the stay on enforcement has alleviated the problems some families faced earlier in the year, they are aware that their pastime is at risk if there isn’t a more permanent fix. Otterbach says that his kids’ lives would be very different without motorcycles. “The kids would probably sit home and watch TV,” he says. “They’d just be cooped up in the house. Racing gets them out, and it’s a good activity for them—for all of us, really.” Virgil’s grandson, Pelka, says videogames would take over his free time. “I’d play on my Nintendo DS,” he says. Grandpa says he’d ultimately get Jay back on a motorcycle, though. “I’d go out of the country and buy a bike if I had to,” Virgil says. If the lead law isn’t repealed and the stay expires, Oldenburg says families would be

able to keep riding for a while. “There would be a lot of old bikes being rebuilt,” Oldenburg says. “Still, a lot of kids will miss out, and a lot of companies would miss out on a lot of money. They’ve already lost a few dollars.” Eventually, though, Oldenburg says kids would have to stop riding. “We’re not going to be able to rebuild those old motorcycles forever,” he says. “We’re going to be doing a lot of bicycle riding, I guess, but I just can’t imagine no motorcycles in our family now.” Oldenburg’s granddaughter, Autumn, can, and she doesn’t like what she sees. “I would play something new,” she says. “And I would try to forget about dirtbikes.”•

Terry Virgil and his grandson, Jay Pelka.

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Watching, Waiting and Working

The Lead Law That Threatens To End Motorcycling For Kids Could Still Destroy The Sport. The AMA And Others Are Trying To Ensure It Doesn’t. By Bill kresnak 42

AmericanMotorcyclist.com


Energy AMA Supercross, an FIM World Championship, in St. Louis shortly after the law went into effect. “The consequences of this ban are serious and have brought a wonderful family outdoor experience for hundreds of thousands of Americans to a near halt,” Self said. “Or, alarmingly, young ATV and motorcycle riders may choose to operate inappropriately sized vehicles since youthsized vehicles and spare parts are not available. Everyone knows this will lead to unnecessary crashes and injuries.”

He does not believe that children should be riding motorcycles. Tim Cotter, MX Sports, speaking of U.S. Sen. Jay Rockefeller (D-W.Va.).

T

im Cotter knows an awful lot about motocross families and kids riding dirtbikes. And he’s scared. Cotter works for MX Sports in Morgantown, W.Va. He’s in charge of the long-running Air Nautiques AMA Amateur National Motocross Championships, presented by Amsoil. The event crowns the country’s best amateur motocross racers every year at Loretta Lynn’s Ranch in Hurricane Mills, Tenn. It’s the premier amateur national motocross series in the United States, with 20,000 entries, including regional and area qualifiers. MX Sports’ sister company, Racer Productions, runs the Can-Am Grand National Cross Country Series, which sees 15,000 entries a year. So Cotter has a close connection to many of America’s amateur racing families. “What scares me the most is that Congress passed a law that literally prevents children from riding and racing motorcycles,” Cotter said. “It will take time to affect us, and by that time it will be too late to reverse it. It’s like arthritis. It hurts a little initially and doesn’t cripple you, but then later you’re crippled.” “We anticipate a huge impact in years to come,” he said. Cotter is talking about the Consumer Product Safety Improvement Act (CPSIA) of 2008—a federal law that went into effect on Feb. 10, 2009, though its enforcement has been delayed until 2011. Sparked by concerns raised after certain toys imported into the United States from China were found to contain dangerous levels of lead, the law bars businesses from selling any product for kids 12 and under that has a specified amount of lead.

That includes motorcycles and all-terrain vehicles (ATVs), which have trace amounts of lead in the engine, brakes, suspension, battery and other parts. The Coalition for Safe and Responsible ATV Use, meanwhile, made up of Honda, Suzuki, Kawasaki, Yamaha, Arctic Cat, Bombardier and Polaris, noted as recently as September that “half of the major ATV manufacturers are no longer selling youthmodel off-highway vehicles.” UNINTENDED CONSEQUENCES Federal lawmakers approved the CPSIA, and President George Bush signed it into law on Aug. 14, 2008, to address dangerous levels of lead found in children’s toys. It called for a ban on the making, importing, distributing or selling of any product intended for children 12 and under that contained more than 600 parts per million of lead in any accessible part. That threshold then dropped to 300 parts per million after Aug. 14, and will drop to 100 parts per million after Aug. 14, 2011. With no way to quickly test and certify that their products met those limits, motorcycle and ATV manufacturers told their dealers to stop selling machines meant for kids 12 and under—along with some of the parts to maintain them. Dealers pulled them from showrooms as motorcyclists and others, including politicians, started speaking out against the law’s unintended consequences. “Congress didn’t intend ATVs and motorcycles to be a part of the new antilead legislation because kids are not going to eat or lick these vehicles,” Missouri state Rep. Tom Self (R-Cole Camp) said at a news conference at the Monster

A TWO-PRONGED COUNTERATTACK With bikes and parts off-limits to buyers in February, the motorcycle and ATV industry immediately noted that the economic impact of the new law could be devastating, with estimates pegging the lost revenue at up to $1 billion a year. “The potential losses for the powersports industry are massive at a time when this country cannot afford additional economic losses,” said Paul Vitrano, general counsel for sister organizations the Specialty Vehicle Institute of America (SVIA) and the Motorcycle Industry Council (MIC), with 300 members in the motorcycle distributing, manufacturing and aftermarket industry. ”With these vehicles sitting in warehouses instead of on showroom floors, the related sales of most protective gear, accessories, parts and services are virtually nonexistent,” Vitrano said. “Thousands of small businesses across America are impacted by this ban.” As a remedy, the SVIA and MIC asked the Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC), which is responsible for carrying out the law, for emergency relief—seeking a temporary final rule to exempt motorcycle and ATV parts from the law altogether “to avoid major disruptions to enthusiasts, to the member companies’ businesses, and to the companies’ dealer networks of thousands of small, independent businesses” that employ tens of thousands of Americans. The AMA acknowledged the economic impact of the law, but as an advocate for

Half of the major ATV “manufacturers are no longer selling youthmodel off-highway vehicles.

The Coalition for Safe and Responsible ATV Use, in a statement released in September.

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CPSC REJECTS EXEMPTIONS, SUPPORTS DELAYED ENFORCEMENT On Jan. 30, less than two weeks before the new law was to go into effect, the CPSC voted to delay the lead testing and certification requirements of the law for a year—until Feb. 10, 2010. That gave the CPSC staff “more time to finalize our proposed rules, which could relieve certain materials and products from lead testing and to issue more guidance on when testing is required and how it is to be conducted,” the CPSC said. On Feb. 5, the CPSC—made up of acting CPSC Chairwoman Nancy Nord and Commissioner Thomas Moore at the time—rejected a request for an emergency delay of the new law, which was made by the National Association of Manufacturers’ CPSC Coalition. The MIC and SVIA joined the coalition in the effort. The CPSC said it didn’t have the authority to delay the law. Months passed as the AMA, riders, dealers and industry groups kept up the pressure, while youth-model bikes and ATVs remained in crates in dealer warehouses. AMA President and CEO Rob Dingman, Moreland, a contingent from MX Sports that included Cotter, Rita Coombs, Carrie Coombs-Russell and Davey Coombs, as well as Cobra Motorcycles President Sean Hilbert, met with Nord on April 3 to convey the dire consequences of the new law and ask for relief. This same group also met with Sen. Jay Rockefeller (D.-W.Va), chair of the Senate Commerce Committee, which oversees the CPSC, and his staff. At that meeting they

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were told that there was no way Congress was going to provide a legislative fix in time. On April 17, the CPSC voted to reject a motorcycle and ATV industry request for an exclusion for their machines and parts from the law. In explaining her vote, Nord said: “I do this because the clear language of the law requires this result, not because it advances consumer safety. “To the contrary, application of the lead content mandates of the CPSIA to the products made by the petitioners may have the perverse effect of actually endangering children by forcing youth-sized vehicles off the market and resulting in children riding the far-more-dangerous adult-sized ATVs,” she said. But Nord and Moore also said they would support a stay delaying enforcement of the law in the interest of safety. On May 1 they voted to approve a stay until May 1, 2011. Moore, an admitted opponent of allowing kids 12 and under to ride ATVs, said he supported a stay so that proper-sized vehicles would be available for children, rather than full-sized machines only, and to give the industry the opportunity to prove its claim that certain vehicle components can’t be made with lead below a certain level without compromising the structural integrity, or another safety element, of the component. SWIFT REACTION The MIC and SVIA immediately announced they were “disappointed” by the CPSC vote to reject their request for an exclusion from the law and didn’t see the stay as an answer. “It is important to note that, even if a stay

of enforcement can be implemented by the CPSC, this is not a solution and would only be a temporary reprieve as to the agency’s enforcement of the ban,” industry spokesman Vitrano said. “It would not apply to state attorneys general or address other unintended consequences of the lead ban.” The AMA remained hopeful that a stay would at least allow dealers to sell their current inventories and allow parents to purchase the right-sized vehicles for their kids. “Clearly, this latest move shows that the CPSC realizes that youth-model motorcycles and ATVs have no business getting caught up in a law aimed at children’s toys,” Moreland said. “We’re heartened that both commissioners favor a stay of enforcement, and it appears that this could clear the way for dealers to sell youthmodel motorcycles and ATVs—an important consideration for riders and motorsports businesses alike as the riding and racing season ramps up.” Despite the issuance of the temporary stay, the industry and AMA noted there was more work to be done. Said Moreland: “This vote doesn’t solve the larger, long-term issue, which is whether or not youth-model motorcycles and ATVs will be permanently exempted from the CPSIA. We believe they should be excluded, and we will continue to work with our partners in the industry and our friends in Congress to make that happen.” Vitrano said: “With today’s vote, it is now obvious that the only permanent solution is for Congress to end the ban once and for all by amending the Consumer Product Safety Improvement Act so parents once again have access to appropriate-sized-model ATVs and motorcycles for their children.”

Photos Hearne: Jenni Hahn Photography; Abboud: Atelier Photography

riders, also expressed a deep concern for the safety of kids. “Even more alarming than the potential damage to business and industry are the potential, unintended safety consequences for motorcycle and ATV youth riders,” Ed Moreland, AMA vice president for government relations, wrote in a letter to the CPSC supporting efforts to exclude youthmodel motorcycles and ATVs from the ban. “If emergency relief is not granted immediately, some consumers will very likely purchase vehicles that are physically too large for young riders, exposing them to unnecessary risk,” Moreland wrote. “In summary, an unreasonable and rushed implementation of the CPSIA is unwarranted and unnecessarily harmful to the motorcycle and ATV riding communities, and may negatively affect youth motorcycle and ATV safety.” While the AMA fully supported the industry efforts, the Association also sought a delay in enforcement of the law, called a stay, to give everyone involved time to figure out a reasonable solution.

Motorcycle Dealer Bill Hearne is still seeing fallout from the lead law, even with the delay in enforcement.


They were astonished to learn that it has zero trade-in value.

Dealer Bill Hearne on customers who discovered that dealers couldn’t sell kids’ bikes of any kind, including used ones.

If these kids don’t have the “ opportunity to experience motorcycle

riding because bikes aren’t available, or they are too expensive to purchase, they will find another sport, and we will lose them for good.

Carrie Coombs-Russell, MX Sports Pro Racing TIME IS RUNNING OUT Clearly, the stay as it is currently written only delays the enforcement of the law. It does not remove the threat. And that makes people like Cotter worried. The promoter sees a potentially bleak future for youth riding under the law, and he also sees that few families are paying attention. “The law is devastating,” Cotter said. “If children 12 and under can’t ride or be around a motorcycle, then there won’t be any motorcycle racing. It’s potentially a death sentence for amateur motorcycling.” Parents aren’t concerned right now because it’s not affecting them, he said. Because of the economy, a lot of racing families are using their old machines anyway, rather than buying new equipment, and because of the stay, parents who want to buy new machines can find some. “Every year that goes by we are going to see an increase in families who can’t ride,” Cotter warned. “Some of our families who are politically savvy understand the issue, but most folks who aren’t as politically astute don’t know that it’s an issue,” he said. “They aren’t concerning themselves with it.” “Ed Moreland has tried to keep the issue in front of his constituency but instead of paying attention, a lot of families went out racing,” he said. Carrie Coombs-Russell, vice president and chief financial officer of MX Sports Pro Racing, which runs the Lucas Oil AMA Pro Motocross Championship, said the impact of the law on professional racing will be negligible at first. “It is the trickle-down effect that will be most worrisome as the years pass and the quality and experience of new athletes becomes a concern,” she said. “Most

athletes at the top level started racing when they were 6, 7, 8 years old, if not earlier. “If these kids don’t have the opportunity to experience motorcycle riding because bikes aren’t available, or they are too expensive to purchase, they will find another sport, and we will lose them for good,” Coombs-Russell said. “That will have a direct long-term impact on professional racing, as the sport you grow up loving as a kid is one you love as an adult,” she said.

DEALERS FEEL THE EFFECTS Motorcycle and ATV dealers said they’re not feeling much of an impact of the law now, but they certainly did during the period between when the law went into effect Feb. 10 and when the stay was announced three months later. That’s because they couldn’t sell kids’ motorcycles and ATVs. Bill Hearne, owner and general manager of Outdoor MotorSports in Spearfish, S.D., a multi-brand dealership that sells machines from Honda, Yamaha, KYMCO, Arctic Cat, Lehman and Club Car, felt a definite pinch. “The affected products accounted for about 6 percent of sales,” Hearne said. “The timing of the ban was also at the height of general economic distress, which doubled the hurt... so you had higher costs with zero sales. Not a good business model.” He doesn’t know any dealers who have gone out of business because of the law, since youth products are a small percentage of sales. But “there probably were dealers that were just barely hanging on financially, and this loss of income may have been the final nail in the coffin,” he said. Hearne also said that his customers thought the issue was silly, and if they wanted to trade in a kids’ machine toward a new one “they were astonished to learn that it has zero trade-in value” since a dealer could not resell even used bikes. Following the issuance of the stay, Hearne said he is selling youth models and parts, with a few exceptions. Jerry Abboud, executive director of

Jerry Abboud of the Colorado Powersports Dealers Association says it could take years to sort out the future sales of kids’ bikes.

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the Powersports Dealers Association of Colorado, said the law has had some impact on his dealers, especially coupled with the state of the nation’s economy. And while the stay doesn’t provide complete relief, it’s enough so that dealers are willing to sell products “even though the legal status of some sales remains in limbo,” Abboud said. DEALERS ARE CONCERNED ABOUT THE FUTURE Abboud said Colorado dealers also have concerns about the manufacturers’ ability to meet the strict lead requirements of the law, how long it will take for the requirements of the law to be clarified, and how quickly the manufacturers can respond. “Once the stay is lifted, the law requires certification, and bikes and parts will have to be certified (that they meet the lead requirements) before they can be sold,” he said. Dealers also wonder how much it will cost for manufacturers to meet the law’s requirements. “Will the price of the product increase substantially? Will it simply not be cost effective to sell to that market? There are no clear answers at this point,” Abboud said. Also looking ahead, Abboud said there didn’t seem to be any communication from manufacturers to dealers between August of 2008, when the president signed the CPSIA into law, and before the law went into effect in February on the issue.

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Photo Jennifer Bates Photography

Sean Hilbert of Cobra Motorcycles says the law, if it stands, could very likely put him out of business.

“In the future, when the manufacturers are facing difficult legislation that will result in an economic hardship on their dealers, it is probably in their best interest to solicit the assistance of their dealers and customers as early as possible, so they can talk with their legislators,” Abboud said. Guido Ebert is a reporter by trade who has served as a powersports industry press representative, speaker, analyst and consultant for businesses in the United States, Europe and Asia (Blog.GuidoEbert. com). He believes the manufacturers didn’t realize the full impact of the law until October 2008. Since 2005 ATV manufacturers had been lobbying for safety standards for ATVs sold in the United States “to stem the tide of small displacement powersports vehicles coming from manufacturers, mostly from China, who were entering the market in growing numbers,” Ebert said. Those standards, including speed restrictions on youth ATVs and safety initiatives, were written into the CPSIA that was signed into law in August 2008. “On Oct. 16, 2008, the CPSC held a public meeting regarding the application of the CPSIA to ATVs,” Ebert said. “In the presentation it was noted that ATVs would have to comply with other sections of the CPSIA beyond the section specifically labeled for ATVs, including the lead-content sections. “That’s when the true impact of the CPSIA became apparent to industry

With these vehicles sitting in warehouses instead of on showroom floors, the related sales of most protective gear, accessories, parts and services are virtually nonexistent. Thousands of small businesses across America are impacted by this ban.

Paul Vitrano, general counsel for the Specialty Vehicle Institute of America and the Motorcycle Industry Council, on the economic impact of the lead law.


stakeholders—manufacturers, dealers and consumers,” he said. “(That realization) resulted in the same OEMs who had for years lobbied together for tighter restrictions governing youth-sized powersports vehicles to go on the defensive in an effort to turn back the new (lead) requirements, and the loss of millions of dollars in revenue, they had instigated.” MANUFACTURERS FEELING THE PRESSURE Meanwhile, the Coalition for Safe and Responsible ATV Use said recently that “due to the risks of selling under the stay, many manufacturers and dealers are no longer selling youth model off-highway vehicles, and there is now a limited availability of these products for consumers.” CPSC Commissioner Moore noted in the Federal Register that manufacturers have told the CPSC that even if they are able to make machines that would comply with the law, it would likely be model year 2011 or 2012 before such machines could be on the market because of the long time required to design and manufacture them. To comply with the law, manufacturers are taking various steps in addition to not selling machines at all. Some are re-labeling their machines designed for kids 12 and under as machines made for kids older than 12 by removing speed-limiting devices, Moore noted, considering putting covers over battery compartments, and making valve stems inaccessible. Sean Hilbert, president of Cobra Motorcycles, which is a producer of competition-level mini motocross bikes, said his company “got lucky” because research

Congress didn’t intend ATVs and motorcycles to be a part of the new antilead legislation because kids are not going to eat or lick these vehicles.

Missouri state Rep. Tom Self shortly after the lead law took effect.

and testing shows his machines meet the lead requirements of the law. But once Cobra is forced to go through the required certification procedures, which will be Feb. 10 unless something is done, his company will probably be forced to close its doors. That’s because he estimates it will cost about two-thirds of the company’s annual revenue to get certified. So the law could add several thousands of dollars to the cost of a kid’s motorcycle. “I would prefer that powersports products be exempt from the law because there is no danger of lead poisoning,” Hilbert said. “I think there will be a political compromise along the way.” he said. UPHILL BATTLE ON CAPITOL HILL Cotter, who with others at MX Sports has been working the halls of Washington, D.C., with the AMA lobbying to get changes to the CPSIA, said getting the law changed would be very difficult because key lawmakers see the law as a way to get kids off motorcycles. West Virginia’s members of Congress didn’t realize the full impact of the law when they passed it, and now are “flabbergasted,” Cotter said. “Every congressman wanted to help” to fix the law, he said. But he also noted that when you consider all the important issues that cross their desks, “it’s hard for them to focus on little motocross families.” And then there are the opponents. “It wasn’t until we went to see Sen. (Jay) Rockefeller (D-W.Va.), who chairs the Commerce, Science and Transportation Committee that this bill comes through, that we ran into opposition,” Cotter said. “He was very much against us. “He does not believe that children should be riding motorcycles,” Cotter said. Sen. Robert Byrd (D-W.Va.), who is the senior member of the Senate Appropriations Committee, is also an opponent, Cotter said, as is Rep. Henry Waxman (D-Calif.), chairman of the U.S. House Energy and Commerce Committee that would consider any proposed changes to the law. “Byrd and Waxman are the keys, because when a bill gets to their committees they can kill it,” Cotter said. “They’re not friends to motorcyclists.” ACT NOW TO CHANGE THE LAW “The law is so bad in so many areas that lawmakers must act to fix it,” Moreland said. “We need to ensure that the voice of youth riding is heard among all the various interests that will be clamoring for changes.” You can find contact information for your elected officials at AmericanMotorcyclist. com. Go to Rights > Issues & Legislation, and enter your zip code in the “Find Your Officials” box.•

It’s Not Over Until It’s Over

The AMA Is Continuing To Fight For Kids’ Bikes and ATVs By Ed Moreland, AMA vice president for government relations When it comes to the battle over the future availability of kids’ bikes and ATVs, it’s too early to claim victory. Sure, we’ve moved the ball down the field, but the game isn’t over. What we have now is a timeout. A chance to regroup and take a breath. The real fight looms in front of us. We have to execute our plan. And it has to be a team effort. The CPSC’s two-year stay of enforcement simply delayed the implementation of that part of the law until May of 2011. It didn’t fix the longer-term issues of testing, certification and manufacturing. By that date, if the manufacturers have not devised a way to comply with the rulemaking, or the riding community hasn’t successfully removed kids’ bikes and ATVs from the CPSIA, we will be right back where we were when the machines were banned. The AMA is working on a number of options. Among them is our active support of of H.R. 1587, introduced by Rep. Denny Rehberg (R-Mont.), to exempt kids’ motorcycles and ATVs from the CPSIA. And we are calling on Chairman Henry Waxman and Chairman Jay Rockefeller to hold hearings on the misapplication of the CPSIA on kids’ motorcycles and ATVs. We’ve gotten this far because of AMA members like you, who, along with other riders, wrote letters, called legislators and made their voices heard. We have to keep up the pressure. Please go to AmericanMotorcyclist.com > Rights > Issues & Legislation and urge your member of Congress to support the Rehberg bill, and urge House and Senate leadership to hold hearings on this critically important issue. It may be halftime, but until the final gun sounds, the battle continues. We have to play every minute like it’s our last—because it could quite literally be.

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JAMES ABBOTT, DESTRY ABBOTT, JOHNNY ABLE, DARYL ABRAMOVITZ, GORDON ACKLER, RICHARD L ADKINS, STEVEN E AKER, MAX AKINS, DALE ALDRICH, ROBERT W ALDRICH, W C ALEXANDER, R KEITH ALLEN, PHILIP J AMMENDOLIA, THOMAS R ANDERSEN, VICKI ANDERSEN, MICHAEL J ANDERSON, WILLIAM T ANDERSON, MARSHALL W ANDERSON, DANIEL C ANDERSON, BLAKE E ANDERSON, JIM ANDRES, STANLEY B ANGLE JR, KARL A ANSTETT, WILLIAM L ARBOGAST, ROBERT T ARCHER, RICHARD D AREND JR, STEVE J ARETZ, RANDY ARGO, TOM ARMISTEAD, CHRISTOPHER R ASHBROOK, DON ASKEW, VICKI LYNN ATHERTON, DEAN K AUEN, MARK A BADER, THOMAS W BAER, DARRYL L BAER, DALLAS G BAER, RON BAILEY, RICHARD W BAKER, W J BAKER III, DEAN BALENTINE, TIMOTHY R BALL, ANDREW BALMER, DON R BANKS, JOHN M BARBER, SCOTT W BARINGER, JOE BARKER, THOMAS L BARNES, PETER R BARNOSKY, JERRY S BARNWELL JR, J C BARR, HANNAH J BARRETT, JIM BARRETT, KEITH D BARRY, PHILLIP F BARTH, JON BARTHOLOW, DENNIS G BARTOLETTI, PATRICK BARTON, JOHN R BASHAM, ROBERT BASKETT, NANCY I BATON, DAVID BAXTER, CHRIS BAY, THOMAS E BEAN, P BEAN, ANTHONY F BEATTY, ED BECKLEY, MICHAEL D BELLOMO, WILLIAM BENJAMIN, HEATH BENNETT, ROBERT W BENNETT, LANCE BESLANOWITCH, ROB BIBBINS, JERRY S BIEDERMANN, DAVID L BIELEMA, J BIERSTEKER, KEVIN G BINDER, JOSHUA BITNER, RUSS BLACKETER, BOBBY L BLACKLEDGE, WILLIAM E BLALACK, TRAY BLANCHARD, WILLIAM G BLOCHER, MICHAEL BLYTHE, CHARLES BOATMAN, DENNIS BOE, S BOLZ, DARREN L BORCHERDING, CRAIG BORDERS, RICHARD J BORGERSON, JIM D BORKOWSKI, RICHARD BOSS, PAM BOSS, JAMES B BOWEN JR, RAY BOWMAN, DANIEL R BOWSER, DANIEL R BOYD, ROBERT L BOYLE, BARRY D BRADFORD, JEFFREY P BRADY, LON BRAND, RICHARD A BRANDEIS, JAMES B BRANDER, CLIFF D BRECHT, SONNY BREST, EDDIE BRIGGS, JOYCE E BRODBECK, DENNY BRODBECK, JEFFREY A BROMLEY, LARRY P BROOKS, JOHN L BROWN, ROBERT L BROWN, JOEL E BROWN, STEPHANIE BROWN, BRUCE BROWN, MITCH BROWN, GARY D BRUCE, MIKE BRUIJN, CHRIS BRYNILDSEN, PAUL F BUETTNER, NOREEN BURCH, ROBERT T BURGER, CLIFF BURKE, NICK BURKITT, BARBARA S BURKY, JOHN D BURNS, KEVIN J BURNS, ROBERT M BUSH, KARTER BUSSE, DANNY E BUTLER, SAMUEL T BYRON JR, GARY CAIN, JUDY L CALMAN, ROBERT A CALVIN, JAMES E CAMACK, DOMINIC CAMPANA, JOHN W CARLSON, GREGORY CASE, MARK CASTILLERO, NEIL K CAVALIER, BILL CAVE, PAUL R CAVONIS, MICHAEL CESARE, GEOFF R CESMAT, LESTER G CHAMPION, DONALD L CHARLTON, DAVID O CHASE, CURT CHEVLEN, JIM D CHRISTENSEN, DOUG CHRISTENSEN, STEVE CLARK, KENNETH C CLARK, JAY S CLARK, EDWARD CLARK JR, HARLEY S CLARKE, JOE D COATS, RONALD COCHRAN, JOSEPH COHO, PATRICK D COLEMAN, MARK D COLLEY, ERIC COLVIN, PATRICIA C CONQUEST, JACK A CONRAD, MICHAEL E COOPER, MICHAEL V CORENTTO, GARY CORLEU, GLEN D CORSELLO, STEVE COTHERMAN, DAVID M COULTER, KIMBERLY COURTNEY, PAUL COVIELLO, GORDON B COYLE, DAVID J CRAWFORD, NICK CRAWFORD, SHANNON S CRAWFORD JR, BOB CREQUE, ROBERT T CRIMI, R SCOTT CROSSON, SCOTT A CRUCE, LEONARDO M CULOTTA, RALPH M CUNNINGHAM, DONNIE L CURD, BARBARA J CURRIE, JEFF A CURRY, MONTE GLENN CURTIS, JAMES D CUSHING, MELVA J DAHL, STEVEN R DAHL, JOHN J DANGELO, A BENJAMIN DANIELS, ROBERT K DARPINO, ROBERT DAVENPORT, DAVID M DAVIDSON, DARRELL L DAVIDSON, THOMAS DAVIS, JEFFREY DEMAIN, JEFF DEMENT, ELLIOTT T DENISON, PETER A DENZER, ROBERT W DERR, MARK DEYO, JOE DIBELLA, J R DICE, ROBERT M DICKEY, JIM H DICKSON, DANIEL R DIEDRICKSON, RONALD F DIEHL, DAVID DILLINGHAM, KATHLEEN L DILLON, CHARLES J DIPASQUALE, RANDY J DITSCHLER, HAROLD S DOANE, KARL A DODSON, LARRY DONALDSON, BRIAN DOTTERWICK, JAMES DOUGAN, BRYAN DOUGLAS, JEFF J DOWNS, PAUL A DOWNS, RANDY W DREXLER, MICHAEL E DRUM, TIMOTHY J DRYER, RICHARD DUDIS, KEITH DUMAINE, HAROLD DUNDORE JR, ROBERT J DUNN, JOE N DUNNING, JANE DUPUIS, JASON M DUTROW, RAYMOND DWENGER, MICHAEL H DWYER, STEVEN R EAKINS, JAMES EASTLEE, DONALD ECKSTEIN, WILLIAM J EDDY, ROGER D EDINGER, DAVE EGERDAL, DANNY C ELLER, RUSSELL L ELLIS, CRAIG A ENGDAHL, MARK C ENGEL, RHODA R ENGEL, DAVID A ENGLERT, MICHAEL ERDMANN, AARON ERNST, MICHAEL L EVANS, RAY J FADDIS, PAT W FAHERTY, JOHN FAIRGRIEVE, VICKI FARLEY, STEVE B FARLEY, WILLIAM D FARMER JR, REGAN W FAUGHT, STUART FERREIRA, JAMES FERRETTI, JOHN M FIGLER, TIM J FILIPPI, EDGAR I FINK JR, TERRY R FINKLE, MARK R FINKLER DVM, JEFFREY S FISHER, MICHAEL J FISHER, THOMAS J FITZPATRICK, PHIL FLEEMAN, PATRICK T FLETCHER, GREGORY B FOLAND, CURT FOLEY, MIKEY FOLKEN, RAYMOND S FORBES, WILLIAM Z FORNSHELL, ROBERT FOX, DONNA FRANCIS, BOB FRANCO, ROBERT C FRANKLIN, RONNIE L FRANKS, COLIN J FRASER, WILLIAM N FREEMAN, JEFF FREEMAN, TONI FRUEHAUF, DAVID G FUNKA, NORMAN E GAINES JR, ALBERT C GALLAGHER, JOHN E GANO, STANLEY J GANTT, T J GARDNER, TODD GARDNER, COOPER T GARZA, JOSEPH R GATHRIGHT, JEFFREY A GAUL, ROGER A GAY, TED GEERTS, RON GETTE, CHARLES GHILANI, TED A GILFERT, ROY I GILMAN, JOSEPH E GODLEY, TROY GOEHRS, HAROLD L GOODMAN, DAVID H GORHAM, PAUL G GOYETTE, CHRIS E GRABER, LAODICE A GRANGER SR, FORREST GRANLUND, KEVIN A GREEN, DONALD GREEN, GREGORY GREEN, KEVIN GREENE, AVERY H GREENE, JAMES R GREIDER, GERALD L GRIBBONS, JIM GRIFFIN, RICHARD A GRILL SR, RODNEY L GRIM, WILLIAM C GROVE III, EILEEN S GUILE, WAYNE HABERMAN, RONALD HAEFNER, STU HAFEN, W HAGER, SUSAN HAGLEY, KAREN J HAINES, JOHNNY HALE, PAUL HALEY, BILLY D HALL, THOMAS A HALL, AL HALSTEAD, ROD HALVERSON, WILLIAM G HAMILL, DON HAPKE, BRYAN K HARDIN, DANIEL J HARMON, DAVID S HARNER, ROBERT E HARP, GEORGE F HARP, DOUGLAS L HARRIS, JERRY HARRIS, PHIL L HARRIS, MICHAEL HARRIS, JON HARRISON, JOHN H HART, JAMES D HART, HUNTER HART, WARREN F HARTZ, STAN HASTINGS, CRAIG HATCH, NATHAN HAUPT, ROBERT O HAUSSER, JOHN C HAWKINS, TED H HEITSCH, MIKE HELMICK, JAMES K HENEBRY, THOMAS G HENRY, ROBERT F HERL, ROBERT O HERRICK, RICK A HESSER, MARK A HEUSDENS, THOMAS F HILL, GENE HODGE II, DWIGHT HOEGENAUER, JAY HOENK, LENI HOFFMAN, THOM HOFFNER, JAMES R HOGAN, KENNETH P HOGUE, MARK HOLASEK, JED A HOLLEY, HENRY A HOLMAN, STEVEN HOLT, ELWOOD W HOLZBAUR, JOHN S HOLZLI JR, JEFFREY B HOMAN, ZOLTAN A HORVATH, JOHN C HOUSLER JR, JOHN HOWLAND JR, ARVID D HOXIE JR, LEONARD E HUBERT, JOHN D HUDDLE, NANCY HUDDLESTON, STEVEN D HUDDLESTON, DANIEL HUDDLESTON, WILLIAM L HUGHES, MICHAEL HUGHES, MICHAEL A HUMPHREY, GREGORY HUSON, MARK HUTSON, GRAHAM A INNS, LEONARD INZEO JR, DWIGHT E IRWIN, DONALD L ISHMAEL, ROGER IWERKS, ROBERT M JACKSON, JOSEPH C JANEIRO, MARK JANES, BILL JANITOR, MATT F JAYICH, PATRICK J JEANY, FRANK E JENKINS, WILL JEWELL, MICHAEL JOBE, MARTHA JOHNSON, MICHAEL JOHNSON, DONALD N JOHNSON, MICHAEL L JOHNSON, GREG JOHNSON, ED JOHNSON JR, RAYMOND C JOHNSTON, MICHAEL JOHNSTON, WOODROW JONES, MARY JANE JONES, ARLEIGH JONES, KEITH A JONES, JERRY R JONES, PETER J JONSSON, JAMES R JORDEN, GARY JORGENSEN, RODNEY D JUDSON, RICHARD J KADAR, CARL KAFFEMAN, THOM KAINZ, JACK KAINZ, JIM A KAISER, LARRY KARNES, KEVIN L KASEY, SANDRA KELLER, ARDYS C KELLERMAN, PAUL J KELLEY, JIM KELLY, STEELE K KENNEDY, DAVID KERR, KIRK P KESSLER, GEORGE P KESTLER, ALEXANDRA KIEFFER, RON KIMBLE, W MICHAEL KIRBY, EVA KIRCHLECHNER, EDWIN B KITNERS, BRIAN E KLINE, NANCY K KLUNE, DOUG KOLONIA, FRANK J KOPETKO, THOMAS KUDLICK, RUDI KUGLER, RONALD W KUMMERLOWE, JOHN W LANCE, CAROL D LANDIS, DARREN LANE, PATRICIA S LANE, JAMES E LANG, BILL LANGENBACH, WILLIAM LASCHE, GARY LASHER, THOMAS W LASLEY, N PETER LAVENGOOD, DENNIS D LAW, BRIAN F LAW, DANIEL NATHAN LEE DD, DAVID J LEIBOLD, KENNETH E LEMLEY, LAWRENCE A LENTINI, CRAIG LENTZ, MICHAEL J LEO, JIM LESLIE, GARY LESTINA, JOEL LEWALLEN, RALPH E LEWIS, ROBERT J LICH, ROBERT LICHTENSTEIN, DARVON LIGHT, MARY LINDEMAN, STEVEN D LINDEN, DOUGLAS LINVILLE MD, SEAN LISKE, DAVID A LLOYD, MIKE LLOYD, RICHARD C LORENSON, PATRICIA LORENZEN, CHESTER R LOVE, DAVID B LOVE, DARYL A LUCAS, CHARLES LUEDERS, KRISTIN LUND, GARY LYON, HAROLD F MACDONALD, JACK B MACHUTA JR, BILL M MACQUEEN, ROGER MAEHLER, RODNEY P MAJOR, JOHN R MANFORD, MICHAEL J MAREK, MARK D MARESCALCO, BOBBY MARKHAM, DHANE B MARQUES, KENNETH MARSTERS, JEREMY MARTENS, VERN E MARTIN, DEREK L MARTIN, DAVE W MARTIN, JOEL MARTIN, FREDRIC E MARTINSON, MICHAEL A MASON, FRANK MATASKA, BILL MATCHUS, STEVEN E MATTESON, RONALD D MATTHEWS, ELISSA MATULIS MYERS, CARL R MATZELLE, JOHN C MAUN, DAVID C MCCARTHY, LARRY MCCARTY, JAMES E MCCOY, JAMES MCCULLAH, DONALD R MCCULLOUGH, TERRY MCDANIEL, CLAUDE MCELVAIN, RICHARD T MCGRATH, JOANN MCINTOSH, KEVIN MCKAY, ROBERT MCKEEVER, RON MCKENZIE, KEVIN MCKILLIP, BRENT H MCKINLAY, GARY E MCMAHAN, DANIEL MCMANUS, THOMAS E MCNABB, MARK W MCNABNEY, KEN E MCNATT, PAUL MCNAUGHTON, ROBERT B MEASE, KENNETH C MECKING, JOHN P MEDGYESI, KARL S MEDINGER, PETER E MEEHAN SR, DEAN J MELLOR, MICHAEL B MENAKER, DAVE N MERKLIN, DIANE MERRILL, KEN MEYER, JAMES P MICHIELUTTI, JASON MIDDLETON, ROSELOU MIETZ, DANIEL J MILLER, VINCENT MILLER, ROBERT W MILLER, DWAIN D MILLER, ROBERT L MILLER, JAMES I MILLER, DALE R MINER, EDWARD M MINNICK, CHRIS J MISSERI, JAMES MITCHELL, JOHN W MITCHELL, PETER S MOLESKY, ROBERT F MOLT, MIKE MONROE, JOHN P MOORE, MICHAEL R MOORE, NELSON MORENO, JACK MORIN, PAUL E MOSCOSO, LARRY D MOSER, WILLIAM H MOSES, JOHN A MULLIGAN, PAUL MULLIGAN, PATRICK T MURPHY, RANDY R MURPHY, JOHN BAGLEY MURRAY, MARK C MYERS, STEVE MYERS, JOHN T MYERS, JOHN C MYRIN, GEORGE NACHAJSKI, SHANE NALLEY, WILLIAM L NEANDER, JOHN NEIDENGARD, DAVID W NELSON, ROBERT NEVOLA, T NEWHARD, BEN NEWHOUSE, MARK NEWMAN, ANGELO R NICHOLES, NICK NICHOLS, JOANNA NICOLINI, BOB NIENABER, RANDEL NISSEN, MIKE W NIX, AL NOGUCHI, ROBERT A NORDT, DONALD B NORTON, MARK S NOTHOM, JOHN K NOVAK, BRUCE A NUGENT, GERALD F OBRIEN, JOSEPH ODEN, DAVE K OHLMAN, STEVEN OHLROGGE, JOHN OLEARY, DENNIS L OLSEN, THOMAS J A OLSHARK, KRIS OLSON, K J OMALLEY, WILLIAM M OMARA, JOHN ONEIL, RICHARD J OPPERMANN, PETER J ORECKINTO, BRIAN M OREILLY, DONALD L ORSINI, BOB OWEN, ERIC OWENS, ANTHONY C PAGGIO, STEVEN PALESCH, BRADLEY PARFITT, DEREK L PARIS, RICHARD E PARKER, KATHRYN PARKER, BRAD PARKS, JOHN J PARROTT, ELIZABETH PARTON, KRISTIN PARZYCH, DAVID PAULI, ALAN J PAWLEY, MERRILL PEGG, SCOTT H PEIRCE, CHARLES E PENOYER, LEONARD PERRONE, JON C PETERSON, THOMAS S PETERSON, DAN PETTIGREW, GERALD A PFEIFER, JERRY L PIEPER, ROBERT A PIERRO, KEVIN PINTO, DAVID PIRNER, RUSSELL POHL, CURTIS D POOLE, GEOFFREY T POOLE, KEVIN S POPAEKO, RICK PORTERFIELD, RUSSELL POUND JR, PAUL POVEROMO, CHRIS J POWERS, STAN W PRAPOTNIK, ROBERT PRESS, DON PREUSS, CHARLES E PRICE, JEFF PRITCHARD, DAVID K PROELL, JOHN R PROSSER, PHIL PSZENNY, TERRY E PUFFER, FRED PUYNKO, DIANE RACKOVAN, ROBERT C RANKIN JR, THOMAS A RANNEY, WILLIAM RANSDELL, ANNETTE M RASP, GARY H RATEKIN, HANS P RAUB, DENNIS B RAY, RONNIE A RAY, THOMAS J READING, TERRY A REAM, LOYAL E REAM, JOHN C REED, NATHAN REICHARD, KERI S REINMAN, BRAD RENSHAW, RUDY L REYNOSA, ROBERT G RICHMOND, BRUCE RICKARD, CURT RINGGENBERG, MIKE RITCHIE, ALAN ROACH, KENNETH G ROBERTS, BRUCE ROBERTS, JOSEPH ROBINSON, AVIS ROBINSON, WESLEY L ROBISON, GARY H ROCK, CARLO A RODRIGO, JOSEPH P ROGERS, DANIEL ROHLLF, ROBERT T ROMANS, TODD K ROPER, JOHN L ROQUEMORE, GREGORY A ROTH, EDWARD J ROYALS, FRANKLIN L RUCH, CLARK N RUNYARD, GARY RUSK, BRUCE D RUST, WARREN K RYAN, PATRICK RYAN, ROGER RYNEARSON, THOMAS L SAIERS, GENE SCHAETTEN, DAVID N SCHANI, LANSING C SCHANTZ, MARK SCHMIDT, JOHANN SCHNEIDER, MARTIN SCHNEIDER JR, ERICH SCHULER, BRENT S SCHUSTER, TERRY SCHWARK, BOB SCHWEGEL, WADE SCOTT, MARTIN W SCOTT, RUSSELL W SEIBOLD, DAN SEKELLICK, FORREST A SELMER, ROD SENTELL, ERIK J SHAFER, JAMES J SHANAHAN, DONALD E SHARPE, STEVEN P SHAUM, JOHN E SHAW, JAY SHELTON, CLYDE S SHERBONDY, DONALD E SHERIDAN SR, STEVE SHERMAN, CURTIS D SHIELDS, ERIC SHIELDS, SCOTT SHIVELY, MATTHEW SHOOK, PAUL SHOOK, GEORGE D SIEGLE JR, ROBERT E SIER, KURT SIMMERS, MARK J SIMMONS, TOM SIMON, MILAN SIMOVICH, JOHN S J SIMPSON, ANDREW J SITTON, ROBERT S SKINNER, URSULA B SKOUG, ELIZABETH SLADE, JAMES E SLADE, DAVID R SMITH, DAVID C SMITH, JEFFREY L SMITH, PETER D SMITH, MIKE SMITH, PHILLIP L SMITH, RONALD R SMITH, CHARLIE SMITH, RAYMOND SMITH, RICHARD C SMITH, KEITH SMITH, BILL F SMITH, RODNEY SMITH, RANDY W SMITH, LOUIS M SMITH JR, JAMES SMITHHISLER, OWEN SOMERFORD, DEBBIE SOUZA, CRAIG SPANGLER, JAMES SPECHT, PHILLIP H SPRAIN, JOHN L STAEHLI, DAVID STAFFORD, STAN STAGG, MIKE A STAHLMAN, GARY STAMMER, CHARLES H STANLEY, RAYMOND C STEFAN, DENNIS M STEINKE, WAYNE A STELLY, GERALD STEWART, TED STICKLER, ROY S STIENEKER, LEONARD M STINCHCOMB JR, DAVE L STOCKTON, JERRY A STOECKIGT, JASON STONE, RONALD STORM, BRADLEY STRANG, ERIK S STRASEL, JACK R STRAW, ROBERT STREETS, JAMES C STRUKE, TED A STULL, MARK SULLIVAN, STEVE SUMNER, KENT SUNDGREN, ALBERT T SUPPLE III, ANGUS SUTHERLAND, JOHN H SWAFFORD, BRIAN J SWARTWOOD, SANDRA B SWEGMAN, MARK A SWYGERT, LARRY A TACK, MARK TAGLIAMONTE, CLEVELAND TAYLOR, RICHARD TAYLOR, ANDREW TEATES, TIMOTHY TEVES, PETER THOMANN, KEITH THOMAS, JAMES A THOMAS, GEORGE THOMAS, ROLAND D THOMPSON, MICHAEL THOMPSON, ROD D THURLEY, JACK TIERNEY, JARRETT A TIPPING, DANIEL TODD, GARY T TOLLEFSON, ANTHONY TOMASELLO, PAUL M TOMSCHE, BILL TRAPP, JEFF TREML, CHARLES L TRYON, DOUG S TSOUHNIKAS, JOHN TULLIS, DEREK R TURNER, HAROLD A TYNDALL, BRUCE D UNDERWOOD, STEVEN A UNDERWOOD, CECIL UPTON JR, CODIE A VAHSHOLTZ, PAUL A VALENTINE, STEVE VANATTA, JEFF VANDEN BOOGART, ROY A VANDERVEUR JR, RAYMOND M VANDEVORT, DOLLY VARNES, BOB VERNER, LOUIS VICKERS, THOMAS VIELE, PATTI J VOLLMER, FRANK H VOLLMER III, ART VONROEMER, HARRY K VROMAN, PERRY M WACKER, DAVID J WADDLE, PATRICK L WADE, JOE M WADE, A J WAGGONER, RANDALL A WAGNER, DENNIE R WAGNER, KENNETH L WAGONER, LINDA WALDHEIM, KRIS WALL, WADE WALLACE, SCOTT WALLACE, LEONARD P WALLS, BRENDAN L WALSH, SANDRA WALSTROM, JAKE G WALTERS, LARRY P WAMBOLD JR, JOHN L WARD, CARYL BUD WARNER, CHADWICK L WARRIX, GARY R WASHBURN, CHADOM WATKINS, RONALD G WATSON, SAM WATSON, GREGORY WAUGH, THOMAS A WEBER, MIKE L WEBSTER, JOHN A WEDDLETON, ROBERT A WEINDORF, MICHAEL WEINER, MAUREEN WELCH, THOMAS ALLEN WELCH, TODD WENDLE, ROBERT L WENGER, ROBERT M WENTZEL, LYNN E WENZBAUER, CHRISTINE WERDER, RUSTY WERNER, BILL WERNER, MARTY WERTHEIM, HENRY W WEST, MARTYN J WHEELER, RICHARD WHITMAN, MARCUS P WIELOSINSKI, BARRON L WIGGINS, STEVE WILBURN, MARIE F WILHELMY, DANIEL C WILLIAMS, JAMES A WILLIAMS, JOHN A WILSON, JANET R WILTSHIRE, JOSHUA WINCHELL, JOBY A WINDMILLER, JOE D WINKLER, RUTH J WITMAN, TOM WOLF, JACK E WOLF, DEBBIE WOLFE, DALE L WOOD, ROGER B WOOD SR, DON WRAGG, BOB WRIGHT, ROBERT WRIGHT, BRIAN L WUBBEN, SCOTT WUBBENA, RICHARD WYKOFF, SURESH YADAV, DAVID R YANKUNAS, RODNEY YENTZER, JOHN YORKS, JOSEPH E ZIERMAN, CHERYL L ZIMMERMAN, DAVID ZUNIGA, RICHARD ZUPKO II, RICHARD ZWIEBEL.

Congratulations to everyone who became an AMA Life Member this year, and thank you for your support!


Go Ride

A few of the hundreds of AMA-sanctioned events this month, detailed on the following pages.

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The battle of the champs takes center stage during the 2010 season of the Monster Energy AMA Supercross, an FIM World championship, when defending champ James Stewart battles Lucas Oil AMA Pro Motocross Champ Chad Reed. But Ryan Villopoto and others are hoping to claim the No. 1 plate for their own. The series begins Jan. 9 at Angel Stadium in Anaheim, Calif. For the full schedule, see page 52.

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A little snow, or even a lot of it, doesn’t stop a group of some 550 New Jersey riders from hitting the roads on their scoots in what they call Polar Bear rides. And they want to invite you along. They have planned a series of rides during the winter months, starting with one Jan. 2 that begins in Lake Hopatcong, N.J. Info: PolarBearGrandTour.com.

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AmericanMotorcyclist.com

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The AMA Arenacross Series is under way, and this season promises to showcase some of the closest racing action ever. The series will crisscross the country, with events Jan. 8-10 in Grand Rapids, Mich.; Jan. 15-17 in Baltimore; Jan. 22-24 in Hampton, Va.; and Jan. 30-31 in Kansas City, Mo. For the full schedule, see page 52.

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Get the new year off to a great start with some family fun by taking part in the Family Off-Road Adventures recreational trail ride that will be held Jan. 2 in Ridgecrest, Calif. The ride begins at the Wagon Wheel staging area 5 miles south of Highway 178 on Trona-Red Mountain Rd. Info: FamilyOffroadAdventures.com.

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Will this be the year that Mike Lafferty wins an unprecedented ninth title in the AMA/Rekluse National Enduro Championship Series, presented by Moose Racing? Or will defending

champion Russell Bobbitt once again dash Lafferty’s dreams? The drama begins when the 10-race series kicks off Jan. 31 at the Manchester State forest in Wedgefield, S.C. Info: SERMAClub.com.

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The 2010 AMA Racing National Hare & Hound Championship Series kicks off Jan. 24 at the Johnson Valley Off-highway Vehicle Recreation Area in Lucerne, Calif., hosted by the Desert Motorcycle Club. Info: DesertMC.com.

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Rain, snow or shine, the Trinity Road Riders will host a Polar Bear Run Jan. 1 with sign up and start from 10 a.m. to noon at Cycle Gear at SE 89th St. and Stark St. in Portland, Ore. Info: PDXPolarBearRun.com.

COMING UP The South Florida Ride for Kids is Feb. 14 beginning and ending at the Sportsplex in Coral Springs, Fla. Registration for this fund-raising ride for the Pediatric Brain Tumor Foundation begins at 8 a.m. and closes at 9:45 a.m. Info: RideForKids.org.


THE

GUIDE TO EVENTS

The following pages list AMA-sanctioned events for this month, up to date at press time. Current listings are in the Riding and Racing sections of www. AmericanMotorcyclist.com. The biggest events—pro races,

national-championship amateur competition, and major rides and rallies—are highlighted in color boxes. For these series, we list all of the remaining events for the entire year. Then there are the local events,

Type of Event Date

Event Class (Competition events only) S - Standard (Amateur classes) Y - Youth Classes T - ATV classes G - Progressive M - Pro-Am classes Location/City

HTTP://POLARBEARGRANDTOUR.COM

NEW YORK the backbone of the AMA’s riding and racing calendar. These events are listed by state and are broken down by type, so you can quickly find the ones near you. Here’s a guide to what you’ll find in these local listings:

NORTH CAROLINA Event Promoter

MOTOCROSS

DEC 6 (S,T,Y): REYNOLDS (D-9): SILVER DOLLAR MX, C/O STEVE JONES; 6 AM; HWY 96 W/JST W OF TWN; (478) 555-4673 Sign-in Time Directions

Contact Phone Number

CALIFORNIA

POKER RUN JAN 23 (R,T,Y): LUCERNE VALLEY: UNITED ENDURO ASSOCIATION, GODON GODEL; 1 PM; JOHNSON VALLEY OHV AREA /STAGEING AREA TBA; (818) 2378396; REC TRAIL RIDE JAN 2 (R,T,Y): RIDGECREST: FAMILY OFF-ROAD ADVENTURE, LD BORGENS; WAGON WHEEL STAGING AREA /5 MI S OF HWY 178 ON TRONA-REDMOUNTAIN RD; (209) 649-3633; FAMILYOFFROADADVENTURES. COM JAN 23 (R,T,Y): LUCERNE VALLEY: UNITED ENDURO ASSOCIATION, GORDON GODEL; 11 AM; JOHNSON VALLEY OHV AREA /STAGEING AREA TBA; (818) 2378396; HARE SCRAMBLES JAN 3 (S,Y): LODI: LODI MOTORCYCLE CLUB, JEFF TAYLOR; 8 AM; LODI CYCLE BOWL/5801 E MORSE / HWY 99 TO 8 MILE/N ON FRONTAGE/R ON MORSE; (209) 368-7182; LODICYCLEBOWL.COM HARE & HOUND JAN 24 (S,T,Y): LUCERNE VALLEY: NATIONAL; DESERT MOTORCYCLE CLUB IN, DALE SHUTTLEWORTH; JOHNSON VALLEY OHVA /MARKED FROM INTERSECTION OF HWY 18 & 247; (909) 578-1599; DESERTMC.COM ENDURO JAN 24 (S,T,Y): LUCERNE VALLEY: UNITED ENDURO ASSOCIATION, GORDON GODEL; JOHNSON VALLEY OHV AREA /STAGEING AREA TBA; (818) 237-8396; CROSS COUNTRY JAN 16 (S,Y): RANCHO CORDOVA: 2 DAY EVENT: POLKA DOTS MOTORCYCLE CLU, BRUCE HENDERSON; 6 AM; 13300 WHITE ROCK RD; (916) 5680708; POLKADOTSMC.COM

MARYLAND

MOTOCROSS JAN 3 (S,T,Y): BUDDS CREEK: BUDDS CREEK MOTOCROSS PAR, JONATHAN BEASLEY; 4 PM; BUDDS CREEK MX PARK /27963 BUDDS CREEK RD; (301) 475-2000; BUDDSCREEK.COM ARENA CROSS JAN 15 (S,Y): BALTIMORE: 3 DAY EVENT: FELD MOTOR SPORTS, JAYME DALSING; 10 AM; 1ST MARINER ARENA /201 W BALTIMORE ST; (800) 216-7482; ARENACROSS.COM

MICHIGAN

ICE RACE JAN 23 (S,T,Y): MOUNT PLEASANT: NATIONAL; 2 DAY EVENT: BAJA MX INC, ROSANNA M GRZEBINSKI; 7 AM; SOARING EAGLE CASINO; (989) 871-3356; BAJAMX. COM ARENA CROSS JAN 8 (S,Y): GRAND RAPIDS: 3 DAY EVENT: FELD MOTOR SPORTS, JAYME DALSING; 10 AM; VAN ANDEL ARENA /130 W FULTON; (800) 216-7482; ARENACROSS. COM

MISSOURI

ARENA CROSS JAN 30 (S,Y): KANSAS CITY: 2 DAY EVENT: FELD MOTOR SPORTS, JAYME DALSING; 10 AM; KEMPER ARENA; (800) 216-7482; ARENACROSS.COM

NEW JERSEY

GRAND TOUR JAN 2 (R): PEMBERTON: AMA-DIST 02 OF NEW JERSEY, ROBERT D HARTPENCE; POLAR BEAR GRAND TOUR /16 ELIZABETH STREET; (609) 894-9241;

Cycle World International Motorcycle Shows MotorcycleShows.com

Dec. 11-13: Seattle, Wash.: Qwest Field Event Center; QwestField.com Jan. 1-3: Novi, Mich.: Rock Financial Showplace; RockFinancialShowplace.com Jan. 8-10: Greenville, S.C.: Carolina First Center; CarolinaFirstCenter.com Jan. 15-17: Washington, D.C.: Washington

KENTUCKY

MOTOCROSS JAN 15 (S,T,Y): CORBIN: INDOOR; VICTORY SPORTS INC, SAM GAMMON; SMG/THE ARENA 455 MARKET ST; (423) 323-5497; VICTORYSPORTSRACING.COM JAN 16 (S,T,Y): CORBIN: INDOOR; VICTORY SPORTS INC, SAM GAMMON; SMG/THE ARENA 455 MARKET ST; (423) 323-5497; VICTORYSPORTSRACING.COM

OREGON

ROAD RUN JAN 1 (R): PORTLAND: TRINITY ROAD RIDERS, BRUCE TILLER; 10 AM; CYCLE GEAR /89TH & SE STARK ST; (503) 314-4757; PDXPOLARBEARRUN.COM

SOUTH CAROLINA

ENDURO JAN 17 (S): EHRHARDT: FAMILY RIDERS MOTORCYCLE, DOUG R COCHRAN; BROXTON BRIDGE PLANTATION /6 MI S OF TOWN; (843) 572-2008; JAN 31 (S): WEDGEFIELD: NATIONAL; SUMTER ENDURO RIDERS MC A, JOHNNY MCCOY; OFF HWY 261 BETWEEN PINEWOOD & /WEDGEFIELD SC; (803) 481-5169; SERMACLUB.COM REL-ENDURO - ISDE JAN 16 (S): EHRHARDT: FAMILY RIDERS MOTORCYCLE, DOUG R COCHRAN; BROXTON BRIDGE PLANTATION /6 MI S OF TOWN; (843) 572-2008;

TENNESSEE

MOTOCROSS JAN 22 (S,T,Y): SHELBYVILLE: INDOOR; VICTORY SPORTS INC, SAM GAMMON; CALSONIC ARENA /HWY 231 EXIT 41A TOWARDS TULLAHOMA; (423) 323-5497; VICTORYSPORTSRACING.COM JAN 23 (S,T,Y): SHELBYVILLE: INDOOR; VICTORY SPORTS INC, SAM GAMMON; CALSONIC ARENA /HWY 231 EXIT 41A TOWARDS TULLAHOMA; (423) 323-5497; VICTORYSPORTSRACING.COM HARE SCRAMBLES JAN 24 (S,Y): SAULSBURY: WOLF RIVER RACING, DICK MCALVAIN; SAULSBURY FARM /GPS N35 0415.7, W890306.9; (901) 351-8468;

Convention Center; DCConvention.com Jan. 22-24: New York, N.Y.: Javits Convention Center; JavitsCenter.com Jan. 29-31: Cleveland, Ohio: I-X Center; IXCenter.com Feb. 5-7: Minneapolis, Minn.: Minneapolis Convention Center; MplsConvCtr.org Feb. 19-21: Chicago, Ill.: Donald E. Stephens Convention Center; Rosemont.com Mar. 3-10: Daytona Beach, Fla.: Ocean Center; OceanCenter.com

MUSEUM EXHIBITS

INDIANA

ROAD RUN JAN 1 (R): INDIANAPOLIS: MIDWEST MOTORCYCLE CLUB, B SHACKELFORD; 10 AM; 3101 S HARDING /2 MI N OF 465S/HARDING EXIT; (317) 557-2130; MIDWESTMC.COM

MOTOCROSS JAN 8 (S,T,Y): FLETCHER: INDOOR; VICTORY SPORTS INC, SAM GAMMON; WESTERN NC AG CENTER /I-26 EX 40@ASHEVILLE AIRPORT; (423) 323-5497; VICTORYSPORTSRACING.COM JAN 9 (S,T,Y): FLETCHER: INDOOR; VICTORY SPORTS INC, SAM GAMMON; WESTERN NC AG CENTER /I-26 EX 40@ASHEVILLE AIRPORT; (423) 323-5497; VICTORYSPORTSRACING.COM JAN 16 (S,T,Y): HENDERSON: 2 DAY EVENT: KRUSTY RIDERS ASSOCIATION, MARK CZYSZ; 6 AM; 900 CHEEKS QUARTER RD /1.5 MI W OF HWY 401/10 MI N OF LOUISBURGH; (252) 438-8192; NCMP.NET

MOTORCYCLE SHOWS

FLORIDA

MOTOCROSS JAN 3 (S,Y): GAINESVILLE: UNLIMITED SPORTS MX, WYN KERR; 6 AM; GATORBACK CYCLE PARK; (813) 470-7498; UNLIMITEDSPORTSMX.COM JAN 10 (S,Y): REDDICK: UNLIMITED SPORTS MX, WYN KERR; 6 AM; MX OF MARION COUNTY; (813) 470-7498; UNLIMITEDSPORTSMX.COM JAN 17 (S,Y): DADE CITY: UNLIMITED SPORTS MX, WYN KERR; 6 AM; DADE CITY RACEWAY; (813) 4707498; UNLIMITEDSPORTSMX.COM JAN 24 (S,Y): LAKE CITY: UNLIMITED SPORTS MX, WYN KERN; 6 AM; LAKE CITY MX; (813) 470-7498; UNLIMITEDSPORTSMX.COM JAN 31 (S,Y): ST PETERSBURG: UNLIMITED SPORTS MX, WYN KERR; 6 AM; SUNSHINE MOTOCROSS; (813) 470-7498; UNLIMITEDSPORTSMX.COM

SHORT TRACK JAN 10 (S,T,Y): JAN 24 (S,T,Y): CAIRO: ELECTRIC CITY RIDERS, FRANK CARPINELLO; 9 AM; SKIDMORE LAKE /220 HERVEY SUNSIDE RD; (518) 542-2144; ELECTRICCITYRIDERS.COM JAN 17 (S,T,Y): JAN 31 (S,T,Y): EAST BERNE: ELECTRIC CITY RIDERS, FRANK CARPINELLO; 9 AM; WARNER’S LAKE /141 WARNERS LAKE ROAD; (518) 542-2144; ELECTRICCITYRIDERS.COM

AMA Motorcycle Hall Of Fame Museum MotorcycleMuseum.org

The Hall of Fame is located on the AMA campus in Pickerington, Ohio, and is open 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. seven days a week year-round exceptfor Easter, Thanksgiving, Christmas and New Year’s Day. MotoStars: Celebrities + Motorcycles: Priceless machines, exclusive memorabilia and tales from celebrities’ favorite adventures. On

display through April 2010. Awesome-Ness: The life and art of Arlen Ness: King of Choppers. AMA Motorcycle Hall of Fame: Bikes and memorabilia recognizing those who have made significant contributions to all aspects of motorcycling. Founder’s Hall: Honoring the Hall of Fame’s generous contributors. January 2010

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VIRGINIA

ARENA CROSS JAN 22 (S,Y): HAMPTON: 3 DAY EVENT: FELD MOTOR SPORTS, JAYME DALSING; 10 AM; HAMPTON COLISEUM; (800) 216-7482; ARENACROSS.COM

WEST VIRGINIA

HARE SCRAMBLES JAN 2 (S,T): ROMNEY: 2 DAY EVENT: MARYLAND

COMPETITION RIDE, KENNETH SCHAEFER; JR RANNELLS RD; (410) 916-1061; MDCOMPRIDERS.COM

WISCONSIN POKER RUN JAN 1 (R): MADISON: MADISON MOTORCYCLE CLUB, DAN MANCL; 10 AM; INN ON THE PARK /CAPITAL SQUARE; (608) 219-8967; MADISONMOTORCYCLECLUB.ORG

AMA NATIONAL CHAMPIONSHIP SERIES AMA Racing National Hare & Hound NationalHareAndHound.com

Jan. 24: Johnson Valley OHVA, Lucerne, Calif.: Desert M/C, Dale Shuttleworth; (909) 578-1599; desertmotorcycleclub@yahoo.com; DesertMC.com Feb. 14: Spangler Hills OHV, Ridgecrest, Calif.: Four Aces MC, Richie Wohlers; (805) 358-2668; richie@fouracesmc.org; FourAcesMC.org March 7: Superstition OHVA, El Centro, Calif.: Roadrunner Off-Road Racing, Kirk Hester; (760) 275-9852; roadrunneroffroad@ hotmail.com; RoadRunnerOffroad.org March 21: Murphy, Idaho: Dirt Inc., Bill Walsh; (208) 459-6871; braaap@cableone.net; DirtIncRacing.com April 10: Jericho, Utah (no ATVs)*: Sageriders MC, Kari Christman; (435) 851-

AMA Racing East Hare Scrambles AMARacing.com

May 2: Dorchester, N.J.: Dennis McKelvey, Tri-County Sportsmen; (609) 390-3772; TeamHammer.org May 30: Rhinelander, Wis.: Scott Schwalbe, Sugar Camp Racing; (715) 272-1101; SugarCampEnt.com June 13: Elkland, Pa.: Jeremy Richardson, MilesMountain; (570) 723-8516; MilesMountainMX.com

April 25: Johnson Valley OHVA, Lucerne, Calif.: Vikings MC, Alex Rodriguez; (760) 8345006; alex@arrowdevelopment.net; VikingsMC. com May 15: Jericho, Utah: Sugarloafers, Rob Davies; (435) 743-4180; offrdsp@hotmail.com; SugarloafersMC.com June 5: Wendover, Nev. (no ATVs)*: Utah Desert Foxes, Steve Rij; (801) 964-8773; steve. bmp@att.net; UtahDesertFoxes.com Oct. 10: TBA: SoCal MC, Justin Shultz; (949) 981-6776; justins@bgainsurance.com; SoCalMC.com Oct. 24: Lucerne Valley, Calif.: 100’s MC, Ryan Sanders; (949) 584-9395; ryansanders24@hotmail.com; 100sMC.org *The U.S. Bureau of Land Management does not allow all-terrain vehicle (ATV) competition at these locations.

July 18: Valley View, Pa.; Tiffany Tobias, Rausch Creek Powersports; (570) 682-4600; RauschCreekRacing.com Aug. 1: Catawissa, Pa.: Mike Soudas, High Mountain Dirt Riders; (570) 954-7799; HMDR.org Aug. 7: Hill City, Minn.: Paul Otto, Range Riders MC; (763) 229-1177; RangeRidersMC.org Aug. 29: Cortland, N.Y.: Cindy Davis, Knobby Acres; (607) 756-5277; WYNOA.org Sept. 19: Lynnville, Ind.: Kenny Moore, IN, IL, KY Enduro Riders; (812) 549-8385; Blackcoal.org

AMA Racing East Youth Hare Scrambles

MilesMountainMX.com

AMARacing.com

July 18: Valley View, Pa.; Tiffany Tobias, Rausch Creek Powersports; (570) 682-4600; RauschCreekRacing.com

April 18 (pending): Berwick, Pa.: Duane Fisher, Evansville MX Park; (570) 759-2841 May 1: Dorchester, N.J.: Dennis McKelvey, Tri-County Sportsmen; (609) 390-3772; TeamHammer.org May 29: Rhinelander, Wis.: Scott Schwalbe, Sugar Camp Racing; (715) 272-1101; SugarCampent.com

July 31: Catawissa, Pa.: Mike Soudas, High Mountain Dirt Riders; (570) 954-7799; HMDR.org Aug. 8: Hill City, Minn.: Paul Otto, Range Riders MC; (763) 229-1177; RangeRidersMC.org Aug. 28: Cortland, N.Y.: Cindy Davis, Knobby Acres; (607) 756-5277; WYNOA.org

2010 Monster Energy AMA Supercross, an FIM World Championship SupercrossOnline.com

Jan. 9: Anaheim, Calif.; Angel Stadium, TicketMaster.com, (714) 940-2000 Jan. 16: Phoenix, Ariz.; Chase Field, TicketMaster. com, (602) 462-6000 Jan. 23: Anaheim, Calif.; Angel Stadium, TicketMaster.com, (714) 9402000 Jan. 30: San Francisco, Calif.; AT&T Park, TicketMaster.com, (415) 972-2000 Feb. 6: San Diego, Calif.; Qualcomm Stadium, TicketMaster.com, (619) 525-8266 Feb. 13: Anaheim, Calif.; Angel Stadium, TicketMaster.com, (714) 940-2000 Feb. 20: Indianapolis, Ind.; Lucas Oil Stadium, TicketMaster.com, (317) 262-8600 Feb. 27: Atlanta, Ga.; Georgia Dome, TicketMaster.com, (404) 223-9200 March 6: Daytona, Fla.; Daytona Int’l Speedway, DaytonaInternationalSpeedway. com, (800) PITSHOP March 13: Toronto, Ontario; Rogers Centre, TicketMaster.com, (416) 341-3000 March 20: Arlington, Texas; Cowboy Stadium, TicketMaster.com, (817) 892-4161 March 27: Jacksonville, Fla.; Jacksonville Municipal Stadium, TicketMaster.com, (904) 633-6100 April 10: Houston, Texas; Reliant Stadium, TicketMaster.com, (832) 667-1400 April 17: St. Louis, Mo.; Edward Jones Dome, TicketMaster.com, (314) 342-5036 April 24: Seattle, Wash.; Quest Field, TicketMaster.com, (206) 381-7500 May 1: Salt Lake City, Utah; Rice-Eccles, TicketMaster.com, (801) 581-UTIX May 8: Las Vegas, Nev.; Sam Boyd Stadium, TicketMaster.com, (702) 895-3761

AMA RACING AMA Arenacross Championship Series Arenacross.com

Jan. 8-10: Grand Rapids, Mich.; Van Andel Arena, TicketMaster.com, (616) 742-6600 Jan. 15-17: Baltimore, Md.; 1st Mariner Arena, TicketMaster.com, (410) 347-2020 Jan. 22-24: Hampton, Va.; Hampton Coliseum, TicketMaster.com, (757) 838-4203

June 12: Elkland, Pa.: Jeremy Richardson, Miles Mountain; (570) 723-8516;

Sept. 18: Lynnville, Ind.: Kenny Moore, IN, IL, KY Enduro Riders; (812) 549-8385; Blackcoal.org

Jan. 30-31: Kansas City, Mo.; Kemper Arena, TicketMaster.com, (816) 949-7100

AMA Rekluse National Enduro Championship Series, presented by Moose Racing

NATRA; (256) 837-0084; NATRA.DirtRider.net

Feb. 6-7: Tulsa, Okla.; BOK Center, TicketMaster.com, (918) 596-7177

NationalEnduro.com

May 16: Park Hills, Mo.: Michael Silger, Missouri Mudders; (636) 639-6373; MOMudders.com

Jan. 31: Wedgefield, S.C.: Johnny McCoy, SERMA; (803) 481-5169; SERMAClub.com

Feb. 20-21: San Antonio, Texas; Alamo Dome, TicketMaster.com, (800) 884-3663

June 20: Upton, Wyo.: Paul Douglas, Inyan Kara Riders; (307) 468-2840; NationalEnduro.com

Feb. 27-28: Fresno, Calif.; Save Mart Center, TicketMaster.com, (559) 347-3401

Feb. 21: Greensboro, Ga.: Garrett McKey, Cherokee Cycle Club; (678) 231-5858; SETRA.org

July 25: Moorestown, Mich.: Jeff Hunt, Lansing Motorcycle Club; (231) 267-9534

March 5-7: Reno, Nev.; Livestock Event Center, TicketMaster.com, (775) 688-5750

March 4: Daytona Beach, Fla.: Steve Pettenger, Daytona Dirt Riders; (386) 615- 0722

Aug. 15: North Berwich, Maine: Peter Anania, Seacoast Trail Riders; (603) 436-4331; SeacoastTrailRiders.org

March 28: Kalgary, Texas: Kelly Simmons, Lubbock Trail Riders; (806) 548-1260; LubbockTrailRiders.org April 18: West Point, Tenn.: Paul Traufler,

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1138; dezchik111@yahoo.com; Sageriders.com

AMA PRO RACING

AmericanMotorcyclist.com

Oct. 2: Matthews, Ind.: Brent Floyd, Muddobbers MC; brent.floyd@att.net; Muddobbers.org

Feb. 12-14: Youngstown, Ohio; Covelli Center, TicketMaster.com, (330) 746-5600

March 12-14: Council Bluffs, Iowa; Mid America Center, TicketMaster.com, (712) 323-0536 March 20-21: Dayton, Ohio; Ervin J. Nutter Center, TicketMaster.com, (937) 775-2060 March 26-28: Denver, Colo.; Denver Coliseum, TicketMaster.com, (720) 865-4220


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The gift of an AMA Membership helps protect the future of motorcycling and promotes the motorcycle lifestyle. Plus, there are incredible everyday benefits, such as AMA Roadside Assistance, a subscription to American Motorcyclist magazine, and great discounts on riding gear, accessories, lodging, and many other valuable services – all worth far more than the $39 annual membership fee.

So this holiday season, choose an AMA Membership for everyone on your shopping list.

GET INVOLVED

* AMA Roadside Assistance is free when you sign up for online auto-renewal, or when you purchase a 3-year membership. Standard one-year membership is also available.

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January 2010

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Guest Column

Help Your Kids Have The Fun You Had One Rider’s View Of The Lead Law By Davey Coombs

There is a Honda QA50 motorcycle that sits in the lobby of my office. It’s an eBay authentic: all the cherished memories of my very first minicycle from more than 35 years ago, only without the wear and tear from countless laps around the yard. It’s a faux relic of my childhood, spent in a family where motorcycling has always been the tie that binds us together. The only difference between my real first bike and this one is that the original was green and this one is red. And then there’s this sad coincidence: the 1974 antique could end up being the last minicycle my 7-year-old son, Vance, gets if the U.S. government doesn’t do something about the far-reaching Consumer Product Safety Improvement Act of 2008 (CPSIA), otherwise known as the lead-limit law. The idea behind the law was to protect small children from consuming lead by chewing or mouthing metal toys, but somewhere along the way, it grew to include all products for children age 12 and under—including motorcycles and all-terrain vehicles (ATVs). That led motorcycle dealerships across the country to pull youth models and parts from showrooms, just as the spring sales season—a crucial time for an already struggling industry—was upon them. Many of us did not see this coming. What do toddlers chewing on cheap metal toys have to do with responsible 12-year-old dirt-riding enthusiasts? But when the threat was apparent, tens of thousands of motorcycle riders of all ages rallied to seek an exemption for our youth products, writing letters to their representatives and even heading to Washington, D.C., to make their voices heard. The thought of a small child somehow getting into a garage to chew on a motorcycle’s engine cases or suspension components is ridiculous. Turns out the chairman of the Senate committee that provides oversight for the Consumer Product Safety Commission is Sen. Jay Rockefeller of West Virginia. As native West Virginians, my family was able to get a foot in Sen. Rockefeller’s door, along with AMA President Rob Dingman and the AMA’s top man in Washington, VP for Government Relations Ed Moreland. We reminded Sen. Rockefeller that when it comes to ATV accidents involving children, our state has a terrible track record—actually, it’s a roads and hunting-trails record—and the new law would have the reverse effect of its intent, as children unable to ride size-appropriate units would simply take up riding adult-sized ATVs and motorcycles. Add it all up, and a stay of enforcement was issued that allowed dealerships to begin selling youth models again, but only through May 2011. Then it’s on again, and our crippled industry will once more have to stand and fight

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for its very survival, because cutting off the grassroots will have far-reaching effects on everyone. My son and your children are counting on us to allow them the same opportunities to enjoy the safe motorcycle and ATV riding that we enjoyed. Please take the time to contact your lawmakers and ask them to revisit the unintended consequences of the CPSIA. The next time they ban youth motorcycles and ATVs, our kids may never have the chance to grow up the way we did. AMA Charter Life Member Davey Coombs is publisher of Racer X motorcycle publications and a member of the family that promotes the Air Nautiques AMA Amateur Motocross Championships and the AMA Pro Racing MX Nationals. Information for contacting your representatives can be found at AmericanMotorcyclist.com/Rights.


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