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2019

SLCHAMBER.COM

U TA H ’ S P R E M I E R L I F E S T Y L E A N D R E L O C AT I O N G U I D E

QUALITY LIVING

The Utah Way WORK

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CLOSE TO E V E RY T H I N G FA R F R O M O R D I N A RY Shopping, dining, exploring...just a few of the things that are minutes from your City Creek Living home. As your primary home or a vacation retreat, City Creek Living sets you apart from the ordinary and keeps you close to life’s simple pleasures. Visit the City Creek Living sales center to tour our selection of designer homes. 99 West South Temple, Suite 100

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TABLE OF CONTENTS © Image courtesy of Cody Booth @cdtwitchy

LIVE

WORK

GETTING 16 AROUND One of the most

EMPLOYMENT TRENDS 42 Fastest-growing occupations

SCHOOL INTERNATIONAL 52 60 DISTRICTS BUSINESS A new "Team Utah" strategy Utahʼs school system

UTAH'S TOP 25 44 EMPLOYERS Utah's industry & annual

COMMERCIAL 62 REAL ESTATE 54 Utah's commercial real

& median earnings

logical city street plans in the nation

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EXAMINING THE MARKET Utah's extraordinary development to supply the demand

20

HEALING IN UTAH Where Utah sits in the top healthiest states

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TIME OF YOUR LIFE 55-plus active adult communities offer lifestyle & amenities

employment statistics

CEO PROFILE: 46 STEVE STARKS His journey to become the

president of the Utah Jazz

CEO PROFILE: CRYSTAL MAGGELET 48 How Crystal Maggelet saved Flying J from bankruptcy

MADE IN UTAH 50 Inventions made by Utahns

UTAH 24 REGIONS Find a place to live,

PLAY

LEARN

HISTORIC THE BLOCKS SITES 68 84 Discover what's happening Utah has long served in Salt Lake's Cultural Core

for foreign investment

AN ELEVATED EXPERIENCE Higher education in Utah

estate market tells a tale of growth & evolution

WHAT'S 56 TRENDING University of Utah

prepares research that helps Utah prosper

58

SMALL BUSINESS Utah continues to grow with low unemployment & new business startups

TALENT READY UTAH 64 Talent Ready Utah helps build workforce pipeline

STEM STATE 66 OF MIND Utahʼs surging sciences

sectors put principles into real-world learning

as the Crossroads of the West

72 THE MIGHTY 5 Utahʼs five national parks are 86 SKI UTAH best experienced individually, Your guide to the ®

with extra time to wander

Greatest Snow on Earth®

UTAH ROUNDUP 74 10 activities you can

FESTIVALS 88 Get to know our unique

ROAD TRIP 76 Explore Utah with us

EVENT 90 CALENDAR Activities from around

only do in Utah

10 KID FAVORITES 82 The Beehive State isnʼt just

culture

the state

a natural playground, itʼs also a home for children

work, explore, dine & pursue education

PUBLISHED IN PARTNERSHIP WITH

Utah's Premier Lifestyle and Relocation Guide VOLUME XXXIII

PRESIDENT & CEO

Derek Miller

ISSUE 2019

EDITORS Marisa Bomis, Kimberly Flores, Maria Loftis, Mikael Short

BOARD CHAIR

Steve Starks

175 E. University Blvd. (400 S.), Suite 600 Salt Lake City, UT 84111 801-364-3631 | slchamber.com saltlakechamber

slchamber

Salt Lake Chamber

slchamber.com

PRESIDENT & CEO

PUBLISHER

4770 South 5600 West, West Valley, UT 84118 801-204-6300 | utahmediagroup.com

90 South 400 West, Salt Lake City, UT 84121 801-839-1404 | utahbusiness.com

Brent Low

Donnie Welch

EDITORIAL/CREATIVE TEAM Megan Donio, Publication Manager Kristy Kuhn, Editorial Coordinator Russ Judkins, Layout and Design Natalie Reed, Layout and Design

ADVERTISING SALES Justin Dunkley COVER PHOTO Autumn Light by Charlie M. Lansche

CONTENT PROVIDED BY CBRE, Inc., Downtown Alliance, FJ Management, Governor's Office of Economic Development, Ivory Homes, Kem C. Gardner Policy Institute, Larry H. Miller Group of Companies, Salt Lake City Arts Council, Salt Lake Chamber, Salt Lake Home Builders Association, Ski Utah, Small Business Association of Utah, STEM Action Center, Talent Ready Utah, Utah Department of Heritage and Arts, Utah Department of Workforce Services, Utah Hospital Association, Utah Media Group, Utah Office of Outdoor Recreation, Utah Office of Tourism, Utah State Board of Education (USOE), Utah System of Higher Education (USHE), Visit Salt Lake, World Trade Center of Utah (WTC Utah). *Images provided by the Salt Lake Chamber and Getty Images unless otherwise stated. Regional business data provided by jobs.utah.gov. County data provided by Scarborough Research R2, 2018. County employment data provided by data.bls.gov. Life in Utah is an official and yearly publication of the Salt Lake Chamber and is distributed throughout Utah. Copyright ©2019 by the Salt Lake Chamber. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced in any format without consent of the Salt Lake Chamber. We make every effort to ensure the accuracy of the information in this publication. The Salt Lake Chamber, Utah Media Group and Utah Business magazine assume no liability for errors, inaccuracies or omissions. All critical information should be independently verified. Utah Media Group and Utah Business are proud to produce the Salt Lake Chamber’s official relocation magazine with a title that reflects its extended scope: Life in Utah.

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LIFE IN UTAH 2019 | SLCHAMBER.com


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WELCOME TO

West. der, ber one is alive c we

Utah

ants, onder

allow Utah e our

ess is a of its

Congratulations, you have just uncovered the gem of the West. Countless media outlets, including Forbes, Business Insider, Bloomberg and CNBC, have recognized Utah as a number one business destination, a place where the American Dream is alive and well. And, while I like to brag about Utah’s economic success, I am even more proud of the work-life balance we continue to achieve. With world-class outdoor recreation opportunities, Welcome to Utah! vibrant cities, nationally renowned restaurants, budding artists and a diverse cultural heritage, it is no wonder Congratulations, you have just uncovered the gem of the West. Utah is one of the fastest-growing states in the nation. Countless media outlets, including Forbes, Business Insider, Bloomberg, and CNBC, have recognized Utah as a number one

Our sound fiscal policies and business-friendly attitudes allow business destination, a place where the American dream is alive Utah toAnd, remain unparalleled land of opportunity. We believe and well. whilean I like to brag about Utah’s economic success, I am even more proud of thethrive work-life balance our residents and businesses when weweallow them the to achieve. With to world-class outdoor recreationUtah’s success is a flcontinue exibility they need succeed. Ultimately, opportunities, vibrant cities, nationally renowned restaurants, testament to and thea industriousness, foresight and ingenuity of its budding artists, diverse cultural heritage, it is no wonder residents. Utah is one of the fastest growing states in the nation.

e, manufacturing, and Our sound fiscaltourism, policies business-friendly attitudes Utah When Utahns aren'tand working in ouraerospace thrivingallow tech, finance, to remain an unparalleled land of opportunity. We sectors, believe ourthey can be manufacturing, tourism and aerospace on a day spent thewhen Greatest Snow on residents skiing and businesses thrive we allow them the found living Life Elevated®. Envision a day spent skiing the flexibility they need to succeed. Ultimately, Utah’s success is a Greatest Snow on Earth® foresight, or backpacking through testament toParks. the industriousness, and ingenuity of its one of Utah’s ive ® National Mighty residents. Five National Parks. ®

Chances are, since you’ve picked up Life in Utah, you’ve already figured out there’s something special about this place. Whether you’re here for a quick trip or considering Utah as your new home, it won’t take long for you to realize that our state is unlike any other. With the most geologically diverse landscape in the country, Utah has something for everyone. From our famous sandstone arches and red rock canyons of southern Utah, to the Bonneville Salt Flats and the powder-covered mountains of northern Utah, where you can find some of the very best skiing on the Greatest Snow on Earth®, the Beehive State offers just about every outdoor experience you can imagine. We’re not just known for our beautiful landscape and recreational opportunities, Utah also boasts the number one economy in the country and is known as the best state for business. The Salt Lake Chamber is working to ensure Utah continues to be the strongest economy in the nation. We are also committed to being a welcoming, inclusive and caring community. That’s why we’ve created the Life in Utah magazine, to give you a taste of what makes Utah so unique.

No matter how long you plan to stay, we want you to know you Life Utaharen't magazine will youtech, a better into Utah’s are welcome here. Come join us and find out what makes Utah Whenin Utahns working in ourgive thriving finance,look manufacturing, tourism, and aerospace ® . Envision a day spent skiing the Greatest Snow on sectors, they and can becultural found living Life Elevated economic landscape. Stories cover everything from the best state to live, work, learn and play. Earth ® or backpacking through one of Utah’s Mighty Five ® National Parks. global business ventures to the details of what it is like to live, work, andmagazine do business in you Utah. Life in Utah will give a better look into Utah’s economic and cultural landscape. Stories

ah’s economic and cultural landscape. Stories tails of what it is like to live, work, and do

cover everything from global business ventures to the details of what it is like to live, work, and do

Itbusiness is time to plan a visit to Utah — you won’t want to leave once in Utah. you are here.

Sincerely,

It is time to plan a visit to Utah—you won’t want to leave once you are here.

Sincerely, Sincerely,

e once you are here. Gary R. Herbert

Gary R. Herbert Governor Governor of Utah

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Derek B. Miller President and CEO Salt Lake Chamber


Now I can ski!

Maleah knows she can do anything she puts her mind to. Since becoming part of the Shriners Hospitals for Children family at 11 months old, she’s received the surgeries, custom-fit prosthetics and social and emotional support needed to overcome her limb difference and follow her dreams. Shriners Hospitals for Children — Salt Lake City has been changing the lives of children like Maleah since 1925 through state-of-the-art pediatric orthopaedic care. Services include inpatient and outpatient surgery; physical, occupational and speech therapy; custom wheelchairs; orthotics and prosthetics; outpatient clinics; low radiation imaging and a motion analysis center. All care is provided regardless of a patient’s ability to pay. Learn more at ShrinersSLC.org.


RESOURCE GUIDE Map of Utah

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WELCOME TO

UTAH

the University of Utah, Utah Valley University and Utah State University. There are also 21 private universities and colleges, including Brigham Young University and Westminster College, as well as several vocational trade schools from which to choose.

T

ake a minute to look around and soak it all in. That view — the epic wall of mountains towering over the valley is the icing on the cake known as Utah. Whether you are looking to move here or are just visiting, these landscapes are yours to savor — compliments of the Beehive State.

LIVE Sure, it has the views, from Utah’s towering mountains to the scenic overlooks and epic vistas of five national parks, there is much to behold. For those who call Utah home, the state offers so much more. In 2018, Utah was ranked as the fourth safest in the nation in a report by WalletHub. And, according to U.S. News and World Report, Salt Lake City, the state’s capital, is the #15 best place to live in the USA. That ranking came, in part, because of the quality health care Utah residents enjoy. There’s a plethora of top-notch hospitals and medical facilities in the state, including the University of Utah’s nationally ranked Ear, Nose and Throat specialty and the Huntsman Cancer Institute, both of which were ranked in the nationwide top 50 for their specialty services. If you’re a newcomer, Utah has a street system that’s set up on a grid so it’s easy to navigate. There’s also a comprehensive public transportation system that includes light rail, buses and a commuter rail system that runs through three different counties along an 89-mile corridor extending to the north and south of downtown Salt Lake City.

WORK That transportation system makes getting to work a breeze. Workers in Utah enjoy some of the shortest and easiest commutes in the country. And the number of jobs in the state is increasing at a steady pace.

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PLAY

According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, Utah’s economy added nearly 55,000 jobs between August 2017 and August 2018, making it first in the nation in job growth. If you’re an engineer or other techknowledge worker, you’re in especially high demand, thanks to Utah’s Silicon Slopes, a technology epicenter located in Salt Lake and Utah counties. The multitude of tech startups and the constant need for skilled workers means you can get in on the ground floor with some hot companies. Other top industries in Utah are aerospace and defense, health technology, sporting goods, natural products, renewable resources, and tourism.

COST OF LIVING Even though Utah is the top state in terms of job growth, residents still enjoy a decent cost of living. Although housing prices have risen in recent years, those costs are somewhat offset by a lower cost of living in other areas. In 2017, the Salt Lake Tribune, citing a report from the Tax Foundation, wrote, “Utahns are 3 percent richer than their incomes suggest.” Basically, for $100, Utah residents can purchase goods and services that would cost $103.09 in a state where prices are at the level of the national average.

LEARN Utah is the perfect place for lifelong learning: the state boasts eight public universities and colleges in the Utah System of Higher Education, including

People in Utah know how to have fun. The state is essentially one big outdoor playground. There are 14 ski resorts, five national parks and seven national monuments at your disposal. If there’s an outdoor adventure you want to try (outside of surfing), you can likely do it here: hike, bike, rock climb, ski, camp, boat, fish, kayak, river raft, snowmobile, snowshoe, hang glide and more. If you’d rather spend your time in the city, surrounded by bright lights, enjoying some shopping, dining and culture, downtown Salt Lake City has you covered. The city offers a multitude of places to dine, from fine cuisine to more casual eateries. Despite what you might think, there are plenty of places to quench your thirst: the city has multiple cocktail bars and a whopping 10 breweries within a 6-mile stretch. Salt Lake City is one of the few cities in the nation to still boast an opera, a symphony and a ballet company. Every summer, the city also hosts top-notch artists and musicians in downtown Salt Lake City at the Utah Arts Festival.

CLIMATE For the most part, Utah has four distinct seasons. Autumn boasts pleasant, moderate temperatures, and canyons that seem to be ablaze with fall colors. Winter is cold, but often sunny, and most of the snow stays in the mountains, making for perfect ski conditions. Spring is unpredictable: it can be warm and sunny one minute with snow flurries the next. Summer is warm, dry and perfect! So, whether you’re here to visit or here to stay: Welcome to Utah — where we work hard and play harder. We’re glad you’re here!

© Image courtesy of Cody Booth @cdtwitchy


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G etting Arou n d IN SALT LAKE

© Image courtesy of Downtown Alliance

SALT LAKE HAS ONE OF THE MOST LOGICAL AND EASY-TO-NAVIGATE CITY STREET PLANS IN THE NATION

O

ne of the first tasks Brigham Young and his Mormon followers undertook upon settling in Salt Lake was to design what would become one of the most logical and easy-tonavigate city street plans in the nation. The grid system — featuring 132-foot-wide streets, wide enough that a wagon team could turn around — allows for simple navigation throughout Utah’s capital city and throughout the Salt Lake Valley. In keeping with that original plan, there are now numerous ways to move along, and throughout, the Wasatch Front. Salt Lake’s streets are some of the easiest to navigate if you have a basic understanding of the grid system and a rudimentary appreciation of direction. The epicenter of all street coordinates is at Temple Square, from which numeric addresses emanate east, west, north and south. If you can remember the towering Wasatch Mountains are to the east, you’re set. Of course, there are some streets with names such as Redwood Road and University Avenue, as well as the local vernacular of shortening streets such as 900 South or 1100 East to 9th South and 11th East, but you’ll quickly figure out where the named streets are and come to appreciate the abbreviated directional numbers. Once you have the basic understanding of the grid system down, the next step is deciding what mode of transportation best

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suits your travel needs, be it an automobile, train, bicycle, scooter or walking. Driving your personal vehicle is easy, but it’s important to note that Salt Lake, as well as other communities along the Wasatch Front, has taken great strides in developing a fantastic mass transit system, the use of which is critical for the long-term wellbeing of locals and visitors alike, especially considering the projected growth of the Salt Lake Valley.

BUS/RAIL The Utah Transit Authority operates a comprehensive bus route throughout the valley that complements its ever-growing TRAX light rail system. If you haven’t utilized TRAX, do yourself a favor and hop on the next time you’re heading downtown, to the airport, the University of Utah or any other high-traffic destination. The impetus of UTA’s now-expansive TRAX network was Salt Lake City’s hosting of the 2002 Olympic Winter Games; its overwhelming success and ridership has necessitated new lines being developed. One of the most anticipated — and now appreciated — TRAX lines is the one running to the Salt Lake City International Airport. The ride takes just 20 minutes from downtown and for a relatively low fare, the green line eliminates the airport parking exercise and its fees. For those needing to travel further north and south, UTA’s FrontRunner commuter

rail runs the length of the Wasatch Front, allowing passengers to travel from Provo in the south, to Ogden up north. FrontRunner stations connect seamlessly with UTA’s TRAX lines and buses, allowing passengers to travel effortlessly along its 70-mile route. Visit rideuta.com for information on routes for all UTA mass transit options.

BICYCLES There are many options to help you get around Salt Lake's 19 unique neighborhoods. For most of the year, bicycles are a fantastic option, with a concerted effort to improve and continually enhance the cycling experience via designated bike lanes and paths. In the downtown area, GREENbike SLC is a fun, affordable and simple way to get around. GREENbike SLC is a bike-sharing program for locals and visitors that provides an alternative and emission-free transportation option for getting around town. There are 34 stations strategically placed in popular areas. GREENbike is a membership-based program where members can take any bike from any station as often as they like for a small fee. Memberships options range from 24 hours to a year and allow unlimited 30-minute trips. Simply undock a bike, ride it to your destination and dock it at a GREENbike station within 30 minutes. For more information on GREENbike SLC, visit greenbikeslc.org


SCOOTER One of the newest, and rapidly expanding, transportation options introduced in Salt Lake City is electric scooters. If you’ve been downtown, you’ve likely noticed the latest transportation trend to hit the streets. Like many other places, electric scooters have descended upon the Beehive State and they’re creating quite a buzz. Two companies, Lime and Bird, have deployed hundreds of ready-to-ride scooters at convenient locations around the city. Since they don’t need to be docked and locked, there’s always one nearby — an advantage over transit options like bike sharing and TRAX light rail. Download the appropriate app to your smartphone to see a map of available scooters near you. From there, you just scan the code and you’re on your way. Upon arrival at your destination, simply leave your scooter on the sidewalk for the next person looking for a ride. Don’t forget to “complete” your ride in the app.

Whether you’re going a few blocks or a few miles, scooters have proven to be a quick, fun, cost-effective and environmentallyfriendly way to get around. Starting at just $1 a ride, they’re perfect for short- to medium-distance trips where hoofing it on foot is a bit too long, but a ride-sharing app like Lyft or Uber is overkill. Pairing a scooter ride with another mode of transportation, like driving or TRAX, makes downtown navigation even easier. Instead of driving in circles, searching for a parking spot near that new restaurant everyone’s clamoring to check out, just park where it’s convenient and then enjoy a fun scooter ride the rest of the way. Like all fun things, both GREENbikes and electric scooters should be enjoyed responsibly. Sidewalks are for pedestrian traffic only, so do your cruising in bike lanes, or in the road close to the curb. Bikes and scooters can move quickly and are virtually silent, so they can be hard for cars to see.

Follow all traffic rules and remember that cars will win out over bikes and scooters every time. All riders must be 18 years or older with a valid driver’s license and should always wear a helmet.

WALKING Then, of course, there’s the simplest of all modes of transportation: walking. Assuming your destination is relatively close, Salt Lake’s clean, safe and wide sidewalks make a stroll easy and enjoyable. Just remember that during the winter months sidewalks can be a bit slippery, so take precaution, button up and enjoy a brisk walk; rarely is it so cold that a 10 to 15-minute walk in Salt Lake isn’t doable. Plus, you’ll likely see some sights that others miss along the way, such as excellent street art, beautiful architecture, or the stunningly awesome Wasatch and Oquirrh mountains that embrace and envelop Salt Lake.

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EXAMIN NG THE MARKET UTAH HAS ENJOYED EXTRAORDINARY DEVELOPMENT

H

ousing shortages have been a national problem over the last decade, particularly in high growth states. Utah has enjoyed extraordinary development, often leading the way, but this growth has placed pressure on both affordability and on our builders’ ability to meet market demand. Since 2011, Utah’s households have expanded to 158,100. At the same time, only 114,600 new housing units were created. This shortfall of 43,500 dwelling units hasn’t occurred in Utah for decades. The recent deficit is a direct result of factors such as labor shortages, rising interest rates, opponents of development and threats of trade wars. The state’s population of 3.2 million residents is estimated to surpass 5 million by 2050, suggesting long-term issues are facing our citizens should nothing be done. Utah citizens and local leaders have proven to be forward-thinking in dealing with problems facing our communities on many fronts. They know that when housing units fall short of demand, the cost of housing outpaces wages. The current housing appreciation is beating wages by a multiple of ten. This imbalance stifles economic growth as new businesses want their employees to be vested in their communities, which often means owning a home. Notable solutions are coming from groups such as the “Housing Gap Coalition,” governed by the Salt Lake Chamber; the development of a “Trades School,” championed by the Salt Lake Home Builders Association; and resident surveys, done by the Utah League of Cities and Towns, to find the causes of anxiety around growth. Additionally, elected officials with a background in business and construction are

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championing legislation that aims to remove governmental interference. Early indications suggest the efforts are taking hold. The expectation for 2019 is that the number of new housing units will match the growth of households. It is important to note that a healthy construction market is one where the number of new housing units created exceeds growth. The hope is that this goal — of new housing units exceeding growth — will occur in time for our millennial population to realize they can participate in homeownership here in Utah. It’s important to have leaders address not only affordability, but other critical needs as well: such as ensuring walkable, vibrant communities, clean air, mass transit and designing subdivisions with shared amenities. Affordability, while critical, is only one aspect of creating neighborhoods that can be fully enjoyed by residents. The primary concern is meeting market demands by presenting housing that is satisfactory. The idea of what constitutes satisfactory housing is also being challenged by these same groups as they are working with municipalities to help elected officials approve housing on smaller lots. Priorities are changing, and future residents of new construction want maintenance-free living without the burden of large lots. Walkable neighborhoods with common, park-like open space will make up for the wasted, unused areas of larger lots. After all, with the world’s greatest outdoors practically at our doorstep, most Utah residents want to spend their free time outside — hiking, biking, skiing or hang gliding. Come enjoy the beautiful outdoors and join us in our forward-thinking Utah living. © Images courtesy of Ivory Homes

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WE’RE LOCAL. WE’RE GLOBAL.® UTAH’S RELOCATION EXPERTS

FREE AREA TOURS | COMFORTABLE MOVES IN AND OUT OF UTAH Working with Windermere Real Estate, you can count on a quality, local, real estate experience, as well as global marketing reach and access to top real estate professionals in any market. Our memberships connect us to 565 top-quality real estate companies in over 80 countries that are prepared to market your property or help you buy or sell with confidence. Visit www.windermere.com to see current listings or find an agent near you. Or call 801-435-3151 for more information.

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© Image courtesy of University of Utah Health

HEALING IN U AH

T

he state of Utah is known as a leader in health care delivery in the United States, and for good reason. Consistently ranked among the top 10 healthiest states, Utah is home to several outstanding hospital systems, including Intermountain Healthcare, Steward Health Care, MountainStar Healthcare and University of Utah Health. Additionally, the VA Salt Lake City Health Care System, Shriners Hospital for Children, several rehabilitation and specialty hospitals, as well as a variety of substance abuse/psychiatric facilities and county mental health clinics, provide a full continuum of health care services across the state.

A HISTORY OF HEALING The first efforts to provide health care services in Utah were tied to faith-based organizations including the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, Roman Catholic Church and Episcopal Church. As the state grew from its establishment in 1847 as a home for the displaced Latter-day Saints to a center of commerce, mining and railroad interests, the need for health care services skyrocketed. In 1872, St. Mark’s Hospital was opened by Episcopal Bishop Rev. Daniel S. Tuttle, offering six beds, one physician and a small staff of all-male nurses. St. Mark’s was the first hospital in the Utah Territory. Holy Cross Hospital, now known as Salt Lake Regional Medical Center, was opened in 1875 by the Sisters of the Holy Cross. LDS Hospital, opened in 1905, was 22

LIFE IN UTAH 2019 | SLCHAMBER.com

funded by donations from philanthropist W.H. Groves and the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. Utah’s 48 community hospitals report more than 8.4 million outpatient visits and 239,000 inpatient admissions annually. Additionally, Utah hospitals welcomed nearly 49,000 newborns in 2016. Utah’s hospitals are a significant contributor to local economies across the state and are often the largest employer in a community. In 2016, hospitals employed nearly 47,000 Utahns. Intermountain Healthcare, based in Salt Lake City, is the largest private employer in the state.

A LEGACY OF HEALTH Utah’s many recreational offerings provide ample opportunity for pursuing an active, healthy lifestyle. In 2017, Utah was rated the 4th healthiest state in the U.S. by America’s Health Rankings, an annual report prepared by United Health Foundation. Utah was recognized for the lowest prevalence of smoking, physical inactivity and cancer deaths in the country. Additionally, CNBC rated Utah 9th overall in its “Well-being” ranking for 2017. Many of Utah’s hospitals have received national recognition for innovation, safety and quality. Nine hospitals received an “A” rating in the Leapfrog Group’s Hospital Safety Grade Report for Spring 2018. Several are also regulars on the IBM Watson Health 100 Top Hospitals ranking.

ABOUT THE MAJOR UTAH HEALTH CARE SYSTEMS Intermountain Healthcare is a Utah-based, not-for-profit system of 23 hospitals, 170 clinics, a medical group and health plan. Intermountain Healthcare was established in 1974 when the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints divested itself of its 15 hospitals. A new, separate entity was created, committed to operating the hospitals as nonprofit institutions focused on serving the community’s needs. Founded in 2006, MountainStar Healthcare is an integrated system of hospitals, physician clinics and outpatient centers located along the Wasatch Front. The system is a division of HCA, one of the world’s leading providers of health care services. MountainStar operates eight hospitals in Utah. Steward Health Care is the largest private, for-profit, physician-led health care network in the United States. Headquartered in Dallas, Texas, Steward operates 36 hospitals in the United States and the country of Malta. Steward owns and operates five facilities in Utah. University of Utah Health is the Mountain West's only academic health care system, providing care for Utahns and residents of five surrounding states in a referral area encompassing more than 10 percent of the continental United States. The system operates four hospitals and 12 community clinics. A listing of hospitals in Utah, including directions and phone numbers, can be found on the Utah Hospital Association website: utahhospitals.org

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TIME

F YOUR LIFE!

UTAH’S 55-PLUS ACTIVE ADULT COMMUNITIES OFFER LIFESTYLE & AMENITIES

Y

our children are grown, you’re at the peak of your career, you’ve made sacrifices over the years and now it’s your turn. You’re eyeing the next phase of your life with eager anticipation: you have a bucket list waiting, and you finally have the time and the means to jump headlong into the adventure that awaits. If you’re a young-at-heart member of the 55-plus population and seeking a community of like-minded peers that offers both the freedom and the lifestyle you deserve, Utah has just the community for you.

LOCATION The northern portion of the state, including Salt Lake County and Utah County, is home to several communities geared specifically toward active adults over 55. Start here if you want to be near the arts and culture of downtown Salt Lake City and still have easy access to the skiing, hiking and other recreational activities afforded by the Wasatch Mountains. You’ll also be minutes away from the Salt Lake City International Airport, a major hub for Delta Airlines, so those longawaited international trips will be quicker and easier than you ever imagined.

24

LIFE IN UTAH 2019 | SLCHAMBER.com

St. George, in southern Utah, is another popular location for active adults over 55, largely due to its warmer temperatures. The weather is perfect for year-round enjoyment of the eight nearby golf courses and miles of hiking and biking trails. Zion National Park is also less than an hour’s drive away. St. George has its own airport and is home to three active adult communities.

PRICE

Play a round of billiards then catch up with friends and neighbors at a community barbecue. Or simply take some time to catch up on your reading while lounging poolside. Whatever your interests, there’s a community that’s just right for you. You’ve spent a lot of years honoring your commitments to everyone else, now it’s your turn — take a look at Utah’s many 55-plus active adult communities and see what opportunities await.

Whether you’re looking to downsize into a modest empty-nest-style abode or looking to build the home you could only dream about in your younger years, there’s a community that’s just right for you. Utah’s active adult communities boast a broad range of sizes and prices to fit every need and budget. You can build a new home starting in the low $200s, or buy a pre-existing home starting in the high $100s — the sky is the limit from there.

SALT LAKE AREA

AMENITIES

• Stirling Pointe at Skye Estates (Highland)

Many active adult communities operate under a homeowner’s association, so you can ditch the yardwork in favor of more fun and active pursuits. In addition to the recreation afforded by the surrounding mountains, cities and national parks, each community offers a wealth of activities and amenities all its own. Get the blood pumping with some on-site tennis, racquetball, aerobics or golf.

• Bridlewood Villas (West Jordan) • Brookhaven Villas (Lehi) • Crescent Heights (Sandy) • Garden Park at Daybreak (South Jordan) • Granite View Estates (American Fork) • Harvest Villas (South Jordan) • Heritage Village (Payson) • Springhouse Village (South Jordan) • Sunset Park Villas (Syracuse) • The Gardens at Ivory Ridge (Lehi) • The Village at Bingham Point (West Valley) • Willow Park Villas (Lehi) ST. GEORGE AREA • BRIO • Entrada at Snow Canyon Country Club • SunRiver St. George

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Ivo uni Ho


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WELCOME TO

NORTHERN UTAH

T

he Bear River Region’s flagship city has been repeatedly named as one of the top five college towns in America. Logan City is home to the Utah State University Aggies. Visitors and residents love the city for many reasons: the friendly people, career opportunities, weather, public transportation and its lively cultural scene.

PROMINENT CITIES BRIGHAM CITY

Summer high 91° Winter low 16° MORGAN

Summer high 88° Winter low 11°

LOGAN

Summer high 88° Winter low 11°

TREMONTON

Summer high 88° Winter low 17°

While college towns traditionally feature a variety of cultural offerings, Logan City steps it up a notch: each summer the city features a five-week run of opera and Broadway-style musical theatre. Attendees have compared the performance and production quality of the Utah Festival Opera & Musical Theatre shows to those found in New York. Two more reasons visitors and residents love the Logan City: its location and access to outdoor activities — there’s even a freshwater lake just a short drive away.

EXPLORE American Heritage West Center

Brigham City Peach Festival

Annual festival in September to celebrate the city’s peach harvest

Bear Lake

Hardware Ranch

Freshwater lake straddling the Utah-Idaho border stateparks.utah.gov

Bear River Migratory Bird Refuge

Refuge offers bird watching via a walking trail and an auto trail fws.gov

boxelderchamber.com

Enjoy a wagon ride and view wild elk wildlife.utah.gov

Logan Canyon Scenic Drive

Scenery-filled drive that takes you from Logan to Bear Lake fhwa.dot.gov/byways/byways/2001

Old Lyric Repertory Company

Utah State University’s performing arts theater lyricrep.usu.edu

Utah Festival Opera & Musical Theatre

5-week summer festival of opera and Broadway-style musical theatre utahfestival.org

Wind Caves

Popular, moderately difficult 3.5-mile hike in Logan Canyon © Image courtesy of Cody Booth @cdtwitchy

26

Fishing is great year-round, but you can also boat, swim, lounge on the beach, enjoy a scenic hike or even play a round of golf. In early August, the annual Raspberry Days festival provides fun for the entire family while celebrating the much-anticipated harvest. Pick up some raspberry jam or a shake made with the tart, red berry that’s coveted statewide.

Smithson used 6,000 tons of black basalt rock and earth to create the black, spiraling coil that sits at 1,500feet long and 15-feet wide. It’s so epic it can be viewed from both the sky and the ground, but only if the level of the saltwater lake is low enough.

About 100 miles to the southwest is another lake — a saltwater lake boasting a unique piece of art that’s sure to impress. The Spiral Jetty, a larger-than-life earthwork crafted right in the bed of the Great Salt Lake, was created by sculptor Robert Smithson in 1970.

SAVOR

Living history museum located in Cache Valley awhc.org

Bear Lake, which straddles the Utah-Idaho border, is known as the “Caribbean of the Rockies” for its vibrant, turquoise-blue water.

LIFE IN UTAH 2019 | SLCHAMBER.com

Aggie Ice Cream

Ice Cream, Frozen Yogurt 750 N 1200 E, Logan

Angie’s

American, Traditional 690 N Main, Logan

Caffe Ibis

Coffee, Tea, Breakfast 52 Federal Ave, Logan

© Image courtesy of Cody Booth @cdtwitchy

Cafe Sabor

Le Nonne

600 W Center Street, Logan

129 N 100 E, Logan

Latin American

Italian

Herm’s Inn

Lucky Slice Pizza

1435 E Canyon Road, Logan

64 Federal Ave, Logan

Breakfast, Brunch Idle Isle Café

American, Traditional

24 S Main Street, Brigham City

Pizza, Vegan

Tandoori Oven

Indian, Pakistani

720 E 1000 N, Logan


EXPLORE. SAVOR. GROW

© Image courtesy of Cody Booth @cdtwitchy

GROW BUSINESS

HOSPITALS

Autoliv ASP

Motor vehicle parts manufacturing Browning

Sales of sporting and recreational goods ConService

Utility billing, equipment and maintenance Gossner Foods

Cheese/dairy production and sales

Bear River Valley Hospital

Intermountain Healthcare 905 N 1000 W, Tremonton

Brigham City Community Hospital

MountainStar Healthcare

950 Medical Dr, Brigham City Cache Valley Hospital

MountainStar Healthcare 2380 N 400 E, North Logan

Logan Regional Hospital

Intermountain Healthcare 500 E 1400 N, Logan

Hyclone Laboratories

Pharmaceutical preparation manufacturing

HIGHER EDUCATION

ICON Health & Fitness, Inc.

Manufacturer of fitness equipment

Utah State University

Inovar

Old Main Hill, Logan

Electronic manufacturing

Nationally recognized research university Bridgerland Technical College

North Eastern Services

Post-secondary educational institution of Utah College of Applied Technlogy

Northrop Grumman Innovation Systems

1301 N 600 W, Logan

Social services

Production of military flight systems Pepperidge Farms

Production of cookies, crackers and breads Procter & Gamble

Manufacturer of paper products Schreiber Foods

Cheese manufacturing Space Dynamics Laboratory

Research and development

Thermo-Fisher Scientific

Biotechnology, laboratory equipment © Image courtesy of Cody Booth @cdtwitchy

COUNTY DATA CHART COUNTY

POPULATION

MEDIAN AGE

HOMEOWNERS

EMPLOYMENT

MEDIAN INCOME

MEDIAN HOUSING

BOX ELDER

38,514

44

81.39%

97.1%

$72,100

$202,010

82,626

28

45.79%

97.4%

$46,339

$204,609

241

70

100%

97.3%

$22,500

$175,000

6,577

63

100%

97.3%

$69,489

$392,465

CACHE RICH MORGAN

*Scarborough Research, R2 2018 based off of adults 18+ and Bureau of Labor Statistics (data.bls.gov)

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WELCOME TO

WASATCH FRONT NORTH

T

he Salt Lake Valley — Salt Lake City and its suburbs — sits nestled between two mountain ranges, the Wasatch and the Oquirrh. These majestic peaks, towering above the valley below, are one of the first things visitors notice. Outside of their stunning beauty, the mountains serve a functional purpose: they offer boundless outdoor adventures just minutes away from the city.

PROMINENT CITIES OGDEN

Summer high 90° Winter low 20° SALT LAKE CITY

Summer high 90° Winter low 26°

SANDY

Summer high 95° Winter low 22° WEST VALLEY CITY

Summer high 93° Winter low 23°

Want to spend the morning hiking before heading off to work? Not a problem. How about a heart-pumping bike ride through canyons cloaked in the fiery colors of autumn? Absolutely! Or, maybe you want to spend an afternoon skiing the Greatest Snow on Earth®. No problem: the mighty Wasatch Mountains host four ski resorts in this region alone. Newcomers are usually surprised at how quickly and easily you can go from a day on the slopes to nightlife in downtown Salt Lake City, the state

EXPLORE Abravanel Hall

Architectural landmark and home to the Utah Symphony artsaltlake.org

Ballet West

American ballet company in downtown Salt Lake City balletwest.org

Clark Planetarium

Planetarium in downtown Salt Lake slco.org/clark-planetarium

of the performances by the city’s opera, symphony or ballet companies: Salt Lake is one of the few major cities that still have all three.

Want to catch a film? Salt Lake City has two local, independent cinema houses showing first-run, foreign and indie films, plus a host of Megaplex theaters that are known for some of the nation’s largest midnight movie premieres. And, at the end of January, downtown theaters host several movie screenings for the Sundance Film Festival. If you’re in the mood for art or culture, there are multiple art galleries and live performances from which to choose. On many nights, there’s a Broadway play in town. You can also take in one

SAVOR Hikes

Bonneville Shoreline Trail, Ensign Peak, The Living Room Hike Hogle Zoo

42-acre zoo in Salt Lake City featuring more than 800 animals hoglezoo.org

Lagoon Amusement Park

Privately owned amusement park located in Davis County

lagoonpark.com

Salt Lake Film Society

First-run foreign and indie films saltlakefilmsociety.org

Utah Museum of Fine Arts

Museum at the University of Utah featuring rotating works of art umfa.utah.edu

Utah Opera

Opera company in downtown Salt Lake utahopera.org

28

capital and urban center. Savor some fine dining or cocktails, then take your pick from a multitude of options for evening fun: premium shopping, a Utah Jazz basketball game, a football game at the University of Utah, or take in some live music at one of the many venues featuring both local and national touring acts.

LIFE IN UTAH 2019 | SLCHAMBER.com

Bombay House

Indian

2731 E Parleys Wy, Salt Lake Caffé Molise

Italian, Wine Bar

404 S West Temple, Salt Lake Campos Coffee

Coffee, Café

228 S Edison St, Salt Lake

Log Haven

Sawadee Utah Thai

6451 E Millcreek Canyon Rd, Salt Lake

754 E South Temple St, Salt Lake

American, dinner only

Thai

Pie Pizzeria

Whiskey Street

1320 E 200 S, Salt Lake

323 S Main St, Salt Lake

Pizza,vegan, gluten-free

Lounge, Gastropub

Red Iguana

Zest Kitchen & Bar

736 W North Temple, Salt Lake

275 S 200 W, Salt Lake

Mexican

Vegan, Cocktails


EXPLORE. SAVOR. GROW

GROW BUSINESS

HOSPITALS

ARUP Laboratories

Laboratory research and development Black Diamond

Outdoor equipment manufacturing Boeing

Design and manufacturer of airplanes, rockets, satellites and missiles Delta Air Lines

Intermountain Medical Center

Intermountain Healthcare 5121 Cottonwood St, Murray

Huntsman Cancer Institute

University of Utah Hospital

1950 Circle of Hope Dr, Salt Lake Primary Children’s Hospital

University of Utah Hospital

100 Mario Capecchi Dr, Salt Lake

Airline hub in Salt Lake City

University of Utah Hospital

Goldman Sachs

University of Utah Hospital

Hill Air Force Base

U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs

Global investment banking, securities and investment firm

50 N Medical Dr, Salt Lake VA Hospital

500 Foothill Dr, Salt Lake

Major U.S. Air Force base Instructure

Educational technology company Intermountain Healthcare

Health care provider

HIGHER EDUCATION University of Utah

Public research university

201 Presidents Circle, Salt Lake

L3 Technologies

Manufacturer of systems for military and commercial aviation Lifetime Products

Manufacturer of sporting and athletic goods Merit Medical Systems

Medical equipment and supplies manufacturing Pluralsight

Specializes in online professional learning Rio Tinto Kennecott

Production of raw and industrial minerals

Weber State University

Public university

3848 Harrison Blvd, Ogden Westminster College

Private liberal arts college 1840 S 1300 E, Salt Lake

Salt Lake Community College

Utah’s largest two-year college

4600 S Redwood Rd, Salt Lake

Davis Technical College

Public technical college 550 E 300 S, Kaysville

Ogden-Weber Technical College

Public technical college

200 Washington Blvd, Ogden

COUNTY DATA CHART COUNTY

POPULATION

MEDIAN AGE

HOMEOWNERS

EMPLOYMENT

MEDIAN INCOME

MEDIAN HOUSING

WEBER

108,657

41

77.77%

96.6%

$50,590

$216,998

238,684

46

78.23%

97.1%

$77,217

$290,419

825,378

42

65.12%

97%

$62,835

$313,768

DAVIS SALT LAKE

*Scarborough Research, R2 2018 based off of adults 18+ and Bureau of Labor Statistics (data.bls.gov)

LIVE


WELCOME TO

WASATCH FRONT SOUTH

U

tah County, the most populous county of this region, lies less than 40 minutes south of the state capital. As you enter the county, looking west, you’ll see the shores of Utah Lake. Glance to the east and you can’t miss the towering, majestic wall of Mount Timpanogos — the second highest peak in the Wasatch Range. Beautiful Mount Timpanogos — affectionately called “Timp” by locals — is one of the most popular mountain hikes in the state. There are two long, rugged trails leading to its stunning peak.

PROMINENT CITIES OREM

TOOELE

PROVO

NEPHI

Summer high 92° Winter low 20° Summer high 94° Winter low 22°

Summer high 92° Winter low 22° Summer high 89° Winter low 20°

Another, shorter paved hike leads to the naturally-formed Timpanogos Cave. Although the hike is short, it’s strenuous, climbing more than 1,000 feet in 1.5 miles. During the warmer months, guided tours take visitors on a journey through the cool, colorful caverns full of geological wonders.

EXPLORE Bonneville Salt Flats

Expanse of densely packed salt on the western edge of the Great Salt Lake blm.gov

Covey Center for the Arts

Performing arts theater in Provo provo.org/community

making it the perfect location for auto racing and other similar activities. Many land speed records have been set at the Bonneville Speedway, an area that’s designated specifically for motorsports.

You’ll get stunning views and photos from the base, or you can hike a short, but steep trail to the bottom of the lower falls for a closer look. Hiking any further is dangerous and prohibited. If your visit includes the family, don’t miss the trout pond near the base of the falls: you can buy pellets for a quarter and let the kids feed the fish. Just west of Utah County, beyond the Oquirrh Mountains, lies Tooele County, home of the Bonneville Salt Flats. This natural salt pan stretches more than 30,000 acres along I-80 near the Utah/Nevada border. The flat, white, salty surface looks much like snow and seems to go on forever,

SAVOR Hike the Y Trail

Asa Ramen

© Image courtesy of Cody Booth @cdtwitchy

Nigh-Time Donuts

Ramen

Donuts, Sandwiches

Monte L. Bean Life Science Museum

Black Sheep Café

mlbean.byu.edu

19 N University Ave, Provo

Oh Mai Sandwich Kitchen

Mount Timpanogos Cave

Communal Restaurant

Popular 2.2-mile roundtrip hike to the top of a “Y” painted for BYU Natural history museum at BYU

Steep, paved hike to a natural cave with guided tours offered during summer nps.gov/tica

Roots of Knowledge at UVU

Permanent, stained glass panorama of history and human drama uvu.edu

Springville Museum of Art

Utah’s first museum for the visual fine arts smofa.org

Strawberry Days

Utah’s longest-running city celebration, held each June in Pleasant Grove strawberrydays.org

30

You can also take a short drive up the south end of Provo Canyon to visit Bridal Veil Falls. Named for the lower falls’ resemblance to a bride’s veil, this spectacular, two-tiered waterfall starts its descent from more than 600 feet above ground.

LIFE IN UTAH 2019 | SLCHAMBER.com

1120 S State St, Orem

American

American

102 N University Ave, Provo

299 N Main St, Tooele

Vietnamese

575 E University Pkwy, Orem

Pennys

Burgers, Breakfast

7760 Hwy 36, Tooele Red Fuego

Peruvian, Chicken

824 E 800 N St, Orem

Oriental Garden

Yummy’s BBQ & Sushi

1200 N Main St, Nephi

287 E 300 S, Provo

Chinese

Korean, Hawaiian


EXPLORE. SAVOR. GROW

© Image courtesy of Cody Booth @cdtwitchy

GROW BUSINESS

HOSPITALS

Adobe Systems

American Fork Hospital

Software publishing

Intermountain Healthcare 170 N 1100 E, American Fork

Ancestry.com

Central Valley Medical Center

Geneological information and genetic testing

Independent

48 W 1500 N, Nephi

Domo

Software publishing

Mountain Point Medical Center

doTERRA International

3000 Triumph Blvd, Lehi

Steward Health Care

Essential oils and related products

Entrata

Property management software

IM Flash

Electronic component manufacturing

MX Technologies

Mountain View Hospital

MountainStar Healthcare 1000 E 100 N, Payson

Mountain West Medical Center

Independent

2055 N Main St, Tooele

Financial software company

Timpanogos Regional Hospital

Nestle

750 W 800 N, Orem

MountainStar Healthcare

Specialty food manufacturing

Nexeo Staffing

Utah Valley Hospital

Intermountain Healthcare

Employment services

1034 N 500 W, Provo

Nu Skin

Dietary supplements and personal care products

Qualtrics

HIGHER EDUCATION Brigham Young University (BYU)

Research software company

Private, nonprofit research university

U.S. Department of Defense

Tooele Army Depot and Dugway Proving Ground

Vivint Solar

Provo, Utah

Mountainland Technical College

Public technical training institution 2301 Ashton Blvd, Lehi

Tooele Technical College

Solar energy company

Public technical training institution

Workday

Financial and HR management software company

Young Living Essential Oils

88 S Toole Blvd, Tooele

Utah Valley University (UVU)

Largest public university in the state 800 W University Pkwy, Orem

Sales of essential oils

© Image courtesy of Cody Booth @cdtwitchy

COUNTY DATA CHART COUNTY

POPULATION

MEDIAN AGE

HOMEOWNERS

EMPLOYMENT

MEDIAN INCOME

MEDIAN HOUSING

TOOELE

44,980

40

80.72%

96.6%

$75,847

$249,627

8,235

50

100%

97.6%

$36,559

$331,527

405,680

37

60.47%

97.2%

$66,202

$298,048

JUAB UTAH

*Scarborough Research, R2 2018 based off of adults 18+ and Bureau of Labor Statistics (data.bls.gov)

LIVE


WELCOME TO

WASATCH BACK

EXPLORE. SAVOR. GROW

© Image courtesy of Cody Booth @cdtwitchy

T

his region is best known for the annual Sundance Film Festival, and for being a first-class, destination ski area. Since Park City and Canyons Resorts merged into one resort, it is now the largest ski area in the country. After you’re done skiing, head to Park City’s Main Street for a bite to eat. If you’re skiing at the Park City Resort, you can ski right up to the doors of the state’s only ski in/ski out gastropub, the High West Distillery. In 2016, High West was named the “distiller of the year” by Whisky Advocate magazine.

PROMINENT CITIES COALVILLE

MIDWAY

HEBER CITY

PARK CITY

Summer high 86° Winter low 11° Summer high 90° Winter low 17°

Summer high 87° Winter low 13° Summer high 83° Winter low 9°

When the snow melts and the sun is out, this region doesn’t close down, it comes alive. Enjoy all the usual mountain pursuits and so much more: glide down the mountain on the Alpine Slide, enjoy some live music or stroll through the weekly Park Silly Market.

GROW HOSPITALS

BUSINESS Backcountry.com

Sales of outdoor recreation gear and clothing Jans

Sales of ski, bike and fly-fishing gear PandoLabs

Community of entrepreneurs helping others with new business development RMD Management

Heber Valley Medical Center

Intermountain Healthcare 1485 S Hwy 40, Heber City Park City Hospital

Intermountain Healthcare

900 Round Valley Dr, Park City

HIGHER EDUCATION USU Extension

Masonry contractor

Regional campus for Utah State University

Skullcandy

1258 Center Dr, Park City

Sales of headphones, earbuds, speakers, etc. Sundance Institute

Nonprofit dedicated to the advancement of independent film and theatre Triumph Gear Systems

Design and manufacturer of automotive components

EXPLORE

SAVOR

Deer Valley Music Festival

Outdoor summer home to the Utah Symphony and Utah Opera deervalleymusicfestival.org

Park City Institute

Back 40 Ranch House Grill

Performing arts theater

American, Bar

parkcityinstitute.org

1223 N Hwy 40, Heber City

Sundance Film Festival

Live theater in Park City

Annual film festival held at the end of January in Park City

Homestead Crater

Swiss Days

homesteadresort.com

midwaycityut.org

Egyptian Theatre

egyptiantheatrecompany.org

sundance.org

One-of-a-kind geothermal spring for swimming, scuba diving and snorkeling Ice Castles at Homestead Resort

Winter tourist attraction featuring ice castles, princesses and fire shows icecastles.com

Belle’s Bakery

Bakery, Sandwiches

734 W 100 S, Heber City

Cortona Italian Café

Italian

1612 Ute Blvd, Park City

Fletcher’s

American

562 Main St, Park City

Five5eeds

Main Street Social

1600 Snow Creek Dr, Park City

98 S Main St, Heber City

Coffee, Tea, Breakfast

American, Bar

Midway’s September celebration with arts, crafts and entertainment

Utah Olympic Park

Activity sports park, originally built for the 2002 Winter Olympics utaholympiclegacy.org

COUNTY DATA CHART COUNTY

POPULATION

MEDIAN AGE

HOMEOWNERS

EMPLOYMENT

MEDIAN INCOME

MEDIAN HOUSING

SUMMIT

28,504

48

57.02%

97%

$124,137

$330,490

25,901

48

71.04%

97.1%

$81,217

$373,674

WASATCH

*Scarborough Research, R2 2018 based off of adults 18+ and Bureau of Labor Statistics (data.bls.gov)

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LIFE IN UTAH 2019 | SLCHAMBER.com

LIVE


A MEETING DESINATION THAT

INSPIRES

When planning your next meeting or event destination, why not choose a beautiful mountain setting conveniently located right in your own backyard? The Heber Valley offers over 60,000 sq/ft of meeting space, an array of dining and catering options, and endless year round outdoor recreation and entertainment.

475 North Main, Heber, UT 84032 • 435.654.3666 • GoHeberValley.com


WELCOME TO

EASTERN UTAH

EXPLORE. SAVOR. GROW

© Image courtesy of Cody Booth @cdtwitchy

E

astern Utah is home to Kings Peak, the tallest mountain in the state. It’s a strenuous, but popular, 23-mile round-trip hike to its summit, which towers 13,528 feet above sea level. For outdoor fun with less altitude, take a drive to Flaming Gorge. This man-made reservoir — named for its brilliant red canyon walls that appear to be on fire when the sun hits them just right — is fed by the Green River and straddles the Utah-Wyoming border. Visitors rave about its cool, clean water, stunning beauty and peaceful solitude.

PROMINENT CITIES VERNAL

Summer high 90° Winter low 7°

ROOSEVELT

Summer high 92° Winter low 3°

EXPLORE U.S. Parks & Forests

Ashley National Forest, Flaming Gorge, Red Fleet State Park, Sheep Creek Bay, Starvation State Park fs.usda.gov

Take a trip back in time with a visit to Vernal’s Dinosaur National Monument. The exhibit hall is built right over the top of the quarry wall, allowing visitors to view 1,500 dinosaur bones in climate-controlled comfort.

Dinosaur National Monument Quarry Exhibit Hall

Covered quarry wall features 1,500 dinosaur bones nps.gov/dino

GROW BUSINESS Anadarko

Ashley Regional Medical Center

Natural gas production

LifePoint Health

150 W 100 N, Vernal

BHI

Uintah Basin Medical Center

Construction company Newfield Exploration Company

Petroleum and natural gas extraction

Independent

250 W 300 N, Roosevelt

HIGHER EDUCATION

Savage Services

Trucking

USU Uintah Basin

J.R. Simplot Company

Regional campus for Utah State University

Agricultural service

987 E Lagoon St, Roosevelt

STRATA Networks

Telecommunications services Walmart

Uintah Basin Technical College

Public technical training institution

General merchandise

1100 E Lagoon St, Roosevelt 450 N 2000 W, Vernal

SAVOR Antica Forma

Mama Lia’s Pizza

Round Robin Drive Inn

251 E Main St, Vernal

415 S Hwy 40, Roosevelt

1500 E Hwy 40, Roosevelt

Pizza

Pizza

Fast food, burgers

China Star

Marion's Variety

Swain Brothers

737 E 200 N, Roosevelt

29 N Main St, Roosevelt

1684 W Hwy 40, Vernal

Chinese

Dinosaur River Expeditions

HOSPITALS

Diner

Steak, Seafood

Guided, whitewater rafting adventures

ompany

dinosaurriverexpeditions.com Fantasy Canyon

Unusual rock formations created by erosion blm.gov

Utah Field House of Natural History

Natural history museum in Vernal stateparks.utah.gov

COUNTY DATA CHART COUNTY

POPULATION

MEDIAN AGE

HOMEOWNERS

EMPLOYMENT

MEDIAN INCOME

MEDIAN HOUSING

DAGGETT

3,429

44

100%

96.6%

$41,900

$211,280

14,897

61

81.29%

96%

$122,723

$288,280

35,975

33

91.01%

95.6%

$68,030

$186,106

DUCHESNE UINTAH

*Scarborough Research, R2 2018 based off of adults 18+ and Bureau of Labor Statistics (data.bls.gov)

34

LIFE IN UTAH 2019 | SLCHAMBER.com

LIVE


DUCHESNE COUNTY Close Enough for Business and Far Enough to Get Away Centennial Events Center is only 60 Miles From Heber

www.duchesneevents.com 435-738-1164 | 60 W 400 S, Duchesne, UT 84021

THE ORIGIN OF

DINOLAND.COM


WELCOME TO

CENTRAL UTAH

EXPLORE. SAVOR. GROW

© Image courtesy of Cody Booth @cdtwitchy

I

f you’re heading to Central Utah, plan some time for a road trip. The region boasts connections to Capitol Reef National Park, the Manti-La Sal National Forest, Fishlake National Forest, and many other canyons and parks. The area also plays host to one of Forbes magazine’s “prettiest towns in America.” Spring City, in Sanpete County, boasts well-preserved, historical state architecture. It’s one of only two spots in the nation where the entire town is listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

PROMINENT CITIES EPHRAIM

Summer high 88° Winter low 10°

RICHFIELD

Summer high 90° Winter low 16°

Each year in May, the city hosts a Heritage Day celebration to raise funds for the town’s ongoing preservation efforts. The festivities include music, arts and crafts, food, and visitors can tour the town’s mid-nineteenth-century pioneer homes and buildings.

EXPLORE

GROW HOSPITALS

BUSINESS CentraCom

Delta Community Hospital

Intermountain Healthcare

Telecommunications

Gunnison Valley Hospital

Cheese production

126 White Sage Ave, Delta

Great Lakes Cheese

Independent

Norbest

64 E 100 N St, Gunnison

Poultry processing

Sanpete Valley Hospital

Intermountain Healthcare

1100 S Medical Dr, Mt. Pleasant Sevier Valley Hospital

Intermountain Healthcare 1000 N Main St, Richfield

HIGHER EDUCATION Snow College

State college

150 College Ave E, Ephraim

SAVOR

Capitol Reef National Park

Features the Waterpocket Fold — a buckle in the earth's surface, almost 100 miles long

Fishlake National Forest

Natural mountain lake for fishing, bird watching and recreation fs.usda.gov

Fort and historical site in Millard County history.lds.org

27 N Main St, Ephraim Big Daddy’s Deli

nps.gov/state/ut

Cove Fort Historic Site

Abundance

Sandwich, Soup, Salad

Manti-La Sal National Forest

Deli

60 W 100 N, Richfield

Ideal Dairy

Roy’s Pizza & Pasta

490 S Main St, Richfield

81 S Main St, Ephraim

Ice cream, American

Italian, Pizza

Little Wonder Cafe

Sagebrush Grill

101 N Main St, Richfield

1345 S 350 W, Richfield

American

American

1.4-million acre mountain range for outdoor recreation fs.usda.gov

Fairview Museum of History & Art

Spring City

fairviewmuseum.org

springcityutah.org

Museum featuring contemporary and historical art

Named by Forbes as one of the “prettiest towns in America”

COUNTY DATA CHART COUNTY

POPULATION

MEDIAN AGE

HOMEOWNERS

EMPLOYMENT

MEDIAN INCOME

MEDIAN HOUSING

MILLARD

5,922

67

100%

97%

$37,219

$97,735

34,916

37

95.73%

96.5%

$24,462

$211,307

15,070

55

100%

96.8%

$57,601

$170,169

8,537

68

89.79%

96%

$25,975

$212,484

3,306

47

71.93%

96.7%

$64,989

$392,465

SANPETE SEVIER PIUTE WAYNE

*Scarborough Research, R2 2018 based off of adults 18+ and Bureau of Labor Statistics (data.bls.gov)

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LIFE IN UTAH 2019 | SLCHAMBER.com

LIVE


Say hello to your brand new, bigger, better Salt Lake City International Airport (SLC), arriving in 2020. The new SLC will replace the three existing terminals with one large, modern terminal that has the capacity to meet the ever-growing demands of a major air transportation hub. To learn more, visit SLCairport.com

@slcairport


WELCOME TO

CASTLE COUNTRY

EXPLORE. SAVOR. GROW

T

he first thing you’ll notice about Castle Country are the small towns surrounded by wide-open spaces. Take a moment to enjoy the calming relaxation it affords. The next thing you’ll likely notice are the fanciful, castle-like rock formations jutting out from the sandstone walls surrounding the area. These natural wonders are a sight to behold and, once you encounter them, you might wonder what other marvels the area is hiding — the answer: goblins.

PROMINENT CITIES CASTLE DALE

Summer high 89° Winter low 10°

PRICE

Summer high 82° Winter low 15°

EXPLORE

Goblin Valley State Park, in Emery County, is filled with unique sandstone formations, known as “hoodoos,” that often resemble goblins or other mythic creatures. The area, which has been featured in several movies and television shows, has a surreal or “other worldly” quality which might leave you feeling as if you’ve been transported to a distant planet.

Cleveland-Lloyd Dinosaur Quarry

Features bones from at least 74 individual Jurassic-age dinosaurs blm.gov/learn

Desert Wave Pool

Outdoor wave pool and indoor pool priceutah.net

© Image courtesy of Cody Booth @cdtwitchy

GROW BUSINESS

HOSPITALS

CaptionCall

Castleview Hospital

Translation services

LifePoint Health

300 Hospital Dr, Price

Castle Valley Mining

Coal mining

HIGHER EDUCATION

Joy Technologies

Machinery and equipment wholesale company

USU Eastern

Regional campus for Utah State University

PacifiCorp

400 E 451 N, Price

Utilities

Savage Industries

Freight trucking

Staker & Parson Companies

Construction company

Bronco Utah Operations

Coal mining

SAVOR Big Don's Pizza

Ray’s Tavern

Tacos La Pasadita

170 W 100 N, Price

25 S Broadway, Green River

215 E Main St, Green River

Pizza

Burgers

Mexican

Big Moe’s Eatery

Sherald’s Drive-In

Tangerine Eatery

61 S 700 E, Price

434 E Main St, Price

695 E Main St, Price

Bakery, Breakfast

American, Burgers

Salad, Soup, Sandwiches

Goblin Valley

Other-worldly landscape has been compared to that of Mars stateparks.utah.gov

San Rafael Swell

Recreation area of brigthly colored sandstone formations and canyons blm.gov/visit

USU Eastern Prehistoric Museum

Prehistoric museum considered to be a hidden gem © Image courtesy of Cody Booth @cdtwitchy

usueastern.edu

COUNTY DATA CHART COUNTY

POPULATION

MEDIAN AGE

HOMEOWNERS

EMPLOYMENT

MEDIAN INCOME

MEDIAN HOUSING

CARBON

6,870

57

76.83%

95.8%

$17,027

$70,313

6,305

61

100%

95.8%

$60,886

$73,639

EMERY

*Scarborough Research, R2 2018 based off of adults 18+ and Bureau of Labor Statistics (data.bls.gov)

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LIFE IN UTAH 2019 | SLCHAMBER.com

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THE SALT LAKE CHAMBER STANDS AS THE VOICE OF BUSINESS, SUPPORTS ITS MEMBERS' SUCCESS AND CHAMPIONS COMMUNITY PROSPERITY.

HELP KEEP UTAH THE BEST STATE FOR BUSINESS INVEST IN THE SALT LAKE CHAMBER

FOR MORE INFORMATION info@slchamber | slchamber.com


WELCOME TO

SOUTHWESTERN UTAH

S

PROMINENT CITIES CEDAR CITY

KANAB

HURRICANE

ST. GEORGE

Summer high 90° Winter low 17° Summer high 101° Winter low 29°

Summer high 93° Winter low 24° Summer high 102° Winter low 33°

outhwestern Utah is warmer and dryer than the northern portion of the state, making it the perfect year-round place to play. Both residents and visitors enjoy the region’s access to miles of hiking and biking trails, fishing, water sports and almost any other outdoor pursuit you can imagine. This region also affords access to two national parks, Zion and Bryce, and one national monument, Grand Staircase-Escalante.

Each year, the city plays host to a multitude of competition sports, including the St. George Marathon — the most scenic and fifth largest in the U.S. — and the IRONMAN 70.3 U.S. Pro Championship. If you’re a golf enthusiast, you’ll love St. George’s unique take on the sport: a golf trail consisting of 10 beautiful courses, each boasting stunning views of the area’s signature red rock cliffs standing in perfect contrast to the vivid greens.

St. George, the region’s largest and most populous city, has always been a popular destination for those living in the northern portion of the state. But, word has gotten out: the city is now the fastest-growing metro area in the nation, according to the Census Bureau. Its ideal weather, stunning beauty — hello, red rock cliffs — and access to outdoor recreation and cultural activities are a major part of its appeal.

If theater is more your speed, you’ll enjoy the Broadway shows at Tuacahn, an outdoor amphitheater set right in the middle of those fiery red stone walls. The theater has been wowing audiences with both its quality productions and its unrivaled natural ambience for 20 years.

EXPLORE Bryce Canyon National Park

Largest collection of hoodoos found on the planet nps.gov

Glen Canyon National Recreation Area

Popular reservoir for water sports and home to Lake Powell nps.gov

On the other hand, if you’d prefer some classic Shakespeare, and it’s summer or early fall, make your way to Cedar City in Iron County.

SAVOR Grand Staircase-Escalante

Centro Woodfired Pizzeria

Three regions for outdoor recreation

Pizza

Kanarra Falls

Chef Alfredo’s Ristorante Italiano

blm.gov

Challenging slot canyon hike kanarrafalls.com

Kayenta Art Village

50 W Center St, Cedar City

Italian, Wine Bar 2313 UT-56, Cedar City

Arts center with galleries, studios, theaters Erawan Thai Thai and restaurants kayentautah.com

Little Hollywood Land

Kanab museum featuring Hollywood movie sets and memorabilia littlehollywoodmuseum.org

Tuacahn Amphitheatre

Red rock amphitheatre featuring Broadway plays tuacahn.org

Utah Shakespeare Festival

Theater festival in Cedar City, runs summer to early fall bard.org

© Image courtesy of Cody Booth @cdtwitchy

40

The Utah Shakespeare Festival is a perfect mix of genres: half are written by contemporary artists, and the other half are Shakespearean plays held outdoors in the Adams Shakespearean Theatre, a replica of the Bard’s original Globe Theatre.

LIFE IN UTAH 2019 | SLCHAMBER.com

1190 Sage Dr, Cedar City

Lighthouse Seafood and Grill

Seafood, Steakhouse

Sakura

Steakhouse, Sushi

2107 N Main St, Cedar City

939 E Saint George Blvd, St. George

Park Place Eatery

Viva Chicken

23 W Center St, Cedar City

1183 E 100 S, St. George

Crepes, Vegan

Peruvian, Chicken

Rusty’s Ranch House

Zion Blues Cafe

2275 E Hwy 14, Cedar City

875 W Red Cliffs Dr, Washington

Steakhouse, BBQ

Coffee, Sandwiches


EXPLORE. SAVOR. GROW

GROW BUSINESS

HOSPITALS

American Pacific Corp

Beaver Valley Hospital

Chemical manufacturing

Independent

Best Friends Animal Sanctuary

Animal rescue organization

1109 N 100 W, Beaver Cedar City Hospital

Intermountain Healthcare

BWAY Corporation

1303 N Main St, Cedar City

Plastic manufacturing

Dixie Regional Medical Center

Genpak

Intermountain Healthcare

Holt Farms

Intermountain Healthcare

Manufacturer of foam food service containers

1380 S Medical Center Dr, St. George Garfield Memorial Hospital

200 N 400 E St, Panguitch

Support for crop production Intermountain Healthcare

Health care provider

SkyWest Airlines

HIGHER EDUCATION Dixie State University

Air transportation

Public university

Sunroc

225 S 700 E, St. George

RAM Company

Public technical training institution

Ready-mix concrete company Manufacturer of fabricated metal products

Decorworx

Dixie Technical College

610 S Tech Ridge Dr, St. George

Southern Utah University

Public university

351 W University Blvd, Cedar City

Manufacturer of retail decor

Southwest Technical College

Litehouse Foods

Public technical training institution

Food manufacturing

757 W 800 S, Cedar City

Metalcraft Technologies

Aircraft parts manufacturing

Milgro Newcastle, Inc.

Nursery

Smithfield Foods

Food manufacturing

COUNTY DATA CHART COUNTY

POPULATION

MEDIAN AGE

HOMEOWNERS

EMPLOYMENT

MEDIAN INCOME

MEDIAN HOUSING

BEAVER

3,789

70

100%

96.7%

$123,414

$323,414

38,045

48

73.03%

96.7%

$49,846

$191,874

1,897

70

100%

96.2%

$43,397

$149,804

121,138

53

86.82%

96.7%

$64,245

$261,758

5,458

70

62.31%

97.5%

$21,496

$182,202

IRON GARFIELD WASHINGTON KANE

*Scarborough Research, R2 2018 based off of adults 18+ and Bureau of Labor Statistics (data.bls.gov)

LIVE


WELCOME TO

SOUTHEASTERN UTAH

EXPLORE. SAVOR. GROW

L

© Image courtesy of Cody Booth @cdtwitchy

ocals often head to Southeastern Utah when they need a serious outdoor weekend getaway. Or, when they want to experience a majestic adventure that can’t be found in the northern part of the state they seek out the stunning, natural beauty and solitude that can be found in Southern Utah’s wide-open spaces, or in its national parks. The city of Moab, in Grand County, is the gateway to two national parks: Canyonlands and Arches. Canyonlands spans more than 500 miles and is brimming with towering mesas, canyons, cliffs and spires.

PROMINENT CITIES BLANDING

Summer high 91° Winter low 22°

MOAB

Summer high 99° Winter low 20°

MONTICELLO

Summer high 83° Winter low 14°

Arches is home to more than 2,000 natural sandstone arches, including Delicate Arch — the 65-foot, freestanding natural arch that serves as an iconic symbol of the state. Arches is also a certified Dark Sky Park, which means it’s an ideal location for stargazing.

EXPLORE

GROW BUSINESS

HOSPITALS

City Market

Blue Mountain Hospital

Grocery stores

Independent

802 S 200 W, Blanding

Kilgore Companies

Moab Regional Hospital

Construction company

Independent

450 Williams Wy, Moab

Gouldings Lodge

Accommodations

San Juan Hospital

Lisbon Valley Mining Company

Mineral mining

Independent

380 W 100 N, Monticello Utah Navajo Health System

Independent

Monument Valley Lodge

Accommodations

30 W Medical Drive, Moument Valley

Red Cliffs Lodge

HIGHER EDUCATION

Accommodations

Resolute Natural Resources

Petroleum extraction

USU Blanding

Regional campus for Utah State University 639 W 100 S, Blanding

SAVOR

Arches National Park

Moab Music Festival

Arches Thai

Natural stone arches and other unique formations

Outdoor music festival features a stunning natural backdrop

Thai, Noodles

Canyonlands National Park

Monument Valley Tribal Park

American, Cocktail Bar

nps.gov

moabmusicfest.org

Canyons and buttes formed by the Colorado River

Awe-inspiring panoramas and buttes

Cedar Mesa Pottery

City museum featuring a variety of artifacts

nps.gov

Moab Garage

PJ’s of Monticello

60 N 100 W, Moab

Coffee, Ice Cream

78 N Main St, Moab

Breakfast, Burgers

La Sal House

Patio Drive In

The Atomic

11 E 100 N, Moab

95 N Grayson Pkwy, Blanding

1393 N Hwy 191, Moab

American, Traditional

216 E Center St, Monticello

Burgers, American

navajonationparks.org

Museum of Moab

Authentic Native American pottery cmpottery.com

Edge of the Cedars State Park

Features Anasazi pottery and an authentic Puebloan village stateparks.utah.gov

moabmuseum.org

Natural Bridges National Monument

Features Native American ruins and natural bridges nps.gov

COUNTY DATA CHART COUNTY

POPULATION

MEDIAN AGE

HOMEOWNERS

EMPLOYMENT

MEDIAN INCOME

MEDIAN HOUSING

GRAND

2,939

63

86.87%

97.4%

$27,569

$409,211

6,070

43

100%

94.7%

$83,143

$271,006

SAN JUAN

*Scarborough Research, R2 2018 based off of adults 18+ and Bureau of Labor Statistics (data.bls.gov)

42

LIFE IN UTAH 2019 | SLCHAMBER.com

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THEBLOCKSSLC. COM

INTRODUCING NEW RESIDENCES, SUITES AND BALLROOM A True Sanctuary within Steps of Zion National Park Each room features local Zion artists who have drawn from the same well-spring of inspiration found in the region’s deserts and canyons. The Residences are complete with a full kitchen and vaulted fireside living room leading to a tiered view balcony designed to reveal your own private panorama of the Park. To make any gathering spectacular, the Zion backdrop event plaza adjoins to our modern, elegant Ballroom.

147 Zion Park Blvd Springdale UT | 877.590.3366 | cablemountainlodge.com


UTAH EMPLOYMENT TRENDS UTAH EMPLOYMENT TRENDS

U

tah is regularly recognized as one of the strongest economies in the nation and one of the best states for business. During the recovery from the Great Recession, Utah led the way with an educated, youthful workforce, cheap startup costs and significant industry diversity. Utah has arguably had the strongest recovery from the recession, with an 18.5 percent increase in employment compared to pre-recession numbers. Ten years out from the recession, Utah has moved on from recovery to economic expansion. However, the economic landscape continues to change in Utah, and employment trends are shifting. Employers now have to compete to hire and retain talent and think more about how to fill not only their current workforce needs, but their future needs as well.

STRONG ECONOMIC GROWTH CREATES A JOB SEEKERS’ MARKET Employment is growing in nearly all major industries statewide, with a yearover-year job growth rate of 3.2 percent, as of October 2018. With unemployment hovering around 3 percent, Utah is

44

LIFE IN UTAH 2019 2018 | SLCHAMBER.com

Fastest-Growing Occupations with 200+ annual openings (2016-2026) 7.1%

Software Developer/Application

6.4%

Postsecondary Health Specialties Teacher

6.0%

Market Research Analyst & Marketing Specialist

5.7%

Management Analyst

5.7%

Personal Care Aid

5.2%

Home Health Aid

5.1%

Brickmason & Blockmason

5.0%

Structural Iron & Steel Worker

4.9%

Cement Mason & Concrete Finisher

4.8%

Roofer

4.7%

Marketing Manager

4.7%

Plumber, Pipefitter, Steamfitter

officially a job seekers’ market. It’s a good time for people who want to make a shift in their career direction to get some additional education or take the leap into a new field. Recent projections by the Utah Department of Workforce Services show that Utah can expect to see a robust

average annual growth rate of 2.9 percent through 2026. The fastest-growing occupations are affiliated with health care, computer software and construction. A drive on I-15 through the Silicon Slopes in Salt Lake and Utah counties puts that growth on full display as new office buildings sprout up for tech power players and startups alike, from Adobe to Pluralsight. For individuals looking to take advantage of this employment growth, there are ample opportunities to gain the additional training or education needed. Utah provides excellent educational opportunities at every level, from world-class research institutions like the University of Utah, to regional technical colleges that provide training for the most in-demand and fastest-growing occupations. “When it comes to employment, education pays off,” says Carrie Mayne, chief economist of the Department of Workforce Services. “With every level of post-secondary education achieved, wages generally increase and unemployment rates tend to go down; however, there is growing demand for workers at every education level, from construction workers to software coders, and from truck drivers to civil engineers.”

WO R K

S


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WITH OVER A CENTURY OF EXPERIENCE, CVE CAPABILITIES INCLUDE: > Comprehensive Electrical Construction > Structured Cabling for Voice & Data > DAS (Distributed Antenna Systems) > Multimedia Design, Programming, & Installation > Network Infrastructure, Enterprise Security, Unified Communications > Physical Security > Cloud Solutions & Software Optimization L E A R N M O R E : W W W.C V E . C O M | 8 8 8 - 5 5 8 - 0 6 0 0 S E R V I C E N AT I O N W I D E W I T H O F F I C E S I N :

U TA H | O R E G O N | T E X A S | A R K A N S A S | H AWA I I


TELECOMMUTING OPPORTUNITIES SHARE THE WEALTH WITH RURAL UTAH Utah is often known first for its outdoor recreational opportunities — home to The Greatest Snow on Earth® in northern Utah and The Mighty Five® national parks in southern Utah. Utah’s wild landscapes and rural heritage draw residents and visitors alike to the vast open spaces of the state. Unfortunately, economic prosperity doesn’t automatically spill over from urban growth into rural communities. More than 80 percent of the projected job growth is expected to occur on the urbanized Wasatch Front (from Ogden in the north to Provo in the south). Thanks to advancing technology, shifting attitudes and growing awareness, remote work (a.k.a. telecommuting) is helping to bring more jobs to Utahns who want to enjoy a rural lifestyle. Workforce Services recently undertook an unprecedented effort to make telecommuting positions easy to find and apply for, adding a feature to the state’s job database that searches vast collections of job postings nationwide to identify remote work opportunities. Job seekers can now find thousands of telecommuting jobs at jobs.utah.gov, simply with the click of a button. Opportunities include work in customer service, tech support, sales, computer programming, accounting and many more. “One of the greatest things that Utah has to offer is an equal opportunity to live in an urban center, in a suburban neighborhood or in a small rural town, and still fully participate in the economy,” says Stephen Lisonbee,

46

LIFE IN UTAH 2019 2018 | SLCHAMBER.com

division director for the Department of Workforce Services' development division. “We have diverse industries, from tech to natural resources and from health care to tourism, and these telecommuting jobs provide just one more way that anyone can reap the benefits of our strong economy.”

Utah Median Earnings population of 25+ (2017) $70,200

Graduates/Professional Degree

$47,100

Bachelor’s Degree

$34,500

Associates Degree /Some College

$31,300

High School Graduate/GED

$27,100

No Degree /Graduate

EDUCATION AND INDUSTRY PARTNER TO MEET TOMORROW’S WORKFORCE NEEDS With steady job growth, strong urban and rural opportunities and booming tech, health care, construction and manufacturing sectors, the workforce has to keep up. Individuals need the education and training necessary to thrive in the careers of the future. Industry, education and government are collaborating to create pathways to education and careers. Work-based learning turns construction sites, hospitals and offices into classrooms, where students can gain real-life experience to be prepared for the real world. Price, Utah, is a rural community of less than 10,000 residents and home

to the regional Castleview Hospital. To meet their current and future workforce needs, local charter school Pinnacle Academy alongside Utah State University Eastern partnered with Castleview and Workforce Services to create internships for high school students interested in health care. Twenty-four students participated in internships, while earning their nursing assistant or phlebotomy certifications, and every student has since moved on to employment in the health care industry while continuing their higher education. Mark Holyoak, Castleview Hospital CEO at the time, recognized the benefit of this internship program for the students and for his hospital. Having the students prepared professionally first with soft skills, workplace expectations, résumé building and interviewing helped increase the successful completion of internships, as well as eliminate many of the issues that have historically occurred with youth internships. “It’s a blessing for us to be able to teach them what we know, so that then we can have a future employee right here in the community who’s going to be working side-by-side with us,” says Holyoak. Industry and education partnerships have also created pathways specific to composites manufacturing, diesel technicians, medical innovations (including medical device and lab science), IT support, and potentially a construction pathways in the future. While trends and technology change over time, the collaboration and innovation that have helped to make Utah a great place to work and live will continue to support a healthy Utah economy for years to come.

WO R K

Full Page


Utah’s Largest Manufacturing Employer

airbags • seatbelts • steering wheels | autoliv.com

Full Page Ad v3.indd 1

12/18/18 1:57 PM


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UTAH'S

TOP

EMPLOYERS INTERMOUNTAIN HEALTHCARE Health Care | Annual Employment of 20,000+ intermountainhealthcare.org

Hi

This not-for-profit health care system, based in Salt Lake City, employs more than 37,000 people. With 23 hospitals and 180 clinics located throughout Utah and southeastern Idaho, Intermountain is the largest health care provider in the Intermountain West.

WALMART ASSOCIATES

STATE OF UTAH

BRIGHAM YOUNG UNIVERSITY

Supercenters | Employment of 15,000-19,999 walmart.com

State Government | Employment of 20,000+ utah.gov

Higher Education | Employment of 15,000-19,999 byu.edu

UNIVERSITY OF UTAH (AND HOSPITAL) Higher Education | Employment of 20,000+ utah.edu

H

Simply called the “U” by locals, the University of Utah is the state’s flagship institution of higher education. The institution, which was founded in 1850, serves more than 32,000 students and employs more than 20,000 people.

HILL AIR FORCE BASE

UTAH STATE UNIVERSITY

DAVIS COUNTY SCHOOL DISTRICT

Federal Government | Employment of 10,000-14,999 hill.af.mil

Higher Education | Employment of 7,000-9,999 usu.edu

Public Education | Employment of 7,000-9,999 davis.k12.ut.us

SMITH'S FOOD & DRUG

Mo

Grocery Stores | Employment of 7,000-9,999 smithsfoodanddrug.com Smith’s Food and Drug is a supermarket chain that was founded in 1911 in Brigham City, Utah. Now a subsidiary of The Kroger Company, this prominent chain operates 132 stores in the southwest and northwest part of the country.

48

GRANITE SCHOOL DISTRICT

ALPINE SCHOOL DISTRICT

JORDAN SCHOOL DISTRICT

Public Education | Employment of 7,000-9,999 graniteschools.org

Public Education | Employment of 7,000-9,999 alpineschools.org

Public Education | Employment of 5,000-6,999 jordandistrict.org

LIFE IN UTAH 2019 | SLCHAMBER.com


99

SALT LAKE COUNTY Local Government | Employment of 5,000-6,999 slco.org Salt Lake County, located in the northern portion of the state, is bordered by the salty waters of the great Salt Lake to the west and the majestic Wasatch Mountains to the east. The most populous county in the state employs more than 30,000 people and plays home to the state capital, Salt Lake City.

UTAH VALLEY UNIVERSITY

U.S. POSTAL SERVICE

U.S. DEPARTMENT OF TREASURY

Higher Education | Employment of 5,000-6,999 uvu.edu

Federal Government | Employment of 5,000-6,999 usps.com

Federal Government | Employment of 4,000-4,999 home.treasury.gov

CANYONS SCHOOL DISTRICT Public Education | Employment of 4,000-4,999 canyonsdistrict.org The Canyons School District, located in Salt Lake County, began operations in 2009. The school district has 44 schools serving 33,000 students from the communities of Alta, Cottonwood Heights, Draper, Midvale and Sandy.

THE HOME DEPOT

ZIONS BANK

WEBER COUNTY SCHOOL DISTRICT

Home Centers | Employment of 4,000-4,999 homedepot.com

Banking | Employment of 4,000-4,999 zionsbank.com

Public Education | Employment of 4,000-4,999 wsd.net

DELTA AIR LINES Air Transportation | Employment of 4,000-4,999 delta.com The Salt Lake City International Airport serves as a hub for Delta Air Lines, with more than 200 daily departures from the state’s capital. The airline employees more than 4,000 people in the State of Utah and more than 80,000 worldwide.

9

9

AUTOLIV

DISCOVER PRODUCTS

VIVINT

Motor Vehicle Parts | Employment of 3,000-3,999 autoliv.com

Consumer Loans | Employment of 3,000-3,999 discover.com

Electrical Contractors | Employment of 3,000-3,999 vivint.com

SALT LAKE CITY SCHOOL DISTRICT Public Education | Employment of 3,000-3,999 slcschools.org The oldest public school district in Utah serves nearly 25,000 students. The district, whose boundaries are identical to those of the state capital, Salt Lake City, employs more than 3,000 people.

WO R K


© Images courtesy of Larry H. Miller Group of Companies

CEO PROFILE

STEVE STARKS

S

teve Starks remembers exactly where he was during the 1997 NBA Finals. The Utah Jazz were locked in a battle with Michael Jordan and the Chicago Bulls; and when Game 3 tipped off in Salt Lake City, Starks, his brother and their father were sitting on the very last row of the arena’s upper bowl. “My dad bought the tickets from a scalper,” Starks said. “It was a sacrifice for him. It’s something I’ve never forgotten.”

50

“We are one of just a few teams that uses their state’s name,” said Starks, the president of the Utah Jazz and Larry H. Miller Sports & Entertainment. “We get to represent all of Utah. It is a privilege and a responsibility, and something we take real pride in.” Starks’ journey to become the president of the Utah Jazz and Larry H. Miller Sports & Entertainment started with a master class in elevator pitches.

More than two decades later — from the days of John Stockton, Karl Malone and Jerry Sloan to the days of Donovan Mitchell, Rudy Gobert and Quin Snyder — much has changed for Starks and the Utah Jazz.

Starks was literally in an elevator with Larry H. Miller when he asked the late business mogul to write a letter of recommendation to bolster Starks’ graduate school applications. At the time, Starks had been in the political arena and had, among other roles, managed then-Gov. elect Jon Huntsman’s transition team in 2004.

The most important things, however, have stayed the same. Hard work, integrity, unselfishness, commitment to the community and sacrifice remain the hallmarks of Utah’s NBA franchise — both on and off the court.

Miller countered with a job offer, a chance to shadow Miller as his protégé. “Larry was such a great business mind. I jumped at the chance,” Starks said. “I quickly realized it would be like a business school unto itself.”

LIFE IN UTAH 2019 | SLCHAMBER.com

Over the next few years, Starks ascended the ranks in the Larry H. Miller Group of Companies, learning the ins and outs of the business in a myriad of roles. “I spent the first eight or nine years working in non-sports roles,” Starks said. “I learned much about the various businesses and learned from other senior leaders of the organization and the Miller family. That was a critical time for me to learn, like getting an MBA.” Starks joined the company in February 2007. In March 2015, he became president of Larry H. Miller Sports & Entertainment. In his role, Starks oversees operations of the Utah Jazz, the Salt Lake Bees, the Salt Lake City Stars, Vivint Smart Home Arena; Megaplex Theatres, the Zones Sports Network radio stations, and the Tour of Utah professional cycling race.


Currently, Starks also serves as Chairman of the Board of the Salt Lake Chamber. The Jazz have called Utah home since 1979 and, thanks to owner Gail Miller’s decision to put the team in a legacy trust and to fund a $125-million renovation of the team’s downtown arena, the franchise’s future in the Beehive State is secure. Starks loves Utah. He grew up in the Ogden Valley, graduated from Weber State University, and considers a round of golf at Wolf Creek in Eden to be the perfect day off. As the president of the Jazz and Larry H. Miller Sports & Entertainment, Starks believes the company’s ideals of hard work and integrity have made it a perfect fit with the people and business of the state of Utah.

“As the franchise has grown, so has Utah,” Starks said. In recent years, the Jazz have partnered with the Utah security and technology company Vivint for the naming rights of the Jazz’s downtown Salt Lake City arena. The boom of the Silicon Slopes has led to other opportunities, too. The Jazz and Larry H. Miller Sports & Entertainment have teamed up with Utah County tech company Qualtrics to provide event analytics and to sponsor the “5 for the Fight” cancer research patches on the Utah Jazz jerseys. “The excitement around the Jazz is so high right now,” Starks said. “At the same time, the state is experiencing tremendous growth and the economy is thriving. It is a great place to live and work and is only getting better.”

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CEO PROFILE

CRYSTAL MAGGELET

© Images courtesy of FJ Management

HOW CRYSTAL MAGGELET SAVED FLYING J FROM BANKRUPTCY AND TURNED THE FAMILY BUSINESS INTO SOMETHING BIGGER.

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n December of 2008, Crystal Maggelet got the call she thought she would never receive. Her father’s company, the 15th largest private company in the United States, was headed into freefall bankruptcy. At the time, she was a member of the board of Flying J and a stay-at-home-mom. Three weeks later, she was the company’s CEO. Growing up in Brigham City, Maggelet always wanted to work for the family business. At 16 years old she asked her father, Jay Call, for a job at one of his truck stops. Either because she was too young or because she was a girl, Maggelet says her father denied her a position. Instead, her first job was at McDonalds. “It made me want, more than ever, to show him that I could work and be good at it,” said Maggelet. “It made me aware that I needed an education.” She

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received her education from Pepperdine University where she earned her Bachelor of Science in Business Administration. During her time in college, at the age of 18, Maggelet was named to the Board of Directors for Flying J. Then, at the age of 21 and with a degree in hand, she returned to Utah and began working for her father’s company. Four years later, Maggelet once again left Utah in search of furthering her education. The next time she would return home, she would hold an MBA from Harvard Business School and have another job offer from her father. This time, instead of service stations, Maggelet would begin working in the hotel industry. “I did not have a lot of experience with hotel management. I had stayed in many hotels because I was traveling a lot,”

said Maggelet. “My dad was a silent partner in a similar hotel in Oregon, so I did a month-long crash course. I did front desk, laundry and construction management, because they were building new hotels — and that was my training.” Then, in 1994, the first Crystal Inn opened in Salt Lake City. Since then, Maggelet and her husband, Chuck Maggelet, founded MacCall Management, which grew to 14 hotels by 2002. Part of her success, Maggelet explains, is her ability to seize opportunities. “I’ve never really done things that I was prepared for. I’ve always been given opportunities that were sink or swim.” When she got that call in 2008, she had to learn very quickly how to keep her father’s multi-billion dollar business above water.


Maggelet's father passed away in a plane crash in 2003. After his passing, Flying J made several acquisitions including a pipeline in the Gulf of Mexico and a refinery in California. When the cost of a barrel of oil plummeted from $148 to $30, Maggelet says the loss in inventory value meant Flying J was losing lots of cash fast. When she got the call that they needed to hire a bankruptcy attorney, Maggelet was essentially a stay-at-home-mom. She had been raising the couple’s four children, but staying engaged through her position on the board. “When the opportunity came, I wasn’t in the day-to-day operations, but I still knew the players. I knew what our strategy would be. In a way, I was waiting,” explained Maggelet. “I kept my foot in the door while I raised my kids, but I didn’t think I would be doing this in 2008; I thought it was going to be more like 2018.” When she was offered the position as CEO, Maggelet knew she had to take it. “I wanted to pay people back and I wanted to save people’s jobs,” explained Maggelet.

“I had a ton to lose, but nothing to lose because I never lived off of Flying J. Crystal Inn wasn’t in bankruptcy, but I didn’t want my father’s business to go down in flames.” The first thing she did as CEO was gather everyone together to brainstorm ways to conserve cash. While great ideas and cost-saving strategies came out of that meeting, Maggelet and her employees only remember one big takeaway from that day. “People know that day as the day the ties went away,” said Maggelet. “During the meeting, someone asked if they could take their ties off, because the previous CEO made everyone wear ties. I said yes, and it was a huge morale boost.” Getting rid of the requirement to wear ties was the first decision Maggelet made as CEO that not only showed who was in charge, but also set the expectation that this new boss was going to be the kind of leader who valued other people’s opinions and listened to good ideas no matter how trivial.

The day the ties went away was the beginning of Flying J’s fresh start. Under Maggelet's leadership, Flying J brokered a deal with Pilot Travel Centers in which Pilot would purchase Flying J and allow Flying J to keep a minority stake in the company. In 2010, the combined company took the name Pilot Flying J. Within 18 months, Flying J had paid off its debts and was out of bankruptcy. In 2012, the newly formed FJ Management acquired Maverik. FJ Management, named one of Utah’s best small companies to work for by Utah Business Magazine, includes Pilot Flying J, Maverik and Big West Oil. Other family entities own Crystal Inn and TAB Bank. FJ Management recently won the EY Entrepreneur of the Year National Award for Family Business. “I would do it all over again in a heartbeat,” said Maggelet. “It was an amazing experience. I had to have a backbone and I had to be a leader, but I was surrounded by smart people who all had the same goal — save Flying J.”

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U

tah is known for many things: breathtaking mountains, great skiing, geological diversity and the Great Salt Lake. However, among all of these stunning outdoor amenities, Utah is also known for its accomplishments in business. Utah is a safe haven for industry, hence the nickname the Beehive State. With a state full of busy bees, it’s no surprise that Utah is home to a quite a few “notable” inventions.

TELEVISION

FRY SAUCE

ELECTRIC TRAFFIC LIGHT

Growing up during the turn of the century in Richfield, Utah, young Philo T. Farnsworth was fascinated with electricity.

Every Utahn is familiar with the classic pink sauce that accompanies every order of burgers and fries. This savory concoction is one of the many brilliant things born in the Beehive State. Did you know that fry sauce was created by accident?

At the turn of the century, with the advent of the automobile, traffic became a new challenge for the modern age. The responsibility of directing traffic fell upon the local police force. It wasn’t until 1912, in Salt Lake City, that the idea of the traffic light was born. We can thank Salt Lake City Police Officer Lester F. Wire for this monumental idea.

In 1927, Philo developed and harnessed this fascination, creating the first fully functional all-electronic image pickup device as well as the first fully functional and complete all-electronic television system — thus making his mark on history. While attending Brigham Young University, Philo met Elma “Pem” Gardner, who later became his wife and the first human subject to be transmitted on television in 1930. At the time of his death in 1971, Philo T. Farnsworth held 300 U.S. and foreign patents. His inventions contributed to the development of radar, infrared night-vision devices, electron microscope, baby incubator, gastroscope and the astronomical telescope.

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In Salt Lake City, 1941, a man by the name of Don Carlos Edwards accidentally mixed ketchup and mayonnaise, thus creating the now famous fry sauce. Edwards later opened Arctic Circle and made the signature sauce for his hamburgers. The original name for his creation was “pink sauce.” It wasn’t until one day while eating some of his food, Edwards accidentally dipped his French fry in the sauce. He loved the taste so much that it was deemed the official fry sauce of his restaurant. Now that’s a happy accident! We can thank Don Carlos Edwards for creating this delicious pink sauce. We only wish people outside of the state could understand its beauty.

It was while he was directing traffic that Officer Wire first had this idea. He saw the need for a safer and more efficient way to direct traffic through intersections. The first electric traffic light was one he designed, complete with a pole-mounted box with green and red lights inside. He dipped the light bulbs in colored paint to make them red and green. An officer would be stationed to manually change the lights in order to direct traffic. More than 100 years later, Officer Wire’s invention can be found all over the world. His invention has saved numerous lives, and we thank him.

© Image courtesy of Cody Booth @cdtwitchy

MADE IN UTAH


FRISBEE Who hasn’t played a good game of ultimate frisbee? Who hasn’t watched a dog leap into the air and catch one in its mouth? Frisbees have brought us much amusement for decades. Did you know that the frisbee was created in Utah?

© Image courtesy of Cody Booth @cdtwitchy

It all comes down to a man named Walter Frederick Morrison from Richfield who, in 1937, found joy in throwing around a popcorn can lid with his then girlfriend, and future wife, Lu. The popcorn can lid eventually dented, making flight difficult, and the couple resorted to the more durable choice: the pie tin. Morrison then served in World War II as a pilot where he learned about aerodynamics. When he returned home, he applied his newfound knowledge of flight and created the now famous Frisbee. Remember Morrison the next time you play a friendly game of frisbee.

ARTIFICIAL HEART If you or someone you know has received an artificial heart, then you can thank Dr. Robert Jarvik. While attending the University of Utah, Jarvik joined their artificial organs program, where he created the Jarvik-7 artificial heart. In 1982, his creation was put to the test. Barney Clark was the first person to receive Jarvik’s invention, giving Clark a second chance at life. Since then, the artificial heart has been used as a short-term placeholder while patients undergo surgery, as well as a permanent replacement. Jarvik’s innovation and passion for patients paved the way for many who have followed in his footsteps.

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© Images courtesy of World Trade Center of Utah

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS

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n many ways, Utah is quite capable of selling itself. With a renowned outdoor recreation scene and a cinematic backdrop worthy of any genre, the state receives attention and admiration from around the world. Harder to capture in a postcard — yet equally impressive — is Utah’s economic influence in the global market. More than 3,500 Utah companies export internationally, and one out of every five local jobs are supported by international business. From outdoor gear to 3D printed components, Utah’s products can be found in 197 markets around the world. However, its exports are not the state’s only commodity. CEO Magazine recently named Utah’s workforce the best in America. Dedicated to sharing Utah’s economic story to an international audience is the private nonprofit, World Trade Center Utah (WTC Utah). With a mission to promote prosperity across the state by attracting investment and increasing exports, WTC Utah connects Utah businesses with growth opportunities around the world and helps foreign investors find investment opportunities in Utah — all to create local jobs and fuel innovation.

SELLING UTAH TO THE WORLD Many of WTC Utah’s programs, like Governor-led international trade missions, give local companies an opportunity to make business connections in other countries while learning how to successfully expand into a new region. Through generous

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contributions from JPMorgan Chase and the U.S. Small Business Administration, WTC Utah also offers grants to small and medium-sized companies who are interested in exporting. Utah-based Optisys, a cutting-edge antenna design company, specializes in using 3D printing to create the industry’s lightest weight and smallest antennas — the backbone for next-generation 5G wireless data systems. WTC Utah programs have enabled Optysis to participate in two trade missions and an aerospace trade show to help the company position itself to expand significantly over the next five years, primarily into Asia, Europe and Mexico. Following WTC Utah’s Governor-led trade mission to Taiwan and South Korea, Janos Opra, chief business officer of Optisys, stated, "The trade mission was essential for Optisys in meeting with customers, including a vice president of Samsung Electronics, and having the backing of the WTC Utah, USTAR and GOED added legitimacy to our company. We’re excited to capitalize on the momentum generated on the trade mission to drive our growth in Asia and beyond.”

A NEW “TEAM UTAH” STRATEGY FOR FOREIGN INVESTMENT WTC Utah is leading a statewide effort to develop a foreign investment strategy. Foreign investment is more than just

providing capital to Utah companies and innovators; with investment comes partnerships that increase the two-way flow of economic activity, creating new markets for Utah companies and jobs for Utah workers, fueling Utah’s innovators, and attracting the best and the brightest from around the world to Utah. In short, foreign investment is a catalyst for Utah’s future economic growth. Foreign investment can be broken down into four types: private investments into Utah companies (private equity, venture capital, etc.), mergers and acquisitions, corporate relocation, and large infrastructure projects. Each type of investment has a different set of public and private stakeholders across the state with which WTC Utah is partnering. This requires an inclusive “Team Utah” approach to ensure effective coordination and a results-driven process for attracting foreign investors and matching them to the opportunities in Utah that will create the greatest value for the state. Utah’s booming economy, vibrant tech industry and large infrastructure projects, including a potential Utah Inland Port, create profitable opportunities for foreign investors in Utah. Plus, a coordinated “Team Utah” strategy for foreign investment will maximize the state’s ability to facilitate foreign investment into Utah.

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COMMERCIAL REAL ESTATE

UTAH'S COMMERCIAL REAL ESTATE MARKET TELLS A TALE OF GROWTH & EVOLUTION

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rowth has been the top story in Utah for nearly a decade in terms of populace, commerce, jobs and influence. Nowhere has growth been more visible to the public eye than in commercial real estate — the literal structures where Utah works, eats, shops, plays and lives.

development slow, allowing important rebalancing.

If you’ve missed the cranes and scaffolds, the numbers tell it all: in Salt Lake and Utah counties, 19,500 multifamily units have been built since 2013, along with 7.4 million square feet (MSF) of new office space and more than 14.5 MSF of industrial space.

A POINT OF EVOLUTION

Seven of the nine major regional retail malls have major redevelopment initiatives either completed, underway or planned. In 2018 alone, industrial and multifamily development reached record levels of growth, delivering 3.9 MSF and 6,533 units respectively.

KEEPING GROWTH IN CHECK Remembering the abrupt economic collapse just ten years ago, headlinehogging growth causes uneasiness for some, but 2018 commercial real estate metrics show that, at least in Utah, the expansion remains in check. Vacancy levels decreased year-to-date for all property types except retail, indicating demand has kept pace with new supply. Corroborating this idea, new lease activity during 2018 was at, or near, record levels. Meanwhile, both retail and office construction (which have been the closest to supply-side imbalances) saw 58

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Taken together, these fundamentals suggest Utah’s commercial real estate market is healthy, with thriving tenant activity and confident, yet careful, developers.

While growth continues, 2018 tells a more prescient story: Utah isn’t just growing, it’s evolving. Across commercial real estate sectors — office, retail, industrial and investments — we see important changes in how space is being marketed and used. This evolution is driven not just by new technology and user preferences, but by a pressing need to stay relevant in a changing, cyclically uncertain world.

RETAIL The most noticeable evolution is that of the retail sector. Out of all property types, retail alone has struggled during the expansion — primarily due to large nationwide closures from behemoths like Sears/Kmart, Sports Authority, Macy’s and Toys-R-Us. Faced with elevated vacancy (the number of vacant big-box storefronts in Utah has more than doubled since 2016), landlords in Utah have been reevaluating and modernizing their centers. The results are promising. Retail lease activity surged in 2018, surpassing 2017’s total and reaching over 1.0 MSF (a post-recession record). Tenant activity was diverse and demonstrative

of evolving modern preferences for experience, convenience, community and cost-saving. As such, a third of leased space in 2018 went to recreation and entertainment services — much of which was old department store space. Vacant retail is also being marketed for non-retail uses like creative office and call centers, among others.

OFFICE Strategic pivots to ensure future relevance are also evident in the office sector. Most notable in 2018 was the meteoric rise of ‘coworking’ in Utah, which echoes a national movement. Coworking refers to communal, serviced office space available on a membership basis. Think of it as a health club, but for office work; instead of signing a long-term lease with a landlord, anyone — from individuals to larger firms — can sign on with a coworking operator, gaining access to their network of office space and amenities. Providers like this have been around for some time in Utah (most notably Regus and Avanti), but recent activity has been disproportionate. Since late-2017, over 160,000 SF has been leased to coworking firms in the Salt Lake area — doubling their prior footprint. Newcomers include Industrious, Kiln, WeWork, Vivo and Spaces, among others. Coworking joins a diverse set of thriving industries driving demand for office.


INDUSTRIAL The industrial sector’s evolution in Utah has been one of capacity and prominence. While occurring over many years, 2018 was a significant milestone for several reasons. First, 2018 saw the cementing of e-commerce infrastructure in Salt Lake with the completion of mega-distribution facilities (800,000+ SF) for Amazon and UPS. Combined with numerous new lastmile logistics locations, this christens a new, best-of-class distribution network throughout the Salt Lake Valley, increasing the area’s ability to attract and service heightened levels of commerce. Second, a Utah Inland Port Authority was established in 2018, facilitating the creation of a foreign trade zone and overseeing roughly 20,000 acres of prime, intermodal industrial land in Salt Lake City’s northwest quadrant. This is a turning point in national relevance for Utah’s industrial market.

With increased capacity and capabilities, elevated demand for large, institutiongrade facilities now becomes the norm. In fact, half of the top ten largest industrial buildings existing or under construction in Salt Lake (ranging from 530,000 to 900,000 SF) are post-2017 builds.

INVESTMENT PROPERTIES As commercial real estate markets in Utah grow and evolve, so do its sources of capital. To investors, Salt Lake City is a low-risk, good-return alternative to larger, saturated gateway cities across the U.S. This has resulted in increased funds from prominent, diverse entities approved for local deployment. Multifamily has been the most attractive property type, with nearly $1 billion in acquisitions in 2018 alone — not far off 2017’s record $1.1-billion year. Burgeoning investor interest is only constrained by the limited availability of institution-grade assets for sale, but this condition is evolving as well.

An increased number of developers are willing to sell their projects, shifting from traditional develop-and-hold strategies that have long dominated the local market.

OUTLOOK The current economic expansion is now the second-largest in U.S. history. Despite this fact, a variety of factors suggest there’s still steam to continue through mid-2020 without a correction. This will allow Utah’s commercial real estate market to continue thriving in the near-term. Looking even further ahead, agility and flexibility will be key to navigating future economic uncertainties. As such, the evolution in how real estate is being built, utilized and traded brings confidence for continued growth. For further statistics and analysis for Utah’s commercial real estate market, visit cbre.com/slc *Due to publishing timelines, statistical figures in this article are based on Q3 2018 data or initial year-end projections, and may differ from published Q4 2018 figures.

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WHAT'S TRENDING IN UTAH'S ECONOMY?

THE KEM C. GARDNER POLICY INSTITUTE AT THE UNIVERSITY OF UTAH PREPARES ECONOMIC, DEMOGRAPHIC AND PUBLIC POLICY RESEARCH THAT HELPS UTAH PROSPER.

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ver the past seven years, the most prominent and important economic trend has been Utah’s exceptional job growth. The economic drivers of this growth are concentrated in just a few industries. Economic conditions will continue to favor these industries and extend Utah’s strong growth trends through 2019.

ECONOMIC BOOM Since 1970, Utah has had three periods of prolonged economic expansion: 1971-1979, 19881998, and the ongoing expansion, which began in 2012. These expansions are defined by several continuous years of annual 3 percent job growth. The current expansion is expected to continue through an eighth year as employment projections show a 3.1 percent increase in jobs (49,000 jobs) for 2019. What can we expect when the boom loses steam? Based on past history (1980s and 2000s), a long expansion is followed by a period of lower growth rates but more volatility with bursts of a year or two of strong growth. Periods of inconsistent growth can last up to 10 years before another prolonged period of strong continuous growth develops. Each slow-growth period has its own unique characteristics. The 1980s were dogged by the energy bust, closing of U.S. Steel’s Geneva plant, Kennecott shutdown, and net out-migration while the 2000s were overwhelmed with the Great Recession and the financial crisis. More moderate growth is coming as signs of a slowdown in the U.S. and global economies emerge, but the recent momentum of the boom should carry the Utah economy through another year of strong employment growth.

288,000 jobs created since 2010 have been in these five sectors. The construction sector, with an 11 percent share of all new jobs, is the leading sector but just barely. Three other sectors have each captured 10 percent of Utah’s recent job growth (see Table 1). Most surprising is the retail trade sector. Despite the rise of online shopping, Utah’s retail trade sector has been an important source of job growth. Nearly 30,000 jobs have been added to the retail sector since 2010. The total number of retail jobs has increased by 22 percent in the past seven years. Nationally, retail jobs have grown by 9.9 percent. The only state to have a larger gain than Utah is Washington, where retail jobs have increased by 24.9 percent (see Table 2). Utah’s demographics — a young, rapidly growing population — are certainly a primary reason for the state’s unusually strong retail job market.

HOUSING PRICES

Price increases will decelerate from double-digit territory to the 5-7 percent range.

Only five states have had greater increases in the price index (see Table 3). According to

Percent Change 24.9% 22.0% 19.0% 16.8% 15.8% 9.9%

Top Five States By Retail Job Growth 2010-2017 SOURCE: U.S. BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS

State Nevada Colorado

Percent Change 69.5% 58.8%

Washington Florida Idaho

56.8% 53.8% 53.1%

Utah

44.8%

Top Six States By Housing Price Growth 2010-2017 SOURCE: FEDERAL HOUSING FINANCE AGENCY

LIFE IN UTAH 2019 2018 | SLCHAMBER.com

O

R

TABLE 1 Increase in Jobs 32,269 30,873 30,742

Share of Employment Growth 11.2% 10.7% 10.7%

29,973 25,542 149,399 138,416

10.4% 8.9% 51.9% 48.1%

287,768

100.0%

W

Employment Sectors Ranked By Job Growth 2010-2017 SOURCE: UTAH DEPARTMENT OF WORKFORCE SERVICES

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TABLE 2 State Washington Utah Florida Texas Idaho U.S.

TABLE 3

Utah’s high growth trends affect the housing cost and the wealth of every one of Utah’s 950,000 households. High growth means higher housing costs. Over the past five years, Utah’s housing price index has increased by 45 percent.

EMPLOYMENT TRENDS Utah’s economic boom has been led by five employment sectors: construction, health care, professional and scientific services, retail trade, and accommodation and food services. Half of the

the National Association of Realtors, out of 180 metropolitan areas, the Salt Lake Metro Area ranks in top 15 percent, ranking 24th with a median sales price of $322,000. Housing price increases in 2019 will likely be dampened slightly as high prices bump into buyer resistance.

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SMALL BUSINESS IN UTAH SMALL BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIES

© Images courtesy of Small Business Administration of Utah

U

tah continues to top the rankings for growth, low unemployment, new business startups and fiscal stability, so it’s no wonder the U.S. Small Business Administration Utah District Office also leads the nation in terms of per capita dollars generated per each SBA loan approved. It is also the lead district office in the region for international trade. “We will continue to capitalize on the fact that Utah is a globally-minded state and is the number one state for export lending in the region,” said Utah District Director Marla Trollan. The Utah District Office will continue to support a new Utah Inland Port and conduct statewide and national promotional events to foster increased lending. Each year, the office participates in the National Small Business Week events, celebrating small businesses in Utah. “We’ve set out to provide excellent customer service by increasing our communication and collaboration to meet community needs for small businesses and strengthen Utah’s economy,” Trollan said. Additionally, the Utah District Office will continue to work with its resource partners including the Women’s Business

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Center of Utah (WBCUtah), SCORE and the Small Business Development Center Network of Utah, which are funded by the SBA. The office also collaborates with other stakeholders and service providers, such as the World Trade Center Utah (WTC Utah), the Governor’s Office of Economic Development, Salt Lake Chamber, Wasatch Front Chamber, Hispanic Chamber, USDA Rural Development, U.S. Commercial Service, SLCC Global Business Center and more to achieve its priority goals. “My goal is to help more of our nation’s small business owners be aware of the resources available to them through the SBA. We want more entrepreneurs to think of the SBA as the go-to resource for access to capital, valuable resources, business know-how and the right expertise for each stage of their business lifecycle. That’s how we can continue to help power the engine of our economy,” SBA Administrator Linda McMahon said. The SBA continues to prioritize its rural initiative to encourage an increase in rural and overall lending and organizes periodic Rural Roadshows to present its programs to communities located further from urban settings, locations such as Vernal, Tooele and Richfield.

“We are continuing to support the SBA’s commitment to rural outreach. We’ll have more legs of the SBA Rural Roadshow, and are partnering with PTAC (Procurement Technical Assistance Center) and the USDA Rural Development to provide joint training and educational events targeting rural communities and small businesses. These events will also include lender roundtables, panelists and networking,” Trollan said.

CASPER’S FAT BOY Casper’s FatBoy Premium Ice Cream is a rural business success story in northern Utah’s fertile Cache Valley where the dairy industry is serious business. No one takes it more seriously than Casper’s CEO, Paul Casper Merrill. He loves the company, has fun running it, and for the last decade, expanding it. FatBoy is a national brand now, available from Alaska to Miami in more than 6,000 retail locations, including numerous grocery store chains, Costco Warehouses and C-stores. Merrill began his career as an 8-year-old sales rep for Casper’s FatBoy, going door to door in the summer until he was old


enough to work in production, which he did when he turned 13. He worked through college, graduating from Utah State University in 1993 with a Bachelor of Science in Marketing Education. Merrill has since spent time working in each major division of the company, assuming control of the company in 2002 as president and CEO, overseeing all operations. When Merrill started running Casper's, he set a goal to grow to $20 million in annual revenue by 2020. Casper's grew from $6 million in the late 1990s to $12 million annual revenue in 2012. In 2014, six years earlier than expected, Casper's passed the $20 million goal. He was able to do that in part with assistance from the SBA loan guarantee program that helped him expand his manufacturing capability. “Paul comes from a long line of ice cream innovators who started the company in 1925. FatBoy's has stayed competitive throughout the years by obsessively improving its manufacturing processes,” said John Evans, president of Mountain West. Mountain West Small Business Finance nominated Merrill for the SBA Utah Small Business Person of the Year Award, and Merrill was selected by a panel in 2018.

YOU COULD BE NEXT Securing funding to transform your business idea into reality can be one of the most difficult steps in the startup or expansion process. Financing could include loans backed by the U.S. Small Business Administration, traditional loans, venture capital, angel investors, loans from family and friends, credit cards and bootstrapping. Most lenders do require some personal equity in a new business endeavor, so you’ll need to determine whether you can personally fund a portion of your business. Also, don’t seek out a loan from a local bank or credit union until your business plan is just as polished as your presentation. For assistance in building your business plan, presentation or pitch, connect with your local business experts at the

Women’s Business Center of Utah (WBCUtah), Utah Small Business Development Center Network and also with SCORE where information, counseling and workshops are available to you for little or no cost. Although not lenders, these experts become your guides as you wind your way through the maze of available and invaluable information as you try to find and apply for funding. WBCUtah provides tools and support to help women (men too) establish, grow and sustain businesses throughout Utah. WBCUtah is focused on providing business counseling and training services to entrepreneurs and is a critical resource to those who are economically or socially disadvantaged. To learn more, visit wbcutah.com The Small Business Development Center Network of Utah supports 13 centers around the state, focusing on counseling in areas such as financial analysis, business planning, training and workshops, and loan packaging assistance to help small businesses achieve their goals of growth, expansion, innovation and success. Check out their website at utahsbdc.org for more information.

Each local SBDC offers the following service areas for startups as well as existing and expanding businesses: • • • •

Financial Analysis Business Planning Operations Assistance Marketing & Social Media Assistance • Training & Workshops • Entrepreneurial Development • Loan Packaging Assistance SCORE is a nonprofit association dedicated to helping small businesses get off the ground, grow and achieve their goals through education and mentorship. Because SCORE is supported by the SBA, and by a network of 10,000 volunteers, SCORE can provide services at no charge or at very low cost. Volunteer mentors share their expertise across 62 industries. Free, confidential business mentoring in person, via email or by video. Free business tools, templates and tips here online. Inexpensive or free business workshops (locally) and webinars (online 24/7). For more information, visit their website at: saltlake.score.org

WO R K


SCHOOL DISTRICTS IN UTAH THE UTAH SCHOOL SYSTEM

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he Utah public school system educates 650,000 students in 1,100 schools throughout the state. This represents more than onefifth of the state’s population. Utah’s Constitution grants the “general control and supervision” of the state’s public education system to the Utah State Board of Education, a 15-member elected body. What this translates into is the State Board of Education setting standards and requirements — academic and financial — for schools, but the actual operation of schools is carried out by locally-elected district boards of education. Utah has 41 school districts. Nearly all of the rural school districts in Utah have the same boundaries as the county in which they are located. Most of the urban districts, and a few of the rural ones, have multiple districts. Salt Lake County, the state’s largest county by population, has five districts: Canyons, Granite, Jordan, Murray and Salt Lake City. Utah County, directly south of Salt Lake, is the state’s second-largest county and is home to three school districts: Alpine, Nebo and Provo.

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Forty of Utah’s 41 school districts were set in place by 1913. In 2008, the Jordan School District, then the largest district in the state, was split in two following a public vote among those who lived in the Jordan District boundaries. The new Canyons School District began operation on July 1, 2009 as the state’s 41st district. While not unique, Utah school districts are unusual in that there are relatively

few districts. Some states will center a school district around just a high school or two. California and Texas each have more than 1,000 school districts. Even a state as sparsely populated as Montana has more than 400. Only five states, and the District of Columbia, have fewer school districts.


This helps to keep administrative costs down. Going a step further, Utah also has four regional service centers for rural districts that give rural districts some economy of scale for purchases of goods (textbooks, school supplies, etc.) and services (information technology assistance, professional development, etc.). Because of this, Utah spends only $64 per pupil on district administration, the lowest in the nation, according to the most recent U.S. Census Bureau’s “Public Education Finances” publication. Nationally the figure is $218. Less than 1 percent of Utah’s current spending goes toward district administration, compared to 1.9 percent nationally, according to the same publication. This is not to say there are not large school districts in Utah. Much as the state’s population is concentrated along the Wasatch Front, so are large school districts. Alpine (northern Utah County) and Davis (north of Salt Lake County) districts, along with Salt Lake County’s Granite and Jordan districts, are among the 100 largest school districts in the country, according to the National Center for Education Statistics. Alpine, Davis and Granite each have more than 70,000 students; Jordan more than 50,000. Each district is governed by a nonpartisan elected board. Larger districts — like those you would find along the Wasatch Front and in Iron and Washington counties down south — have seven members. Smaller districts have five. These part-time board members govern the districts, set policy and hire a superintendent to carry out day-to-day administration. Local school boards set the academic calendars, i.e., when schools start in the fall and when they finish in the spring. They are required to form traffic safety committees annually to look at changing traffic flow dangers and the hazards they present to students.

They are required to annually update safety plans in coordination with local public safety officials for each school and see that required emergency drills are carried out periodically. Starting with the 2019 school year, they will also be required to make sure each school has a reunification plan to get students back with their parents or guardians in the event of a school evacuation. Districts are also the backbone of support for classroom teachers. Districts employ reading, language arts, math, science and special education specialists to improve instruction and help share best practices among schools. School buses are operated out of district offices. In a state as geographically large as Utah, this is an undertaking. More than 2,400 school buses transport more than 175,000 pupils daily to and from school. Utah is also in the midst of a clean fuel campaign for its school buses.

With help from the legislature and from the Volkswagen clean diesel cheating settlement, more buses are going green with a conversion from diesel to certified natural gas or propane fuels. District schools are not the only public schools in Utah. The state also has a healthy charter school system with 130 charter campuses serving about 12 percent of the total public-school student population. Some of the charter schools are operated by districts, but that is the exception rather than the rule. Nondistrict charter schools are governed by appointed boards. They are held accountable to the Utah State Charter School Board and ultimately the Utah State Board of Education. We encourage you to learn more about Utah’s school districts. For information about individual schools within each of the districts as well as charter school information visit: utah.gov/ schoolsdirectory

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STUDENTS IN THE UTAH SYSTEM OF HIGHER EDUCATION • Eight public colleges and universities

AN ELEVATED EXPERIENCE

• Eight out of 10 high school graduates who go on to college enroll at one of the eight public colleges and universities

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• Enrollment projected to increase by 52,000 students by 2025 — adding roughly two large universities in a decade

HIGHER EDUCATION IN UTAH ne of Utah’s greatest gems is its system of public colleges and universities, which provide the lifeblood to the state’s talent force. There are two research universities, the University of Utah and Utah State University; four regional universities: Weber State University, Southern Utah University, Dixie State University and Utah Valley University; and two community colleges, Salt Lake Community College and Snow College. Eight out of 10 Utah high school graduates who enroll in college, attend one of Utah’s public colleges and universities, making them the primary talent pipeline for Utah’s fast-growing workforce. With more than 180,000 students and counting, Utah's colleges and universities are some of the fastestgrowing in the country. They are expected to collectively add more than 50,000 students by 2025 — the equivalent of two large universities. Utah's public colleges and universities are tuned in to the workforce needs of the future. In recent years, pathway initiatives have been launched with industry leaders in the fast-growing areas of aerospace, composites manufacturing and diesel mechanics, ensuring a solid path from high school to the workforce in highwage, high-demand fields. High-end research, innovative commercialization and entrepreneurship in higher education are also critical to 66

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sustainable economic growth. Last year, Utah garnered a record $701 million of outside funds for research and grants at Utah's public colleges and universities — leading to hundreds of patents and spinoffs throughout the state. To plan for the challenges and opportunities accompanying this expected growth, the Utah Board of Regents — Utah’s higher education governing authority — has developed a strategic plan focusing on college access, affordability and timely completion for Utah’s college students. The Board of Regents also has many programs in partnership with K-12 that focus on college readiness, which is key to an educated and trained workforce. For instance, over half of high school graduates earn college credit while in high school through concurrent enrollment, saving them more than $41 million in future tuition costs. Another program is Utah College Application Week, where over 21,000 high school seniors in more than 120 high schools are given the opportunity to apply to college during the school day. Additionally, the Regents’ Scholarship is a statewide merit-based scholarship that encourages a college-prep course of study while in high school. The Regents’ Scholarship has experienced rapid growth since its inception in 2008 with an average 54 percent year-over-year increase.

UTAH HAS THE MOST AFFORDABLE COLLEGE OPTIONS • 3rd lowest four-year tuition in the nation • Lowest student debt in the nation • Of those who borrow, average student debt ($18,838) is lowest in the country (national average: $29,650) • my529 has received Morningstar's Analyst Rating of Gold for the sixth year running, the only state 529 college savings plan to receive such consistent top ratings

COLLEGE IN UTAH IS CRITICAL • College grads earn $830,000 more over a lifetime than those with only a high school diploma • College grads are three times less likely to be unemployed and four times less likely to live in poverty than those with only a high school diploma • In 2015, the unemployment rate of a Utahn with only a high school diploma was 11 percent, while for a Utahn with a bachelor’s degree, it was three percent

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TALENT READY UTAH!

TALENT READY UTAH HELPS BUILD OUR WORKFORCE PIPELINE

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inding qualified workers in our current economy is one of the biggest challenges our state faces today. While our unemployment rate is continually one of the lowest in the nation, we are seeing many high-wage, high-demand jobs going unfilled. With this in mind, Governor Herbert used his 2017 State of the State address to announce Talent Ready Utah. This statewide initiative seeks to fill high-wage, high-demand jobs, and better train our future workforce, by bringing industry and education together. The program was passed into legislation in 2018. The one-of-a-kind Talent Ready Utah Center, housed in the Governor’s Office of Economic Development, brings together education, industry and government. The board, as defined by statute, includes: the superintendent of public education, Sydnee Dickson; the commissioner of higher education, Dave Buhler; the commissioner of technical education, Mike Bouwhuis; the executive director of GOED, Val Hale; the executive director of DWS, Jon Pierpont; the governor’s education advisor, Tami Pyfer; the president of the Salt Lake Chamber, Derek Miller; representative from the Utah State Senate, Ann Millner; representative from the House of Representatives, Cory Maloy; and industry representatives selected by the Talent Ready Utah director: Aaron Skonnard, CEO of Adobe; Andrea Moss, CEO of Nelnet Bank; Chuck Taylor, CEO of Syber Jet; and Jeff Nelson, CEO of Nelson Labs. When industry and education work together, great things can happen, and it all starts with

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work-based learning. Work–based learning can be anything from job shadowing, internships and mentoring programs, to inkind donations and curriculum feedback. Companies get the benefit of building awareness of their industry among students, and students get the benefit of an enhanced education experience and better training and preparation for their roles in the workplace of the future. Take, for example, Utah Aerospace Pathways. It was the first industry-driven pathway to integrate stackable credentials with work-based learning in order to train and hire individuals into the aerospace manufacturing workforce. Companies including Boeing, Northrup Grumman formerly known as Orbital ATK, MSC Aerospace and others provide externships for high school students. These companies also worked with school district Career and Technical Education (CTE) directors as well as technical and community colleges to provide the necessary post-secondary curriculum. The model was so successful, it has been replicated in additional industries, including the technology and life sciences sectors. The aerospace and other pathway programs were launched with Talent Ready Utah grants, which are funded and managed by the Department of Workforce Services. These grants provide seed funding to develop and implement industry driven

© Image courtesy of Talent Ready Utah

programs. Talent Ready Utah grants are a great resource available for partnerships across the state. Another stand-out example is Utah Diesel Tech Pathways. The program started out as a Talent Ready Utah grant in the Jordan and Canyons school districts, executed in partnership with Salt Lake Community College (SLCC), and has since grown into additional regions across the state. Diesel companies in Utah have worked with educational institutions to provide a number of work-based learning opportunities. Students complete job shadows with multiple companies during the school year. Company leaders give presentations in schools and donate equipment, bring students on tours of their companies, and meet with education leaders monthly. Through these efforts, enrollment in the diesel courses doubled within the first year in both the Jordan and Canyons school districts. The diesel industry has seen the value of partnering with education to help fill their talent pipeline. As Talent Ready Utah continues to grow and expand, students and individuals across the state will see additional opportunities to learn and be trained in high-wage, high-demand jobs. Strong industry and education partnerships grow our talent pipeline and build our workforce. For more information, visit talentreadyutah.com

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A STEM STATE OF MIND

© Image courtesy of STEM Action Center

EDUCATION’S ALIGNMENT WITH INDUSTRY BODES WELL FOR UTAH’S SURGING SCIENCES SECTORS AS K-12 STUDENTS PUT PRINCIPLES INTO PRACTICE THROUGH EXCITING, REAL-WORLD APPLIED LEARNING.

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tah ranked among the nation’s Top 10 Most Innovative States at No. 8 for the past two years in an analysis by D.C.-based WalletHub. A look at the Beehive State’s roster of historic scientific advancements suggests innovation is built into its DNA: Television, video gaming, word processing software and advanced digital animation all began here, not to mention such revolutionary medical breakthroughs as the hearing aid, first artificial heart, discovery of the APC gene’s role in colorectal cancer, and Nobel Prizewinning research on how to control the function of genes.

on problem-based learning that helps our students learn how to not only 'see' problems but solve problems. This is at the heart of fostering innovation," said Dr. Tamara Goetz, executive director of the Utah STEM Action Center. Goetz and the Center’s team are instrumental in an ongoing collaboration between Utah’s industry, education and government leaders who are working together to prepare students for today’s STEM world through providing impactful K-12 learning opportunities — including high-quality professional development for elementary, middle and high school teachers.

Considering the influx of tech companies and rise of Silicon Slopes in recent years, the state certainly ranks among the top 5 in the innovation-friendly environment category, the first of two criteria in the Innovative States metric. WalletHub ranks Utah 12th — up from 14th — for criterion two: human capital, the native talent available to fill the thousands of industry jobs.

Computer science education is a key strategic focus for the Center and its education and industry partners. The 2016 legislative session gave rise to the Utah K-16 Computing Partnership, which provided just over $1.2 million in funding to support the development of sustainable computing programs in Utah schools.

Utah’s positive trend in producing homegrown talent to meet science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) jobs growth is expected to continue. “We need to continue to focus on K-16 education, with an emphasis

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High-priority emphasis has been given to early education, particularly around opportunities for K-8 students. The early impacts are already evident. First-round funds were distributed fall of 2017, with second-round funding awarded in spring of 2018. This initiative has so far

benefited 296 schools in 21 districts, more than half of them in rural areas, comprising 169 elementary schools as well as 99 middle schools. More than 30 after-school coding clubs and 22 robotics clubs have launched as a result. “Getting students interested earlier will hopefully lead to more students staying engaged later on in high school and through college,” said Cory Henwood, digital teaching and learning specialist of Iron County School District. Industry partners Hill Air Force Base, Carbonite, Centeva, Comcast, Dell EMC, Adobe, Ivanti and Microsoft have been vital to this initiative through their support of various efforts including code.org, which offers teacher training and professional development workshops in Computer Science Discoveries and Computer Science Principles for more than 200 Utah teachers. The resulting curriculum development has allowed for the addition of 18 Advanced Placement (AP) Computer Science Classes. Hill Air Force Base STEM Program Manager Alison Sturgeon is often asked why the Air Force is especially vested in K-12 STEM outreach. “The Air Force mission can only be met if the right


people, with the right skills, are available now and in the future,” she said. “As technology continues to increase throughout the Air Force, these skills are increasingly STEM skills. With Hill AFB needing to hire 300-plus STEM professionals each year, STEM outreach is of vital importance.” Comcast has powered the computing surge as well, notably striving to close the gender gap in STEM professions. Utah has seen a nearly three-fold proliferation of Girls Who Code clubs statewide in the past year alone, with the introduction of 44 new clubs of more than 250 elementary and middle school girls to computer programming’s limitless potential — and their own. Comcast, as well as Centeva and Carbonite, have also championed support for Girls Who Code with an Entrepreneurship Challenge program, coming in the spring of 2019. Also helping girls’ interests in STEM careers take flight, JetBlue launched its first annual Salt Lake City “Fly Like a Girl” event in September 2018, departing its New York City origin for the first time in the event’s four-year history. More than 100 local girls ages 8 to 14 took part in an afternoon of hands-on activities and interactions with an all-woman JetBlue entourage of pilots, maintenance crew members, inflight crew members and executives, including JetBlue President and COO Joanna Geraghty — the highestranking woman in U.S. commercial aviation. “We all know that men hold a majority of STEM careers, but did you know that women hold only 24 percent of those jobs, and that less than 7 percent of airline pilots are women?” Geraghty said, adding that, “Utah is among the states that have a lot of work to do in bringing the ratio up to 50-50, and the governor’s office here is doing a great job of working to create and support those opportunities.”

in all corners of the state as a mobile classroom. Seeded by Andeavor and jointly supported by the Larry H. & Gail Miller Family Foundation, the USB has already visited more than 100 schools across nearly half of the state’s districts since its March 2017 ignition. Curriculum includes robotics, 3D modeling, engineering, spatial math, renewable energy, physics, computer programming and video game design. Support from Comcast, Hill Air Force Base, Adobe, IM Flash, Shell, MHTN Architects, Midwest Commercial Interiors, Steve Price Realty and VCBO Architecture has driven the retrofitted UTA-donated vehicle’s success in students’ exploration of roads to STEM careers. Rolling right along in pairing industry with education since its inception last year, the Utah STEM Foundation, along with the Utah STEM Action Center, has recently partnered with the Utah Department of Heritage and Arts and SelectHealth to embark on “Mobile Museums” touring exhibits that will travel across the state to various community centers and schools in an effort to provide STEM-relevant issues and subjects in the form of 3D-printed and mixed-media displays. Some of these hands-on exhibits will be tailored specifically to individuals with impaired sight or total vision loss to allow

them an immersive museum experience. All of these engaging hands-on, interactive STEM displays will connect concepts to careers. With so much industry support, it’s no surprise that a 2018 analysis by the National Science Foundation — based on data from venture capital and private equity database Pitchbook — shows that Utah has one of the highest rates of science industry venture-capital funding raised per deal, at nearly four times the national average. This underscores how much growth is in store for STEM jobs in the state, where the average industry salary looms nearly twice as large as that of statewide jobs in general. “There are thousands of high-paying local tech jobs going unfilled due to a shortage of STEM talent,” Lt. Gov. Spencer Cox said during the Utah STEM Action Center’s Best Practices educator conference in June 2018, leading a panel of local industry, education and lawmaking officials abuzz with innovative, STEM-minded solutions to bridge this gap. With so much set in motion and momentum continuing to build, stakeholders are set on setting students up to support the Beehive State’s long-term economic sustainability and success.

Aerospace is a major industry player in Utah with nearly 1,000 related companies accounting for more than 30,000 jobs. Boeing is among industry partners who support the Utah STEM Foundation in piloting novel programs such as the Utah STEM Bus (USB), which continues rolling out hands-on K-12 curriculum to schools

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THE BLOCKS O n a sun-dappled day in July of 2018, Salt Lake City Mayor Jackie Biskupski, staff from the Downtown Alliance and officials from Salt Lake County’s Center for the Arts gathered on Exchange Place Plaza to announce a new partnership.

Dubbed THE BLOCKS in reference to our capital city’s famously large city blocks, this collaboration was created to showcase downtown Salt Lake City’s broad range of artistic, cultural and entertainment programming. “With its wide variety of venues, audiences and non-stop creative energy, THE BLOCKS offers a quality and consistent experience you cannot get anywhere else in Utah,” Biskupski said. THE BLOCKS spans downtown Salt Lake City’s urban core, running from the west side of 600 West to the east side of 400 East, and the north side of North Temple to the south side of 400 South.

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© Images courtesy of THE BLOCKS

A smidgen of the offerings and events located within this conveniently compact area include the El Mac & Retna Ave Maria mural (160 E 200 S), Jann Haworth’s SLC Pepper mural (250 S 400 W), the monthly Third Friday Gallery Stroll, the Utah Arts Festival, Abravanel Hall, George S. and Dolores Doré Eccles Theater, the Twilight Concert Series, the Utah Museum of Contemporary Art, the Craft Lake City DIY Festival, Pride Weekend, the Living Traditions Festival, and a variety of events celebrating the local Greek, Pacific Island, Italian, Japanese, and Hispanic communities. One of the exciting initiatives as part of THE BLOCKS is a mural inside the underpass at 200 West. THE BLOCKS partnered with the Salt Palace Convention Center to create a community mural in this previously underutilized space. Six local artists — Traci O’Very Covey, Chuck Landvatter, Matt Monsoon, Evan Jed Mammott, Alexis Rose and Jimmi Toro — created a 150-foot-wide, paint-by-numbers style mural along the wall of the underpass, which the public was then invited to help fill in during a celebration held in August of 2018.

“With experiences ranging from intimate to arena, traditional to contemporary, world-renowned to backyard, structured to spontaneous, highly-refined to cuttingloose, THE BLOCKS is Salt Lake’s Cultural Core,” says Tyler Bloomquist, Downtown Alliance artistic director of the Cultural Core.

In September, THE BLOCKS activated downtown streets and underutilized urban spaces during a three-day period with the spontaneous and participatory nature of Plein Air (outdoor) painting. This project invited audiences to engage with participating artists and get a view into their process of completing a painting, providing the opportunity to see live art. A curated team of 25 artists was selected to demonstrate their painting skills to the

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public at 10 curated locations in the downtown area. This three-day period culminated with an exhibition of the completed works at the Utah Museum of Contemporary Art. “As Salt Lake City is embracing our new growth and outside interest, we have seen an infrastructural shift to answer the demand for an engaging and inviting urban lifestyle,” Bloomquist says. “With more people living, working, commuting into, and experiencing downtown, now is the ideal time to reimagine our public spaces, forge new collaborations focused on creative problem solving, galvanize our street life, and celebrate our diversity.

economic impacts of our city’s arts offerings are very much quantifiable and play a key role in our state’s financial well-being. According to a study by Americans for the Arts, 7.4 million people attended arts and culture events in Utah in 2015, spending more than $194 million in the process. Furthermore, spending by Utah arts and cultural organizations and their audiences support more than 10,000 jobs. “In THE BLOCKS, we have great dining, amazing theaters, and interesting visual arts, and we want the entire surrounding regional community to know about and experience all this district has to offer,” says Sarah Pearce, division director of Salt Lake County’s Center for the Arts. “This joint effort by Salt Lake County and Salt Lake City is a testament that investing in the arts makes huge impacts both directly and indirectly to the economic vitality of a community. Visual arts can stimulate a lonely alley or abandoned building, and performing arts, film and music events attract audiences that spend money not only on tickets, but also at surrounding retail, restaurants and bars. And, a community with a vibrant arts scene attracts new visitors, new residents and new businesses.”

Now is the time to create the downtown we have always wanted. How will this happen? By supporting and championing our creative community.” While the quality of life benefits downtown Salt Lake’s artistic community provides are likely immeasurable, the 74

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So, whether you’re looking for a new gallery, a poetry reading, a play by a celebrated local writer, a performance of a Bach masterpiece, an edgy piece of street art, the nation’s biggest LGBTQ+ festival, engaging architecture, whetting your pallet with a new cocktail or coffee, creating alongside your kids at a contemporary art museum or simply stumbling across a ballet versus breakdance battle, THE BLOCKS have you covered.

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DEEP TRAVEL BEYOND THE MIGHTY 5

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UTAH'S FIVE NATIONAL PARKS ARE BEST EXPERIENCED INDIVIDUALLY, WITH EXTRA TIME TO WANDER

Arches National Park

Bryce Canyon National Park

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Race the Sunrise and More

ome things are worth racing the sunrise for, like being there when the sun cracks over the eastern horizon beyond Delicate Arch. Being an early riser on your national park vacation comes with many rewards: quieter, blue-light hikes, the best chances to glimpse wildlife and a personal feeling of accomplishment. Of course, there’s only so much morning light, so having multiple days to witness the sunrise is not a bad idea, especially if you’re a photographer. You’ll also encounter fewer hikers on the Devils Garden Primitive Loop trail, which takes off from the same trail that accesses Landscape Arch and Double O Arch but requires a high level of attention. Planning ahead and getting a guided tour of Fiery Furnace, or even a permit for a solitary night camping in the backcountry can further expand your sense of solitude and create a much deeper appreciation for this place. Tip: Throughout the warmer seasons, things get busy around Moab and Arches National Park. Keep an eye on nps.gov/arch for alerts and Twitter @ArchesNPS for travel restrictions during peak visitation days or hours. Moab fills up during major annual events, posted at discovermoab.com. Once in the park, drive carefully, watch for cyclists and be courteous. visitutah.com/arches

Complete Vacation Base camp: Moab or Green River to access a wealth of restaurants as well as local guides and outfitters for mountain biking, river rafting, rock climbing, off-highway vehicles and more Destinations: Fisher Towers, Sand Flats Recreation Area, Castle Valley, Dead Horse Point State Park, stops on the Dinosaur Diamond and Lower Colorado scenic byways 76

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Life at Elevation

t dawn and dusk, mule deer graze the forested plateau along the road into Bryce Canyon. The high-alpine environment is home to dozens of species of mammals and birds, all acquainted with a spectacular truth: this is no ordinary forest. Water and wind over millions of years, freezing and thawing, have carved into the plateau endless fields of the park’s distinctive red rock pillars, called hoodoos. To create some separation from the crowd, look at Fairyland or Riggs Spring loops, two 8-mile hikes that will require more time and better preparation, with the reward of seeing more of the park than most. Though it’s Utah’s smallest national park, there is backcountry in Bryce — load up a pack for an overnight at designated camping spots, grab a permit and find your way to the furthest reaches of this hoodoo wonderland. Tip: Since the park sits at more than 8,000 feet above sea level, in winter, snowshoeing and cross-country skiing can take the place of traditional hikes, so keep an eye on the forecast and park information to know what road and trail conditions await. nps.gov/brca, @BryceCanyonNPS and visitutah.com/bryce-cayon

Complete Vacation Base camps: Bryce Canyon City, Tropic and Panguitch to access area guides for mountain biking, fishing, all-terrain vehicle trails and horseback riding Destinations: Red Canyon, Kodachrome Basin State Park, Grand Staircase-Escalante and Cedar Breaks national monuments, Brian Head Resort


It is believed the first people to explore what is now Zion National Park entered the canyon looking for food. Thousands of years later, more than 4 million people come from around the world to feed more than their bodies. Most visitors today come to nourish their souls with the sight of the verdant valleys and vermillion cliffs of Zion, one of the most visited national parks in the United States. All of Utah’s Mighty 5® national parks are well-loved for their ability to inspire awe. If you give yourself the freedom to wander mindfully by planning extra time, each park offers the opportunity for a fuller, more intimate experience. Each park, and its surrounding area, is a trip all its own.

Canyonlands National Park

Capitol Reef National Park

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Tip: Each district can fill an entire outdoor adventure vacation, with offerings ranging from guided overnight mountain biking or river rafting to solitary backpacking. nps. gov/cany, @CanyonlandsNPS and visitutah.com/canyonlands

Tip: First-time visitors should certainly stop for pie at the Gifford House, pick in-season fruit from the orchards in the historic Fruita District and tour the park’s scenic drive. Check seasonality and road conditions. nps.gov/care, @CapitolReefNPS and visitutah.com/capitol-reef

Complete Vacation

Complete Vacation

Base camps: Moab and Hanksville (or Green River) for Island in the Sky and The Maze, respectively, and Monticello for The Needles

Base camps: Torrey and other towns from Hanksville to Loa along S.R. 24

Four for the Price of One

magine wave after wave of deep canyons, towering mesas, pinnacles, cliffs and spires stretching across 527 square miles. Four land districts comprise Canyonlands, shaped through the erosive power of water and time by Utah’s Green and Colorado rivers. The park grabs your attention with panoramic overlooks on Island in the Sky, but you’ll fall in love with deeper explorations, like a guided mountain biking trip on White Rim Trail, overnight backcountry hikes in The Needles or standing before the Great Gallery’s petroglyphs in Horseshoe Canyon. With a permit and a little know-how, the canyon country of southeastern Utah is open for exploration. And with a lot of extra time, the right equipment and experience, self-sufficient adventurers can find their way into one of the most remote places in the lower 48: The Maze District. Canyonlands is also accredited as an International Dark Sky Park.

Destinations: Dead Horse Point State Park, Bears Ears National Monument, Horseshoe Canyon, Edge of the Cedars State Park Museum

Equipped for the Backcountry

t is difficult to rival Capitol Reef ’s broad, sweeping vistas of tortured, twisted and seemingly endless desert rock landscape beneath limitless sky. While visitors should plan lots of time to explore the park’s extensive trail system near the highway, including longer, lesser trafficked hikes on Frying Pan or Navajo Knobs, or even the watery walk down Sulphur Creek, the park really makes a name for itself with its backcountry. If you have a high-clearance vehicle and backcountry experience, unpaved roads along the park’s central geologic feature — the 100-mile-long Waterpocket Fold and into Cathedral Valley — access remote trails, twisting canyons, towering monoliths and backcountry primitive camping under pristine dark skies. Don’t worry: nearby towns offer terrific local dining, lodging and supply stops: perfect bookends to your time off the grid.

Destinations: Goblin Valley State Park, San Rafael Swell, Boulder Mountain

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Zion National Park Place of Refuge

HOW TO VISIT Safely exploring the parks, monuments and wide-open lands of Southern Utah often means adhering to the old scouting motto, “be prepared.” This is How-to-Utah 101:

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randeur is easy to behold here, but the real spirit of Zion is the subtle wonders. The main canyon floor and its trails are stunning — crowds are understandably drawn to them. During the busy summer months, you’ll want to leave your car in town and catch the shuttle. Give yourself plenty of time and be patient. While there are trails that receive less traffic, you’ll experience the most solitude in the backcountry. Wherever you are in Zion, it’s worth pausing to reflect on the space you’re in. The elements took eons to create the varied wonders of Zion National Park. Whether you are trying to catch your breath while climbing the incredible trail to Observation Point, or up early to cycle the canyon and look for wildlife, you’ll build the most enduring memories when you plan time to appreciate all that makes up Zion — and that may well include hiring a guide for canyoneering, or getting a permit for a backcountry overnight. Tip: Follow alerts at nps.gov/zion, @ZionNPS on Twitter or try the chatbot at visitutah.com/zion, which can help with current conditions, weather, shuttle schedule, traffic and park recommendations.

Complete Vacation Base camps: St. George, La Verkin, Hurricane, Springdale and Kanab (East Entrance) to access local guides and outfitters for area canyoneering, mountain biking, off-highway vehicle options and warm-water fishing Destinations: Snow Canyon, Quail Creek and Sand Hollow state parks, Red Cliffs National Conservation Area, Gooseberry Mesa

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Stay on trails and hike in appropriate apparel and footwear, carrying plenty of water for everyone in your group, and provisions for longer hikes. Make sure to pack out everything with you. Southern Utah can exceed 100 degrees in the summer and the high-country desert plateaus will rapidly parch your thirst. Beat the heat by planning ahead and exploring early in the morning and later in the evening during the peak of summer. Get acclimated to the altitude if you’re visiting from a lower elevation. Give yourself extra time and manage your electrolytes. The parks range from around 4,000 to 9,000 feet above sea level. This also means chilly nights and mornings in spring and fall, and freezing temperatures should you visit in winter. Be mindful of other travelers’ experiences by respectfully sharing viewsheds and soundscapes. Arrive with the mindset to stay awhile. Take a backpack for your supplies so you can take on those longer hikes and activities with fewer visitors. A few more things to think about when planning and visiting the parks and their environs: respect and protect; leave no trace; and tread lightly. Southern Utah landscapes appear durable and timeless yet can be quite fragile. Whether carefully approaching sensitive ancient sites and petroglyphs or sticking to the trail through delicate cryptobiotic soil, mindful travel enriches your visit and protects the place. Look for more inspiration and begin planning your trip at visitutah.com

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UNIQUELY UTAH ROUNDUP 10 ACTIVITIES YOU CAN ONLY DO IN UTAH

© Image courtesy of Cody Booth @cdtwitchy

Loosen Up at a Ski-In Distillery From Park City Mountain, you can ski right up to the High West Distillery & Saloon for a session of small-batch, local whiskey tasting paired with the saloon's western-inspired menu. When High West began distilling in Park City in 2007, it was Utah’s first legal distillery since 1870. Now, it’s probably one of the few places on Earth where you can get a decent Old-Fashioned while still wearing your ski boots. Looking for more? Enjoy a tour and whiskey tasting at the scenic Distillery and Tasting Room at Blue Sky Ranch in the nearby, quaint mountain town of Wanship.

Drive Through a 46-Mile-Long Art Gallery Follow Nine Mile Canyon Road into the rugged and remote Book Cliffs, where tens of thousands of petroglyphs and pictographs line the rock walls. These images have been traced to the ancient Fremont people and date between 400-1400 A.D. In the canyon, you’ll also pass through Harper ghost town. Many visitors combine Nine Mile Canyon with trips to the San Rafael Swell. Plan at least a half-day to drive the canyon with options to get out and hike or bike. Remember to practice the “leave no trace” principles and avoid touching any of the petroglyphs.

Taste the Craft Chocolate Capital of the United States Between Salt Lake City, Park City and Provo are eight bean-to-bar chocolate makers, making Utah one the most dense capitals of quality, small-batch craft chocolate in the United States. The local Caputo’s Markets currently stock upward of 500 varieties of chocolate. Local chocolatier Amano Artisan Chocolate is arguably one of the most award-winning chocolate in the world, having won more than 200 national and international awards.

Stargaze at a Certified Dark Sky Park The Great Western Starry Way is a catalog of the finest dark skies in the developed world. Of the 50 accredited or in-process International Dark Sky Parks and Communities, half of them are in Utah. Across the state, with multiple certified parks from north to south, there is almost no bad place in Utah to observe the starry show after dark. Find a certified park at: visitutah.com/stargaze

See the Landscapes Behind Iconic Western Films From the Bonneville Salt Flats to Monument Valley Navajo Tribal Park, Utah is one of the silver screen’s best-loved and most diverse backdrops. Get in the mind of a western legend by hiking or mountain biking the Cassidy Trail of Red Canyon. The trail is located along the route used to evade the law by the notorious, Utah-born Butch Cassidy. It was also the primary filming location for the 1969 movie “Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid,” starring Robert Redford and Paul Newman. Snow Canyon and Dead Horse Point state parks, as well as Castle Valley, Arches National Park and Lake Powell, also frequently grace the big screen. Find more film tourism locations: visitutah.com/film 80

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See Jurassic-aged Dinosaur Bones Utah is a hotbed of new fossil discoveries nestled among stunning landscapes. The Cleveland-Lloyd Dinosaur Quarry contains the densest concentration of Jurassic-aged dinosaur bones ever found. Over 12,000 bones (belonging to at least 74 individual dinosaurs) have been excavated at the quarry. Want to find out about all the dinosaur action Utah has to offer? The best place to get started is the Natural History Museum of Utah, which includes a stunning display of the state’s prehistoric past and dinosaurs.

Ski Among the Red Rocks At 9,800 feet, Brian Head Resort rises from one of the nation’s highest base towns, offering red rock views from a high-desert alpine environment. While enjoying 71 runs across 650 acres, skiers and snowboarders also peer into the nearby red rock amphitheater of Cedar Breaks National Monument. Just over a three-hour drive from Salt Lake City, this resort is uniquely Utah. And don’t overlook the fact that the resort is also known for great barbecue, served up by the owner, “Big” John Grissinger, who is a Kansas City native turned Utah ambassador.

Meander the Longest Slot Canyon in the World Buckskin Gulch is the world’s longest slot canyon, stretching for more than 15 miles. In its narrows, the slot canyon is no more than 10 feet wide and reaches up to 500 feet deep. To complete the entire hike is a serious endeavor and is generally completed over several days. But the canyon can also be experienced for a few hours — park the car, walk the trail to the canyon entrance, walk the slot canyon for a couple miles, then return the way you came. Wire Pass Trailhead offers the most direct access for a day hike. Learn more about the hike: visitutah.com/buckskin

Walk on a Piece of Earth Art Jutting out into the bed of the Great Salt Lake is the Spiral Jetty, a famous piece of earth art created by sculptor Robert Smithson. Smithson formed the Spiral Jetty from six thousand tons of black basalt rocks and earth from the site. The spiral reaches 1,500 feet in length and is 15 feet wide. Perhaps most miraculous are the views from the jetty, where the Great Salt Lake often takes on a very pink hue. While in the area, check out the Golden Spike National Historic Site. Fill up your tank and bring water, snacks and towels, just in case. Experience the Sundance Film Festival Robert Redford’s storied film festival lights up the streets of Park City and Salt Lake City every January. It’s a mix of celebrities and locals, all gathering to appreciate the art of film and vibrant culture. When not catching a show, mix in some fine dining and experience the area's wintry recreation, from downhill and cross-country skiing to snowshoeing and ice castles. Learn more about the festival: sundance.org/festival

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ROADTRIP!

BEARS EARS STARTER KIT

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pair of towering, distant buttes emerge against a beautiful backdrop, where rugged terrain meets expansive sky. The twin buttes are so distinctive that in each of the native languages of the region their name is the same: Hoon'Naqvut, Shash Jáa, Kwiyagatu Nukavachi, Ansh An Lashokdiwe, or in English: Bears Ears. (Your best view of the Bears Ears occurs on the third day of this itinerary, but they are not a primary destination.) Bears Ears National Monument covers a broad expanse of red rock, juniper forests, high plateau, cultural, historic and prehistoric legacy that includes an abundance of early human and Native American historical artifacts left behind by early Clovis people, then later Ancestral Puebloans, Fremont people and others. The Navajo Nation, Ute Mountain Ute Tribe, Hopi Nation and other tribes have close, contemporary connections to the land.

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3 Days, 320 Miles

Perhaps many road trips have covered the distance between Moab and Monument Valley without realizing what treasures are out there. While the designation of Bears Ears has started to change that, southeastern Utah remains a remote and little-understood place. Two units of Bears Ears, Indian Creek and Shash Jáa, provide a glimpse into the diverse lands that stretch across the southeastern corner of Utah, in the famed Four Corners region of the United States. You'll visit ancestral cliff dwellings, examine the desert ecosystem, stand beneath gargantuan natural bridges, and interact with the communities of locals and native cultures that call it all home. Much of Bears Ears National Monument is remote and requires a combination of wayfinding skills and a high-clearance vehicle to access, or the savvy of a wellprepared backpacker. Much of Bears Ears

is also fragile. Travelers to any of the thousands of ancestral sites, including cliff dwellings and kivas — testaments to astonishing architectural prowess and strong prehistoric communities — should visit with extreme care and observe the land's “respect and protect” principles. Appreciate from afar: examine potsherds, arrowheads and other fragments of past cultures with awe, but leave them where you find them. Note the imprint of some ancient thumb in the adobe mortar, but leave no trace of your own. No matter its designation, no matter how you say it, Bears Ears combines profound human past with distinctive and sacred lands. You could lose yourself for days out here, but this Bears Ears area starter kit introduces you to the experiences, places, history and people that give definition to these fascinating lands.


DAY 1 - 160 MILES

INTRODUCTION TO BEARS EARS

If traveling south from the Moab area, start with an exploratory drive through the Indian Creek unit of Bears Ears — on the Indian Creek Corridor Scenic Byway — including a stop at Newspaper Rock State Historic Monment. Though not the focus of this itinerary, if your schedule permits, add a day (or more) for a visit to the Needles District of Canyonlands National Park at the end of the byway. Your best introduction to Bears Ears might be a stop at the Edge of the Cedars State Park Museum, whose collection highlights the artifacts and lifestyle of ancestral Puebloan culture. Introductory hikes to the Shash Jáa unit of Bears Ears include House on Fire and Cave Towers, but an even more accessible, and well-interpreted, trail is the Butler Wash Ruins Overlook. Stay overnight in Monticello, Blanding or Bluff for lodging; or the IDA-certified International Dark Sky Park Hovenweep National Monument for camping, stargazing and an early start for tomorrow’s adventure.

DAY 2 - 70 MILES

DAY 3 - 90 MILES

If you camped overnight in Hovenweep National Monument and the skies were clear, you’ll proceed, star-struck, to the well-interpreted trails of the monument. Here, you can peer into the lives of an ancient culture that built astonishing multistoried towers on the edge of a canyon more than 700 years ago. Meanwhile, Bluff, Utah, is a small town with a big personality where you can enjoy great local food and coffee. The nearby Twin Rocks Trading Post honors local Navajo artists with fairly-priced, museum-caliber baskets and art. The tour continues near the south end of Shash Jaa, with an easy stop at Sand Island petroglyphs, and a more challenging visit to the River House Ruin, which showcases a confluence of ancient culture with Mormon pioneer culture. Visit the Bluff Fort historic site for details on the area's pioneer past.

As scenic as the trip has been so far, on day three the skies get bigger, and the vistas broader, as you ascend in elevation. Peer down at the meandering San Juan River at Goosenecks State Park and explore the Valley of the Gods Scenic Backway on an unpaved road through landscapes sometimes described as a miniature Monument Valley — think red rock monoliths below rolling clouds. The drive continues up the unpaved and narrow switchbacks of the Moki Dugway of state Route 261 — excluding large RVs and trailers — to crest the vast and lush Cedar Mesa. Here, the eponymous Bears Ears formation comes fully into view as two distinctive buttes rising from the mesa, which will stay in your windshield as you traverse Cedar Mesa en route to Natural Bridges National Monument. Natural Bridges can be enjoyed with an automobile tour, stopping at overlooks, but adventurous hikers will want to descend into the canyon at least once to stand beneath some of the world’s largest natural bridges.

ANCESTRAL LIVES AND ART

Lodgers can reserve overnight accommodations in Bluff, or you could consider adding a day to this itinerary with an overnight and tour of Monument Valley Navajo Tribal Park.

GOOSENECKS, GODS AND BRIDGES

Find more Utah trip ideas at visitutah.com/itineraries

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ROADTRIP!

SOUTHERN DINOS AND GOBLINS

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ou could build an entire trip out of Utah's dinosaur and rock art sites. For this itinerary, we're sticking to Southern Utah. Day one drops you into the epicenter of adventure in the city of Moab. Roar up steep slickrock to rarely seen overlooks on a Hummer tour, then scramble to the base of the behemoth Wilson Arch — the most accessible arch for small kids. Finish the day by roaming a dinosaur trail, where life-size statues of massive Mesozoic monsters stand frozen in time for children to ogle. Day two is for the history hounds: visit Newspaper Rock in the Indian Creek unit of Bears of National

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4 Days, 430 Miles

Monument, where hundreds of well-preserved petroglyphs share the 2,000-year-old news. Then, live like the pioneers who settled this once-barren area at Bluff Fort. End the day by wandering through an eclectic mid-century home carved into the side of a cliff at Hole N" the Rock. Day three takes you to another easily accessible panel of petroglyphs in Sand Island, part of the Shash JĂĄa unit of Bears Ears. Here, you can also play on the sandy beaches of the San Juan River. Next, head for the entertaining Goulding's Lodge and sweeping panorama of Monument Valley.

Jump in a Jeep with a Navajo tour guide at Monument Valley and learn about Navajo culture and the area's incredible history. Your final day takes you to one of two places: Natural Bridges National Monument, where stone bridges delicately hang between cliffs; or Goblin Valley State Park, a magical place where kids, and kids-at-heart, can climb on goblin-like pillars of sandstone. Top it off with a scamper through Little Wild Horse Canyon: a playful, but not overly technical, slot canyon that will make everyone in the family feel like a kid again.


DAY 1 - 55 MILES

DAY 2 - 125 MILES

Load ‘em up! Sure, the family wagon gets your vacation going, but it won't always take you where you want to go. To climb the steep slickrock overlooking unbelievable natural places, leave the wagon for the day and choose from one of several Moab outfitters offering rides to places only a Hummer should go. Afterward, learn about prehistoric life at Moab Giants, where state-of-the-art indoor interactive exhibits meld with lands where dinosaurs once roamed. Dead Horse Point State Park is your evening stop, offering views that rival the Grand Canyon. If you have the time, today is also a good day to visit Arches National Park. Spend the night in Moab.

By outward appearance, Hole N" the Rock appears kitschy. The large block lettering on the massive sandstone wall will definitely catch your eye. But, this is actually a pretty impressive place, blasted and hand-chiseled into a hometurned-gift shop and curio cabinet with guided tours. Kids under five are free. Marvel at the art and history behind Newspaper Rock on the Indian Creek Corridor Scenic Byway in Bears Ears National Monument. Time permitting, the Cave Spring hike in Canyonlands National Park is great for families. Fans of pioneer history may want to press on to Bluff Fort. Spend the night in Monticello, Blanding or Bluff.

DAY 3 - 50 MILES

DAY 4 - 200 MILES

Start the day by touring easily accessible petroglyphs in the scenic landscape defined by the winding San Juan River. Sand Island is another quick glimpse into the storied past of Bears Ears National Monument. More adventurous families may spend today rafting the gentle rapids of the river. Otherwise, Monument Valley Navajo Tribal Park awaits. Book a Jeep tour in advance to get the best access to the park. There are tours of varying lengths depending on how much time you want to spend exploring the Navajo art, artifacts, western memorabilia, and Navajo tacos of Goulding’s Lodge. Overnight in Monument Valley or Mexican Hat.

Today, gauge the family’s energy level and make a choice: explore deep into Natural Bridges National Monument on moderately strenuous hikes, or stick to the scenic drive with overlooks and save some extra time for Goblin Valley. Goblin Valley’s whimsical geology charms kids of all ages. The Valley of Goblins, the park’s main attraction, is located at its heart. Here, there are three established trails which are suitable for most anyone. Further down Little Wild Horse Road is the excellent canyon of the same name, where kids will love squeezing through the narrow passage.

MOAB TO DEAD HORSE POINT PARK

BLUFF FORT TO MONUMENT VALLEY

DEAD HORSE TO BLUFF FORT

MONUMENT VALLEY TO GOBLIN VALLEY

Find more Utah trip ideas at visitutah.com/itineraries

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ROADTRIP!

FARTHER AWAY FROM IT ALL

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tah writer Edward Abbey famously referred to wild places as “not a luxury but a necessity of the human spirit, and as vital to our lives as water and good bread.” This sixday itinerary will provide you with plenty of wild spaces to soothe your soul and boost your spirits along your journey.

For well-prepared backpackers, with a permit and a shuttle, you could use this time to spend five spectacular days backpacking the 48-mile Trans Zion Trek, with its deep canyons, high ridgelines, and all the striking views of Zion National Park you can imagine. Or you can split up your Utah trip across several wild spaces. Start with

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6 Days, 820 Miles

the rugged scenery of the Joshua Tree Scenic Backway, or the Mars-like landscape of Gooseberry Mesa, and then add the expansive views and natural quiet of Red Cliffs National Conservation Area. You’ll find full solitude in Ashdown Gorge Wilderness Area, where only 10 miles of trail sprinkle the 7,000-acre expanse. Later, you can drop deep into Bryce Canyon National Park’s spire-filled backcountry, where few tourists ever venture. Capitol Reef National Park will provide you with the national park experience without the usual crowds. After a spectacular sunset, you can gaze

at the majestic Milky Way in one of Utah’s internationally-certified Dark Sky Parks. Towering sandstone buttes stand as silent sentinels over the spirit of the desert at Monument Valley and ancestral cliff dwellings hide in the canyons of Bears Ears National Monument. Soak up the vast expanses and cloistered spaces of the Needles District of Canyonlands National Park, where you can you feel like the only person in the world. Spend a few days away from the hustle and bustle and gain a new appreciation for the peace you’ll find in wild places.


DAY 1 - 115 MILES

DAY 2 - 100 MILES

DAY 3 - 300 MILES

Day one begins at Gooseberry Mesa; for a rolling tour, take along some mountain bikes. Or, you can simply take a hike around its fascinating Marslike landscape. Tour the remote Joshua Tree Backway, then hike through the conservation habitat of Red Cliffs Desert Reserve. You might also make a stop at the reservoir of Gunlock State Park, then spend the night in Cedar City.

On the rim of Cedar Breaks National Monument, you might find yourself wondering, “What’s out there?” Turns out it’s the Ashdown Gorge in the Dixie National Forest. The Ramparts trail hike can separate you from the crowd, but true solace awaits you in the Ashdown Gorge. Time permitting, continue on to Bryce Canyon and set up camp, or book a room in the area so you can gain easy access to the spectacular stargazing afforded by the park’s Dark Sky designation.

A high-clearance vehicle will get you deep into the backcountry of Capitol Reef, where some of its most iconic sandstone monoliths stand sentry over these peaceful, but rugged lands. You can break from the crowd on the Frying Pan and Cassidy Arch hikes or stick to the more popular Cohab Canyon and Grand Wash hikes. Feel free to linger in Torrey for great dining and lodging options or continue to Natural Bridges for a second date with the Milky Way, this time by camping in the world’s first certified International Dark Sky Park.

DAY 4 - 115 MILES

DAY 5 - 100 MILES

DAY 6 - 90 MILES

State Route 261 is a wonderful drive. Not only do you get the white-knuckleinducing switchbacks of the Moki Dugway, a place where large RVs and trailers should not pass, but you get a glance at the lovely Cedar Mesa region of San Juan County. There are lots of trailheads here, or you can grab the aerial view of it all from Muley Point and continue down through Valley of the Gods to your spirit tour of Monument Valley. Stay overnight in Monument Valley or Bluff.

Here’s a good choice to have to make: Book a day on the San Juan River for the best angle on several excellent petroglyphs or take the lonely road to Hovenweep National Monument to peer into an ancient civilization. Regardless, the cliff dwellings of Bears Ears National Monument’s Shash Jáa unit found on hikes along state Route 95 are a must. Spend the night in Blanding.

On the final day, stop in Monticello for information and provisions, then see the Indian Creek unit of Bears Ears National Monument with a stop at Newspaper Rock. This scenic byway takes you into the Needles District of Canyonlands National Park. This hiker-friendly landscape offers dozens of incredible trails, many of which are overnighters (with a permit) and will get you far away from the crowds. The even more popular Druid Arch is a solid 10.8-mile day, which means you’ll only hobnob with other dedicated hikers.

ST. GEORGE TO CEDAR CITY

Alternatively, you can stop by the lesservisited Kolob Canyons section of Zion National Park for a hike — a long hike. And, if you really want to disappear for a few days, get a permit, arrange a shuttle, and gear up for a multi-day trip through the backcountry of Zion.

NATURAL BRIDGES TO MONUMENT

CEDAR CITY TO BRYCE CANYON

MONUMENT VALLEY TO BLANDING

BRYCE CANYON TO NATURAL BRIDGES

BLANDING TO CANYONLANDS

Find more Utah trip ideas at visitutah.com/itineraries

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10 KID FAVORITES!

WITH EXPANSIVE RANGES AND PRISTINE MOUNTAIN SNOW, TOP-RATED SKI RESORTS AND INCREDIBLE NATIONAL AND STATE PARKS, UTAH IS A PLACE FOR PLAY. THE BEEHIVE STATE ISN’T JUST A NATURAL PLAYGROUND FOR ADULTS, IT'S ALSO HOME TO SOME FUN-FILLED PLACES FOR CHILDREN.

LOVELAND LIVING PLANET AQUARIUM It’s true, life is better under the sea. At the Living Planet Aquarium you will “dive” beneath the waves and come face-to-face with some of the world’s most dazzling sea creatures. Don’t let the name fool you; the aquarium also has plenty of land animals from Utah, Antarctica, Asia and South America. Explore the world and meet some of the most fascinating creatures from far away lands. After you’ve made new friends, visit the 4D Theatre and watch educational movies that let you experience unbelievable adventures. A day at the Living Planet Aquarium is a day well spent.

THANKSGIVING POINT From colossal creatures of the past to beautiful gardens and a hands-on, interactive museum experience, Thanksgiving Point has something for everyone. There you can explore the Museum of Natural Curiosity, take a relaxing stroll through the Ashton Gardens, or visit the animals on a real working farm. Thanksgiving Point is the perfect place to take the family.

UTAH’S HOGLE ZOO Have you ever come face-to-face with a lion, heard the triumphant trumpet of an elephant’s call, or been so close to a polar bear you could almost touch it? If not, you need to visit Utah’s Hogle Zoo. The zoo offers visitors a chance to get up close with wild animals in its Asian Highlands, Rocky Shores and Elephant Encounter exhibits. Be sure to take a ride on the Zoofari Express train that takes you through the middle of it all. Not only will you learn about fascinating species, but you will also discover the zoo’s conservation efforts.

LAGOON AMUSEMENT PARK Whether you prefer fast and thrilling roller coasters or smooth sailing joy rides, Lagoon has something for every member of the family. If roller coasters aren’t your thing, you can also relax at Lagoon-A-Beach, step into the past and take a stroll through Pioneer Village, or take a break from walking and enjoy the park’s live entertainment options. There’s never a dull moment at Utah’s favorite amusement park.

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SEVEN PEAKS RESORT Utah summers can get very hot. When the temperatures rise to uncomfortable levels, there’s only one thing to do — head for the water. Splash into summer at Seven Peaks Resort. Seven Peaks is the perfect place to cool down. Complete with a kiddie pool area, numerous waterslides ranging from mild to wild, and a super fun wave pool, Seven Peaks has everything you need for some cool family fun.

DISCOVERY GATEWAY Discover the power of play at Discovery Gateway! Discovery Gateway Children’s Museum is full of interactive exhibits that invite the whole family to create, learn and play. The exhibits range from a reading nook to a sensory room. The main rules are to have fun and to learn something new. Create new family memories at Discovery Gateway Children’s Museum. © Image courtesy of NHMU/Tom Smart

CLARK PLANETARIUM Since the dawn of time we have been gazing up at the night sky in wonderment. Thousands of years of discovery are waiting for you at the Clark Planetarium. Discover the vastness of the universe and gaze at the sheer size of our solar system. Learn the wonders of the natural world and experience the Earth as you never have before. Visit the Clark Planetarium and let your imagination take flight as you wander through exhibits and tackle hands-on exhibits. © Image courtesy of NHMU/Tom Smart

NATURAL HISTORY MUSEUM OF UTAH Are you fascinated by the creatures and people of Utah’s past? If so, you should visit the Natural History Museum of Utah. The museum has a vast collection of fossils and relics found locally, as well as some found farther away. Discover the wonders of the creatures that used to roam here. Learn about the culture of the Native Americans and walk among their artifacts. Uncover the beauty of the present by stepping into the past at the Natural History Museum of Utah. © Image courtesy of NHMU/Tom Smart

WHEELER HISTORIC FARM Utah is full of easily accessible historic sites, one of which is the Wheeler Historic Farm. Established in 1870, the farm was once the home of William and Martha Grainger Young. Now, almost 150 years later, the farm is still home to horses, cows, pigs and goats. The farm offers tours, wagon rides, cow milking and more. You can even rent the barn for events. Wheeler Historic Farm is the perfect place to get up close to farm animals.

TRACY AVIARY If flying animals are more your style, make sure to visit the Tracy Aviary. Come face-to-face with some of the most beautiful birds from all over the world. Attend a bird show and watch them soar above your head. You can check out the white pelicans, chilean flamingos, gold and bald eagles as well as some of the birds that inhabit Utah’s lakes and wetlands. And although you’re in the middle of Salt Lake City, you can also experience the sights and sounds of a real tropical rainforest. There are plenty of feathered friends to meet and interact with at Tracy Aviary.

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HISTORIC SITES A BLAST TO THE PAST

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espite its seemingly remote location, Utah has long served as the crossroads of the Western United States and, as such, has many important historic sites and heritage areas. As many railroad enthusiasts and American history buffs know, May 10, 2019, will offer a rare opportunity to celebrate the 150th anniversary of the completion of the Transcontinental Railroad. The placing of the Golden Spike at Promontory Summit in 1869, which marked the connections of the Union Pacific and Central Pacific lines, heralded an accomplishment that physically and symbolically brought together a nation still healing from the Civil War. Many “Spike 150” festivities (spike150.org) are planned throughout the state, including the sesquicentennial celebrations at the Golden Spike National Historic Monument. Visiting the park on any day, however, will delight young and old, particularly because of the daily demonstrations of the steam locomotives. For a truly unique experience, pair your visit to Golden Spike with a trip to Spiral Jetty, one of the greatest examples of “land art” in the country. Another stop in northern Utah, the Union Pacific Depot in Ogden, has multiple exhibitions about the history of the railroad and its impact on the state. The Depot also serves as an anchor for Historic 25th Street, which has a rough-and-tumble past but has now become a hotbed for dining and nightlife. For many, traveling to Utah means visiting the state’s national parks — a trip that affords many opportunities to also experience the history of Mormon pioneers, outlaws, Native Americans and more. Although a few miles into Nevada and not technically one of Utah’s national parks, Great Basin National Park includes the Lehman 90

LIFE IN UTAH 2019 | SLCHAMBER.com

Caves that once operated as a resort. Driving from Salt Lake City will allow for a stop at the Topaz Camp Museum in Delta, which gives a glimpse into the lives of the Japanese residents of the Topaz internment camp during World War II. Zion National Park is a must-see destination, and many will drive I-15 to reach it. Along the way, a stop at the well-preserved Territorial Statehouse in Fillmore offers a window into life in the 1850s and features some of Utah’s earliest pioneer furniture. A little further south is the recently restored and professionally interpreted Cove Fort, which served as a residence, barn, blacksmith shop, stagecoach and mail courier stop. Cove Fort is also the only fort built by the Latter-day Saints in the 1800s that still stands today. Another interesting stop only minutes from the freeway is the town of Parowan, affectionately called the “Mother Town of Southern Utah.” Today, visitors to the Old Rock Church will see a prime example of Greek Revival architecture in a building built of old growth timber, sandstone and adobe brick. Inside, a museum includes what is described as a massive curio cabinet filled with 19th and early 20th century artifacts, Native American and natural history materials. Another stop nearby is the Parowan Gap, where visitors can see some of Utah’s most significant ancient art and graffiti panels, wonderful evidence of ancient inhabitants and recent travelers. An alternate route to Zion and Bryce Canyon National Park is U.S. 89, the “Heritage Highway,” that runs through the heart of Utah. This highway can provide a scenic route for most of the southern portion of the state without adding significant time. While the entire drive can feel like a journey through time, one essential stop is Spring City, where many people have restored century-old homes.

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HERITAGE FESTIVAL TRANSCONTINENTAL CONNECTION 150TH ANNIVERSARY MAY 9-11, 2019 - LOCATED ON HISTORIC 25TH STREET

Ogden Downtown Alliance, Ogden City and Visit Ogden present a special anniversary edition of the annual Heritage Festival held at Ogden Union Station expanding the event down Historic 25th Street for three full days of historic presentations, live music, performances, vendors, community activities and more. For more information and a calendar of 150 th events in Ogden, visit GoldenSpike2019.com


SKI UTAH!

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© Images courtesy of Utah Office of Tourism

YOUR GUIDE TO THE GREATEST SNOW ON EARTH

®

tah is home to 14 world-class resorts. With 10 of those resorts within an hour of the Salt Lake City International Airport, the access to thousands of acres of skiing and snowboarding is unparalleled. Utah’s 14 resorts provide terrain at every level, so whether you’re a seasoned powder pro or a beginner hitting the slopes for the first time, there’s an adventure for everyone.

SALT LAKE AREA

Big city life and deep powder together in one package. That's the beauty of Salt Lake City. Stay downtown and be on the slopes at Solitude Mountain Resort, Brighton Resort, Alta Ski Area or Snowbird before you know it. All of these resorts feature incredible terrain and more than 500 inches of snow annually. Once you’ve had your fill of powder, check out the infinite number of bars, restaurants, sporting events, museums and concerts available in the Salt Lake Valley.

PROVO AREA

Nestled in the shadow of Mount Timpanogos, the famed Sundance Mountain Resort contains more than 450 skiable acres combined with oneof-a-kind experiences, like on-site art classes throughout the year. Its intimate surroundings, understated elegance and relaxed atmosphere create the perfect mountain escape. 92

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PARK CITY AREA

Park City is a mere 35 minutes from Salt Lake City International Airport. Once there, choose between Park City Mountain and Deer Valley Resort. Park City Mountain has more than 7,300 acres with a new beginner ski and snowboard area opening during the 2018-2019 season. Deer Valley Resort is a ski-only resort with 14 restaurants, three elegant day lodges and hundreds of luxury accommodations. For a post-skiing activity, wander Park City’s Main Street with local shops and more than 100 bars and restaurants.

SOUTHERN UTAH

The Greatest Snow on Earth® meets red rock at Utah's two most southern resorts: Eagle Point and Brian Head Ski Resort. Both are within four hours of Salt Lake and three hours of Las Vegas. Supplement a ski trip with visits to Cedar Breaks National Monument, Bryce Canyon and Zion National Parks, all within a two-hour drive.

OGDEN AREA

Home to Powder Mountain, Snowbasin Resort and Nordic Valley, the Ogden region has plenty of snow without all the crowds. Snowbasin has amazing views of the Great Salt Lake and an award-winning lesson program. Powder Mountain guarantees an uncrowded skiing experience by capping day passes to 1,500 per day and season passes at 3,000. With a family-friendly atmosphere and small-resort feel, Nordic Valley is perfect for those learning how to ski or ride. The town of Ogden and its Historic 25th Street are just 30 minutes away from all the skiing.

NORTHERN UTAH

Beaver Mountain and Cherry Peak Resort are both within an hour of Logan, Utah, home to Utah State University. Beaver Mountain, the oldest family-owned-andoperated resort in North America, is perfect for families with kids or those looking for a true throwback. For more information on Utah’s ski resorts and to start planning your trip, visit skiutah.com


ClearTheAirChallenge.org CA R P O O L

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TRIP CHAIN

ALWAYS IN SEASON SPRING BEER FEST

MUSIC ON THE PLAZA

PECULIAR POURS BEER FEST

URBAN ADVENTURE FESTIVAL

FARMERS MARKET OGDEN

WITCHSTOCK

HERITAGE FESTIVAL

HARVEST MOON CELEBRATION

ADDITIONAL POP-UP EVENTS

HISTORIC 25TH STREET CAR SHOW

FALL MARKET BY FARMERS MARKET OGDEN

March 23, 2019

May 4, 2019

May 9-11, 2019

June 7, 2019

Wednesdays, June 12 - July 17, 2019

Saturdays, June 22 - September 14, 2019

September 21, 2019

October 12, 2019

October 26, 2019

Pop-up Art Projects throughout the year

September 28 - October 26, 2019

SEE WHAT'S HAPPENING DOWNTOWN

Visit OgdenDowntown.com Follow @OgdenDowntown on Instagram and Facebook

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FESTIVALS!

tah is not short of things to do. The state has a wide variety of celebrations and festivals that offer the opportunity to explore another side of the state’s artistry, culture, diversity and heritage. There’s something for everyone throughout the entire year. Spend time with family and friends enjoying art, music, outdoor recreation and so much more. Here are some of the top events happening around the state you won’t want to miss.

SPRING

arrival of spring and the passing of winter. Come ready to get doused in the colors of the rainbow. Living Traditions Festival

Tulip Festival at Thanksgiving Point

As the weather turns warmer, the tulips at the Ashton Gardens begin to bloom! Check out the arrival of 280,000 tulips at the Tulip Festival at Thanksgiving Point. Spread throughout the 55-acre Thanksgiving Point Gardens, it is definitely a sight to be seen. On Fridays and Saturdays, the Tulip Festival includes music, vendors, food and storytelling for children. Fun fact: All tulips at this festival are imported directly from Holland.

Every year, more than 70 different cultural groups come together for the Living Traditions Festival — a free, cultural celebration that showcases traditional music, dance, foods and crafts of the ethnic communities that make Salt Lake their home. From Bosnian stuffed pitas and West African samosas to Chinese dragon dancing and Scottish bagpipes, the sights, sounds and flavors of the festival cannot be found at any other cultural event in Utah.

© Image courtesy of Salt Lake City Arts Council

artist marketplace, music and performing arts, film, street theater, literary arts and Art Yard. Utah Pride Festival

Rainbow flags line the streets of Salt Lake City during the first week of June for the Utah Pride Festival. Celebrate Utah’s diversity and LGBTQ+ community by attending the festival or one of the many Utah Pride Week events, such as the Utah Pride Parade, Pride Interfaith Service, or Pride March and Rally. From its humble beginnings in 1974 as an informal gathering in the park, the Utah Pride Festival has come a long way and continues to grow each year.

SUMMER Utah Arts Festival

Holi Festival of Colors

Each spring, Radha Krishna Temple in Spanish Fork explodes with various kinds of hues at the Festival of Colors. This widely popular event observes the tradition, Holi, which celebrates the 94

View the latest-and-greatest artwork and find the perfect piece that speaks to your soul at the Utah Arts Festival — the state’s largest outdoor festival. More than 160 visual artists and 100-plus performing artists gather to promote the arts and enhance the quality of life in Utah. The festival features an

LIFE IN UTAH 2019 | SLCHAMBER.com

Bands like The Flaming Lips, CHVRCHES, Cold War Kids and The Shins have all graced the Ogden Amphitheater stage at one time for this world-class concert series. On your way to the venue, check out Ogden’s Historic 25th Street, grab a bite at Lucky Slice, then get ready for a night of unbeatable fun and music.

© Image courtesy of Downtown Alliance

Ogden Twilight

Where can you find bigname acts for an unbeatable price? The Ogden Twilight Concert Series, of course!

© Image courtesy of Jared E. Allen

Utah Shakespeare Festival

Find your inner thespian at the Utah Shakespeare Festival — one of the premier regional theaters in the county and one of the biggest Shakespeare festivals in the nation. During the sixteen-week season, the festival presents classic and contemporary plays in repertory. These plays are then enhanced by interactive festival experiences, such as backstage tours, seminars and orientations — all in an effort to entertain, enrich and educate.


A FESTIVAL FOR ALL SEASONS designed for all ages. Discover why Snowbird’s annual festival was voted one of America's 10 Best Oktoberfests by Men's Journal Magazine.

Days of ‘47

Celebrate the arrival of the first pioneer settlers to the Salt Lake Valley by attending one of the many Days of '47 events. From dusting off those cowboy boots for the Days of ‘47 Cowboy Games & Rodeo to camping out for the Days of ‘47 Parade, to working up a sweat at the Deseret News Marathon and the Pioneer Day Concert with the Mormon Tabernacle Choir, there is something for every Utahn to do at this time of the year.

festival includes plein air festivities, art exhibits, hands-on activities for all ages, live entertainment, speaker series, film showcase and so much more. Enjoy the changing of the seasons in one of the most beautiful areas in the south. WINTER

head to downtown Salt Lake City for Last Hurrah. This free community event features multiple outdoor live music stages, indoor games, and a 21-and-over speakeasy lounge. Guests of all ages will find some kind of fun at Utah’s largest countdown celebration.

Festival of Trees

Utah State Fair

Bring the whole family out to the Utah State Fairpark and have some fun at the Utah State Fair! This extravaganza offers a plethora of events including a rodeo, demolition derby, truck pull, carnival rides and all the fair food you can eat.

FALL

O Christmas tree, O Christmas tree, how lovely are thy branches. Start the holiday season off right with the magic, wonderment and joy of the Festival of Trees. After Thanksgiving, the Mountain America Expo Center is transformed into a winter wonderland of uniquely decorated Christmas trees, wreaths, playhouses, centerpieces, quilts and gingerbread houses. While you’re finding your festive spirit, meet Santa Claus, check out the gift shops, visit the playhouses and more. All proceeds benefit the Primary Children’s Hospital.

© Image courtesy of Downtown Alliance

Sundance Film Festival

Every winter since 1985, the Sundance Film Festival becomes the gathering house of storytellers and audiences seeking new voices and fresh perspectives. Their annual program includes dramatic and documentary features and short films; series and episodic content; filmmaker conversations, panel discussions and live music events. It is one event any cinephile won’t want to miss.

Escalante Canyons Art Festival Oktoberfest

Fall is the time for Snowbird Mountain Resort's annual Oktoberfest, one of Utah’s largest festivals, which draws more than 60,000 visitors. Attendees can enjoy food, brews and fun activities

Artists, art lovers, rangers and outdoor enthusiasts gather to celebrate Utah’s canyon country. This weeklong festival brings together people near and far for this premier art event of the Colorado Plateau. The

Last Hurrah

Take the stress out of planning the perfect New Year's Eve celebration and

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EVENT CALENDAR 2019 ACTIVITIES FROM AROUND THE STATE JANUARY Sundance Film Festival January 24–February 3 Various Locations sundance.org

FEBRUARY Kanab Balloons & Tunes Roundup February 15–17 Kanab visitsouthernutah.com

MARCH International Sportsmen’s Expo March 14–17 Sandy sportsexpos.com

Holi Festival of Colors March 30–31 Spanish Fork festivalofcolorsusa.com

APRIL SLC Marathon

April 13 Salt Lake City saltlakecitymarathon.com

St. George Art Festival April 19–20 St. George sgartfestival.com

FanX Comic Convention April 19–20 Salt Lake City fanxsaltlake.com

Tulip Festival

April 13–May 5 Lehi thanksgivingpoint.org

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Utah Dough Show April 27 Salt Lake City utahdoughshow.com

AUGUST Tour of Utah

August 12-18 Statewide tourofutah.com

Dine O’Round

September–October Salt Lake City dineoround.com

Raspberry Days

Xterra Utah Off-Road Triathlon

JUNE Utah Pride Festival

Craft Lake City DIY Festival

Utah Humanities Book Festival

Utah Arts Festival

Utah Beer Festival

OCTOBER Pumpkin Nights

Utah Shakespeare Festival

Swiss Days

MAY Living Traditions Festival May 17–19 Salt Lake City livingtraditionsfestival.com

June 1–2 Salt Lake City utahpridecenter.org June 20–23 Salt Lake City uaf.org

June 27–October 12 Cedar City bard.org

JULY America’s Freedom Festival July 4 Provo freedomfestival.org

Utah Festival Opera & Musical Theatre July 6–August 3 Logan utahfestival.org

Days of ‘47 Parade July 24 Salt Lake City daysof47.com

LIFE IN UTAH 2019 | SLCHAMBER.com

August 1–3 Garden City bearlake.org

August 9-11 Salt Lake City craftlakecity.com

August 17-18 Utah State Fair Park utahbeerfestival.com

August 30–31 Midway midwayswissdays.com

September 14 Ogden xterraplanet.com

Statewide utahhumanities.org

Salt Lake City pumpkinnights.com

Scarecrow Festival Lehi thanksgivingpoint.org

Oktoberfest

NOVEMBER Luminaria: Experience the Light

SEPTEMBER Utah State Fair

DECEMBER Zoo Lights

August–October Snowbird Ski & Summer Resort snowbird.com

September 5–15 Salt Lake City utahstatefair.com

Salt Lake Greek Festival Salt Lake City saltlakegreekfestival.com

FanX Comic Convention September 4–7 Salt Lake City fanxsaltlake.com

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November–December Lehi thanksgivingpoint.org

Salt Lake City hoglezoo.org

Festival of Trees

Sandy intermountainhealthcare.org

*Due to publishing timelines, dates

and information may change. Please verify dates and times before attending an event.

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Run Date:

Sun Jan 13 2019 04:00:00 GMT+0530 (India Standard Time)

We’re all about the

Golden Spike

• Visit the premier birding destination of the Western United States. • Take in two renowned pieces of land art. • Stand on the spot where the Union and Central Pacific Railroads joined their rails and forged the destiny of a nation.

Sun Tunnels

• Soak in a natural spring pool with the highest mineral content in the world. • Eat at Utah’s original steakhouse. • Eat, sleep and play in a place unlike any other.

Crystal Hot Springs

AND MANY MORE!

As you empty your Box Elder County bucket list, we’re confident you’ll find a whole new set of experiences to fill it up again. Visit boxelder.org for details.


EXPERIENCE IS EVERYTHING!

32 Program Areas

Hands-on Training

Low Monthly Tuition

Convenient Schedule

Transferable Credits

High School students attend tuition-free! Financial aid and scholarships are available for most programs.

discover.otech.edu/ut 801-627-8300 200 N. Washington Blvd., Ogden UT 84404

17635


Casper’s Ice Cream

Maverik

Iron County School District

Partners in innovation

Caring for Utah’s future isn’t just good business sense, it’s common sense. That’s why at Rocky Mountain Power we’re pleased to partner with businesses like these to make them more energy efficient and sustainable. Together, we have the power to boost their bottom lines while making Utah healthier now and for years to come. • Casper’s Ice Cream, makers of the famous FatBoy®, improves the efficiency of their refrigeration equipment and lighting to save more than $75,000 annually. • Maverik completes renewable and energy efficiency projects and adds electric vehicle charging stations across Utah with help from Rocky Mountain Power. • Iron County School District improves comfort and saves $46,000 annually through wattsmart energy-efficient cooling upgrades. ®

How can we help your business? Learn more at wattsmart.com. © 2019 Rocky Mountain Power

wattsmart is registered in U.S. Patent and Trademark Office.

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Life in Utah 2019  

Utah's Premier Lifestyle and Relocation Guide

Life in Utah 2019  

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