Utah Spaces Magazine – 2018 Fall Edition

Page 1

Dare

to go

Dark

COVER PRICE $5

Dark woods &colors

Offer a variety of interiors

COLOR SPOTLIGHT:

JEWEL TONES

JULY 2018

SPECIAL EDITION FOR SUBSCRIBERS OF DESERET NEWS AND THE SALT LAKE TRIBUNE

ALSO INSIDE: Fringe in Your Décor • Design Tips for Renters • Late-Season Tree Planting • 4 Steps for Year-Round Grilling


14

24

2

Spaces Magazine

42

Table of Contents 2

Interior Design 101

6

Rich and Royal

10

Fringe Benefits

14

Timeless vs. Trendy

18

Dark and Dramatic

22

Beautiful (Temporary) Spaces

24

Marry Your Styles

28

What’s Your Design Style?

32

The She Shed

36

Growing Season Lives On

38

This is Not a Diet

42

Don’t Put That Grill Away

Have you wondered where to even begin? Start here.

Incorporating popular jewel tones and shades into your décor.

Learn how to use the trendy design element wisely.

Exciting trends abound, but certain designs are always “in.”

White-and-light has long ruled the design world. Do you dare to go dark?

Design tips and tricks for renters.

Decorating advice for newlyweds—or any partners with differing tastes.

Six categories to help you get started on finding your design groove.

A woman’s home-away-from-home…behind her home.

Successful late-season tree planting.

Quick-and-easy healthy eating hacks for the non-dieter.

How to keep serving up grilled favorites all year long.

July 2018


6

32 July 2018 Š2018 All rights reserved Published by

4770 South 5600 West, West Valley City, UT 84118 editor@utahmediagroup.com www.utahmediagroup.com 801-204-6300 President & CEO Brent Low Project Team Sally Steed, Sr. VP of Advertising Megan Donio, Publication Manager Hillary Bowler Davis, Editorial Madeline Jacobs, Design & Layout Content and images from Getty Images unless otherwise stated

July 2018

18

Cover photo credit Getty Images / asbe Spaces Magazine is a publication of Utah Media Group. Copyright Š July 2018. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced in any format without consent of Utah Media Group. Every effort has been made to ensure the accuracy of the information in this publication and assume no liability for errors, Spaces: Home for theinaccuracies Holidays or Spaces Magazine omissions.

1


2

Spaces Magazine

July 2018


Interior

Design

101

HAVE YOU WONDERED WHERE TO EVEN BEGIN? START HERE.


BY KATHERINE TORRES SPACES STAFF WRITER

W

hether you’ve just purchased a new house, remodeled a room in your existing house, or have been called upon to redecorate a home or office, determining how you’re going to design and decorate your interior space can be a daunting task. Sure, you can browse through and organize countless images on Pinterest. You can also binge-watch hours of interior design shows or flip through every home décor catalog you can get your hands on. These tactics may help… or, they may make you feel even more flustered than you were when you started hunting for information. In order to avoid becoming frustrated with your interior design project, forget the pins, shows or catalogs and instead focus on the following four aspects of your project: function, unity, balance and personality. Read on to learn more about each aspect and how to incorporate it into your space. FUNCTION Function appears first on this list because it truly is the most important element to consider. Although interior design does include many decorative elements, it’s really about making each space work the way you’d like it to. To infuse function into your design scheme, first determine your space’s focal point. This could be a naturallyoccurring focal point like a fireplace or large window, or it could be a manufactured one like a piece of art or a colorful rug. Determine which pieces of furniture serve the functions you have planned for your space and ensure they fit properly. Select lighting that is ideal for the activities you envision performing in the space. Then, plan out your space on paper and bring all your pieces together. Make sure your furniture is directed toward your focal point.

4

Spaces Magazine

UNITY You create unity through the selection of complementary colors, styles, textures and patterns. Unity can center around an inspirational piece— like a pillow, photo, or piece of art—or it can be based off a theme such as industrial, minimalist or “shabby chic.” Start by choosing a color palette that fits your inspirational piece or theme, then select patterns that incorporate your chosen palette. Not all of your chosen patterns have to match, but they should include the same colors and vary in size or scale. Be sure to select textures that add dimension and depth to your space to keep things interesting. Too much of the same texture can make a space look flat. BALANCE Balance refers to the visual “weight” each object brings to a space, and can

July 2018


The personality you infuse into your space will separate it from every other interior design project.

be incorporated symmetrically, asymmetrically or radially. Because balance is a design element that is specific to each space, it can be difficult to prescribe a one-size-fits-all solution. Instead, keep in mind that larger, brighter or more textured objects add visual “heaviness” to a space and therefore must be balanced through the strategic placement of equally heavy pieces of furniture or décor. PERSONALITY It is often said that no two individuals are exactly alike. If that’s so, then why should any two spaces look exactly alike? Although the three aspects of interior design mentioned above are important, it’s the personality you infuse into your space that will separate it from every other interior design project. Feel free to add something whimsical or unexpected to

July 2018

your space to make it look less sterile, and accessorize with pieces that are meaningful to you. By breaking down your interior design project into the four aspects of function, unity, balance and personality, you can ensure that you’re able to successfully design your space without wanting to pull your hair out. You’ll also be able to create a space that is not only visually attractive, but also functionally appealing. 

Spaces Magazine

5


BY JENI FITZGIBBON, SPACES STAFF WRITER

Rich & Royal

INCORPORATING POPULAR JEWEL TONES AND SHADES INTO YOUR DÉCOR.

N

eed some inspiration for your home? Looking to add some color to a dreary room? Try using a variety of jewel tones that mimic precious stones such as turquoise, sapphires, rubies and emeralds. These colors work naturally together for a vibrant and non-clashy mix. Once you choose one of these gorgeous jewel colors for paint, an accent piece or furniture, you can then offset them with black, gray and white. According to architecturaldigest.com, “When applied to everything from paint to upholstery, jewel tones can transform any room into a sumptuous refuge or a light-filled bijou box depending on the shade.” Here is how you can incorporate jewel colors into your home décor. WALL COLOR It’s your home, so why not choose a color you like? For rooms that do not have much natural light, a jewel color could help brighten it up. “Pick a shade that already matches your home’s aesthetic. The color amethyst can add to your bohemian décor, and a golden tone works great with an industrialstyle home full of distressed wood and worldly figurines,” says midnightvelvet.com. FURNITURE Dress up your sofa, bed or chairs by using a mix of matte and shiny fabrics such as felt, gloss velvet, silk and velvet. These luxurious fabrics enhance rich jewel tones and instantly add a touch

6

Spaces Magazine

July 2018


Jewel tones—colors that mimic precious stones such as turquoise, sapphires, rubies, emeralds and more— work naturally together for a vibrant and nonclashy mix.

July 2018

Spaces Magazine

7


Luxurious fabrics such as felt, gloss velvet, silk and velvet enhance rich jewel tones and instantly add a touch of uniqueness to your home.

of uniqueness to your home. Soothing gray walls will allow you to use the jewel tones on your fabrics without clashing. ACCESSORIES Glassware is always a great accessory that never goes out of style. Group together a mix of jewelcolored glassware to create a bright and cheery display. Fragments of colored light will scatter across the room. Glassware is usually ideal on a mantel or console table beside a window with natural light, but remember, all colors look different depending on your home’s lighting. The style site midnightvelvet.com says, “Rooms with large, open windows let in a lot of brightness, making even the darkest jewel tone reflect light. On the other hand, a

8

Spaces Magazine

room without any windows is typically darker, making the space feel more intimate and comfy.” ANCHOR KEY PIECES You may wonder what we’re talking about when we say, “anchor key pieces.” If you decide to paint a wall of your home one of these fabulous jewel colors, you can use a dark piece of wood furniture such as a wooden chest or wall unit to accent the bright color and give it depth. This combination provides an anchor for your colorful decorating plan. This also works well when using jewel tone cushions on dark colored furniture. USE PATTERNS You can always mix a jewel tone with a geometric pattern of your choice. It

may sound intimidating, but once you find a pattern and jewel color you like, you may be surprised by how it can make a serious room into something contemporary and fun. MIX AND MATCH You can always mix jewel colors together to add some excitement to your décor. Colors such as turquoise and deep pink play off each other well, especially when arranged as cushions on a light-colored sofa or chairs around a kitchen table. DON’T BE AFRAID OF TOO MUCH GREEN Emerald green is a bold jewel color, but that doesn’t mean you must be afraid of it. Emerald, when matched with a dark background, can add sophistication to any home. You can also add

shades of blue such as turquoise to add an elemental feeling according to homedit.com. Remember to use your anchor pieces! Whether you’re painting a wall, adding throw pillows or just arranging some accent pieces, jewel colors are a great choice to use. They not only brighten up your space, but can also add a level of sophistication to an otherwise average home. 

July 2018


Mix jewel colors together to add some excitement to your dĂŠcor.

July 2018

Spaces Magazine

9


Fringe Benefits LEARN HOW TO USE THE TRENDY DESIGN ELEMENT WISELY. BY MADELINE JACOBS, SPACES STAFF WRITER

F

ringe is in. Whether it’s a statement piece, an accent pillow or a tassel hanging on your doorknob, the fringe trend can be easily incorporated into your home décor. Heather Osmond, an interior designer with more than 17 years of

experience, founded and owns Osmond Designs, a full-service interior design and furniture store in Lehi and Orem. She suggests the modern farmhouse trend can be credited for bringing back some of that fringe look. “What I love most about fringe is that it adds texture and personality

PHOTO COURTESY OF OSMOND DESIGNS

10

Spaces Magazine

July 2018


July 2018

Spaces Magazine

11


Interchangeable items, such as pillows or throw blankets, can be used to add a little fringe to your space in any season.

that has been missing from accessories like rugs and pillows,” Osmond says. Before you go fringing every single piece of furniture and adding fringe-textured wallpaper, it’s important to note that an excess of fringe is not in. Osmond shared some insight on how to add this trend into your home without overdoing it. “I think you can overdo fringe, but if you use it tastefully, you can really enhance almost any room with any trend,” Osmond says.

O

12

PH

O S M TO O CO N D UR DE TE SI SY G N OF S

Spaces Magazine

According to Osmond, a good way to think about fringe and trends in general, is to treat them like the accessories you wear. You have your basic, staple clothing, and then you accessorize with the trend. Pick two to three coordinating pieces to highlight the fringe. Osmond shares four ways you can tastefully incorporate fringe into your home. FURNITURE Having tassel skirts around an ottoman or leather threads on a chair can add a lot of character to furniture. Fringe isn’t just for the borders though. For example, in this gray pouf, fringe is used to add a geometric textured pattern. CURTAINS Using fringe on curtains lets a little light into the bottom of the room. Adding a tassel tieback is another way of incorporating this trend without being too overbearing.

PHOTO COURTESY OF OSMOND DESIGNS

PILLOWS & BLANKETS This one is super easy. Get a pillow or blanket with some tassels, and add it to your couch or bedroom. These are easily interchangeable items and can be used through all seasons. As with the furniture, pillows and blankets don’t just come with fringe borders. There are options for the fringe to be the main element, used as a pattern on the blanket or pillow. WALL DÉCOR Fringe wall décor can be many things and is not limited to materials like thread, leather and yarn. It can also be seen in other elements such as metallic or glass hangings. Dream

catchers and macramé wall art can also add more texture and personality to your home. Make sure to avoid a heavy feel by pairing the fringe with a lighter item like an airy mobile. Whatever way you want to add fringe, remember to have fun with it. It’s a great way to add an organic feel. Don’t be afraid to combine a few of these and experiment with how it looks in your own home.  You can hear Heather Osmond every Saturday morning from 11am – 12pm as she hosts the KSL Real Estate Show.

July 2018


Tassels on curtains are an easy way to incorporate fringe without being too overbearing. July 2018

Spaces Magazine

13


14

Spaces Magazine

July 2018


Timeless vs. Trendy EXCITING TRENDS ABOUND, BUT CERTAIN DESIGNS ARE ALWAYS “IN.” BY KATIE PORTER, SPACES STAFF WRITER

A

fter graduating with a degree in Interior Design from LDS Business College in 2008, Keesa Fullmer learned the value of timeless design. Fullmer describes those few years, mid-economic recession. “No one could afford their home as it was,” she says. “They certainly weren’t going to pay for renovation or décor.”

July 2018

Needless to say, Fullmer’s early design experience was very budget-friendly, with homeowners focused on timeless elements, especially given the risk of spending money on trends that would quickly go out of style. Today, Fullmer’s portfolio includes high-profile residential clients, several commercial design projects and even LDS temples. She stages homes for Velocity Utah Real

Spaces Magazine

15


Expensive components are investments that need longevity. Less expensive accessories are the best way to channel the hottest trends.

16

Spaces Magazine

July 2018


trend that makes a substantial change to your home’s framework, go neutral. (Unless, of course, your love for the element is large enough for you to keep it around regardless.) The better way to incorporate trends is splurging on small items that can be easily switched out. Accessories like small décor, rugs, artwork, throws or accent furniture pieces are all great ways to keep your home current without breaking the bank.

Estate Group and freelances on the side. Through all of this, one of the top questions Fullmer still gets from her clients is whether to keep up with the ever-changing trends or opt for more classic or traditional design. Here are some of Fullmer’s suggestions. DON’T GET HEAVY-HANDED WITH THE TRENDY DESIGNS “Trends are always fun, and I love them,” Fullmer says. “Gold fixtures, for example, have been so trendy for the last few years, but to be honest...I don’t think it will last. Five years from now I’m willing to bet, it will be out again.” Five years may not be a problem for your budget and design cycle. However, Fullmer advises for this or any bold

July 2018

THINK TIMELESS WHEN MAKING BIG PURCHASES For bigger investment pieces like a large sofa, or permanent home elements like architecture and cabinets, Fullmer recommends going for classic and beautiful styles that speak to you. “Whenever I’m working with people, I tell them, ‘If you remember nothing else about what we talk about, remember this: Only choose pieces you absolutely love, love, love. There will be lots that you like, even like a lot, but only a few things that you will truly love.’” Fullmer also suggests to keep in mind that “timeless” might not have the same meaning for you as it does for someone else. Again, timeless items are things that you “love, love, love” or at least things “you will still love five years from now.” This is the best way

to balance trendy and timeless design. Expensive components are investments that need longevity. Less expensive accessories are the best way to channel the hottest trends. HAVE A DESIGN STYLE IN MIND The final tip Fullmer gives to navigate balancing trendy and timeless elements in your home is to examine what your overall style. With so many types available to us now with the click of a button, it’s easy to get overwhelmed. Industrial, shabby chic, art deco, Scandinavian...the list goes on and on. Do your best to whittle all the noise down to just one or two room design images that inspire your mind and give you that #goals kind of feeling. This will take pressure off of your purchasing process and ultimately help you achieve that final desired look that is trendy or timeless in the context of your style. “Do I love it?” and “Does it fit the style?” are the two questions that will now be your mantra. Armed with these two simple but powerful questions, you’ll finally achieve just the right balance between trendy and timeless design for your space.  You can find Keesa Fullmer on Instagram @keesajenniedesign.

Spaces Magazine

17


Dark

&

Dramatic

WHITE-AND-LIGHT HAS LONG RULED THE DESIGN WORLD. DO YOU DARE TO GO DARK?

18

Spaces Magazine

DESIGN BY LISMAN STUDIOS, PHOTOS BY LUCY CALL

July 2018


BY HILLARY BOWLER DAVIS SPACES STAFF WRITER

L

aMar Lisman scours design publications on a regular basis to monitor color trends. A veteran of the industry, Lisman is owner and principal designer of the awardwinning Lisman Studios in Midvale. He makes two observations: white, minimal spaces are still going strong, but dark and dramatic tones and shades—from wall color and art to furniture—are making a splash in the interior design world. “We’ve done so many beautiful white kitchens,” he says, for example. “But we just did a kitchen in a dark Cherrywood, and it got nearly 4,000 likes on Houzz.” (This is the studio’s most popular post to date). “People are ready to consider options other than white. Dark is coming.” If you find yourself craving something new in your home, consider following this trend and adding dark woods and colors to your space. Let’s clear up a few misconceptions and make our case. Myth No. 1: Darker colors will make a space seem smaller. “Surprisingly, you can paint a small space in a dark color and it gives it an illusion of being bigger,” Lisman says. “When you paint it darker, you can’t see the corners, and it gives the illusion of a bigger room.” Warmer dark colors, such as deep reds, are especially good at creating this illusion. Myth No. 2: Dark equals drab, dreary and depressing. “When people think of dark, they think it can be depressing, but that’s not true,” Lisman says. “People love these dark, very moody rooms. They feel very cocooning, very safe. They are spaces in which you can feel relaxed.” For example, Lisman recommends painting a very high ceiling in a darker color, to “bring it closer to you” and create a greater sense of intimacy in the space. Cozy-feeling, but larger-looking spaces. That’s just the beginning.

“People love these dark, very moody rooms. They feel very cocooning, very safe. They are spaces in which you can feel relaxed.” LAMAR LISMAN OWNER AND PRINCIPAL DESIGNER, LISMAN STUDIOS

July 2018

Spaces Magazine

19


DESIGN BY LISMAN STUDIOS, PHOTOS BY LUCY CALL

WHY YOU SHOULD CONSIDER GOING DARK First and foremost, you need contrast. “You can only do so much white before you need to use its counterparts,” Lisman says. It is difficult for a bright and white room to stand out if it’s just like the rest of your home. This is especially common with builder-made homes, Lisman says.

20

Spaces Magazine

Second, it’s probable that you’ll like it even better than the usual white. Lisman explains that people tend to look at photos or staged rooms and find the “stark, white, clean, minimal” appealing—in theory. But when they experience the spaces, the feedback is, “I couldn’t live in a room like that. I couldn’t cook dinner in a kitchen like that.” You must ask yourself if you can truly picture living in a space.

“We want to be comfortable in our homes,” Lisman says. And dark colors could be your ticket to achieving that. WHERE TO USE DARK COLORS IN YOUR HOME The short answer: almost anywhere. Except for children’s rooms and creative spaces (music rooms, art rooms, etc. where light and plain space is ideal), Lisman says dark palettes can be used in just

about any living space from kitchen to bathroom to bedroom. HOW TO INCORPORATE DARK WOODS INTO A ROOM Darker woods are increasingly popular, appearing in furniture, cabinetry, molding and more. Medium tones, such as in that Cherrywood kitchen, are on the rise. Wood can work especially well to create the

July 2018


“When I have a client who is color nervous, we start small and let them live with it. It inevitably grows on them.” LAMAR LISMAN OWNER AND PRINCIPAL DESIGNER, LISMAN STUDIOS

comfortable feelings you crave for your home, and it can be used more liberally than you would think. The trick, Lisman says, is that “wood needs to be broken up.” This is achieved with other materials— whether it’s drywall or another type of wood. Lisman points to actual forests, with various trees growing side by side, for inspiration in mixing woods. In fact, if you take a page out of nature’s

July 2018

playbook for any of your design, you won’t be disappointed. “If your palette is inspired by nature, you will never tire of it,” Lisman says. “That will always give you a timeless feeling.” HOW TO TAKE THE PLUNGE Ready to give it a try? Because that’s really all you need to do to incorporate the dark and dramatic look in your space—try it.

“When I have a client who is color nervous, we start small and let them live with it,” Lisman says. “It inevitably grows on them.” Lisman recommends starting with something like paint or wall coverings, especially because they are easy to change. If you are extra hesitant, think even smaller. “Do it with artwork,” Lisman says, pointing out that you don’t even have to touch your home to add colors. “Splash

some paint on canvas and live with it.” We’re betting you’ll want more, but it all starts with that first experiment. “You have to be adventurous, and you have to step out the box,” Lisman says.  Visit lismanstudios.com for more.

Spaces Magazine

21


Experiment with different bulbs and lamps until you get the right light for your space.

Beautiful (Temporary) Spaces DESIGN TIPS AND TRICKS FOR RENTERS. BY MADELINE JACOBS SPACES STAFF WRITER

I

’ve been renting for five years now. In my most recent move to Utah, I was excited to get into a onebedroom apartment that was all our own and make it feel like home, coming prepared with several ideas to make it look “Pinterest perfect.” Once we got settled, I quickly realized that some of those ideas wouldn’t work for a rental or budget. The wall paint color would probably be forever off-

22

Spaces Magazine

white, the carpet would not magically change to wood flooring and the blinds would have to stay that way. We had typical renters’ restrictions: small space, no nails into the walls or anything else, and limited storage. Here are my tips and tricks to use those limitations as a gateway to be more creative. LIGHT BULB MOMENTS An instant hack is lighting. The toowarm or too-cool lights can be changed out to brighten up a space and make it

feel more inviting. Also, overhead lights can feel less intimate than a purposeful placement of a lamp or string lights. Experiment with different bulbs and lamps until you get the right light for your space (buy different kinds to see how they work in your home and return the ones that aren’t right). HIGHLIGHT, DON’T HIDE Bikes are hard to hide in a small apartment. If you have a place outside, or your rental comes with a garage, then definitely take advantage of that.

July 2018


clothespins. I was able to put nails in the wall for one of my rentals, and the nails and string held all of my favorite photos.

Multi-use furniture can make smaller spaces work to your advantage. Pillows are one of the most affordable ways to quickly add more color and personality to a space. But bikes can be a great display item when they have a place to go. For easy access to them, but also so they’re out of the way, find a place that works for you. We utilized a floor-to-ceiling bike rack that serves as a utility and as as a somewhat decorative piece. You definitely can’t miss it when you walk into the apartment. OUT-OF-THE-BOX STORAGE SOLUTIONS If it doesn’t fit, sell it or donate it. It’s not worth hanging on to something you’re not going to use. We initially had a desk in our apartment, but we realized we were mainly using it as a place to put our stuff on. When we got a piano keyboard, we got rid of the desk to fit the keyboard. Haven’t missed it one bit.

July 2018

Having multi-use furniture like a frame that folds down into a table, or an ottoman that doubles as a storage container is very useful in making smaller spaces work to your advantage. COMMAND STRIPS ARE YOUR BEST FRIEND Everything hanging on our walls are stuck to them with Command™ Picture Hanging Strips. Pay attention to the weight they’re able to hold (it varies), and read the directions before you pull them off—it’s important to pull down and not out, or else you’ll strip the paint and defeat the purpose of using them. Some alternatives to Command™ Picture Hanging Strips are magnet and sticker combinations sold on sites like Parabo Press, or using string and

PILLOWS, PILLOWS AND MORE PILLOWS…AND OTHER EASY DECORATIONS Put some decorative pillows on your couch or bed to really bring it all together. Pillows are one of the most affordable ways to quickly add more color and personality to a space. Plus, they can be easily changed out for something new. Don’t like your carpet? Get a larger rug to cover it up or multiple overlapping rugs to add more texture and color. Hate the drab wall paint? Consider removable vinyl décor or wallpaper (Note: wallpaper is much easier to remove these days). Need a little more than posters and art for your walls? Try peel-and-stick tiles or add some mirrors to make the space feel larger. DON’T UNDERESTIMATE THE DETAILS I personally wanted to focus on ways I could bring more of our personality in and make our space feel like home while including pieces we could take with us later. If you want to go all the way and spend a little more money to create your home, there’s a long list of items you can replace with pieces that suit your tastes. It’s easy: Hang on to the original pieces and put them back when your lease is up. These items include: • Kitchen/bathroom faucets • Shower heads • Toilet seats • Curtains (and/or curtain rods) • Light fixtures • Knobs (on drawers or doorways) Our apartment may not completely match my Pinterest board, and I still have a ways to go, but the important thing is that it’s got a lot of “us” in it. It definitely feels like home. 

Spaces Magazine

23


Marry Your Styles DECORATING ADVICE FOR NEWLYWEDS— OR ANY PARTNERS WITH DIFFERING TASTES. BY HILLARY BOWLER DAVIS, SPACES STAFF WRITER

24

Spaces Magazine

July 2018


July 2018

Spaces Magazine

25


Furniture and other items can be repainted, re-upholstered or re-purposed for another use.

G

etting married is busy enough. Who has time to design a new space? My new husband and I are currently in the thick of this, melding two lives and two completely different design styles. I’m hoping we’ll eventually come up with something we can both happily call “home.” In the meantime, I touched base with Monique Flesher, the Salt Lake City-based owner of Monique Jacqueline Design, and she has some very helpful insights. For any pair with differing styles, this one’s for you. Here are a few quick tips for tackling the task of designing your shared space: LET IT GO! (FOR THE MOST PART) This is mostly me interjecting here, but it’s important. My husband and I

26

Spaces Magazine

each have several years of moves, experiences and stuff. Our first step has been some major cleaning, reorganizing, throwing out and donating. It would be difficult to design a mess. Now that that’s out of the way (literally)…. RE-PURPOSE OLD FAVORITES Pause before getting rid of some things. Take inventory of what you already have, Flesher says. “Everyone has pieces they feel are near and dear to their hearts. Some of us might say we are not sentimental, but there is something keeping us from getting rid of something.” Adopt an unspoken rule to honor that some things just have meaning, no explanation necessary. Furniture and other items can be re-painted, re-upholstered or re-purposed for another use. These

sentimental items can help you design a space that feels very “you.” GET SOME INSPO “One of the things I tell everyone to do is go shopping together,” Flesher says, “And not even necessarily physical shopping. Go online.” She recommends looking at favorite home store sites, particularly large-stock sites such as Wayfair, and selecting items to save in a cart or images to collect somewhere like a Pinterest board. Before mapping out your projects, Flesher recommends combing through the collection of what each partner likes and looking for themes and patterns. You’ll start finding harmony in your styles. START WITH NEUTRALS Flesher favors neutrals in her designs, regardless of whether her clients are

July 2018


newlyweds. “When you have a neutral base, the sky is the limit,” she says. “You have so much opportunity for things to work.” Pro tip: Make sure the undertones of the neutrals match and are reflective of light—otherwise a room can look drab. Those undertones will also be your guide as you introduce other colors. Start with the clean slate of neutrals in paint, furniture and flooring, then experiment with color and pattern. CREATE A NEW STYLE AS A COUPLE Look at your favorite items—whether it’s an old keepsake or new item the

“It’s give and take in everything with a marriage, and design is no exception.” MONIQUE FLESHER DESIGNER

two of you agreed on. Flesher says it’s important to ask yourself why you like the piece so much. Is it the color? The shape? Once you’ve identified the element you really love, you can “springboard from it,” she adds. Start with the piece of art, a pillow or whatever the small piece is, and design your space around it. You have the exciting opportunity to develop a whole new style together. TRY SOME BUDGET-FRIENDLY DESIGN TRICKS Don’t feel bad about starting small. You’re not yet certain of your combined style, and you’re likely on a budget. Flesher says pillows are one of the least expensive ways to add color and a whole new feel to a room. Assess the room for quick fixes—small things that can make a big difference. Flesher emphasizes lighting, noting that 27003000 Kelvin light bulbs are ideal for bringing out colors and improving the look of your space. Paint is also an affordable option to achieve a drastic change. In the process of re-purposing items, Flesher adds, you can take on some fun DIY projects as a team and literally build your space together. COMPROMISE, COMPROMISE, COMPROMISE The most important advice Flesher has for design-ambitious newlyweds is to give and take. If you must keep a certain thing, perhaps be willing to part with another. Or if you keep it, and your spouse doesn’t love it, be willing to “allow it to change” with a new stain, paint or use. If you love florals and he doesn’t, maybe find a light paisley pattern. There are many opportunities to find a middle ground and develop a space you both love. “It’s a give and take in everything with a marriage, and design is no exception,” Flesher says. I couldn’t agree more.  You can find Monique Flesher’s work at moniquejacquelinedesign.com.

July 2018

Spaces Magazine

27


What’s Your Design Style? SIX CATEGORIES TO HELP YOU GET STARTED ON FINDING YOUR DESIGN GROOVE.

28

Spaces Magazine

July 2018


BY ALYSHA COLEMAN SPACES STAFF WRITER

T

he turning seasons inspire many people to rejuvenate their surroundings inside and out. When it comes to reimagining the décor inside your home, how do you decide which style to use? Choosing a style that works for you starts with deciding what kinds of shapes and accessories appeal to you. Would you like clean, crisp lines to give you home a sleek vibe? Or would you prefer to sink into plush and cozy cushions after a long day? Understanding the defining qualities of each décor style and matching them to how you want each room to look and feel will help make redecorating much easier.

MID-CENTURY MODERN

MID-CENTURY MODERN A call back to the 1950s and brought to the forefront of pop culture’s mind by TV shows like Mad Men, midcentury modern is characterized by minimalist designs, and incorporates materials like plywood and molded plastic. Simple, geometric shapes provide a sleek feel. Bold colors serve as warm accents. If you’re decorating on a budget, choose a prominent piece to anchor the style in your space, then select accessories with the complimentary colors to create a cohesive look. INDUSTRIAL The best way to envision what industrial style looks like is to draw upon images of a New York City loft. Exposed brick and steel, distressed wood, warm-colored metals, and a touch of ruggedness are hallmarks of this style. Neutral colors help accentuate natural light and provide a quality of earthiness. Keeping your space free of clutter and accessorizing sparingly will help achieve the

INDUSTRIAL

Choosing a style that works for you starts with deciding what kinds of shapes and accessories appeal to you.


There are dozens of décor styles, fusions and variations to choose from. Peruse showrooms in person or pin your favorites from online galleries to find your style.

RUSTIC COTTAGE

minimalist aesthetic. The accessories you do choose should provide a spark of creativity in the otherwise stoic room. Light fixtures and rugs with neutral colors can help balance and warm up the room. ECLECTIC Unlike minimalist and crisp styles like mid-century modern and industrial, an eclectic style is all about masterfully curating colors, patterns and textures, and creating one cohesive space. This décor style borrows from different time periods and trends to create an interesting, conversationstarting environment. Contrasting elements such as shag rugs, marble busts and boldly-colored accessories can be married to create a unique and unexpected space.

30

Spaces Magazine

CONTEMPORARY If bold furniture, geometric shapes and textured fabrics appeal to you, contemporary style may be a good fit for your space. Contemporary differs from mid-century modern through its focus on the here and now—what’s trendy today. These days, boldness in furniture is demonstrated in its size and shape rather than its color or pattern. In fact, choosing furniture in neutral colors will give you the opportunity to incorporate fresh colors and accessories, which can be textured or have simple patterns like stripes. Contemporary spaces should be bright and clutter-free while maintaining a comfortable and welcoming air.

ART DECO Glamorous and elegant, art deco style is reminiscent of the 1920s and 1930s. Mirror accents and glass tops help provide brightness while the geometric patterns in décor and fabrics give the room strong personality. Choose furniture with bold

structure and exposed dark wood or chrome. Pieces with curved ornamental elements will help give an unmistakable nod to this impressive style. Imagine you’re decorating Jay Gatsby’s home from The Great Gatsby and you’ll be on the right track.

July 2018


ART DECO

RUSTIC COTTAGE Perhaps you’re looking for a cozier style, one that encourages people in the space to curl up and get comfortable. Plush couches or armchairs covered in soft floral patterns with an accompanying throw blanket are a step in that

July 2018

direction. Tables, chairs and cabinets with a handmade feel give the space a rustic aesthetic. Installing white wood paneling and incorporating floral arrangements will help brighten the room. Search flea markets and antique shops for pieces with

authentic distressed wood to help anchor your style. To bring some life and cheer into your room, try rugs and curtains with traditional colors and patterns. As you rethink the design of your home, there are

dozens of décor styles, fusions and variations to choose from. Peruse showrooms in person or pin your favorites from online galleries. You’ll be certain to find a style that calls to you! 

Spaces Magazine

31


The She Shed

A WOMAN’S HOME-AWAY-FROM-HOME… BEHIND HER HOME.

PHOTOS BY GET MADELINE JACOBS CREDIT T Y IMAGES / A ZMAN JAK A 32PHOTO Spaces Magazine

July 2018


BY KATIE PORTER SPACES STAFF WRITER

Y

ou may have heard of the trend taking over backyards in the last few years. And if you haven’t, it’s definitely time to consider one for your own home. Dubbed by Sebring Design as “the ladies’ answer to the man cave,” she sheds are tranquil spots for wives and moms in many households to unwind and reconnect. Just as the name indicates, they most often start as a simple shed. But they’re often decked out with air conditioning, furniture, or even small kitchenettes to create a comforting space for women to reflect, get creative, read, socialize, garden or just relax. Here is a quick guide to our favorite tips for turning your dusty outdoor shack into a personal oasis. GIVE IT A PURPOSE Most people have that “dream space” they’ve always wanted, and a she shed is the ideal opportunity to make that a reality. Perhaps you enjoy painting or writing and would really like your own space for it. Maybe you just need to get a decent nap once in a while. Or this might be the best place to have your girlfriends join you for wine, cheese and chit-chat. Whatever the goal, ensure it’s an activity that relaxes and invigorates you. Choosing furniture, décor and an aesthetic will all be much simpler as you continually ask yourself, “Does this item serve the purpose of the room?” PAINT CHANGES EVERYTHING Whether you’re converting an existing 50-year-old catch-all or a newly-built shed from the hardware store, you’ll be amazed at how much a fresh coat inside and out (and even on the floor, if needed) will completely transform the space. Victoria Smith, an interior design blogger from San Francisco says paint will “give it a breath of fresh life!” In her famous blog SF Girl By The Bay Smith explains how it’s hard to go wrong with crisp, clean white; and we

July 2018

totally agree. But since this is your oasis, we say it’s also the perfect time to get crazy with whatever colors inspire you and create a sense of calm. MAKE IT COMFY Daybeds, sofas, oversized armchairs or chaise lounges would all be excellent pieces to put inside your shack to create a soft, yummy retreat. Keep in mind that comfort does not have to be pricey. Check local flea markets, yard sales or

thrift stores to find unique vintage pieces that will bring in plenty of style and coziness. INVITE NATURE IN As an outdoor room, your she shed is the perfect way to connect with Mother Nature while enjoying some modern luxuries. Introduce greenery back into your world with live plants or incorporate horticultural prints like florals.

Spaces Magazine

33


PERSONALIZE YOUR DESIGN This is a place with no rules, and the design should be completely your own. She shed styles are running the gamut from ultra-sleek Danish modern to maximalist eclectic boho. Smith recommends completing a boho look with “lots of layered rugs and sitting poufs, a small vintage desk and a comfy chair to work from.” We also love the ultra-feminine décor many people are opting for right now with vintage furniture, antique windows, pale pastel color palettes with white-washed neutrals, much like the shed pictured from Jennifer Reed’s home in Orem.

Most importantly, make a she shed your own…. There isn’t a woman out here that doesn’t deserve a little more “me time.”

34

Spaces Magazine

PHOTOS BY MADELINE JACOBS

Most importantly, just make this she shed your own. From hard-working stay at home mamas to the corporate single lady putting in 80 hour weeks, there isn’t a woman out there that doesn’t deserve a little more “me time.” Your cozy, outdoor home-behind-yourhome is an investment in your mental strength and self-care. Enjoy it. 

July 2018


Q&A

with Jennifer Reed

Jennifer Reed, owner of vintage décor company “3 Dotters Vintage” and founder of the Provo Vintage Market, shared with us her charming English-style she shed cottage built by her husband Nat Reed. Read on to learn the why, when and how behind her shed and love of all things vintage. QUESTION: What first incited the idea of creating your ‘she shed?’ ANSWER: I had seen a friends’ [she shed], and hers was built completely out of windows. Hers was the only one I had ever really seen. I really loved it, and luckily I have a husband who is a very skilled builder. Q: Tell me about this décor and where all these pieces came from. A: We collected a lot of it; we went to the Midwest on a big ‘junking trip.’ …The tin on the roof we got from a barn in Nebraska, the French doors are from Wyoming…I love the Midwest and they have a lot of farmhouses. The wood for the floors was from my grandfather’s farm. He passed away five years ago and I went and got a lot of the wood, so I love that this is from his farm. Q: Your husband built this? A: Yes, my husband Nat is a set designer. And once we had gathered all these things to create the structure, he checked with the city to deal with the codes and all that. And then he designed it and built it. I love it because it’s now a space that is really special for me to get time away. And of course I love vintage which is something I incorporate to make it all the things I really love. Already I have redecorated the shed three times. (Jen’s shed has been up and running for less than a year) Q: How has the shed changed the dynamic of your family? A: Well, my youngest daughter, my little one, has had sleepovers out here and my older daughters love to come out here with their friends and do photo shoots... But it’s also really nice for Nat and I to come out here and just

July 2018

talk and get away. Even though it’s just 20 feet from our house, it really feels like a different place. (Jen and Nat have three teenage daughters.) Q: Why do you think ‘she sheds’ have become such a trend? A: I think women like to have a space of their own... and a place to get away. My house is definitely my home and I love it; but out here I can do whatever I want—it can look however I want. I love to come out here to relax and read. … Raising three teenage girls can be stressful, and having a house full of their friends ends up being a shared space. But this is truly my space.  You can find Jennifer Reed on Instagram @3dottersvintage to learn more about the vintage décor community she is creating in Utah County. See more creations by Nat Reed on Instagram @gnatworks.

Spaces Magazine

35


Growing Season Lives On

SUCCESSFUL LATE-SEASON TREE PLANTING

A

BY SHAUN MOSER CONSERVATION GARDEN PARK

36

s we approach fall and its cooler temperatures, it’s the perfect time to be outside in our landscapes. It’s also a great time to

Spaces Magazine

plant a tree—the summer heat that makes it hard for new trees to thrive is behind us, but there’s still enough time for the roots of new trees to acclimate before winter arrives. An added bonus to fall planting? There are usually closeout prices on all types of plants as nurseries prepare for the change of seasons.

Here are some tips to help with the success of your new trees: SMALLER IS BETTER When picking out a new tree, smaller is better. It can be tempting to pick out the largest tree that you can afford, but the large trees will have a

July 2018


harder time establishing than a smaller tree. Typically, a small tree in a pot will catch up to a larger, balled and burlapped tree in just a few years. This is because the smaller plant goes through less stress during planting and will get roots growing much faster than more mature tree. Trees, like people, are more resilient while young. AVOID IMPULSE BUYING Selecting trees is one of the most important landscape decisions you’ll make for your property, so you should never let sale pricing determine which trees you plant. Create a list of potential trees that will fit the needs of your landscape in advance, then look for those trees at end-of-season sales. The mature size of a maple tree, for example, can vary widely depending on the type and variety of maple selected, so make sure to research the anticipated size of the specific cultivars within that family. It’s always sad to see a tree removed just as it is gaining maturity because the ultimate size of the tree was poorly considered in the planning stages. TOO HIGH IS BETTER THAN TOO LOW When setting the tree in the ground, make sure the tree isn’t too low. Locate the trunk flare at the base of the tree

July 2018

After breaking up the root ball, plant the tree using the native, unamended soil, and water it properly to ensure it takes well to its new home. PHOTOS COURTESY OF CONSERVATION GARDEN PARK

where the first big roots start to form. You don’t want to cover the trunk flare with soil or mulch. If the trunk flare is covered, it can lead to rot and disease. Remember, it is better to plant too high than too low. BREAK UP THE ROOT BALL Don’t be afraid to break up the root ball. Many times, trees in pots have roots that circle around the edge of the root ball. It’s not good to leave these roots in this condition. They need to be broken up so they can spread into the surrounding landscape and will have a hard time doing that if they are left alone. It is best to use a knife, pruners, or your hands to cut the roots around the edge of the ball to loosen them so they can grow correctly. Think of it this way: Instead of the roots circling around, work them until they splay out so they can spread outward.

backfill soil when planting the tree. The soil that was removed to make the hole should be the same soil that goes back into the ground. If you amend the soil, then you are essentially planting the tree in a new larger pot. The tree will do much better if the new roots are forced to go directly into the native soil immediately. WATER PROPERLY Water immediately after planting. This will give the tree its first drink that it will need to get started. Your new tree will need water more often than your established plants, so don’t count on your sprinklers to water it sufficiently. Plan on watering every other day for the first week and then start tapering off from there. A new tree will need months, or even a year in some cases, to establish a good root system in your landscape.  For more fall planting and maintenance tips, join our upcoming class “Turning Over the Garden: Fall Time Yard and Garden Care” on September 30. Register for the class online at conservationgardenpark.org/events.

DON’T AMEND THE SOIL It is not necessary to amend the

Spaces Magazine

37


38

Spaces Magazine

July 2018


This is Not a Diet BY HILLARY BOWLER DAVIS, SPACES STAFF WRITER

QUICK-AND-EASY HEALTHY EATING HACKS FOR THE NON-DIETER.

H

ealthy eating. Do you feel a bit of creeping anxiety when you read those words? Welcome to the club. It can be daunting to imagine clearing out your pantry and fridge and changing your entire lifestyle, which is what most diets demand. But some small substitutions can make a big difference. Think healthy eating, in stealth mode. Your kids—and any adults in your life—will hardly notice the difference, and it requires just a little bit of work. We’ve done a bit of research and compiled a few ideas for you to try: GO BANANAS It’s well known that bananas are a rich source of potassium, but that is just the beginning. According to a recent Medical News Today article, regular banana consumption has been linked to lower blood pressure, increased heart health and lower risk for asthma. Bananas are also a good source of fiber (helping digestive and blood sugar

July 2018

issues) and tryptophan, an amino acid linked to improved memory and mood. But enough with the ode to the healthiness of bananas. This versatile fruit can be used in baking as a substitute for eggs, butter, oil or sugar. Seriously. In addition, New York Times Cooking has a popular “one Ingredient” recipe for banana “ice cream”—a tasty substitute without the processed sugar, dairy or unhealthy additives. With about five minutes of prep time and a

Spaces Magazine

39


quick hour to freeze, this is more than worth a try— look it up! MASTER THE SMOOTHIE FOR ON-THE-GO-MEALS Ok, this one is easy. Do not skip meals. Just don’t do it. Sometimes in our hectic lives, that’s easier said than done. Consider investing in a good blender and finding a few smoothie recipes you love. Fitness magazine, Women’s Health, Men’s Health and AllRecipes are great resources. Be sure to find recipes full of protein, low on sugar (remember fruits contain sugar already) and high in veggies. Cooking Light recommends starting with spinach because it is a

40

Spaces Magazine

little more palatable than the sometimes-bitter kale. However, as you get used to it, you’ll barely notice any green stuff in your delicious drink. USE YOUR FREEZER SPACE WISELY Sorry, Eggo waffles, but the space belongs to real food. This can be the ingredients you use in the above-mentioned smoothies, but it can also be so much more. According to EatingWell, there are several cases where frozen produce is healthier than the fresh stuff you pick up at the store. Peas, for example, see their sugars turn into starch within 24 hours of picking.

Smoothies and freezer meals are excellent solutions for healthier eating when life gets busy.

July 2018


Oats can take muffins, cakes and cookies to the next level. Dark chocolate is a rich dessert replacement that satisfies in small doses.

So unless “fresh” means “I picked this out of my own garden 20 minutes ago,” you might actually find better nutrients in the frozen food aisle. (P.S. You go, green-thumbed friends!) In addition, your freezer is an excellent tool for meal prepping. It’s much easier to make healthy food decisions ahead of time than it is when you’re starving during a busy work day. Thriving Home blog has over 70 recipes for healthy freezer meals. SEW YOUR WILD OATS Refined white flour is so

July 2018

cheap and easy, we know! But, when consumed in large amounts, it brings with it the same problems as refined sugar: increased blood pressure, blood sugar issues, inflammation, etc. Consider a healthier alternative like oat flour. Oat flour, full of protein, fiber and heart-protecting Vitamin E, is an easy standin because it’s often a 1:1 substitution. According to Bon Appetit, because oat flour is gluten-free (perhaps a double bonus for you and your family) it isn’t your best bet for slow-rising baked good like yeast

breads. However, according to Food&Wine magazine, it is perfect for muffins, cakes, cookies and banana and zucchini bread. For example, you’ll be taking your oatmeal raisin cookies to the next level. Tastier, and at least a little bit healthier. GUILT-FREE CHOCOLATE (IN MODERATION) Take a look at the wrapper the next time you get a chocolate bar. Depending on your tastes, it’s likely you’re eating a “chocolate flavored candy.” In other words, it’s not actually chocolate. People have been buzzing about the health benefits of dark chocolate—CNN chimed in earlier this year. According to their report, dark chocolate has less sugar and

dairy, especially if you go for at least 60 percent cacao. The flavanols in the chocolate have proven to lower blood pressure and cholesterol. Some folks even say it helps with sugar cravings. A few small pieces for dessert are more beneficial than detrimental (the same can’t be said for your milk “chocolate” faves!) Thankfully, this chocolate is rich and flavorful, making a small amount satisfying. Just think about it: sneaky health eating. Feel good about yourself with small effort. Good luck! 

Spaces Magazine

41


Don’t Put That Grill Away HOW TO KEEP SERVING UP GRILLED FAVORITES ALL YEAR LONG.

42

Spaces Magazine

July 2018


W

BY JAKE REED, SPACES STAFF WRITER arm weather finally arrived and we’ve spent the long summer days on outdoor fun— including backyard barbecues and our favorite grilled delicacies. But what if grilling wasn’t relegated to only the warm season? Fall is just around the corner and, in Utah, winter closely follows. Utah winters can last a long time. Do you really want to go months without enjoying your charbroiled favorites? After all, kabobs, burgers, steaks, sausages and grilled corn on the cob are as delicious in January as they are in July! For most, grilling has been strictly a summer pastime. Let’s face it—we don’t always relish the idea of outdoor cooking during harsh weather. Don’t be ashamed if this includes you. Many a Utahn finds their grilling gusto plummeting with the thermometer come October or November. There are a bold few, though, who keep the briquettes cooking. Hey, everyone has their thing. Some people take pleasure in running 26.2 miles at a time. Others of us pride ourselves on grilling the perfect medium-rare sirloin over charcoal in single-digit temperatures. Whether you’re a seasoned grill warrior or a bleak-weather barbecue beginner, here are some tips to help you whip up delicious entrées on your grill all year round. OPTIMIZE YOUR GRILLING SPACE FOR COLD-WEATHER COOKING The way your outdoor cooking space is organized can make or break your experience when cooking in the cold. Place your grill as close as is practical to the door through which you’ll be exiting your home. This will help you avoid sock-soaking treks through deep snow to get to your cooking station. Keep a snow shovel near the door for clearing your path to the grill. If you’re grilling on a patio, you may even consider raising the bottom rail of your railing to allow snow to easily be July 2018

What if grilling wasn’t relegated to only the warm season?

seasons. Try to situate your grill to shield it from prevailing winds. However you decide to combat the elements, never use a charcoal or gas grill in an enclosed or non-ventilated area.

shoveled underneath it. Lifting shovelfulls of wet snow over a railing will quickly take its toll on even the most dedicated grillmeister (and their lower back). When designing your grilling space, consider extending the roof of your home over your patio to protect your cold-weather grilling sessions from the elements. Another popular trend is to create a dedicated grilling gazebo. These are great for shade in the summer, as well as shelter in other

ADAPT YOUR GRILLING TO CHANGES IN THE WEATHER Ardent grillers usually get a good ‘feel’ for the way their grill performs given a certain amount of fuel. Be aware, your baseline will change with the seasons. You aren’t the only one who gets more sluggish in January—the grill also has a tougher time in the cold. It will need more time to arrive at optimal cooking temperature, and it will require more briquettes or gas to maintain it. This effect can be minimized by cooking on a highquality grill. Great grills separate themselves from the pack during the winter. Their superior insulation provides more stable cooking temperatures in frigid conditions than the cheaper, thin-walled discount grills.

Spaces Magazine

43


You can also help keep your grill’s temperature steady by minimizing the time you spend with the lid removed. PICK QUICK-COOKING CUTS Minimize your own exposure to the elements by focusing your off-season barbecuing efforts on quick-cooking entrées. You’ll spend a lot less time grilling a fish fillet than grilling a pork shoulder. Thinner, more tender cuts of meat generally cook quickly. Sirloins and rib eyes are great cuts for coldweather cooking. They will cook in no time; especially if you prefer your steak on the medium or rare side. Avoid tougher, thicker cuts that require a ‘low and slow’ barbecue approach. If you have any questions about which meats will cook quickly, be sure to ask for recommendations from your local butcher.

clothing items which may melt when exposed to heat. Remember, your snow mittens and grilling gloves are not interchangeable! Due to early sunsets, winter grilling is often performed in the dark. A good headlamp may be the cold-weather grill warrior’s best friend. After all, sometimes even good patio lighting isn’t enough to allow the grill master to tell the difference between ‘perfect’ and ‘overdone’ steak.

HAVE FUN! Year-round grilling can be demanding—which is why it is so very fulfilling. When you optimize your grilling space, adapt to the weather, and cook safely, you can have fun with your grill no matter the season. Happy grilling! 

DRESS FOR THE OCCASION Of course you’ll want to dress warmly when grilling in the cold. Choose your wardrobe carefully. Avoid clothing which dangles away from your arms or body and can easily catch fire. Stay away from polyester or other

Quick-cooking cuts—such as sirloins like these— are excellent options for cold-weather grilling.

44

Spaces Magazine

July 2018


SAVE THE DATE! SEPTEMBER 7 - 8, 2018 AT MOUNTAIN AMERICA EXPO CENTER See the latest in home décor, DIY, fashion, beauty and fitness. Enter to win fabulous giveaways, treat yourself to pampering beauty treatments, shop the latest trends, attend free workshops and live fashions shows. We can’t wait to see you there!

BUY ONLINE AND

SAVE 50% USING PROMO CODE SPACES

SALTLAKEWOMENSSHOW.COM

@SLWOMENSSHOW


Pre-Opening prices end October 1.

You’re the architect Imagine a lifestyle designed around your passions and interests. At Summit Vista, we partner with our residents to create the perfect home for their retirement lifestyles. From the finishes, to the fixtures, to the flooring, you have the freedom to customize your space to meet your needs and taste. But Summit Vista is about so much more than walls and decor. It’s a community built around you. You design your every day around what’s important: engaging in relationships and activities that enrich and inspire.

Are you ready to design your retirement? Give us a call at 385-715-4295 or visit us online to request your FREE Info Kit today! summitvista.com/design2

6183 S. Prairie View Dr., Ste. 103A, Taylorsville, UT 84129